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Sample records for cell cycle inhibition

  1. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2009-12-16

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis.

  2. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  3. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process. PMID:26265439

  4. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer.

  5. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUSONG; ZHUANG, ZHIXIANG; MENG, QINGHUI; JIAO, YANG; XU, JIAYING; FAN, SAIJUN

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  6. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  7. Caudatin Inhibits Human Glioma Cells Growth Through Triggering DNA Damage-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Yang, Ming-feng; Fan, Cun-dong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    Caudatin, one of the species of C-21 steroidal glycosides mainly isolated from the root of Cynanchum bungei Decne, exhibits potent anticancer activities. However, the mechanism remains poorly defined. In the present study, the growth inhibitory effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma cells were evaluated in vitro. The results revealed that caudatin time- and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and U87 cells growth. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that caudatin-induced growth inhibition against U251 and U87 cells was mainly achieved by the induction of G0/G1 and S-phase cell cycle arrest through triggering DNA damage, as convinced by the up-regulation of p53, p21, and histone phosphorylation, as well as the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, caudatin treatment also triggered the activation of ERK and inactivation of AKT pathway. LY294002 (an AKT inhibitor) addition enhanced caudation-induced AKT inhibition, indicating that caudatin inhibited U251 cells growth in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that caudatin may act as a novel cytostatic reagent against human glioma cells through the induction of DNA damage-mediated cell cycle arrest with the involvement of modulating MAPK and AKT pathways.

  8. Vitisin A inhibits adipocyte differentiation through cell cycle arrest in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soon-hee; Park, Hee-Sook; Lee, Myoung-su; Cho, Yong-Jin; Kim, Young-Sup; Hwang, Jin-Taek; Sung, Mi Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Kwon, Dae Young

    2008-07-18

    Inhibition of adipocyte differentiation is one approach among the anti-obesity strategies. This study demonstrates that vitisin A, a resveratrol tetramer, inhibits adipocyte differentiation most effectively of 18 stilbenes tested. Fat accumulation and PPAR{gamma} expression were decreased by vitisin A in a dose-dependent manner. Vitisin A significantly inhibited preadipocyte proliferation and consequent differentiation within the first 2 days of treatment, indicating that the anti-adipogenic effect of vitisin A was derived from anti-proliferation. Based on cell cycle analysis, vitisin A blocked the cell cycle at the G1-S phase transition, causing cells to remain in the preadipocyte state. Vitisin A increased p21 expression, while the Rb phosphorylation level was reduced. Therefore, vitisin A seems to induce G1 arrest through p21- and consequent Rb-dependent suppression of transcription. On the other hand, ERK and Akt signaling pathways were not involved in the anti-mitotic regulation by vitisin A. Taken together, these results suggest that vitisin A inhibits adipocyte differentiation through preadipocyte cell cycle arrest.

  9. Cell cycle inhibition and retinoblastoma protein overexpression prevent Purkinje cell death in organotypic slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Jaya; Brown, Kristy; Shelanski, Michael L

    2007-05-01

    Purkinje cells are vulnerable to a number of physical, chemical, and genetic insults during development and maturity. Normal development of these cells depends on the cell-cell interactions between granule and astroglial cell populations. Apoptotic death in Purkinje neurons had been shown to be associated with cell cycle activation, and new DNA synthesis is associated with Purkinje cell death in staggerer and lurcher mutant mice. Here using an in vitro organotypic slice culture model from 9 (P9) and 4 days (P4) old postnatal rats we show that the cyclin dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors (roscovitine, olomoucine, and flavopiridol) protect the Purkinje cells from cell death. The results are more pronounced in the cerebellar sections from P4 rats. Analysis of Purkinje neurons in sections from P4 rats after 1 week of culturing showed that while there were very limited calbindin positive neurons in the untreated sections the cdk inhibitor treated sections had a notably higher number. Although treatment with cdk inhibitors inhibited Purkinje cell loss significantly, the morphology of these neurons was abnormal, with stunted dendrites and axons. Since the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) is the major pocket protein involved in determining the differentiated state of neurons we examined the effect of over-expressing Rb in the organotypic cultures. Rb overexpression significantly inhibited the Purkinje cell death and these neurons maintained their normal morphology. Thus our studies show that the cell death in Purkinje neurons observed in organotypic cultures is cell cycle dependent and the optimal survival requires Rb.

  10. Bevacizumab inhibits proliferation of choroidal endothelial cells by regulation of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Rusovici, Raluca; Patel, Chirag J; Chalam, Kakarla V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cell cycle changes in choroidal endothelial cells treated with varying doses of bevacizumab in the presence of a range of concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab, a drug widely used in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy, neutralizes all isoforms of VEGF. However, the effect of intravitreal administration of bevacizumab on the choroidal endothelial cell cycle has not been established. Monkey choroidal endothelial (RF/6A) cells were treated with VEGF 50 ng/mL and escalating doses of bevacizumab 0.1-2 mg/mL for 72 hours. Cell cycle changes in response to bevacizumab were analyzed by flow cytometry and propidium iodide staining. Cell proliferation was measured using the WST-1 assay. Morphological changes were recorded by bright field cell microscopy. Bevacizumab inhibited proliferation of choroidal endothelial cells by stabilization of the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle analysis of VEGF-enriched choroidal endothelial cells revealed a predominant increase in the G2/M population (21.84%, P, 0.01) and a decrease in the G0/G1 phase population (55.08%, P, 0.01). Addition of escalating doses of bevacizumab stabilized VEGF-enriched cells in the G0/G1 phase (55.08%, 54.49%, 56.3%, and 64% [P, 0.01]) and arrested proliferation by inhibiting the G2/M phase (21.84%, 21.46%, 20.59%, 20.94%, and 16.1% [P, 0.01]). The increase in G0/G1 subpopulation in VEGF-enriched and bevacizumab-treated cells compared with VEGF-enriched cells alone was dose-dependent. Bevacizumab arrests proliferation of VEGF-enriched choroidal endothelial cells by stabilizing the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and inhibiting the G2/M phase in a dose-dependent fashion.

  11. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  12. Simvastatin induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits proliferation of bladder cancer cells via PPARγ signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yongzhi; Qian, Guofeng; Dan, Han C.; Jiang, Wei; Ju, Lingao; Wu, Min; Xiao, Yu; Wang, Xinghuan

    2016-01-01

    Simvastatin is currently one of the most common drugs for old patients with hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerotic diseases by reducing cholesterol level and anti-lipid properties. Importantly, simvastatin has also been reported to have anti-tumor effect, but the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. We collected several human bladder samples and performed microarray. Data analysis suggested bladder cancer (BCa) was significantly associated with fatty acid/lipid metabolism via PPAR signalling pathway. We observed simvastatin did not trigger BCa cell apoptosis, but reduced cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by PPARγ-activation. Moreover, flow cytometry analysis indicated that simvastatin induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, suggested by downregulation of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, simvastatin suppressed BCa cell metastasis by inhibiting EMT and affecting AKT/GSK3β. More importantly, we found that the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and the alterations of CDK4/6 and Cyclin D1 triggered by simvastatin could be recovered by PPARγ-antagonist (GW9662), whereas the treatment of PPARα-antagonist (GW6471) shown no significant effects on the BCa cells. Taken together, our study for the first time revealed that simvastatin inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase via PPARγ signalling pathway. PMID:27779188

  13. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer Cell Lines by Interrupting Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Park, Jong-Jae; Lee, Beom Jae; Joo, Moon Kyung; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2016-05-23

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment that has antioxidant, antitumoral, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this in vitro study, we investigated the mechanism of anticancer effects of astaxanthin in gastric carcinoma cell lines. The human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines AGS, KATO-III, MKN-45, and SNU-1 were treated with various concentrations of astaxanthin. A cell viability test, cell cycle analysis, and immunoblotting were performed. The viability of each cancer cell line was suppressed by astaxanthin in a dose-dependent manner with significantly decreased proliferation in KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Astaxanthin increased the number of cells in the G0/G1 phase but reduced the proportion of S phase KATO-III and SNU-1 cells. Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was decreased in an inverse dose-dependent correlation with astaxanthin concentration, and the expression of p27(kip-1) increased the KATO-III and SNU-1 cell lines in an astaxanthin dose-dependent manner. Astaxanthin inhibits proliferation by interrupting cell cycle progression in KATO-III and SNU-1 gastric cancer cells. This may be caused by the inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK and the enhanced expression of p27(kip-1).

  14. Thoc1 inhibits cell growth via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jianmei; Zou, Shitao; Hu, Mengshang; Zhu, Ran; Xu, Jiaying; Jiao, Yang; Fan, Saijun

    2014-06-01

    THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a human nuclear matrix protein that binds to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRb). While some studies suggest that Thoc1 has characteristics of a tumor suppressor protein, whether Thoc1 can inhibit lung cancer cell growth is not clear. In the present study, we observed that Thoc1 is lowly expressed in the lung cancer cell lines SPC-A1 and NCI-H1975. Then, we investigated the potential effects of Thoc1 on lung cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis after stable transfection of these lines with a Thoc1 expression vector. We found that overexpression of Thoc1 can inhibit cell proliferation, induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and promote apoptosis. Further investigation indicated that overexpression of Thoc1 is involved in the inhibition of cell cycle-related proteins cyclin A1 and B1 and of pro-apoptotic factors Bax and caspase-3. In vivo experiments showed that tumors overexpressing Thoc1 display a slower growth rate than the control xenografts and show reduced expression of the protein Ki-67, which localized on the nuclear membrane. Taken together, our data show that in lung cancer cells, Thoc1 inhibits cell growth through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results indicate that Thoc1 may be used as a novel therapeutic target for human lung cancer treatment.

  15. Icarisid II inhibits the proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Mao; Jiang, Neng; Huang, Feifei; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Ruishan; Lu, Jingjing; Liao, Shijie; Liu, Yun

    2017-06-01

    Icarisid II, one of the main active components of Herba Epimedii extracts, shows potent antitumor activity in various cancer cell lines, including osteosarcoma cells. However, the anticancer mechanism of icarisid II against osteosarcoma U2OS needs further exploration. This study aims to investigate further antitumor effects of icarisid II on human osteosarcoma cells and elucidate the underlying mechanism. We cultivated human osteosarcoma USO2 cells in vitro using different concentrations of icarisid II (0-30 µM). Cell viability was detected at 24, 48, and 72 h using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis. Cell cycle was tested by flow cytometry after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Annexin V-allophycocyanin and 7-aminoactinomycin D staining were conducted to detect cell apoptosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay were performed to measure the levels of genes and proteins related to cell cycle and apoptosis. Results showed that icarisid II significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells. The half maximal inhibitory concentration values were 14.44, 11.02, and 7.37 µM at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively. Cell cycle was arrested in the G2/M phase in vitro. In addition, icarisid II upregulated the expression levels of P21 and CyclinB1 whereas downregulated the expression levels of CyclinD1, CDC2, and P-Cdc25C, which were related to cell cycle arrest in U2OS cells. The cell apoptotic rate increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with icarisid II for 48 h. Icarisid II induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax, downregulating Bcl-2, and activating apoptosis-related proteins, including cleaved caspase-3, caspase-7, caspase-9, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. These data indicate that icarisid II exhibits an antiproliferation effect on human osteosarcoma cells and induces apoptosis by activating the caspase family in a time- and dose

  16. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  17. Mefloquine inhibits chondrocytic proliferation by arresting cell cycle in G2/M phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Chen, Zeng-Gan; Xia, Qing; Lin, Jian-Ping; Yan, Zuo-Qin; Yao, Zheng-Jun; Dong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Mefloquine (MQ), an analog of chloroquine, exhibits a promising cytotoxic activity against carcinoma cell lines and for the treatment of glioblastoma patients. The present study demonstrates the effect of mefloquine on proliferation and cell cycle in chondrocytes. MTT assay and propidium iodide staining were used for the analysis of proliferation and cell cycle distribution, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression levels of cyclin B1/cdc2, cdc25c, p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53. The results revealed that mefloquine inhibited the proliferation of chondrocytes and caused cell cycle arrests in the G2/M phase. The proliferation of chondrocytes was reduced to 27% at 40 μM concentration of mefloquine after 48 h. The population of chondrocytes in G2/M phase was found to be 15.7 and 48.4%, respectively at 10 and 40 μM concentration of mefloquine at 48 h following treatment. The expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins including, cyclin B1/cdc2 and cdc25c was inhibited. On the other hand, mefloquine treatment promoted the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 and p53 at 40 μM concentration after 48 h. Therefore, mefloquine inhibits proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in chondrocytes.

  18. Schlafen-1 causes a cell cycle arrest by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gareth; Boggan, Louise; Bowie, Andrew; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2005-09-02

    Schlafen-1 (Slfn-1), the prototypic member of the Schlafen family of proteins, was described as an inducer of growth arrest in T-lymphocytes and causes a cell cycle arrest in NIH3T3 fibroblasts prior to the G1/S transition. How Slfn-1 exerts its effects on the cell cycle is not currently known. We report that synchronized murine fibroblasts expressing Slfn-1 do not exit G1 when stimulated with fetal calf serum, platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The induction of cyclin D1 by these stimuli was blocked in the presence of Slfn-1 as were all downstream cell cycle processes. Overexpression of cyclin D1 in growth-arrested, Slfn-1-expressing cells induced an increase in cell growth consistent with this protein being the biological target of Slfn-1. Activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by EGF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was unaffected by Slfn-1 expression. PDGF signaling was, however, almost completely blocked. This was due to a lack of PDGF receptor expression in Slfn-1-expressing cells consistent with Slfn-1 blocking the cell cycle in G1 where PDGF receptor expression is normally down-regulated. Finally, overexpression of Slfn-1 inhibited the activation of the cyclin D1 promoter. Slfn-1 therefore causes a cell cycle arrest during G1 by inhibiting induction of cyclin D1 by mitogens.

  19. Rosiglitazone inhibits cell proliferation by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawei; Dai, Bing; Fu, Lili; Jia, Jieshuang; Mei, Changlin

    2010-06-01

    Abnormal proliferation is an important pathological feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Many drugs inhibiting cell proliferation have been proved to be effective in slowing the disease progression in ADPKD. Recent evidence has suggested that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have anti-neoplasm effects through inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis in various cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of PPARgamma in human ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line, and found that the expression of PPARgamma was greater in ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line than in normal kidney tissues and human kidney cortex (HKC) cell line. Rosiglitazone inhibited significantly proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These effects were diminished by GW9662, a specific PPARgamma antagonist. Cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest in human ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells with rosiglitazone treatment. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins revealed that rosiglitazone decreased the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, pRb, cyclin D1, cyclin D2 and Cdk4 but increased the levels of p21 and p27 in a dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone also induced apoptosis in cyst-lining epithelial cells, which was correlated with increased bax expression and decreased bcl-2 expression. These results suggest PPARgamma agonist might serve as a promising drug for the treatment of ADPKD.

  20. Methoxychlor inhibits growth of antral follicles by altering cell cycle regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rupesh K. Meachum, Sharon Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel Peretz, Jackye Yao, Humphrey H. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2009-10-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) reduces fertility in female rodents, decreases antral follicle numbers, and increases atresia through oxidative stress pathways. MXC also inhibits antral follicle growth in vitro. The mechanism by which MXC inhibits growth of follicles is unknown. The growth of follicles is controlled, in part, by cell cycle regulators. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that MXC inhibits follicle growth by reducing the levels of selected cell cycle regulators. Further, we tested whether co-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), prevents the MXC-induced reduction in cell cycle regulators. For in vivo studies, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with MXC or vehicle for 20 days. Treated ovaries were subjected to immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining. For in vitro studies, antral follicles isolated from adult cycling CD-1 mouse ovaries were cultured with vehicle, MXC, and/or NAC for 48, 72 and 96 h. Levels of cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) and cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) were measured using in vivo and in vitro samples. The results indicate that MXC decreased PCNA staining, and Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels compared to controls. NAC co-treatment restored follicle growth and expression of Ccnd2 and Cdk4. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC exposure reduces the levels of Ccnd2 and Cdk4 in follicles, and that protection from oxidative stress restores Ccnd2 and Cdk4 levels. Therefore, MXC-induced oxidative stress may decrease the levels of cell cycle regulators, which in turn, results in inhibition of the growth of antral follicles.

  1. Regulation of cell division cycle progression by bcl-2 expression: a potential mechanism for inhibition of programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Expression of the bcl-2 gene has been shown to effectively confer resistance to programmed cell death under a variety of circumstances. However, despite a wealth of literature describing this phenomenon, very little is known about the mechanism of resistance. In the experiments described here, we show that bcl-2 gene expression can result in an inhibition of cell division cycle progression. These findings are based upon the analysis of cell cycle distribution, cell cycle kinetics, and relative phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein, using primary tissues in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro, as well as continuous cell lines. The effects of bcl-2 expression on cell cycle progression appear to be focused at the G1 to S phase transition, which is a critical control point in the decision between continued cell cycle progression or the induction programmed cell death. In all systems tested, bcl-2 expression resulted in a substantial 30-60% increase in the length of G1 phase; such an increase is very substantial in the context of other regulators of cell cycle progression. Based upon our findings, and the related findings of others, we propose a mechanism by which bcl-2 expression might exert its well known inhibition of programmed cell death by regulating the kinetics of cell cycle progression at a critical control point. PMID:8642331

  2. Apigenin inhibits proliferation and invasion, and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangming; Han, Xiaodong; Cheng, Wei; Ni, Jing; Zhang, Yunfei; Lin, Jingrong; Song, Zhiqi

    2017-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most invasive and fatal form of cutaneous cancer. Moreover it is extremely resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Apigenin, a non-mutagenic flavonoid, has been found to exhibit chemopreventive and/or anticancerogenic properties in many different types of human cancer cells. Therefore, apigenin may have particular relevance for development as a chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of apigenin on the viability, migration and invasion potential, dendrite morphology, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in human melanoma A375 and C8161 cell lines in vitro. Apigenin effectively suppressed the proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. Moreover, it inhibited cell migration and invasion, lengthened the dendrites, and induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, apigenin promoted the activation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP proteins and decreased the expression of phosphorylated (p)‑ERK1/2 proteins, p-AKT and p-mTOR. Consequently, apigenin is a novel therapeutic candidate for melanoma.

  3. Calreticulin down-regulation inhibits the cell growth, invasion and cell cycle progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruo; Ye, Jianwen; Zhou, Chuang; Qi, Lei; Fu, Zhe; Yan, Bing; Liang, Zhiwei; Li, Renfeng; Zhai, Wenlong

    2015-08-27

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent cancers in the world. Calreticulin(CRT) is aberrantly overexpressed in many human cancer cells. The function of CRT in HCC cells remains unclear. We attempted to investigate the effects and the underlying mechanisms of CRT down-regulation on HCC cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and invasion. To investigate the function of CRT in HCC cells, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down the expression of CRT in SMMC7721 and HepG2 HCC cells. CRT expression was examined by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by the flow cytometry. The invasion capability was assessed by transwell assay. The phosphorylation level of Akt was evaluated by Western blot. Compared with human hepatic cells L02, CRT was apparently up-regulated in SMMC7721, HepG2 and Huh7 HCC cells. Down-regulation of CRT expression effectively inhibited HCC cell growth and invasion. CRT knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of CRT expression significantly decreased the Akt phosphorylation. CRT was aberrantly over-expressed in HCC cell lines. CRT over-expression contributes greatly to HCC malignant behavior, likely via PI3K/Akt pathway. CRT could serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Cimicifuga foetida extract inhibits proliferation of hepatocellular cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ze; Pan, Ruile; Chang, Qi; Si, Jianyong; Xiao, Peigen; Wu, Erxi

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) from the aerial part of Cimicifuga foetida Linnaeus possesses the anti-tumor action on hepatoma, and therefore, provide evidence for the traditional use of the plant as a detoxification agent. EAF was extracted and its cytotoxicity was evaluated on a panel of Hepatocytes by MTT assay. The IC(50) values of EAF on HepG2, R-HepG2 and primary cultured normal mouse hepatocytes were 21, 43 and 80 microg/mL, respectively. Morphology observation, Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, cell cycle analysis and western blot were used to further elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of EAF. EAF induced G(0)/G(1)cell cycle arrest at lower concentration (25 microg/mL), and triggered G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis at higher concentrations (50 and 100 microg/mL, respectively). An increase in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, activation of downstream effector Caspase 3, and cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were implicated in EAF-induced apoptosis. In addition, EAF inhibited the growth of the implanted mouse H(22) tumor in a dose-dependent manner with the growth inhibitory rate of 63.32% at 200 mg/kg. In conclusion, EAF may potentially find use as a new therapy for the treatment of hepatoma.

  5. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  6. WEE1 inhibition targets cell cycle checkpoints for triple negative breast cancers to overcome cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongping; Shao, Fangyuan; Martin, Scots; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2017-03-06

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used therapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, yet prolonged cisplatin treatment frequently results in drug resistance. To enhance therapeutic effect of cisplatin, we conducted a high throughput screening using a kinase library containing 704 kinases against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. We demonstrated that cisplatin activates ATR, CHK1 and WEE1, which shut down DNA replication and attenuate cisplatin induced-lethality. WEE1 inhibition sensitizes TNBCs and cisplatin resistant cancer cells to cisplatin-induced lethality, because it not only impairs DNA replication checkpoint more profoundly than inhibition of ATR or CHK1, but also defects G2-M cell cycle checkpoint. Finally, we demonstrated that combined cisplatin treatment and WEE1 inhibition synergistically inhibits xenograft cancer growth accompanied by markedly reduced expression of TNBC signature genes. Thus targeting DNA replication and G2-M cell cycle checkpoint simultaneously by cisplatin and WEE1 inhibition is promising for TNBCs treatment, and for overcoming their cisplatin resistance.

  7. WEE1 inhibition targets cell cycle checkpoints for triple negative breast cancers to overcome cisplatin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongping; Shao, Fangyuan; Martin, Scots; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used therapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, yet prolonged cisplatin treatment frequently results in drug resistance. To enhance therapeutic effect of cisplatin, we conducted a high throughput screening using a kinase library containing 704 kinases against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. We demonstrated that cisplatin activates ATR, CHK1 and WEE1, which shut down DNA replication and attenuate cisplatin induced-lethality. WEE1 inhibition sensitizes TNBCs and cisplatin resistant cancer cells to cisplatin-induced lethality, because it not only impairs DNA replication checkpoint more profoundly than inhibition of ATR or CHK1, but also defects G2-M cell cycle checkpoint. Finally, we demonstrated that combined cisplatin treatment and WEE1 inhibition synergistically inhibits xenograft cancer growth accompanied by markedly reduced expression of TNBC signature genes. Thus targeting DNA replication and G2-M cell cycle checkpoint simultaneously by cisplatin and WEE1 inhibition is promising for TNBCs treatment, and for overcoming their cisplatin resistance. PMID:28262781

  8. Inhibition of cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells by andrographolide.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming-Der; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Lee, Yi-Che; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lin, Rong-An; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2008-08-11

    In recent years, attention has been focused on the anti-cancer properties of pure components, an important role in the prevention of disease. Andrographolide (Andro), the major constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F.) Nees plant, is implicated towards its pharmacological activity. To investigate the mechanism basis for the anti-tumor properties of Andro, Andro was used to examine its effect on cell-cycle progression in human colorectal carcinoma Lovo cells. The data from cell growth experiment showed that Andro exhibited the anti-proliferation effect on Lovo cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This event was accompanied the arrest of the cells at the G1-S phase by Andro at the tested concentrations of 0-30 microM. Cellular uptake of Andro and Andro was confirmed by capillary electrophoresis analysis and the intracellular accumulation of Andro (0.61+/-0.07 microM/mg protein) was observed when treatment of Lovo cells with Andro for 12h. In addition, an accumulation of the cells in G1 phase (15% increase for 10 microM of Andro) was observed as well as by the association with a marked decrease in the protein expression of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cdk2 and Cdk4. Andro also inducted the content of Cdk inhibitor p21 and p16, and the phosphorylation of p53. Further immunoprecipitation studies found that, in response to the treatment, the formation of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and Cyclin A/Cdk2 complexes had declined, preventing the phosphorylation of Rb and the subsequent dissociation of Rb/E2F complex. These results suggested Andro can inhibit Lovo cell growth by G1-S phase arrest, and was exerted by inducing the expression of p53, p21 and p16 that, in turn, repressed the activity of Cyclin D1/Cdk4 and/or Cyclin A/Cdk2, as well as Rb phosphorylation.

  9. Isoprenoid geranylgeranylacetone inhibits human colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoyuki; Tsuno, Nelson H; Okaji, Yurai; Kawai, Kazushige; Shuno, Yasutaka; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Oshima, Noriko; Takahashi, Koki

    2010-10-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is a widely used antiulcer drug developed in Japan. GGA is structurally similar to plaunotol and geranylgeraniol, another isoprenoid reported to exert strong anticancer effects. In an earlier study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating not only Rho activation, but also Ras-MAPK activation. In this study, we aimed to test whether GGA could have a therapeutic effect on colon cancer cells. As a result, we found that GGA induced a dose-dependent decrease in the proliferative activity through induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. The induction of apoptosis was mediated by the activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9 pathways. The induction of G1 arrest was mediated by the increase of p21 and p27, and also the decrease of phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein levels. This study showed the potential anticancer activity of GGA. As this drug is already available in Japan for clinical use as an antiulcer/antigastritis agent, clinical trials will be designed to confirm its potential usefulness for cancer patients.

  10. Cycle inhibiting factors (cifs): cyclomodulins that usurp the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells.

    PubMed

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are "cyclomodulins" that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  11. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs): Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions. PMID:22069713

  12. Isolation of bisindole alkaloids that inhibit the cell cycle from Myxomycetes Arcyria ferruginea and Tubifera casparyi.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Satomi; Naoe, Ayano; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Ishibashi, Masami

    2003-09-01

    From a myxomycete Arcyria ferruginea, dihydroarcyriarubin C (1), a new bisindole alkaloid, has been isolated together with two known bisindoles, arcyriarubin C (2) and arcyriaflavin C (3), and arcyriaflavin C (3) was also isolated from Tubifera casparyi together with arcyriaflavin B (4). Arcyriaflavin C (3) exhibited cell cycle inhibition effect at G1 and G2/M stage at 10 and 100ng/mL, respectively.

  13. CDK4/6 inhibition induces epithelial cell cycle arrest and ameliorates acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    DiRocco, Derek P.; Bisi, John; Roberts, Patrick; Strum, Jay; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sharpless, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and urgently requires new preventative therapies. Expression of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor transgene protects against AKI, suggesting that manipulating the tubular epithelial cell cycle may be a viable therapeutic strategy. Broad spectrum small molecule CDK inhibitors are protective in some kidney injury models, but these have toxicities and epithelial proliferation is eventually required for renal repair. Here, we tested a well-tolerated, novel and specific small molecule inhibitor of CDK4 and CDK6, PD 0332991, to investigate the effects of transient cell cycle inhibition on epithelial survival in vitro and kidney injury in vivo. We report that CDK4/6 inhibition induced G0/G1 cycle arrest in cultured human renal proximal tubule cells (hRPTC) at baseline and after injury. Induction of transient G0/G1 cycle arrest through CDK4/6 inhibition protected hRPTC from DNA damage and caspase 3/7 activation following exposure to the nephrotoxins cisplatin, etoposide, and antimycin A. In vivo, mice treated with PD 0332991 before ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) exhibited dramatically reduced epithelial progression through S phase 24 h after IRI. Despite reduced epithelial proliferation, PD 0332991 ameliorated kidney injury as reflected by improved serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels 24 h after injury. Inflammatory markers and macrophage infiltration were significantly decreased in injured kidneys 3 days following IRI. These results indicate that induction of proximal tubule cell cycle arrest with specific CDK4/6 inhibitors, or “pharmacological quiescence,” represents a novel strategy to prevent AKI. PMID:24338822

  14. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  15. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-20

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  16. Resveratrol inhibits oral squamous cell carcinoma through induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Jing-Lei; Zhang, Wan-Lin; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) present as a natural phytoalexin in grapes, peanuts, and red wine on oral squamous cancer cell lines, SCC-VII, SCC-25, and YD-38. MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively, were used for the analysis of inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the effect of resveratrol on the expression of proteins associated with cell cycle regulation. The results revealed a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation in all the three tested cell lines on treatment with resveratrol. The IC50 of resveratrol for SCC-VII, SCC-25, and YD-38 cell lines was found to be 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 μg/ml, respectively, after 48-h treatment. Examination of the cell cycle analysis showed that resveratrol treatment induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and enhanced the expression of phospho-cdc2 (Tyr 15), cyclin A2, and cyclin B1 in the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. It also caused a marked increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as revealed by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Thus, resveratrol exhibits inhibitory effect on the proliferation of OSCC oral cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest.

  17. Selective inhibition of human leukemia cell growth and induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by pseudolaric acid B.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guoyi; Chong, Li; Li, Xing-Cong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2010-09-01

    The leukemias account for the largest number of cases of childhood cancer and remain the primary cause of cancer-related mortality among children in the United States. There is a need for novel antileukemia agents due to toxicity and resistant to existing chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, the effects of pseudolaric acid B (PAB) on three human leukemia cell lines, acute promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells, acute lymphoblastic leukemia CCRF-CEM cells, and human chronic myeloid leukemia blast-phase K562 cells were investigated in vitro, compared to normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Cell viability was determined using CellTiter-Glo luminescent reagent. Colony formation was assessed by Microtitration cloning assay. Cell cycle analysis was carried out by flow cytometry. Tubulin polymerization was measured by recording the increase in absorbance. Inhibition of topoisomerase I (topo I) and topoisomerase II (topo II) enzyme activities was measured by DNA relaxation assay using topo I and II drug screening kit. Apoptosis was observed by DAPI staining assay and Caspase3/7 activities was measured using Caspase-Glo((R)) 3/7 assay kit. Pseudolaric acid B selectively inhibited the growth of human leukemia HL-60, CCRF-CEM and K562 cells, but not normal PBMC. PAB suppressed colony formation in HL-60 cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that PAB blocked the cell cycle at G(2)/M phase in HL-60 cells, suggesting that it suppresses mitosis. DNA topo I and topo II were not inhibited, but tubulin polymerization was inhibited. PAB-induced apoptosis and activated caspase-3/7 activity. This study indicates that PAB has a potential for use against leukemia and its effects might be mediated by inhibiting tubulin polymerization, preventing cell division and activating caspase-3, which leads to apoptosis.

  18. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  19. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiki, Michael B. |; Milam, Ben; Ding Xianzhong |; Roginsky, Alexandra B.; Salabat, M. Reza; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H. |; Gu Wenxin; Silverman, Richard B. ||; Adrian, Thomas E. |. E-mail: tadrian@northwestern.edu

    2006-02-24

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. AP-2γ Induces p21 Expression, Arrests Cell Cycle, and Inhibits the Tumor Growth of Human Carcinoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hualei; Goswami, Prabhat C; Domann, Frederick E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Activating enhancer-binding protein 2γ (AP-2γ) is a member of the developmentally regulated AP-2 transcription factor family that regulates the expression of many downstream genes. Whereas the effects of AP-2α overexpression on cell growth are fairly well established, the cellular effects of AP-2γ overexpression are less well studied. Our new findings show that AP-2γ significantly upregulates p21 mRNA and proteins, inhibits cell growth, and decreases clonogenic survival. Cell cycle analysis revealed that forced AP-2γ expression induced G1-phase arrest, decreased DNA synthesis, and decreased the fraction of cells in S phase. AP-2γ expression also led to cyclin D1 repression, decreased Rb phosphorylation, and decreased E2F activity in breast carcinoma cells. AP-2γ binding to the p21 promoter was observed in vivo, and the absence of growth inhibition in response to AP-2γ expression in p21 (-/-) cells demonstrated that p21 caused, at least in part, AP-2-induced cell cycle arrest. Finally, the tumor growth of human breast carcinoma cells in vivo was inhibited by the expression of AP-2γ relative to empty vector-infected cells, suggesting that AP-2γ acts as a tumor suppressor. In summary, expression of either AP-2γ or AP-2α inhibited breast carcinoma cell growth; thus, these genes may be therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:16867219

  1. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  2. Inhibition of protein kinase B activity induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis during early G₁ phase in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    van Opstal, Angélique; Bijvelt, José; van Donselaar, Elly; Humbel, Bruno M; Boonstra, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    Inhibition of PKB (protein kinase B) activity using a highly selective PKB inhibitor resulted in inhibition of cell cycle progression only if cells were in early G1 phase at the time of addition of the inhibitor, as demonstrated by time-lapse cinematography. Addition of the inhibitor during mitosis up to 2 h after mitosis resulted in arrest of the cells in early G1 phase, as deduced from the expression of cyclins D and A and incorporation of thymidine. After 24 h of cell cycle arrest, cells expressed the cleaved caspase-3, a central mediator of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that PKB activity in early G1 phase is required to prevent the induction of apoptosis. Using antibodies, it was demonstrated that active PKB translocates to the nucleus during early G1 phase, while an even distribution of PKB was observed through cytoplasm and nucleus during the end of G1 phase.

  3. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage–induced cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A.; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase–regulated nuclear–cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage–induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β–dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP–regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  4. Crude Garlic Extract Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis of Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Bagul, Mukta; Kakumanu, Srikanth; Wilson, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Garlic and its lipid-based extracts have played an important medicinal role in humans for centuries that includes antimicrobial, hypoglycemic, and lipid-lowering properties. The present study was to investigate the effects of crude garlic extract (CGE) on the proliferation of human breast, prostate, hepatic, and colon cancer cell lines and mouse macrophageal cells, not previously studied. The human cancer cell lines, such as hepatic (Hep-G2), colon (Caco-2), prostate (PC-3), and breast (MCF-7), were propagated at 37°C; air/CO2 (95:5 v/v) using the ATCC-formulated RPMI-1640 Medium and 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), while the mouse macrophage cell line (TIB-71) was propagated at 37°C; air/CO2 (95:5 v/v) using the ATCC-formulated DMEM and 10% FBS. All cells were plated at a density of ∼5000 cells/well. After overnight incubation, the cells were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/mL of CGE an additional 72 h. Inhibition of cell proliferation of 80-90% was observed for Hep-G2, MCF-7, TIB-71, and PC-3 cells, but only 40-55% for the Caco-2 cells when treated with 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/mL. In a coculture study of Caco-2 and TIB-71 cells, inhibition of cell proliferation of 90% was observed for Caco-2 cells compared to the 40-55% when cultured separately. CGE also induced cell cycle arrest and had a fourfold increase in caspase activity (apoptosis) in PC-3 cells when treated at a dose of 0.5 or 1 μg/mL. This investigation of CGE clearly highlights the fact that the lipid bioactive compounds in CGE have the potential as promising anticancer agents.

  5. Spica Prunellae extract inhibits the proliferation of human colon carcinoma cells via the regulation of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Zheng, Liangpu; Zhuang, Qunchuan; Shen, Aling; Liu, Liya; Chen, Youqin; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Spica Prunellae has long been used as a significant component in numerous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas to clinically treat cancers. Previously, Spica Prunellae was shown to promote cancer cell apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. To further elucidate the precise mechanism of its tumoricidal activity, the effect of the ethanol extract of Spica Prunellae (EESP) on the proliferation of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells was elucidated and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. The proliferation of HT-29 cells was evaluated using 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony formation analyses. The cell cycle was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) with propidium iodide (PI) staining. The mRNA and protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclin D1 was examined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. EESP was observed to inhibit HT-29 viability and survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EESP treatment blocked G1/S cell cycle progression and reduced the expression of pro-proliferative cyclin D1 and CDK4 at the transcriptional and translational levels. Altogether, these data suggest that the inhibition of cell proliferation via G1/S cell cycle arrest may be one of the mechanisms through which Spica Prunellae treats cancer.

  6. Spica Prunellae extract inhibits the proliferation of human colon carcinoma cells via the regulation of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    LIN, WEI; ZHENG, LIANGPU; ZHUANG, QUNCHUAN; SHEN, ALING; LIU, LIYA; CHEN, YOUQIN; SFERRA, THOMAS J.; PENG, JUN

    2013-01-01

    Spica Prunellae has long been used as a significant component in numerous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas to clinically treat cancers. Previously, Spica Prunellae was shown to promote cancer cell apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. To further elucidate the precise mechanism of its tumoricidal activity, the effect of the ethanol extract of Spica Prunellae (EESP) on the proliferation of human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells was elucidated and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. The proliferation of HT-29 cells was evaluated using 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and colony formation analyses. The cell cycle was determined using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) with propidium iodide (PI) staining. The mRNA and protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cyclin D1 was examined using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. EESP was observed to inhibit HT-29 viability and survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EESP treatment blocked G1/S cell cycle progression and reduced the expression of pro-proliferative cyclin D1 and CDK4 at the transcriptional and translational levels. Altogether, these data suggest that the inhibition of cell proliferation via G1/S cell cycle arrest may be one of the mechanisms through which Spica Prunellae treats cancer. PMID:24137475

  7. Tryptone-stabilized gold nanoparticles target tubulin and inhibit cell viability by inducing an unusual form of cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Mahaddalkar, Tejashree; Mehta, Sourabh; Cheriyamundath, Sanith; Muthurajan, Harries; Lopus, Manu

    2017-09-05

    Gold nanoparticles have been investigated extensively for their molecular mechanisms of action and anticancer potential. We report a novel, tubulin-targeted antiproliferative mechanism of action of tryptone-stabilized gold nanoparticles (TsAuNPs). TsAuNPs, synthesized using HAuCl4·3H2O and tryptone and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic methods and transmission electron microscopy, were found to be inhibitory to viability of human pancreatic (PANC-1), cervical (HeLa), and breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner, with highest efficacy against PANC-1 cells. The particles strongly inhibited the clonogenic propagation of PANC-1 cells. TsAuNPs-mediated inhibition of cell viability involved an unusual mode of cell cycle arrest (arrest at both G0/G1 phase and S-phase) followed by apoptosis. In vitro, TsAuNPs bound purified tubulin, competitively inhibited anilinonaphthalene sulfonate binding to tubulin, and suppressed tubulin assembly. In cells, tubulin-TsAuNPs interactions were manifested as a disrupted microtubule network, defective reassembly of cold-disassembled microtubules, and induction of tubulin acetylation. Our data indicate that TsAuNPs inhibit cell viability by inducing differential cell cycle arrest possibly through disrupted dynamicity of cellular microtubules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeted disruption of the MYC antagonist MAD1 inhibits cell cycle exit during granulocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, K P; McArthur, G A; Quéva, C; Hurlin, P J; Soriano, P; Eisenman, R N

    1998-01-01

    The switch from transcriptionally activating MYC-MAX to transcriptionally repressing MAD1-MAX protein heterodimers has been correlated with the initiation of terminal differentiation in many cell types. To investigate the function of MAD1-MAX dimers during differentiation, we disrupted the Mad1 gene by homologous recombination in mice. Analysis of hematopoietic differentiation in homozygous mutant animals revealed that cell cycle exit of granulocytic precursors was inhibited following the colony-forming cell stage, resulting in increased proliferation and delayed terminal differentiation of low proliferative potential cluster-forming cells. Surprisingly, the numbers of terminally differentiated bone marrow and peripheral blood granulocytes were essentially unchanged in Mad1 null mice. This imbalance between the frequencies of precursor and mature granulocytes was correlated with a compensatory decrease in granulocytic cluster-forming cell survival under apoptosis-inducing conditions. In addition, recovery of the peripheral granulocyte compartment following bone marrow ablation was significantly enhanced in Mad1 knockout mice. Two Mad1-related genes, Mxi1 and Mad3, were found to be expressed ectopically in adult spleen, indicating that functional redundancy and cross-regulation between MAD family members may allow for apparently normal differentiation in the absence of MAD1. These findings demonstrate that MAD1 regulates cell cycle withdrawal during a late stage of granulocyte differentiation, and suggest that the relative levels of MYC versus MAD1 mediate a balance between cell proliferation and terminal differentiation. PMID:9451002

  9. Sulforaphane inhibits mitotic clonal expansion during adipogenesis through cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Lee, Youn-Sun; Sin, Dong-Mi; Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2012-07-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for numerous metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. Adipocyte differentiation is triggered by adipocyte hyperplasia, which leads to obesity. In this study, the inhibitory effect of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells was investigated. Sulforaphane decreased the accumulation of lipid droplets stained with Oil Red O and inhibited the elevation of triglycerides in the adipocytes (half-maximal inhibitory concentration = 7.3 µmol/l). The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), major transcription factors for adipocyte differentiation, was significantly reduced by sulforaphane. The major effects of sulforaphane on the inhibition of adipocyte differentiation occurred during the early stage of adipogenesis. Thus, the expression of C/EBPβ, an early-stage biomarker of adipogenesis, decreased in a concentration-dependent manner when the adipocytes were exposed to sulforaphane (0, 5, 10, and 20 µmol/l). The proliferation of adipocytes treated with 20 µmol/l sulforaphane for 24 and 48 h was also suppressed. These results indicate that sulforaphane may specifically affect mitotic clonal expansion to inhibit adipocyte differentiation. Sulforaphane arrested the cell cycle at the G(0)/G(1) phase, increased p27 expression, and decreased retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation. Additionally, sulforaphane modestly decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Our results indicate that the inhibition of early-stage adipocyte differentiation by sulforaphane may be associated with cell cycle arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase through upregulation of p27 expression.

  10. Xanthohumol inhibits cell cycle progression and proliferation of larynx cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sławińska-Brych, Adrianna; Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Dmoszyńska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Zdzisińska, Barbara; Stepulak, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2015-10-05

    Xanthohumol (XN), a prenylflavonoid derived from the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.) has been found to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological properties, including anti-cancer activity. In this study, the mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity of XN in human RK33 and RK45 larynx cancer cell lines were investigated. The effect of XN on the viability of larynx cancer and normal cells (human skin fibroblasts HSF and rat oligodendroglia-derived cells, OLN-93) was compared. Additionally, the influence of XN on proliferation, cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis in larynx cancer cells, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying in these processes were analyzed. XN promoted the reduction of cell viability in cancer cells, but showed low cytotoxicity to normal cells. The decrease in cell viability in the cancer cells was coupled with induction of apoptosis via two pathways. The mechanisms involved in these effects of XN were associated with cell growth inhibition by induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, increased p53 and p21/WAF1 expression levels, downregulation of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2, and activation of caspases-9, -8, and -3. Moreover, this compound inhibited phosphorylation of ERK1/2, suggesting a key role of the ERKs pathway in the XN-mediated growth suppressing effects against the studied cells. These results indicate that XN could be used as a potential agent for the treatment of patients with larynx cancer.

  11. Propionibacterium acnes inhibits FOXM1 and induces cell cycle alterations in human primary prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Sayanjali, Behnam; Christensen, Gitte J M; Al-Zeer, Munir A; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been detected in diseased human prostate tissue, and cell culture experiments suggest that the bacterium can establish a low-grade inflammation. Here, we investigated its impact on human primary prostate epithelial cells. Microarray analysis confirmed the inflammation-inducing capability of P. acnes but also showed deregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. qPCR experiments showed that viable P. acnes downregulates a master regulator of cell cycle progression, FOXM1. Flow cytometry experiments revealed that P. acnes increases the number of cells in S-phase. We tested the hypothesis that a P. acnes-produced berninamycin-like thiopeptide is responsible for this effect, since it is related to the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin. The thiopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster was strongly expressed; it is present in subtype IB of P. acnes, but absent from type IA, which is most abundant on human skin. A knock-out mutant lacking the gene encoding the berninamycin-like peptide precursor was unable to downregulate FOXM1 and to halt the cell cycle. Our study reveals a novel host cell-interacting activity of P. acnes.

  12. Pirarubicin inhibits multidrug-resistant osteosarcoma cell proliferation through induction of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shui-er; Xiong, Sang; Lin, Feng; Qiao, Guang-lei; Feng, Tao; Shen, Zan; Min, Da-liu; Zhang, Chun-ling; Yao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Pirarubicin (THP) is recently found to be effective in treating patients with advanced, relapsed or recurrent high-grade osteosarcoma. In this study, the effects of THP on the multidrug-resistant (MDR) osteosarcoma cells were assessed, and the underlying mechanisms for the disruption of cell cycle kinetics by THP were explored. Methods: Human osteosarcoma cell line MG63 and human MDR osteosarcoma cell line MG63/DOX were tested. The cytotoxicity of drugs was examined using a cell proliferation assay with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). The distribution of cells across the cell cycle was determined with flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle-regulated genes cyclin B1 and Cdc2 (CDK1), and the phosphorylated Cdc2 and Cdc25C was examined using Western blot analyses. Results: MG63/DOX cells were highly resistant to doxorubicin (ADM) and gemcitabine (GEM), but were sensitive or lowly resistant to THP, methotrexate (MTX) and cisplatin (DDP). Treatment of MG63/DOX cells with THP (200–1000 ng/mL) inhibited the cell proliferation in time- and concentration-dependent manners. THP (50–500 ng/mL) induced MG63/DOX cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Furthermore, the treatment of MG63/DOX cells with THP (200–1000 ng/mL) downregulated cyclin B1 expression, and decreased the phosphorylated Cdc2 at Thr161. Conversely, the treatment increased the phosphorylated Cdc2 at Thr14/Tyr15 and Cdc25C at Ser216, which led to a decrease in Cdc2-cyclin B1 activity. Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of THP to MG63/DOX cells may be in part due to its ability to arrest cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase, which supports the use of THP for managing patients with MDR osteosarcoma. PMID:22580740

  13. Indole-3-carbinol, a vegetable phytochemical, inhibits adipogenesis by regulating cell cycle and AMPKα signaling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a phytochemical present mainly in cruciferous vegetables. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which I3C blocks adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, and evaluated the anti-adipogenic effect of I3C in zebrafish. Our data showed that I3C mainly inhibits early differentiation of adipocyte through cell cycle arrest. Inhibition of early differentiation was reflected by down-regulation of early adipogenic factors such as CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins β and δ (C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ), followed by down-regulation of late adipogenic factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and C/EBPα, and regulation of signaling molecules. This result was supported by a reduction in triglyceride (TG) levels and TG synthetic enzymes. I3C activated AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) to inhibit fatty acid synthesis. In addition, an anti-adipogenic effect of I3C was found in zebrafish study. Our data suggest that vegetables-derived I3C could reduce lipid accumulation via various molecular mechanisms in cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. HnRNP-L promotes prostate cancer progression by enhancing cell cycling and inhibiting apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xumin; Li, Qi; He, Jincan; Zhong, Liren; Shu, Fangpeng; Xing, Rongwei; Lv, Daojun; Lei, Bin; Wan, Bo; Yang, Yu; Wu, Huayan; Mao, Xiangming; Zou, Yaguang

    2016-12-27

    Expression of the RNA-binding protein HnRNP-L was previously shown to associate with tumorigenesis in liver and lung cancer. In this study, we examined the role of HnRNP-L in prostate cancer (Pca). We found that HnRNP-L is overexpressed in prostate tissue samples from 160 PC patients compared with tissue samples from 32 donors with cancers other than Pca. Moreover, HnRNP-L positively correlated with aggressive tumor characteristics. HnRNP-L knockdown inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis of Pca cell lines in vitro, and suppressed tumor growth when the cells were subcutaneously implanted in an athymic mouse model. Conversely, overexpression of HnRNP-L promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth while prohibiting cell apoptosis. HnRNP-L promoted cell proliferation and tumor growth in Pca in part by interacting with endogenous p53 mRNA, which was closely associated with cyclin p21. In addition, HnRNP-L affected cell apoptosis by directly binding the classical apoptosis protein BCL-2. These observations suggest HnRNP-L is an important regulatory factor that exerts pro-proliferation and anti-apoptosis effects in Pca through actions affecting the cell cycle and intrinsic apoptotic signaling. Thus HnRNP-L could potentially serve as a valuable molecular biomarker or therapeutic target in the treatment of Pca.

  15. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibition of survival signals in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Chie; Arbiser, Jack L; Mori, Naoki

    2012-07-01

    Honokiol, a naturally occurring biphenyl, possesses anti-neoplastic properties. We investigated activities of honokiol against adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) associated with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Cell viability was assessed using colorimetric assay. Propidium iodide staining was performed to determine cell cycle phase. Apoptotic effects were evaluated by 7A6 detection and caspases activity. Expressions of cell cycle- and apoptosis-associated proteins were analyzed by Western blot. We investigated the efficacy of honokiol in mice harboring tumors of HTLV-1-infected T-cell origin. Honokiol exhibited cytotoxic activity against HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and ATL cells. We identified two different effects of honokiol on HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines: cell cycle inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Honokiol induced G1 cell cycle arrest by reducing the expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6 and c-Myc, while apoptosis was induced via reduced expression of cIAP-2, XIAP and survivin. The induced apoptosis was also associated with activation of caspases-3 and -9. In addition, honokiol suppressed the phosphorylation of IκBα, IKKα, IKKβ, STAT3, STAT5 and Akt, down-regulated JunB and JunD, and inhibited DNA binding of NF-κB, AP-1, STAT3 and STAT5. These effects resulted in the inactivation of survival signals including NF-κB, AP-1, STATs and Akt. Honokiol was highly effective against ATL in mice Our data suggested that honokiol is a systemically available, non-toxic inhibitor of ATL cell growth that should be examined for potential clinical application. Our findings provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of honokiol for the management of ATL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The inhibiting effect of cola on gastric mucosal cell cycle proliferation in humans.

    PubMed

    Kapicioğlu, S; Baki, A; Tekelioğlu, Y; Arslan, M; Sari, M; Ovali, E

    1998-07-01

    Acidic beverages may be involved in regulating the cell proliferation of the gastric mucosa. We therefore analyzed the interaction of Coca-Cola consumption and gastric mucosal proliferation by means of flow cytometry. Sixteen healthy students agreed to participate in this study. All volunteers underwent an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy after a 12-h overnight fast. Endoscopic changes in the gastric mucosa were determined quantitatively. One day later, after a 12-h overnight fast, all volunteers received standard Coca-Cola (200 ml, pH 2.6, 4 degrees C). One hour later all volunteers again underwent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, to measure gastric mucosal damage. During both the first and the second endoscopy at least four biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum for flow cytometric analysis. The endoscopic analysis showed that there was no difference before and after Coca-Cola consumption. However, the flow cytometric analysis showed that Coca-Cola inhibited the proliferation index and the S phase. Before Coca-Cola consumption G0/G1: 60 (57-62), G2/M: 0.6 (0.2-1), S: 40 (37-42), and PI: 0.40 (0.38-0.43) and after Coca-Cola consumption G0/G1: 70 (60-73), G2/M: 1.9 (1.2-2.5), S: 28 (26-32), and PI: 0.30 (0.27-0.34) the cell population G0/G1 and G2/M phases were significantly increased (P < 0.0001, 0.0003), and the cell population S and PI phases were significantly low compared with the pre-consumption data (P < 0.0002, 0.0001). The cell cycle analysis reflects that Coca-Cola inhibits a crucial event in the cell cycle occurring at the G1/S border.

  17. Isoalantolactone inhibits UM-SCC-10A cell growth via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minjun; Zhang, Hua; Hu, Jiehua; Weng, Zhiyong; Li, Chenyuan; Li, Hong; Zhao, Yan; Mei, Xifan; Ren, Fu; Li, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    Isoalantolactone is a sesquiterpene lactone compound isolated from the roots of Inula helenium L. Previous studies have demonstrated that isoalantolactone possesses antifungal, anti-bacterial, anti-helminthic and anti-proliferative properties in a variety of cells, but there are no studies concerning its effects on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In the present study, an MTT assay demonstrated that isoalantolactone has anti-proliferative activity against the HNSCC cell line (UM-SCC-10A). Immunostaining identified that this compound induced UM-SCC-10A cell apoptosis but not necrosis. To explain the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects, flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that the apoptosis was associated with cell cycle arrest during the G1 phase, up-regulation of p53 and p21, and down-regulation of cyclin D. Furthermore, our results revealed that induction of apoptosis through a mitochondrial pathway led to up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein expression (Bax), down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein expression (Bcl-2), mitochondrial release of cytochrome c (Cyto c), reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and activation of caspase-3 (Casp-3). Involvement of the caspase apoptosis pathway was confirmed using caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK pretreatment. Together, our findings suggest that isoalantolactone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway and was associated with cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in UM-SCC-10A cells. Therefore, isoalantolactone may become a potential drug for treating HNSCC.

  18. Rheum emodin inhibits enterovirus 71 viral replication and affects the host cell cycle environment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ting; Zhang, Li-ying; Wang, Zeng-yan; Wang, Yue; Song, Feng-mei; Zhang, Ya-hong; Yu, Jing-hua

    2017-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the primary causative agent of recent large-scale outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in Asia. Currently, there are no drugs available for the prevention and treatment of HFMD. In this study, we compared the anti-EV71 activities of three natural compounds, rheum emodin, artemisinin and astragaloside extracted from Chinese herbs Chinese rhubarb, Artemisia carvifolia and Astragalus, respectively, which have been traditionally used for the treatment and prevention of epidemic diseases. Human lung fibroblast cell line MRC5 was mock-infected or infected with EV71, and treated with drugs. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was detected with MTT assay. The cytopathic effects such as cell death and condensed nuclei were morphologically observed. The VP1-coding sequence required for EV71 genome replication was assayed with qRT-PCR. Viral protein expression was analyzed with Western blotting. Viral TCID50 was determined to evaluate EV71 virulence. Flow cytometry analysis of propidium iodide staining was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution of MRC5 cells. Rheum emodin (29.6 μmol/L) effectively protected MRC5 cells from EV71-induced cytopathic effects, which resulted from the inhibiting viral replication: rheum emodin treatment decreased viral genomic levels by 5.34-fold, viral protein expression by less than 30-fold and EV71 virulence by 0.33107-fold. The fact that inhibition of rheum emodin on viral virulence was much stronger than its effects on genomic levels and viral protein expression suggested that rheum emodin inhibited viral maturation. Furthermore, rheum emodin treatment markedly diminished cell cycle arrest at S phase in MRC5 cells, which was induced by EV71 infection and favored the viral replication. In contrast, neither astragaloside (50 μmol/L) nor artemisinin (50 μmol/L) showed similar anti-EV71 activities. Among the three natural compounds tested, rheum emodin effectively suppressed EV71 viral replication

  19. Rheum emodin inhibits enterovirus 71 viral replication and affects the host cell cycle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ting; Zhang, Li-Ying; Wang, Zeng-Yan; Wang, Yue; Song, Feng-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Hong; Yu, Jing-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the primary causative agent of recent large-scale outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in Asia. Currently, there are no drugs available for the prevention and treatment of HFMD. In this study, we compared the anti-EV71 activities of three natural compounds, rheum emodin, artemisinin and astragaloside extracted from Chinese herbs Chinese rhubarb, Artemisia carvifolia and Astragalus, respectively, which have been traditionally used for the treatment and prevention of epidemic diseases. Human lung fibroblast cell line MRC5 was mock-infected or infected with EV71, and treated with drugs. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was detected with MTT assay. The cytopathic effects such as cell death and condensed nuclei were morphologically observed. The VP1-coding sequence required for EV71 genome replication was assayed with qRT-PCR. Viral protein expression was analyzed with Western blotting. Viral TCID50 was determined to evaluate EV71 virulence. Flow cytometry analysis of propidium iodide staining was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution of MRC5 cells. Rheum emodin (29.6 μmol/L) effectively protected MRC5 cells from EV71-induced cytopathic effects, which resulted from the inhibiting viral replication: rheum emodin treatment decreased viral genomic levels by 5.34-fold, viral protein expression by less than 30-fold and EV71 virulence by 0.33107-fold. The fact that inhibition of rheum emodin on viral virulence was much stronger than its effects on genomic levels and viral protein expression suggested that rheum emodin inhibited viral maturation. Furthermore, rheum emodin treatment markedly diminished cell cycle arrest at S phase in MRC5 cells, which was induced by EV71 infection and favored the viral replication. In contrast, neither astragaloside (50 μmol/L) nor artemisinin (50 μmol/L) showed similar anti-EV71 activities. Among the three natural compounds tested, rheum emodin effectively suppressed EV71 viral replication

  20. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside induces human DNA topoisomerase II inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Sudhanshu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Dietary flavonoids have been associated with reduced risk of cancer including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G) has been shown to possess anti-proliferative and antioxidant activities. The objectives of this study were to assess the anti-proliferative properties of Q3G in human liver cancer cells (HepG2); assess the cytotoxicity on normal primary cells; and elucidate its possible mechanism of action(s). Using a dose- and time-dependent study, we evaluated the antiproliferative properties of Q3G in HepG2 cells using MTS cell viability assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay. To elucidate the mechanism of action, we performed cell-cycle analysis using flow cytometry. Cell death via apoptosis was analyzed by DNA fragmentation assay, caspase-3 induction assay and fluorescence microscopy. DNA topoisomerase II drug screening assay was performed to assess the effect of Q3G on DNA topoisomerase II. Q3G treatment inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in HepG2 cells with the blockade of the cell cycle in the S-phase. Additionally, Q3G exhibited a strong ability to inhibit DNA topoisomerase II. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation and fluorescence microscopy analysis suggested that Q3G induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells with the activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, Q3G exhibited significantly lower toxicity to normal cells (primary human and rat hepatocytes and primary lung cells) than sorafenib (p<0.05), a chemotherapy drug for hepatocellular carcinoma. The results suggest that Q3G is a potential antitumor agent against liver cancer with a possible mechanism of action via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Further research should be performed to confirm these results in vivo.

  1. Triglyceride accumulation and fatty acid profile changes in Chlorella (Chlorophyta) during high pH-induced cell cycle inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Guckert, J.B.; Cooksey, K.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Alkaline pH stress resulted in triglyceride (TG) accumulation in Chlorella CHLOR1 and was independent of medium nitrogen or carbon levels. Based on morphological observations, alkaline pH inhibited autospore release, thus increasing the time for cell cycle completion. Autospore release has been postulated to coincide with TG utilization within the microalgal cell division cycle. The alkaline pH stress affected lipid accumulation by inhibiting the cell division cycle prior to autospore release and, therefore, prior to TG utilization. Cells inhibited in this manner showed an increase in TG accumulation but a decrease in both membrane lipid classes (glycolipid and polar lipid). Unlike TG fatty acid profiles, membrane lipid fatty acid profiles were not stable during TG accumulation. The membrane profiles became similar to the TG, i.e. less unsaturated than in the membrane lipids of unstressed control cells.

  2. Inhibition of PPARα induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and synergizes with glycolysis inhibition in kidney cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abu Aboud, Omran; Wettersten, Hiromi I; Weiss, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the US. While RCC is highly metastatic, there are few therapeutics options available for patients with metastatic RCC, and progression-free survival of patients even with the newest targeted therapeutics is only up to two years. Thus, novel therapeutic targets for this disease are desperately needed. Based on our previous metabolomics studies showing alteration of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) related events in both RCC patient and xenograft mice materials, this pathway was further examined in the current study in the setting of RCC. PPARα is a nuclear receptor protein that functions as a transcription factor for genes including those encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism; while PPARα has been reported to regulate tumor growth in several cancers, it has not been evaluated in RCC. A specific PPARα antagonist, GW6471, induced both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in VHL(+) and VHL(-) RCC cell lines (786-O and Caki-1) associated with attenuation of the cell cycle regulatory proteins c-Myc, Cyclin D1, and CDK4; this data was confirmed as specific to PPARα antagonism by siRNA methods. Interestingly, when glycolysis was blocked by several methods, the cytotoxicity of GW6471 was synergistically increased, suggesting a switch to fatty acid oxidation from glycolysis and providing an entirely novel therapeutic approach for RCC.

  3. Apigenin promotes apoptosis, inhibits invasion and induces cell cycle arrest of T24 human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Mao, Yeqing; Chen, Hong; Lin, Yiwei; Hu, Zhenghui; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xin; Xu, Xianglai; Qin, Jie; Xie, Liping

    2013-06-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) was recently shown effective in inhibiting several cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of apigenin in the human bladder cancer cell line T24 for the first time. T24 cells were treated with varying concentrations and time of apigenin. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell motility and invasiveness were assayed by Matrigel migration and invasion assay. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to detect cell apoptosis, cell cycle and signaling pathway. The results demonstrated that apigenin suppressed proliferation and inhibited the migration and invasion potential of T24 bladder cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was associated with induced G2/M Phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The mechanism of action is like to involve PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins. Apigenin increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage, indicating that apigenin induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. These findings suggest that apigenin may be an effective way for treating human bladder cancer.

  4. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue; Cui, Hongjuan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-04-29

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma. - Highlights: • High expression of HDAC9 correlates with poor patient prognosis. • Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. • Downregulation of HDAC9 suppresses tumor growth in nude mice.

  5. Knockdown of REGγ inhibits proliferation by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaojun; Wang, Longsheng; Xu, Chen; Chen, Hui; Peng, Bo; Xu, Yunfei; Yao, Xudong; Li, Lei; Zheng, Junhua

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant tumor and the second leading cause of cancer related death among men in western countries. REGγ, a proteasome activator, is reported to play important roles in various human cancers. However, the expression patterns and potential roles of REGγ in prostate cancer have never been reported. In this study, we found for the first time that REGγ is overexpressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines at both protein and mRNA levels. In addition, we demonstrated that knockdown of REGγ significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in PCa cell lines PC-3 and DU145. Moreover, we observed that the expressions of P21 were increased while the levels of cycinD1 and bcl-2 were decreased after knockdown of REGγ in PCa cells. And the stabilization of P21 was enhanced after REGγ knockdown in PC-3 cells. In summary, our findings suggest that REGγ may play important roles in prostate cancer and may serve as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of PCa patients. PMID:28861169

  6. Bufalin inhibits pancreatic cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest via the c-Myc/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Xiao, Xiang-Yang; Shou, Qi-Yang; Yan, Jun-Feng; Chen, Long; Fu, Hui-Ying; Wang, Jian-Chao

    2016-12-04

    Bufalin, a cardiotonic steroid isolated from toad venom (bufo gargarizans Cantor or B. melanotictus Schneider), has widely demonstrated antitumor effects and exhibits potential antitumor activity in various human cancer cells lines. The main characteristic of cancers including pancreatic cancer is the ability of uncontrolled proliferation. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which bufalin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. The effect of bufalin on the suppression of tumor growth in vivo was studied in a bioluminescent mouse model generated using the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3-luc2 and the cytotoxicity was evaluated in BcPc3 and Sw1990 cells with MTT. Flow cytometry and western blotting analyses were utilized to detect the effect of bufalin on the cell cycle and to detect the cell cycle-related proteins, respectively. Then, a luciferase reporter assay was applied to screen the activity of potent transcription factors following bufalin exposure and their expression was detected by western blotting. Bufalin suppressed tumor growth in a bioluminescence mouse model generated using BxPC3-luc2 cells and inhibited cell proliferation in vitro through inducing cell cycle arrest at S phase. Bufalin treatment inhibited cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 expression and therefore increased expression of p27, a regulatory molecular that controls cell cycle transition from S to G2 phase. Furthermore, luciferase reporter screening studies revealed that bufalin inhibited the expression and activity of the transcription factors c-Myc and NF-κB, which might cause cell cycle arrest at S phase and the inhibition of cell proliferation. Taken together, our results indicate that bufalin can inhibit pancreatic cancer by targeting c-Myc, thus suggesting that the mechanism of c-Myc regulation by bufalin might be worthy of further study regarding its potential as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  7. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  8. Inhibition of exportin-1 function results in rapid cell cycle-associated DNA damage in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Russell T.; Marcus, Joshua M.; Orth, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE) are small molecules in development as anti-cancer agents. The first-in-class SINE, selinexor, is in clinical trials for blood and solid cancers. Selinexor forms a covalent bond with exportin-1 at cysteine-528, and blocks its ability to export cargos. Previous work has shown strong cell cycle effects and drug-induced cell death across many different cancer-derived cell lines. Here, we report strong cell cycle-associated DNA double-stranded break formation upon the treatment of cancer cells with SINE. In multiple cell models, selinexor treatment results in the formation of clustered DNA damage foci in 30-40% of cells within 8 hours that is dependent upon cysteine-528. DNA damage strongly correlates with G1/S-phase and decreased DNA replication. Live cell microscopy reveals an association between DNA damage and cell fate. Cells that form damage in G1-phase more often die or arrest, while those damaged in S/G2-phase frequently progress to cell division. Up to half of all treated cells form damage foci, and most cells that die after being damaged, were damaged in G1-phase. By comparison, non-transformed cell lines show strong cell cycle effects but little DNA damage and less death than cancer cells. Significant drug combination effects occur when selinexor is paired with different classes of agents that either cause DNA damage or that diminish DNA damage repair. These data present a novel effect of exportin-1 inhibition and provide a strong rationale for multiple combination treatments of selinexor with agents that are currently in use for the treatment of different solid cancers. PMID:28467801

  9. Overexpression of Transcription Factor Sp1 Leads to Gene Expression Perturbations and Cell Cycle Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Deniaud, Emmanuelle; Baguet, Joël; Chalard, Roxane; Blanquier, Bariza; Brinza, Lilia; Meunier, Julien; Michallet, Marie-Cécile; Laugraud, Aurélie; Ah-Soon, Claudette; Wierinckx, Anne; Castellazzi, Marc; Lachuer, Joël; Gautier, Christian

    2009-01-01

    induces an inhibition of cell cycle progression that precedes apoptosis and a transcriptional response targeting genes containing Sp1 binding sites in their promoter or not suggesting both direct Sp1-driven transcription and indirect mechanisms. PMID:19753117

  10. The flavonoid quercetin transiently inhibits the activity of taxol and nocodazole through interference with the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Temesgen; Fadlalla, Khalda; Turner, Timothy; Yehualaeshet, Teshome E.

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid with anticancer properties. In this study, we examined the effects of quercetin on cell cycle, viability and proliferation of cancer cells, either singly or in combination with the microtubule-targeting drugs taxol and nocodazole. Although quercetin induced cell death in a dose dependent manner, 12.5-50μM quercetin inhibited the activity of both taxol and nocodazole to induce G2/M arrest in various cell lines. Quercetin also partially restored drug-induced loss in viability of treated cells for up to 72 hours. This antagonism of microtubule-targeting drugs was accompanied by a delay in cell cycle progression and inhibition of the buildup of cyclin-B1 at the microtubule organizing center of treated cells. However, quercetin did not inhibit the microtubule targeting of taxol or nocodazole. Despite the short-term protection of cells by quercetin, colony formation and clonogenicity of HCT116 cells were still suppressed by quercetin or quercetin-taxol combination. The status of cell adherence to growth matrix was critical in determining the sensitivity of HCT116 cells to quercetin. We conclude that while long-term exposure of cancer cells to quercetin may prevent cell proliferation and survival, the interference of quercetin with cell cycle progression diminishes the efficacy of microtubule-targeting drugs to arrest cells at G2/M. PMID:21058190

  11. The flavonoid quercetin transiently inhibits the activity of taxol and nocodazole through interference with the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Temesgen; Fadlalla, Khalda; Turner, Timothy; Yehualaeshet, Teshome E

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a flavonoid with anticancer properties. In this study, we examined the effects of quercetin on cell cycle, viability, and proliferation of cancer cells, either singly or in combination with the microtubule-targeting drugs taxol and nocodazole. Although quercetin induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, 12.5-50 μM quercetin inhibited the activity of both taxol and nocodazole to induce G2/M arrest in various cell lines. Quercetin also partially restored drug-induced loss in viability of treated cells for up to 72 h. This antagonism of microtubule-targeting drugs was accompanied by a delay in cell cycle progression and inhibition of the buildup of cyclin-B1 at the microtubule organizing center of treated cells. However, quercetin did not inhibit the microtubule targeting of taxol or nocodazole. Despite the short-term protection of cells by quercetin, colony formation and clonogenicity of HCT116 cells were still suppressed by quercetin or quercetin-taxol combination. The status of cell adherence to growth matrix was critical in determining the sensitivity of HCT116 cells to quercetin. We conclude that although long-term exposure of cancer cells to quercetin may prevent cell proliferation and survival, the interference of quercetin with cell cycle progression diminishes the efficacy of microtubule-targeting drugs to arrest cells at G2/M.

  12. Fangchinoline inhibits the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells by blocking cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xue; Peng, Jian-Ming; Su, Lan-DI; Wang, Dong-Yan; Yu, You-Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Fangchinoline (Fan) is a bioactive compound isolated from the Chinese herb Stephania tetrandra S. Moore (Fen Fang Ji). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Fan on the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells, and to define the associated molecular mechanisms. Following treatment with Fan, Cell Counting Kit-8, phase contrast imaging and Giemsa staining assays were used to detect cell viability; flow cytometry was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to investigate changes in the expression levels of cell cycle-associated genes and proteins. In the present study, treatment with Fan markedly inhibited the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells and significantly increased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05 for 2.5-5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm), whereas the percentage of cells in the S and G2/M phases were significantly reduced following treatment (P<0.05 for 5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm). Mechanistically, Fan significantly reduced the mRNA expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 (P<0.05 for 2.5-5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm), which are key genes in the regulation of the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, treatment with Fan also decreased the expression of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F transcription factor-1 (E2F-1) proteins (P<0.05 for 5 µm; P<0.01 for 10 µm). In summary, the present study demonstrated that Fan inhibited the proliferation of SPC-A-1 lung cancer cells and induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. These effects may be mediated by the downregulation of cellular CDK4, CDK6 and cyclin D1 levels, thus leading to hypophosphorylation of Rb and subsequent suppression of E2F-1 activity. Therefore, the present results suggest that Fan may be a potential drug candidate for the prevention of lung cancer.

  13. Enteric pathogens deploy cell cycle inhibiting factors to block the bactericidal activity of Perforin-2

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Olsson, Melissa L; Podack, Eckhard R; Munson, George P

    2015-01-01

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is an effector of the innate immune system that limits the proliferation and spread of medically relevant Gram-negative, -positive, and acid fast bacteria. We show here that a cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex containing cullin-1 and βTrCP monoubiquitylates Perforin-2 in response to pathogen associated molecular patterns such as LPS. Ubiquitylation triggers a rapid redistribution of Perforin-2 and is essential for its bactericidal activity. Enteric pathogens such as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli disarm host cells by injecting cell cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) into mammalian cells to deamidate the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. Because CRL activity is dependent upon NEDD8, Cif blocks ubiquitin dependent trafficking of Perforin-2 and thus, its bactericidal activity. Collectively, these studies further underscore the biological significance of Perforin-2 and elucidate critical molecular events that culminate in Perforin-2-dependent killing of both intracellular and extracellular, cell-adherent bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06505.001 PMID:26418746

  14. Enteric pathogens deploy cell cycle inhibiting factors to block the bactericidal activity of Perforin-2.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Olsson, Melissa L; Podack, Eckhard R; Munson, George P

    2015-09-29

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is an effector of the innate immune system that limits the proliferation and spread of medically relevant Gram-negative, -positive, and acid fast bacteria. We show here that a cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complex containing cullin-1 and βTrCP monoubiquitylates Perforin-2 in response to pathogen associated molecular patterns such as LPS. Ubiquitylation triggers a rapid redistribution of Perforin-2 and is essential for its bactericidal activity. Enteric pathogens such as Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli disarm host cells by injecting cell cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) into mammalian cells to deamidate the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. Because CRL activity is dependent upon NEDD8, Cif blocks ubiquitin dependent trafficking of Perforin-2 and thus, its bactericidal activity. Collectively, these studies further underscore the biological significance of Perforin-2 and elucidate critical molecular events that culminate in Perforin-2-dependent killing of both intracellular and extracellular, cell-adherent bacteria.

  15. Regulation of cell cycle transcription factor Swi4 through auto-inhibition of DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Baetz, K; Andrews, B

    1999-10-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two transcription factors, SBF (SCB binding factor) and MBF (MCB binding factor), promote the induction of gene expression at the G(1)/S-phase transition of the mitotic cell cycle. Swi4 and Mbp1 are the DNA binding components of SBF and MBF, respectively. The Swi6 protein is a common subunit of both transcription factors and is presumed to play a regulatory role. SBF binding to its target sequences, the SCBs, is a highly regulated event and requires the association of Swi4 with Swi6 through their C-terminal domains. Swi4 binding to SCBs is restricted to the late M and G(1) phases, when Swi6 is localized to the nucleus. We show that in contrast to Swi6, Swi4 remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle. This finding suggests that the DNA binding domain of Swi4 is inaccessible in the full-length protein when not complexed with Swi6. To explore this hypothesis, we expressed Swi4 and Swi6 in insect cells by using the baculovirus system. We determined that partially purified Swi4 cannot bind SCBs in the absence of Swi6. However, Swi4 derivatives carrying point mutations or alterations in the extreme C terminus were able to bind DNA or activate transcription in the absence of Swi6, and the C terminus of Swi4 inhibited Swi4 derivatives from binding DNA in trans. Full-length Swi4 was determined to be monomeric in solution, suggesting an intramolecular mechanism for auto-inhibition of binding to DNA by Swi4. We detected a direct in vitro interaction between a C-terminal fragment of Swi4 and the N-terminal 197 amino acids of Swi4, which contain the DNA binding domain. Together, our data suggest that intramolecular interactions involving the C-terminal region of Swi4 physically prevent the DNA binding domain from binding SCBs. The interaction of the carboxy-terminal region of Swi4 with Swi6 alleviates this inhibition, allowing Swi4 to bind DNA.

  16. Solanum tuberosum lectin inhibits Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells growth by inducing apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed Rashel; Rahman, Md Musfikur; Amin, Ruhul; Karim, Md Rezaul; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat; Hossain, M Tofazzal

    2016-06-01

    Recently, a lectin was purified from the potato cultivated in Bangladesh locally known as Sheel. In the present study cytotoxicity of the lectin against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells was studied by MTT assay in vitro in RPMI-1640 medium and 8.0-36.0 % cell growth inhibition was observed at the range of 2.5-160 μg/ml protein concentration when incubated for 24 h. The lectin-induced apoptosis in EAC cells was confirmed by fluorescence and optical microscope. The apoptotic cell death was also confirmed by using caspase inhibitors. Cells growth inhibition caused by the lectin (36 %) was remarkably decreased to 7.6 and 22.3 % respectively in the presence of caspase-3 and -8 inhibitors. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of apoptosis-related genes Bcl-X, p53, and Bax. An intensive expression of Bcl-X gene was observed in untreated control EAC cells with the disappeared of the gene in Sheel-treated EAC cells. At the same time, Bax gene expression appeared only in Sheel-treated EAC cells and the expression level of the p53 gene was increased remarkable after the treatment of EAC cells with the lectin. The lectin showed strong agglutination activity against EAC cells. Flow cytometry was used to study the cell cycle phases of EAC cells and it was observed that the lectin arrested the G2/M phase. In conclusion, Sheel lectin inhibited EAC cells growth by inducing apoptosis.

  17. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  18. Nobiletin, a Polymethoxylated Flavone, Inhibits Glioma Cell Growth and Migration via Arresting Cell Cycle and Suppressing MAPK and Akt Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lien, Li-Ming; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Chen, Ray-Jade; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Wu, Jia-Lun; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chou, Duen-Suey; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Lu, Wan-Jung

    2016-02-01

    Nobiletin, a bioactive polymethoxylated flavone (5,6,7,8,3(') ,4(') -hexamethoxyflavone), is abundant in citrus fruit peel. Although nobiletin exhibits antitumor activity against various cancer cells, the effect of nobiletin on glioma cells remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nobiletin on the human U87 and Hs683 glioma cell lines. Treating glioma cells with nobiletin (20-100 µm) reduced cell viability and arrested the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, as detected using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide (PI) staining, respectively; however, nobiletin did not induce cell apoptosis according to PI-annexin V double staining. Data from western blotting showed that nobiletin significantly attenuated the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4, and E2 promoter-binding factor 1 (E2F1) and the phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinases, including p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our data also showed that nobiletin inhibited glioma cell migration, as detected by both functional wound healing and transwell migration assays. Altogether, the present results suggest that nobiletin inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt/protein kinase B pathways and downregulates positive regulators of the cell cycle, leading to subsequent suppression of glioma cell proliferation and migration. Our findings evidence that nobiletin may have potential for treating glioblastoma multiforme.

  19. Endosulfan inhibiting the meiosis process via depressing expressions of regulatory factors and causing cell cycle arrest in spermatogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang-Zi; Zhang, Lian-Shuang; Wei, Jia-Liu; Ren, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jin; Jing, Li; Yang, Man; Wang, Ji; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Endosulfan is a persistent organic pollutant and widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. It is present in air, water, and soil worldwide; therefore, it is a health risk affecting especially the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan in the reproductive system. To investigate the effect of endosulfan on meiosis process, 32 rats were divided into four groups, treated with 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day endosulfan, respectively, and sacrificed after the 21 days of treatments. Results show that endosulfan caused the reductions in sperm concentration and motility rate, which resulted into an increased in sperm abnormality rate; further, endosulfan induced downregulation of spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (Sohlh1) which controls the switch on meiosis in mammals, as well cyclin A1, cyclin-dependent kinases 1 (CDK1), and cyclin-dependent kinases 2 (CDK2). In vitro, endosulfan induced G2/M phase arrest in the spermatogenic cell cycle and caused proliferation inhibition. Moreover, endosulfan induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in vivo and vitro. The results suggested that endosulfan could inhibit the start of meiosis by downregulating the expression of Sohlh1 and induce G2/M phase arrest of cell cycle by decreasing the expression of cyclin A1, CDK1, and CDK2 via oxidative damage, which inhibits the meiosis process, and therefore decrease the amount of sperm.

  20. Ammodytoxin, a secretory phospholipase A2, inhibits G2 cell-cycle arrest in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Uros; Sribar, Jernej; Matis, Maja; Anderluh, Gregor; Peter-Katalinić, Jasna; Krizaj, Igor; Gubensek, Franc

    2005-10-15

    Ammodytoxin (Atx), an sPLA2 (secretory phospholipase A2), binds to g and e isoforms of porcine 14-3-3 proteins in vitro. 14-3-3 proteins are evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic regulatory proteins involved in a variety of biological processes, including cell-cycle regulation. We have now shown that Atx binds to yeast 14-3-3 proteins with an affinity similar to that for the mammalian isoforms. Thus yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used as a model eukaryotic cell, which lacks endogenous phospholipases A2, to assess the in vivo relevance of this interaction. Atx was expressed in yeast cells and shown to be biologically active inside the cells. It inhibited G2 cell-cycle arrest in yeast, which is regulated by 14-3-3 proteins. Interference with the cell cycle indicates a possible mechanism by which sPLA2s are able to cause the opposing effects, proliferation and apoptosis, in mammalian cells.

  1. Receptor-selective retinoids inhibit the growth of normal and malignant breast cells by inducing G1 cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kendall; DuPré, Elizabeth; Kim, Heetae; Tin-U, Caesar K; Bissonnette, Reid P; Lamph, William W; Brown, Powel H

    2006-03-01

    Despite advances in treatment, breast cancer continues to be the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Statistics suggest that while focus on treatment should continue, chemopreventive approaches should also be pursued. Previous studies have demonstrated that naturally occurring retinoids such as 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA) can prevent breast cancer in animal models. However, these studies have also shown that these compounds are too toxic for general use. Work from our laboratory showed that an RXR-selective retinoid LGD1069 prevented tumor development in animal models of cancer with reduced toxicity as compared to an RAR-selective retinoid TTNPB. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms by which receptor-selective retinoids inhibit the growth of normal and malignant breast cells. Our results demonstrate that the synthetic retinoids tested are as effective as 9cRA in suppressing the growth of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancer cells. Although the receptor-selective retinoids induce minimal amounts of apoptosis in T47D breast cancer cells, the predominant factor that leads to growth arrest is G1 cell cycle blockade. Our data indicate that this blockade results from the downregulation of Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3, which in turn causes Rb hypophosphorylation. Non-toxic retinoids that are potent inducers of cell cycle arrest may be particularly useful for the prevention of breast cancer.

  2. Icilin inhibits E2F1-mediated cell cycle regulatory programs in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghoon; Chun, Jung Nyeo; Kim, Su-Hwa; So, Insuk; Jeon, Ju-Hong

    2013-11-29

    Aberrant expression of cell cycle regulators have been implicated in prostate cancer development and progression. Therefore, understanding transcriptional networks controlling the cell cycle remain a challenge in the development of prostate cancer treatment. In this study, we found that icilin, a super-cooling agent, down-regulated the expression of cell cycle signature genes and caused G1 arrest in PC-3 prostate cancer cells. With reverse-engineering and an unbiased interrogation of a prostate cancer-specific regulatory network, master regulator analysis discovered that icilin affected cell cycle-related transcriptional modules and identified E2F1 transcription factor as a target master regulator of icilin. Experimental analyses confirmed that icilin reduced the activity and expression levels of E2F1. These results demonstrated that icilin inactivates a small regulatory module controlling the cell cycle in prostate cancer cells. Our study might provide insight into the development of cell cycle-targeted cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Resveratrol Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Malignant NK Cells via JAK2/STAT3 Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Quoc Trung, Ly; Espinoza, J. Luis; Takami, Akiyoshi; Nakao, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell malignancies, particularly aggressive NK cell leukaemias and lymphomas, have poor prognoses. Although recent regimens with L-asparaginase substantially improved outcomes, novel therapeutic approaches are still needed to enhance clinical response. Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, has been extensively studied for its anti-inflammatory, cardioprotective and anti-cancer activities. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-tumour activities of resveratrol against the NK cell lines KHYG-1, NKL, NK-92 and NK-YS. Resveratrol induced robust G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, significantly suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner for all four cell lines. In addition, resveratrol suppressed constitutively active STAT3 in all the cell lines and inhibited JAK2 phosphorylation but had no effect on other upstream mediators of STAT3 activation, such as PTEN, TYK2, and JAK1. Resveratrol also induced downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins MCL1 and survivin, two downstream effectors of the STAT3 pathway. Finally, resveratrol induced synergistic effect on the apoptotic and antiproliferative activities of L-asparaginase against KHYG-1, NKL and NK-92 cells. These results suggest that resveratrol may have therapeutic potential against NK cell malignancies. Furthermore, our finding that resveratrol is a bonafide JAK2 inhibitor extends its potential benefits to other diseases with dysregulated JAK2 signaling. PMID:23372833

  4. Cell cycle-dependent inhibition of 53BP1 signaling by BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Li, Nan; Li, Yujing; Wang, Jiadong; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage response mediator protein 53BP1 is a key regulator of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. 53BP1 protects DNA broken ends from resection by recruiting two downstream factors, RIF1 (RAP1-interacting factor 1) and PTIP (Pax transactivation domain-interacting protein), to double-stranded breaks (DSBs) via ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated 53BP1 phosphorylation, and competes with BRCA1-mediated homologous recombination (HR) repair in G1 phase. In contrast, BRCA1 antagonizes 53BP1-direct NHEJ repair in S/G2 phases. We and others have found that BRCA1 prevents the translocation of RIF1 to DSBs in S/G2 phases; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that efficient ATM-dependent 53BP1 phosphorylation is restricted to the G1 phase of the cell cycle, as a consequence RIF1 and PTIP accumulation at DSB sites only occur in G1 phase. Mechanistically, both BRCT and RING domains of BRCA1 are required for the inhibition of 53BP1 phosphorylation in S and G2 phases. Thus, our findings reveal how BRCA1 antagonizes 53BP1 signaling to ensure that HR repair is the dominant repair pathway in S/G2 phases. PMID:27462418

  5. Rice hull extracts inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 cells with G₁ cell cycle arrest in parallel with their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nam-Jin; Choi, Ki-Choon; Lee, Seung-Ah; Baek, Jin-A; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2015-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been a major dietary staple worldwide for centuries. Growing interest in the beneficial effects of antioxidants has inspired investigation of rice hulls as an attractive source of chemopreventive compounds for breast cancer intervention. We prepared methanol extracts from rice hulls of three Korean bred cultivars (japonica), Ilpum, Heugjinju, and Jeogjinju, and one japonica weedy rice, WD-3. We examined the antiproliferative potential of the hull extracts on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and the related mechanisms thereof. Hull extracts inhibited proliferation of the cells and mediated G0/G1 phase arrest by suppressing cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases, where WD-3 extract showed the most potent. Blockage of p21 expression by small interfering RNA transfection attenuated G1 phase arrest induced by WD-3 extract. The WD-3 extract exhibited greater antioxidant potential and total phenolic compounds, compared with other rice hulls. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis for the F4 fractioned from WD-3 extract revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives were the major active constituents. The F4 fraction most potently inhibited proliferation of MCF-7 cells than WD-3 extract through the suppression of cell cycle regulatory factors. Collectively, our results suggest that the pigmented rice hulls possess greater antioxidant and chemopreventive activity against breast cancer than the other rice cultivars tested, demonstrating that WD-3 rice hulls are an attractive source of chemopreventive bioactive compounds.

  6. Olive Oil Polyphenols Differentially Inhibit Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation through a G1/S Cell Cycle Block Regulated by ERK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Rei; Beckett, Joel; Abe, Ryuzo; Nixon, Alexander; Rochier, Adrienne; Yamashita, Norio; Sumpio, Bauer

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that polyphenols contained in olive oil play a role in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine if the polyphenols in olive oil, oleuropein (Ole), hydroxytyrosol (HT), and tyrosol (Tyr) could inhibit smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation through its influence on cell cycle regulation. Bovine vascular SMC were cultured in the presence of Ole, HT, or Tyr at concentration of 1, 10, or 100 μmol/L. On days 1, 3, and 5, numbers of cells were counted. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry on day 1 after SMC were stained with propidium iodide. Cell populations grown in the presence of Ole or HT at 100 μmol/L concentration were significantly inhibited after 5 days of exposure. Tyr had a similar tendency but it did not attain significance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that 66% of cells were in G1 phase in Ole group, compared with 48% in control group. To examine the cell cycle block between G1 and S phases, we performed Western blotting and found that ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by Ole or HT. We conclude that olive oil polyphenols could inhibit SMC proliferation through a cell cycle block between G1 and S phases which may be regulated by ERK1/2. These results demonstrate a mechanism by which olive oil consumption may be atheroprotective by inhibiting SMC proliferation. PMID:23730132

  7. Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo via G1/S cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyue; Sun, Guodong; Shen, Aling; Liu, Liya; Ding, Jingzhen; Peng, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Patrinia scabiosaefolia (PS) has long been used as an important component in traditional Chinese medicine formulas to treat gastrointestinal malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC). We recently reported that PS can inhibit CRC growth through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. To further elucidate the mode of action of PS, in the present study, we used a CRC mouse xenograft model and a human CRC cell line HT-29 to evaluate the effect of the ethanol extract of PS (EEPS) on cancer cell proliferation and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that EEPS inhibited CRC growth both in vivo and in vitro, which was associated with the inhibitory effects of EEPS on cancer cell proliferation. In addition, EEPS treatment significantly blocked G1 to S phase cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells. Moreover, EEPS treatment decreased the expression of pro-proliferative CyclinD1 and CDK4, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Thus, inhibition of cell proliferation via G1/S cell cycle arrest might be a potential mechanism whereby PS effectively treats cancers.

  8. Nde1-mediated inhibition of ciliogenesis affects cell cycle re-entry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sehyun; Zaghloul, Norann A.; Bubenshchikova, Ekaterina; Oh, Edwin C.; Rankin, Susannah; Katsanis, Nicholas; Obara, Tomoko; Tsiokas, Leonidas

    2011-01-01

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like organelle that is dynamically regulated during the cell cycle. Ciliogenesis is initiated as cells enter quiescence, while cilium resorption precedes mitosis. The mechanisms coordinating ciliogenesis with the cell cycle are unknown. Here we identify the centrosomal protein, Nde1, as a negative regulator of ciliary length. Nde1 is expressed at high levels in mitosis, low levels in quiescence and localizes at the mother centriole, which nucleates the primary cilium. Cells depleted of Nde1 show longer cilia and a delay in cell cycle re-entry that correlates with ciliary length. Knockdown of Nde1 in zebrafish embryos results in increased ciliary length, suppression of cell division, reduction of the number of cells forming the Kupffer’s vesicle, and left-right patterning defects. These data suggest that Nde1 is an integral component of a network coordinating ciliary length with cell cycle progression and have implications in the transition from quiescence to a proliferative state. PMID:21394081

  9. Azathioprine inhibits vaccinia virus replication in both BSC-40 and RAG cell lines acting on different stages of virus cycle.

    PubMed

    Damaso, Clarissa R A; Oliveira, Marcus F; Massarani, Susana M; Moussatché, Nissin

    2002-08-15

    In the present study we demonstrate that azathioprine (AZA) inhibits vaccinia virus (VV) replication in both BSC-40 and RAG cell lines, acting on different stages of virus cycle. In BSC-40 cells, early protein synthesis was not significantly affected, but late gene expression was severely impaired. In RAG cells all stages of gene expression were completed during synchronous infection in the presence of the drug. The onset of DNA replication was not affected in RAG cells, but a severe inhibition was observed in BSC-40 cells. Electron microscopic analysis of VV-infected RAG cells treated with AZA revealed brick-shaped particles presenting abnormal definition of the internal structure. Purified virions from AZA-treated RAG cells presented several modifications of the protein content, a lesser amount of DNA, and a lower PFU:particle ratio. Our results suggest that in VV-infected RAG cells AZA interfered with virus morphogenesis, whereas in BSC-40 cells the replicative cycle was inhibited at the DNA replication stage.

  10. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20) in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Xue, Ying-Bo; Li, Hang; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Tan, Shi-Sheng

    2017-02-04

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20) in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients.

  11. Inhibition of Cell Survival by Curcumin Is Associated with Downregulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20) in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Xue, Ying-bo; Li, Hang; Qiu, Dong; Wang, Zhi-wei; Tan, Shi-sheng

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human tumors in the United States. Curcumin, a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, has been reported to exert its antitumor activity in pancreatic cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-mediated tumor suppressive function have not been fully elucidated. In the current study, we explore whether curcumin exhibits its anti-cancer function through inhibition of oncoprotein cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20) in pancreatic cancer cells. We found that curcumin inhibited cell growth, enhanced apoptosis, induced cell cycle arrest and retarded cell invasion in pancreatic cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that curcumin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that overexpression of Cdc20 enhanced cell proliferation and invasion, and abrogated the cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin in pancreatic cancer cells. Consistently, downregulation of Cdc20 promoted curcumin-mediated anti-tumor activity. Therefore, our findings indicated that inhibition of Cdc20 by curcumin could be useful for the treatment of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:28165402

  12. Exit from exit: resetting the cell cycle through Amn1 inhibition of G protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchang; Shirogane, Takahiro; Liu, Dou; Harper, J Wade; Elledge, Stephen J

    2003-03-07

    In S. cerevisiae cells undergoing anaphase, a ras-related GTPase, Tem1, is located on the spindle pole body that enters the daughter cell and activates a signal transduction pathway, MEN, to allow mitotic exit. MEN activation must be reversed after mitotic exit to reset the cell cycle in G1. We find that daughter cells activate an Antagonist of MEN pathway (AMEN) in part through induction of the Amn1 protein that binds directly to Tem1 and prevents its association with its target kinase Cdc15. Failure of Amn1 function results in defects of both the spindle assembly and nuclear orientation checkpoints and delays turning off Cdc14 in G1. Thus, Amn1 is part of a daughter-specific switch that helps cells exit from mitotic exit and reset the cell cycle.

  13. Resveratrol oligomers isolated from Carex species inhibit growth of human colon tumorigenic cells mediated by cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Gromek, Samantha; Niesen, Daniel; Seeram, Navindra P; Henry, Geneive E

    2011-08-24

    Research has shown that members of the Carex genus produce biologically active stilbenoids including resveratrol oligomers. This is of great interest to the nutraceutical industry given that resveratrol, a constituent of grape and red wine, has attracted immense research attention due to its potential human health benefits. In the current study, five resveratrol oligomers (isolated from Carex folliculata and Carex gynandra ), along with resveratrol, were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon cancer (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and normal human colon (CCD-18Co) cells. The resveratrol oligomers included one dimer, two trimers, and two tetramers: pallidol (1); α-viniferin (2) and trans-miyabenol C (3); and kobophenols A (4) and B (5), respectively. Although not cytotoxic, the resveratrol oligomers (1-5), as well as resveratrol, inhibited growth of the human colon cancer cells. Among the six stilbenoids, α-viniferin (2) was most active against the colon cancer cells with IC(50) values of 6-32 μM (>2-fold compared to normal colon cells). Moreover, α-viniferin (at 20 μM) did not induce apoptosis but arrested cell cycle (in the S-phase) for the colon cancer but not the normal colon cells. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge supporting the anticancer effects of resveratrol and its oligomers. Furthermore, Carex species should be investigated for their nutraceutical potential given that they produce biologically active stilbenoids such as α-viniferin.

  14. Protein kinase C-beta inhibition induces apoptosis and inhibits cell cycle progression in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related non-hodgkin lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nakhle S; Levy, Laura S

    2012-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) constitutes an aggressive variety of lymphomas characterized by increased extranodal involvement, relapse rate, and resistance to chemotherapy. Protein kinase C-beta (PKCβ) targeting showed promising results in preclinical and clinical studies involving a wide variety of cancers, but studies describing the role of PKCβ in AIDS-NHL are primitive if not lacking. In the present study, 3 AIDS-NHL cell lines were examined: 2F7 (AIDS-Burkitt lymphoma), BCBL-1 (AIDS-primary effusion lymphoma), and UMCL01-101 (AIDS-diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated expression of PKCβ1 and PKCβ2 in 2F7 and UMCL01-101 cells, and PKCβ1 alone in BCBL-1 cells. The viability of 2F7 and BCBL-1 cells decreased significantly in the presence of PKCβ-selective inhibitor at half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 14 and 15 μmol/L, respectively, as measured by tetrazolium dye reduction assay. In contrast, UMCL01-101 cells were relatively resistant. As determined using flow cytometric deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay with propidium iodide staining, the responsiveness of sensitive cells was associated with apoptotic induction and cell cycle inhibition. Protein kinase C-beta-selective inhibition was observed not to affect AKT phosphorylation but to induce a rapid and sustained reduction in the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, ribosomal protein S6, and mammalian target of rapamycin in sensitive cell lines. The results indicate that PKCβ plays an important role in AIDS-related NHL survival and suggest that PKCβ targeting should be considered in a broader spectrum of NHL. The observations in BCBL-1 were unexpected in the absence of PKCβ2 expression and implicate PKCβ1 as a regulator in those cells.

  15. Parthenolide inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells through induction of G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest*

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shao-xiang; Sui, Mei-hua; Chen, Shan; Wang, Jian-an; Xu, Geng; Ma, Ji; Shan, Jiang; Fang, Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study is to determine the effect of the natural product parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from extracts of the herb Tanacetum parthenium, on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: Rat aortic VSMCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and treated with different concentrations of parthenolide (10, 20 and 30 μmol/L). [3H]thymidine incorporation was used as an index of cell proliferation. Cell cycle progression and distribution were determined by flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, the expression of several regulatory proteins relevant to VSMC proliferation including IκBα, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), p21, and p27 was examined to investigate the potential molecular mechanism. Results: Treatment with parthenolide significantly decreased the [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA by 30%~56% relative to control values in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Addition of parthenolide also increased cell population at G0/G1 phase by 19.2%~65.7% (P<0.05) and decreased cell population at S phase by 50.7%~84.8% (P<0.05), which is consistent with its stimulatory effects on p21 and p27. In addition, parthenolide also increased IκBα expression and reduced Cox-2 expression in a time-dependent manner. Conclusion: Our results show that parthenolide significantly inhibits the VSMC proliferation by inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. IκBα and Cox-2 are likely involved in such inhibitory effect of parthenolide on VSMC proliferation. These findings warrant further investigation on potential therapeutic implications of parthenolide on VSMC proliferation in vivo. PMID:19585671

  16. Gelam honey attenuated radiation-induced cell death in human diploid fibroblasts by promoting cell cycle progression and inhibiting apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tengku Ahmad, Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal; Jaafar, Faizul; Jubri, Zakiah; Abdul Rahim, Khairuddin; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Makpol, Suzana

    2014-03-24

    The interaction between ionizing radiation and substances in cells will induce the production of free radicals. These free radicals inflict damage to important biomolecules such as chromosomes, proteins and lipids which consequently trigger the expression of genes which are involved in protecting the cells or repair the oxidative damages. Honey has been known for its antioxidant properties and was used in medical and cosmetic products. Currently, research on honey is ongoing and diversifying. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Gelam honey as a radioprotector in human diploid fibroblast (HDFs) which were exposed to gamma-rays by determining the expression of genes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and cell death. Six groups of HDFs were studied viz. untreated control, irradiated HDFs, Gelam honey-treated HDFs and HDF treated with Gelam honey pre-, during- and post-irradiation. HDFs were treated with 6 mg/ml of sterilized Gelam honey (w/v) for 24 h and exposed to 1 Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays at the dose rate of 0.25 Gy/min. Our findings showed that, gamma-irradiation at 1 Gy up-regulated ATM, p53, p16ink4a and cyclin D1 genes and subsequently initiated cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis (p < 0.05). Pre-treatment with Gelam honey however caused down regulation of these genes in irradiated HDFs while no significant changes was observed on the expression of GADD45 and PAK genes. The expression of ATM and p16 proteins was increased in irradiated HDFs but the p53 gene was translated into p73 protein which was also increased in irradiated HDFs. Gelam honey treatment however significantly decreased the expression of ATM, p73, and p16 proteins (p < 0.05) while the expression of cyclin D1 remained unchanged. Analysis on cell cycle profile showed that cells progressed to S phase with less percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase with Gelam honey treatment while apoptosis was inhibited. Gelam honey acts a radioprotector

  17. Gelam honey attenuated radiation-induced cell death in human diploid fibroblasts by promoting cell cycle progression and inhibiting apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The interaction between ionizing radiation and substances in cells will induce the production of free radicals. These free radicals inflict damage to important biomolecules such as chromosomes, proteins and lipids which consequently trigger the expression of genes which are involved in protecting the cells or repair the oxidative damages. Honey has been known for its antioxidant properties and was used in medical and cosmetic products. Currently, research on honey is ongoing and diversifying. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Gelam honey as a radioprotector in human diploid fibroblast (HDFs) which were exposed to gamma-rays by determining the expression of genes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and cell death. Methods Six groups of HDFs were studied viz. untreated control, irradiated HDFs, Gelam honey-treated HDFs and HDF treated with Gelam honey pre-, during- and post-irradiation. HDFs were treated with 6 mg/ml of sterilized Gelam honey (w/v) for 24 h and exposed to 1 Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays at the dose rate of 0.25 Gy/min. Results Our findings showed that, gamma-irradiation at 1 Gy up-regulated ATM, p53, p16ink4a and cyclin D1 genes and subsequently initiated cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis (p < 0.05). Pre-treatment with Gelam honey however caused down regulation of these genes in irradiated HDFs while no significant changes was observed on the expression of GADD45 and PAK genes. The expression of ATM and p16 proteins was increased in irradiated HDFs but the p53 gene was translated into p73 protein which was also increased in irradiated HDFs. Gelam honey treatment however significantly decreased the expression of ATM, p73, and p16 proteins (p < 0.05) while the expression of cyclin D1 remained unchanged. Analysis on cell cycle profile showed that cells progressed to S phase with less percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase with Gelam honey treatment while apoptosis was inhibited. Conclusion

  18. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus.

  19. Ailanthone Inhibits Huh7 Cancer Cell Growth via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Zhenjian; Hu, Jianyang; Yang, Xiaolin; Chen, Minfen; Lei, Xueping; Deng, Lijuan; Yao, Nan; Peng, Qunlong; Chen, Zhesheng; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-11-03

    While searching for natural anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) components in Ailanthus altissima, we discovered that ailanthone had potent antineoplastic activity against HCC. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of ailanthone on HCC have not been examined. In this study, the antitumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of ailanthone were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that ailanthone induced G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as indicated by decreased expression of cyclins and CDKs and increased expression of p21 and p27. Our results demonstrated that ailanthone triggered DNA damage characterized by activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Moreover, ailanthone-induced cell death was associated with apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased ratio of cells in the subG1 phase and by PARP cleavage and caspase activation. Ailanthone-induced apoptosis was mitochondrion-mediated and involved the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in Huh7 cells. In vivo studies demonstrated that ailanthone inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts without significant secondary adverse effects, indicating its safety for treating HCC. In conclusion, our study is the first to report the efficacy of ailanthone against Huh7 cells and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. These findings suggest that ailanthone is a potential agent for the treatment of liver cancer.

  20. Ailanthone Inhibits Huh7 Cancer Cell Growth via Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Zhenjian; Hu, Jianyang; Yang, Xiaolin; Chen, Minfen; Lei, Xueping; Deng, Lijuan; Yao, Nan; Peng, Qunlong; Chen, Zhesheng; Ye, Wencai; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    While searching for natural anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) components in Ailanthus altissima, we discovered that ailanthone had potent antineoplastic activity against HCC. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of ailanthone on HCC have not been examined. In this study, the antitumor activity and the underlying mechanisms of ailanthone were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that ailanthone induced G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as indicated by decreased expression of cyclins and CDKs and increased expression of p21 and p27. Our results demonstrated that ailanthone triggered DNA damage characterized by activation of the ATM/ATR pathway. Moreover, ailanthone-induced cell death was associated with apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased ratio of cells in the subG1 phase and by PARP cleavage and caspase activation. Ailanthone-induced apoptosis was mitochondrion-mediated and involved the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in Huh7 cells. In vivo studies demonstrated that ailanthone inhibited the growth and angiogenesis of tumor xenografts without significant secondary adverse effects, indicating its safety for treating HCC. In conclusion, our study is the first to report the efficacy of ailanthone against Huh7 cells and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. These findings suggest that ailanthone is a potential agent for the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26525771

  1. Silencing of AP-4 inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and promotes apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuanyu; Guo, Wei; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Yizhuo; Li, Ping; Wang, Huaqi; Chu, Heying; Li, Juan; DU, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein (AP)-4 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, and is involved in tumor biology. However, the role of AP-4 in human lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of AP-4 in human lung cancer tissues and cells was investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and it was observed that the level of AP-4 was increased in tumor tissues and cells compared with their normal counterparts. AP-4 expression was knocked down by transfection with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in lung cancer cells, and this indicated that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 inhibited cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis by modulating the expression of p21 and cyclin D1. The results of the present study suggest that AP-4 may be an oncoprotein that has a significant role in lung cancer, and that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 may have therapeutic potential as a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  2. Inhibition of Casein kinase-2 induces p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and sensitizes glioblastoma cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-induced apoptosis through SIRT1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dixit, D; Sharma, V; Ghosh, S; Mehta, V S; Sen, E

    2012-02-09

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are resistant to TNFα-induced apoptosis and blockade of TNFα-induced NF-κB activation sensitizes glioma cells to apoptosis. As Casein kinase-2 (CK2) induces aberrant NF-κB activation and as we observed elevated CK2 levels in GBM tumors, we investigated the potential of CK2 inhibitors (CK2-Is) - DRB and Apigenin in sensitizing glioma cells to TNFα-induced apoptosis. CK2-Is and CK2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced glioma cell viability, inhibited TNFα-mediated NF-κB activation, and sensitized cell to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Importantly, CK2-Is activated p53 function in wild-type but not in p53 mutant cells. Activation of p53 function involved its increased transcriptional activation, DNA-binding ability, increased expression of p53 target genes associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Moreover, CK2-Is decreased telomerase activity and increased senescence in a p53-dependent manner. Apoptotic gene profiling indicated that CK2-Is differentially affect p53 and TNFα targets in p53 wild-type and mutant glioma cells. CK2-I decreased MDM2-p53 association and p53 ubiquitination to enhance p53 levels. Interestingly, CK2-Is downregulated SIRT1 activity and over-expression of SIRT1 decreased p53 transcriptional activity and rescued cells from CK2-I-induced apoptosis. This ability of CK2-Is to sensitize glioma to TNFα-induced death via multiple mechanisms involving abrogation of NF-κB activation, reactivation of wild-type p53 function and SIRT1 inhibition warrants investigation.

  3. INHIBITION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII GROWTH BY PYRROLIDINE DITHIOCARBAMATE IS CELL CYCLE SPECIFIC AND LEADS TO POPULATION SYNCHRONIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Conde de Felipe, Magnolia M.; Lehmann, Margaret M.; Jerome, Maria E.; White, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Successful completion of the Toxoplasma cell cycle requires the coordination of a series of complex and ordered processes that results in the formation of two daughters by internal budding. Although we now understand the order and timing of intracellular events associated with the parasite cell cycle, the molecular details of the checkpoints that regulate each step in T. gondii division is still uncertain. In other eukaryotic cells, the use of cytostatic inhibitors that are able to arrest replication at natural checkpoints have been exploited to induce synchronization of population growth. Herein, we describe a novel method to synchronize T. gondii tachyzoites based on the reversible growth inhibition by the drug, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. This method is an improvement over other strategies developed for this parasite as no prior genetic manipulation of the parasite was required. RH tachyzoites blocked by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate exhibited a near uniform haploid DNA content and single centrosome indicating that this compound arrests parasites in the G1 phase of the tachyzoite cell cycle with a minor block in late cytokinesis. Thus, these studies support the existence of a natural checkpoint that regulates passage through the G1 period of the cell cycle. Populations released from pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibition completed progression through G1 and entered S phase ~2 hours post-drug release. The transit of drug-synchronized populations through S phase and mitosis followed a similar timeframe to previous studies of the tachyzoite cell cycle. Tachyzoites treated with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate were fully viable and completed two identical division cycles post-drug release demonstrating that this is a robust method for synchronizing population growth in Toxoplasma. PMID:17976834

  4. Tocotrienols inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in human HeLa cells through the cell cycle signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Jing; Ng, Lean-Teik

    2010-03-01

    Tocotrienols of palm oil have been shown to possess potent neuroprotective, antioxidative, anticancer, and cholesterol-lowering activities. In this study, the authors examined the antiproliferative effects of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols (alphaT3, gammaT3, and deltaT3), and alpha-tocopherol (alphaT) in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. Their mechanism(s) of action on cell cycle signaling pathway were also investigated. 3.19 +/- 0.05 microM) and gammaT3 (IC(50): 2.85 +/- 0.07 microM) was more potent than deltaT3 (IC(50): >100 microM) and alphaT (IC(50): 69.46 +/- 3.01 microM). Both alphaT3 and gammaT3 also demonstrated a dose-dependent and time-dependent induction of cell death.They caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and triggered apoptosis as displayed by the externalization of annexin V-targeted phosphatidylserine and accumulation of sub-G1 peak. At a concentration of 3 microM, alphaT3 downregulated the expression of cyclin D3, p16, and CDK6, while having no effect on cyclin D1, p15, p21, p27, and CDK4 expression. However, gammaT3 showed no effect on these proteins. The induction of HeLa cell apoptosis by alphaT3 and gammaT3 appeared to be associated with the expression of IL-6, but not the other cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and IL-10).Taken together, the results suggest that alphaT3 and gammaT3 are more effective than deltaT3 and alphaT in inhibiting HeLa cell proliferation, and their mode of action could be through the upregulation of IL-6, and the downregulation of cyclin D3, p16, and CDK6 expression in the cell cycle signaling pathway.

  5. Downregulation of HDAC9 inhibits cell proliferation and tumor formation by inducing cell cycle arrest in retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiting; Wu, Dan; Xia, Fengjie; Xian, Hongyu; Zhu, Xinyue; Cui, Hongjuan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-04-29

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) is a member of class II HDACs, which regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. Recently, HDAC9 has been found to be overexpressed in some types of human cancers. However, the role of HDAC9 in retinoblastoma remains unclear. In this study, we found that HDAC9 was commonly expressed in retinoblastoma tissues and HDAC9 was overexpressed in prognostically poor retinoblastoma patients. Through knocking down HDAC9 in Y79 and WERI-Rb-1 cells, the expression level of HDAC9 was found to be positively related to cell proliferation in vitro. Further investigation indicated that knockdown HDAC9 could significantly induce cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in retinoblastoma cells. Western blot assay showed downregulation of HDAC9 could significantly decrease cyclin E2 and CDK2 expression. Lastly, xenograft study in nude mice showed that downregulation of HDAC9 inhibited tumor growth and development in vivo. Therefore, our results suggest that HDAC9 could serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of retinoblastoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell wall mannoprotein of Candida albicans induces cell cycle alternation and inhibits apoptosis of HaCaT cells via NF-κB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Jiang, Hang-Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jing; Hao, Xing-Jia; Sun, Yu-Zhe; Qi, Rui-Qun; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a commensal organism in human and a well-known dimorphic opportunistic pathogenic fungus. Though plenty of researches on the pathogenesis of C. albicans have been performed, the mechanism is not fully understood. The cell wall components of C. albicans have been documented to play important roles in its pathogenic processes. To further study the infectious mechanism of C. albicans, we investigated the potential functional role of its cell wall mannoprotein in cell cycle and apoptosis of HaCaT cells. We found that mannoprotein could promote the transition of cell cycle from G1/G0 to S phase, in which Cyclin D1, CDK4 and p-Rb, the major regulators of the cell cycle progression, showed significant upregulation, and CDKN1A (cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21)) showed significant downregulation. Mannoprotein also could inhibit apoptosis of HaCaT cells, which was well associated with increased expression of BCL2 (Bcl-2). Moreover, mannoprotein could increase the phosphorylation levels of RELA (p65) and NFKBIA (IκBα), as the key factors of NF-κB signal pathway in HaCaT cells, suggesting the activation of NF-κB signal pathway. Additionally, a NF-κB specific inhibitor, PDTC, could rescue the effect of mannoprotein on cell cycle and apoptosis of HaCaT cells, which suggested that mannoprotein could activate NF-κB signal pathway to mediate cell cycle alternation and inhibit apoptosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Andrographolide inhibits prostate cancer by targeting cell cycle regulators, CXCR3 and CXCR7 chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Mir, Hina; Kapur, Neeraj; Singh, Rajesh; Sonpavde, Guru; Lillard, James W; Singh, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Despite state of the art cancer diagnostics and therapies offered in clinic, prostate cancer (PCa) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hence, more robust therapeutic/preventive regimes are required to combat this lethal disease. In the current study, we have tested the efficacy of Andrographolide (AG), a bioactive diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata, against PCa. This natural agent selectively affects PCa cell viability in a dose and time-dependent manner, without affecting primary prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, AG showed differential effect on cell cycle phases in LNCaP, C4-2b and PC3 cells compared to retinoblastoma protein (RB(-/-)) and CDKN2A lacking DU-145 cells. G2/M transition was blocked in LNCaP, C4-2b and PC3 after AG treatment whereas DU-145 cells failed to transit G1/S phase. This difference was primarily due to differential activation of cell cycle regulators in these cell lines. Levels of cyclin A2 after AG treatment increased in all PCa cells line. Cyclin B1 levels increased in LNCaP and PC3, decreased in C4-2b and showed no difference in DU-145 cells after AG treatment. AG decreased cyclin E2 levels only in PC3 and DU-145 cells. It also altered Rb, H3, Wee1 and CDC2 phosphorylation in PCa cells. Intriguingly, AG reduced cell viability and the ability of PCa cells to migrate via modulating CXCL11 and CXCR3 and CXCR7 expression. The significant impact of AG on cellular and molecular processes involved in PCa progression suggests its potential use as a therapeutic and/or preventive agent for PCa.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor activation inhibits cell cycle progression by modulating 14-3-3β.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hye-Won; Park, Inae; Ghil, Sungho

    2014-09-01

    Cannabinoids display various pharmacological activities, including tumor regression, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, we used a yeast two-hybrid system to screen a mouse brain cDNA library for proteins interacting with type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R). Using the intracellular loop 3 of CB1R as bait, we identified 14-3-3β as an interacting partner of CB1R and confirmed their interaction using affinity-binding assays. 14-3-3β has been reported to induce a cell cycle delay at the G2/M phase. We tested the effects of cannabinoids on cell cycle progression in HeLa cells synchronized using a double-thymidine block-and-release protocol and found an increase in the population of G2/M phase cells. We further found that CB1R activation augmented the interaction of 14-3-3β with Wee1 and Cdc25B, and promoted phosphorylation of Cdc2 at Tyr-15. These results suggest that cannabinoids induce cell cycle delay at the G2/M phase by activating 14-3-3β.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction inhibits telomerase activity independent of its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, M; Ogawa, T; Mizumoto, K; Ueno, H; Niiyama, H; Sato, N; Nakamura, M; Tanaka, M

    1999-08-01

    Evidence for a relationship between overexpression of wild-type p53 and telomerase activity remains controversial. We investigated whether p53 gene transduction could cause telomerase inhibition in pancreatic cancer cell lines, focusing on the relation of transduction to growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptotic cell death. The cells were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing wild-type p53 or p21WAF1 at a multiplicity of infection of 100 or were continuously exposed to 10 microM VP-16, which is well known to induce apoptosis. Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction caused G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and resultant growth inhibition in MIA PaCa-2 cells; the cell number 2 days after infection was 50% of preinfection value, and 13% of the cells were dead. Moreover, the transduction resulted in complete depression of telomerase activity through down-regulation of hTERT mRNA expression. In contrast, p21WAF1 gene transduction only arrested cell growth and cell cycle at G1 phase, and VP-16 treatment inhibited cell growth with G2-M arrest and apoptosis; after treatment, the cell number was 73% of pretreatment, and 12% of the cells were dead. Neither p21WAF1 gene transduction nor VP-16 treatment caused telomerase inhibition. Similar results were obtained in two other pancreatic cancer cell lines, SUIT-2 and AsPC-1. Thus, our results demonstrate that the p53 gene transduction directly inhibits telomerase activity, independent of its effects on cell growth arrest, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis.

  10. Andrographis paniculata extracts and major constituent diterpenoids inhibit growth of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Pholphana, Nanthanit; Rangkadilok, Nuchanart; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2014-05-01

    Andrographis paniculata is an important herbal medicine widely used in several Asian countries for the treatment of various diseases due to its broad range of pharmacological activities. The present study reports that A. paniculata extracts potently inhibit the growth of liver (HepG2 and SK-Hep1) and bile duct (HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1) cancer cells. A. paniculata extracts with different contents of major diterpenoids, including andrographolide, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, neoandrographolide, and 14-deoxyandrographolide, exhibited a different potency of growth inhibition. The ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage, which contained a high amount of 14-deoxyandrographolide but a low amount of andrographolide, showed a cytotoxic effect to cancer cells about 4 times higher than the water extract of A. paniculata at the mature leaf stage, which contained a high amount of andrographolide but a low amount of 14-deoxyandrographolide. Andrographolide, not 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide, neoandrographolide, or 14-deoxyandrographolide, possessed potent cytotoxic activity against the growth of liver and bile duct cancer cells. The cytotoxic effect of the water extract of A. paniculata at the mature leaf stage could be explained by the present amount of andrographolide, while the cytotoxic effect of the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage could not. HuCCA-1 cells showed more sensitivity to A. paniculata extracts and andrographolide than RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata at the first true leaf stage increased cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 and G2/M phases, and induced apoptosis in both HuCCA-1 and RMCCA-1 cells. The expressions of cyclin-D1, Bcl-2, and the inactive proenzyme form of caspase-3 were reduced by the ethanolic extract of A. paniculata in the first true leaf stage treatment, while a proapoptotic protein Bax was increased. The cleavage of poly (ADP

  11. Schisandrin B inhibits the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by inducing cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xue-Jiao; Zhao, Li-Jing; Hao, Yu-Qiu; Su, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Jun-Yao; Du, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the world. Schizandrin B (Sch B) is one of the main dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans present in the fruit of Schisandra chinensis (Schisandraceae). Sch B has multiple functions against cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Sch B on the proliferation, cell cycling, apoptosis and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by MTT, flow cytometry, wound healing and transwell invasion assays. Treatment with Sch B inhibited the proliferation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Sch B induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase by down-regulating the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4, and CDK6, but up-regulating p53 and p21 expression in A549 cells. Furthermore, Sch B triggered A549 cell apoptosis by increasing Bax, cleaved caspase-3, 9, Cyto C, but decreasing Bcl-2 and PCNA expression. In addition, Sch B inhibited the invasion and migration of A549 cells by down-regulating the expressions of HIF-1, VEGF, MMP-9 and MMP-2. Therefore, Sch B has potent anti-tumor activity and may be a promising traditional Chinese medicine for human lung carcinoma. PMID:26221229

  12. Inhibition of root growth by narciclasine is caused by DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng; Li, Jiaolong; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wenbin; Cao, Xiaoping; Bi, Yurong

    2014-09-01

    Narciclasine (NCS) is an Amaryllidaceae alkaloid isolated from Narcissus tazetta bulbs. Its phytotoxic effects on plant growth were examined in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings. Results showed that high concentrations (0.5-5 μM) of NCS restricted the growth of lettuce roots in a dose-dependent manner. In NCS-treated lettuce seedlings, the following changes were detected: reduction of mitotic cells and cell elongation in the mature region, inhibition of proliferation of meristematic cells, and cell cycle. Moreover, comet assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that higher levels NCS (0.5-5 μM) induced DNA damage in root cells of lettuce. The decrease in meristematic cells and increase in DNA damage signals in lettuce roots in responses to NCS are in a dose-dependent manner. NCS-induced reactive oxygen species accumulation may explain an increase in DNA damage in lettuce roots. Thus, the restraint of root growth is due to cell cycle arrest which is caused by NCS-induced DNA damage. In addition, it was also found that NCS (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the root hair development of lettuce seedlings. Further investigations on the underlying mechanism revealed that both auxin and ethylene signaling pathways are involved in the response of root hairs to NCS.

  13. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony‑formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Hu, Chenghuan; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Feizhou; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hongbo; Nie, Wanpin

    2014-09-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT1 cells. The results showed that single transfection of ROS- or FIG-specific shRNA inhibited HUCCT1 cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the co-inhibition of ROS- and FIG-specific shRNA exhibited stronger effects on HUCCT1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, when compared to single inhibition of ROS and FIG. Furthermore, findings of this study suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the ROS-FIG-mediated biological processes of HUCCT1 cells. In summary, the results suggest that FIG-ROS plays an oncogenic role in ICC. Additionally, ROS1-6290 and FIG-363 segments may become effective therapeutic targets for ICC harboring ROS-FIG fusion protein.

  14. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony-formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    DENG, GANG; HU, CHENGHUAN; ZHU, LEI; HUANG, FEIZHOU; HUANG, WEI; XU, HONGBO; NIE, WANPIN

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT1 cells. The results showed that single transfection of ROS- or FIG-specific shRNA inhibited HUCCT1 cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the co-inhibition of ROS- and FIG-specific shRNA exhibited stronger effects on HUCCT1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, when compared to single inhibition of ROS and FIG. Furthermore, findings of this study suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the ROS-FIG-mediated biological processes of HUCCT1 cells. In summary, the results suggest that FIG-ROS plays an oncogenic role in ICC. Additionally, ROS1-6290 and FIG-363 segments may become effective therapeutic targets for ICC harboring ROS-FIG fusion protein. PMID:24968753

  15. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clove Extract Inhibits Tumor Growth and Promotes Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haizhou; Schmitz, John C.; Wei, Jianteng; Cao, Shousong; Beumer, Jan H.; Strychor, Sandra; Cheng, Linyou; Liu, Ming; Wang, Cuicui; Wu, Ning; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Zhang, Yuyan; Liao, Joshua; Chu, Edward; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-01-01

    Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) have been used as a traditional Chinese medicinal herb for thousands of years. Cloves possess antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties, but their potential anticancer activity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects and biological mechanisms of ethyl acetate extract of cloves (EAEC) and the potential bioactive components responsible for its antitumor activity. The effects of EAEC on cell growth, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis were investigated using human cancer cell lines. The molecular changes associated with the effects of EAEC were analyzed by Western blot and (qRT)-PCR analysis. The in vivo effect of EAEC and its bioactive component was investigated using the HT-29 tumor xenograft model. We identified oleanolic acid (OA) as one of the components of EAEC responsible for its antitumor activity. Both EAEC and OA display cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, EAEC was superior to OA and the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil at suppressing growth of colon tumor xenografts. EAEC promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with EAEC and OA selectively increased protein expression of p21WAF1/Cip1 and γ-H2AX and downregulated expression of cell cycle-regulated proteins. Moreover, many of these changes were at the mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional regulation by EAEC treatment. Our results demonstrate that clove extract may represent a novel therapeutic herb for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and OA appears to be one of the bioactive components. PMID:24854101

  17. Clove extract inhibits tumor growth and promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schmitz, John C; Wei, Jianteng; Cao, Shousong; Beumer, Jan H; Strychor, Sandra; Cheng, Linyou; Liu, Ming; Wang, Cuicui; Wu, Ning; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Zhang, Yuyan; Liao, Joshua; Chu, Edward; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-01-01

    Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum) have been used as a traditional Chinese medicinal herb for thousands of years. Cloves possess antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties, but their potential anticancer activity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects and biological mechanisms of ethyl acetate extract of cloves (EAEC) and the potential bioactive components responsible for its antitumor activity. The effects of EAEC on cell growth, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis were investigated using human cancer cell lines. The molecular changes associated with the effects of EAEC were analyzed by Western blot and (qRT)-PCR analysis. The in vivo effect of EAEC and its bioactive component was investigated using the HT-29 tumor xenograft model. We identified oleanolic acid (OA) as one of the components of EAEC responsible for its antitumor activity. Both EAEC and OA display cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, EAEC was superior to OA and the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil at suppressing growth of colon tumor xenografts. EAEC promoted G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with EAEC and OA selectively increased protein expression of p21(WAF1/Cip1) and γ-H2AX and downregulated expression of cell cycle-regulated proteins. Moreover, many of these changes were at the mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional regulation by EAEC treatment. Our results demonstrate that clove extract may represent a novel therapeutic herb for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and OA appears to be one of the bioactive components.

  18. Cannabinoid WIN55, 212-2 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits the proliferation and migration of human BEL7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dacai; Wang, Jianglin; Zhou, Zhenkang; He, Zhiwei; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide; however, only limited therapeutic treatments are currently available. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids as novel therapeutic targets in HCC. In addition, the mechanism underlying the effects of a synthetic cannabinoid, WIN55, 212‑2, on the BEL7402 HCC cell line was investigated. The results demonstrated that WIN55, 212‑2 induced cell cycle arrest of the BEL7402 cells at the G0/G1 phase via cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2)‑mediated downregulation of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, upregulation of p27, and downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase 4. Furthermore, inhibition of CB2 with the CB2 antagonist AM630 abrogated WIN55, 212‑2‑induced cell cycle arrest. Inhibition of ERK1/2 also resulted in cell cycle dysregulation and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, which subsequently resulted in cell growth inhibition. In addition, the present study detected a significant reduction in matrix metalloproteinase‑9, retinoblastoma protein and E2F1 expression, and migration inhibition by WIN treatment. These results suggested that cannabinoid receptor agonists, including WIN, may be considered as novel therapeutics for the treatment of HCC.

  19. Inhibition of Aurora-A kinase induces cell cycle arrest in epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells by affecting NFĸB pathway.

    PubMed

    Chefetz, Ilana; Holmberg, Jennie C; Alvero, Ayesha B; Visintin, Irene; Mor, Gil

    2011-07-01

    Recurrent ovarian cancer is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. A sub-population of ovarian cancer cells, the epithelial ovarian cancer stem cells (EOC stem cells) have stemness properties, constitutive NFκB activity, and represent the chemoresistant population. Currently, there is no effective treatment that targets these cells. Aurora-A kinase (Aurora-A) is associated with tumor initiation and progression and is overexpressed in numerous malignancies. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of Aurora-A inhibition in EOC stem cells. EOC stem cells were treated with the Aurora-A inhibitor, MK-5108. Cell growth was monitored by Incucyte real-time imaging system, cell viability was measured using the Celltiter 96 assay and cytokine levels were quantified using xMAP technology. The intracellular changes associated with MK-5108 treatment are: (1) polyploidy and cell cycle arrest; (2) inhibition of NFκB activity; (3) decreased cytokine production; and (4) nuclear accumulation of IκBα. Thus, inhibition of Aurora-A decreases cell proliferation in the EOC stem cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and affecting the NFκB pathway. As EOC stem cells represent a source of recurrence and chemoresistance, these results suggest that Aurora-A inhibition may effectively target the cancer stem cell population in ovarian cancer.

  20. ROCK inhibition with Y27632 promotes the proliferation and cell cycle progression of cultured astrocyte from spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Liu, Miao; Fu, Peicai; Xie, Minjie; Wang, Wei; Luo, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Rho-associated Kinase (ROCK) has been identified as an important regulator of proliferation and cell cycle progression in a number of cell types. Although its effects on astrocyte proliferation have not been well characterized, ROCK has been reported to play important roles in gap junction formation, morphology, and migration of astrocytes. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effect of ROCK inhibition by [(+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride] (Y27632) on proliferation and DNA synthesis in cultured astrocytes from rat spinal cord and the possible mechanism involved. Western blots showed that treatment of astrocytes with Y27632 increased their expression of cyclin D1, CDK4, and cyclin E, thereby causing cell cycle progression. Furthermore, Y27632-induced astrocyte proliferation was mediated through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase signaling cascade. These results indicate the importance of ROCK in astrocyte proliferation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of NF-kappaB by combination therapy with parthenolide and hyperthermia and kinetics of apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Sachiko; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Akio; Tanaka, Yukie; Hatashita, Masanori; Shioura, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of thermosensitization related to combination therapy with sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide (PTL), a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, and hyperthermia using human lung adenocarcinoma cells A549. The kinetics of apoptosis induction and cell cycle of cells treated with PTL, heating, and combined treatment were examined by flow cytometric analysis. The flow cytometric distribution was calculated and expressed as a percentage. The ratios of the sub-G1 division, used to determine the induction of apoptosis, increased significantly with the combination therapy. Furthermore, the ratios of G2/M division increased and the ratios of G0/G1 division decreased, indicating cell cycle arrest in G2/M. The cell phase response to PTL by A549 cells synchronized in the G1/S border with hydroxyurea was also analyzed. PTL showed remarkable cytotoxicity at the S phase of the cell cycle in A549 cells at all concentrations as well as with hyperthermia, thus PTL reduced the number of cells in the proliferation phase. Inhibition of intracellular transcription factor NF-kappaB activation in A549 cells with various incubation periods after treatments with PTL, heating and combined treatment was examined by Western blot analysis. Unexpectedly, PTL alone did not inhibit NF-kappaB activation in cells stimulated with TNF-alpha, while heating alone inhibited NF-kappaB early after treatment and that effect faded over time. In contrast, PTL combined with heating completely inhibited NF-kappaB activation. Our results demonstrated that PTL and heating in combination cause significant thermosensitization of A549 cells via induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest in G2/M by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation in a synergistic manner.

  2. Selective inhibitors of aurora kinases inhibit proliferation, reduce cell viability and impair cell cycle progression in papillary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Baldini, E; Tuccilli, C; Prinzi, N; Sorrenti, S; Antonelli, A; Fallahi, P; Mian, C; Barollo, S; Catania, A; Morrone, S; Tartaglia, F; Mascagni, D; Coccaro, C; Pepe, M; Filippini, A; D'Armiento, M; Ulisse, S

    2015-01-01

    The three members of the Aurora kinase family, Aurora-A, -B and -C, regulate several aspects of the mitotic process, and their aberrant expression and/or function causes mitotic abnormalities leading either to cell death or aneuploidy. They are found overexpressed in several human malignancies, including the papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In the present study, we sought to establish whether Aurora kinase inhibition could be of any therapeutic value in the treatment of aggressive forms of PTC, enduring to radioactive iodide (RAI) ablation. To this end, the effects of selective inhibitors of Aurora-A (MLN8237) and Aurora-B (AZD1152) were analyzed on 3 human PTC cell lines expressing either wild-type (K1 and TPC1) or mutant p53 (BCPAP). The two inhibitors were capable of reducing cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with IC₅₀ comprised between 65.4 and 114.9 nM for MLN8237, and between 26.6 and 484.6 nM for AZD1152. Immunofluorescence experiments confirmed that AZD1152 inhibited Aurora-B phosphorylation of histone H3 on Ser10, however, it did not affect Aurora-A autophosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited Aurora-A autophosphorylation as expected, but at concentrations required to achieve the maximum antiproliferative effects it also abolished H3 (Ser10) phosphorylation. Time-lapse videomicroscopy evidenced that both inhibitors prevented the completion of cytokinesis, and cytofluorimetric analysis showed accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and/or polyploidy. Apoptosis was induced in all the cells by both inhibitors independently from the p53 status. In conclusion, in the present preclinical study MLN8237 and AZD1152 have emerged as promising drug candidates for RAI-insensitive PTC.

  3. Novel tumor growth inhibition mechanism by cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 involves anti-angiogenesis modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator protein cdk2-associating protein1 (cdk2ap1) in inhibiting growth of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Expression of cdk2ap1 correlated with reduction in several SCC malignant cell phenotypes, including reduced angiogenesis. We observed several alterations in gene expression consistent with classical functions of cdk2ap1, including upregulation of cell cycle inhibitory genes, and an upregulation in expression of genes belonging to both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cascades. Interestingly, we also uncovered a profile of gene expression and activation of signaling pathways that may suggest new tumor-suppressive functions for cdk2ap1 through downregulation of invasion/metastasis and modulation of antiangiogenesis by upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Blocking of the TGFβ1 pathway resulted in inhibition of the cdk2ap1 antiangiogenesis phenotype. In combination, these data support the role of cdk2ap1 as a tumor suppressor gene that can regulate SCC tumor growth in a cell autonomous manner through decreases in invasiveness and a non cell-autonomous manner through decreases in angiogenesis phenotypes, and these are novel phenotypes induced by cdk2ap1. PMID:20541561

  4. Wogonoside induces growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest via promoting the expression and binding activity of GATA-1 in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hui, Hui; Xu, Jingyan; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Yuxin; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2016-06-01

    GATA-1, a zinc finger transcription factor, has been demonstrated to play a key role in the progression of leukemia. In this study, we investigate the effects of wogonoside, a naturally bioactive flavonoid derived from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, on cell growth and cell cycle in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, and uncover its underlying mechanisms. The experimental design comprised CML cell lines K562, imatinib-resistant K562 (K562r) cells, and primary CML cells, treated in vitro or in vivo, respectively, with wogonoside; growth and cell cycle were then evaluated. We found that wogonoside could induce growth inhibition and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in both normal and K562r cells. Wogonoside promotes the expression of GATA-1 and facilitates the binding to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) and p21 promoter, thus inhibiting MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling and cell cycle checkpoint proteins, including CDK2, CDK4, cyclin A, and cyclin D1, and increasing p21 expression. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that administration of wogonoside decreased CML cells and prolonged survival in NOD/SCID mice with CML cell xenografts. In conclusion, these results clearly revealed the inhibitory effect of wogonoside on the growth in CML cells and suggested that wogonoside may act as a promising drug for the treatment of imatinib-resistant CML.

  5. A novel curcumin derivative which inhibits P-glycoprotein, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Oliveira, Ana; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Pinto, Madalena; Lima, Raquel T; Sousa, Emília; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2017-01-15

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major limitation to the success of cancer treatment and is highly associated with the overexpression of drug efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In order to achieve more effective chemotherapeutic treatments, it is important to develop P-gp inhibitors to block/decrease its activity. Curcumin (1) is a secondary metabolite isolated from the turmeric of Curcuma longa L.. Diverse biological activities have been identified for this compound, particularly, MDR modulation in various cancer cell models. However, curcumin (1) has low chemical stability, which severely limits its application. In order to improve stability and P-gp inhibitory effect, two potential more stable curcumin derivatives were synthesized as building blocks, followed by several curcumin derivatives. These compounds were then analyzed in terms of antitumor and anti-P-gp activity, in two MDR and sensitive tumor lines (from chronic myeloid leukemia and non-small cell lung cancer). We identified from a series of curcumin derivatives a novel curcumin derivative (1,7-bis(3-methoxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)phenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione, 10) with more potent antitumor and anti-P-gp activity than curcumin (1). This compound (10) was shown to promote cell cycle arrest (at the G2/M phase) and induce apoptosis in the MDR chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. Therefore it is a really interesting P-gp inhibitor due to its ability to inhibit both P-gp function and expression.

  6. An Aqueous Extract of Tuberaria lignosa Inhibits Cell Growth, Alters the Cell Cycle Profile, and Induces Apoptosis of NCI-H460 Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana M; Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, M João; Lima, Raquel T; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2016-05-06

    Tuberaria lignosa (Sweet) Samp. is found in European regions, and has antioxidant properties due to its composition in ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Given its traditional use and antioxidant properties, the tumor cell growth inhibitory potential of aqueous extracts from T. lignosa (prepared by infusion and decoction) was investigated in three human tumor cell lines: MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), and HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma). Both extracts inhibited the growth of these cell lines; the most potent one being the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion in the NCI-H460 cells (GI50 of approximately 50 μg/mL). Further assays were carried out with this extract in NCI-H460 cells. At 100 μg/mL or 150 μg/mL it caused an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a decrease of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, these concentrations caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In agreement, a decrease in total poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-caspase 3 levels was found. In conclusion, the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion was more potent in NCI-H460 cells, altering the cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis. This work highlights the importance of T. lignosa as a source of bioactive compounds with tumor cell growth inhibitory potential.

  7. CUDC-907 Promotes Bone Marrow Adipocytic Differentiation Through Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase and Regulation of Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ali, Dalia; Alshammari, Hassan; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Hamam, Rimi; Alfayez, Musaad; Kassem, Moustapha; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Alajez, Nehad M

    2017-03-01

    The role of bone marrow adipocytes (BMAs) in overall energy metabolism and their effects on bone mass are currently areas of intensive investigation. BMAs differentiate from bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs); however, the molecular mechanisms regulating BMA differentiation are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of CUDC-907, identified by screening an epigenetic small-molecule library, on adipocytic differentiation of human BMSCs (hBMSCs) and determined its molecular mechanism of action. Human bone marrow stromal cells exposed to CUDC-907 (500 nM) exhibited enhanced adipocytic differentiation (∼2.9-fold increase, P < 0.005) compared with that of control cells. Global gene expression and signaling pathway analyses of differentially expressed genes revealed a strong enrichment of genes involved in adipogenesis, cell cycle, and DNA replication. Chromatin immune precipitation combined with quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed significant increase in H3K9ac epigenetic marker in the promoter regions of AdipoQ, FABP4, PPARγ, KLF15, and CEBPA in CUDC-907-treated hBMSCs. Follow-up experiments corroborated that the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity enhanced adipocytic differentiation, while the inhibition of PI3K decreased adipocytic differentiation. In addition, CUDC-907 arrested hBMSCs in the G0-G1 phase of the cell cycle and reduced the number of S-phase cells. Our data reveal that HDAC, PI3K, and cell cycle genes are important regulators of BMA formation and demonstrate that adipocyte differentiation of hBMSCs is associated with complex changes in a number of epigenetic and genetic pathways, which can be targeted to regulate BMA formation.

  8. Downregulation of PAX6 by shRNA Inhibits Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoting; Yue, Wentao; Zhang, Lina; Ma, Li; Jia, Wenyun; Qian, Zhe; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Background The transcription factor PAX6 is primarily expressed in embryos. PAX6 is also expressed in several tumors and plays an oncogenic role. However, little is known about the role of PAX6 in lung cancer. Methods The function of PAX6 in lung cancer cells was evaluated by small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of the protein followed by analyses of cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and cell cycle arrest. The changes of cyclin D1, pRB, ERK1/2, p38 expression caused by PAX6 inhibition were detected using western-blotting. The PAX6 mRNA level in 52 pairs of tumors and corresponding matched adjacent normal tissues from non-small cell lung cancer patients and lung cancer cell lines was detected by real-time PCR. Results Suppression of PAX6 expression inhibited cell growth and colony formation in A549 and H1299 cells. The percentage of cells in G1-phase increased when PAX6 expression was inhibited. The cyclin D1 protein level, as well as the pRB phosphorylation level, decreased as a result of PAX6 down-regulation. The activity of ERK1/2 and p38 was also suppressed in PAX6 knock-down cells. The PAX6 mRNA was highly expressed in lung cancer tissue and lung cancer cell lines. In most patients (about 65%), the relative ratio of PAX6 mRNA in primary NSCLC versus adjacent tissues exceeded 100. Conclusions Our data implicated that PAX6 accelerates cell cycle progression by activating MAPK signal pathway. PAX6 mRNA levels were significantly elevated in primary lung cancer tissues compared to their matched adjacent tissues. PMID:24454925

  9. Inhibition of p70 S6 Kinase (S6K1) Activity by A77 1726 and Its Effect on Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progress12

    PubMed Central

    Doscas, Michelle E.; Williamson, Ashley J.; Usha, Lydia; Bogachkov, Yedida; Rao, Geetha S.; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yimin; Ruby, Carl; Kaufman, Howard; Zhou, Jingsong; Williams, James W.; Li, Yi; Xu, Xiulong

    2014-01-01

    Leflunomide is a novel immunomodulatory drug prescribed for treating rheumatoid arthritis. It inhibits the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, inhibited the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and two other substrates of S6K1, insulin receptor substrate-1 and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2, in an A375 melanoma cell line. A77 1726 increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p70 S6 (S6K1), ERK1/2, and MEK through the feedback activation of the IGF-1 receptor–mediated signaling pathway. Invitro kinase assay revealed that leflunomide and A77 1726 inhibited S6K1 activity with IC50 values of approximately 55 and 80 μM, respectively. Exogenous uridine partially blocked A77 1726–induced inhibition of A375 cell proliferation. S6K1 knockdown led to the inhibition of A375 cell proliferation but did not potentiate the antiproliferative effect of A77 1726. A77 1726 stimulated bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in A375 cells but arrested the cell cycle in the S phase, which was reversed by addition of exogenous uridine or by MAP kinase pathway inhibitors but not by rapamycin and LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor). These observations suggest that A77 1726 accelerates cell cycle entry into the S phase through MAP kinase activation and that pyrimidine nucleotide depletion halts the completion of the cell cycle. Our study identified a novel molecular target of A77 1726 and showed that the inhibition of S6K1 activity was in part responsible for its antiproliferative activity. Our study also provides a novel mechanistic insight into A77 1726–induced cell cycle arrest in the S phase. PMID:25379019

  10. Inhibition of p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) activity by A77 1726 and its effect on cell proliferation and cell cycle progress.

    PubMed

    Doscas, Michelle E; Williamson, Ashley J; Usha, Lydia; Bogachkov, Yedida; Rao, Geetha S; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yimin; Ruby, Carl; Kaufman, Howard; Zhou, Jingsong; Williams, James W; Li, Yi; Xu, Xiulong

    2014-10-01

    Leflunomide is a novel immunomodulatory drug prescribed for treating rheumatoid arthritis. It inhibits the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis pathway. Here, we report that A77 1726, the active metabolite of leflunomide, inhibited the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 and two other substrates of S6K1, insulin receptor substrate-1 and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 2, in an A375 melanoma cell line. A77 1726 increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p70 S6 (S6K1), ERK1/2, and MEK through the feedback activation of the IGF-1 receptor-mediated signaling pathway. In vitro kinase assay revealed that leflunomide and A77 1726 inhibited S6K1 activity with IC50 values of approximately 55 and 80 μM, respectively. Exogenous uridine partially blocked A77 1726-induced inhibition of A375 cell proliferation. S6K1 knockdown led to the inhibition of A375 cell proliferation but did not potentiate the antiproliferative effect of A77 1726. A77 1726 stimulated bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in A375 cells but arrested the cell cycle in the S phase, which was reversed by addition of exogenous uridine or by MAP kinase pathway inhibitors but not by rapamycin and LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor). These observations suggest that A77 1726 accelerates cell cycle entry into the S phase through MAP kinase activation and that pyrimidine nucleotide depletion halts the completion of the cell cycle. Our study identified a novel molecular target of A77 1726 and showed that the inhibition of S6K1 activity was in part responsible for its antiproliferative activity. Our study also provides a novel mechanistic insight into A77 1726-induced cell cycle arrest in the S phase.

  11. Metformin inhibits salivary adenocarcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuqi; Yu, Tao; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Tianqing; Zhou, Yang; He, Fan; Kurago, Zoya; Myssiorek, David; Wu, Yingjie; Lee, Peng; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of metformin have been observed in many types of cancer. However, its effect on human salivary gland carcinoma is unknown. The effect of metformin alone or in combination with pp242 (an mTOR inhibitor) on salivary adenocarcinoma cells growth were determined in vitro and in vivo. We found that metformin suppressed HSY cell growth in vitro in a time and dose dependent manner associated with a reduced expression of MYC onco-protein, and the same inhibitory effect of metformin was also confirmed in HSG cells. In association with the reduction of MYC onco-protein, metformin significantly restored p53 tumor suppressor gene expression. The distinctive effects of metformin and PP242 on MYC reduction and P53 restoration suggested that metformin inhibited cell growth through a different pathway from PP242 in salivary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the anti-tumor efficacy of metformin was confirmed in vivo as indicated by the increases of tumor necrosis and reduced proliferation in xenograft tumors from metformin treated group. For the first time, the inhibitory effect of metformin on human salivary gland tumor cells was documented. Moreover, metformin inhibitory effects were enhanced by mTOR inhibitor suggesting that metformin and mTOR inhibitor utilize distinctive signaling pathways to suppress salivary tumor growth. PMID:26885449

  12. CSN5 silencing inhibits invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer SW480 and LS174T cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Gang; Li, Huikai; Shan, Tao; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    CSN5 has been implicated as a candidate oncogene in human cancers by genetic linkage with activation of the poor-prognosis, wound response gene expression signature. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing CSN5 on invasion and cell cycle progression of human colorectal cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The CSN5 specific small interfering RNA (shRNA) plasmid vector was constructed and then transfected into colorectal cancer cells. The expression of CSN5 mRNA and protein was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell adhesion and invasion were analyzed using MTS and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Adhesion, invasion, and cell cycle distribution were assessed following knockdown of CSN5 by RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, knockdown of CSN5 significantly inhibited cell adhesion and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (P < 0.05). Western blot and real-time PCR analysis were used to identify differentially expressed invasion and cell cycle associated proteins in cells with silenced CSN5. The expression levels of CSN5 in colorectal cancer cells transfected with siRNA were decreased, leading to a significant inhibition of colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of CSN5 may inhibit CD44, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9 protein expression, significantly promoted cell cycle-related genes P53 and P27 expression. In addition, CSN5 silencing may induce activation PI3K/AKT signal regulated cell invasion. Moreover, CSN5 silencing inhibited the secretion of TGF-β, IL-1β and IL-6 and the transcriptional activity of transcription factor NF-κB and Twist in human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, down regulation of CSN5 may inhibit invasion and arrests cell

  13. CSN5 silencing inhibits invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer SW480 and LS174T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Gang; Li, Huikai; Shan, Tao; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    CSN5 has been implicated as a candidate oncogene in human cancers by genetic linkage with activation of the poor-prognosis, wound response gene expression signature. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing CSN5 on invasion and cell cycle progression of human colorectal cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The CSN5 specific small interfering RNA (shRNA) plasmid vector was constructed and then transfected into colorectal cancer cells. The expression of CSN5 mRNA and protein was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell adhesion and invasion were analyzed using MTS and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Adhesion, invasion, and cell cycle distribution were assessed following knockdown of CSN5 by RNA interference (RNAi). Furthermore, knockdown of CSN5 significantly inhibited cell adhesion and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (P<0.05). Western blot and real-time PCR analysis were used to identify differentially expressed invasion and cell cycle associated proteins in cells with silenced CSN5. The expression levels of CSN5 in colorectal cancer cells transfected with siRNA were decreased, leading to a significant inhibition of colorectal cancer cell adhesion and invasion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of CSN5 may inhibit CD44, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and MMP 9 protein expression, significantly promoted cell cycle-related genes P53 and P27 expression. In addition, CSN5 silencing may induce activation PI3K/AKT signal regulated cell invasion. Moreover, CSN5 silencing inhibited the secretion of TGF-β, IL-1β and IL-6 and the transcriptional activity of transcription factor NF-κB and Twist in human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, down regulation of CSN5 may inhibit invasion and arrests cell cycle

  14. Up-regulation of miR-506 inhibits cell growth and disrupt the cell cycle by targeting YAP in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kaiyao; Yang, Weiguo; Song, Hongming; Song, Jialu; Wei, Chuankui; Li, Dengfeng; Fang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a small class of non-coding RNAs that are extensively deregulated in various cancers. They can act as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the crucial role of miR-506 in breast cancer and to validate whether miR-506 could regulate proliferation of breast cancer cells by targeting YAP (Yes-associated protein) gene. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to quantify the expression levels of miR-506 in breast cancer and adjacent non-cancerous breast tissues. To characterize the miR-506 function, MTT assays, colony formation assays, cell migration assays, cell invasion assays and cell cycle assays were used. Finally, luciferase reporter assays were performed to validate the regulation of a putative target of miR-506, in corroboration with western blot assays. We found that expression of miR-506 was commonly down-regulated in breast cancer cells and breast cancer specimens when compared with that in non-malignant breast epithelial cells and adjacent normal tissues. Up-regulation of miR-506 inhibited cellular proliferation, migration and invasion as well as disrupt the cell cycle of breast cancer cells. Luciferase assays revealed that miR-506 directly bound to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of YAP. Western blot analysis verified that miR-506 regulated the expression of YAP at the protein levels. These findings suggest that miR-506 exerts as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer and up-regulation of miR-506 expression inhibits cellular growth, cell migration and invasion as well as disrupt the cell cycle by targeting YAP. Our study demonstrates that the miR-506/YAP axis may help us better understand the molecular mechanisms of breast cancer progression.

  15. Silencing HCCR2 expression inhibits the proliferation of leukemia cells by inducing apoptosis and promoting cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shu-Kai; Ren, Han-Yun; Shi, Yong-Jin; Liu, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR2) has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of human malignant tumors cells, and its function is related to cell cycle progression and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of HCCR2 in leukemia remain unclear. In this study, we used the RNA interference strategy to investigate the effects of HCCR2 knockdown in the K562 leukemia cell line, and to explore the potential mechanisms involved. Following transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting HCCR2 (HCCR2-siRNA), we examined the effects of HCCR2 knockdown on cell morphology, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in K562 cells. Morphological changes were evaluated by Wright-Giemsa staining. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. The expression levels of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. HCCR2 expression at the mRNA and protein level was significantly decreased following transfection with plasmids expressing HCCR2-siRNA. Silencing HCCR2 expression significantly suppressed cell proliferation, induced G1 cell cycle arrest and promoted the apoptosis of K562 cells. Additionally, we found that the expression of Bax, p53 and p21 was significantly increased, while Bcl-2 expression was significantly decreased in the HCCR2-siRNA-transfected cells. However, the expression of p27 was not affected. These results suggest that the HCCR2 gene plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of leukemia, thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for acute leukemia.

  16. Induction of apoptosis, stimulation of cell-cycle arrest and inhibition of angiogenesis make human amnion-derived cells promising sources for cell therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Niknejad, Hassan; Yazdanpanah, Ghasem; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan

    2016-03-01

    Amniotic membrane (AM), the nearest layer of fetal membranes to the fetus, contains two types of cells with unique characteristics that make them excellent candidates for clinical applications. Amniotic epithelial and mesenchymal cells have low immunogenicity, anti-inflammation, anti-fibrosis and anti-bacterial properties and no ethical issues. Although amniotic cells have stem cell properties and express transcription factors specific for pluripotent stem cells, they are not tumorigenic after transplantation. In the last decade, a new line of research has been initiated with a focus on the anti-proliferative effects of amniotic epithelial and mesenchymal cells on tumor growth. Amnion-derived epithelial and mesenchymal cells inhibit tumor growth and invasion through three pathways: the induction of apoptosis, the stimulation of cell-cycle arrest and the inhibition of angiogenesis. In this review, the various aspects of the anti-cancer properties of amnion-derived cells and the underlying mechanisms are discussed with emphasis on the translation of the cell therapy of cancer from experimental into clinical practice.

  17. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) silencing inhibits tumor growth and promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in hypopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanhao; Cui, Xiaobo; Wang, Jun; Wu, Shuai; Bai, Yunfei; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Boqian; Fang, Jugao

    2015-05-01

    As an important pathway maintaining the balance of intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)), store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is critical for cellular functions. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), a key component of SOCE, plays a dual role as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) receptor and an SOCE exciter. Aberrant expression of STIM1 could be discovered in several human cancer cells. However, the role of STIM1 in regulating human hypopharyngeal carcinoma still remains unclear. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect expression of STIM1 in human hypopharyngeal carcinoma cell line FaDu. STIM1 on FaDu cells was knocked down by lentiviral transduction method. The biological impacts after knocking down of STIM1 on FaDu cells were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The result of real-time PCR showed that STIM1 was expressed in FaDu cells. Lentiviral transduction efficiently downregulated the expression of STIM1 in FaDu cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Significant downregulation of STIM1 on FaDu cells inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, promoted cell apoptosis, and restrained cell growth rate. The antigrowth effect of STIM1 silencing was also discovered in FaDu hypopharyngeal tumor model. Our findings indicate that STIM1 is likely to become a new therapeutic target for hypopharyngeal carcinoma treatment.

  18. Theabrownin Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression and Tumor Growth of Lung Carcinoma through c-myc-Related Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Wu, Feifei; Jin, Wangdong; Yan, Bo; Chen, Xin; He, Yingfei; Yang, Weiji; Du, Wenlin; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Yonghua; Yuan, Qiang; Dong, Xiaoqiao; Yu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jin; Xiao, Luwei; Tong, Peijian; Shan, Letian; Efferth, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Green tea, the fresh leaves of Camellia sinensis, is not only a health-promoting beverage but also a traditional Chinese medicine used for prevention or treatment of cancer, such as lung cancer. Theabrownin (TB) is the main fraction responsible for the medicinal effects of green tea, but whether it possesses anti-cancer effect is unknown yet. This study aimed to determine the in vitro and in vivo anti-lung cancer effect of TB and explore the underlying molecular mechanism, by using A549 cell line and Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice. In cellular experiment, MTT assay was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect and IC50 values of TB, and flow cytometry was conducted to analyze the cell cycle progression affected by TB. In animal experiment, mice body mass, tumor incidence, tumor size and tumor weight were measured, and histopathological analysis on tumor was performed with Transferase dUTP nick-end labeling staining. Real time PCR and western blot assays were adopted to detect the expression of C-MYC associated genes and proteins for mechanism clarification. TB was found to inhibit A549 cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner and block A549 cell cycle at G0/G1 phase. Down-regulation of c-myc, cyclin A, cyclin D, cdk2, cdk4, proliferation of cell nuclear antigen and up-regulation of p21, p27, and phosphate and tension homolog in both gene and protein levels were observed with TB treatment. A c-myc-related mechanism was thereby proposed, since c-myc could transcriptionally regulate all other genes in its downstream region for G1/S transitions of cell cycle and proliferation of cancer cells. This is the first report regarding the anti-NSCLC effect and the underlying mechanism of TB on cell cycle progression and proliferation of A549 cells. The in vivo data verified the in vitro result that TB could significantly inhibit the lung cancer growth in mice and induce apoptosis on tumors in a dose-dependent manner. It provides a promising candidate of natural

  19. CD81, a cell cycle regulator, is a novel target for histone deacetylase inhibition in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Gensert, JoAnn M; Baranova, Oxana V; Weinstein, David E; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in cancer cell biology have focused on histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) because they target pathways critical to the development and progression of disease. In particular, HDACi's can induce expression of epigenetically silenced genes that promote growth arrest, differentiation and cell death. In glioma cells, one such repressed gene is the tetraspanin CD81, which regulates cytostasis in various cell lines and in astrocytes, the major cellular component of gliomas. Our studies show that HDACi's, trichostatin and sodium butyrate, promote growth arrest and differentiation with negligible cell death in glioma cells and induce expression of CD81 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21(CIP/WAF-1)), another regulator of cytostasis in astrocytes. Interference RNA knock-down of CD81 abrogates cytostasis promoted by HDAC inhibition indicating that HDACi-induced CD81 is responsible for growth arrest. Induction of CD81 expression through HDAC inhibition is a novel strategy to promote growth arrest in glioma cells.

  20. Fermented wheat germ extract inhibits glycolysis/pentose cycle enzymes and induces apoptosis through poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation in Jurkat T-cell leukemia tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Comin-Anduix, Begona; Boros, Laszlo G; Marin, Silvia; Boren, Joan; Callol-Massot, Carles; Centelles, Josep J; Torres, Josep L; Agell, Neus; Bassilian, Sara; Cascante, Marta

    2002-11-29

    The fermented extract of wheat germ, trade name Avemar, is a complex mixture of biologically active molecules with potent anti-metastatic activities in various human malignancies. Here we report the effect of Avemar on Jurkat leukemia cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and the activity of key glycolytic/pentose cycle enzymes that control carbon flow for nucleic acid synthesis. The cytotoxic IC(50) concentration of Avemar for Jurkat tumor cells is 0.2 mg/ml, and increasing doses of the crude powder inhibit Jurkat cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. At concentrations higher than 0.2 mg/ml, Avemar inhibits cell growth by more than 50% (72 h of incubation), which is preceded by the appearance of a sub-G(1) peak on flow histograms at 48 h. Laser scanning cytometry of propidium iodide- and annexin V-stained cells indicated that the growth-inhibiting effect of Avemar was consistent with a strong induction of apoptosis. Inhibition by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp fluoromethyl ketone of apoptosis but increased proteolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) indicate caspases mediate the cellular effects of Avemar. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and transketolase were inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion, which correlated with decreased (13)C incorporation and pentose cycle substrate flow into RNA ribose. This decrease in pentose cycle enzyme activities and carbon flow toward nucleic acid precursor synthesis provide the mechanistic understanding of the cell growth-controlling and apoptosis-inducing effects of fermented wheat germ. Avemar exhibits about a 50-fold higher IC(50) (10.02 mg/ml) for peripheral blood lymphocytes to induce a biological response, which provides the broad therapeutic window for this supplemental cancer treatment modality with no toxic effects.

  1. Neoplastic transformation of BALB/3T3 cells and cell cycle of HL-60 cells are inhibited by mango (Mangifera indica L.) juice and mango juice extracts.

    PubMed

    Percival, Susan S; Talcott, Stephen T; Chin, Sherry T; Mallak, Anne C; Lounds-Singleton, Angela; Pettit-Moore, Jennifer

    2006-05-01

    The mango, Mangifera indica L., is a fruit with high levels of phytochemicals, suggesting that it might have chemopreventative properties. In this study, whole mango juice and juice extracts were screened for antioxidant and anticancer activity. Antioxidant activity of the mango juice and juice extracts was measured by 3 standard in vitro methods. The results of the 3 methods were in general agreement, although different radicals were measured in each. Anticancer activity was measured by examining the effect on cell cycle kinetics and the ability to inhibit chemically induced neoplastic transformation of mammalian cell lines. Incubation of HL-60 cells with whole mango juice and mango juice fractions resulted in an inhibition of the cell cycle in the G(0)/G(1) phase. A fraction of the eluted mango juice with low peroxyl radical scavenging ability was most effective in arresting cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase. Whole mango juice was effective in reducing the number of transformed foci in the neoplastic transformation assay in a dose-dependent manner. These techniques provide valuable screening tools for health benefits derived from mango phytochemicals.

  2. Gleditsia sinensis thorn extract inhibits human colon cancer cells: the role of ERK1/2, G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest and p53 expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Jung; Park, Keerang; Ha, Sang-Do; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2010-12-01

    The thorns of Gleditsia sinensis are used as a medicinal herb in China and Korea. However, the mechanisms responsible for the antitumor effects of the water extract of Gleditsia sinensis thorns (WEGS) remain unknown. HCT116 cells treated with the WEGS at a dose of 800 μg/mL (IC₅₀) showed a significant decrease in cell growth and an increase in cell cycle arrest during the G2/M-phase. G2/M-phase arrest was correlated with increased p53 levels and down-regulation of the check-point proteins, cyclinB1, Cdc2 and Cdc25c. In addition, treatment with WEGS induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 MAP kinase and JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinases). Moreover, inhibition of ERK by treatment of cells with the ERK-specific inhibitor PD98059 blocked WEGS-mediated p53 expression. Similarly, blockage of ERK function in the WEGS-treated cells reversed cell-growth inhibition and decreased cell cycle proteins. Finally, in vivo WEGS treatment significantly inhibited the growth of HCT116 tumor cell xenografts in nude mice with no negative side effects, including loss of body weight. These results describe the molecular mechanisms whereby the WEGS might inhibit proliferation of colon cancer both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that WEGS has potential as an anticancer agent for the treatment of malignancies. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tofacitinib induces G1 cell-cycle arrest and inhibits tumor growth in Epstein-Barr virus-associated T and natural killer cell lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Shotaro; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Suzuki, Michio; Sato, Yoshitaka; Torii, Yuka; Asai, Masato; Goshima, Fumi; Murata, Takayuki; Shimizu, Norio; Ito, Yoshinori; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects not only B cells, but also T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, and is associated with T or NK cell lymphoma. These lymphoid malignancies are refractory to conventional chemotherapy. We examined the activation of the JAK3/STAT5 pathway in EBV-positive and -negative B, T and NK cell lines and in cell samples from patients with EBV-associated T cell lymphoma. We then evaluated the antitumor effects of the selective JAK3 inhibitor, tofacitinib, against these cell lines in vitro and in a murine xenograft model. We found that all EBV-positive T and NK cell lines and patient samples tested displayed activation of the JAK3/STAT5 pathway. Treatment of these cell lines with tofacitinib reduced the levels of phospho-STAT5, suppressed proliferation, induced G1 cell-cycle arrest and decreased EBV LMP1 and EBNA1 expression. An EBV-negative NK cell line was also sensitive to tofacitinib, whereas an EBV-infected NK cell line was more sensitive to tofacitinib than its parental line. Tofacitinib significantly inhibited the growth of established tumors in NOG mice. These findings suggest that tofacitinib may represent a useful therapeutic agent for patients with EBV-associated T and NK cell lymphoma. PMID:27732937

  5. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H.

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  6. Inhibition of tumor proliferation associated with cell cycle arrest caused by extract and fraction from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae).

    PubMed

    Felipe, Karina Bettega; Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; da Silva, Fabiana Ourique; Bücker, Nádia Falcão; Farias, Mirelle Sinfroni; Castro, Luiza Sheyla Evenni Porfirio Will; de Souza Grinevicius, Valdelúcia Maria Alves; Motta, Nadia Sandrini; Correia, João Francisco Gomes; Rossi, Maria Helena; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi

    2014-09-29

    Casearia sylvestris is a tree found in tropical America. In Brazil it is known mainly as Guaçatonga. Literature reports suggest that the leaves and other plant parts have been used by indigenous populations from South America in preparations, mainly aqueous or hydroethanolic macerations or decoctions, most times taken orally for the primary treatment of several diseases, including cancer. This article reports the results of an investigation about the antiproliferative effects of Casearia sylvestris on tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Aqueous ethanolic maceration and column chromatography were done to obtain a crude aqueous ethanolic extract (CAE) and a chloroform fraction (f-CHCl3). The human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was used in culture. In vitro, non-cytotoxic concentrations were determined by MTT assay and the antiproliferative effect was assessed by the colony forming unit assay using non-cytotoxic concentrations. Effects on the cell cycle were observed through flow cytometry using a propidium iodide kit. Casearin C was identified in f-CHCl3 by chromatography and H(1) nuclear magnetic resonance. The effect on some key proteins of DNA damage (phosphorylation on the histone H2AX) and cell cycle control (p53, p16, cdk2) was evaluated through immunoblot. Antiproliferative effects in vivo were measured in tumor tissue from Ehrlich ascites-bearing mice through the (3)H-thymidine uptake assay and the trypan blue exclusion method. In vitro, EC50 values found at 24 h on MCF-7 cells were 141 µg/mL for CAE and 66 µg/mL for f-CHCl3. Inhibition on proliferation was recorded at concentrations as low as 4 µg/mL in the case of the f-CHCl3 (up to 40%) and up to 50% when CAE was added at 9 µg/mL. The cell cycle arrest was demonstrated by the reduction in terms of number of cells in phases G2/M and S, up to 38.9% and 51.9% when cells were treated with CAE, and 53.9% and 66.2%, respectively, when cells were treated with f-CHCl3. The number of cells in G1 was increased

  7. Combined paclitaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil therapy enhances ionizing radiation effects, inhibits migration and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elias, Silvia Taveira; Borges, Gabriel Alvares; Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; E Silva, Luis Felipe Oliveira; Avelino, Samuel; DE Matos Neto, João Nunes; Simeoni, Luiz Alberto; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2015-09-01

    Although taxels (in particular paclitaxel), cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy has been approved for use in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), little is known with regard to the cellular mechanisms of this novel drug association. In order to investigate the reaction of cells to this novel treatment, the present study aimed to examine the cytotoxic effect of TPF in HNSCC cell lines in combination with irradiation, to analyze its effect on cell cycle progression and cell death, and to evaluate its ability to alter cell migration. An MTT assay was used to determine cell viability following TPF and cisplatin treatments in two human HNSCC cell lines (FaDu and SCC-9) and one keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The concurrent use of TPF or cisplatin and irradiation was also analyzed. Flow cytometric analysis was utilized to determine the cell cycle distribution and to verify the induction of apoptosis. The capacity of the drugs to alter oral cancer cell migration was also evaluated using a Transwell migration assay. The results indicated that TPF and cisplatin were cytotoxic to all cell lines, and enhanced the effects of ionizing radiation. FaDu cells were significantly more sensitive to the two treatments, and TPF was more cytotoxic than cisplatin for all cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that TPF increased the number of cells in G0/G1 phase in the SCC-9 cell line, and indicated apoptotic cell death. The results of the Transwell assay demonstrated that TPF inhibited migration in oral carcinoma cell lines. The results of the present study indicated that TPF functions in oral carcinoma cell lines through the enhancement of ionizing radiation effects, inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 and apoptosis, in addition to inhibiting migration.

  8. Pirfenidone inhibits proliferation, arrests the cell cycle, and downregulates heat shock protein-47 and collagen type I in rat hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xian-Hong; Jiang, Tian-Peng; Zhang, Shuai; Song, Jie; Li, Xing; Yang, Jian-Yong; Zhou, Shi

    2015-07-01

    Pirfenidone (esbiret) is an established anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory drug used to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, the dose-dependent effects of pirfenidone on the cell cycle, proliferation and expression of heat shock protein (HSP)-47 and collagen type I in a cultured rat hepatic stellate cell line (HSC-T6) were investigated. Following pirfenidone treatment, cell proliferation was determined using the cell counting kit-8 assay and the cell cycle was measured using flow cytometry. HSP-47 expression was estimated using western blot analysis and collagen type I mRNA was assessed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Pirfenidone induced significant dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in HSC-T6 cells. Cell viability was unaffected by treatment with pirfenidone (0, 10 or 100 µM) for 24 and 72 h. However, after 24 h, HSC-T6 cells exhibited dose-dependent decreases in HSP-47 protein and collagen I mRNA levels. In conclusion, pirfenidone inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle and reduced the expression of HSP-47 and collagen type I, indicating that pirfenidone may be a promising drug in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  9. Fasudil inhibits the proliferation and contractility and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human endometriotic stromal cells: a promising agent for the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuno, Akitoshi; Nasu, Kaei; Kawano, Yukie; Yuge, Akitoshi; Li, Haili; Abe, Wakana; Narahara, Hisashi

    2011-12-01

    During the development of endometriotic lesions, excess fibrosis may lead to scarring and to the alterations of tissue function that are the characteristic features of this disease. Enhanced extracellular matrix contractility of endometriotic stromal cells (ECSC) mediated by the mevalonate-Ras homology (Rho)/Rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein kinase (ROCK) pathway has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis. To assess the use of fasudil, a selective ROCK inhibitor, for the medical treatment of endometriosis-associated fibrosis, the effects of this agent on the cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, morphology, cell density, and contractility of ECSC were investigated. The effects of fasudil on the expression of contractility-related, apoptosis-related, and cell cycle-related molecules in ECSC were also evaluated. Fasudil significantly inhibited the proliferation and contractility of ECSC and induced the cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and apoptosis of these cells. Morphological observation revealed the suppression of ECSC attachment to collagen fibers and decrease of cell density by fasudil. The expression of α-smooth muscle actin, RhoA, ROCK-I, and ROCK-II proteins was inhibited by fasudil administration. The expression of the antiapoptotic factors, Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), in two-dimensional cultured ECSC were down-regulated by the addition of fasudil, whereas, the expression of p16(INK4a) and p21(Waf1/Cip1) was up-regulated by the addition of fasudil. The present findings suggest that fasudil is a promising agent for the treatment of endometriosis. The inhibition of cell proliferation, contractility, and myofibroblastic differentiation, the attenuation of attachment to collagen fibers, the decrease of cell density, and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of ECSC are involved in the active mechanisms of fasudil.

  10. A novel platinum compound inhibits constitutive Stat3 signaling and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Turkson, James; Zhang, Shumin; Mora, Linda B; Burns, Audrey; Sebti, Said; Jove, Richard

    2005-09-23

    Previous studies have established constitutive activation of Stat3 protein as one of the molecular changes required for tumorigenesis. To develop novel therapeutics for tumors harboring constitutively active Stat3, compounds from the NCI 2000 diversity set were evaluated for inhibition of Stat3 DNA-binding activity in vitro. Of these, a novel platinum (IV) compound, IS3 295, interacted with Stat3 and inhibited its binding to specific DNA-response elements. Further analysis suggested noncompetitive-type kinetics for the inhibition of Stat3 binding to DNA. In human and mouse tumor cell lines with constitutively active Stat3, IS3 295 selectively attenuated Stat3 signaling, thereby inducing cell growth arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. Moreover, in transformed cells, IS3 295 repressed expression of cyclin D1 and bcl-xL, two of the known Stat3-regulated genes that are overexpressed in malignant cells, suggesting that IS3 295 mediates anti-tumor cell activity in part by blocking Stat3-mediated sub-version of cell growth and apoptotic signals. Together, our findings provide evidence for the inhibition of Stat3 activity and biological functions by IS3 295 through interaction with Stat3 protein. This study represents a significant advance in small molecule-based approaches to target Stat3 and suggests potential new applications for platinum (IV) complexes as modulators of the Stat3 pathway for cancer therapy.

  11. Comparison of the activity of three different HSP70 inhibitors on apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, autophagy inhibition, and HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Balaburski, Gregor M; Bondar, Anastasia; Beeharry, Neil; Yen, Tim; Murphy, Maureen E

    2014-02-01

    The chaperone HSP70 promotes the survival of cells exposed to many different types of stresses, and is also potently anti-apoptotic. The major stress-induced form of this protein, HSP70-1, is overexpressed in a number of human cancers, yet is negligibly expressed in normal cells. Silencing of the gene encoding HSP70-1 (HSPA1A) is cytotoxic to transformed but not normal cells. Therefore, HSP70 is considered to be a promising cancer drug target, and there has been active interest in the identification and characterization of HSP70 inhibitors for cancer therapy. Because HSP70 behaves in a relatively non-specific manner in the control of protein folding, to date there are no reliably-identified "clients" of this protein, nor is there consensus as to what the phenotypic effects of HSP70 inhibitors are on a cancer cell. Here for the first time we compare three recently-identified HSP70 inhibitors, PES-Cl, MKT-077, and Ver-155008, for their ability to impact some of the known and reported functions of this chaperone; specifically, the ability to inhibit autophagy, to influence the level of HSP90 client proteins, to induce cell cycle arrest, and to inhibit the enzymatic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). We report that all three of these compounds can inhibit autophagy and cause reduced levels of HSP90 client proteins; however, only PES-Cl can inhibit the APC/C and induce G 2/M arrest. Possible reasons for these differences, and the implications for the further development of these prototype compounds as anti-cancer agents, are discussed.

  12. Suppressed expression of non-DSB repair genes inhibits gamma-radiation-induced cytogenetic repair and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish K; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Pierson, Duane L; Wu, Honglu

    2008-11-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression. In this study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequency of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine efficiency of cytogenetic repair, especially DSB repair. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR-induced biological consequences. Furthermore, eight non-DBS repair genes showed involvement in regulating DSB repair, indicating that

  13. Time course of morphine's effects on adult hippocampal subgranular zone reveals preferential inhibition of cells in S phase of the cell cycle and a subpopulation of immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Arguello, A A; Harburg, G C; Schonborn, J R; Mandyam, C D; Yamaguchi, M; Eisch, A J

    2008-11-11

    Opiates, such as morphine, decrease neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ), raising the possibility that decreased neurogenesis contributes to opiate-induced cognitive deficits. However, there is an incomplete understanding of how alterations in cell cycle progression and progenitor maturation contribute to this decrease. The present study examined how morphine regulates progenitor cell cycle, cell death and immature SGZ neurons (experiment 1) as well as the progression of SGZ progenitors through key stages of maturation (experiment 2). In experiment 1, mice received sham or morphine pellets (s.c., 0 and 48 h) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) 2 h prior to sacrifice (24, 72 or 96 h). Morphine decreased both the number of S phase and total cycling cells, as there were fewer cells immunoreactive (IR) for the S phase marker BrdU and the cell cycle marker Ki67. The percentage of Ki67-IR cells that were BrdU-IR was decreased after 24 but not 96 h of morphine, suggesting a disproportionate effect on S phase cells relative to all cycling cells at this time point. Cell death (activated caspase-3 counts) was increased after 24 but not 96 h. In experiment 2, nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice given BrdU 1 day prior to morphine or sham surgery (0 and 48 h, sacrifice 96 h) had fewer Ki67-IR cells, but no change in BrdU-IR cell number, suggesting that this population of BrdU-IR cells was less sensitive to morphine. Interestingly, examination of key stages of progenitor cell maturation revealed that morphine increased the percent of BrdU-IR cells that were type 2b and decreased the percent that were immature neurons. These data suggest that chronic morphine decreases SGZ neurogenesis by inhibiting dividing cells, particularly those in S phase, and progenitor cell progression to a more mature neuronal stage.

  14. Modulation of cellular response to anticancer treatment by caffeine: inhibition of cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair and more.

    PubMed

    Sabisz, Michal; Skladanowski, Andrzej

    2008-08-01

    Caffeine and other methylxanthines produce multiple physiologic effects throughout the human body, many of these effects could potentially modulate the activity of anticancer therapy. Caffeine may directly interfere with drug transport to tumor cells by formation of mixed stacking complexes with polyaromatic drugs. If formed in cells, these complexes may also prevent of intercalating drugs from DNA binding and, in this way, lower their antitumor activity. Since many of potent carcinogens are polyaromatic compounds, formation of stacking complexes with carcinogens could be associated with anti-genotoxic activity of caffeine and its use in cancer chemoprevention. Caffeine has also been reported to inhibit ATM and ATR kinases which leads to the disruption of multiple DNA damage-responsive cell cycle checkpoints and greatly sensitizes tumor cells to antitumor agents which induce genotoxic stress. Caffeine may inhibit repair of DNA lesions through a direct interference with DNA-PK activity and other repair enzymes. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that caffeine modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses via inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-phosphodiesterase. Finally, another group of effects induced by caffeine is mediated through its inhibitory action on adenosine receptors. This may modulate the stability of HIF1 alpha as well as VEGF and interleukin-8 expression in tumor cells, which could have a direct impact on neovascularization of human tumors. In this review, we present different molecular mechanisms by which caffeine and other methylxanthines may directly or indirectly modulate the effect of antitumor treatment in tumor cells and in cancer patients.

  15. Lentivirus-Mediated Silencing of Myosin VI Inhibits Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zhu, Zhenghong; Chang, Jianhua; Wang, Jialei; Shen, Xiaoyong

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique actin motor, which moves toward the pointed ends of actin filaments. In this study, we found that MYO6 is overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and associated with lung cancer progression, particularly lymph node metastasis. To investigate its functions in lung cancer cells, we generated recombinant lentivirus taking shRNA of MYO6. Using two lung cancer cell lines, A549 and 95D, we found that Lv-shMYO6 could infect lung cancer cells with high efficiency and downregulate MYO6 on both mRNA and protein levels. After knockdown of MYO6, the proliferation rates of lung cancer cells were decreased significantly. The colony-formation ability of MYO6-silenced lung cancer cells was also impaired with reduced colony numbers and fewer cells per colony. Flow cytometry showed that cell cycle progression was stuck at the G0 /G1 phase, especially at the sub-G1 phase, which represents apoptotic cells. Moreover, knockdown of MYO6 downregulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Further experiments using another shRNA of MYO6 confirmed the above results. These results suggest that MYO6 is crucial in maintaining cell cycle and cell growth of lung cancer cells. MYO6 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment.

  16. Inhibition of Aurora A Kinase by Alisertib Induces Autophagy and Cell Cycle Arrest and Increases Chemosensitivity in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiaohua; Yu, Xinfa; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Chengyu; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Aurora A kinase represent a feasible target in cancer therapy. To evaluate the proteomic response of human liver carcinoma cells to alisertib (ALS) and identify the molecular targets of ALS, we examined the effects of ALS on the proliferation, cell cycle, autophagy, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity in HepG2 cells. The stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based quantitative proteomic study was performed to evaluate the proteomic response to ALS. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed using flow cytometry and autophagy was determined using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Our SILAC proteomic study showed that ALS regulated the expression of 914 proteins, with 407 molecules being up-regulated and 507 molecules being down-regulated in HepG2 cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) and KEGG pathway analysis identified 146 and 32 signaling pathways were regulated by ALS, respectively, which were associated with cell survival, programmed cell death, and nutrition-energy metabolism. Subsequently, the verification experiments showed that ALS remarkably arrested HepG2 cells in G2/M phase and led to an accumulation of aneuploidy via regulating the expression of key cell cycle regulators. ALS induced a marked autophagy in a concentration- and time-dependent manner via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Autophagy inhibition promoted the pro-apoptotic effect of ALS, indicating a cyto-protective role of ALS-induced autophagy. ALS increased the chemosensitivity of HepG2 cells to cisplatin and doxorubicin. Taken together, ALS induces autophagy and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells via PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathway. Autophagy inhibition may promote the anticancer effect of ALS and sensitize the chemotherapy in HepG2 cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 on Hep G{sub 2} cells via inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jing; Du, Yi-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Yi; Pan, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Huan, Lin; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Wei, Shao-Hua; Huang, Shi-Qian; Xun, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Lei-Lei; Xie, Meng-Yu; Ao, Gui-Zhen; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Xu, Guang-Lin

    2014-01-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the inhibitory activity test on Hep G{sub 2} growth. We found that KYKZL-1 inhibited the growth of Hep G{sub 2} cells via inducing apoptosis. Further studies showed that KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c release from mitochondria and down regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced the high level of COX-2 and 5-LOX. As shown in its anti-inflammatory effect, KYKZL-1 also exhibited inhibitory effect on the PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} production in Hep G{sub 2} cells. Accordingly, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or LTB{sub 4} reversed the decreases in cell viability. In addition, KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the S–G{sub 2} checkpoint via the activation of p21{sup CIP1} protein and down-regulation of cyclin A expression. These data indicate that the growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 is associated with inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest. Combined with our previous findings, KYKZL-1 exhibiting COX/5-LOX inhibition may be a promising potential agent not only for inflammation control but also for cancer prevention/therapy with an enhanced gastric safety profile. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 resulted in apoptosis of Hep G{sub 2} cells. • KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c and bcl-2/bax ratio. • KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest via modulation of p21{sup CIP1} and cyclin A level.

  18. Chelidonium majus crude extract inhibits migration and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deljanin, Milena; Nikolic, Mladen; Baskic, Dejan; Todorovic, Danijela; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Zaric, Milan; Stankovic, Milan; Todorovic, Milos; Avramovic, Dusko; Popovic, Suzana

    2016-08-22

    Chelidonium majus L (Papaveraceae) is widely used in alternative medicine for treatment of various disorders. Antitumor activities of alkaloids isolated from this plant have been reviewed, while there are only a few studies that examine properties of the whole extract. The aim of the present study was to investigate direct cytotoxic effects, as well as indirect antitumor effects of Chelidonium majus ethanolic extract against different tumor cell lines,. MTT and SRB assays were performed to estimate cytotoxic effects of Chelidonium majus extract against human tumor cell lines A549, H460, HCT 116, SW480, MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Type of cell death induced by extract was determined by flow cytometry and cell morphology assessment. Inhibitory effect on migration of cancer cells was assessed by wound healing assay. Chelidonium majus extract showed selective time- and dose-dependent increase of cytotoxicity in all six cell lines, with individual cell line sensitivities. Extract promoted cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis. Cotreatment with doxorubicin enhanced cytotoxicity of the drug. Also, inhibitory effect on migration was shown with non-toxic extract concentration. These results indicate possible usefulness of Chelidonium majus crude extract in antitumor therapy, whether through its direct cytotoxic effect, by prevention of metastasis, or as adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sister chromatid exchange induction and cell cycle inhibition by aniline and its metabolites in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmer, J.L.; Kligerman, A.D.; Erexson, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and cell cycle analyses in human fibroblasts were used to ascertain the relative genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of aniline and its metabolites. Significant increases (P0.05) in SCE frequencies were found with aniline HCl, o-aminophenol, N-phenylhydroxylamine, and trimethymelamine (TEM). On an SCE/mmole basis at the highest concentrations examined, o-aminophenol was 270 times more potent than aniline in inducing SCE, whereas TEM was about 390 times more potent than o-aminophenol. Furthermore, fibroblasts treated with o-aminophenol responded in a dose-dependent fashion and exhibited a 2-fold increase in SCE frequency. N-phenylhydroxylamine induced a less clear-cut, dose related increase in SCE frequency with a 1.4-fold elevation. Only marginal increases in SCE were observed with aniline at the highest doses. Using these data, we propose that aniline may exert its turmorigenic potential in rats through the production of both genotoxic and cytotoxic metabolities. (JMT)

  20. PC-SPES inhibits cell proliferation by modulating p21, cyclins D, E and B and multiple cell cycle-related genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohua; Guo, Junqiao; Hsieh, Tze-chen

    2003-01-01

    PC-SPES is an herbal mixture, with evidence of clinical efficacy against prostate cancer (CaP), recently attracting tremendous attention. Using immunoblot and cell cycle specific cDNA array analyses, we investigated effects of PC-SPES on LNCaP, a hormone-dependent prostate cancer cell line. PC-SPES inhibited expression of cyclins D and E, inhibited Rb phosphorylation, switching it to a G1-to-S inhibitory state. Moreover, cDNA array analysis showed that PC-SPES caused up-regulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) and decreased expression of cyclin B, Nedd8, cdc2, skp1, PCNA, MAD2L1, cyclin H, CKS2, E2F, Rbx1, MCM2, MCM5, Mpp2, Cullin-Cul4A, Cks1p9 and McM7, which are involved in cell cycle progression. Taken together, our results provide a mechanistic explanation for antiproliferative and antitumor effects of PC-SPES, suggesting that induction of CDK inhibitors and downregulation of cyclins leads to dephosphorylation of Rb and growth arrest.

  1. DNA‐damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival

    PubMed Central

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life‐long by their unique abilities of self‐renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA‐damage‐inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA‐damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time‐lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A‐expressing HSCs failed to long‐term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ‐irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen‐activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic‐erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress‐induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system. Stem Cells 2016;34:699–710 PMID:26731607

  2. Notch1 signaling inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Runzi; An, Huazhang; Yu, Yizhi; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Shuxun; Xu, Hongmei; Guo, Zhenghong; Cheng, Tao; Cao, Xuetao

    2003-12-01

    Notch signaling plays a critical role in maintaining the balance between cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis; hence, perturbed Notch signaling may contribute to tumorigenesis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in Africa and Asia. The mechanisms that orchestrate the multiple oncogenic insults required for initiation and progression of HCC are not clear. We constitutively overexpressed active Notch1 in human HCC to explore the effects of Notch1 signaling on HCC cell growth and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. We show here that overexpression of Notch1 was able to inhibit the growth of HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Biochemical analysis revealed the involvement of cell cycle regulated proteins in Notch1-mediated G(0)/G(1) arrest of HCC cells. Compared with green fluorescent protein (GFP) control, transient transfection of Notch1 ICN decreased expression of cyclin A (3.5-fold), cyclin D1 (2-fold), cyclin E (4.5-fold), CDK2 (2.8-fold), and the phosphorylated form of retinoblastoma protein (3-fold). Up-regulation of p21(waf/cip1) protein expression was observed in SMMC7721-ICN cells stably expressing active Notch1 but not in SMMC7721-GFP cells, which only express GFP. Furthermore, a 12-fold increase in p53 expression and an increase (4.8-fold) in Jun-NH(2)-terminal kinase activation were induced in SMMC7721-ICN cells compared with SMMC7721-GFP cells. In contrast, expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein could not be detected in SMMC7721-ICN cells. These findings suggest that Notch1 signaling may participate in the development of HCC cells, affecting multiple pathways that control both cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  3. DNA-damage response gene GADD45A induces differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells without inhibiting cell cycle or survival.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Susanne; Thalheimer, Frederic B; Haetscher, Nadine; Rehage, Maike; Schroeder, Timm; Rieger, Michael A

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood cell production life-long by their unique abilities of self-renewal and differentiation into all blood cell lineages. Growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 alpha (GADD45A) is induced by genotoxic stress in HSCs. GADD45A has been implicated in cell cycle control, cell death and senescence, as well as in DNA-damage repair. In general, GADD45A provides cellular stability by either arresting the cell cycle progression until DNA damage is repaired or, in cases of fatal damage, by inducing apoptosis. However, the function of GADD45A in hematopoiesis remains controversial. We revealed the changes in murine HSC fate control orchestrated by the expression of GADD45A at single cell resolution. In contrast to other cellular systems, GADD45A expression did not cause a cell cycle arrest or an alteration in the decision between cell survival and apoptosis in HSCs. Strikingly, GADD45A strongly induced and accelerated the differentiation program in HSCs. Continuous tracking of individual HSCs and their progeny via time-lapse microscopy elucidated that once GADD45A was expressed, HSCs differentiate into committed progenitors within 29 hours. GADD45A-expressing HSCs failed to long-term reconstitute the blood of recipients by inducing multilineage differentiation in vivo. Importantly, γ-irradiation of HSCs induced their differentiation by upregulating endogenous GADD45A. The differentiation induction by GADD45A was transmitted by activating p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and allowed the generation of megakaryocytic-erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages. These data indicate that genotoxic stress-induced GADD45A expression in HSCs prevents their fatal transformation by directing them into differentiation and thereby clearing them from the system.

  4. δ-Cadinene inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cells via caspase-dependent apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Hui, Li-Mei; Zhao, Guo-Dong; Zhao, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common causes of mortality among all cancers in females and is the primary cause of mortality from gynecological malignancies. The objective of the current research work was to evaluate a naturally occurring sesquiterpene-δ-Cadinene for its antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on human ovary cancer (OVCAR-3) cells. We also demonstrated the effect of δ-Cadinene on cell cycle phase distribution, intracellular damage and caspase activation. Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was used to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of δ-cadinene on OVCAR-3 cells. Cellular morphology after δ-cadinene treatment was demonstrated by inverted phase contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the effect of δ-cadinene on cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis using propidium iodide and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/PI kit. The results revealed that δ-cadinene induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent growth inhibitory effects on OVACR-3 cell line. δ-cadinene also induced cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear membrane rupture which are characteristic of apoptosis. Treatment with different doses of δ-cadinene also led to cell cycle arrest in sub-G1 phase which showed dose-dependence. Western blotting assay revealed that δ-cadinene led to activation of caspases in OVCAR-3 cancer cells. PARP cleavage was noticed at 50 µM dose of δ-cadinene with the advent of the cleaved 85-kDa fragment after exposure to δ-cadinene. At 100 µM, only the cleaved form of PARP was detectable. Pro-caspase-8 expression remained unaltered until 10 µM dose of δ-cadinene. However, at 50 and 100 µM dose, pro-caspase-8 expression was no longer detectable. There was a significant increase in the caspase-9 expression levels after 50 and 100 µM δ-cadinene treatments.

  5. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation by a cell cycle inhibitory peptide fused to a thermally responsive polypeptide carrier

    PubMed Central

    Massodi, Iqbal; Moktan, Shama; Rawat, Aruna; Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by normal tissue tolerance, resulting in a narrow therapeutic index. To increase drug specificity and efficacy and to reduce toxicity in normal tissues, we have developed a polypeptide carrier for a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, which has the potential to be thermally targeted to the tumor site. The design of this polypeptide is based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). The coding sequence of ELP was modified by the addition of the cell penetrating peptide Bac-7 at the N-terminus and a 23 amino acid peptide derived from p21 at the C-terminus (Bac-ELP1-p21). Bac-ELP1-p21 is soluble in aqueous solutions below physiological temperature (37°C) but aggregates when the temperature is raised above 39°C, making it a promising thermally responsive therapeutic carrier that may be actively targeted to solid tumors by application of focused hyperthermia. While Bac-ELP1-p21 at 37°C did not have any effect on SKOV-3 cell proliferation, the use of hyperthermia increased the antiproliferative effect of Bac-ELP1-p21 compared with a thermally unresponsive control polypeptide. Bac-ELP1-p21 displayed both a cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution in the SKOV-3 cells, with nuclear-localized polypeptide enriched in the heated cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Using Western blotting, we show that Bac-ELP1-p21 caused a decrease in Rb phosphorylation levels in cells treated at 42°C. The polypeptide also induced caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and cell cycle arrest in S-phase and G2/M-phase. These studies indicate that ELP is a promising macromolecular carrier for the delivery of cell cycle inhibitory peptides to solid tumors. PMID:19588502

  6. RNA-binding motif protein 5 inhibits the proliferation of cigarette smoke-transformed BEAS-2B cells through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue-Jiao; Du, Yan-Wei; Hao, Yu-Qiu; Su, Zhen-Zhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Li-Jing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoking has been shown to be the most significant risk factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have also indicated that RNA-binding motif protein 5 (RBM5) can modulate apoptosis and suppress tumor growth. The present study focused on the role of RBM5 in the regulation of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced transformation of bronchial epithelial cells into the cancerous phenotype and its mechanism of action. Herein, we exposed normal BEAS-2B cells for 8 days to varying concentrations of CSE or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), followed by a recovery period of 2 weeks. Next, the RBM5 protein was overexpressed in these transformed BEAS-2B cells though lentiviral infection. Later, the morphological changes, cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration were assessed. In addition, we analyzed the role of RBM5 in xenograft growth. The expression of RBM5 along with the genes related to cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and invasion were also examined. Finally, our results revealed that BEAS-2B cells exposed to 100 µg/ml CSE acquired phenotypic changes and formed tumors in nude mice, indicative of their cancerous transformation and had reduced RBM5 expression. Subsequent overexpression of RBM5 in these cells significantly inhibited their proliferation, induced G1/S arrest, triggered apoptosis and inhibited their invasion and migration, including xenograft growth. Thus, we established an in vitro model of CSE-induced cancerous transformation and concluded that RBM5 overexpression inhibited the growth of these transformed cells through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Therefore, our study suggests the importance of RBM5 in the pathogenesis of smoking-related cancer.

  7. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  8. LRD-22, a novel dual dithiocarbamatic acid ester, inhibits Aurora-A kinase and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiling; Li, Ridong; Li, Li; Ge, Zemei; Zhou, Rouli; Li, Runtao

    2015-02-27

    In this study we investigated the antitumor activity of the novel dual dithiocarbamatic acid ester LRD-22 in vitro and in vivo. Several cancer cell lines were employed to determine the effect of LRD-22 on cell growth, and the MTT assay showed there was a significant decrease in viable tumor cell numbers in the presence of LRD-22, especially in the HepG2 cell line. Colony formation assay also showed LRD-22 strongly inhibits HepG2 cell growth. Evaluation of the mechanism involved showed that inhibitory effects of LRD-22 on cell growth are due to induction of apoptosis and G2/M arrest. LRD-22 inhibited Aurora-A phosphorylation at Thr{sub 288} and subsequently impaired p53 phosphorylation at Ser{sub 315} which was associated with the proteasome degradation pathway. Tumor suppressor protein p53 is stabilized by this mechanism and accumulates through inhibition of Aurora-A kinase activity via treatment with LRD-22. In vivo study of HepG2 xenograft in nude mice also shows LRD-22 suppresses tumor growth at a concentration of 5 mg/kg without animals suffering loss of body weight. In conclusion, our results demonstrate LRD-22 acts as an Aurora-A kinase inhibitor to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in HepG2 cells, and should be considered as a promising targeting agent for HCC therapy. - Highlights: • LRD-22 significantly inhibits cancer cell growth, especially in the HepG2 cell line. • The inhibitory effect of LRD-22 is due to induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. • LRD-22 inhibits Aurora-A phosphorylation which results in subsequent impairment of the p53 pathway. • LRD-22 suppresses tumor growth in xenograft mice without body weight loss.

  9. Ethanol inhibits retinal and CNS differentiation due to failure of cell cycle exit via an apoptosis-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hsin-Yu; Chang, Chin-Teng; Young, Huay-Win; Hu, Shing P; Tzou, Wen-Shyong; Hu, Chin-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol exposure during embryogenesis results in a variety of developmental disorders. Here, we demonstrate that continuous exposure to 1.5% ethanol causes substantial apoptosis and abrogated retinal and CNS development in zebrafish embryos. Chronic exposure to ethanol for 24h before hatching also induces apoptosis and retinal disorder. After the 2-day post-fertilization (dpf) stage, chronic exposure to ethanol continued to induce apoptosis, but did not block retinal differentiation. Although continuous ethanol exposure induces substantial accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increases p53 expression, depletion of p53 did not eliminate ethanol-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, sequestering ROS with the antioxidant reagent N-acetylcysteine (NAC) successfully inhibited ethanol-associated apoptosis, suggesting that the ethanol-induced cell death primarily results from ROS accumulation. Continuous ethanol treatment of embryos reduced expression of the mature neural and photoreceptor markers elavl3/huC, rho, and crx; in addition, expression of the neural and retinal progenitor markers ascl1b and pax6b was maintained at the undifferentiated stage, indicating that retinal and CNS neural progenitor cells failed to undergo further differentiation. Moreover, ethanol treatment enhanced BrdU incorporation, histone H3 phosphorylation, and pcna expression in neural progenitor cells, thereby maintaining a high rate of proliferation. Ethanol treatment also resulted in sustained transcription of ccnd1/cyclin D1 and ccne/cyclin E throughout development in neural progenitor cells, without an appropriate increase of cdkn1b/p27 and cdkn1c/p57 expression, suggesting that these cells failed to exit from the cell cycle. Although NAC was able to mitigate ethanol-mediated apoptosis, it was unable to ameliorate the defects in visual and CNS neural differentiation, suggesting that abrogated neural development in ethanol-exposed embryos is unlikely to arise from excessive

  10. Evodiamine inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells through the suppression of cell cycle progression and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xie; Chen, Si-Yu; Liu, Mei; Liang, Ting-Ming; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is a key event in the development of in-stent restenosis. Evodiamine is an indole alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicine, evodia, and has been shown to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and protect the cardiovascular system. However, whether evodiamine affects VSMC proliferation remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study examined the effects and the mechanisms of action of evodiamine on the proliferation of rat VSMCs. The cells were treated with evodiamine alone or in combination with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) stimulation. It was found that evodiamine inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without inducing cell death. Evodiamine also retarded cell cycle progression, evidenced by the suppression of the expression of cell cycle-promoting cyclin proteins and cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition, evodiamine attenuated the PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, however, it had no effect on the phosphorylation of Akt. Evodiamine also inhibited the increase of reactive oxygen species generation and upregulated the mRNA expression levels of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes. These findings provide important insights into the mechanisms underlying the vasoprotective actions of evodiamine and suggest that it may be a useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of vascular occlusive disease. PMID:27748810

  11. Telomerase Cajal body protein 1 depletion inhibits telomerase trafficking to telomeres and induces G1 cell cycle arrest in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ping; Wang, Zhitian; Lv, Wang; Pan, Hui; Yang, Yunhai; Yuan, Xiaoshuai; Hu, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Telomerase Cajal body protein 1 (TCAB1) is a telomerase holoenzyme, which is markedly enriched in Cajal bodies (CBs) and facilitates the recruitment of telomerase to CBs in the S phase of the cell cycle. This recruitment is dependent on TCAB1 binding to a telomerase RNA component. The majority of cancer cells are able to grow indefinitely due to telomerase and its mechanism of trafficking to telomeres. In the present study, a certain level of TCAB1 expression in A549 human lung cells was identified and TCAB1 knockdown exhibited a potent antiproliferative effect on these cells, which was coupled with a decrease in the cell density and activity of the cellular enzymes. In addition, TCAB1-depletion was demonstrated to inhibit telomerase trafficking to telomeres in the A549 cells, leading to subsequent G1 cell cycle arrest without inducing apoptotic cell death. Overall, these observations indicated that TCAB1 may be essential for A549 cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation, and may be a potential candidate for the development of a therapeutic target for lung adenocarcinomas.

  12. MiR-146a-5p inhibits cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in NSCLC cell lines by targeting CCND1 and CCND2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-Qing; Wang, Hui-Min; Ding, Lei; Gu, Yu-Chen; Lou, Jia-Tao; Zhao, Xin-Tai; Ma, Zhong-Liang; Jin, You-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that miR-146a-5p acts as an oncogene in several types of cancer, yet a tumor suppressor gene in others. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), one report showed that it was downregulated and played the role of tumor suppressor. However, another study showed that miR-146a-5p was overexpressed in the serum of NSCLC patients compared to healthy controls. Therefore, it is obvious that further study of the function of miR-146a-5p in NSCLC is necessary to fully understand its importance. Herein, we have verified that miR- 146a- 5p acts as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Our data revealed that the expression level of miR-146a-5p was significantly decreased in several human NSCLC cell lines, and also less abundant in human NSCLC tissues, when compared with controls. Moreover, we observed that miR-146a-5p could suppress cell proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results also showed that miR-146a-5p directly targeted the 3′-UTR of CCND1 and CCND2 mRNAs as well as decreased their expression at both mRNA and protein levels, causing cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of CCND1 or CCND2 yielded the same effects on proliferation and cell cycle arrest as miR-146a-5p upregulation did in the NSCLC cell lines. We confirmed that the expression of miR-146a-5p had negative relationship with CCND1 or CCND2. Besides, we also found that miR-146a-5p could inhibit tumor growth in xengroft mouse models, and CCND1 and CCND2 were downregulated in miR-146a-5p overexpressed xengroft tumor tissues. In summary, our results demonstrated that miR-146a-5p could suppress the proliferation and cell cycle progression in NSCLC cells by inhibiting the expression of CCND1 and CCND2. PMID:27494902

  13. Recovery of the Cell Cycle Inhibition in CCl(4)-Induced Cirrhosis by the Adenosine Derivative IFC-305.

    PubMed

    Chagoya de Sánchez, Victoria; Martínez-Pérez, Lidia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cirrhosis is a chronic degenerative illness characterized by changes in normal liver architecture, failure of hepatic function, and impairment of proliferative activity. The aim of this study is to know how IFC-305 compound induces proliferation of the liver during reversion of cirrhosis. Methods. Once cirrhosis has been installed by CCl(4) treatment for 10 weeks in male Wistar rats, they were divided into four groups: two received saline and two received the compound; all were euthanized at 5 and 10 weeks of treatment. Liver homogenate, mitochondria, and nucleus were used to measure cyclins, CDKs, and cell cycle regulatory proteins PCNA, pRb, p53, E2F, p21, p27, HGF, liver ATP, and mitochondrial function. Results. Diminution and small changes were observed in the studied proteins in the cirrhotic animals without treatment. The IFC-305-treated rats showed a clear increase in most of the proteins studied mainly in PCNA and CDK6, and a marked increased in ATP and mitochondrial function. Discussion/Conclusion. IFC-305 induces a recovery of the cell cycle inhibition promoting recovery of DNA damage through the action of PCNA and p53. The increase in energy and preservation of mitochondrial function contribute to recovering the proliferative function.

  14. Recovery of the Cell Cycle Inhibition in CCl4-Induced Cirrhosis by the Adenosine Derivative IFC-305

    PubMed Central

    Chagoya de Sánchez, Victoria; Martínez-Pérez, Lidia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cirrhosis is a chronic degenerative illness characterized by changes in normal liver architecture, failure of hepatic function, and impairment of proliferative activity. The aim of this study is to know how IFC-305 compound induces proliferation of the liver during reversion of cirrhosis. Methods. Once cirrhosis has been installed by CCl4 treatment for 10 weeks in male Wistar rats, they were divided into four groups: two received saline and two received the compound; all were euthanized at 5 and 10 weeks of treatment. Liver homogenate, mitochondria, and nucleus were used to measure cyclins, CDKs, and cell cycle regulatory proteins PCNA, pRb, p53, E2F, p21, p27, HGF, liver ATP, and mitochondrial function. Results. Diminution and small changes were observed in the studied proteins in the cirrhotic animals without treatment. The IFC-305-treated rats showed a clear increase in most of the proteins studied mainly in PCNA and CDK6, and a marked increased in ATP and mitochondrial function. Discussion/Conclusion. IFC-305 induces a recovery of the cell cycle inhibition promoting recovery of DNA damage through the action of PCNA and p53. The increase in energy and preservation of mitochondrial function contribute to recovering the proliferative function. PMID:23056951

  15. Short-term inhibition of TERT induces telomere length-independent cell cycle arrest and apoptotic response in EBV-immortalized and transformed B cells

    PubMed Central

    Celeghin, Andrea; Giunco, Silvia; Freguja, Riccardo; Zangrossi, Manuela; Nalio, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; De Rossi, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Besides its canonical role in stabilizing telomeres, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) may promote tumorigenesis through extra-telomeric functions. The possible therapeutic effects of BIBR1532 (BIBR), a powerful TERT inhibitor, have been evaluated in different cellular backgrounds, but no data are currently available regarding Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell malignancies. Our aim was to characterize the biological effects of TERT inhibition by BIBR on EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and fully transformed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines. We found that BIBR selectively inhibits telomerase activity in TERT-positive 4134/Late and 4134/TERT+ LCLs and EBV-negative BL41 and EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 BL cell lines. TERT inhibition led to decreased cell proliferation, accumulation of cells in the S-phase and ultimately to increased apoptosis, compared with mock-treated control cells. All these effects occurred within 72 h and were not observed in BIBR-treated TERT-negative 4134/TERT- and U2OS cells. The cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, consequent upon short-term TERT inhibition, were associated with and likely dependent on the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR), highlighted by the increased levels of γH2AX and activation of ATM and ATR pathways. Analyses of the mean and range of telomere lengths and telomere dysfunction-induced foci indicated that DDR after short-term TERT inhibition was not related to telomere dysfunction, thus suggesting that TERT, besides stabilizing telomere, may protect DNA via telomere-independent mechanisms. Notably, TERT-positive LCLs treated with BIBR in combination with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide showed a significant increase in the number of apoptotic cells with respect to those treated with chemotherapeutic agents alone. In conclusion, TERT inhibition impairs cell cycle progression and enhances the pro-apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents in TERT-positive cells. These results support new

  16. Decursin inhibits growth of human bladder and colon cancer cells via apoptosis, G1-phase cell cycle arrest and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wun-Jae; Lee, Se-Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2010-04-01

    Decursin, a pyranocoumarin isolated from the Korean Angelica gigas root, has demonstrated anti-cancer properties. In the present study, we found that decursin inhibited cell viability in cultured human urinary bladder cancer 235J cells and colon cancer HCT116 cells. The inhibited proliferation was due to apoptotic induction, because both cells treated with decursin dose-dependently showed a sub-G1 phase accumulation and an increased cytoplasmic DNA-histone complex. Cell death caused by decursin was also associated with the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 and the up-regulation of pro-apoptotic molecules cytochrome c, caspase 3 and Bax. Treatment of both types of cancer cells with decursin resulted in G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as revealed by FACS analyses. In addition, decursin increased protein levels of p21WAF1 with a decrease in cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Furthermore, decursin induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in both cancer cell lines, with the notable exceptions of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase. Finally, pretreatment with ERK-specific inhibitor PD98059 reversed decursin-induced p21WAF1 expression and decursin-inhibited cell growth. Thus, these findings suggest that decursin has potential therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bladder and colon cancer.

  17. Ajwa Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Extract Inhibits Human Breast Adenocarcinoma (MCF7) Cells In Vitro by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazal; Ahmed, Farid; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel; Kumosani, Taha; Barbour, Elie; AlQahtani, Mohammed; Gauthaman, Kalamegam

    2016-01-01

    Phoenix dactylifera L (Date palm) is a native plant of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and other Middle Eastern countries. Ajwa date has been described in the traditional and alternative medicine to provide several health benefits including anticholesteremic, antioxidant, hepatoprotective and anticancer effects, but most remains to be scientifically validated. Herein, we evaluated the anticancer effects of the Methanolic Extract of Ajwa Date (MEAD) on human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cells in vitro. MCF7 cells were treated with various concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/ml) of MEAD for 24, 48 and 72 h and changes in cell morphology, cell cycle, apoptosis related protein and gene expression were studied. Phase contrast microscopy showed various morphological changes such as cell shrinkage, vacuolation, blebbing and fragmentation. MTT (2-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent inhibitions of MCF7 cell proliferation from 35% to 95%. Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays showed positive staining for apoptosis of MCF7 cells treated with MEAD (15 mg and 25 mg for 48 h). Flow cytometric analyses of MCF7 cells with MEAD (15 mg/ml and 20 mg/ml) for 24 h demonstrated cell cycle arrest at 'S' phase; increased p53, Bax protein expression; caspase 3activation and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed up-regulation of p53, Bax, Fas, and FasL and down-regulation of Bcl-2. MEAD inhibited MCF7 cells in vitro by the inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our results indicate the anticancer effects of Ajwa dates, which therefore may be used as an adjunct therapy with conventional chemotherapeutics to achieve a synergistic effect against breast cancer.

  18. Ajwa Date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Extract Inhibits Human Breast Adenocarcinoma (MCF7) Cells In Vitro by Inducing Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazal; Ahmed, Farid; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel; Kumosani, Taha; Barbour, Elie; AlQahtani, Mohammed; Gauthaman, Kalamegam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phoenix dactylifera L (Date palm) is a native plant of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and other Middle Eastern countries. Ajwa date has been described in the traditional and alternative medicine to provide several health benefits including anticholesteremic, antioxidant, hepatoprotective and anticancer effects, but most remains to be scientifically validated. Herein, we evaluated the anticancer effects of the Methanolic Extract of Ajwa Date (MEAD) on human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cells in vitro. Methods MCF7 cells were treated with various concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/ml) of MEAD for 24, 48 and 72 h and changes in cell morphology, cell cycle, apoptosis related protein and gene expression were studied. Results Phase contrast microscopy showed various morphological changes such as cell shrinkage, vacuolation, blebbing and fragmentation. MTT (2-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent inhibitions of MCF7 cell proliferation from 35% to 95%. Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays showed positive staining for apoptosis of MCF7 cells treated with MEAD (15 mg and 25 mg for 48 h). Flow cytometric analyses of MCF7 cells with MEAD (15 mg/ml and 20 mg/ml) for 24 h demonstrated cell cycle arrest at 'S' phase; increased p53, Bax protein expression; caspase 3activation and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed up-regulation of p53, Bax, Fas, and FasL and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Conclusions MEAD inhibited MCF7 cells in vitro by the inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our results indicate the anticancer effects of Ajwa dates, which therefore may be used as an adjunct therapy with conventional chemotherapeutics to achieve a synergistic effect against breast cancer. PMID:27441372

  19. Dehydroleucodine inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical melanoma model by inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Valeria V; Lobos-Gonzalez, Lorena; Ibañez, Jorge; Fernandez, Dario; Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Valenzuela, Manuel A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Semino, Silvana N; Jahn, Graciela A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lopez, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma represents the fastest growing public health risk of all cancer types worldwide. Several strategies and anti-cancer drugs have been used in an effort to improve treatments, but the development of resistance to anti-neoplastic drugs remains the major cause of chemotherapy failure in melanomas. Previously, we showed that the sesquiterpene lactone, dehydroleucodine (DhL), promotes the accumulation of DNA damage markers, such as H2AX and 53BP1, in human tumor cells. Also DhL was shown to trigger either cell senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in HeLa and MCF7 cells. Here, we evaluated the effects of DhL on B16F0 mouse melanoma cells in vitro and in a pre-clinical melanoma model. DhL inhibited the proliferation of B16F0 cells by inducing senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, DhL reduced the expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1 and B1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, survivin. In melanomas generated by subcutaneous injection of B16F0 cells into C57/BL6 mice, the treatment with 20 mg DhL /Kg/day in preventive, simultaneous and therapeutic protocols reduced tumor volumes by 70%, 60% and 50%, respectively. DhL treatments reduced the number of proliferating, while increasing the number of senescent and apoptotic tumor cells. To estimate the long-term effects of DhL, a mathematical model was applied to fit experimental data. Extrapolation beyond experimental time points revealed that DhL administration following preventive and therapeutic protocols is predicted to be more effective than simultaneous treatments with DhL in restricting tumor growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MST-312 induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in APL cells through inhibition of telomerase activity and suppression of NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Ahmad; Safa, Majid; Kazemi, Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Telomerase-targeted therapy for cancer has received great attention because telomerase is expressed in almost all cancer cells but is inactive in most normal somatic cells. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of telomerase inhibitor MST-312, a chemically modified derivative of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. Our results showed that MST-312 exerted a dose-dependent short-term cytotoxic effect on APL cells, with G2/M cell cycle arrest. Moreover, MST-312 induced apoptosis of APL cells in caspase-mediated manner. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay revealed significant reduction in telomerase activity of APL cells following short-term exposure to MST-312. Interestingly, MST-312-induced telomerase inhibition was coupled with suppression of NF-κB activity as evidenced by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation and its degradation and decreased NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, gene expression analysis showed downregulation of genes regulated by NF-κB, such as antiapoptotic (survivin, Bcl-2, Mcl-1), proliferative (c-Myc), and telomerase-related (hTERT) genes. Importantly, MST-312 did not show any apoptotic effect in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In conclusion, our data suggest that dual inhibition of telomerase activity and NF-κB pathway by MST-312 represents a novel treatment strategy for APL.

  1. Harmine induces cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial pathway-mediated cellular apoptosis in SW620 cells via inhibition of the Akt and ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiming; Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhilong; Lin, Liuming; Zhang, Xiangqiang; Cao, Mingrong; Jiang, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    Harmine, a β-carboline alkaloid isolated from the seeds of Peganum harmala, possesses both antitumor and anti‑nociceptive effects and inhibits human DNA topoisomerase. However, no detailed data are available concerning the mechanisms of harmine in human colorectal carcinoma SW620 cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that harmine inhibited the proliferation of SW620 cells in a dose-dependent manner using MTT and clone formation assays, and the IC50 value of harmine on the growth inhibition of SW620 cells for 48 h was 5.13 µg/ml. PI staining showed that harmine altered the cell cycle distribution by decreasing the proportion of cells in the G0-G1 phase and increasing the proportion in the S and G2-M phase. The expression level of cyclin D1 was decreased, while the expression of cyclin A, E2 and B1, CDK1/cdc2, Myt-1 and p-cdc2 (Tyr15) were increased, which was in accordance with the S and G2/M phase arrest. Hoechst 33258 staining revealed nuclear fragmentation, chromosomal condensation and cell shrinkage in the SW620 cells treated with harmine. Flow cytometry revealed that the percentage of apoptotic sub-G1 cells increased from 7.19 to 26.58%, while in the control group, sub-G1 cells only increased from 1.53 to 1.60%. Furthermore, early and late apoptotic cells were increased from 11.96 to 26.38% when incubated with the indicated concentration of harmine for 48 h, while in the control group, <8% of cells underwent apoptosis. JC-1 staining revealed that harmine decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). The apoptosis of SW620 cells was also detected by western blot analysis, showing caspase-3 and -9, and PARP activation; the downregulation of Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-xL; and the upregulation of Bax. The expression of p-ERK, p-Akt (Ser473) and p-Akt (Thr308) was inhibited, and phosphorylation of downstream targets of Akt, such as p-FoxO3a and p-GSK‑3β were also attenuated. In conclusion, harmine induces cell cycle arrest and

  2. Downregulation of Mcl-1 through inhibition of translation contributes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, T; Li, G; Cao, B; Liu, L; Cheng, Q; Kong, H; Shan, C; Huang, X; Chen, J; Gao, N

    2013-02-28

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the compounds of ITCs' family that has attracted a great deal of interest because of its ability to exhibit anticancer activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of BITC on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines, primary leukemia cells, and nude mice Jurkat xenograft. Exposure of Jurkat cells to BITC resulted in dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptosis, caspase activation, cytochrome c release, nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) accumulation, Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) translocation, and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) downregulation. Treatment with these cells also resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. The G2/M-arrested cells are more sensitive to undergoing Mcl-1 downregulation and apoptosis mediated by BITC. BITC downregulates Mcl-1 expression through inhibition of translation, rather than through a transcriptional, post-translational, or caspase-dependent mechanism. Dephosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G could contribute to the inhibition of Mcl-1 translation mediated by BITC. Furthermore, ectopic expression of Mcl-1 substantially attenuates BITC-mediated lethality in these cells, whereas knockdown of Mcl-1 through small interfering RNA significantly enhances BITC-mediated lethality. Finally, administration of BITC markedly inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis in Jurkat xenograft model in association with the downregulation of Mcl-1. Taken together, these findings represent a novel mechanism by which agents targeting Mcl-1 potentiate BITC lethality in transformed and primary human leukemia cells and inhibitory activity of tumor growth of Jurkat xenograft model.

  3. Sinomenine, a COX-2 inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits growth of human colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HAIBO; YIN, PEIHAO; SHI, ZHAN; MA, YANCHUN; ZHAO, CHENGGEN; ZHENG, JAMPU; CHEN, TENG

    2016-01-01

    Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may possess anti-tumorigenic effects in certain cancer cell types. Sinomenine (SIN) is an alkaloid from Sinomenium acutum, a Chinese medicinal plant that inhibits inflammatory reactions and that has been used in the treatment of neuralgia and rheumatic diseases. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of SIN against colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo, as well as the underlying mechanisms. The effects of SIN on proliferation, cell cycle progression and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression were examined in human colorectal cancer-derived SW1116 cells. The in vivo effects of SIN were examined in a model of SW1116 tumor xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. Changes in COX-2 expression induced by the biological effects of SIN were analyzed by western blot analysis. The effects of SIN treatment on G1 phase cell cycle regulators in xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that SIN inhibits the proliferation of SW1116 cells by promoting their accumulation in the G1 phase, with concomitant suppression of COX-2 expression. Time- and dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and reduced toxicity were observed in nude mice administered daily intraperitoneal injections of SIN at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg. SIN-treated tumors also exhibited reduced COX-2 expression, a marked increase in Cip1/p21 protein levels and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. SIN may be an effective chemopreventive agent against colorectal cancer. The growth inhibitory properties of SIN against colorectal cancer may be mediated via a COX-2 inhibitory effect and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. PMID:26870226

  4. Sinomenine, a COX-2 inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits growth of human colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haibo; Yin, Peihao; Shi, Zhan; Ma, Yanchun; Zhao, Chenggen; Zheng, Jampu; Chen, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may possess anti-tumorigenic effects in certain cancer cell types. Sinomenine (SIN) is an alkaloid from Sinomenium acutum, a Chinese medicinal plant that inhibits inflammatory reactions and that has been used in the treatment of neuralgia and rheumatic diseases. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of SIN against colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo, as well as the underlying mechanisms. The effects of SIN on proliferation, cell cycle progression and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression were examined in human colorectal cancer-derived SW1116 cells. The in vivo effects of SIN were examined in a model of SW1116 tumor xenograft growth in athymic nude mice. Changes in COX-2 expression induced by the biological effects of SIN were analyzed by western blot analysis. The effects of SIN treatment on G1 phase cell cycle regulators in xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that SIN inhibits the proliferation of SW1116 cells by promoting their accumulation in the G1 phase, with concomitant suppression of COX-2 expression. Time- and dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and reduced toxicity were observed in nude mice administered daily intraperitoneal injections of SIN at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg. SIN-treated tumors also exhibited reduced COX-2 expression, a marked increase in Cip1/p21 protein levels and a decrease in the levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. SIN may be an effective chemopreventive agent against colorectal cancer. The growth inhibitory properties of SIN against colorectal cancer may be mediated via a COX-2 inhibitory effect and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase.

  5. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-11-01

    Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine-suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xenograft athymic nude mice. Solanine regulates the protein levels of cell cycle proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and P21 in vivo and in vitro. Also, in cultured DU145 cell, solanine significantly inhibits cell growth. Moreover, the administration of NAC, an active oxygen scavenger, markedly reduces solanine-induced cell death. Blockade of P38 MAPK kinase cannot suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS), but can suppress solanine-induced cell apoptosis. Also, inhibition of ROS by NAC inactivates P38 pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine may be through blocking the expression of cell cycle proteins and inducing apoptosis via ROS and activation of P38 pathway. These findings indicate an attractive therapeutic potential of solanine for suppression of prostate cancer.

  6. HDAC8 Inhibition Blocks SMC3 Deacetylation and Delays Cell Cycle Progression without Affecting Cohesin-dependent Transcription in MCF7 Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tanushree; Antony, Jisha; Braithwaite, Antony W; Horsfield, Julia A

    2016-06-10

    Cohesin, a multi-subunit protein complex involved in chromosome organization, is frequently mutated or aberrantly expressed in cancer. Multiple functions of cohesin, including cell division and gene expression, highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target. The SMC3 subunit of cohesin is acetylated (ac) during S phase to establish cohesion between replicated chromosomes. Following anaphase, ac-SMC3 is deacetylated by HDAC8. Reversal of SMC3 acetylation is imperative for recycling cohesin so that it can be reloaded in interphase for both non-mitotic and mitotic functions. We blocked deacetylation of ac-SMC3 using an HDAC8-specific inhibitor PCI-34051 in MCF7 breast cancer cells, and examined the effects on transcription of cohesin-dependent genes that respond to estrogen. HDAC8 inhibition led to accumulation of ac-SMC3 as expected, but surprisingly, had no influence on the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes that are altered by siRNA targeting of RAD21 or SMC3. Knockdown of RAD21 altered estrogen receptor α (ER) recruitment at SOX4 and IL20, and affected transcription of these genes, while HDAC8 inhibition did not. Rather, inhibition of HDAC8 delayed cell cycle progression, suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We conclude that HDAC8 inhibition does not change the estrogen-specific transcriptional role of cohesin in MCF7 cells, but instead, compromises cell cycle progression and cell survival. Our results argue that candidate inhibitors of cohesin function may differ in their effects depending on the cellular genotype and should be thoroughly tested for predicted effects on cohesin's mechanistic roles.

  7. Analysis of the prevalence, secretion and function of a cell cycle-inhibiting factor in the melioidosis pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Pumirat, Pornpan; Broek, Charles Vander; Juntawieng, Niramol; Muangsombut, Veerachat; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Stevens, Joanne M; Stevens, Mark P; Korbsrisate, Sunee

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli express a cell cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), that is injected into host cells via a Type III secretion system (T3SS) leading to arrest of cell division, delayed apoptosis and cytoskeletal rearrangements. A homologue of Cif has been identified in Burkholderia pseudomallei (CHBP; Cif homologue in B. pseudomallei; BPSS1385), which shares catalytic activity, but its prevalence, secretion and function are ill-defined. Among 43 available B. pseudomallei genome sequences, 33 genomes (76.7%) harbor the gene encoding CHBP. Western blot analysis using antiserum raised to a synthetic CHBP peptide detected CHBP in 46.6% (7/15) of clinical B. pseudomallei isolates from the endemic area. Secretion of CHBP into bacterial culture supernatant could not be detected under conditions where a known effector (BopE) was secreted in a manner dependent on the Bsa T3SS. In contrast, CHBP could be detected in U937 cells infected with B. pseudomallei by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting in a manner dependent on bsaQ. Unlike E. coli Cif, CHBP was localized within the cytoplasm of B. pseudomallei-infected cells. A B. pseudomallei chbP insertion mutant showed a significant reduction in cytotoxicity and plaque formation compared to the wild-type strain that could be restored by plasmid-mediated trans-complementation. However, there was no defect in actin-based motility or multinucleated giant cell formation by the chbP mutant. The data suggest that the level or timing of CHBP secretion differs from a known Bsa-secreted effector and that CHBP is required for selected virulence-associated phenotypes in vitro.

  8. Fucoidan inhibits the proliferation of human urinary bladder cancer T24 cells by blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Young; Kim, Gi-Young; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Wun Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2014-05-09

    Although fucoidan has been shown to exert anticancer activity against several types of cancer cell lines, no reports have explored fucoidan-affected cell growth in human urinary bladder cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of fucoidan in human bladder cancer T24 cells. Our results indicated that fucoidan decreased the viability of T24 cells through the induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis. Fucoidan-induced G1 arrest is associated with the enhanced expression of the Cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and dephosphorylation of the pRB along with enhanced binding of p21 to Cdk4/6 as well as pRB to the transcription factor E2Fs. Further investigations showed the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol, proving mitochondrial dysfunction upon fucoidan treatment with a corresponding increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio. Fucoidan-triggered apoptosis was also accompanied by the up-regulation of Fas and truncated Bid as well as the sequential activation of caspase-8. Furthermore, a significant increased activation of caspase-9/-3 was detected in response to fucoidan treatment with the decreased expression of IAPs and degradation of PARP, whereas a pan-caspase inhibitor significantly suppressed apoptosis and rescued the cell viability reduction. In conclusion, these observations suggest that fucoidan attenuates G1-S phase cell cycle progression and serves as an important mediator of crosstalk between caspase-dependent intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in T24 cells.

  9. Knockdown of SALL4 expression using RNA interference induces cell cycle arrest, enhances early apoptosis, inhibits invasion and increases chemosensitivity to temozolomide in U251 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yan, Yong; Jiang, Ying; Qian, Jun; Jiang, Lei; Hu, Guohan; Lu, Yicheng; Luo, Chun

    2017-10-01

    Spalt-like transcription factor 4 (SALL4) is essential for the maintenance of the self-renewal and pluripotent properties in embryonic stem cells. Although the detailed mechanism remains unclear, dysregulation of SALL4 has been detected in various malignancies. Previously, the authors' of the present study reported that the expression level of SALL4 was associated with the poor prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The present study aimed to investigate the function of SALL4 in U251 human glioblastoma cells, including apoptosis and invasion inhibition. It was revealed that knockdown of SALL4 expression through RNA interference induced cell cycle arrest, enhanced early apoptosis and significantly inhibited invasion. Furthermore, downregulation of SALL4 was associated with a significantly lower expression level of the core transcription factors, including POU class 5 homeobox 1, SRY-box 2 and Nanog homeobox. In addition, inhibition of SALL4 significantly reduced the concentration of chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide required to inhibit cell growth by 50%, which decreased from 113.66±23.07 and 114.93±20.91 µg/ml to 68.34±3.52 and 67.44±4.71 µg/ml in two independent short interfering RNA transfected groups. These results indicate that SALL4 serves an important role in the GBM pathophysiology and targeting SALL4 may be a potential approach to the treatment of GBM.

  10. Morin Inhibits Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion of Bladder Cancer EJ Cells via Modulation of Signaling Pathways, Cell Cycle Regulators, and Transcription Factor-Mediated MMP-9 Expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Shick; Won, Se Yeon; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Hwang, Byungdoo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical Research Previous studies have shown that morin exerts diverse pharmacological activities. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activity of morin on bladder cancer EJ cells. Morin significantly inhibited EJ cell proliferation, which was related to the G1-phase cell cycle arrest together with the reduced expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4 via increased expression of p21WAF1. Morin also increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and decreased JNK and AKT phosphorylation without altering the p38MAPK phosphorylation levels. Morin treatment suppressed the migration and invasion of EJ cells in wound-healing and transwell cell invasion assays. Zymographic and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that morin suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) via repression of the binding activity of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB. Collectively, these results demonstrate that morin reduced cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4 expression via the induction of p21WAF1 expression, increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and decreased JNK, and AKT phosphorylation, and prevented MMP-9 expression via the inhibition of transcription factors AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB, thereby resulting in the inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells. These results provide a novel insight into the use of morin in the prevention of bladder cancer. Drug Dev Res 78 : 81-90, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Protein-bound P-cresol inhibits human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Li, Jing; Li, Xun; Yuan, Fa-Huan

    2017-01-01

    P-cresol is a typical protein-bound uremic toxin, which is retained in patients with renal failure. It is not known whether protein-bound P-cresol exhibits the toxicity in humans. This study aims to investigate the endothelial toxicity of protein-bound P-cresol. Cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with unbound or human serum albumin-bound (HSA, 4 g/dL), P-cresol (0, 20, 40, 80 μg/mL) for 24, 48, 72 h, respectively. Cell viability was determined by using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed by using flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle proteins in HUVEC were analyzed by using western blot and double immunofluorescent labeling assay. The results indicated that the viability of HUVEC was dose- and time-dependently inhibited by the protein-bound P-cresol (77.56% inhibition at 72 h, P<0.05) and unbound P-cresol (80.65% inhibition at 72 h, P<0.05). Most HUVECs were arrested at G0/G1 phase by both protein-bound P-cresol (79.63% inhibition at 72 h, P<0.05) and unbound P-cresol (81.27% at 72 h, P<0.05). Both protein-bound and unbound P-cresol enhanced the expression of p21Cip1 (0.62 and 0.60, both P<0.05) and suppressed the expression of cyclin D1 (0.49 and 0.53, both P<0.05) in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, unbound and protein-bound P-cresol inhibit the HUVEC proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which associates with the up-regulation of p21Cip1 and down-regulation of cyclin D1. PMID:28469807

  12. n-Butyrate, a cell cycle blocker, inhibits the replication of polyomaviruses and papillomaviruses but not that of adenoviruses and herpesviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, F F; Cowsert, L M; Villarreal, L P

    1994-01-01

    Small DNA viruses are dependent on the interaction of early proteins (such as large T antigen) with host p53 and Rb to bring about the G1-to-S cell cycle transition. The large DNA viruses are less dependent on host regulatory genes since additional early viral proteins (such as viral DNA polymerase, DNA metabolic enzymes, and other replication proteins) are involved in DNA synthesis. A highly conserved domain of large T antigen (similar to the p53-binding region) exclusively identifies papovavirus, parvovirus, and papillomaviruses from all other larger DNA viruses and implies a conserved interaction with host regulatory genes. In this report, we show that 3 to 6 mM butyrate, a general cell cycle blocker implicated in inhibition of the G1-to-S transition, inhibits DNA replication of polyomavirus and human papillomavirus type 11 but not the replication of larger DNA viruses such as adenovirus types 2 and 5, herpes simplex virus type 1, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus, which all bypass the butyrate-mediated cell cycle block. This butyrate effect on polyomavirus replication is not cell type specific, nor does it depend on the p53 or Rb gene, as inhibition was seen in fibroblasts with intact or homozygous deleted p53 or Rb, 3T6 cells, keratinocytes, C2C12 myoblasts, and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In addition, butyrate did not inhibit expression of polyomavirus T antigen. The antiviral effect of butyrate involves a form of imprinted state, since pretreatment of cells with 3 mM butyrate inhibits human papillomavirus type 11 DNA replication for at least 96 h after its removal. Butyrate, therefore, serves as a molecular tool in dissecting the life cycle of smaller DNA viruses from that of the larger DNA viruses in relation to the cell cycle. Images PMID:8035479

  13. Lebein, a snake venom disintegrin, suppresses human colon cancer cells proliferation and tumor-induced angiogenesis through cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and inhibition of VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Zakraoui, Ons; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Aloui, Zohra; Othman, Houcemeddine; Grépin, Renaud; Haoues, Meriam; Essafi, Makram; Srairi-Abid, Najet; Gasmi, Ammar; Karoui, Habib; Pagès, Gilles; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2017-01-01

    Lebein, is an heterodimeric disintegrin isolated from Macrovipera lebetina snake venom that was previously characterized as an inhibitor of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the effect of Lebein on the p53-dependent growth of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that Lebein significantly inhibited LS174 (p53wt), HCT116 (p53wt), and HT29 (p53mut) colon cancer cell viability by inducing cell cycle arrest through the modulation of expression levels of the tumor suppression factor p53, cell cycle regulating proteins cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK4, retinoblastoma (Rb), CDK1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Interestingly, Lebein-induced apoptosis of colon cancer cells was dependent on their p53 status. Thus, in LS174 cells, cell death was associated with PARP cleavage and the activation of caspases 3 and 8 while in HCT116 cells, Lebein induced caspase-independent apoptosis through increased expression of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF). In LS174 cells, Lebein triggers the activation of the MAPK ERK1/2 pathway through induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also decreased cell adhesion and migration to fibronectin through down regulation of α5β1 integrin. Moreover, Lebein significantly reduced the expression of two angiogenesis stimulators, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Neuropilin 1 (NRP1). It inhibited the VEGF-induced neovascularization process in the quail embryonic CAM system and blocked the development of human colon adenocarcinoma in nude mice. Overall, our work indicates that Lebein may be useful to design a new therapy against colon cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor AR-42 differentially affects cell cycle transit in meningeal and meningioma cells, potently inhibiting NF2-deficient meningioma growth

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Sarah S.; Akhmametyeva, Elena M.; Oblinger, Janet L.; Bush, Matthew L.; Huang, Jie; Senner, Volker; Chen, Ching-Shih; Jacob, Abraham; Welling, D. Bradley; Chang, Long-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas constitute ~34% of primary intracranial tumors and are associated with increased mortality in NF2 patients. To evaluate potential medical therapies for these tumors, we have established a quantifiable orthotopic model for NF2-deficient meningiomas. We showed that telomerase-immortalized Ben-Men-1 benign meningioma cells harbored a single nucleotide deletion in NF2 exon 7 and did not express the NF2 protein, merlin. We also demonstrated that AR-42, a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor, inhibited proliferation of both Ben-Men-1 and normal meningeal cells by increasing expression of p16INK4A, p21CIP1/WAF1, and p27KIP1. Also, AR-42 increased pro-apoptotic Bim expression and decreased anti-apoptotic BclXL levels. However, AR-42 predominantly arrested Ben-Men-1 cells at G2/M, while inducing cell-cycle arrest at G1 in meningeal cells. Consistently, AR-42 substantially decreased the levels of cyclin D1, E, and A, and PCNA in meningeal cells while significantly reducing the expression of cyclin B, important for progression through G2, in Ben-Men-1 cells. In addition, AR-42 decreased Aurora A and B expression. To compare the in vivo efficacies of AR-42 and AR-12, a PDK1 inhibitor, we generated and used luciferase-expressing Ben-Men-1-LucB cells to establish intracranial xenografts that grew over time. While AR-12 treatment moderately slowed tumor growth, AR-42 caused regression of Ben-Men-1-LucB tumors. Importantly, AR-42-treated tumors showed minimal regrowth when xenograft-bearing mice were switched to normal diet. Together, these results suggest that AR-42 is a potential therapy for meningiomas. The differential effect of AR-42 on cell-cycle progression of normal meningeal and meningioma cells may have implications for why AR-42 is well-tolerated while it potently inhibits tumor growth. PMID:23151902

  15. Downregulation of p16(ink4a) inhibits cell proliferation and induces G1 cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chu-Yue; Bao, Wei; Wang, Li-Hua

    2014-06-01

    Studies have suggested that p16(ink4a) may be a surrogate biomarker for the diagnosis of cervical cancer; however, the function of p16(ink4a) in human cervical cancer cells remains largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate the role of p16(ink4a) in human cervical cancer cells. Immunocytochemistry was used to examine invasive squamous cell carcinoma and its precancerous lesions. p16(ink4a)-siRNA was transfected into SiHa and HeLa cells to deplete its expression. The cellular levels of p16(ink4a) mRNA and protein were detected by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Proliferation rates were assessed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and plate colony formation assays. Cellular migration and invasion ability were assessed by a wound healing assay and Transwell assay. Cellular apoptosis and the cell cycle were measured by flow cytometry. The protein levels of retinoblastoma (Rb), phosphorylated Rb (phospho-Rb), cyclin D1 and caspase-3 were determined by western blot analysis. The results revealed that p16(ink4a) was overexpressed in the cervical cancer and precancerous lesions (P<0.05). The downregulation of p16(ink4a) in the SiHa and HeLa cells inhibited their proliferation, migration and invasion. In the SiHa cells, p16(ink4a)-siRNA also induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that the downregulation of p16(ink4a) in the SiHa cells markedly induced caspase-3 activation and decreased cyclin D1 expression. These data suggest that the overexpression of p16(ink4a) appears to be useful in monitoring cervical precancerous lesions, which supports that the hypothesis that p16(ink4a) is a surrogate biomarker for the diagnosis of cervical cancer. The therapeutic targeting of overexpressed p16(ink4a) in the p16(ink4a)-cyclin-Rb pathway may be a useful strategy in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  16. N-Acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline inhibits DNA synthesis in human mesangial cells via up-regulation of cell cycle modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Haneda, Masakazu; Sugimoto, Toshiro . E-mail: toshiro@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Shibuya, Kazuyuki; Isono, Motohide; Isshiki, Keiji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Uzu, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Koya, Daisuke

    2006-04-14

    N-Acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) was originally reported as a natural inhibitor of the proliferation of stem cells. To elucidate whether Ac-SDKP inhibits the proliferation of human mesangial cells, we examined the effect of Ac-SDKP on fetal calf serum (FCS)- or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced DNA synthesis and a cell proliferation. Ac-SDKP inhibited PDGF-BB- or FCS-induced DNA synthesis without cellular toxicity. The protein expression of p53 and p27{sup kip1} was significantly increased by Ac-SDKP. Ac-SDKP also up-regulated the PDGF-BB-stimulated expression of p21{sup cip1} and suppressed PDGF-BB-induced cyclin D{sub 1} expression. In p53 knock-out human mesangial cells made with small interference RNA, the protein expression of p21{sup cip1} and p27{sup kip1} was also decreased and the inhibitory effect of Ac-SDKP on mesangial proliferation was completely abolished. Ac-SDKP increased the stability of p53 protein as demonstrated by pulse-chase experiment. These results suggest that p53 is the key mediator of Ac-SDKP-induced inhibition of DNA synthesis through the up-regulation of cell cycle modulators, highlighting a potential effect of Ac-SDKP on various progressive renal diseases.

  17. Sulforaphane inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell by up-regulation of p53 leading to G1/S cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Lim, Yong; Kim, Seung-Jung; Yoo, Kyu-Dong; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Lee, Mi-Yea; Yun, Yeo-Pyo

    2013-01-01

    Vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis artery angioplasty are associated with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and intimal thickening arterial walls. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate produced in cruciferous vegetables, on VSMC proliferation and neointimal formation in a rat carotid artery injury model. Sulforaphane at the concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μM significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced VSMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, determined by cell count. The IC50 value of sulforaphane-inhibited VSMC proliferation was 0.8 μM. Sulforaphane increased the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and p53 levels, while it decreased CDK2 and cyclin E expression. The effects of sulforaphane on vascular thickening were determined 14 days after the injury to the rat carotid artery. The angiographic mean luminary diameters of the group treated with 2 and 4 μM sulforaphane were 0.25±0.1 and 0.09±0.1 mm², respectively, while the value of the control groups was 0.40±0.1 mm², indicating that sulforaphane may inhibit neointimal formation. The expression of PCNA, maker for cell cycle arrest, was decreased, while that of p53 and p21 was increased, which showed the same pattern as one in in-vitro study. These results suggest that sulforaphane-inhibited VSMC proliferation may occur through the G1/S cell cycle arrest by up-regulation of p53 signaling pathway, and then lead to the decreased neointimal hyperplasia thickening. Thus, sulforaphane may be a promising candidate for the therapy of atherosclerosis and post-angiography restenosis. © 2013.

  18. Overexpression of high molecular weight FGF-2 forms inhibits glioma growth by acting on cell-cycle progression and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiere, Sylvie; Azar, Rania; Belloc, Francis; Guersel, Demir; Pyronnet, Stephane; Bikfalvi, Andreas Auguste, Patrick

    2008-12-10

    In order to clarify the role of HMW FGF-2 in glioma development and angiogenesis, we over-expressed different human FGF-2 isoforms in C6 rat glioma cell line using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. Phenotypic modifications were analyzed in vitro and compared to untransfected cells or to cells over-expressing 18 kDa FGF-2 or all FGF-2 isoforms. In particular, we demonstrate that HMW FGF-2 has unique features in inhibiting glioma cell proliferation. HMW FGF-2 expressing cells showed a cell-cycle arrest at the G2M, demonstrating a role of HMW FGF-2 in controlling the entry in mitosis. Moreover, hydroxyurea was ineffective in blocking cells at the G1S boundary when HMW FGF-2 was expressed. We also show that the HMW FGF-2 isoforms inhibit 4E-BP1 phosphorylation at critical sites restoring the translation inhibitory activity of 4E-BP1. In vivo, inhibition of tumor growth was observed when cells expressed HMW FGF-2. This indicates that HMW FGF-2 inhibits tumor growth in glioma cells by acting on cell-cycle progression and protein translation.

  19. Overexpression of HDAC9 promotes oral squamous cell carcinoma growth, regulates cell cycle progression, and inhibits apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Bhawna; Raut, Satish K; Panda, Naresh K; Rattan, Vidya; Radotra, Bishan D; Khullar, Madhu

    2016-04-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of deacetylase enzymes that regulate the acetylation state of histones and a variety of other non-histone proteins including key oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins, which modulates chromatin conformation, leading to regulation of gene expression. HDACs has been grouped into classes I-IV and histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9) belongs to class IIa which exhibits tissue-specific expression. Recent reports have demonstrated both pro-oncogenic and tumor suppressive role for HDAC9 in different cancers; however, its role in OSCC remains elusive. Here, we investigated the role of HDAC9 in pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our data showed significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of HDAC9 in clinical OSCC samples and UPCI-SCC-116 cells as compared to normal counterpart. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the patients with high-level of HDAC9 expression had significantly reduced overall survival than those with low-level of HDAC9 expression (p = 0.034). Knockdown of HDAC9 using siRNA interference suppressed cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in UPCI-SCC-116 cells. Immunofluorescence analysis showed increased nuclear localization of HDAC9 in frozen OSCC sections, and indicative of active HDAC9 that may transcriptionally repress its downstream target genes. Subsequent investigation revealed that overexpression of HDAC9 contributes to OSCC carcinogenesis via targeting a transcription factor, MEF2D, and NR4A1/Nur77, a pro-apoptotic MEF2 target.

  20. Silymarin inhibits melanoma cell growth both in vitro and in vivo by targeting cell cycle regulators, angiogenic biomarkers and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Mudit; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin diseases and is often associated with activating mutations of the proto-oncogene BRAF. To develop more effective strategies for the prevention or treatment of melanoma, we have examined the inhibitory effects of silymarin, a flavanoid from Silybum marianum, on melanoma cells. Using A375 (BRAF-mutated) and Hs294t (non BRAF-mutated but highly metastatic) human melanoma cell lines, we found that in vitro treatment with silymarin resulted in a dose-dependent: (i) reduction in cell viability; (ii) enhancement of either Go/G1 (A375) or G2-M (Hs294t) phase cell cycle arrest with corresponding alterations in cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases; and (iii) induction of apoptosis. The silymarin-induced apoptosis of human melanoma cells was associated with a reduction in the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl), an increase in the levels of pro-apoptotic protein (Bax), and activation of caspases. Further, oral administration of silymarin (500 mg/kg body weight/2× a week) significantly inhibited (60%, P < 0.01) the growth of BRAF-mutated A375 melanoma tumor xenografts, and this was associated with: (i) inhibition of cell proliferation; (ii) induction of apoptosis of tumor cells; (iii) alterations in cell cycle regulatory proteins; and (iv) reduced expression of tumor angiogenic biomarkers in tumor xenograft tissues. These results indicate that silymarin may have a chemotherapeutic effect on human melanoma cell growth and warrant its further evaluation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Putranjivain A from Euphorbia jolkini inhibits proliferation of human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells via blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, P.-L.; Cho, C.-Y.; Hsu, Y.-L.; Lin, T.-C.; Lin, C.-C. . E-mail: aalin@ms24.hinet.net

    2006-05-15

    Putranjivain A, isolated from the whole plant of Euphorbia jolkini Bioss (Euphorbiaceae), was investigated for its antiproliferative activity in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. The results showed that putranjivain A inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 by blocking cell cycle progression in the G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptosis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that putranjivain A increased the expression of p21/WAF1 concomitantly as MCF-7 cell underwent G0/G1 arrest. An enhancement in Fas/APO-1 and its two forms of ligands, membrane-bound Fas ligand (mFasL) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL), might be responsible for the apoptotic effect induced by putranjivain A. Our study reports here for the first time that the induction of p21/WAF1 and the activity of Fas/Fas ligand apoptotic system may participate in the antiproliferative activity of putranjivain A in MCF-7 cells.

  2. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways.

    PubMed

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; Yeh, Wen-I; Berro, Reem; Klase, Zachary; Pedati, Caitlin; Kehn-Hall, Kyleen; Wu, Weilin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-06-10

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L), a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-kappaB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-kappaB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-kappaB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds) to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKbeta kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration) value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A, which target

  3. Inhibition of cell proliferation and migration by oxidative stress from ascorbate-driven juglone redox cycling in human bladder-derived T24 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kviecinski, M.R.; Pedrosa, R.C.; Felipe, K.B.; Farias, M.S.; Glorieux, C.; Valenzuela, M.; Sid, B.; and others

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxicity of juglone is markedly increased by ascorbate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T24 cell death by oxidative stress is necrosis-like. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Redox cycling by juglone/ascorbate inhibits cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular migration is impaired by juglone/ascorbate. -- Abstract: The effects of juglone on T24 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of ascorbate. The EC{sub 50} value for juglone at 24 h decreased from 28.5 {mu}M to 6.3 {mu}M in the presence of ascorbate. In juglone-treated cells, ascorbate increased ROS formation (4-fold) and depleted GSH (65%). N-acetylcysteine or catalase restricted the juglone/ascorbate-mediated effects, highlighting the role of oxidative stress in juglone cytotoxicity. Juglone alone or associated with ascorbate did not cause caspase-3 activation or PARP cleavage, suggesting necrosis-like cell death. DNA damage and the mild ER stress caused by juglone were both enhanced by ascorbate. In cells treated with juglone (1-5 {mu}M), a concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation was observed. Ascorbate did not impair cell proliferation but its association with juglone led to a clonogenic death state. The motility of ascorbate-treated cells was not affected. Juglone slightly restricted motility, but cells lost their ability to migrate most noticeably when treated with juglone plus ascorbate. We postulate that juglone kills cells by a necrosis-like mechanism inhibiting cell proliferation and the motility of T24 cells. These effects are enhanced in the presence of ascorbate.

  4. Grape antioxidant dietary fiber inhibits intestinal polyposis in ApcMin/+ mice: relation to cell cycle and immune response.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Tena, Susana; Lizárraga, Daneida; Miranda, Anibal; Vinardell, Maria P; García-García, Francisco; Dopazo, Joaquín; Torres, Josep L; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio; Capellà, Gabriel; Cascante, Marta

    2013-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that fiber and phenolic compounds might have a protective effect on the development of colon cancer in humans. Accordingly, we assessed the chemopreventive efficacy and associated mechanisms of action of a lyophilized red grape pomace containing proanthocyanidin (PA)-rich dietary fiber [grape antioxidant dietary fiber (GADF)] on spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model. Mice were fed a standard diet (control group) or a 1% (w/w) GADF-supplemented diet (GADF group) for 6 weeks. GADF supplementation greatly reduced intestinal tumorigenesis, significantly decreasing the total number of polyps by 76%. Moreover, size distribution analysis showed a considerable reduction in all polyp size categories [diameter <1mm (65%), 1-2mm (67%) and >2mm (87%)]. In terms of polyp formation in the proximal, middle and distal portions of the small intestine, a decrease of 76, 81 and 73% was observed, respectively. Putative molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of intestinal tumorigenesis were investigated by comparison of microarray expression profiles of GADF-treated and non-treated mice. We observed that the effects of GADF are mainly associated with the induction of a G1 cell cycle arrest and the downregulation of genes related to the immune response and inflammation. Our findings show for the first time the efficacy and associated mechanisms of action of GADF against intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice, suggesting its potential for the prevention of colorectal cancer.

  5. Potential role of Notch1 signaling pathway in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line Hep-2 involving proliferation inhibition, cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jing; Qin, Zhaobing; Li, Sha; Liu, Hongtao; Lu, Zhaoming

    2009-10-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and laryngeal cancer represents the largest subgroup. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its malignant behavior and progression is not clarified. Accumulating evidence has shown that Notch1 signaling pathway plays a central role in carcinogenesis, but its potential role in regulating the development of laryngeal carcinoma, has not been characterized. Here, we identified that Notch1 signaling pathway was activated in laryngeal carcinoma accompanied with up-regulation of Notch1 and Hes1 expression. Overexpression of Notch1 in laryngeal carcinoma cell line Hep-2 led to suppression of tumor cellular proliferation and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase and induced cell apoptosis, which were coupled with the down-regulation of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cdk2 and bcl-2 and up-regulation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and p53. Most importantly, up-regulation of Notch1 expression also reduced the migration of Hep-2 cells, which was closely associated with down-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The finding may lay a foundation for further investigations into the Notch1 signaling pathway as a potential target for laryngeal carcinoma.

  6. Novel ent-Kaurane Diterpenoid from Rubus corchorifolius L. f. Inhibits Human Colon Cancer Cell Growth via Inducing Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexiang; Wu, Xian; Ouyang, Wen; Gu, Min; Gao, Zili; Song, Mingyue; Chen, Yunjiao; Lin, Yanyin; Cao, Yong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    The tender leaves of Rubus corchorifolius L. f. have been consumed as tea for drinking in China since ancient times. In this study, a novel ent-kaurane diterpenoid was isolated and identified from R. corchorifolius L. f. leaves as ent-kaur-2-one-16β,17-dihydroxy-acetone-ketal (DEK). DEK suppressed the growth of HCT116 human colon cancer cells with an IC50 value of 40 ± 0.21 μM, while it did not cause significant growth inhibition on CCD-18Co human colonic myofibroblasts at up to100 μM. Moreover, DEK induced extensive apoptosis and S phase cell cycle arrest in the colon cancer cells. Accordingly, DEK caused profound effects on multiple signaling proteins associated with cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. DEK significantly upregulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved PARP, p53, Bax, and tumor suppressor p21(Cip1/Waf1), downregulated the levels of cell cycle regulating proteins such as cyclinD1, CDK2, and CDK4 and carcinogenic proteins such as EGFR and COX-2, and suppressed the activation of Akt. Overall, our results provide a basis for using DEK as a potential chemopreventive agent against colon carcinogenesis.

  7. SOX4 inhibits GBM cell growth and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through Akt-p53 axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Huawei; Shao, Jiaofang; Mao, Ruifang; Liu, Jie; Ma, Yingying; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Na; Zheng, Shu; Lin, Biaoyang

    2014-11-01

    SOX4 is a transcription factor required for tissue development and differentiation in vertebrates. Overexpression of SOX4 has been reported in many cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, the underlying mechanism of actions has not been studied. In this study, we investigated the role of SOX4 in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to assess the association between SOX4 expression levels and survival times in primary GBM samples. Cre/lox P system was used to generate gain or loss of SOX4 in GBM cells, and microarray analysis uncovered the regulation network of SOX4 in GBM cells. High SOX4 expression was significantly associated with good prognosis of primary GBMs. SOX4 inhibited the growth of GBM cell line LN229, A172G and U87MG, partly via the activation of p53-p21 signaling and down-regulation of phosphorylated AKT1. Gene expression profiling and subsequent gene ontology analysis showed that SOX4 influenced several key pathways including the Wnt/ beta-catenin and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Our study found that SOX4 acts as a tumor suppressor in GBM cells by induce cell cycle arrest and inhibiting cell growth.

  8. Emulsified isoflurane treatment inhibits the cell cycle and respiration of human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Deng, Jia; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Zeng, Xianzheng; He, Zhiyang; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhuoning; Jiang, Chunling

    2016-07-01

    Emulsified isoflurane (EIso), as a result of its rapid anesthetic induction, recovery and convenience, is widely used as a novel intravenous general anesthetic. Treatment with EIso can reduce injuries caused by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) to organs, including the heart, lung and liver, without knowing understanding the molecular mechanism. The present study hypothesized that treatment with EIso can affect the physiological processes of human lung bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) prior to I/R. To test this hypothesis, the present study first constructed stable p53 knockdown and synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase (SCO)2 knockdown 16HBE cells. The above cells were subsequently treated with EIso at a concentration of 0.1 and 0.2% for 24 h. The relevant concentration of fat emulsion was used as a negative control. The expression levels of p53, p21, SCO1, SCO2 and Tp53‑induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) were detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Subsequently, the cell proliferation, respiration and glycolysis were investigated. The results revealed that EIso treatment significantly decreased the transcription of TIGAR, SCO1 and SCO2, and increased the transcription of p21, which are all p53 target genes, in a p53-independent manner. The cell cycle was inhibited by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase. Respiration was reduced, which caused a decrease in oxygen consumption and the accumulation of lactate and reactive oxygen species. Taken together, EIso treatment inhibited the proliferation and respiration, and promoted glycolysis in 16HBE cells. This regulatory pathway may represent a protective mechanism of EIso treatment by inhibiting cell growth and decreasing the oxygen consumption from I/R.

  9. The inhibition of PI3K and NFκB promoted curcumin-induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M via altering polyamine metabolism in Bcl-2 overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Berrak, Özge; Akkoç, Yunus; Arısan, Elif Damla; Çoker-Gürkan, Ajda; Obakan-Yerlikaya, Pınar; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2016-02-01

    Bcl-2 protein has been contributed with number of genes which are involved in oncogenesis. Among the many targets of Bcl-2, NFκB have potential role in induction of cell cycle arrest. Curcumin has potential therapeutic effects against breast cancer through multiple signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of curcumin in induction of cell cycle arrest via regulating of NFκB and polyamine biosynthesis in wt and Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. To examine the effect of curcumin on cell cycle regulatory proteins, PI3K/Akt, NFκB pathways and polyamine catabolism, we performed immunoblotting assay. In addition, cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The results indicated that curcumin induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase by downregulation of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 and inhibited colony formation in MCF-7wt cells. However, Bcl-2 overexpression prevented the inhibition of cell cycle associated proteins after curcumin treatment. The combination of LY294002, PI3K inhibitor, and curcumin induced cell cycle arrest by decreasing CDK4, CDK2 and cyclin E2 in Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. Moreover, LY294002 further inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt in Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. Curcumin could suppress the nuclear transport of NFκB through decreasing the interaction of P-IκB-NFκB. The combination of wedelolactone, NFκB inhibitor, and curcumin acted different on SSAT expression in wt MCF-7 and Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. NFκB inhibition increased the SSAT after curcumin treatment in Bcl-2 overexpressed MCF-7 cells. Inhibition of NFκB activity as well as suppression of ROS generation with NAC resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint after curcumin treatment in wt MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, the potential role of curcumin in induction of cell cycle arrest is related with NFκB-regulated polyamine biosynthesis.

  10. Theracurmin® efficiently inhibits the growth of human prostate and bladder cancer cells via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minyong; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Kook, Ha Rim; Lee, Sangchul; Oh, Jong Jin; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok-Soo

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer properties of Theracurmin®, a novel form of the yellow curry pigment curcumin, as well as explore the molecular mechanisms of the potential anticancer effects of Theracurmin® on human prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells in vitro. The proliferation of cancer cells was examined by using the Cell Counting Kit-8. The clonogenic growth potential was determined by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle distribution was evaluated by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis was applied to explore the expression patterns of molecules associated with apoptotic cell death and cell cycle checkpoint. We noted that Theracurmin® and curcumin exhibited similar anticancer effects in both androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These agents reduced cell viability and clonogenic growth potential by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle disturbance in human prostate cancer cells. Theracurmin® and curcumin also exerted marked anticancer effects on human bladder cancer cells, even in cisplatin-resistant T24R2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, Theracurmin® and curcumin treatment decreased cell viability and clonogenicity via induction of apoptotic cell death and cell cycle dysregulation in human bladder cancer cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that Theracurmin® has potential as an anticancer agent in complementary and alternative medicine for these urological cancers.

  11. Plitidepsin has a dual effect inhibiting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis via Rac1/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Alonso, María J; González-Santiago, Laura; Zarich, Natasha; Martínez, Teresa; Alvarez, Enrique; Rojas, José María; Muñoz, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer and a serious health problem worldwide because of its increasing incidence and the lack of satisfactory chemotherapy for late stages of the disease. The marine depsipeptide Aplidin (plitidepsin) is an antitumoral agent under phase II clinical development against several neoplasias, including melanoma. We report that plitidepsin has a dual effect on the human SK-MEL-28 and UACC-257 melanoma cell lines; at low concentrations (inhibits the cell cycle by inducing G(1) and G(2)/M arrest, whereas at higher concentrations it induces apoptosis as assessed by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and the appearance of a hypodiploid peak in flow cytometry analyses. Plitidepsin activates Rac1 GTPase and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). In addition, it induces AKT and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. By using inhibitors, we found that JNK and p38 MAPK activation depends on Rac1 but not on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), whereas AKT activation is independent of Rac1 but requires PI3K activity. Plitidepsin cytotoxicity diminishes by Rac1 inhibition or by the blockage of JNK and p38 MAPK using 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB203580), but not by PI3K inhibition using wortmannin or 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (LY294002). It is remarkable that plitidepsin and dacarbazine, the alkylating agent most active for treating metastatic melanoma, show a synergistic antiproliferative effect that was paralleled at the level of JNK activation. These results indicate that Rac1/JNK activation is critical for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction by plitidepsin in melanoma cells. They also support the combined use of plitidepsin and dacarbazine in in vivo studies.

  12. Phyllanthus spp. Induces Selective Growth Inhibition of PC-3 and MeWo Human Cancer Cells through Modulation of Cell Cycle and Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yin-Quan; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2010-01-01

    Background Phyllanthus is a traditional medicinal plant that has been used in the treatment of many diseases including hepatitis and diabetes. The main aim of the present work was to investigate the potential cytotoxic effects of aqueous and methanolic extracts of four Phyllanthus species (P.amarus, P.niruri, P.urinaria and P.watsonii) against skin melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Phyllanthus plant appears to possess cytotoxic properties with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 150–300 µg/ml for aqueous extract and 50–150 µg/ml for methanolic extract that were determined using the MTS reduction assay. In comparison, the plant extracts did not show any significant cytotoxicity on normal human skin (CCD-1127Sk) and prostate (RWPE-1) cells. The extracts appeared to act by causing the formation of a clear “ladder” fragmentation of apoptotic DNA on agarose gel, displayed TUNEL-positive cells with an elevation of caspase-3 and -7 activities. The Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) level was lower than 15% in Phyllanthus treated-cancer cells. These indicate that Phyllanthus extracts have the ability to induce apoptosis with minimal necrotic effects. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that Phyllanthus induced a Go/G1-phase arrest on PC-3 cells and a S-phase arrest on MeWo cells and these were accompanied by accumulation of cells in the Sub-G1 (apoptosis) phase. The cytotoxic properties may be due to the presence of polyphenol compounds such as ellagitannins, gallotannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids found both in the water and methanol extract of the plants. Conclusions/Significance Phyllanthus plant exerts its growth inhibition effect in a selective manner towards cancer cells through the modulation of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis via caspases activation in melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Hence, Phyllanthus may be sourced for the development of a potent apoptosis-inducing anticancer agent. PMID

  13. Butein inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in acute lymphoblastic leukemia via FOXO3a/p27kip1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Na; Tian, Yun; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Qin, Ge; Li, Anchuan; Liang, Yan-Ni; Zhou, Huan-Juan; Ke, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo; Luo, Xue-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a common hematological malignancy characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of leukemia cells in children. Discovering and developing effective chemotherapeutic drugs are needed for ALL. In this study, we investigated the anti-leukemic activity of butein and its action mechanisms in ALL. Butein was found to significantly suppress the cellular proliferation of ALL cell lines and primary ALL blasts in a dose-dependent manner. It also induced cell cycle arrest by decreasing the expression of cyclin E and CDK2. We also found that butein promoted nuclear Forkhead Class box O3a (FOXO3a) localization, enhanced the binding of FOXO3a on the p27kip1 gene promoter and then increased the expression of p27kip1. Moreover, we showed that FOXO3a knockdown significantly decreased the proliferation inhibition by butein, whereas overexpression of FOXO3a enhanced the butein-mediated proliferation inhibition. However, overexpression of FOXO3a mutation (C-terminally truncated FOXO3a DNA-binding domain) decreased the proliferation inhibition by butein through decreasing the expression of p27kip1. Our results therefore demonstrate the therapeutic potential of butein for ALL via FOXO3a/p27kip1 pathway. PMID:26919107

  14. The SMRT Coregulator Enhances Growth of Estrogen Receptor-α-Positive Breast Cancer Cells by Promotion of Cell Cycle Progression and Inhibition of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Blackmore, Julia K.; Karmakar, Sudipan; Gu, Guowei; Chaubal, Vaishali; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The SMRT coregulator functions as a dual coactivator and corepressor for estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in a gene-specific manner, and in several studies its elevated expression correlates with poor outcome for breast cancer patients. A specific role of SMRT in breast cancer progression has not been elucidated, but SMRT knock-down limits estradiol-dependent growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In this study, small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches were used to determine the effects of SMRT depletion on growth of ERα-positive MCF-7 and ZR-75–1 breast cancer cells, as well as the ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer line. Depletion of SMRT inhibited growth of ERα-positive cells grown in monolayer but had no effect on growth of the ERα-negative cells. Reduced SMRT levels also negatively impacted the anchorage-independent growth of MCF-7 cells as assessed by soft agar colony formation assays. The observed growth inhibitions were due to a loss of estradiol-induced progression through the G1/S transition of the cell cycle and increased apoptosis in SMRT-depleted compared with control cells. Gene expression analyses indicated that SMRT inhibits apoptosis by a coordinated regulation of genes involved in apoptosis. Functioning as a dual coactivator for anti-apoptotic genes and corepressor for pro-apoptotic genes, SMRT can limit apoptosis. Together these data indicate that SMRT promotes breast cancer progression through multiple pathways leading to increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. PMID:24971610

  15. [Overexpression of SEPP1 inhibits the proliferation and induces cell cycle G2/M arrest of 786-O and 769-P human renal carcinoma cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kan; Zhao, Chaofei; Chen, Jianwen; Wu, Shengpan; Yao, Yuanxin; Wu, Chong; Luo, Guoxiong; Zhang, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Objective To establish selenoprotein P, plasma 1 (SEPP1) gene recombinant lentiviral vector and investigate the effect of SEPP1 on the proliferation of human clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells. Methods cDNA sequence of SEPP1 was cloned from the total cDNA of HEK293T cells by PCR. Then, the cDNA fragment was combined with the pLV-EGFP(2A)Puro vector and the constructed plasmid pLV-EGFP(2A)Puro-SEPP1 was transfected into HEK293T cells for packaging the virus. Forty-eight hours after transfected with the virus supernatant, the level of SEPP1 protein in 769-P and 786-O cells were tested by Western blotting. Cells were divided into recombinant lentivirus-infected cells, empty vector lentivirus-infected cells and the blank control cells. Cell proliferation rate was detected by MTS assay, colony forming ability was evaluated by plate clony formation assay and cell cycle change was assayed by flow cytometry after transfected with pLV-EGFP(2A)Puro-SEPP1 or empty pLV-EGFP(2A)Puro vector. Results Enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the recombinant plasmid pLV-EGFP(2A)Puro-SEPP1 was constructed successfully. After being infected by the virus supernatant, the 786-O and 769-P cells expressed EGFP. Compared with the empty vector group and the blank control group, expression level of SEPP1 in the experimental group was much higher. The cell proliferative ability was inhibited in the cells overexpressing SEPP1, and the colony forming ability of SEPP1-overexpressed cells evidently decreased. Cell cycle was arrested in G2/M phase in 786-O cells overexpressing SEPP1. Conclusion The recombinant plasmid pLV-EGFP(2A)Puro-SEPP1 has been constructed successfully. Overexpression of SEPP1 could significantly reduce the proliferation rate of 786-O and 769P cells, and cause G2/M phase arrest of 786-O cells.

  16. Cryptotanshinone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of multidrug resistant human chronic myeloid leukemia cells by inhibiting the activity of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yuqing; Cheng, Rubin; Zhou, Yuhong; Shen, Jianping; Peng, Laijun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Dai, Qun; Liu, Pei; Wang, Haibing; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Jia, Jia; Chen, Zhe

    2012-09-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT), a diterpene quinone isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza, is recently reported to have obvious anticancer activities against diverse cancer cells. However, the effect and regulatory mechanism of CPT remain unclear in human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative activity of CPT on the multidrug resistant CML cells K562/ADM. Our results demonstrated that CPT decreased the cell viability of K562/ADM cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through suppressing the expression of cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. Further studies indicated that CPT mainly functions at post-transcriptional levels, suggesting the involvement of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). CPT significantly reduced the expression and activity of eIF4E in K562/ADM cells. Overexpression of eIF4E obvious conferred resistance to the CPT antiproliferation and proapoptotic activity as well as the cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 expressions. Knockdown of eIF4E significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of CPT in K562/ADM, confirming the participation of eIF4E during CPT function process. More importantly, the relative inhibitory efficiency of CPT positively correlated with the reductions on eIF4E in primary CML specimens. These results demonstrated that CPT played antitumor roles in K562/ADM cells by inhibiting the eIF4E regulatory system. Our results provide a novel anticancer mechanism of CPT in human CML cells.

  17. Growth inhibition, cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Olga; Sannino, Anna; Romeo, Stefania; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Scarfi, Maria Rosaria

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper (BP) in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Materials & methods & results: BP treatment led to a delay in the cell growth, as proven by a minor increase in the cell number over time relative to that seen in untreated cells, assessed by trypan blue, resazurin and neutral red assays. The analysis of cell-cycle profile, by propidium iodide staining, indicated that BP treatment blocked cell-cycle progression by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, increased apoptosis was also recorded by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. The results presented here demonstrate an inhibitor effect of BP on cell growth that was likely through cytostatic and cytotoxic events.

  18. Induction of p21CIP1 protein and cell cycle arrest after inhibition of Aurora B kinase is attributed to aneuploidy and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Geeta; Ulrich, Tanja; Krause, Michael; Finkernagel, Florian; Gaubatz, Stefan

    2014-06-06

    Cell cycle progression requires a series of highly coordinated events that ultimately lead to faithful segregation of chromosomes. Aurora B is an essential mitotic kinase, which is involved in regulation of microtubule-kinetochore attachments and cytokinesis. Inhibition of Aurora B results in stabilization of p53 and induction of p53-target genes such as p21 to inhibit proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that induction of p21 by p53 after inhibition of Aurora B is dependent on the p38 MAPK, which promotes transcriptional elongation of p21 by RNA Pol II. In this study, we show that a subset of p53-target genes are induced in a p38-dependent manner upon inhibition of Aurora B. We also demonstrate that inhibition of Aurora B results in down-regulation of E2F-mediated transcription and that the cell cycle arrest after Aurora B inhibition depends on p53 and pRB tumor suppressor pathways. In addition, we report that activation of p21 after inhibition of Aurora B is correlated with increased chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy but not with binucleation or tetraploidy. We provide evidence that p21 is activated in aneuploid cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p38 MAPK. Finally, we demonstrate that certain drugs that act on aneuploid cells synergize with inhibitors of Aurora B to inhibit colony formation and oncogenic transformation. These findings provide an important link between aneuploidy and the stress pathways activated by Aurora B inhibition and also support the use of Aurora B inhibitors in combination therapy for treatment of cancer. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja; Kulcenty, Katarzyna; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Murias, Marek; Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  20. Short hairpin RNA targeting Notch2 inhibits U87 human glioma cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LI, XUEZHEN; HE, XIN; TIAN, WEI; WANG, JIANZHEN

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling has been reported to be oncogenic or tumor suppressive, depending on the tissue context. To investigate the effects of Notch2 knockdown on U87 human glioma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and the associated mechanisms, U87 cells were stably transfected with p green fluorescent protein (GFP)-V-RS Notch2 short hairpin (sh) RNA plasmid and pGFP-V-RS scramble-shRNA plasmid. The former was referred to as the Notch2-shRNA group and the latter as the negative-shRNA group. mRNA and protein expression, cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis and flow cytometry using propidium iodide, respectively. Tumor volume, tumor weight and cumulative survival rate were determined in a nude mouse xenograft tumor model. Notch2 mRNA and protein expression in the Notch2-shRNA group were reduced by 87.6 and 94.5% compared with the negative-shRNA group (P<0.001). Notch2 knockdown significantly inhibited U87 cell proliferation after three days of culture (P<0.05). Notch2 silencing induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase by upregulation of p21 protein expression and downregulation of mini chromosome maintenance complex 2 and cyclin-D1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Notch2 also induced U87 cell apoptosis. On day 50 after inoculation, tumor weight in the Notch2-shRNA group was significantly lower than that in the negative-shRNA group (0.55±0.10 vs. 1.23±0.52 g; P<0.01). The cumulative survival rate was significantly longer in the Notch2-shRNA group compared with the negative-shRNA group (log rank test P=0.01). In conclusion, Notch2 silencing inhibited U87 glioma cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Thus, Notch2 may be a key therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. PMID:25323114

  1. Short hairpin RNA targeting Notch2 inhibits U87 human glioma cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuezhen; He, Xin; Tian, Wei; Wang, Jianzhen

    2014-12-01

    Notch signaling has been reported to be oncogenic or tumor suppressive, depending on the tissue context. To investigate the effects of Notch2 knockdown on U87 human glioma cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and the associated mechanisms, U87 cells were stably transfected with p green fluorescent protein (GFP)‑V‑RS Notch2 short hairpin (sh) RNA plasmid and pGFP‑V‑RS scramble‑shRNA plasmid. The former was referred to as the Notch2‑shRNA group and the latter as the negative‑shRNA group. mRNA and protein expression, cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide analysis and flow cytometry using propidium iodide, respectively. Tumor volume, tumor weight and cumulative survival rate were determined in a nude mouse xenograft tumor model. Notch2 mRNA and protein expression in the Notch2‑shRNA group were reduced by 87.6 and 94.5% compared with the negative‑shRNA group (P<0.001). Notch2 knockdown significantly inhibited U87 cell proliferation after three days of culture (P<0.05). Notch2 silencing induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase by upregulation of p21 protein expression and downregulation of mini chromosome maintenance complex 2 and cyclin‑D1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Notch2 also induced U87 cell apoptosis. On day 50 after inoculation, tumor weight in the Notch2‑shRNA group was significantly lower than that in the negative‑shRNA group (0.55±0.10 vs. 1.23±0.52 g; P<0.01). The cumulative survival rate was significantly longer in the Notch2‑shRNA group compared with the negative‑shRNA group (log rank test P=0.01). In conclusion, Notch2 silencing inhibited U87 glioma cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Thus, Notch2 may be a key therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma.

  2. The microbial cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Nurse, P.; Streiblova, E.

    1984-01-01

    This book concentrates on the major problems of cell cycle control in microorganisms. A wide variety of microorganisms, ranging from bacteria and yeasts to hyphal fungi, algae, and ciliates are analyzed, with emphasis on the basic similarities among the organisms. Different ways of looking at cell cycle control which emphasize aspects of the problem such as circadian rhythms, limit cycle oscillators, and cell size models, are considered. New approaches such as the study of cell cycle mutants, and cloning of cell cycle control genes are also presented.

  3. Curcumin inhibits growth potential by G1 cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in p53-mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dasiram, Jade Dhananjay; Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Kannan, Janani; Kotteeswaran, Venkatesan; Sivalingam, Nageswaran

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic compound and it is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, have been reported to possess anticancer effect against stage I and II colon cancer. However, the effect of curcumin on colon cancer at Dukes' type C metastatic stage III remains still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of curcumin on p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage. The cellular viability and proliferation were assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity effect was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle distribution was performed by flow cytometry analysis. Here we have observed that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited the cellular viability and proliferation potential of p53 mutated COLO 320DM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin treatment showed no cytotoxic effects to the COLO 320DM cells. DNA fragmentation analysis, Hoechst and propidium iodide double fluorescent staining and confocal microscopy analysis revealed that curcumin treatment induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM cells. Furthermore, curcumin caused cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, decreased the cell population in the S phase and induced apoptosis in COLO 320DM colon adenocarcinoma cells. Together, these data suggest that curcumin exerts anticancer effects and induces apoptosis in p53 mutated COLO 320DM human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from Dukes' type C metastatic stage.

  4. Flavonoid-enriched apple fraction AF4 induces cell cycle arrest, DNA topoisomerase II inhibition, and apoptosis in human liver cancer HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Sudhanshu; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Apples are a major source of dietary phytochemicals such as flavonoids in the Western diet. Here we report anticancer properties and possible mechanism of action of apple flavonoid-enriched fraction (AF4) isolated from the peels of Northern Spy apples in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, HepG2. Treatment with AF4 induced cell growth inhibition in HepG2 cells in time- and dose-dependent manner. Concentration of 50 μg/ml (50 μg total monomeric polyphenols/ml) AF4 was sufficient to induce a significant reduction in cell viability within 6 h of treatment (92%, P < 0.05) but had very low toxicity (minimum 4% to maximum 16%) on primary liver and lung cells, which was significantly lower than currently prescribed chemotherapy drug Sorafenib (minimum 29% to maximum 49%, P < 0.05). AF4 induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells within 6 h of treatment via activation of caspase-3. Cell cycle analysis via flow-cytometer showed that AF4 induced G2/M phase arrest. Further, results showed that AF4 acts as a strong DNA topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor, which may be a plausible reason to drive the cells to apoptosis. Overall, our data suggests that AF4 possesses a significantly stronger antiproliferative and specific action than Sorafenib in vitro and is a potential natural chemotherapy agent for treatment of liver cancer.

  5. Reversible cell cycle inhibition and premature aging features imposed by conditional expression of p16Ink4a

    PubMed Central

    Boquoi, Amelie; Arora, Sanjeevani; Chen, Tina; Litwin, Sam; Koh, James; Enders, Greg H

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p16Ink4a (p16) is a canonical mediator of cellular senescence and accumulates in aging tissues, where it constrains proliferation of some progenitor cells. However, whether p16 induction in tissues is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation, mediate senescence, and/or impose aging features has remained unclear. To address these issues, we generated transgenic mice that permit conditional p16 expression. Broad induction at weaning inhibited proliferation of intestinal transit-amplifying and Lgr5+ stem cells and rapidly imposed features of aging, including hair loss, skin wrinkling, reduced body weight and subcutaneous fat, an increased myeloid fraction in peripheral blood, poor dentition, and cataracts. Aging features were observed with multiple combinations of p16 transgenes and transactivators and were largely abrogated by a germline Cdk4 R24C mutation, confirming that they reflect Cdk inhibition. Senescence markers were not found, and de-induction of p16, even after weeks of sustained expression, allowed rapid recovery of intestinal cell proliferation and reversal of aging features in most mice. These results suggest that p16-mediated inhibition of Cdk activity is sufficient to inhibit cell proliferation and impose aging features in somatic tissues of mammals and that at least some of these aging features are reversible. PMID:25481981

  6. Intravenous administration of Honokiol provides neuroprotection and improves functional recovery after traumatic brain injury through cell cycle inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiquan; Liao, Zhengbu; Sun, Xiaochuan; Shi, Quanhong; Huo, Gang; Xie, Yanfeng; Tang, Xiaolan; Zhi, Xinggang; Tang, Zhaohua

    2014-11-01

    Recently, increasing evidence has shown that cell cycle activation is a key factor of neuronal death and neurological dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aims to investigate the effects of Honokiol, a cell cycle inhibitor, on attenuating the neuronal damage and facilitating functional recovery after TBI in rats, in an attempt to unveil its underlying molecular mechanisms in TBI. This study suggested that delayed intravenous administration of Honokiol could effectively ameliorate TBI-induced sensorimotor and cognitive dysfunctions. Meanwhile, Honokiol treatment could also reduce the lesion volume and increase the neuronal survival in the cortex and hippocampus. The neuronal degeneration and apoptosis in the cortex and hippocampus were further significantly attenuated by Honokiol treatment. In addition, the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin D1, CDK4, pRb and E2F1, was significantly increased and endogenous cell cycle inhibitor p27 was markedly decreased at different time points after TBI. And these changes were significantly reversed by post-injury Honokiol treatment. Furthermore, the expression of some of the key cell cycle proteins such as cyclin D1 and E2F1 and the associated apoptosis in neurons were both remarkably attenuated by Honokiol treatment. These results show that delayed intravenous administration of Honokiol could effectively improve the functional recovery and attenuate the neuronal cell death, which is probably, at least in part, attributed to its role as a cell cycle inhibitior. This might give clues to developing attractive therapies for future clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nitrogen deficiency inhibits leaf blade growth in Lolium perenne by increasing cell cycle duration and decreasing mitotic and post-mitotic growth rates.

    PubMed

    Kavanová, Monika; Lattanzi, Fernando Alfredo; Schnyder, Hans

    2008-06-01

    Nitrogen deficiency severely inhibits leaf growth. This response was analysed at the cellular level by growing Lolium perenne L. under 7.5 mM (high) or 1 mM (low) nitrate supply, and performing a kinematic analysis to assess the effect of nitrogen status on cell proliferation and cell growth in the leaf blade epidermis. Low nitrogen supply reduced leaf elongation rate (LER) by 43% through a similar decrease in the cell production rate and final cell length. The former was entirely because of a decreased average cell division rate (0.023 versus 0.032 h(-1)) and thus longer cell cycle duration (30 versus 22 h). Nitrogen status did not affect the number of division cycles of the initial cell's progeny (5.7), and accordingly the meristematic cell number (53). Meristematic cell length was unaffected by nitrogen deficiency, implying that the division and mitotic growth rates were equally impaired. The shorter mature cell length arose from a considerably reduced post-mitotic growth rate (0.033 versus 0.049 h(-1)). But, nitrogen stress did not affect the position where elongation stopped, and increased cell elongation duration. In conclusion, nitrogen deficiency limited leaf growth by increasing the cell cycle duration and decreasing mitotic and post-mitotic elongation rates, delaying cell maturation.

  8. Apple phytochemical extracts inhibit proliferation of estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent human breast cancer cells through cell cycle modulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Liu, Rui Hai

    2008-12-24

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women in the United States. Dietary modification, particularly increased intake of fruits and vegetables, has been consistently associated with a reduced risk of various cancers, including breast cancer. Apples are a major source of dietary phytochemicals and flavonoids and possess potent antioxidant activity and antiproliferative activity in vitro. However, the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer properties of apple phytochemical extracts are not completely understood. In this study a possible mechanism by which apple extracts could inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro using estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines was analyzed. The data showed that apple phytochemical extracts significantly inhibited human breast cancer MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation at concentrations of 10-80 mg/mL (p < 0.05). DNA flow cytometric analysis showed that apple extracts significantly induced G1 arrest in MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations >20 mg/mL (p < 0.05). At concentrations of 15, 30, and 50 mg/mL, apple extracts caused a greater increase in the G1/S ratio in MDA-MB-231 cells when compared with MCF-7 cells (p < 0.05). Cyclin D1 and Cdk4 proteins, the two major G1/S transit regulators, decreased in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to apple extracts. These results suggest that the antiproliferative activities of apple phytochemical extracts toward human breast cancer cells might be due to the modulation effects on cell cycle machinery.

  9. 17beta-estradiol combined with testosterone promotes chicken osteoblast proliferation and differentiation by accelerating the cell cycle and inhibiting apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuxia; Deng, Yifeng; Zhou, Zhenlei; Tao, Qingshu; Zhu, Jie; Li, Xiaolan; Chen, Jinli; Hou, Jiafa

    2010-02-01

    Medullary bone is a unique tissue in the long bones cavities of lay hens, and plays an important role as a calcium reservoir for egg-shell formation. Medullary bone formation requires the synergistic action of estrogen and androgen on osteoblasts during the early stage of sexual maturity. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of 17beta-estradiol, testosterone, and the combination on the proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, apoptosis, the cell cycle of chicken osteoblasts in vitro. The proliferation of osteoblasts was examined with the MTT assay. Apoptosis and the cell cycle were assessed with flow cytometry. Either 17beta-estradiol (200 pg ml(-1)) or testosterone (100 pg ml(-1)) or the combination (100 pg ml(-1) each) significantly enhanced osteoblast proliferation and ALP activity, accelerated the osteoblast cell cycle, and stimulated osteoblast DNA synthesis in a period of 24 h. 17beta-estradiol, used alone or with testosterone, inhibited chicken osteoblast apoptosis; However, testosterone alone induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion, 17beta-estradiol combined with testosterone promoted osteoblast proliferation and ALP activity, accelerated the osteoblast cell cycle, inhibited osteoblast apoptosis.

  10. Licochalcone A Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines A549 and H460 by Inducing G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest and ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chenyu; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Wenxin; Zhou, Lina; Yu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhihong; Liu, Zhiguo; Zou, Peng; Liang, Guang

    2017-08-12

    Licochalcone A (LicA), a flavonoid isolated from the famous Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, has wide spectrum of pharmacological activities. In this study, the anti-cancer effects and potential mechanisms of LicA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were studied. LicA decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in NSCLC cells. LicA inhibited lung cancer cells growth by blocking cell cycle progression at the G2/M transition and inducing apoptosis. LicA treatment decreased the expression of MDM2, Cyclin B1, Cdc2 and Cdc25C in H460 and A549 cancer cell lines. In addition, LicA induced caspase-3 activation and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, which displayed features of apoptotic signals. Furthermore, LicA increased the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress related proteins, such as p-EIF2α and ATF4. These data provide evidence that LicA has the potential to be used in the treatment of lung cancer.

  11. G protein-coupled receptor 30 ligand G-1 increases aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling by inhibition of tubulin assembly and cell cycle arrest in human MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Patrick; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is well established. Apart from the nuclear receptors ERα and ERβ, oestrogen signalling further involves an unrelated G protein-coupled receptor termed GPR30. In order to investigate potential regulatory crosstalk, this study investigated the influence of G-1 as one of the few GPR30-specific ligands on the AHR regulon in MCF-7 cells. As a well-characterised model system, these human mammary carcinoma cells co-express all three receptors (AHR, ERα and GPR30) and are thus ideally suited to study corresponding regulatory pathway interactions on transcript level. Indeed, treatment with micromolar concentrations of the GPR30-specific agonist G-1 resulted in up-regulation of AHR as well as the transcripts for cytochromes P450 1A1 and 1B1, two well-known targets of the AHR regulon. While this was partly attributable to G-1-mediated inhibition of tubulin assembly and subsequent cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, the effects nevertheless required functional AHR. However, G-1-induced up-regulation of CYP 1A1 was not mediated by GPR30, as G15 antagonist treatment as well as a knockdown of GPR30 and AHR failed to inhibit this effect.

  12. The PPARα/p16INK4a Pathway inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by repressing Cell Cycle-dependent Telomerase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Gizard, Florence; Nomiyama, Takashi; Zhao, Yue; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Heywood, Elizabeth B.; Jones, Karrie L.; Staels, Bart; Bruemmer, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) α, the molecular target for fibrates used to treat dyslipidemia, exerts pleiotropic effects on vascular cells. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we have previously demonstrated that PPARα activation suppresses G1→S cell cycle progression by targeting the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4a (p16). In the present study, we demonstrate that this inhibition of VSMC proliferation by PPARα is mediated through a p16-dependent suppression of telomerase activity, which has been implicated in key cellular functions including proliferation. PPARα activation inhibited mitogen-induced telomerase activity by repressing the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) through negative cross-talk with an E2F-1-dependent trans-activation of the TERT promoter. This trans-repression involved the recruitment of the retinoblastoma (RB) family proteins p107 and p130 to the TERT promoter resulting in impaired E2F-1 binding, an effect which was dependent on p16. The inhibition of cell proliferation by PPARα activation was lost in VSMC following TERT overexpression or knock-down, pointing to a key role of telomerase as a target for the antiproliferative effects of PPARα. Finally, we demonstrate that PPARα agonists suppress telomerase activation during the proliferative response following vascular injury indicating that these findings are applicable in vivo. In concert, these results demonstrate that the anti-proliferative effects of PPARα in VSMCs depend on the suppression of telomerase activity by targeting the p16/RB/E2F transcriptional cascade. PMID:18818403

  13. Ingestion of an isothiocyanate metabolite from cruciferous vegetables inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cell xenografts by apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Jen Wei; Wu, Hongyan; Ramaswamy, Gita; Conaway, C Clifford; Chung, Fung-Lung; Wang, Longgui; Liu, Delong

    2004-08-01

    Epidemiological surveys indicate that intake of cruciferous vegetables is inversely related to prostate cancer incidence, although the responsible dietary factors have not been identified. Our studies demonstrated that exposure of human prostate cancer cells in culture to the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC-NAC), the major metabolite of PEITC that is abundant in watercress, inhibited proliferation and tumorigenesis. The PEITC-NAC is known to mediate cytoprotection at initiation of carcinogenesis. The relevance of PEITC-NAC in diets on the growth of prostate tumor cells has been evaluated in immunodeficient mice with xenografted tumors of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. The daily PEITC-NAC (8 micromol/g) supplemented diet group showed a significant reduction in tumor size in 100% of the mice during the 9-week treatment period. Tumor weight at autopsy was reduced by 50% compared with mice on the diet without PEITC-NAC (P = 0.05). Mitosis and in vivo 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeled proliferating cells were reduced in these tumors. The PEITC-NAC diet up-regulated the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases p21WAF-1/Cip-1 and p27Kip1, and reduced the expression of cyclins D and E, indicating they were potential molecular targets. As a result, phosphorylated Rb was significantly decreased and the G1- to S-phase transition retarded. The treated tumors also showed a significant increase in apoptosis as determined by in situ end-labeling, and by poly ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. This study demonstrates the first in vivo evidence of dietary PEITC-NAC inhibiting tumorigenesis of prostate cancer cells. PEITC-NAC may prevent initiation of carcinogenesis and modulate the post-initiation phase by targeting cell cycle regulators and apoptosis induction.

  14. Overexpression of E2F5/p130, but not E2F5 alone, can inhibit E2F-induced cell cycle entry in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin; Liang, Dongcai; Overbeek, Paul A

    2008-03-25

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) gene family member p130 binds preferentially to the E2F5 transcription factor and forms a repressive E2F5/p130 complex that inhibits cell cycle progression and tumor growth. It is unclear whether E2F5, either alone or in combination with p130, can interfere with the transcriptional activity of other E2F family members, such as E2F1 and E2F3a, in vivo. In this study, we used transgenic mice to test whether overexpression of E2F5 with/without p130 would be sufficient to inhibit E2F1 or E2F3a induced cell cycle reentry. Transgenic mice were generated by microinjection of constructs containing different E2F cDNAs (E2F1, E2F3a, and E2F5) or the p130 cDNA linked to the mouse alphaA-crystallin promoter. The E2F5 single and E2F5/p130 double transgenic mice were cross-mated with E2F1 or E2F3a transgenic mice. The resulting double or triple transgenic mouse embryos were characterized by histology, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and BrdU incorporation assays. Overexpression of E2F5 alone was not sufficient to inhibit E2F1 or E2F3a induced cell cycle reentry in lens fiber cells. Transgenic mice coexpressing E2F5 and p130 in lens fiber cells did not show lens defects. However, coexpression of E2F5/p130 with E2F1 or E2F3a in lens fiber cells decreased the number of BrdU positive fiber cells induced by the E2F1 or E2F3a alone. Therefore, overexpression of E2F5/p130, but not E2F5 alone, can inhibit activator E2F-mediated cell proliferation in vivo, confirming that p130 plays a critical role in the repressive activity of E2F5/p130 complex. Overexpression of E2F5/p130 in post-mitotic lens fiber cells does not affect their normal differentiation program, but can inhibit inappropriate cell cycle reentry induced by the activator E2Fs. Since E2F5 alone cannot interfere with these E2F activities, we conclude that p130 is a key player in the inhibitory process.

  15. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae induces SJPL cell cycle arrest in G2/M-phase and inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Barbosa, Jérémy A; Labrie, Josée; Beaudry, Francis; Gagnon, Carl A; Jacques, Mario

    2015-11-14

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most important pathogens in the swine industry and causes important economic losses. No effective antiviral drugs against it are commercially available. We recently reported that the culture supernatant of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the porcine pleuropneumonia causative agent, has an antiviral activity in vitro against PRRSV in SJPL cells. Objectives of this study were (i) to identify the mechanism behind the antiviral activity displayed by A. pleuropneumoniae and (ii) to characterize the active molecules present in the bacterial culture supernatant. Antibody microarray analysis was used in order to point out cellular pathways modulated by the A. pleuropneumoniae supernatant. Subsequent, flow cytometry analysis and cell cycle inhibitors were used to confirm antibody microarray data and to link them to the antiviral activity of the A. pleuropneumoniae supernatant. Finally, A. pleuropneumoniae supernatant characterization was partially achieved using mass spectrometry. Using antibody microarray, we observed modulations in G2/M-phase cell cycle regulation pathway when SJPL cells were treated with A. pleuropneumoniae culture supernatant. These modulations were confirmed by a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M-phase when cells were treated with the A. pleuropneumoniae culture supernatant. Furthermore, two G2/M-phase cell cycle inhibitors demonstrated the ability to inhibit PRRSV infection, indicating a potential key role for PRRSV infection. Finally, mass spectrometry lead to identify two molecules (m/z 515.2 and m/z 663.6) present only in the culture supernatant. We demonstrated for the first time that A. pleuropneumoniae is able to disrupt SJPL cell cycle resulting in inhibitory activity against PRRSV. Furthermore, two putative molecules were identified from the culture supernatant. This study highlighted the cell cycle importance for PRRSV and will allow the development of new prophylactic or

  16. Solid-phase synthesis of 2'-hydroxychalcones. Effects on cell growth inhibition, cell cycle and apoptosis of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Neves, Marta Perro; Cravo, Sara; Lima, Raquel T; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Nascimento, M São José; Silva, Artur M S; Pinto, Madalena; Cidade, Honorina; Corrêa, Arlene G

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-one 2'-hydroxychalcones were prepared via solid-phase synthesis by base-catalyzed aldol condensation of substituted 2'-hydroxyacetophenones and benzaldehydes. Chalcones were tested for their growth inhibitory activity in three human tumor cell lines (MCF-7, NCI-H460 and A375-C5) using the SRB assay. Results revealed that several of the tested compounds caused a pronounced dose-dependent growth inhibitory effect on the tumor cell lines studied in the low micromolar range. To gain further insight on the cellular mechanism of action of this class of compounds, studies of their effect on cell cycle profile as well as on induction of cellular apoptosis were also carried out. Generally, the tested chalcones interfered with the cell cycle profile and increased the percentage of apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The results here presented may help to identify new chalcone-like structures with optimized cell growth inhibitory activity which may be further tested as potential antitumor agents.

  17. Inhibition of Breast Tumor Cell Growth by Ectopic Expression of p16/INK4A Via Combined Effects of Cell Cycle Arrest, Senescence and Apoptotic Induction, and Angiogenesis Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Xiongwen; Zhang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    p16-mediated inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and tumor suppression have been studied before,; the common consensus is that p16's cell-cycle arrest function plays a primary role in these actions, with some additional apoptotic induction by p16. However, other effects of p16 that may potentially contribute to p16-mediated anti-tumor ability have not been well studied. The emerging data including ours indicated that p16 contributes its anti-cancer ability by inducing tumor cells to senescence. Moreover, we showed that p16 inhibits breast cancer cell growth by inhibiting the VEGF signaling pathway and angiogenesis. In this study, we used adenoviral-mediated p16 expression (AdRSVp16) and breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 as the model to simultaneously analyze all these p16's anti-tumor functions. We demonstrated that adenoviral-mediated p16 expression exhibited multiple anti-tumor functions by simultaneously suppressing in vitro growth and in vivo angiogenesis of breast cancer cells, blocking cell division, as well as inducing senescence and apoptosis. The in vivo study implies that p16's effect on anti-angiogenesis may play a more significant role than its anti-cell proliferation in the overall suppression of tumor growth. These results suggest, for the first time, that AdRSVp16-mediated tumor suppression results from a combination of p16's multiple anti-tumor functions including p16's well-known anti-proliferation/cell division function, apoptotic and senescence induction function, and its lesser-known/under-investigated anti-angiogenesis function. These combined results strongly indicate that p16 gene therapy has a multi-module platform with different anti-tumor functions; therefore, this study justifies and promotes the viral-mediated p16 gene therapy as a promising and powerful treatment approach for cancer patients due to p16's multiple anti-tumor functions.

  18. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. G1 cell cycle arrest due to the inhibition of erbB family receptor tyrosine kinases does not require the retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Andrea J. . E-mail: Andrea.Gonzales@pfizer.com; Fry, David W.

    2005-02-01

    The erbB receptor family (EGFr, erbB-2, erbB-3, and erbB-4) consists of transmembrane glycoproteins that transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus when activated. erbB family members are widely expressed in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuronal cells and contribute to the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival of these cell types. The present study evaluates the effects of erbB family signaling on cell cycle progression and the role that pRB plays in regulating this process. ErbB family RTK activity was inhibited by PD 158780 in the breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. PD 158780 (0.5 {mu}M) inhibited EGF-stimulated and heregulin-stimulated autophosphorylation and caused a G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 h, which correlated with hypophosporylation of pRB. MCF10A cells lacking functional pRB retained the ability to arrest in G1 when treated with PD 158780. Both cell lines showed induction of p27{sup KIP1} protein when treated with PD 158780 and increased association of p27{sup KIP1} with cyclin E-CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 kinase activity was dramatically inhibited with drug treatment. Changes in other pRB family members were noted with drug treatment, namely a decrease in p107 and an increase in p130. These findings show that the G1 arrest induced through inhibition of erbB family RTK activity does not require functional pRB.

  20. Caspase-3, myogenic transcription factors and cell cycle inhibitors are regulated by leukemia inhibitory factor to mediate inhibition of myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is known to inhibit myogenic differentiation as well as to inhibit apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in non-differentiating myoblasts. In addition caspase-3 activity is required for myogenic differentiation. Therefore the aim of this study was to further investigate mechanisms of the differentiation suppressing effect of LIF in particular the possibility of a caspase-3 mediated inhibition of differentiation. Results LIF dependent inhibition of differentiation appeared to involve several mechanisms. Differentiating myoblasts that were exposed to LIF displayed increased transcripts for c-fos. Transcripts for the cell cycle inhibitor p21 as well as muscle regulatory factors myoD and myogenin were decreased with LIF exposure. However, LIF did not directly induce a proliferative effect under differentiation conditions, but did prevent the proportion of myoblasts that were proliferating from decreasing as differentiation proceeded. LIF stimulation decreased the percentage of cells positive for active caspase-3 occurring during differentiation. Both the effect of LIF inhibiting caspase-3 activation and differentiation appeared dependent on mitogen activated protein kinase and extracellular signal regulated kinase kinase (MEK) signalling. The role of LIF in myogenic differentiation was further refined to demonstrate that myoblasts are unlikely to secrete LIF endogenously. Conclusions Altogether this study provides a more comprehensive view of the role of LIF in myogenic differentiation including LIF and receptor regulation in myoblasts and myotubes, mechanisms of inhibition of differentiation and the link between caspase-3 activation, apoptosis and myogenic differentiation. PMID:21798094

  1. Deviating the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Trypanosoma brucei elicits distinct mechanisms for inhibiting proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Ana L; Ramsey, Aaron C; Mackey, Zachary B

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is spatially and temporally coordinated in all cells to reproduce a single exact copy of the genome per division, but its regulation in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is not well characterized. We characterized the effects of altering the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a key component of the DNA replication machinery, in bloodstream form T. brucei. This study demonstrated that tight regulation of TbPCNA levels was critical for normal proliferation and DNA replication in the parasite. Depleting TbPCNA mRNA reduced proliferation, severely diminished DNA replication, arrested the synthesis of new DNA and caused the parasites to accumulated in G2/M. Attenuating the parasite by downregulating TbPCNA caused it to become hypersensitive to hydroxyurea. Overexpressing TbPCNA in T. brucei arrested proliferation, inhibited DNA replication and prevented the parasite from exiting G2/M. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms of cell cycle arrest are associated with upregulating or downregulating TbPCNA. The findings of this study validate deregulating intra-parasite levels of TbPCNA as a potential strategy for therapeutically exploiting this target in bloodstream form T. brucei.

  2. A platinum(II) complex of liriodenine from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM): Cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis induction and telomerase inhibition activity via G-quadruplex DNA stabilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Lan; Qin, Qi-Pin; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liang, Hong

    2014-08-01

    Liriodenine (L), an antitumor active ingredient from the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), Zanthoxylum nitidum, afforded a platinum(II) complex (1) of L, cis-[PtCl2(L)(DMSO)], which previously reported for its in vitro antitumor activity and intercalative binding with DNA. In this study, complex 1 was further discussed for its antitumor mechanism and structure-activity relationship, comparing with L and cisplatin. Towards the most sensitive BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells, complex 1 significantly induced cell cycle arrest at both G2/M phase and S phase. It suggests that double helix DNA is not the simplex intracellular target for 1. On the other hand, the BEL-7404 cells incubated with 1 and stained by Hoechst 33258 and AO/EB showed typical cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. The BEL-7404 cells incubated with 1 and stained by JC-1 were also characteristic for cell apoptosis on the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, the G-quadruplex DNA binding property of complex 1 was also investigated by spectroscopic analyses, fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. The results indicated that 1 stabilized the human telomeric G4-HTG21 DNA better than L. The telomerase inhibition ratio of 1 ((62.50±0.03)%), which was examined by telomerase polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), was much higher than L ((21.77±0.01)%). It can be ascribed to the better G4-HTG21 DNA stabilization of 1 than L. The results suggested that the nuclei, mitochondria and telomerase via G-quadruplex DNA stabilization all should be key targets for the antitumor mechanism of 1, in which the central platinum(II) played a key role.

  3. MicroRNA inhibition fine-tunes and provides robustness to the restriction point switch of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    del Rosario, Ricardo C. H.; Damasco, Joseph Ray Clarence G.; Aguda, Baltazar D.

    2016-01-01

    The restriction point marks a switch in G1 from growth factor-dependent to growth factor-independent progression of the cell cycle. The proper regulation of this switch is important for normal cell processes; aberrations could result in a number of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, stroke and myocardial infarction. To further understand the regulation of the restriction point, we extended a mathematical model of the Rb-E2F pathway to include members of the microRNA cluster miR-17-92. Our mathematical analysis shows that microRNAs play an essential role in fine-tuning and providing robustness to the switch. We also demonstrate how microRNA regulation can steer cells in or out of cancer states. PMID:27610602

  4. Myc and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Bretones, Gabriel; Delgado, M Dolores; León, Javier

    2015-05-01

    Soon after the discovery of the Myc gene (c-Myc), it became clear that Myc expression levels tightly correlate to cell proliferation. The entry in cell cycle of quiescent cells upon Myc enforced expression has been described in many models. Also, the downregulation or inactivation of Myc results in the impairment of cell cycle progression. Given the frequent deregulation of Myc oncogene in human cancer it is important to dissect out the mechanisms underlying the role of Myc on cell cycle control. Several parallel mechanisms account for Myc-mediated stimulation of the cell cycle. First, most of the critical positive cell cycle regulators are encoded by genes induced by Myc. These Myc target genes include Cdks, cyclins and E2F transcription factors. Apart from its direct effects on the transcription, Myc is able to hyperactivate cyclin/Cdk complexes through the induction of Cdk activating kinase (CAK) and Cdc25 phosphatases. Moreover, Myc antagonizes the activity of cell cycle inhibitors as p21 and p27 through different mechanisms. Thus, Myc is able to block p21 transcription or to induce Skp2, a protein involved in p27 degradation. Finally, Myc induces DNA replication by binding to replication origins and by upregulating genes encoding proteins required for replication initiation. Myc also regulates genes involved in the mitotic control. A promising approach to treat tumors with deregulated Myc is the synthetic lethality based on the inhibition of Cdks. Thus, the knowledge of the Myc-dependent cell cycle regulatory mechanisms will help to discover new therapeutic approaches directed against malignancies with deregulated Myc. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Myc proteins in cell biology and pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antisense inhibition of microRNA-21 or -221 arrests cell cycle, induces apoptosis, and sensitizes the effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kook; Lee, Eun Joo; Esau, Christine; Schmittgen, Thomas D

    2009-10-01

    The contribution of overexpressed microRNA-21 and -221 (miR-21 and miR-221) to the malignant phenotype was determined by inhibiting these miRNAs using antisense oligonucleotides. The effects of antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, combinatorial effects with gemcitabine, and effects on target protein levels were studied. Low nanomolar concentrations of both antisense oligonucleotides reduced proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Reduced proliferation was less pronounced in the normal ductal epithelial cell line human pancreatic Nestin-expressing cell or in pancreatic cancer cell lines exposed to an irrelevant control oligonucleotide. Inhibition of miR-21 and miR-221 increased the amount of apoptosis in HS766T cells by 3- to 6-fold compared with the control oligonucleotide. HS766T cells exposed to miR-21 antisense resulted in cell cycle arrest (G1 phase). Protein levels of tumor suppressor targets of the miRNAs were increased by antisense to miR-21 (PTEN and RECK) and miR-221 (p27). Antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 sensitized the effects of gemcitabine, and the antisense-gemcitabine combinations were synergistic at high fraction affected. We demonstrate that antisense to miR-21 and miR-221 results in significant cell killing under various conditions and that antisense oligonucleotides targeted to miRNA represents a potential new therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  6. Cell cycle regulation by protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Deanna M

    2014-01-01

    Cell division is controlled by a highly regulated program to accurately duplicate and segregate chromosomes. An important feature of the cell cycle regulatory program is that key cell cycle proteins are present and active during specific cell cycle stages but are later removed or inhibited to maintain appropriate timing. The ubiquitin-proteasome system has emerged as an important mechanism to target cell cycle proteins for degradation at critical junctures during cell division. Two key E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes that target key cell cycle proteins are the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein complex and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. This chapter focuses on the role of these E3 ubiquitin ligases and how ubiquitin-dependent degradation of central cell cycle regulatory proteins advances the cell cycle.

  7. Honokiol, a phytochemical from the Magnolia plant, inhibits photocarcinogenesis by targeting UVB-induced inflammatory mediators and cell cycle regulators: development of topical formulation.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Mudit; Sharma, Som D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2010-11-01

    To develop newer and more effective chemopreventive agents for skin cancer, we assessed the effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from the Magnolia plant, on ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumorigenesis using the SKH-1 hairless mouse model. Topical treatment of mice with honokiol in a hydrophilic cream-based topical formulation before or after UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation resulted in a significant protection against photocarcinogenesis in terms of tumor multiplicity (28-60%, P < 0.05 to <0.001) and tumor volume per tumor-bearing mouse (33-80%, P < 0.05 to 0.001, n = 20). Honokiol also inhibited and delayed the malignant progression of papillomas to carcinomas. To investigate the in vivo molecular targets of honokiol efficacy, tumors and tumor-uninvolved skin samples from the tumor-bearing mice were analyzed for inflammatory mediators, cell cycle regulators and survival signals using immunostaining, western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with honokiol significantly inhibited UVB-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2) (P < 0.001), proliferating cell nuclear antigen and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (P < 0.001), interleukin (IL)-1β (P < 0.01) and IL-6 (P < 0.001) in the skin as well as in skin tumors. Western blot analysis revealed that honokiol: (i) inhibited the levels of cyclins D1, D2 and E and associated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs)2, CDK4 and CDK6, (ii) upregulated Cip/p21 and Kip/p27 and (iii) inhibited the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and the phosphorylation of Akt at Ser(473) in UVB-induced skin tumors. Together, our results indicate that honokiol holds promise for the prevention of UVB-induced skin cancer by targeting inflammatory mediators, cell cycle regulators and cell survival signals in UVB-exposed skin.

  8. Activation of nuclear PTEN by inhibition of Notch signaling induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Lee, H-W; Baek, J-H; Cho, Y-H; Kang, H G; Jeong, J S; Song, J; Park, H-S; Chun, K-H

    2016-01-14

    Mutation in PTEN has not yet been detected, but its function as a tumor suppressor is inactivated in many cancers. In this study we determined that, activated Notch signaling disables PTEN by phosphorylation and thereby contributes to gastric tumorigenesis. Notch inhibition by small interfering RNA or γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Notch inhibition induced dephosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of PTEN, which led to PTEN nuclear localization. Overexpression of activated Notch1-induced phosphorylation of PTEN and reversed GSI-induced mitotic arrest. Dephosphorylated nuclear PTEN caused prometaphase arrest by interaction with the cyclin B1-CDK1 complex, resulting in their accumulation in the nucleus and subsequent apoptosis. We found a correlation between high expression levels of Notch1 and low survival rates and, similarly, between reduced nuclear PTEN expression and increasing the TNM classification of malignant tumours stages in malignant tissues from gastric cancer patients. The growth of Notch1-depleted gastric tumors was significantly retarded in xenografted mice, and in addition, PTEN deletion restored growth similar to control tumors. We also demonstrated that combination treatment with GSI and chemotherapeutic agents significantly reduced the orthotopically transplanted gastric tumors in mice without noticeable toxicity. Overall, our findings suggest that inhibition of Notch signaling can be employed as a PTEN activator, making it a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  9. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 potentiates DATS-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells; involvement of G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, signaling pathways, and transcription factors-mediated MMP-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Shick; Song, Jun-Hui; Hwang, Byungdoo; Park, Sung Lyea; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a bioactive sulfur compound in garlic, has been highlighted due to its strong anti-carcinogenic activity. Objective: The current study investigated the molecular mechanism of garlic-derived DATS in cancer cells. Additionally, we explored possible molecular markers to monitoring clinical responses to DATS-based chemotherapy. Design: EJ bladder carcinoma cells were treated with different concentration of DATS. Molecular changes including differentially expressed genes in EJ cells were examined using immunoblot, FACS cell cycle analysis, migration and invasion assays, electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA), microarray, and bioinformatics analysis. Results: DATS inhibited EJ cell growth via G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest. ATM-CHK2-Cdc25c-p21WAF1-Cdc2 signaling cascade, MAPKs, and AKT were associated with the DATS-mediated growth inhibition of EJ cells. DATS-induced inhibition of migration and invasion was correlated with down-regulated MMP-9 via reduced activation of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB. Through microarray gene expression analysis, ANGPTL4, PLCXD1, and MMP3 were identified as candidates of molecular targets of DATS. Introduction of each gene to EJ cells revealed that ANGPTL4 was associated with the DATS-induced inhibition of cell growth, migration, and invasion. Conclusions: ANGPTL4 regulates DATS-mediated inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells, and thus, has potential as a prognostic marker for bladder cancer patients.

  10. Nucleolar Targeting by Platinum: p53-Independent Apoptosis Follows rRNA Inhibition, Cell-Cycle Arrest, and DNA Compaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    TriplatinNC is a highly positively charged, substitution-inert derivative of the phase II clinical anticancer drug, BBR3464. Such substitution-inert complexes form a distinct subset of polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs) interacting with DNA and other biomolecules through noncovalent interactions. Rapid cellular entry is facilitated via interaction with cell surface glycosoaminoglycans and is a mechanism unique to PPCs. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) showed rapid distribution within cytoplasmic and nucleolar compartments, but not the nucleus. In this article, the downstream effects of nucleolar localization are described. In human colon carcinoma cells, HCT116, the production rate of 47S rRNA precursor transcripts was dramatically reduced as an early event after drug treatment. Transcriptional inhibition of rRNA was followed by a robust G1 arrest, and activation of apoptotic proteins caspase-8, -9, and -3 and PARP-1 in a p53-independent manner. Using cell synchronization and flow cytometry, it was determined that cells treated while in G1 arrest immediately, but cells treated in S or G2 successfully complete mitosis. Twenty-four hours after treatment, the majority of cells finally arrest in G1, but nearly one-third contained highly compacted DNA; a distinct biological feature that cannot be associated with mitosis, senescence, or apoptosis. This unique effect mirrored the efficient condensation of tRNA and DNA in cell-free systems. The combination of DNA compaction and apoptosis by TriplatinNC treatment conferred striking activity in platinum-resistant and/or p53 mutant or null cell lines. Taken together, our results support that the biological activity of TriplatinNC reflects reduced metabolic deactivation (substitution-inert compound not reactive to sulfur nucleophiles), high cellular accumulation, and novel consequences of high-affinity noncovalent DNA binding, producing a new profile and a further shift in the structure

  11. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibiting class I histone deacetylases in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Ying; Ye, Hai-Ge; Chen, Chi-Qi; Yin, Li-Hui; Wu, Jian-Bo; He, Li-Cai; Gao, Shen-Meng

    2015-02-01

    Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to possess potent anti-cancer activity through targeting multiple signaling pathways in numerous malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be defined. Here, we report that honokiol effectively decreased enzyme activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and reduced the protein expression of class I HDACs in leukemic cells. Moreover, treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented honokiol-induced degradation of class I HDACs. Importantly, honokiol increased the levels of p21/waf1 and Bax via triggering acetylation of histone in the regions of p21/waf1 and Bax promoter. Honokiol induced apoptosis, decreased activity of HDACs, and significantly inhibited the clonogenic activity of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow mononuclear cells from patients with AML. However, honokiol did not decrease the activity of HDACs and induce apoptosis in normal hematopoietic progenitors from unbilicial cord blood. Finally, honokiol dramatically reduced tumorigenicity in a xenograft leukemia model. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that honokiol has anti-leukemia activity through inhibiting HDACs. Thus, being a relative non-toxic agent, honokiol may serve as a novel natural agent for cancer prevention and therapy in leukemia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anticancer activity of taraxerol acetate in human glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model via induction of autophagy and apoptotic cell death, cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing-Fang; Song, Ying-Fang; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Shou-Sen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of taraxerol acetate in U87 human glioblastoma cells. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution, cell cycle-associated proteins, autophagy, DNA fragmentation and cell migration were assessed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay, and phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy was utilized to determine the viability and apoptotic morphological features of the U87 cells. Flow cytometry using propidium iodide and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate demonstrated the effect of taraxerol acetate on the cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the taraxerol acetate on cell cycle‑associated proteins and autophagy‑linked LC3B‑II proteins. The results demonstrated that taraxerol acetate induced dose‑ and time‑dependent cytotoxic effects in the U87 cells. Apoptotic induction following taraxerol acetate treatment was observed and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 7.3% in the control cells, to 16.1, 44.1 and 76.7% in the 10, 50 and 150 µM taraxerol acetate‑treated cells, respectively. Furthermore, taraxerol acetate treatment led to sub‑G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in the number of S‑phase cells. DNA fragments were observed as a result of the gel electrophoresis experiment following taraxerol acetate treatment. To investigate the inhibitory effects of taraxerol acetate on the migration of U87 cell, a wound healing assay was conducted. The number of cells that migrated to the scratched area decreased significantly following treatment with taraxerol acetate. In addition, taraxerol acetate inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Administration of 0.25 and 0.75 µg/g taraxerol acetate reduced the tumor weight from 1.2 g in the phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS)‑treated group (control) to 0.81 and 0.42

  13. Inhibition of AMPK and Krebs cycle gene expression drives metabolic remodeling of Pten-deficient preneoplastic thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria G; Russo, Marika A; Kang, Kristy S; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly proliferating and neoplastically transformed cells generate the energy required to support rapid cell division by increasing glycolysis and decreasing flux through the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway, usually without alterations in mitochondrial function. In contrast, little is known of the metabolic alterations, if any, which occur in cells harboring mutations that prime their neoplastic transformation. To address this question, we used a Pten-deficient mouse model to examine thyroid cells where a mild hyperplasia progresses slowly to follicular thyroid carcinoma. Using this model, we report that constitutive phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation caused by PTEN deficiency in nontransformed thyrocytes results in a global downregulation of Krebs cycle and OXPHOS gene expression, defective mitochondria, reduced respiration, and an enhancement in compensatory glycolysis. We found that this process does not involve any of the pathways classically associated with the Warburg effect. Moreover, this process was independent of proliferation but contributed directly to thyroid hyperplasia. Our findings define a novel metabolic switch to glycolysis driven by PI3K-dependent AMPK inactivation with a consequent repression in the expression of key metabolic transcription regulators. ©2013 AACR.

  14. Ras/ERK1 pathway regulation of p27KIP1-mediated G1-phase cell-cycle arrest in cordycepin-induced inhibition of the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su-Mi; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2012-04-15

    Cordycepin, the main constituent of Cordyceps militaris, demonstrated an anti-atherogenic effect in experimental animals. However, the effects of cordycepin on cell-cycle regulation and the signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain largely unknown; therefore, unexpected roles of cordycepin-induced inhibition in VSMC growth were investigated. Mechanisms in cordycepin-treated VSMC were examined via an MTT assay, a thymidine uptake experiment, FACS analysis, immunoblot analysis, kinase assay, immunoprecipitation assay, and transient transfection assays. Cordycepin inhibited cell growth, induced G1-phase cell-cycle arrest, down-regulated cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) expression, and up-regulated p27KIP1 expression in VSMC. Cordycepin induced activation of JNK, p38MAPK and ERK1/2. Blocking of the ERK function using either ERK1/2-specific inhibitor U0126 or a small interfering RNA (si-ERK1) reversed p27KIP1 expression, inhibition of cell growth, and decreased cell-cycle proteins in cordycepin-treated VSMC. Ras activation was increased by cordycepin. Transfection of cells with dominant negative Ras (RasN17) mutant genes rescued cordycepin-induced ERK1/2 activity, increased p27KIP1 expression, inhibited cell proliferation, and reduced cell cycle proteins. In conclusion, our findings indicate that Ras/ERK1 pathways participate in p27KIP1-mediated G1-phase cell-cycle arrest induced by cordycepin via a decrease in cyclin/CDK complexes in VSMC. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A newly synthesized Ligustrazine stilbene derivative inhibits PDGF-BB induced vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic switch and proliferation via delaying cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chunlian; Zhang, Siming; Liu, Haixin; Jiao, Yanxiao; Su, Guifa; Zhu, Yan

    2017-08-12

    Vascular Smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) possess remarkable phenotype plasticity that allows it to rapidly adapt to fluctuating environmental cues, including the period of development and progression of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis subsequent to vein grafting or coronary intervention. Although VSMC phenotypic switch is an attractive target, there is no effective drug so far. Using rat aortic VSMCs, we investigate the effects of Ligustrazine and its synthetic derivatives on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) induced proliferation and phenotypic switch by a cell image-based screening of 60 Ligustrazine stilbene derivatives. We showed that one of the Ligustrazine stilbene derivatives TMP-C4a markedly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs proliferation in a time and dose-dependent manner, which is more potent than Ligustrazine. Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF-BB significantly reduced the contractile marker protein α-smooth muscle actin expression and increased the synthetic marker proteins osteopontin expression. However, TMP-C4a effectively reversed this phenotypic switch, which was accompanied by a decreased expression of Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 (MMP2 and MMP9) and cell cycle related proteins, including cyclin D1 and CDK4. In conclusion, the present study showed that a new Ligustrazine stilbene derivative TMP-C4a suppressed PDGF-induced VSMC proliferation and phenotypic switch, indicating that it has a potential to become a promising therapeutic agent for treating VSMC-related atherosclerosis and restenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bortezomib stabilizes mitotic cyclins and prevents cell cycle progression via inhibition of UBE2C in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Prashant; Uddin, Shahab; Ahmed, Maqbool; Jehan, Zeenath; Bu, Rong; Abubaker, Jehad; Sultana, Mehar; Al-Sanea, Nasser; Abduljabbar, Alaa; Ashari, Luai H; Alhomoud, Samar; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Prabhakaran, Sarita; Hussain, Azhar R; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2011-05-01

    Substantial evidence implicates the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C (UBE2C) gene, in several human cancers, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC). We therefore investigated the prognostic value of UBE2C alterations in CRC and UBE2C signaling in CRC cell lines. UBE2C protein expression and UBE2C gene copy number were evaluated on clinical samples by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization in a TMA format. The effect of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and small-interfering RNA knockdown was assessed by apoptotic assays and immunoblotting. UBE2C dysregulation was associated with proliferative marker Ki-67, accumulation of cyclin A and B1, and a poor overall survival. UBE2C expression was an independent prognostic marker in early-stage (I and II) CRC. UBE2C depletion resulted in suppression of cellular growth and accumulation of cyclin A and B1. In vitro, bortezomib treatment of CRC cells caused inhibition of cell viability via down-regulation of UBE2C. UBE2C knockdown by bortezomib or transfection with specific small-interfering RNA against UBE2C also caused cells to be arrested at the G2/M level, leading to accumulation of cyclin A and cyclin B1. In vivo, a significant reduction in tumor volume and weight was noted in mice treated with a combination of subtoxic doses of oxaliplatin and bortezomib compared with treatment with oxaliplatin or bortezomib alone. Altogether, our results suggest that UBE2C and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may be potential targets for therapeutic intervention in CRC. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. miR-34a inhibits differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells by regulating cell cycle and senescence induction.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho; Park, Hyeon; Pak, Ha-Jin; Yang, Dong-Yun; Kim, Yun-Hong; Choi, Won-Jun; Park, Se-Jin; Cho, Jung-Ah; Lee, Kyo-Won

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical in the maintenance, differentiation, and lineage commitment of stem cells. Stem cells have the unique property to differentiate into tissue-specific cell types (lineage commitment) during cell division (self-renewal). In this study, we investigated whether miR-34a, a cell cycle-regulating microRNA, could control the stem cell properties of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs). First, we found that the expression level of miR-34a was increased as the cell passage number was increased. This finding, however, was inversely correlated with our finding that the overexpression of miR-34a induced the decrease of cell proliferation. In addition, miR-34a overexpression decreased the expression of various cell cycle regulators such as CDKs (-2, -4, -6) and cyclins (-E, -D), but not p21 and p53. The cell cycle analysis showed accumulation of dividing cells at S phase by miR-34a, which was reversible by co-treatment with anti-miR-34a. The potential of adipogenesis and osteogenesis of ADSCs was also decreased by miR-34a overexpression, which was recovered by co-treatment with anti-miR-34a. The surface expression of stem cell markers including CD44 was also down-regulated by miR-34a overexpression as similar to that elicited by cell cycle inhibitors. miR-34a also caused a significant decrease in mRNA expression of stem cell transcription factors as well as STAT-3 expression and phosphorylation. Cytokine profiling revealed that miR-34a significantly modulated IL-6 and -8 production, which was strongly related to cellular senescence. These data suggest the importance of miR-34a for the fate of ADSCs toward senescence rather than differentiation.

  18. Sodium ascorbate inhibits growth via the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human malignant melanoma A375.S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuw-Yuan; Lai, Wan-Wen; Chou, Chi-Chung; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Li, Te-Mao; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2006-12-01

    Vitamin C has been reported to be useful in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Inconsistent effects from growth stimulation to induction of apoptosis of malignant tumor cells, however, have been reported. Melanoma is an increasingly common and potentially lethal malignancy. It was reported that melanoma cells were more susceptible to ascorbate toxicity than any other tumor cells. The mechanisms accounting for ascorbate-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells, however, have remained unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sodium ascorbate on cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human malignant melanoma A375.S2 cells. A375.S2 cells were incubated with a certain range of concentrations of sodium ascorbate for various time periods. In order to examine the effects of sodium ascorbate on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and necrosis, we performed 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride assays and flow cytometry analysis. Polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the mRNA levels of p53, p21, p27, cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, which are associated with cell cycle S-phase arrest and apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis showed that sodium ascorbate significantly induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the A375.S2 cell line in a dose-dependent manner. The increased expressions of p53 and p21, and the decreased expressions of cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4, indicated the cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase after the cells had been treated with sodium ascorbate. Induction of apoptosis involved an increase in the levels of p53, p21 and cellular Ca, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase 3 before culminating in apoptosis in sodium ascorbate-treated A375.S2 cells.

  19. Pax-7 up-regulation inhibits myogenesis and cell cycle progression in satellite cells: a potential mechanism for self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Olguin, Hugo C.; Olwin, Bradley B.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic precursors responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration. Satellite cells are absent in the Pax-7−/− mouse, suggesting that this transcription factor is crucial for satellite cell specification [Seale, P., Sabourin, L.A., Girgis-Gabardo, A., Mansouri, A., Gruss, P., Rudnicki, M.A., 2000. Pax7 is required for the specification of myogenic satellite cells. Cell 102, 777–786]. Analysis of Pax-7 expression in activated satellite cells unexpectedly revealed substantial heterogeneity within individual clones. Further analyses show that Pax-7 and myogenin expression are mutually exclusive during differentiation, where Pax-7 appears to be up-regulated in cells that escape differentiation and exit the cell cycle, suggesting a regulatory relationship between these two transcription factors. Indeed, overexpression of Pax-7 down-regulates MyoD, prevents myogenin induction, and blocks MyoD-induced myogenic conversion of 10T1/2 cells. Overexpression of Pax-7 also promotes cell cycle exit even in proliferation conditions. Together, these results suggest that Pax-7 may play a crucial role in allowing activated satellite cells to reacquire a quiescent, undifferentiated state. These data support the concept that satellite cell self-renewal may be a primary mechanism for replenishment of the satellite cell compartment during skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:15501225

  20. Glycoprotein 5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain SD16 inhibits viral replication and causes G2/M cell cycle arrest, but does not induce cellular apoptosis in Marc-145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Yang; Li, Liangliang; Zhang, Beibei; Huang, Baicheng; Gao, Jiming; and others

    2015-10-15

    Cell apoptosis is common after infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). PRRSV GP5 has been reported to induce cell apoptosis. To further understand the role of GP5 in PRRSV induced cell apoptosis, we established Marc-145 cell lines stably expressing full-length GP5, GP5{sup Δ84-96} (aa 84-96 deletion), and GP5{sup Δ97-119} (aa 97-119 deletion). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis and virus replication in these cell lines were evaluated. Neither truncated nor full-length GP5 induced cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells. However, GP5{sup Δ97-119}, but not full-length or GP5{sup Δ84-96}, induced a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase resulting in a reduction in the growth of Marc-145 cells. Additionally, GP5{sup Δ84-96} inhibited the replication of PRRSV in Marc-145 cells through induction of IFN-β. These findings suggest that PRRSV GP5 is not responsible for inducing cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells under these experimental conditions; however it has other important roles in virus/host cell biology. - Highlights: • Marc-145 cell lines stable expression PRRSV GP5 or truncated GP5 were constructed. • GP5{sup Δ97-119} expression in Marc-145 cell induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. • Expression of GP5 and truncated GP5 could not induce Marc-145 cells apoptosis. • PRRSV replication in Marc-145-GP5{sup Δ84-96} was significantly inhibited.

  1. Heparin selectively inhibits a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism of cell cycle progression in calf aortic smooth muscle cells [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Mar;110(3):863

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Previous studies have indicated that the glycosaminoglycan heparin specifically inhibited the growth of vascular SMCs in vivo and in culture, although the precise mechanism(s) of action have not been elucidated. In this study, we have examined the ability of specific mitogens (PDGF, EGF, heparin-binding growth factors, phorbol esters, and insulin) to stimulate SMC proliferation. Our results indicate that SMCs derived from different species and vascular sources respond differently to these growth factors. We next examined the ability of heparin to inhibit the proliferative responses to these mitogens. In calf aortic SMCs, heparin inhibits a protein kinase C-dependent pathway for mitogenesis. Detailed cell cycle analysis revealed several new features of the effects of heparin on SMCs. For example, heparin has two effects on the Go----S transition: it delays entry into S phase and also reduces the number of cells entering the cycle from Go. Using two separate experimental approaches, we found that heparin must be present during the last 4 h before S phase, suggesting a mid-to-late G1 heparin block. In addition, our data indicate that heparin-treated SMCs, while initially blocked in mid-to-late G1, slowly move back into a quiescent growth state in the continued presence of heparin. These results suggest that heparin may have multiple targets for its antiproliferative effect. PMID:2592420

  2. Bergamottin isolated from Citrus bergamia exerts in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in lung adenocarcinoma through the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential loss and inhibition of cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Juan; Wu, Hong-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Chen, Li-Juan; Zou, Hong-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties of bergamottin, a natural furanocoumarin, against human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) A549 cells. We also studied its effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell invasion, cell migration as well as cell apoptosis. Antiproliferative activity of bergamottin was estimated by the MTT assay. Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC assay were used to study induction of apoptosis by bergamottin in these cells. The effects of bergamottin on cell cycle phase distribution as well as on mitochondrial membrane potential were also demonstrated using flow cytometry. In vitro wound healing assay was used to study the effect of bergamottin on cell migration. The effects of bergamottin on tumor progression were also observed using a nude mouse model. The mice were divided into 4 groups and treated with bergamottin injected intraperitoneally. Bergamottin induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent cytotoxic effects as well as inhibition of colony formation in the A549 cancer cells. Bergamottin also suppressed cancer cell invasion as well as cancer cell migration. Phase contrast microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that bergamottin induced cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and the cells became rounded and detached from each other. Bergamottin also induced a potent cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Experiments in mice showed that 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg bergamottin injection reduced the tumor weight from 1.61 g in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group (control) to 1.21, 0.42 and 0.15 g in the bergamottin-treated groups, respectively. The results of the present study revealed that bergamottin was able to inhibit lung cancer cell growth both in a cell model and a xenograft mouse model by inducing apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, G2/M cell cycle

  3. Cell cycle regulation during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Sumedha; Bouchard, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    To replicate their genomes in cells and generate new progeny, viruses typically require factors provided by the cells that they have infected. Subversion of the cellular machinery that controls replication of the infected host cell is a common activity of many viruses. Viruses employ different strategies to deregulate cell cycle checkpoint controls and modulate cell proliferation pathways. A number of DNA and RNA viruses encode proteins that target critical cell cycle regulators to achieve cellular conditions that are beneficial for viral replication. Many DNA viruses induce quiescent cells to enter the cell cycle; this is thought to increase pools of deoxynucleotides and thus, facilitate viral replication. In contrast, some viruses can arrest cells in a particular phase of the cell cycle that is favorable for replication of the specific virus. Cell cycle arrest may inhibit early cell death of infected cells, allow the cells to evade immune defenses, or help promote virus assembly. Although beneficial for the viral life cycle, virus-mediated alterations in normal cell cycle control mechanisms could have detrimental effects on cellular physiology and may ultimately contribute to pathologies associated with the viral infection, including cell transformation and cancer progression and maintenance. In this chapter, we summarize various strategies employed by DNA and RNA viruses to modulate the replication cycle of the virus-infected cell. When known, we describe how these virus-associated effects influence replication of the virus and contribute to diseases associated with infection by that specific virus.

  4. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma cell-25 cell lines by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl) -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and determination of percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle by flow cytometry: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Magadi, Visveswaraiah Paranjyothi; Ravi, Venkatadasappa; Arpitha, Anantharaju; Litha; Kumaraswamy, Kikkerilakshminarayana; Manjunath, Krishnappa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignancies constitute a wide variety of disorders having high mortality and morbidity rates. Current protocols for management include surgical intervention, chemotherapy, and radiation which possess numerous adverse effects. Many phytochemicals are available with anticancer properties similar to anticancer drugs. Major benefit of these compounds is apparent lack of toxicity to normal tissues. Graviola (botanical name: Annona Muricata) contain bioactive compound “annonaceous acetogenins” known for anticancer activity on cancer cell lines. Aims: To determine cytotoxicity of Graviola and percentage cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle. Settings and Design: The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola leaves on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-25) cell lines at various concentrations evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Methods: Graviola Leaves, American Type Culture Collection SCC-25 cell lines were procured from Skanda Laboratories, Bengaluru. The cytotoxicity of aqueous extract of Graviola on SCC-25 cells at various concentrations evaluated using MTT assay. The percentage of SCC-25 cell inhibition at G2M phase of cell cycle determined using flow cytometry. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using one-way ANOVA. Results: MTT assay showed statistically significant (P < 0.001) dose-dependent inhibition of SCC-25 cell lines by Graviola with IC50 value of 12.42 μg/ml. Flow cytometry revealed that Graviola at 25 and 50 g/ml arrested 53.39% and 52.09% cells in G2M phase of cell cycle respectively, which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Graviola showed significant cytotoxic activity and percentage of cell inhibition at G2M phase cell cycle against SCC-25 cell lines. PMID:26681860

  5. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  6. MicroRNA-219-5p Inhibits Morphine-Induced Apoptosis by Targeting Key Cell Cycle Regulator WEE1.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wei; Zhang, Xingwang; Hu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Ai-Rong

    2016-06-02

    BACKGROUND To identify the effects of microRNA (miR)-219-5p on morphine-induced apoptosis by targeting WEE1. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty Balb/C mice (Toll-like receptor 9, TLR9 knockout) were randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups (20 in each group). The baseline miR-219-5p expression was detected using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). After morphine was injected at 6 h on the 2nd and 6th days, experimental and control groups received miR-219-5p mimics or miRNA-negative control (NC), respectively, compound injection. Tissues and cells were later obtained from subjects in each group separately after mice were killed. TUNEL assay was used to investigate apoptosis in both groups. RAW264.7 cells were treated with miR-219-5p mimics and controls, respectively. After 24 h, 10 μM of morphine was added at 24 h. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometer. The WEE1 and Phospho-cdc2 (Tyr15) expressions were examined by Western blotting. RESULTS MiR-219-5p expression in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Mice injected with miR-219-5p mimic experienced an evident increase in apoptosis rate compared with the control group (P<0.05). The miR-219-5p NC group and the morphine group both presented an elevated apoptosis rate compared with the blank control group (both, P<0.05). The apoptosis rate in the miR-219-5p mimic group was 10.06%, remarkably lower than in the miR-219-5p NC group and blank control group (both P<0.05). WEE1 and Tyr15 protein expressions in the miR-219-5p NC group and morphine group were obviously stronger than those in the blank control group (all P<0.05). In the miR-219-5p mimic group, WEE1 and Tyr15 protein expressions were significantly lower compared with those in the miR-219-5p NC group and morphine group (all P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Morphine significantly downregulated the expression of miRNA-219-5p, which targets WEE1 to suppress Tyr15 expressions and activate Cdc2, thus inhibiting

  7. Suppression of Vimentin Phosphorylation by the Avian Reovirus p17 through Inhibition of CDK1 and Plk1 Impacting the G2/M Phase of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Huang, Wei-Ru; Liao, Tsai-Ling; Wu, Hung-Yi; Munir, Muhammad; Shih, Wing-Ling; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2016-01-01

    The p17 protein of avian reovirus (ARV) causes cell cycle retardation in a variety of cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism(s) by which p17 regulates the cell cycle remains largely unknown. We demonstrate for the first time that p17 interacts with CDK1 and vimentin as revealed by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicated that direct interaction of p17 and CDK1/vimentin was mapped within the amino terminus (aa 1–60) of p17 and central region (aa 27–118) of CDK1/vimentin. Furthermore, p17 was found to occupy the Plk1-binding site within the vimentin, thereby blocking Plk1 recruitment to CDK1-induced vimentin phosphorylation at Ser 56. Interaction of p17 to CDK1 or vimentin interferes with CDK1-catalyzed phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser 56 and subsequently vimentin phosphorylation at Ser 82 by Plk1. Furthermore, we have identified upstream signaling pathways and cellular factor(s) targeted by p17 and found that p17 regulates inhibitory phosphorylation of CDK1 and blocks vimentin phosphorylation at Ser 56 and Ser 82. The p17-mediated inactivation of CDK1 is dependent on several mechanisms, which include direct interaction with CDK1, p17-mediated suppression of Plk1 by activating the Tpr/p53 and ATM/Chk1/PP2A pathways, and p17-mediated cdc25C degradation via an ubiquitin- proteasome pathway. Additionally, depletion of p53 with a shRNA as well as inhibition of ATM and vimentin by inhibitors diminished virus yield while Tpr and CDK1 knockdown increased virus yield. Taken together, results demonstrate that p17 suppresses both CDK1 and Plk1functions, disrupts vimentin phosphorylation, causes G2/M cell cycle arrest and thus benefits virus replication. PMID:27603133

  8. Down-regulation of dihydrofolate reductase inhibits the growth of endothelial EA.hy926 cell through induction of G1 cell cycle arrest via up-regulating p53 and p21(waf1/cip1) expression.

    PubMed

    Fei, Zhewei; Gao, Yong; Qiu, Mingke; Qi, Xianqin; Dai, Yuxin; Wang, Shuqing; Quan, Zhiwei; Liu, Yingbin; Ou, Jingmin

    2016-03-01

    Folic acid supplementation may meliorate cardiovascular disease risk by improving vascular endothelial structure and function. However, the underlying mechanisms are still lack of a global understanding. To be used, folic acid must be converted to 7,8-dihydrofolate by dihydrofolate reductase to generate one-carbon derivatives serving as important cellular cofactors in the synthesis of nucleotides and amino acids required for cell growth. Therefore, this study explored the effect of dihydrofolate reductase knockdown on endothelial EA.hy926 cell growth and the mechanism involved. We found that down-regulation of dihydrofolate reductase inhibited EA.hy926 cell proliferation, and induced G1 phase arrest. Meanwhile, the expression of regulators necessary for G1/S phase transition, such as cyclin-dependent kinases CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6, were remarkably down-regulated; by contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p21(waf/cip1), p27(Kip1) and p53 were significantly up-regulated after dihydrofolate reductase knockdown. Furthermore, supplementation of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to the dihydrofolate reductase knockdown cells could weaken the inhibitory effect of dihydrofolate reductase knockdown on cell proliferation, simultaneously, inducing the expression of p53 and p21(waf/cip1) falling back moderately. Our findings suggest that attenuating dihydrofolate reductase may cause imbalanced expression of cell cycle regulators, especially up-regulation of p53-p21(waf/cip1) pathway, leading to G1 cell cycle arrest, thereby inhibiting the growth of endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

  9. Disialoganglioside GD3-synthase over expression inhibits survival and angiogenesis of pancreatic cancer cells through cell cycle arrest at S-phase and disruption of integrin-β1-mediated anchorage.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Chandan; Sarkar, Sayantani; Chatterjee, Uttara; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-08-01

    Gangliosides play important roles in the development, differentiation and proliferation of mammalian cells. They bind to other cell membrane components through their terminal sialic acids. Different gangliosides influence cellular functions based on the positions and linkages of sialic acids. Expression of gangliosides mainly depends on the status of sialic acid-modulatory enzymes, such as different types of sialyltransferases and sialidases. One such sialyltransferase, disialoganglioside GD3 synthase, is specifically responsible for the production of GD3. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, making up more than 90% of pancreatic cancers, is a fatal malignancy with poor prognosis. Despite higher sialylation status, the disialoganglioside GD3 level is very low in this cancer. However, the exact status and function of this disialoganglioside is still unknown. Here, we intended to study the intracellular mechanism of disialoganglioside GD3-induced apoptosis and its correlation with the adhesion and angiogenic pathways in pancreatic cancer. We demonstrated that disialoganglioside GD3 synthase-transfected cells showed enhanced apoptosis and it caused the arrest of these cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Integrins, a family of transmembrane proteins play important role in cell-cell recognition, invasion, adhesion and migration. disialoganglioside GD3 co-localised with integrin-β1 and thereby inhibited it's downstream signalling in transfected cells. Transfected cells exhibited inhibition of cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins. Enhanced GD3 expression down regulated angiogenesis-regulatory proteins and inhibited epidermal growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor-driven angiogenic cell growth in these cells. Taken together, our study provides support for the GD3-induced cell cycle arrest, disruption of integrin-β1-mediated anchorage, inhibition of angiogenesis and thereby induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases by citric acid cycle intermediates: possible links between cell metabolism and stabilization of HIF.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Peppi; Hirsilä, Maija; Remes, Anne M; Hassinen, Ilmo E; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna

    2007-02-16

    The stability and transcriptional activity of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are regulated by two oxygen-dependent events that are catalyzed by three HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (HIF-P4Hs) and one HIF asparaginyl hydroxylase (FIH). We have studied possible links between metabolic pathways and HIF hydroxylases by analyzing the abilities of citric acid cycle intermediates to inhibit purified human HIF-P4Hs and FIH. Fumarate and succinate were identified as in vitro inhibitors of all three HIF-P4Hs, fumarate having K(i) values of 50-80 microM and succinate 350-460 microM, whereas neither inhibited FIH. Oxaloacetate was an additional inhibitor of all three HIF-P4Hs with K(i) values of 400-1000 microM and citrate of HIF-P4H-3, citrate being the most effective inhibitor of FIH with a K(i) of 110 microM. Culturing of cells with fumarate diethyl or dimethyl ester, or a high concentration of monoethyl ester, stabilized HIF-1alpha and increased production of vascular endothelial growth factor and erythropoietin. Similar, although much smaller, changes were found in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with fumarate hydratase (FH) deficiency and upon silencing FH using small interfering RNA. No such effects were seen upon culturing of cells with succinate diethyl or dimethyl ester. As FIH was not inhibited by fumarate, our data indicate that the transcriptional activity of HIF is quite high even when binding of the coactivator p300 is prevented. Our data also support recent suggestions that the increased fumarate and succinate levels present in the FH and succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors, respectively, can inhibit the HIF-P4Hs with consequent stabilization of HIF-alphas and effects on tumor pathology.

  11. Cell cycle regulation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Zhang, Yong; Bedelbaeva, Khamila; Song, Fengyu; Chen, Xiaoping; Stocum, David L

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration of ear punch holes in the MRL mouse and amputated limbs of the axolotl show a number of similarities. A large proportion of the fibroblasts of the uninjured MRL mouse ear are arrested in G2 of the cell cycle, and enter nerve-dependent mitosis after injury to form a ring-shaped blastema that regenerates the ear tissue. Multiple cell types contribute to the establishment of the regeneration blastema of the urodele limb by dedifferentiation, and there is substantial reason to believe that the cells of this early blastema are also arrested in G2, and enter mitosis under the influence of nerve-dependent factors supplied by the apical epidermal cap. Molecular analysis reveals other parallels, such as; (1) the upregulation of Evi5, a centrosomal protein that prevents mitosis by stabilizing Emi1, a protein that inhibits the degradation of cyclins by the anaphase promoting complex and (2) the expression of sodium channels by the epidermis. A central feature in the entry into the cell cycle by MRL ear fibroblasts is a natural downregulation of p21, and knockout of p21 in wild-type mice confers regenerative capacity on non-regenerating ear tissue. Whether the same is true for entry into the cell cycle in regenerating urodele limbs is presently unknown.

  12. Overexpression of Lin28 inhibits the proliferation, migration and cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis of BGC-823 gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hu; Xu, Wei; Song, Jun; Liang, Yong; Fu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Cheng; Li, Chao; Peng, Jun-Sheng; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-02-01

    Lin28 plays important roles in the development, maintenance of pluripotency and progression of various types of cancers. Lin28 represses the biogenesis of let-7 microRNAs and is implicated in both development and tumorigenesis. Oncogenic regulation of let-7 microRNAs has been demonstrated in several human malignancies, yet their correlation with Lin28 has not yet been studied in gastric cancer. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the possible mechanisms involved in the effects by Lin28 on the proliferation, migration, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via alteration of let-7 miRNA. The expression levels of Lin28 and let-7 were detected by real-time PCR in gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. Lin28 was overexpressed in the BGC-823 cells via lentiviral transfection, and let-7 expression was assessed. Cell proliferation and migration capabilities were investigated by MTT and Transwell assays, while cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis rate were detected using flow cytometry. The expression of Lin28 was moderately expressed in the GES cells while underexpressed in the BGC-823, SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cells. Let-7a miRNA was highly expressed in the GES, BGC-823, SGC-7901 and HGC-27 cells. Overexpression of Lin28 was inversely correlated with the downregulated expression of let-7a, and markedly suppressed the proliferation, migration, cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in the BGC-823 cells. These findings demonstrated that overexpression of Lin28 can suppress the biological behavior of gastric cancer in vitro, and let-7 miRNA may play an important role in the process. We suggest that Lin28 may be a candidate predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for gastric cancer patients.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral protein R (Vpr) arrests cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle by inhibiting p34cdc2 activity.

    PubMed Central

    He, J; Choe, S; Walker, R; Di Marzio, P; Morgan, D O; Landau, N R

    1995-01-01

    The Vpr accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 and simian immunodeficiency virus is believed to play a role in permitting entry of the viral core into the nucleus of nondividing cells. A second role for Vpr was recently suggested by Rogel et al. (M. E. Rogel, L. I. Wu, and M. Emerman, J. Virol. 69:882-888, 1995), who showed that Vpr prevents the establishment in vitro of chronically infected HIV producer cell lines, apparently by causing infected cells to arrest in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In cycling cells, progression from G2 to M phase is driven by activation of the p34cdc2/cyclin B complex, an event caused, in part, by dephosphorylation of two regulatory amino acids of p34cdc2 (Thr-14 and Tyr-15). We show here that Vpr arrests the cell cycle in G2 by preventing the activation of the p34cdc2/cyclin B complex. Vpr expression in cells caused p34cdc2 to remain in the phosphorylated, inactive state, p34cdc2/cyclin B complexes immunoprecipitated from cells expressing Vpr were almost completely inactive in a histone H1 kinase assay. Coexpression of a constitutively active mutant p34cdc2 molecule with Vpr relieved the G2 arrest. These findings strongly suggest that Vpr arrests cells in G2 by preventing the activation of the p34cdc2/cyclin B complex that is required for entry into M phase. In vivo, Vpr might, by preventing p34cdc2 activation, delay or prevent apoptosis of infected cells. This would increase the amount of virus each infected cell produced. PMID:7474080

  14. Inhibition of leukemic U937 cell growth by induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and suppression of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities by cytotoxin protein NN-32 purified from Indian spectacled cobra (Naja naja) venom.

    PubMed

    Das, Tanaya; Bhattacharya, Shamik; Biswas, Archita; Gupta, Shubho Das; Gomes, Antony; Gomes, Aparna

    2013-04-01

    A cytotoxin NN-32 (6.7 kDa) from Indian cobra (Naja naja) venom inhibited human leukemic U937 cell growth as observed by Trypan blue dye exclusion method and cytotoxicity was confirmed by MTT assay. NN-32 induced apoptosis of U937 cell and cell cycle arrest of sub-G1 phase were revealed by FACS analysis. Increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, increased caspase 3 and 9 activities, cleaved PARP, decreased VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were observed after NN-32 treatment of U937 cell. Antileukemic activity of NN-32 on U937 cell may be due to activation of apoptosis, arresting cell cycle and antiangiogenesis activities.

  15. The cell cycle- and insulin-signaling-inhibiting miRNA expression pattern of very small embryonic-like stem cells contributes to their quiescent state.

    PubMed

    Maj, Magdalena; Schneider, Gabriela; Ratajczak, Janina; Suszynska, Malwina; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-08-01

    Murine Oct4(+), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), are a quiescent stem cell population that requires a supportive co-culture layer to proliferate and/or to differentiate in vitro. Gene expression studies have revealed that the quiescence of these cells is due to changes in expression of parentally imprinted genes, including genes involved in cell cycle regulation and insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS). To investigate the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in VSEL quiescence, we performed miRNA studies in highly purified VSELs and observed a unique miRNA expression pattern in these cells. Specifically, we observed significant differences in the expression of certain miRNA species (relative to a reference cell population), including (i) miRNA-25_1 and miRNA-19 b, whose downregulation has the effect of upregulating cell cycle checkpoint genes and (ii) miRNA-675-3 p and miRNA-675-5 p, miRNA-292-5 p, miRNA-184, and miRNA-125 b, whose upregulation attenuates IIS. These observations are important for understanding the biology of these cells and for developing efficient ex vivo expansion strategies for VSELs isolated from adult tissues.

  16. Pin1 inhibits PP2A-mediated Rb dephosphorylation in regulation of cell cycle and S-phase DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Y; Ying, H; Liu, R; Li, L; Bergholz, J; Xiao, Z-X

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) has a key role in tumorigenesis. It is well established that Rb function is largely regulated by a dynamic balance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Although much research has been done to understand the mechanisms and function of RB phosphorylation, the regulation of Rb dephosphorylation is still not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that Pin1 has an important role in the regulation of Rb function in cell cycle progression and S-phase checkpoint upon DNA damage. We show that the Rb C-pocket directly binds to the Pin1 WW domain in vitro and in vivo, and that the phosphorylation of Rb C-pocket by G1/S Cyclin/Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes is critical for mediating this interaction. We further show that Rb-mediated cell cycle arrest and Rb-induced premature cellular senescence are effectively inhibited by Pin1 expression. In addition, DNA damage induces Rb dephosphorylation in a PP2A-dependent manner, and this process is inhibited by Pin1. Furthermore, the overexpression of Pin1 promotes Rb hyperphosphorylation upon S-phase DNA damage. Importantly, both the Pin1 WW domain and isomerase activity are required for its effect on S-phase checkpoint. Moreover, the overexpression of Pin1 is correlated with Rb hyperphosphorylation in breast cancer biopsies. These results indicate that Pin1 has a critical role in the modulation of Rb function by the regulation of Rb dephosphorylation, which may have an important pathological role in cancer development. PMID:25675300

  17. Pin1 inhibits PP2A-mediated Rb dephosphorylation in regulation of cell cycle and S-phase DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tong, Y; Ying, H; Liu, R; Li, L; Bergholz, J; Xiao, Z-X

    2015-02-12

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) has a key role in tumorigenesis. It is well established that Rb function is largely regulated by a dynamic balance of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Although much research has been done to understand the mechanisms and function of RB phosphorylation, the regulation of Rb dephosphorylation is still not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that Pin1 has an important role in the regulation of Rb function in cell cycle progression and S-phase checkpoint upon DNA damage. We show that the Rb C-pocket directly binds to the Pin1 WW domain in vitro and in vivo, and that the phosphorylation of Rb C-pocket by G1/S Cyclin/Cyclin-dependent kinase complexes is critical for mediating this interaction. We further show that Rb-mediated cell cycle arrest and Rb-induced premature cellular senescence are effectively inhibited by Pin1 expression. In addition, DNA damage induces Rb dephosphorylation in a PP2A-dependent manner, and this process is inhibited by Pin1. Furthermore, the overexpression of Pin1 promotes Rb hyperphosphorylation upon S-phase DNA damage. Importantly, both the Pin1 WW domain and isomerase activity are required for its effect on S-phase checkpoint. Moreover, the overexpression of Pin1 is correlated with Rb hyperphosphorylation in breast cancer biopsies. These results indicate that Pin1 has a critical role in the modulation of Rb function by the regulation of Rb dephosphorylation, which may have an important pathological role in cancer development.

  18. Honokiol causes G0-G1 phase cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells in association with suppression of retinoblastoma protein level/phosphorylation and inhibition of E2F1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Singh, Shivendra V

    2007-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the mechanism of cell cycle arrest caused by honokiol, a constituent of oriental herb Magnolia officinalis. The honokiol treatment decreased the viability of PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, which correlated with G0-G1 phase cell cycle arrest. The honokiol-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with a decrease in protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), Cdk6, and/or cyclin E and suppression of complex formation between cyclin D1 and Cdk4 as revealed by immunoprecipitation using anti-cyclin D1 antibody followed by immunoblotting for Cdk4 protein. The honokiol-treated PC-3 and LNCaP cells exhibited a marked decrease in the levels of total and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (Rb), which correlated with the suppression of transcriptional activity of E2F1. Exposure of PC-3 and LNCaP cells to honokiol resulted in the induction of p21 (PC-3 and LNCaP) and p53 protein expression (LNCaP). However, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of either p21 (PC-3 and LNCaP) or p53 (LNCaP) protein failed to confer any protection against honokiol-induced cell cycle arrest. The honokiol treatment caused the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the cell cycle arrest caused by honokiol was partially but significantly attenuated in the presence of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the honokiol-mediated G0-G1 phase cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells is associated with the suppression of protein level/phosphorylation of Rb leading to inhibition of transcriptional activity of E2F1.

  19. CARI III inhibits tumor growth in a melanoma-bearing mouse model through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2014-09-12

    Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute) III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox)-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88%) was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  20. Cell cycle regulation of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Logan, Philip C; Steiner, Michael; Ponnampalam, Anna P; Mitchell, Murray D

    2012-08-01

    Differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells is crucial for optimal endometrial receptivity. Data from our previous microarray study implied that expression of many cell cycle regulators are changed during decidualization and inhibition of DNA methylation in vitro. In this study, we hypothesized that both the classic progestin treatment and DNA methylation inhibition would inhibit stromal cell proliferation and cell cycle transition. The human endometrial stromal cell line (HESC) was treated from 2 days to 18 days with the DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA), a mixture of estradiol/progestin/cyclic adenosine monophosphate ([cAMP]; medroxy-progesterone acetate [MPA mix]) or both. Cell growth was measured by cell counting, cell cycle transition and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, expression of cell cycle regulators were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting, and change in DNA methylation profiles were detected by methylation-specific PCR. Both AZA and MPA mix inhibited the proliferation of HESC for at least 7 days. Treatment with MPA mix resulted in an early G0/G1 inhibition followed by G2/M phase inhibition at 18 days. In contrast, AZA treatment inhibited cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase throughout. The protein levels of p21(Cip1)and 14-3-3σ were increased with both AZA and MPA mix treatments without any change in the DNA methylation profiles of the genes. Our data imply that the decidualization of HESC is associated with cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase initially and G2/M phase at later stages. Our results also suggest that p53 pathway members play a role in the cell cycle regulation of endometrial stromal cells.

  1. MicroRNA-20b inhibits the proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells via the targeting of cell cycle regulation and Sp-1-mediated MMP-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Lyea; Cho, Tae-Min; Won, Se Yeon; Song, Jun-Hui; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) serve either as oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes in tumor progression. MicroRNA-20b (miR‑20b) is known to be involved with the oncomirs of several types of cancers. However, in the present study we describe how miR-20b inhibits the proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells. In the present study, miR-20b was downregulated in bladder cancer cell lines, and its overexpression resulted in a significant reduction in the proliferation of EJ cells. In addition, via a bioinformatics approach, we identified cell cycle-regulated genes that are the putative targets of miR-20b. The transfection of miR-20b into EJ cells induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest via the decreased expression of cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK6 without affecting another G1 phase cell cycle regulator, cyclin E. The cell cycle inhibitor p21WAF1 was upregulated in the miR-20b transfected cells. Moreover, the enforced expression of miR-20b resulted in impaired wound-healing migration and invasion in the EJ cells. Based on our target prediction analysis of miRs, we confirmed that miR-20b overexpression strongly impedes MMP-2 expression via suppressive activation of the Sp-1 binding motif, an important transcription factor present in the MMP-2 promoter. Herein, we report the novel concept that miR-20b exerts a suppressive effect on both cell cycle-modulated proliferation and MMP-2-mediated migration and invasion in bladder cancer EJ cells.

  2. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  3. Expression of progesterone receptor B is associated with G0/G1 arrest of the cell cycle and growth inhibition in NIH3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Kato, Kiyoko . E-mail: kkatoh@tsurumi.beppu.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Suga, Shin; Takahashi, Akira; Ueoka, Yousuke; Arima, Takahiro; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Hachisuga, Toru; Kawarabayashi, Tatsuhiko; Wake, Norio

    2005-05-01

    Previously, we found a significant reduction of progesterone receptor B (PR-B) expression levels in the Ras-mediated NIH3T3 cell transformation, and re-expression of exogenous PR-B eliminated the tumorigenic potential. We hypothesized that this reduction is of biological significance in cell transformation. In the present study, we determined the correlation between PR-B expression and cell cycle progression. In synchronized NIH3T3 cells, we found an increase in PR-B protein and p27 CDK inhibitor levels in the G0/G1 phase and a reduction due to redistribution in the S and G2/M phases. The MEK inhibitor or cAMP stimulation arrested NIH3T3 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. The expression of PR-B and p27 CDK inhibitors was up-regulated by treatment with both the MEK inhibitor and cAMP. Treatment of synchronized cells with a PKA inhibitor in the presence of 1% calf serum resulted in a significant reduction in both PR-B and p27 levels. The decrease in the PR-B levels caused by anti-sense oligomers or siRNA corresponded to the reduction in p27 levels. PR-B overexpression by adenovirus infection induced p27 and suppressed cell growth. Finally, we showed that PR-B modulation involved in the regulation of NIH3T3 cell proliferation was independent of nuclear estrogen receptor (ER) activity but dependent on non-genomic ER activity.

  4. Microgravity Induces Pelvic Bone Loss through Osteoclastic Activity, Osteocytic Osteolysis, and Osteoblastic Cell Cycle Inhibition by CDKN1a/p21

    PubMed Central

    Blaber, Elizabeth A.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Lee, Chialing; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yousuf, Rukhsana; Pianetta, Piero; Globus, Ruth K.; Burns, Brendan P.; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamically remodeled tissue that requires gravity-mediated mechanical stimulation for maintenance of mineral content and structure. Homeostasis in bone occurs through a balance in the activities and signaling of osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, as well as proliferation and differentiation of their stem cell progenitors. Microgravity and unloading are known to cause osteoclast-mediated bone resorption; however, we hypothesize that osteocytic osteolysis, and cell cycle arrest during osteogenesis may also contribute to bone loss in space. To test this possibility, we exposed 16-week-old female C57BL/6J mice (n = 8) to microgravity for 15-days on the STS-131 space shuttle mission. Analysis of the pelvis by µCT shows decreases in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) of 6.29%, and bone thickness of 11.91%. TRAP-positive osteoclast-covered trabecular bone surfaces also increased in microgravity by 170% (p = 0.004), indicating osteoclastic bone degeneration. High-resolution X-ray nanoCT studies revealed signs of lacunar osteolysis, including increases in cross-sectional area (+17%, p = 0.022), perimeter (+14%, p = 0.008), and canalicular diameter (+6%, p = 0.037). Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 3, and 10 in bone, as measured by RT-qPCR, was also up-regulated in microgravity (+12.94, +2.98 and +16.85 fold respectively, p<0.01), with MMP10 localized to osteocytes, and consistent with induction of osteocytic osteolysis. Furthermore, expression of CDKN1a/p21 in bone increased 3.31 fold (p<0.01), and was localized to osteoblasts, possibly inhibiting the cell cycle during tissue regeneration as well as conferring apoptosis resistance to these cells. Finally the apoptosis inducer Trp53 was down-regulated by −1.54 fold (p<0.01), possibly associated with the quiescent survival-promoting function of CDKN1a/p21. In conclusion, our findings identify the pelvic and femoral region of the mouse skeleton as an active site of rapid bone

  5. The long non-coding RNA ANRIL promotes proliferation and cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis and senescence in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jun-jun; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ying-lei; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Jing-xin; Hua, Ke-qin

    2016-01-01

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) has been implicated in a variety of cancers. In the present study, we evaluated ANRIL expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and defined its clinical implications and biological functions. ANRIL was overexpressed in EOC tissues relative to normal controls. Overexpression correlated with advanced International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians stage and high histological grade. Multivariate analysis indicated that ANRIL is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in EOC. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that ANRIL promotes EOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The proliferative effect was linked to the promotion of cell cycle progression and inhibition of apoptosis and senescence. Down-regulation of P15INK4B and up-regulation of Bcl-2 by ANRIL may partially explain ANRIL-induced EOC cell proliferation. This study is the first to establish that ANRIL promotes EOC progression and is a potential prognostic biomarker. PMID:27095571

  6. The pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 inhibits tumor cell proliferation by downregulation of c-Myc and cyclins D1 and B1 mRNA and upregulation of p21 cell cycle inhibitor expression.

    PubMed

    Martino, Thiago; Magalhães, Fernanda C J; Justo, Graça A; Coelho, Marsen G P; Netto, Chaquip D; Costa, Paulo R R; Sabino, Kátia C C

    2014-06-15

    The incidence of cancer grows annually worldwide and in Brazil it is the second cause of death. The search for anti-cancer drugs has then become urgent. It depends on the studies of natural and chemical synthesis products. The antitumor action of LQB-118, a pterocarpanquinone structurally related to lapachol, has been demonstrated to induce mechanisms linked to leukemia cell apoptosis. This work investigated some mechanisms of the in vitro antitumor action of LQB-118 on prostate cancer cells. LQB-118 reduced the expression of the c-Myc transcription factor, downregulated the cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 mRNA levels and upregulated the p21 cell cycle inhibitor. These effects resulted in cell cycle arrest in the S and G2/M phases and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. LQB-118 also induced programmed cell death of the prostate cancer cells, as evidenced by internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and annexin-V positive cells. Except the cell cycle arrest in the S phase and enhanced c-Myc expression, all the mechanisms observed here for the in vitro antitumor action of LQB-118 were also found for Paclitaxel, a traditional antineoplastic drug. These findings suggest new molecular mechanisms for the LQB-118 in vitro antitumor action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. HSPA6 augments garlic extract-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells; Implication for cell cycle dysregulation, signaling pathway alteration, and transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Shick; Song, Jun-Hui; Hwang, Byungdoo; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Park, Sung Lyea; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of garlic extract (GE), the exact molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism associated with the inhibitory action of GE against bladder cancer EJ cell responses. Treatment with GE significantly inhibited proliferation of EJ cells dose-dependently through G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest. This G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest by GE was due to the activation of ATM and CHK2, which appears to inhibit phosphorylation of Cdc25C (Ser216) and Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15), this in turn was accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p21WAF1. Furthermore, GE treatment was also found to induce phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK) and AKT. In addition, GE impeded the migration and invasion of EJ cells via inhibition of MMP-9 expression followed by decreased binding activities of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB motifs. Based on microarray datasets, we selected Heat shock protein A6 (HSPA6) as the most up-regulated gene responsible for the inhibitory effects of GE. Interestingly, overexpression of HSPA6 gene resulted in an augmentation effect with GE inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells. The augmentation effect of HSPA6 was verified by enhancing the induction of G2/M-phase-mediated ATM-CHK2-Cdc25C-p21WAF1-Cdc2 cascade, phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT signaling, and suppression of transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation in response to GE in EJ cells. Overall, our novel results indicate that HSPA6 reinforces the GE-mediated inhibitory effects of proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells and may provide a new approach for therapeutic treatment of malignancies.

  8. HSPA6 augments garlic extract-induced inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer EJ cells; Implication for cell cycle dysregulation, signaling pathway alteration, and transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Byungdoo; Noh, Dae-Hwa; Park, Sung Lyea; Kim, Won Tae; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of garlic extract (GE), the exact molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism associated with the inhibitory action of GE against bladder cancer EJ cell responses. Treatment with GE significantly inhibited proliferation of EJ cells dose-dependently through G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest. This G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest by GE was due to the activation of ATM and CHK2, which appears to inhibit phosphorylation of Cdc25C (Ser216) and Cdc2 (Thr14/Tyr15), this in turn was accompanied by down-regulation of cyclin B1 and up-regulation of p21WAF1. Furthermore, GE treatment was also found to induce phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and JNK) and AKT. In addition, GE impeded the migration and invasion of EJ cells via inhibition of MMP-9 expression followed by decreased binding activities of AP-1, Sp-1, and NF-κB motifs. Based on microarray datasets, we selected Heat shock protein A6 (HSPA6) as the most up-regulated gene responsible for the inhibitory effects of GE. Interestingly, overexpression of HSPA6 gene resulted in an augmentation effect with GE inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells. The augmentation effect of HSPA6 was verified by enhancing the induction of G2/M-phase-mediated ATM-CHK2-Cdc25C-p21WAF1-Cdc2 cascade, phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT signaling, and suppression of transcription factor-associated MMP-9 regulation in response to GE in EJ cells. Overall, our novel results indicate that HSPA6 reinforces the GE-mediated inhibitory effects of proliferation, migration, and invasion of EJ cells and may provide a new approach for therapeutic treatment of malignancies. PMID:28187175

  9. Tangeretin and its metabolite 4′-hydroxytetramethoxyflavone attenuate EGF-stimulated cell cycle progression in hepatocytes; role of inhibition at the level of mTOR/p70S6K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Z; Surichan, S; Ruparelia, K; Arroo, R; Boarder, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms by which the dietary compound tangeretin has anticancer effects may include acting as a prodrug, forming an antiproliferative product in cancer cells. Here we show that tangeretin also inhibits cell cycle progression in hepatocytes and investigate the role of its primary metabolite 4′-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxyflavone (4′-OH-TMF) in this effect. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated rat hepatocytes, with [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA as an index of progression to S-phase of the cell cycle, and Western blots for phospho-proteins involved in the cell signalling cascade. KEY RESULTS Incubation of tangeretin with microsomes expressing CYP1A, or with hepatocytes, generated a primary product we identified as 4′-OH-TMF. Low micromolar concentrations of tangeretin or 4′-OH-TMF gave a concentration-dependent inhibition of EGF-stimulated progression to S-phase while having little effect on cell viability. To determine whether time for conversion of tangeretin to an active metabolite would enhance the inhibitory effect we used long pre-incubations; this reduced the inhibitory effect, in parallel with a reduction in the concentration of tangeretin. The EGF-stimulation of hepatocyte cell cycle progression requires signalling through Akt/mTOR/p70S6K kinase cascades. The tangeretin metabolite 4′-OH-TMF selectively inhibited S6K phosphorylation in the absence of significant inhibition of upstream Akt activity, suggesting an effect at the level of mTOR. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Tangeretin and 4′-OH-TMF both inhibit cell cycle progression in primary hepatocytes. The inhibition of p70S6K phosphorylation by 4′-OH-TMF raises the possibility that inhibition of the mTOR pathway may contribute to the anticancer influence of a flavonoid-rich diet. PMID:21198542

  10. Cell cycle effects of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Cell Growth and Division Cycle; Cell Cycle Effects of Alkylating Agents; Biological Effects of Folic Acid Antagonists with Antineoplastic Activity; and Bleomycin-Mode of Action with Particular Reference to the Cell Cycle.

  11. A New Perspective for Osteosarcoma Therapy: Proteasome Inhibition by MLN9708/2238 Successfully Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest and Attenuates the Invasion Ability of Osteosarcoma Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renhao; Fu, Chunjiang; Sun, Jiabing; Wang, Xvming; Geng, Shuo; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zou, Jilong; Bi, Zhenggang; Yang, Chenglin

    2017-01-01

    The proteasome exists in all eukaryotic cells and provides the main route of intracellular proteins degradation involved in cell growth and apoptosis. Proteasome inhibition could block protein degradation pathways and disturb regulatory networks, possibly leading to profound effects on cell growth, particularly in cancer cells. A proteasome inhibitor with an appropriate toxicity index for malignant cells rather than normal cells would be an attractive anticancer therapy. The human osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines MG-63 and Saos-2 and normal osteoblast cells were used to study the antitumour activity of the proteasome inhibitor MLN9708/2238. MLN2238 inhibited cell growth, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and attenuated the invasion abilities of MG-63 and Saos-2 cells, with little cytotoxicity to normal cells. In addition, MLN2238 promoted antitumour mechanisms including the accumulation of E2F1, P53, P21 and other negative G2/M checkpoint proteins; up-regulated the relative expression ratio of BAX/BCL-2, APAF-1 and pro-apoptotic proteins of the BCL-2 family; triggered mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP); down-regulated BCL-2 and XIAP; activated caspase3/8/9; and suppressed MMP2/9 expression and secretion levels. The proteasome may be a novel biochemical target for OS treatment in vitro. Our study provides a promising mechanistic framework for MLN9708/2238 in OS treatment, supporting its clinical development. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The flavonoid quercetin induces cell cycle arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells through p53 induction and NF-κB inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vidya Priyadarsini, R; Senthil Murugan, R; Maitreyi, S; Ramalingam, K; Karunagaran, D; Nagini, S

    2010-12-15

    With increasing use of plant-derived cancer chemotherapeutic agents, exploring the antiproliferative effects of phytochemicals has gained increasing momentum for anticancer drug design. The dietary phytochemical quercetin, modulates several signal transduction pathways associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of quercetin on cell viability, and to determine the molecular mechanism of quercetin-induced cell death by investigating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl1, Bax, Bad, p-Bad), cytochrome C, Apaf-1, caspases, and survivin as well as the cell cycle regulatory proteins (p53, p21, cyclin D1), and NF-κB family members (p50, p65, IκB, p-IκB-α, IKKβ and ubiquitin ligase) in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells. The results demonstrate that quercetin suppressed the viability of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial apoptosis through a p53-dependent mechanism. This involved characteristic changes in nuclear morphology, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins and NF-κB family members, upregulation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, cytochrome C, Apaf-1 and caspases, and downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins and survivin. Quercetin that exerts opposing effects on different signaling networks to inhibit cancer progression is a classic candidate for anticancer drug design. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolinderanolide B, a butanolide extracted from the stems of Cinnamomum subavenium, inhibits proliferation of T24 human bladder cancer cells by blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kun-Hung; Lin, En-Shyh; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chen, Chung-Yi; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2011-12-01

    Isolinderanolide B (IOB), a butanolide extracted from the stems of Cinnamomum subavenium, was investigated for its antiproliferative activity in T24 human bladder cancer cells. To identity the anticancer mechanism of IOB, its effect on apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, and levels of p53, p21 Waf1/Cip1, Fas/APO-1 receptor, and Fas ligand was assayed. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the G0/G1 phase arrest is because of increase in the expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1. An enhancement in Fas/APO-1 and membrane-bound Fas ligand (mFasL) might be responsible for the apoptotic effect induced by IOB. This study reports the novel finding that the induction of p21 Waf1/Cip1 and activity of the Fas/mFas ligand apoptotic system may participate in the antiproliferative activity of IOB in T24 cells.

  14. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces G1 cell cycle arrest, triggers apoptosis and inhibits migration and invasion in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Qiu-Shuang; Meng, Fan-Cheng; Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xiuping; Lin, Li-Gen; Chen, Ping; Qiang, Wen-An; Wang, Yi-Tao; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-12-01

    Panacis Japonici Rhizoma (PJR) is one of the most famous Chinese medical herbs that is known for exhibiting potential anti-cancer effects. This study aims to isolate and investigate the anti-cancer potential of saponins from PJR in ovarian cancer cells. The compounds were separated by comprehensive chromatographic methods. By comparison of the 1H- and 13C NMR data, as well as the HR-ESI-MS data, with the corresponding references, the structures of compounds were determined. MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell viability, along with flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. JC-1 staining, Annexin V-PI double staining as well as Hoechst 33; 342 staining were used for detecting cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis was conducted to determine the relative protein level. Transwell assays were performed to investigate the effect of the saponin on cell migration and invasion and zymography experiments were used to detect the enzymatic activities. Eleven saponins were isolated from PJR and their anti-proliferative effects were evaluated in human ovarian cancer cells. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (1) exhibited the highest anti-proliferative potential among these isolates with the IC50 values at less than 10 µM in both ovarian cancer A2780 and HEY cell lines. Compound 1 induced G1 cell cycle arrest accompanied with an S phase decrease, and down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6. Further study showed that compound 1 effectively decreased the cell mitochondrial membrane potential, increased the annexin V positive cells and nuclear chromatin condensation, as well as enhanced the expression of cleaved PARP, Bax and cleaved-caspase 3 while decreasing that of Bcl-2. Moreover, compound 1 suppressed the migration and invasion of HEY and A2780 cells, down-regulated the expression of Cdc42, Rac, RohA, MMP2 and MMP9, and decreased the enzymatic activities of MMP2 and MMP9. These results provide a comprehensive evaluation of compound 1 as a potential agent

  15. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb.

  16. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  17. Cell Cycle Reprogramming for PI3K Inhibition Overrides Relapse-Specific C481S BTK Mutation Revealed by Longitudinal Functional Genomics in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiron, David; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Martin, Peter; Huang, Xiangao; Sharman, Jeff; Blecua, Pedro; Mathew, Susan; Vijay, Priyanka; Eng, Ken; Ali, Siraj; Johnson, Amy; Chang, Betty; Ely, Scott; Elemento, Olivier; Mason, Christopher E.; Leonard, John P.; Chen-Kiang, Selina

    2014-01-01

    Despite the unprecedented clinical activity of the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib in MCL, acquired-resistance is common. By longitudinal integrative whole-exome and whole-transcriptome sequencing and targeted sequencing, we identified the first relapse-specific C481S mutation at the ibrutinib-binding site of BTK in MCL cells at progression following a durable response. This mutation enhanced BTK and AKT activation and tissue-specific proliferation of resistant MCL cells driven by CDK4 activation. It was absent, however, in patients with primary-resistance or progression following transient response to ibrutinib, suggesting alternative mechanisms of resistance. Through synergistic induction of PIK3IP1 and inhibition of PI3K-AKT activation, prolonged early G1 arrest induced by PD 0332991 (palbociclib) inhibition of CDK4 sensitized resistant lymphoma cells to ibrutinib killing when BTK was unmutated, and to PI3K inhibitors independent of C481S mutation. These data identify a genomic basis for acquired-ibrutinib resistance in MCL and suggest a strategy to override both primary- and acquired-ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25082755

  18. Cucurbitacin D induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by inhibiting STAT3 and NF-κB signaling in doxorubicin-resistant human breast carcinoma (MCF7/ADR) cells.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jin Mo; Kim, Soon Re; Hong, Se Hyang; Choi, Han-Seok; Seo, Hye Sook; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer for women and is a major cause of mortality in women. Doxorubicin is a generally used chemotherapy drug for breast cancer. However, multidrug resistance of breast cancer interferes with the chemotherapy. We examined whether cucurbitacin D affects doxorubicin resistance of MCF7/ADR breast cancer cells. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Levels of p-STAT3, p-NF-κB, IκB, and caspases were measured by Western blot analysis. Nuclear staining of Stat3 and NF-κB was measured by immunocytochemistry. STAT3 and NF-κB transcriptional activity was detected by STAT3 and NF-κB luciferase reporter gene assays. Analysis of cell cycle arrest was performed by flow cytometry. Induction of apoptosis by cucurbitacin D was measured by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide assay. More than 90% of MCF7/ADR cells lived upon treatment with doxorubicin for 24 h. However, upon treatment with cucurbitacin D, cell death was more than 60%. Co-administration of cucurbitacin D and doxorubicin induced apoptosis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest, and inhibited upregulated Stat3 by doxorubicin on MCF7/ADR cells. Additionally, cucurbitacin D led to an increase in the IκBα level in the cytosol and a decrease in the p-NF-κB level in the nucleus. Finally, cucurbitacin D inhibited translocation of Stat3 and NF-κB and decreased transcriptional activity in the nucleus. Cucurbitacin D decreases cell proliferation and induces apoptosis by inhibiting Stat3 and NF-κB signaling in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells. Cucurbitacin D could be used as a useful compound to treat adriamycin-resistant patients.

  19. Genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, prevents the growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells induced by 17β-estradiol or bisphenol A via the inhibition of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Kang, Nam-Hee; Yi, Bo-Rim; Lee, Hye-Rim; Park, Min-Ah; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-02-01

    An endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) is a global health concern. In this study, we examined the effects of genistein (GEN) on bisphenol A (BPA) or 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced cell growth and gene alterations of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells expressing estrogen receptors (ERs). In an in vitro cell viability assay, E2 or BPA significantly increased the growth of BG-1 cells. This increased proliferative activity was reversed by treatment with ICI 182,780, a well-known ER antagonist, while cell proliferation was further promoted in the presence of propyl pyrazole triol (PPT), an ERα agonist. These results imply that cell proliferation increased by E2 or BPA was mediated by ERs, particularly ERα. BPA clearly acted as a xenoestrogen in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells by mimicking E2 action. In contrast, GEN effectively suppressed BG-1 cell proliferation promoted by E2 or BPA by inhibiting cell cycle progression. E2 and BPA increased the expression of cyclin D1, a factor responsible for the G1/S cell cycle transition. They also decreased the expression of p21, a potent cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that arrests the cell cycle in G1 phase, and promoted the proliferation of BG-1 cells. As shown by its repressive effect on cell growth, GEN decreased the expression of cyclin D1 augmented by E2 or BPA. On the other hand, GEN increased the p21 expression downregulated by E2 or BPA. Collectively, our findings suggest that GEN, a dietary phytoestrogen, has an inhibitory effect on the growth of estrogen-dependent cancers promoted by E2 or BPA.

  20. Cell cycle in mouse development.

    PubMed

    Ciemerych, Maria A; Sicinski, Peter

    2005-04-18

    Mice likely represent the most-studied mammalian organism, except for humans. Genetic engineering in embryonic stem cells has allowed derivation of mouse strains lacking particular cell cycle proteins. Analyses of these mutant mice, and cells derived from them, facilitated the studies of the functions of cell cycle apparatus at the organismal and cellular levels. In this review, we give some background about the cell cycle progression during mouse development. We next discuss some insights about in vivo functions of the cell cycle proteins, gleaned from mouse knockout experiments. Our text is meant to provide examples of the recent experiments, rather than to supply an extensive and complete list.

  1. Inhibition of miR301 enhances Akt-mediated cell proliferation by accumulation of PTEN in nucleus and its effects on cell-cycle regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mayur V.; Shareef, Ahmad; Likus, Wirginia; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Ghavami, Saeid; Łos, Marek J.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) represent an innovative class of genes that act as regulators of gene expression. Recently, the aberrant expression of several miRs has been associated with different types of cancers. In this study, we show that miR301 inhibition influences PI3K-Akt pathway activity. Akt overexpression in MCF7 and MDAMB468 cells caused downregulation of miR301 expression. This effect was confirmed by co-transfection of miR301-modulators in the presence of Akt. Cells overexpressing miR301-inhibitor and Akt, exhibited increased migration and proliferation. Experimental results also confirmed PI3K, PTEN and FoxF2 as regulatory targets for miR301. Furthermore, Akt expression in conjunction with miR301-inhibitor increased nuclear accumulation of PTEN, thus preventing it from downregulating the PI3K-signalling. In summary, our data emphasize the importance of miR301 inhibition on PI3K-Akt pathway-mediated cellular functions. Hence, it opens new avenues for the development of new anti-cancer agents preferentially targeting PI3K-Akt pathway. PMID:26967567

  2. Novel phyto-derivative BRM270 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cells proliferation by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in xenograft mice model.

    PubMed

    Kumar Mongre, Raj; Sharma, Neelesh; Singh Sodhi, Simrinder; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Kumar Singh, Amit; Kim, Nameun; Park, Yang Ho; Shin, Young Gyu; Kim, Sung Jin; Jiao Jiao, Zhang; Huynh, Do Luong; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major threat to human health worldwide and development of novel antineoplastic drug is demanding task. BRM270 is a proprietary combination of traditional medicinal herbs, has been shown to be effective against a wide range of stem-like cancer initiating cells (SLCICs). However, the underlying mechanism and antitumor efficacy of BRM270 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells have not been well elucidated till date. Here we studied the tumoricidal effect of BRM270 on human-CD133(+) expressing stem-like HepG-2 and SNU-398 cells. Gene expression profiling by qPCR and specific cellular protein expressions was measured using immunocytochemistry/western blot analysis. In vivo efficacy of BRM270 has been elucidated in the SLCICs induced xenograft model. In addition, 2DG-(2-Deoxy-d-Glucose) optical-probe guided tumor monitoring was performed to delineate the size and extent of metastasized tumor. Significant (P<0.05) induction of Annexin-V positive cell population and dose-dependent upregulation of caspase-3 confirmed apoptotic cell death by pre/late apoptosis. In addition, bright field and fluorescence microscopy of treated cells revealed apoptotic morphology and DNA fragmentation in Hoechst33342 staining. Levels of c-Myc, Bcl-2 and c-Jun as invasive potential apoptotic marker were detected using qPCR/Western blot. Moreover, BRM270 significantly (P<0.05) increased survival rate that observed by Kaplan-Meier log rank test. In conclusion, these results indicate that BRM270 can effectively inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in hepatoma cells by down-regulating CyclinD1/Bcl2 mediated c-Jun apoptotic pathway.

  3. The p75NTR-interacting protein SC1 inhibits cell cycle progression by transcriptional repression of cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Chittka, Alexandra; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Guzman, Maria; Pérez, Pilar; Chao, Moses V.; Sendtner, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Schwann cell factor 1 (SC1), a p75 neurotrophin receptor–interacting protein, is a member of the positive regulatory/suppressor of variegation, enhancer of zeste, trithorax (PR/SET) domain-containing zinc finger protein family, and it has been shown to be regulated by serum and neurotrophins. SC1 shows a differential cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution, and its presence in the nucleus correlates strongly with the absence of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in these nuclei. Here, we investigated potential transcriptional activities of SC1 and analyzed the function of its various domains. We show that SC1 acts as a transcriptional repressor when it is tethered to Gal4 DNA-binding domain. The repressive activity requires a trichostatin A–sensitive histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, and SC1 is found in a complex with HDACs 1, 2, and 3. Transcriptional repression exerted by SC1 requires the presence of its zinc finger domains and the PR domain. Additionally, these two domains are involved in the efficient block of BrdU incorporation by SC1. The zinc finger domains are also necessary to direct SC1's nuclear localization. Lastly, SC1 represses the promoter of a promitotic gene, cyclin E, suggesting a mechanism for how growth arrest is regulated by SC1. PMID:15051733

  4. The inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells proliferation by arctigenin through G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest: persistent p27(Kip1) induction by interfering with PI3K/Akt/FOXO3a signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Wang, Jun; Wu, Mingjun; Zhang, Xiaoxun; Zhang, Hongzhi

    2015-01-15

    Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is vital for the development of fibrosis during liver injury. In this study, we describe that arctigenin (ATG), a major bioactive component of Fructus Arctii, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity via inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-activated HSCs proliferation and arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which could not be observed in normal human hepatocytes in vitro. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activities could be strongly inhibited by ATG through down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4/6 expression in early G1 phase arrest. In the ATG-treated HSCs, the expression level of p27(Kip1) and the formation of CDK2-p27(Kip1) complex were also increased. p27(Kip1) silencing significantly attenuated the effect of ATG, including cell cycle arrest and suppression of proliferation in activated HSCs. We also found that ATG suppressed PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream transcription factor Forkhead box O 3a (FOXO3a), decreased binding of FOXO3a to 14-3-3 protein, and stimulated nuclear translocation of FOXO3a in activated HSCs. Furthermore, knockdown of FOXO3a expression by FOXO3a siRNA attenuated ATG-induced up-regulation of p27(Kip1) in activated HSCs. All the above findings suggested that ATG could increase the levels of p27(Kip1) protein through inhibition of Akt and improvement of FOXO3a activity, in turn inhibited the CDK2 kinase activity, and eventually caused an overall inhibition of HSCs proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell cycle regulation by microRNAs in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangming; Blelloch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The ability to self-renew and to differentiate into at least one-cell lineage defines a stem cell. Self-renewal is a process by which stem cells proliferate without differentiation. Proliferation is achieved through a series of highly regulated events of the cell cycle. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short noncoding RNAs whose importance in these events is becoming increasingly appreciated. In this chapter, we discuss the role of miRNAs in regulating the cell cycle in various stem cells with a focus on embryonic stem cells. We also present the evidence indicating that cell cycle-regulating miRNAs are incorporated into a large regulatory network to control the self-renewal of stem cells by inducing or inhibiting differentiation. In addition, we discuss the function of cell cycle-regulating miRNAs in cancer.

  6. LYG-202 inhibits the proliferation of human colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells through induction of G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via p53 and p21(WAF1/Cip1) expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dai, Qinsheng; Lu, Na; Wei, Libin; Ha, Jun; Rong, Jingjing; Mu, Rong; You, Qidong; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong

    2011-06-01

    We recently established that LYG-202, a new flavonoid with a piperazine substitution, exerts an anti-tumor effect in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that LYG-202 induces G1/S phase arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. Data showed that the blockade of the cell cycle was associated with increased p21(WAF1/Cip1) and Rb levels and reduced expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and CDK4. Moreover, PARP cleavage, activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9, and an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were detected in LYG-202-induced apoptosis. Additionally, activation of p53 resulted in the up-regulation of its downstream targets PUMA and p21(WAF1/Cip1), as well as the down-regulation of its negative regulator MDM2, suggesting that the p53 pathway may play a crucial role in LYG-202-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of p53 attenuated the G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by LYG-202, as the effects of LYG-202 on up-regulation of p21(WAF1/Cip1) and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and pro-caspase-3 were partly inhibited in p53 siRNA transfected cells compared with control siRNA transfected cells. Collectively, these data indicate that LYG-202 exerts its anti-tumor potency by activating the p53-p21 pathway for G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

  7. How do prokaryotic cells cycle?

    PubMed

    Margolin, William; Bernander, Rolf

    2004-09-21

    This issue of Current Biology features five reviews covering various key aspects of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The topics include initiation of chromosome replication, assembly of the mitotic spindle, cytokinesis, the regulation of cell-cycle progression, and cell-cycle modeling, focusing mainly on budding yeast, fission yeast and animal cell model systems. The reviews underscore common themes as well as key differences in the way these processes are carried out and regulated among the different model organisms. Consequently, an important question is how cell-cycle mechanisms and controls have evolved, particularly in the broader perspective of the three domains of life.

  8. NETs and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Robson, Michael I; Le Thanh, Phu; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    There are many ways that the nuclear envelope can influence the cell cycle. In addition to roles of lamins in regulating the master cell cycle regulator pRb and nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis, many other nuclear envelope proteins influence the cell cycle through regulatory or structural functions. Of particular note among these are the nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that appear to influence cell cycle regulation through multiple separate mechanisms. Some NETs and other nuclear envelope proteins accumulate on the mitotic spindle, suggesting functional or structural roles in the cell cycle. In interphase exogenous overexpression of some NETs promotes an increase in G1 populations, while others promote an increase in G2/M populations, sometimes associated with the induction of senescence. Intriguingly, most of the NETs linked to the cell cycle are highly restricted in their tissue expression; thus, their misregulation in cancer could contribute to the many tissue-specific types of cancer.

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Evelyn, Chris R.; Lisabeth, Erika M.; Wade, Susan M.; Haak, Andrew J.; Johnson, Craig N.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Neubig, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL) and serum response factor (SRF) drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B), which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB) showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis. PMID:27600078

  10. A new indole-3-carbinol tetrameric derivative inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase 6 expression, and induces G1 cell cycle arrest in both estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Brandi, Giorgio; Paiardini, Mirko; Cervasi, Barbara; Fiorucci, Chiara; Filippone, Paolino; De Marco, Cinzia; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Magnani, Mauro

    2003-07-15

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), autolysis product of glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, has been indicated as a promising agent in preventing the development and progression of breast cancer. I3C has been shown to inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in vitro and possesses anticarcinogenic activity in vivo. Because I3C is unstable and may be converted into many polymeric products in the digestive tract, it is not yet clear whether the biological activity observed can be attributed to I3C or some of its polymeric products. In this study we synthesized a stable I3C cyclic tetrameric derivative and investigated its effects on a panel of human breast cancer cell lines. The I3C tetramer suppressed the growth of both estrogen receptor (ER) -positive (MCF-7, 734B, and BT474) and ER-negative (BT20, MDA-MB-231, and BT539) human breast cancer cell lines, and it was found to induce G(1) cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner without evidence of apoptosis, suggesting a growth arrest via a cytostatic mechanism. At the molecular level, the tetramer inhibited cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 6 expression and activity, induced an increase in the level of p27(kip1), and reduced the level of retinoblastoma protein expression. Contrarily to CDK6, the level of CDK4, the other kinase involved in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, remains unchanged. Interestingly, the tetramer resulted about five times more active than I3C in suppressing the growth of human breast cancer cells. On the whole, our data suggest that the I3C tetrameric derivative is a novel lead inhibitor of breast cancer cell growth that may be a considered a new, promising therapeutic agent for both ER+ and ER- breast cancer.

  11. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Hsiao, Ping-Hsuan; Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-03-30

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1-3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4-2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAPE treatment significantly reduced protein abundance of Skp2, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk7, Rb, phospho-Rb S807/811, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin H, E2F1, c-Myc, SGK, phospho-p70S6kinase T421/S424, phospho-mTOR Ser2481, phospho-GSK3α Ser21, but induced p21Cip1, p27Kip1, ATF4, cyclin E, p53, TRIB3, phospho-p53 (Ser6, Ser33, Ser46, Ser392), phospho-p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182, Chk1, Chk2, phospho-ATM S1981, phospho-ATR S428, and phospho-p90RSK Ser380. CAPE treatment decreased Skp2 and Akt1 protein expression in LNCaP 104-R1 tumors as compared to control group. Overexpression of Skp2, or siRNA knockdown of p21Cip1, p27Kip1, or p53 blocked suppressive effect of CAPE treatment. Co-treatment of CAPE with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT737 showed synergistic suppressive effects. Our finding suggested that CAPE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in CRPC cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1.

  12. The Abbreviated Pluripotent Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Grandy, Rodrigo; Ghule, Prachi; Medina, Ricardo; Becker, Klaus; Pardee, Arthur; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Lian, Jane; Stein, Janet; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells proliferate rapidly and divide symmetrically producing equivalent progeny cells. In contrast, lineage committed cells acquire an extended symmetrical cell cycle. Self-renewal of tissue-specific stem cells is sustained by asymmetric cell division where one progeny cell remains a progenitor while the partner progeny cell exits the cell cycle and differentiates. There are three principal contexts for considering the operation and regulation of the pluripotent cell cycle: temporal, regulatory andstructural. The primary temporal context that the pluripotent self-renewal cell cycle of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a short G1 period without reducing periods of time allocated to S phase, G2, and mitosis. The rules that govern proliferation in hESCs remain to be comprehensively established. However, several lines of evidence suggest a key role for the naïve transcriptome of hESCs, which is competent to stringently regulate the ESC cell cycle. This supports the requirements of pluripotent cells to self propagate while suppressing expression of genes that confer lineage commitment and/or tissue specificity. However, for the first time, we consider unique dimensions to the architectural organization and assembly of regulatory machinery for gene expression in nuclear microenviornments that define parameters of pluripotency. From both fundamental biological and clinical perspectives, understanding control of the abbreviated embryonic stem cell cycle can provide options to coordinate control of proliferation versus differentiation. Wound healing, tissue engineering, and cell-based therapy to mitigate developmental aberrations illustrate applications that benefit from knowledge of the biology of the pluripotent cell cycle. PMID:22552993

  13. Inhibition of PID1/NYGGF4/PCLI1 gene expression highlights its role in the early events of the cell cycle in NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Francesca; Vitale, Monica; Caratù, Ginevra; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Di Giovanni, Stefano; Gorrese, Marisa; Napolitano, Francesco; Romano, Maria Fiammetta; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Succoio, Mariangela; Scaloni, Andrea; Zambrano, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The PID1/NYGGF4/PCLI1 gene encodes for a protein with a phosphotyrosine-binding domain, which interacts with the lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1. Previous work by us and others suggested a function of the gene in cell proliferation of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes. The molecular characterization of PCLI1 protein, ectopically expressed in NIH3T3 fibroblasts, revealed two phosphorylation sites at Ser154 and Ser165. In order to clarify the functions of this gene, we analyzed the effects of its downregulation on cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression in NIH3T3 cell cultures. Downregulation of PID1/NYGGF4/PCLI1 mRNA levels by short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) elicited decreased proliferation rate in mammalian cell lines; cell cycle analysis of serum-starved, synchronized NIH3T3 fibroblasts showed an increased accumulation of shRNA-interfered cells in the G1 phase. Decreased levels of FOS and MYC mRNAs were accordingly associated with these events. The molecular scenario emerging from our data suggests that PID1/NYGGF4/PCLI1 controls cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression in NIH3T3 cells.

  14. The abbreviated pluripotent cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kapinas, Kristina; Grandy, Rodrigo; Ghule, Prachi; Medina, Ricardo; Becker, Klaus; Pardee, Arthur; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane; Stein, Janet; van Wijnen, Andre; Stein, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells proliferate rapidly and divide symmetrically producing equivalent progeny cells. In contrast, lineage committed cells acquire an extended symmetrical cell cycle. Self-renewal of tissue-specific stem cells is sustained by asymmetric cell division where one progeny cell remains a progenitor while the partner progeny cell exits the cell cycle and differentiates. There are three principal contexts for considering the operation and regulation of the pluripotent cell cycle: temporal, regulatory, and structural. The primary temporal context that the pluripotent self-renewal cell cycle of hESCs is a short G1 period without reducing periods of time allocated to S phase, G2, and mitosis. The rules that govern proliferation in hESCs remain to be comprehensively established. However, several lines of evidence suggest a key role for the naïve transcriptome of hESCs, which is competent to stringently regulate the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cell cycle. This supports the requirements of pluripotent cells to self-propagate while suppressing expression of genes that confer lineage commitment and/or tissue specificity. However, for the first time, we consider unique dimensions to the architectural organization and assembly of regulatory machinery for gene expression in nuclear microenviornments that define parameters of pluripotency. From both fundamental biological and clinical perspectives, understanding control of the abbreviated ESC cycle can provide options to coordinate control of proliferation versus differentiation. Wound healing, tissue engineering, and cell-based therapy to mitigate developmental aberrations illustrate applications that benefit from knowledge of the biology of the pluripotent cell cycle.

  15. Cell cycle regulation in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pietras, Eric M; Warr, Matthew R; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2011-11-28

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all lineages of blood cells. Because HSCs must persist for a lifetime, the balance between their proliferation and quiescence is carefully regulated to ensure blood homeostasis while limiting cellular damage. Cell cycle regulation therefore plays a critical role in controlling HSC function during both fetal life and in the adult. The cell cycle activity of HSCs is carefully modulated by a complex interplay between cell-intrinsic mechanisms and cell-extrinsic factors produced by the microenvironment. This fine-tuned regulatory network may become altered with age, leading to aberrant HSC cell cycle regulation, degraded HSC function, and hematological malignancy.

  16. Cytotoxic activity of Justicia spicigera is inhibited by bcl-2 proto-oncogene and induces apoptosis in a cell cycle dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R; Cantú-Garza, F A; Mendoza-Mata, M T; Chavez-González, M A; Ramos-Mandujano, G; Zambrano-Ramírez, I R

    2001-12-01

    Identification of organic compounds from plants is of clinical significance because of the effect that they might have in patients with haematopoietic disorders. We studied the effect of the plant extract Justicia spicigera (Acanthaceae) in different haematopoietic cells: human leukaemic cell lines, umbilical cord blood cells, and mouse bone marrow cells. By examining colony formation and performing the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay it was shown that the plant extract of Justicia spicigera contains cytotoxic factors for leukaemic cells and has no proliferative activity on normal haematopoietic progenitor cells. Our results show that this plant extract induces apoptosis in the human leukaemia cell line TF-1, but not in the bcl-2 transfectant cell line TB-1. Similar results were obtained using a haemopoietic cell line 32D and 32DBcl2. The cultures of umbilical cord blood cells and mouse bone marrow that contain granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) do not proliferate or become terminally differentiated in the presence of the infusion of Justicia spicigera. GM-CSF that acts by abrogating programmed cell death is not sufficient to inhibit the apoptotic stimulus in TF-1 and 32D cells. Moreover mouse fibroblasts (3T3) and two cervical carcinoma cell lines CALO and INBL, undergo apoptosis in the presence of different concentrations of an infusion from the plant. Our data show that there is a strong correlation between the cytotoxic effect and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that the plant infusion of Justicia spicigera does not contain any haematopoietic activity, induces apoptosis inhibited by bcl-2 and is linked to cell proliferation. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of CoQ0 against melanoma cells: inhibition of metastasis and induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis through modulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsou, Hsiao-Tung; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Jye; Lin, Chung-Ming; Liao, Jiuun-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q0 (CoQ0, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone), a novel quinone derivative, has been shown to modulate cellular redox balance. However, effect of this compound on melanoma remains unclear. This study examined the in vitro or in vivo anti-tumor, apoptosis, and anti-metastasis activities of CoQ0 (0-20 μM) through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CoQ0 exhibits a significant cytotoxic effect on melanoma cell lines (B16F10, B16F1, and A2058), while causing little toxicity toward normal (HaCaT) cells. The suppression of β-catenin was seen with CoQ0 administration accompanied by a decrease in the expression of Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target c-myc, cyclin D1, and survivin through GSK3β-independent pathway. We found that CoQ0 treatment caused G1 cell-cycle arrest by reducing the levels of cyclin E and CDK4. Furthermore, CoQ0 treatment induced apoptosis through caspase-9/-3 activation, PARP degradation, Bcl-2/Bax dysregulation, and p53 expression. Notably, non- or sub-cytotoxic concentrations of CoQ0 markedly inhibited migration and invasion, accompanied by the down-regulation of MMP-2 and -9, and up-regulation of TIMP-1 and -2 expressions in highly metastatic B16F10 cells. Furthermore, the in vivo study results revealed that CoQ0 treatment inhibited the tumor growth in B16F10 xenografted nude mice. Histological analysis and western blotting confirmed that CoQ0 significantly decreased the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by induction of apoptosis, suppression of β-catenin, and inhibition of cell cycle-, apoptotic-, and metastatic-regulatory proteins. The data suggest that CoQ0 unveils a novel mechanism by down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathways and could be used as a potential lead compound for melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:26968952

  18. Artemisinin triggers a G1 cell cycle arrest of human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and inhibits cyclin-dependent kinase-4 promoter activity and expression by disrupting nuclear factor-κB transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kalvin Q; Tin, Antony S; Firestone, Gary L

    2014-03-01

    Relatively little is known about the antiproliferative effects of artemisinin, a naturally occurring antimalarial compound from Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, in human endometrial cancer cells. Artemisinin induced a G1 cell cycle arrest in cultured human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells and downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) and CDK4 transcript and protein levels. Analysis of CDK4 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs showed that the artemisinin ablation of CDK4 gene expression was accounted for by the loss of CDK4 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that artemisinin inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) subunit p65 and p50 interactions with the endogenous Ishikawa cell CDK4 promoter. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed that artemisinin disrupts endogenous p65 and p50 nuclear translocation through increased protein-protein interactions with IκB-α, an NF-κB inhibitor, and disrupts its interaction with the CDK4 promoter, leading to a loss of CDK4 gene expression. Artemisinin treatment stimulated the cellular levels of IκB-α protein without altering the level of IκB-α transcripts. Finally, expression of exogenous p65 resulted in the accumulation of this NF-κB subunit in the nucleus of artemisinin-treated and artemisinin-untreated cells, reversed the artemisinin downregulation of CDK4 protein expression and promoter activity, and prevented the artemisinin-induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin antiproliferative effects in endometrial cancer cells is the transcriptional downregulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of NF-κB interactions with the CDK4 promoter.

  19. ZNF313 is a novel cell cycle activator with an E3 ligase activity inhibiting cellular senescence by destabilizing p21(WAF1.).

    PubMed

    Han, J; Kim, Y-L; Lee, K-W; Her, N-G; Ha, T-K; Yoon, S; Jeong, S-I; Lee, J-H; Kang, M-J; Lee, M-G; Ryu, B-K; Baik, J-H; Chi, S-G

    2013-08-01

    ZNF313 encoding a zinc-binding protein is located at chromosome 20q13.13, which exhibits a frequent genomic amplification in multiple human cancers. However, the biological function of ZNF313 remains largely undefined. Here we report that ZNF313 is an ubiquitin E3 ligase that has a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle progression, differentiation and senescence. In this study, ZNF313 is initially identified as a XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1)-interacting protein, which upregulates the stability and proapoptotic effect of XAF1. Intriguingly, we found that ZNF313 activates cell cycle progression and suppresses cellular senescence through the RING domain-mediated degradation of p21(WAF1). ZNF313 ubiquitinates p21(WAF1) and also destabilizes p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2), three members of the CDK-interacting protein (CIP)/kinase inhibitor protein (KIP) family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, whereas it does not affect the stability of the inhibitor of CDK (INK4) family members, such as p16(INK4A) and p15(INK4B). ZNF313 expression is tightly controlled during the cell cycle and its elevation at the late G1 phase is crucial for the G1-to-S phase transition. ZNF313 is induced by mitogenic growth factors and its blockade profoundly delays cell cycle progression and accelerates p21(WAF1)-mediated senescence. Both replicative and stress-induced senescence are accompanied with ZNF313 reduction. ZNF313 is downregulated during cellular differentiation process in vitro and in vivo, while it is commonly upregulated in many types of cancer cells. ZNF313 shows both the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization in epithelial cells of normal tissues, but exhibits an intense cytoplasmic distribution in carcinoma cells of tumor tissues. Collectively, ZNF313 is a novel E3 ligase for p21(WAF1), whose alteration might be implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including cancers.

  20. Costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone combination treatment inhibit breast cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through c-Myc/p53 and AKT/14-3-3 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhangxiao; Wang, Yan; Fan, Jianhui; Lin, Xuejing; Liu, Chunying; Xu, Yang; Ji, Weidan; Yan, Chao; Su, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that volatile oil from saussurea lappa root (VOSL), rich in two natural sesquiterpene lactones, costunolide (Cos) and dehydrocostuslactone (Dehy), exerts better anti-breast cancer efficacy and lower side effects than Cos or Dehy alone in vivo, however, their anti-cancer molecular mechanisms were still unknown. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of Cos and Dehy combination treatment (CD) on breast cancer cells through proteomics technology coupled with Western blot validation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) results based on the differentially expressed proteins revealed that both VOSL and CD affect the 14-3-3-mediated signaling, c-Myc mediated apoptosis signaling and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. Western blot coupled with cell cycle and apoptosis analysis validated the results of proteomics analysis. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were induced in a dose-dependent manner, and the expressions of p53 and p-14-3-3 were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expressions of c-Myc, p-AKT, p-BID were significantly down-regulated, furthermore, the ratio of BAX/BCL-2 were significantly increased in breast cancer cells after CD and VOSL treatment. The findings indicated that VOSL and CD could induce breast cancer cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through c-Myc/p53 and AKT/14-3-3 signaling pathways and may be novel effective candidates for breast cancer treatment. PMID:28117370

  1. Costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone combination treatment inhibit breast cancer by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through c-Myc/p53 and AKT/14-3-3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhangxiao; Wang, Yan; Fan, Jianhui; Lin, Xuejing; Liu, Chunying; Xu, Yang; Ji, Weidan; Yan, Chao; Su, Changqing

    2017-01-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that volatile oil from saussurea lappa root (VOSL), rich in two natural sesquiterpene lactones, costunolide (Cos) and dehydrocostuslactone (Dehy), exerts better anti-breast cancer efficacy and lower side effects than Cos or Dehy alone in vivo, however, their anti-cancer molecular mechanisms were still unknown. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of Cos and Dehy combination treatment (CD) on breast cancer cells through proteomics technology coupled with Western blot validation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) results based on the differentially expressed proteins revealed that both VOSL and CD affect the 14-3-3-mediated signaling, c-Myc mediated apoptosis signaling and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. Western blot coupled with cell cycle and apoptosis analysis validated the results of proteomics analysis. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were induced in a dose-dependent manner, and the expressions of p53 and p-14-3-3 were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expressions of c-Myc, p-AKT, p-BID were significantly down-regulated, furthermore, the ratio of BAX/BCL-2 were significantly increased in breast cancer cells after CD and VOSL treatment. The findings indicated that VOSL and CD could induce breast cancer cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through c-Myc/p53 and AKT/14-3-3 signaling pathways and may be novel effective candidates for breast cancer treatment.

  2. The cell cycle and pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher; Philpott, Anna

    2013-04-15

    PSCs (pluripotent stem cells) possess two key properties that have made them the focus of global research efforts in regenerative medicine: they have unlimited expansion potential under conditions which favour their preservation as PSCs and they have the ability to generate all somatic cell types upon differentiation (pluripotency). Conditions have been defined in vitro in which pluripotency is maintained, or else differentiation is favoured and is directed towards specific somatic cell types. However, an unanswered question is whether or not the core cell cycle machinery directly regulates the pluripotency and differentiation properties of PSCs. If so, then manipulation of the cell cycle may represent an additional tool by which in vitro maintenance or differentiation of PSCs may be controlled in regenerative medicine. The present review aims to summarize our current understanding of links between the core cell cycle machinery and the maintenance of pluripotency in ESCs (embryonic stem cells) and iPSCs (induced PSCs).

  3. Cell Cycle Regulation by Checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J.; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that monitor the order, integrity, and fidelity of the major events of the cell cycle. These include growth to the appropriate cell size, the replication and integrity of the chromosomes, and their accurate segregation at mitosis. Many of these mechanisms are ancient in origin and highly conserved, and hence have been heavily informed by studies in simple organisms such as the yeasts. Others have evolved in higher organisms, and control alternative cell fates with significant impact on tumor suppression. Here, we consider these different checkpoint pathways and the consequences of their dysfunction on cell fate. PMID:24906307

  4. Cell cycle regulation by checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that monitor the order, integrity, and fidelity of the major events of the cell cycle. These include growth to the appropriate cell size, the replication and integrity of the chromosomes, and their accurate segregation at mitosis. Many of these mechanisms are ancient in origin and highly conserved, and hence have been heavily informed by studies in simple organisms such as the yeasts. Others have evolved in higher organisms, and control alternative cell fates with significant impact on tumor suppression. Here, we consider these different checkpoint pathways and the consequences of their dysfunction on cell fate.

  5. Soy milk digestion extract inhibits progression of prostate cancer cell growth via regulation of prostate cancer‑specific antigen and cell cycle-regulatory genes in human LNCaP cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam-Hee; Shin, Hee-Chang; Oh, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyun-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-08-01

    Soy milk, which is produced from whole soybeans, contains a variety of biologically active components. Isoflavones are a class of soy-derived phytoestrogens with beneficial effects, among which genistein (GEN) has been previously indicated to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The present study evaluated the effects of soy milk digestion extract (SMD) on the progression of prostate cancer via the estrogen receptor (ER)β in human LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the effects of SMD (daizein, 1.988 mg/100g, glycitein, 23.537 mg/100 g and GEN, 0.685 mg/100g) on cell proliferation, LNCaP cells were cultured in media containing vehicle (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide), 17β‑estradiol (E2; 2.7x10‑7 mg/ml), GEN (2.7x10-2 mg/ml) of SMD (total aglycon concentration, 0.79 mg/ml), after which the cell viability was examined using an MTT assay. The cell viability was significantly elevated by E2 (by 45±0.18%), while it was markedly reduced by GEN (73.2±0.03%) or SMD (74.8±0.09%). Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes, including ERβ, prostate cancer‑specific antigen (PSA) and cell cycle regulators p21, Cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4. The expression of ERβ was almost completely diminished by E2, whereas it was significantly elevated by SMD. In addition, the expression levels of PSA were considerably reduced by SMD. The expression of p21 was significantly elevated by SMD, while it was markedly reduced by E2. Of note, the expression levels of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 were considerably elevated by E2, while being significantly reduced by GEN and SMD. All of these results indicated that SMD may inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells via regulating the expression of ERβ, PSA, p21, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 in an ER-dependent manner.

  6. Sesamin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signalling in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pengyi; Wang, Chen; Chen, Liulin; Wang, Cheng; Du, Yuhan; Yan, Xu; Chen, Mingjie; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2013-01-01

    Sesamin, one of the most abundant lignans in sesame seeds, has been shown to exhibit various pharmacological effects. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether sesamin promotes cell cycle arrest and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells and further to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we found that sesamin inhibited HepG2 cell growth by inducing G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, sesamin suppressed the constitutive and interleukin (IL)-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signalling pathway in HepG2 cells, leading to regulate the downstream genes, including p53, p21, cyclin proteins and the Bcl-2 protein family. Our studies showed that STAT3 signalling played a key role in sesamin-induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These findings provided a molecular basis for understanding of the effects of sesamin in hepatocellular carcinoma tumour cell proliferation. Therefore, sesamin may thus be a potential chemotherapy drug for liver cancer.

  7. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  8. Effect of immunosuppression on the human mesangial cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, XIAOSHUANG; WORKENEH, BIRUH; HU, ZHAOYONG; LI, RONGSHAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of immunosuppressive agents [tacrolimus (Tac), cyclosporine A (CsA), mycophenolic acid (MMF) and methylprednisone (MP)] on the proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptotic rate of human mesangial cells. Cultured human mesangial cells were treated with several concentrations of the immunosuppressive agents for 24, 48 or 72 h. Cell cycle progression, proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed using an MTT assay and flow cytometry. Tac and CsA significantly inhibited the proliferation of human mesangial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that Tac and CsA arrested mesangial cells in the G0/G1 phase, preventing them from entering S phase. Similarly, MP inhibited human mesangial cell growth by causing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. MMF also inhibited mesangial cell proliferation, but accomplished this by preventing progression from S phase to the G2/M phase. The combination of MP and MMF synergistically inhibited mesangial cell proliferation. Tac, CsA, MP and MMF inhibited proliferation of human mesangial cells by blocking progression of the cell cycle. In conclusion, these agents, sequentially or in combination, may be used to effectively treat mesangial proliferative glomerular disease. PMID:25370945

  9. What cycles the cell? -Robust autonomous cell cycle models.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Orit; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-12-01

    The cell cycle is one of the best studied cellular mechanisms at the experimental and theoretical levels. Although most of the important biochemical components and reactions of the cell cycle are probably known, the precise way the cell cycle dynamics are driven is still under debate. This phenomenon is not atypical to many other biological systems where the knowledge of the molecular building blocks and the interactions between them does not lead to a coherent picture of the appropriate dynamics. We here propose a methodology to develop plausible models for the driving mechanisms of embryonic and cancerous cell cycles. We first define a key property of the system (a cyclic behaviour in the case of the embryonic cell cycle) and set mathematical constraints on the types of two variable simplified systems robustly reproducing such a cyclic behaviour. We then expand these robust systems to three variables and reiterate the procedure. At each step, we further limit the type of expanded systems to fit the known microbiology until a detailed description of the system is obtained. This methodology produces mathematical descriptions of the required biological systems that are more robust to changes in the precise function and rate constants. This methodology can be extended to practically any type of subcellular mechanism.

  10. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway impairs G2/M transition of cell cycle in late developing progenitors of the avian embryo retina.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Silva, Thayane Martins; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2013-01-01

    PI3K/Akt is an important pathway implicated in the proliferation and survival of cells in the CNS. Here we investigated the participation of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway in cell cycle of developing retinal progenitors. Immunofluorescence assays performed in cultures of chick embryo retinal cells and intact tissues revealed the presence of phosphorylated Akt and 4E-BP1 in cells with typical mitotic profiles. Blockade of PI3K activity with the chemical inhibitor LY 294002 (LY) in retinal explants blocked the progression of proliferating cells through G2/M transition, indicated by an expressive increase in the number of cells labeled for phosphorylated histone H3 in the ventricular margin of the retina. No significant level of cell death could be detected at this region. Retinal explants treated with LY for 24 h also showed a significant decrease in the expression of phospho-Akt, phospho-GSK-3 and the hyperphosphorylated form of 4E-BP1. Although no change in the expression of cyclin B1 was detected, a significant decrease in CDK1 expression was noticed after 24 h of LY treatment both in retinal explants and monolayer cultures. Our results suggest that PI3K/Akt is an active pathway during proliferation of retinal progenitors and its activity appears to be required for proper CDK1 expression levels and mitosis progression of these cells.

  11. The cyclomodulin cycle inhibiting factor (CIF) alters cullin neddylation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Toro, Tasha B; Toth, Julia I; Petroski, Matthew D

    2013-05-24

    The bacterial effector protein cycle inhibiting factor (CIF) converts glutamine 40 of NEDD8 to glutamate (Q40E), causing cytopathic effects and inhibiting cell proliferation. Although these have been attributed to blocking the functions of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases, how CIF modulates NEDD8-dependent signaling is unclear. Here we use conditional NEDD8-dependent yeast to explore the effects of CIF on cullin neddylation. Although CIF causes cullin deneddylation and the generation of free NEDD8 Q40E, inhibiting the COP9 signalosome (CSN) allows Q40E to form only on NEDD8 attached to cullins. In the presence of the CSN, NEDD8 Q40E is removed from cullins more rapidly than NEDD8, leading to a decrease in steady-state cullin neddylation. As NEDD8 Q40E is competent for cullin conjugation in the absence of functional CSN and with overexpression of the NEDD8 ligase Dcn1, our data are consistent with NEDD8 deamidation causing enhanced deneddylation of cullins by the CSN. This leads to a dramatic change in the extent of activated cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases.

  12. The Cyclomodulin Cycle Inhibiting Factor (CIF) Alters Cullin Neddylation Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Tasha B.; Toth, Julia I.; Petroski, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial effector protein cycle inhibiting factor (CIF) converts glutamine 40 of NEDD8 to glutamate (Q40E), causing cytopathic effects and inhibiting cell proliferation. Although these have been attributed to blocking the functions of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases, how CIF modulates NEDD8-dependent signaling is unclear. Here we use conditional NEDD8-dependent yeast to explore the effects of CIF on cullin neddylation. Although CIF causes cullin deneddylation and the generation of free NEDD8 Q40E, inhibiting the COP9 signalosome (CSN) allows Q40E to form only on NEDD8 attached to cullins. In the presence of the CSN, NEDD8 Q40E is removed from cullins more rapidly than NEDD8, leading to a decrease in steady-state cullin neddylation. As NEDD8 Q40E is competent for cullin conjugation in the absence of functional CSN and with overexpression of the NEDD8 ligase Dcn1, our data are consistent with NEDD8 deamidation causing enhanced deneddylation of cullins by the CSN. This leads to a dramatic change in the extent of activated cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases. PMID:23589306

  13. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  14. Autoradiography and the Cell Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, C. Weldon

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the stages of a cell biology "pulse-chase" experiment in which the students apply autoradiography techniques to learn about the concept of the cell cycle. Includes (1) seed germination and plant growth; (2) radioactive labeling and fixation of root tips; (3) feulgen staining of root tips; (4) preparation of autoradiograms; and…

  15. Bumetanide-induced NKCC1 inhibition attenuates oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced decrease in proliferative activity and cell cycle progression arrest in cultured OPCs via p-38 MAPKs.

    PubMed

    Fu, Peicai; Tang, Ronghua; Yu, Zhiyuan; Huang, Shanshan; Xie, Minjie; Luo, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-10

    The Na-K-Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1; a member of the cation-chloride co-transporter family) mediates the coupled movement of Na(+) and/or K(+) with Cl(-) across the plasma membrane of cells (Haas and Forbush, 2000, Annu. Rev. Physiol., 62, 515-534; Russell, 2000, Physiol. Rev., 80, 211-276). Although it acts as an important regulator of cell volume, secretion, and modulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation (Chen et al., 2005, J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab., 25, 54-66; Kahle et al., 2008, Nat. Clin. Pract. Neurol., 4, 490-503; Kidokoro et al., 2014, Am. J. Physiol. Ren. Physiol., 306, F1155-F1160; Wang et al., 2011, Cell. Physiol. Biochem., 28, 703-714), NKCC1׳s effects on oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have not been characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and to what extent inhibition of NKCC1 alters oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced cell cycle progression. In the present study, we demonstrated that inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide attenuates the decrease in OGD-induced DNA synthesis in cultured OPCs. Western blots showed that NKCC1 inhibition led to an increased expression of cyclin D1, CDK 4, and cyclin E in OGD-treated cells. Furthermore, our results showed bumetanide attenuated the decrease in OGD-induced proliferation and arrest of cell cycle progression via the P-38 MAPK signaling cascade. Thus, NKCC1 plays important roles in the proliferation of OPCs under OGD-induced stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dieckol, a major phlorotannin in Ecklonia cava, suppresses lipid accumulation in the adipocytes of high-fat diet-fed zebrafish and mice: Inhibition of early adipogenesis via cell-cycle arrest and AMPKα activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2015-08-01

    Dieckol is a major polyphenol of Ecklonia cava. This study demonstrates a mechanistic role for dieckol in the suppression of lipid accumulation using three models. Mice were split into four experimental groups (n = 10 per group): normal diet, high-fat diet (HFD), and dieckol-supplemented diets. Dieckol-supplemented mice groups showed a significant decrease of body weight gain (38%) as well as fats of organs including epididymal (45%) compared with a HFD-fed group. LDL cholesterol level was reduced by 55% in dieckol-supplemented group. Adipogenic factors and lipid synthetic enzymes were analyzed via real-time PCR or immunoblotting. Dieckol regulated mRNA expressions of early adipogenic genes in 3T3-L1 cells. These results were reflected in downregulation of late adipogenic factors, resulting in a decrease in triacylglycerol content. These data were also verified in zebrafish and mouse models. Dieckol activated AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) signaling to inhibit lipid synthesis in 3T3-L1 and mouse model. Dieckol was also shown to inhibit mitotic clonal expansion via cell-cycle arrest. Our data demonstrate that dieckol inhibits lipid accumulation via activation of AMPKα signaling and cell-cycle arrest. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mir-33 regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Ryan M; Salerno, Alessandro G; Ramírez, Cristina M; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Wanschel, Amarylis C; Lasunción, Miguel A; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Suárez, Yajaira; Baldán, Ángel; Esplugues, Enric

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level and is essential for cellular growth. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs, have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, acting predominantly at the posttranscriptional level. Recent work from our group and others has shown that hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b, miRNAs located within intronic sequences of the Srebp genes, regulate cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that hsa-miR-33 family members modulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation. MiR-33 inhibits the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), thereby reducing cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Overexpression of miR-33 induces a significant G1 cell cycle arrest in Huh7 and A549 cell lines. Most importantly, inhibition of miR-33 expression using 2′fluoro/methoxyethyl-modified (2′F/MOE-modified) phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligonucleotides improves liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice, suggesting an important role for miR-33 in regulating hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. Altogether, these results suggest that Srebp/miR-33 locus may cooperate to regulate cell proliferation and cell cycle progression and may also be relevant to human liver regeneration. PMID:22333591

  18. Mir-33 regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Pauta, Montse; Allen, Ryan M; Salerno, Alessandro G; Ramírez, Cristina M; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Wanschel, Amarylis C; Lasuncion, Miguel A; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Suarez, Yajaira; Baldan, Ángel; Esplugues, Enric; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level and is essential for cellular growth. microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs, have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, acting predominantly at posttranscriptional level. Recent work from our group and others has shown that hsa-miR-33a and hsa-miR-33b, miRNAs located within intronic sequences of the Srebp genes, regulate cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that hsa-miR-33 family members modulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation. MiR-33 inhibits the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), thereby reducing cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Overexpression of miR-33 induces a significant G 1 cell cycle arrest in Huh7 and A549 cell lines. Most importantly, inhibition of miR-33 expression using 2'fluoro/methoxyethyl-modified (2'F/MOE-modified) phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligonucleotides improves liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice, suggesting an important role for miR-33 in regulating hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. Altogether, these results suggest that Srebp/miR-33 locus may cooperate to regulate cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and may also be relevant to human liver regeneration.

  19. Cell Cycle Regulation and Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; McArthur, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of cell cycle control is a hallmark of melanomagenesis. Agents targeting the G1-S and G2-M checkpoints, as well as direct anti-mitotic agents, have all shown promising preclinical activity in melanoma. However, in vivo, standalone single agents targeting cell cycle regulation have only demonstrated modest efficacy in unselected patients. The advent of specific CDK 4/6 inhibitors targeting the G1-S transition, with an improved therapeutic index, is a significant step forward. Potential synergy exists with the combination of CDK4/6 inhibitors with existing therapies targeting the MAPK pathway, particularly in subsets of metastatic melanomas such as NRAS and BRAF mutants. This reviews summaries of the latest developments in both preclinical and clinical data with cell cycle-targeted therapies in melanoma.

  20. SJSZ glycoprotein (38 kDa) inhibits cell cycle and oxidative stress in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2013-05-01

    The initiation stage of liver cancer is closely related to abnormal cell proliferation as observed for other types of carcinogenesis. Recently, we isolated a glycoprotein from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein), which consists of a carbohydrate moiety (52.64%) and a protein moiety (47.36%). In this study, the antitumoric mechanism of SJSZ glycoprotein during the initiation stage in N-Methyl-N`-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG; 40 mg/kg, BW)-induced ICR was investigated. First, we evaluated the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and activities of antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT)] in mouse liver tissue and serum. The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cell cycle-related factors [cyclin D1/ cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4], cell cycle inhibitors (CKIs; p53, p21, and p27), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were then assessed using Western Blot analysis. The results of this analysis showed that the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW) decreased the levels of LDH, ALT, TBARS, and the expression of AFP but it increased the activity of hepatic anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT). In addition, the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW)was shown to decrease the expression of cyclin D1/CDK4 and PCNA and increase the expression of CKIs (p53, p21, and p27). The results in this study indicate that the SJSZ glycoprotein displays anti-oxidative stress and anti-cell proliferation activity in MNNG induced ICR.

  1. Cucurbitacin-I inhibits Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin, induces defects in cell cycle progression and promotes ABT-737-induced cell death in a caspase-independent manner in malignant human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Daniel R; Jane, Esther P; Pollack, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Because STAT signaling is commonly activated in malignant gliomas as a result of constitutive EGFR activation, strategies for inhibiting the EGFR/JAK/STAT cascade are of significant interest. We, therefore, treated a panel of established glioma cell lines, including EGFR overexpressors, and primary cultures derived from patients diagnosed with glioblastoma with the JAK/STAT inhibitor cucurbitacin-I. Treatment with cucurbitacin-I depleted p-STAT3, p-STAT5, p-JAK1 and p-JAK2 levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and induced G2/M accumulation, DNA endoreduplication, and multipolar mitotic spindles. Longer exposure to cucurbitacin-I significantly reduced the number of viable cells and this decrease in viability was associated with cell death, as confirmed by an increase in the subG1 fraction. Our data also demonstrated that cucurbitacin-I strikingly downregulated Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin. We then searched for agents that exhibited a synergistic effect on cell death in combination with cucurbitacin-I. We found that cotreatment with cucurbitacin-I significantly increased Bcl(-)2/Bcl(-)xL family member antagonist ABT-737-induced cell death regardless of EGFR/PTEN/p53 status of malignant human glioma cell lines. Although >50% of the cucurbitacin-I plus ABT-737 treated cells were annexin V and propidium iodide positive, PARP cleavage or caspase activation was not observed. Pretreatment of z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor did not inhibit cell death, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism of cell death. Genetic inhibition of Aurora kinase A or Aurora kinase B or survivin by RNA interference also sensitized glioma cells to ABT-737, suggesting a link between STAT activation and Aurora kinases in malignant gliomas.

  2. Inhibition of nuclear import and cell-cycle progression by mutated forms of the dynamin-like GTPase MxB.

    PubMed

    King, Megan C; Raposo, Graça; Lemmon, Mark A

    2004-06-15

    Mx proteins form a subfamily of the dynamin-like GTPases, which have well established roles in cellular trafficking. Some Mx proteins (e.g., human MxA) have antiviral activity and are tightly regulated by type I IFNs. Others (e.g., human MxB) lack antiviral activity and are thought to have normal cellular functions that remain undefined. Consistent with this hypothesis, we report that MxB is expressed without IFN treatment. MxB seems to be exclusively extranuclear and is concentrated at the cytoplasmic face of nuclear pores, suggesting a role in their regulation. We find that expression of dominant negative (GTPase-defective) MxB mutants efficiently blocks nuclear import and causes a delay in G(1)/S cell-cycle progression. MxB depletion using RNA interference (RNAi) leads to a similar cell-cycle defect but does not block nuclear import. MxB therefore seems not to be required for nuclear import per se but may instead regulate its efficiency and/or kinetics. These studies indicate an unexpected role for a dynamin-like protein in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and suggest that a related function might be usurped by its antiviral relatives.

  3. Aqueous extracts of the edible Gracilaria tenuistipitata are protective against H₂O₂-induced DNA damage, growth inhibition, and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Iong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Lee, Jin-Ching; Yi, Szu-Cheng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2012-06-13

    Potential antioxidant properties of an aqueous extract of the edible red seaweed Gracilaria tenuistipitata (AEGT) against oxidative DNA damage were evaluated. The AEGT revealed several antioxidant molecules, including phenolics, flavonoids and ascorbic acid. In a cell-free assay, the extract exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity that significantly reduced H₂O₂-induced plasmid DNA breaks in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001). The AEGT also suppressed H₂O₂-induced oxidative DNA damage in H1299 cells by reducing the percentage of damaged DNA in a dose-response manner (P < 0.001) as measured by a modified alkaline comet-nuclear extract (comet-NE) assay. The MTT assay results showed that AEGT confers significant protection against H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity and that AEGT itself is not cytotoxic (P < 0.001). Moreover, H₂O₂-induced cell cycle G2/M arrest was significantly released when cells were co-treated with different concentrations of AEGT (P < 0.001). Taken together, these findings suggest that edible red algae Gracilaria water extract can prevent H₂O₂-induced oxidative DNA damage and its related cellular responses.

  4. Autophagy interplays with apoptosis and cell cycle regulation in the growth inhibiting effect of Trisenox in HEP-2, a laryngeal squamous cancer.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Débora Lima; Dos Santos Ferreira, Ana Carolina; de Faria, Giselle Pinto; Kwee, Jolie Kiemlian

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) is the most common among several types of head and neck cancers. Current treatments have a poor effect on early and advanced cases, and further investigations for novel agents against LSCCs are desirable. In this study, we elucidate the cytotoxic enhancing effect of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) combined with L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) in LSCC. The effect of BSO with As2O3 or Cisplatin (CDDP) on cell viability was examined using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, cell cycle, and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), propidium iodide (PI) and annexin V/PI. The acidic vacuolar organelles were visualized by fluorescence microscope and quantified using flow cytometry. Neither CDDP nor As2O3 when used alone reduced the cell viability. BSO was found to enhance only As2O3 sensitivity, leading to G2/M arrest and autophagy with no correlation of ROS induction. This result suggests that modulation of glutathione enhances autophagy, which interplays with apoptosis. In this study, we obtained initial preclinical evidence for the potential efficacy of these drugs in a combined therapy protocol.

  5. 1,25(OH)2D3 disrupts glucose metabolism in prostate cancer cells leading to a truncation of the TCA cycle and inhibition of TXNIP expression.

    PubMed

    Abu El Maaty, Mohamed A; Alborzinia, Hamed; Khan, Shehryar J; Büttner, Michael; Wölfl, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cell metabolism exhibits distinct profiles pre- and post-malignancy. The malignant metabolic shift converts prostate cells from "citrate-producing" to "citrate-oxidizing" cells, thereby enhancing glucose metabolism, a phenotype that contrasts classical tumoral Warburg metabolism. An on-line biosensor chip system (BIONAS 2500) was used to monitor metabolic changes (glycolysis and respiration) in response to the putative anti-cancer nutraceutical 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], in different prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines (LNCaP, VCaP, DU145 and PC3). LNCaP cells exhibited profound metabolic responsiveness to the treatment and thus extensive analysis of metabolism-modulating effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 were performed, including mRNA expression analysis of key metabolic genes (e.g. GLUT1 and PDHK1), analysis of TCA cycle metabolites, glucose uptake/consumption measurements, ATP production, and mitochondrial biogenesis/activity. Altogether, data demonstrate a vivid disruption of glucose metabolism by 1,25(OH)2D3, illustrated by a decreased glucose uptake and an accumulation of citrate/isocitrate due to TCA cycle truncation. Depletion of glycolytic intermediates led to a consistent decrease in TXNIP expression in response to 1,25(OH)2D3, an effect that coincided with the activation of AMPK signaling and a reduction in c-MYC expression. Reduction in TXNIP levels in response to 1,25(OH)2D3 was rescued by an AMPK signaling inhibitor and mimicked by a MYC inhibitor highlighting the possible involvement of both pathways in mediating 1,25(OH)2D3's metabolic effects in PCa cells. Furthermore, pharmacological and genetic modulation of the androgen receptor showed similar and disparate effects on metabolic parameters compared to 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment, highlighting the AR-independent nature of 1,25(OH)2D3's metabolism-modulating effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Beta-escin inhibits colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats and regulates the cell cycle growth by inducing p21(waf1/cip1) in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Raju, Jayadev; Swamy, Malisetty V; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2006-06-01

    Extracts of Aesculus hippocastanum (horse chestnut) seed have been used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, edema, and hemorrhoids. Most of the beneficial effects of horse chestnut are attributed to its principal component beta-escin or aescin. Recent studies suggest that beta-escin may possess anti-inflammatory, anti-hyaluronidase, and anti-histamine properties. We have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of dietary beta-escin on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF). In addition, we analyzed the cell growth inhibitory effects and the induction of apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. To evaluate the inhibitory properties of beta-escin on colonic ACF, 7-week-old male F344 rats were fed experimental diets containing 0%, 0.025%, or 0.05% beta-escin. After 1 week, the rats received s.c. injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 2 weeks) or an equal volume of normal saline (vehicle). Rats were continued on respective experimental diets and sacrificed 8 weeks after the azoxymethane treatment. Colons were evaluated histopathologically for ACF. Administration of dietary 0.025% and 0.05% beta-escin significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation up to approximately 40% (P < 0.001) and approximately 50% (P < 0.0001), respectively, when compared with control diet group. Importantly, rats fed beta-escin showed dose-dependent inhibition (approximately 49% to 65%, P < 0.0001) of foci containing four or more aberrant crypts. To understand the growth inhibitory effects, HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell lines were treated with various concentrations of beta-escin and analyzed by flow cytometry for apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Beta-escin treatment in HT-29 cells induced growth arrest at the G1-S phase, which was associated with the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1), and this correlated with reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Results also indicate that

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics during cell cycling.

    PubMed

    Horbay, Rostyslav; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are the cell's power plant that must be in a proper functional state in order to produce the energy necessary for basic cellular functions, such as proliferation. Mitochondria are 'dynamic' in that they are constantly undergoing fission and fusion to remain in a functional state throughout the cell cycle, as well as during other vital processes such as energy supply, cellular respiration and programmed cell death. The mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery is involved in generating young mitochondria, while eliminating old, damaged and non-repairable ones. As a result, the organelles change in shape, size and number throughout the cell cycle. Such precise and accurate balance is maintained by the cytoskeletal transporting system via microtubules, which deliver the mitochondrion from one location to another. During the gap phases G1 and G2, mitochondria form an interconnected network, whereas in mitosis and S-phase fragmentation of the mitochondrial network will take place. However, such balance is lost during neoplastic transformation and autoimmune disorders. Several proteins, such as Drp1, Fis1, Kif-family proteins, Opa1, Bax and mitofusins change in activity and might link the mitochondrial fission/fusion events with processes such as alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis, necrosis, cell cycle arrest, and malignant growth. All this indicates how vital proper functioning of mitochondria is in maintaining cell integrity and preventing carcinogenesis.

  8. [Cell cycle regulation in cancer stem cells].

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Shoichiro

    2015-05-01

    In addition to the properties of self-renewal and multipotency, cancer stem cells share the characteristics of their distinct cell cycle status with somatic stem cells. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained in a quiescent state with this characteristic conferring resistance to anticancer therapies that target dividing cells. Elucidation of the mechanisms of CSC quiescence might therefore be expected to provide further insight into CSC behaviors and lead to the elimination of cancer. This review summarizes several key regulators of the cell cycle in CSCs as well as attempts to define future challenges in this field, especially from the point of view of the application of our current understandings to the clinical medicine.

  9. Artemisinin blocks prostate cancer growth and cell cycle progression by disrupting Sp1 interactions with the cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (CDK4) promoter and inhibiting CDK4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Jamin A; Sundar, Shyam N; Cheung, Mark; Tin, Antony S; Modiano, Jaime; Firestone, Gary L

    2009-01-23

    Artemisinin, a naturally occurring component of Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, is a potent anti-malaria compound that has recently been shown to have anti-proliferative effects on a number of human cancer cell types, although little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this response. We have observed that artemisinin treatment triggers a stringent G1 cell cycle arrest of LNCaP (lymph node carcinoma of the prostate) human prostate cancer cells that is accompanied by a rapid down-regulation of CDK2 and CDK4 protein and transcript levels. Transient transfection with promoter-linked luciferase reporter plasmids revealed that artemisinin strongly inhibits CDK2 and CDK4 promoter activity. Deletion analysis of the CDK4 promoter revealed a 231-bp artemisinin-responsive region between -1737 and -1506. Site-specific mutations revealed that the Sp1 site at -1531 was necessary for artemisinin responsiveness in the context of the CDK4 promoter. DNA binding assays as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that this Sp1-binding site in the CDK4 promoter forms a specific artemisinin-responsive DNA-protein complex that contains the Sp1 transcription factor. Artemisinin reduced phosphorylation of Sp1, and when dephosphorylation of Sp1 was inhibited by treatment of cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, the ability of artemisinin to down-regulate Sp1 interactions with the CDK4 promoter was ablated, rendering the CDK4 promoter unresponsive to artemisinin. Finally, overexpression of Sp1 mostly reversed the artemisinin down-regulation of CDK4 promoter activity and partially reversed the cell cycle arrest. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a key event in the artemisinin anti-proliferative effects in prostate cancer cells is the transcriptional down-regulation of CDK4 expression by disruption of Sp1 interactions with the CDK4 promoter.

  10. Ionizing radiation damage to cells: effects of cell cycle redistribution.

    PubMed

    Chen, P L; Brenner, D J; Sachs, R K

    1995-04-01

    If a population of cycling cells is exposed to a fixed dose of ionizing radiation delivered over time T, it is sometimes observed that increasing T increases the amount of cell killing. This is essentially because at first the radiation preferentially kills cells in a sensitive portion of the cycle and the surviving, more resistant cells then have time to reach more sensitive stages. We refer to this effect as population resensitization, caused by redistribution within the cell cycle. We investigate the effect theoretically by employing the McKendrick-von Foerster equation for age-structured proliferating cell populations, generalized by introducing a radiation damage term. Within our formalism, we show that population resensitization occurs whenever: (a) prior to irradiation the cell population has the stable age-distribution approached asymptotically by an unirradiated population, and (b) T is sufficiently small. Examples and other cases are outlined. The methods of Volterra integral equations, renewal theory, and positive semigroup theory are applied. The effect of varying T is evaluated by considering the ultimate amplitude of the stable age-distribution population at times much greater than both the irradiation duration and the average cell-cycle time. The main biological limitations of the formalism are the following: considering only radiation damage which is not subject to enzymatic repair or quadratic misrepair, using an overly naive method of ensuring loss of cell cycle synchrony, neglecting nonlinear effects such as density inhibition of growth, and neglecting radiatively induced perturbations of the cell cycle. Possible methods for removing these limitations are briefly discussed.

  11. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A with the small molecule LB100 overcomes cell cycle arrest in osteosarcoma after cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Hong, Christopher S; Hu, Xu; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Zhu, Dongwang; Moon, Seogin; Dmitriev, Pauline; Lu, Jie; Chiang, Jeffrey; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhou, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor and affects a significant portion of pediatric oncology patients. Although surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy confer significant survival benefits, many patients go on to develop metastatic disease, particularly to the lungs, secondary to development of drug resistance. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A with the small molecule, LB100, has demonstrated potent chemo- and radio-sensitizing properties in numerous pre-clinical tumor models. In this study, we showed that LB100 overcame DNA repair mechanisms in osteosarcoma cells treated with cisplatin, in vitro, and recapitulated these findings in an in vivo xenograft model. Notably, the addition of LB100 to cisplatin prevented development of pulmonary metastases in the majority of treated animals. Our data indicated the mechanism of chemo-sensitization by LB100 involved abrogation of the ATM/ATR-activated DNA damage response, leading to hyperphosphorylation of Chk proteins and persistent cyclin activity. In addition, LB100 exposure suppressed Akt signaling, leading to Mdm2-mediated proteasomal degradation of functional p53. Taken together, LB100 prevented repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, resulting in mitotic catastrophe and cell death.

  12. Virus manipulation of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, R; Costa, H; Parkhouse, R M E

    2012-07-01

    Viruses depend on host cell resources for replication and access to those resources may be limited to a particular phase of the cell cycle. Thus manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment. For example, viruses capable of infecting nondividing cells induce S phase in order to activate the host DNA replication machinery and provide the nucleotide triphosphates necessary for viral DNA replication (Flemington in J Virol 75:4475-4481, 2001; Sullivan and Pipas in Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:179-202, 2002). Viruses have developed several strategies to subvert the cell cycle by association with cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and molecules that regulate their activity. Viruses tend to act on cellular proteins involved in a network of interactions in a way that minimal protein-protein interactions lead to a major effect. The complex and interactive nature of intracellular signaling pathways controlling cell division affords many opportunities for virus manipulation strategies. Taking the maxim "Set a thief to catch a thief" as a counter strategy, however, provides us with the very same virus evasion strategies as "ready-made tools" for the development of novel antivirus therapeutics. The most obvious are attenuated virus vaccines with critical evasion genes deleted. Similarly, vaccines against viruses causing cancer are now being successfully developed. Finally, as viruses have been playing chess with our cell biology and immune responses for millions of years, the study of their evasion strategies will also undoubtedly reveal new control mechanisms and their corresponding cellular intracellular signaling pathways.

  13. Computational Discovery of Niclosamide Ethanolamine, a Repurposed Drug Candidate That Reduces Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and in Mice by Inhibiting Cell Division Cycle 37 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Wei, Wei; Ma, Li; Yang, Bin; Gill, Ryan M; Chua, Mei-Sze; Butte, Atul J; So, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    hepatocytes. Oral administration of NEN to mice significantly slowed growth of genetically induced liver tumors and patient-derived xenografts, whereas niclosamide did not, coinciding with the observed greater bioavailability of NEN compared with niclosamide. The combination of NEN and sorafenib was more effective at slowing growth of patient-derived xenografts than either agent alone. In HepG2 cells and in patient-derived xenografts, administration of niclosamide or NEN increased expression of 20 genes down-regulated in HCC and reduced expression of 29 genes up-regulated in the 274-gene HCC signature. Administration of NEN to mice with patient-derived xenografts reduced expression of proteins in the Wnt-β-catenin, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, AKT-mechanistic target of rapamycin, epidermal growth factor receptor-Ras-Raf signaling pathways. Using immunoprecipitation assays, we found NEN to bind cell division cycle 37 protein and disrupt its interaction with heat shock protein 90. In a bioinformatics search for agents that alter the HCC-specific gene expression pattern, we identified the anthelmintic niclosamide as a potential anti-tumor agent. Its ethanolamine salt, with greater bioavailability, was more effective than niclosamide at slowing the growth of genetically induced liver tumors and patient-derived xenografts in mice. Both agents disrupted interaction between cell division cycle 37 and heat shock protein 90 in HCC cells, with concomitant inhibition of their downstream signaling pathways. NEN might be effective for treatment of patients with HCC. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Alters Chromatin Organization, Nuclear Positioning and Activity of 45S rDNA Loci in Cycling Cells of Q. robur

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Tomislav; Maglica, Željka; Vojta, Aleksandar; Zoldoš, Vlatka

    2014-01-01

    Around 2200 copies of genes encoding ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in pedunculate oak, Quercus robur, are organized into two rDNA loci, the major (NOR-1) and the minor (NOR-2) locus. We present the first cytogenetic evidence indicating that the NOR-1 represents the active nucleolar organizer responsible for rRNA synthesis, while the NOR-2 probably stays transcriptionally silent and does not participate in the formation of the nucleolus in Q. robur, which is a situation resembling the well-known phenomenon of nucleolar dominance. rDNA chromatin topology analyses in cycling root tip cells by light and electron microscopy revealed the minor locus to be highly condensed and located away from the nucleolus, while the major locus was consistently associated with the nucleolus and often exhibited different levels of condensation. In addition, silver precipitation was confined exclusively to the NOR-1 locus. Also, NOR-2 was highly methylated at cytosines and rDNA chromatin was marked with histone modifications characteristic for repressive state. After treatment of the root cells with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, we observed an increase in the total level of rRNA transcripts and a decrease in DNA methylation level at the NOR-2 locus. Also, NOR-2 sites relocalized with respect to the nuclear periphery/nucleolus, however, the relocation did not affect the contribution of this locus to nucleolar formation, nor did it affect rDNA chromatin decondensation, strongly suggesting that NOR-2 has lost the function of rRNA synthesis and nucleolar organization. PMID:25093501

  15. N-acetyl cysteine protects human oral keratinocytes from Bis-GMA-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by inhibiting reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Gu, Ying-xin; Mo, Jia-ji; Shi, Jun-yu; Qiao, Shi-chong; Lai, Hong-chang

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol-A-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) released from dental resin materials causes various toxic effects on gingival epithelium. Thus the underlying mechanisms of its cytotoxicity should be elucidated for safety use. One potential cause of cell damage is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) beyond the capacity of a balanced redox regulation. In this study, we found that exposure of human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) to Bis-GMA caused apoptosis and G1/S cell cycle arrest in parallel with an increased ROS level. Moreover, Bis-GMA induced a depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential, an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, an activation of caspase-3 and altered expressions of cell cycle-related proteins (p21, PCNA, cyclinD1). Furthermore, the co-treatment of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) obviously attenuated Bis-GMA-induced toxicity. Here we also evaluated the effects of Bis-GMA on the ROS-related PI3k/Akt pathway. We found that Bis-GMA inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, whereas the amount of phosphorylated Akt was reverted to the control level in the presence of NAC. Our findings suggested that the toxic effects of Bis-GMA were related to ROS production and the antioxidant NAC effectively reduced Bis-GMA-mediated cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed. PMID:25914884

  17. Targeting cell cycle regulators in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Eiman; Arceci, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies represent the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer in economically developed countries. In hematologic malignancies normal hematopoiesis is interrupted by uncontrolled growth of a genetically altered stem or progenitor cell (HSPC) that maintains its ability of self-renewal. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) not only regulate the mammalian cell cycle, but also influence other vital cellular processes, such as stem cell renewal, differentiation, transcription, epigenetic regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. Chromosomal translocations, amplification, overexpression and altered CDK activities have been described in different types of human cancer, which have made them attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition. Mouse models deficient for one or more CDKs have significantly contributed to our current understanding of the physiological functions of CDKs, as well as their roles in human cancer. The present review focuses on selected cell cycle kinases with recent emerging key functions in hematopoiesis and in hematopoietic malignancies, such as CDK6 and its role in MLL-rearranged leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia, CDK1 and its regulator WEE-1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and cyclin C/CDK8/CDK19 complexes in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. The knowledge gained from gene knockout experiments in mice of these kinases is also summarized. An overview of compounds targeting these kinases, which are currently in clinical development in various solid tumors and hematopoietic malignances, is presented. These include the CDK4/CDK6 inhibitors (palbociclib, LEE011, LY2835219), pan-CDK inhibitors that target CDK1 (dinaciclib, flavopiridol, AT7519, TG02, P276-00, terampeprocol and RGB 286638) as well as the WEE-1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. The advantage of combination therapy of cell cycle inhibitors with conventional chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of AML, such as cytarabine, is discussed.

  18. Ferulenol specifically inhibits succinate ubiquinone reductase at the level of the ubiquinone cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Lahouel, Mesbah; Zini, Roland; Zellagui, Ammar; Rhouati, Salah; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Morin, Didier; E-mail: didier.morin@creteil.inserm.fr

    2007-03-30

    The natural compound ferulenol, a sesquiterpene prenylated coumarin derivative, was purified from Ferula vesceritensis and its mitochondrial effects were studied. Ferulenol caused inhibition of oxidative phoshorylation. At low concentrations, ferulenol inhibited ATP synthesis by inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocase without limitation of mitochondrial respiration. At higher concentrations, ferulenol inhibited oxygen consumption. Ferulenol caused specific inhibition of succinate ubiquinone reductase without altering succinate dehydrogenase activity of the complex II. This inhibition results from a limitation of electron transfers initiated by the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol in the ubiquinone cycle. This original mechanism of action makes ferulenol a useful tool to study the physiological role and the mechanism of electron transfer in the complex II. In addition, these data provide an additional mechanism by which ferulenol may alter cell function and demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction is an important determinant in Ferula plant toxicity.

  19. Selective inhibition of BET bromodomain epigenetic signalling interferes with the bone-associated tumour vicious cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, François; Baud'Huin, Marc; Rodriguez Calleja, Lidia; Jacques, Camille; Berreur, Martine; Rédini, Françoise; Lecanda, Fernando; Bradner, James E.; Heymann, Dominique; Ory, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    The vicious cycle established between bone-associated tumours and bone resorption is the central problem with therapeutic strategies against primary bone tumours and bone metastasis. Here we report data to support inhibition of BET bromodomain proteins as a promising therapeutic strategy that target simultaneously the three partners of the vicious cycle. Treatment with JQ1, a BET bromodomain inhibitor, reduces cell viability of osteosarcoma cells and inhibits osteoblastic differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. These effects are associated with transcriptional silencing of MYC and RUNX2, resulting from the depletion of BRD4 from their respective loci. Moreover, JQ1 also inhibits osteoclast differentiation by interfering with BRD4-dependent RANKL activation of NFATC1 transcription. Collectively, our data indicate that JQ1 is a potent inhibitor of osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation as well as bone tumour development.

  20. Interruption of the Calvin cycle inhibits the repair of Photosystem II from photodamage.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shunichi; Murata, Norio

    2005-07-15

    In photosynthetic organisms, impairment of the activities of enzymes in the Calvin cycle enhances the extent of photoinactivation of Photosystem II (PSII). We investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for this phenomenon in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. When the Calvin cycle was interrupted by glycolaldehyde, which is known to inhibit phosphoribulokinase, the extent of photoinactivation of PSII was enhanced. The effect of glycolaldehyde was very similar to that of chloramphenicol, which inhibits protein synthesis de novo in chloroplasts. The interruption of the Calvin cycle by the introduction of a missense mutation into the gene for the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) also enhanced the extent of photoinactivation of PSII. In such mutant 10-6C cells, neither glycolaldehyde nor chloramphenicol has any additional effect on photoinactivation. When wild-type cells were incubated under weak light after photodamage to PSII, the activity of PSII recovered gradually and reached a level close to the initial level. However, recovery was inhibited in wild-type cells by glycolaldehyde and was also inhibited in 10-6C cells. Radioactive labelling and Northern blotting demonstrated that the interruption of the Calvin cycle suppressed the synthesis de novo of chloroplast proteins, such as the D1 and D2 proteins, but did not affect the levels of psbA and psbD mRNAs. Our results suggest that the photoinactivation of PSII that is associated with the interruption of the Calvin cycle is attributable primarily to the inhibition of the protein synthesis-dependent repair of PSII at the level of translation in chloroplasts.

  1. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  2. "Constructing" the Cell Cycle in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Isil; Turan, Merve

    2012-01-01

    The cycle of duplication and division, known as the "cell cycle," is the essential mechanism by which all living organisms reproduce. This activity allows students to develop an understanding of the main events that occur during the typical eukaryotic cell cycle mostly in the process of mitotic phase that divides the duplicated genetic material…

  3. Cross-Linking of Thioredoxin Reductase by the Sulfur Mustard Analogue Mechlorethamine (Methyl bis(2-chloroethyl) amine) in Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Rat Lung: Selective Inhibition of Disulfide Reduction but Not Redox Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Heck, Diane E.; Malaviya, Rama; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in mechlorethamine (methyl bis(2-chloroethyl) amine, HN2) toxicity. The thioredoxin system, consisting of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin, and NADPH, is important in redox regulation and protection against oxidative stress. HN2 contains two electrophilic side chains that can react with nucleophilic sites in proteins leading to changes in their structure and function. We report that HN2 inhibits the cytosolic (TrxR1) and mitochondrial (TrxR2) forms of TrxR in A549 lung epithelial cells. TrxR exists as homodimers under native conditions; monomers can be detected by denaturing and reducing SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting. HN2 treatment caused marked decreases in TrxR1 and TrxR2 monomers along with increases in dimers and oligomers under reducing conditions, indicating that HN2 cross-links TrxR. Cross-links were also observed in rat lung after HN2 treatment. Using purified TrxR1, NADPH reduced, but not oxidized, enzyme was inhibited and cross-linked by HN2. LC-MS/MS analysis of TrxR1 demonstrated that HN2 adducted cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing redox centers forming monoadducts, intramolecule and intermolecule cross-links, resulting in enzyme inhibition. HN2 cross-links two dimeric subunits through intermolecular binding to cysteine 59 in one subunit of the dimer and selenocysteine 498 in the other subunit, confirming the close proximity of the N- and C-terminal redox centers of adjacent subunits. Despite cross-linking and inhibition of TrxR activity by HN2, TrxR continued to mediate menadione redox cycling and generated reactive oxygen species. These data suggest that disruption of the thioredoxin system contributes to oxidative stress and tissue injury induced by HN2. PMID:24274902

  4. Cross-linking of thioredoxin reductase by the sulfur mustard analogue mechlorethamine (methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine) in human lung epithelial cells and rat lung: selective inhibition of disulfide reduction but not redox cycling.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Heck, Diane E; Malaviya, Rama; Casillas, Robert P; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-21

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in mechlorethamine (methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine, HN2) toxicity. The thioredoxin system, consisting of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin, and NADPH, is important in redox regulation and protection against oxidative stress. HN2 contains two electrophilic side chains that can react with nucleophilic sites in proteins, leading to changes in their structure and function. We report that HN2 inhibits the cytosolic (TrxR1) and mitochondrial (TrxR2) forms of TrxR in A549 lung epithelial cells. TrxR exists as homodimers under native conditions; monomers can be detected by denaturing and reducing SDS-PAGE followed by western blotting. HN2 treatment caused marked decreases in TrxR1 and TrxR2 monomers along with increases in dimers and oligomers under reducing conditions, indicating that HN2 cross-links TrxR. Cross-links were also observed in rat lung after HN2 treatment. Using purified TrxR1, NADPH reduced, but not oxidized, enzyme was inhibited and cross-linked by HN2. LC-MS/MS analysis of TrxR1 demonstrated that HN2 adducted cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing redox centers forming monoadducts, intramolecule and intermolecule cross-links, resulting in enzyme inhibition. HN2 cross-links two dimeric subunits through intermolecular binding to cysteine 59 in one subunit of the dimer and selenocysteine 498 in the other subunit, confirming the close proximity of the N- and C-terminal redox centers of adjacent subunits. Despite cross-linking and inhibition of TrxR activity by HN2, TrxR continued to mediate menadione redox cycling and generated reactive oxygen species. These data suggest that disruption of the thioredoxin system contributes to oxidative stress and tissue injury induced by HN2.

  5. FNC efficiently inhibits mantle cell lymphoma growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Ding, Xixi; Peng, Bangan; Wang, Ning; Ma, Fang; Peng, Youmei; Wang, Qingduan; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    FNC, 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azidocytidine, is a novel cytidine analogue, that has shown strong antiproliferative activity in human lymphoma, lung adenocarcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of FNC on mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and the underlying mechanisms. In in vitro experiments, cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of relative apoptosis proteins were detected by Western Blot. The in vivo antitumor effect of FNC was investigated in a SCID xenograft model. Finally, the mechanisms of action of FNC were assessed using a whole human genome expression profile chip. The data showed that FNC inhibited cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and FNC could induce apoptosis by the death recepter pathways in JeKo-1 cells and arrest the cell cycle in the G1/S or G2/M phase. Notably, FNC showed in vivo efficacy in mice bearing JeKo-1 xenograft tumors. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly focused on the immune system process, cellular process and death. These findings implied that FNC may be a valuable therapeutic in mantle cell lymphoma and provided an experimental basis for the early clinical application of FNC.

  6. FNC efficiently inhibits mantle cell lymphoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xixi; Peng, Bangan; Wang, Ning; Ma, Fang; Peng, Youmei; Wang, Qingduan; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    FNC, 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azidocytidine, is a novel cytidine analogue, that has shown strong antiproliferative activity in human lymphoma, lung adenocarcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of FNC on mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and the underlying mechanisms. In in vitro experiments, cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of relative apoptosis proteins were detected by Western Blot. The in vivo antitumor effect of FNC was investigated in a SCID xenograft model. Finally, the mechanisms of action of FNC were assessed using a whole human genome expression profile chip. The data showed that FNC inhibited cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and FNC could induce apoptosis by the death recepter pathways in JeKo-1 cells and arrest the cell cycle in the G1/S or G2/M phase. Notably, FNC showed in vivo efficacy in mice bearing JeKo-1 xenograft tumors. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly focused on the immune system process, cellular process and death. These findings implied that FNC may be a valuable therapeutic in mantle cell lymphoma and provided an experimental basis for the early clinical application of FNC. PMID:28333959

  7. Inhibition of cullin RING ligases by cycle inhibiting factor: evidence for interference with Nedd8-induced conformational control.

    PubMed

    Boh, Boon Kim; Ng, Mei Ying; Leck, Yee Chin; Shaw, Barry; Long, Jed; Sun, Guang Wen; Gan, Yunn Hwen; Searle, Mark S; Layfield, Robert; Hagen, Thilo

    2011-10-21

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is produced by pathogenic intracellular bacteria and injected into the host cells via a type III secretion system. Cif is known to interfere with the eukaryotic cell cycle by inhibiting the function of cullin RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). Cullin proteins form the scaffold protein of CRLs and are modified with the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8, which exerts important conformational control required for CRL activity. Cif has recently been shown to catalyze the deamidation of Gln40 in Nedd8 to Glu. Here, we addressed how Nedd8 deamidation inhibits CRL activity. Our results indicate that Burkholderia pseudomallei Cif (also known as CHBP) inhibits the deconjugation of Nedd8 in vivo by inhibiting binding of the deneddylating COP9 signalosome (CSN) complex. We provide evidence that the reduced binding of CSN and the inhibition of CRL activity by Cif are due to interference with Nedd8-induced conformational control, which is dependent on the interaction between the Nedd8 hydrophobic patch and the cullin winged-helix B subdomain. Of note, mutation of Gln40 to Glu in ubiquitin, an additional target of Cif, inhibits the interaction between the hydrophobic surface of ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-binding protein p62/SQSTM1, showing conceptually that Cif activity can impair ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like protein non-covalent interactions. Our results also suggest that Cif may exert additional cellular effects by interfering with the association between ubiquitin and ubiquitin-binding proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of cell proliferation by the Mad1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Ashmun, R A; Sherr, C J; Eisenman, R N; Ayer, D E

    1996-01-01

    Mad1 is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that is induced upon differentiation of a number of distinct cell types. Mad1 dimerizes with Max and recognizes the same DNA sequences as do Myc:Max dimers. However, Mad1 and Myc appear to have opposing functions. Myc:Max heterodimers activate transcription while Mad:Max heterodimers repress transcription from the same promoter. In addition Mad1 has been shown to block the oncogenic activity of Myc. Here we show that ectopic expression of Mad1 inhibits the proliferative response of 3T3 cells to signaling through the colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) receptor. The ability of over-expressed Myc and cyclin D1 to complement the mutant CSF-1 receptor Y809F (containing a Y-to-F mutation at position 809) is also inhibited by Mad1. Cell cycle analysis of proliferating 3T3 cells transfected with Mad1 demonstrates a significant decrease in the fraction of cells in the S and G2/M phases and a concomitant increase in the fraction of G1 phase cells, indicating that Mad1 negatively influences cell cycle progression from the G1 to the S phase. Mutations in Mad1 which inhibit its activity as a transcription repressor also result in loss of Mad1 cell cycle inhibitory activity. Thus, the ability of Mad1 to inhibit cell cycle progression is tightly coupled to its function as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:8649388

  9. LncRNA SNHG12 promotes cell growth and inhibits cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.Z.; Xu, C.L.; Wu, H.; Shen, S.J.

    2017-01-01

    Several long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) might be correlated with the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and serve as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker. However, the exact expression pattern of small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) in colorectal cancer and its clinical significance remains unclear. The level of SNHG12 was detected by qRT-PCR in CRC tissues and CRC cells. MTT assay and colony formation assay were performed to examine the cell proliferation of CRC cells transfected with pcDNA-SNHG12 or si-SNHG12. Flow cytometry technology was used to detect cell cycle and cell apoptosis of CRC cells transfected with pcDNA-SNHG12 or si-SNHG12. The protein level of cell cycle progression-related molecules, including cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4, CDK6), cyclin D1 (CCND1) and cell apoptosis-related molecule caspase 3 was detected by western blot. The effect of SNHG12 knockdown was examined in vivo. Increased levels of SNHG12 were observed in CRC tissues and in CRC cells. SNHG12 promoted the cell proliferation of CRC cells. In addition, SNHG12 overexpression boosted the cell cycle progression of SW480 cells transfected with pcDNA-SNHG12 and SNHG12 knockdown inhibited the cell cycle progression of HT29 cells transfected with si-SNHG12. SNHG12 also inhibited the cell apoptosis of CRC cells. We also found that SNHG12 increased the expression of cell cycle-related proteins and suppressed the expression of caspase 3. Our results suggest that SNHG12 promoted cell growth and inhibited cell apoptosis in CRC cells, indicating that SNHG12 might be a useful biomarker for colorectal cancer. PMID:28225893

  10. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji; Lee, Hui-Young; Hong, Suntaek; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces Smad3 linker phosphorylation through Akt-ERK1/2 pathway. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated suppression of TGF-β signal requires Smad3 linker phosphorylation. •This is a first report about interplay between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and growth inhibition pathway. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.05–0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15{sup INK4B} expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15{sup INK4B}-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing

  12. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-04-23

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells.

  13. Cytofluorometric assessment of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Ilio; Jemaà, Mohamed; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Metivier, Didier; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-01-01

    One of the most prominent features of cellular senescence, a stress response that prevents the propagation of cells that have accumulated potentially oncogenic alterations, is a permanent loss of proliferative potential. Thus, at odds with quiescent cells, which resume proliferation when stimulated to do so, senescent cells cannot proceed through the cell cycle even in the presence of mitogenic factors. Here, we describe a set of cytofluorometric techniques for studying how chemical and/or physical stimuli alter the cell cycle in vitro, in both qualitative and quantitative terms. Taken together, these methods allow for the identification of bona fide cytostatic effects as well as for a refined characterization of cell cycle distributions, providing information on proliferation, DNA content as well as on the presence of cell cycle phase-specific markers. At the end of the chapter, a set of guidelines is offered to assist researchers that approach the study of the cell cycle with the interpretation of results.

  14. 3-β-Εrythrodiol isolated from Conyza canadensis inhibits MKN‑45 human gastric cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, DNA fragmentation, ROS generation and reduces tumor weight and volume in mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Qin, Yue-Hong; Yu, Jian-Yong; Ma, Heng; Song, Xi-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of 3-β-erythrodiol, a plant-derived triterpene against MKN-45 human gastric cancer cells. In addition, effects on cellular morphology, cell cycle phase distribution, DNA fragmentation, and ROS generation were also elucidated in the current research work. Cytotoxic activity of 3-β-erythrodiol was demonstrated by MTT cell viability and LDH assay. Cellular morphological study was carried out using phase contrast, fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by flow cytometry and gel electrophoresis was used to evaluate DNA fragmentation pattern. The results of the present study revealed that 3-β-erythrodiol induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent anticancer effects in MKN-45 gastric cancer cells. Cellular morphological changes in MKN-45 cells as indicated by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy were induced by 3-β-erythrodiol. This triterpene induced both early and late apoptotic features in these cancer cells. 3-β-Erythrodiol treatment led to sub-G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in S-phase cells and an increase in G2/M phase cells. DNA fragments were evident in gel electrophoresis experiment following 3-β-erythrodiol treatment. It was observed that 0.50 and 1.0 µg/g 3-β-erythrodiol injection reduced the tumor weight from 1.4 g in PBS-treated group (control) to 0.61 and 0.22 g, respectively. Similarly, 0.50 and 1.0 µg/g 3-β-erythrodiol injection reduced the tumor volume from 1.5 cm3 in PBS-treated group (control) to 0.91 and 0.31 cm3, respectively. The present investigation indicates that 3-β-erythrodiol exerts anti-proliferative effects in human gastric cancer by inducing early and late apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and ROS generation. It also decreased the tumor volume and tumor weight in male Balb/c nude mice.

  15. Cell division cycle 45 promotes papillary thyroid cancer progression via regulating cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Shi, Run; Zhao, Sha; Li, Xiaona; Lu, Shan; Bu, Hemei; Ma, Xianghua

    2017-05-01

    Cell division cycle 45 was reported to be overexpressed in some cancer-derived cell lines and was predicted to be a candidate oncogene in cervical cancer. However, the clinical and biological significance of cell division cycle 45 in papillary thyroid cancer has never been investigated. We determined the expression level and clinical significance of cell division cycle 45 using The Cancer Genome Atlas, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. A great upregulation of cell division cycle 45 was observed in papillary thyroid cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, overexpression of cell division cycle 45 positively correlates with more advanced clinical characteristics. Silence of cell division cycle 45 suppressed proliferation of papillary thyroid cancer cells via G1-phase arrest and inducing apoptosis. The oncogenic activity of cell division cycle 45 was also confirmed in vivo. In conclusion, cell division cycle 45 may serve as a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for papillary thyroid cancer.

  16. Cell cycle transitions: a common role for stoichiometric inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Michael; Tyson, John J; Novák, Béla

    2017-09-20

    The cell division cycle is the process by which eukaryotic cells replicate their chromosomes and partition them to two daughter cells. To maintain the integrity of the genome, proliferating cells must be able to block progression through the division cycle at key transition points (called 'checkpoints'), if there have been problems in the replication of the chromosomes or their biorientation on the mitotic spindle. These checkpoints are governed by protein-interaction networks, composed of phase-specific cell-cycle activators and inhibitors. Examples include Cdk1:Clb5 and its inhibitor Sic1 at the G1/S checkpoint in budding yeast, APC:Cdc20 and its inhibitor MCC at the mitotic checkpoint, and PP2A:B55 and its inhibitor ENSA at the mitotic-exit checkpoint. Each of these inhibitors is a substrate as well as a stoichiometric inhibitor of the cell-cycle activator. Because the production of each inhibitor is promoted by a regulatory protein that is itself inhibited by the cell cycle activator, their interaction network presents a regulatory motif characteristic of a 'feedback-amplified domineering substrate' (FADS). We describe how the FADS motif responds to signals in the fashion of a bistable toggle switch, and then we discuss how this toggle switch accounts for the abrupt and irreversible nature of three specific cell-cycle checkpoints. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  17. Model Organisms for Studying the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of the cell-division cycle is fundamental for the growth, development, and reproduction of all species of life. In the past several decades, a conserved theme of cell cycle regulation has emerged from research in diverse model organisms. A comparison of distinct features of several diverse model organisms commonly used in cell cycle studies highlights their suitability for various experimental approaches, and recaptures their contributions to our current understanding of the eukaryotic cell cycle. A historic perspective presents a recollection of the breakthrough upon unfolding the universal principles of cell cycle control by scientists working with diverse model organisms, thereby appreciating the discovery pathways in this field. A comprehensive understanding is necessary to address current challenging questions about cell cycle control. Advances in genomics, proteomics, quantitative methodologies, and approaches of systems biology are redefining the traditional concept of what constitutes a model organism and have established a new era for development of novel, and refinement of the established model organisms. Researchers working in the field are no longer separated by their favorite model organisms; they have become more integrated into a larger community for gaining greater insights into how a cell divides and cycles. The new technologies provide a broad evolutionary spectrum of the cell-division cycle and allow informative comparisons among different species at a level that has never been possible, exerting unimaginable impact on our comprehensive understanding of cell cycle regulation.

  18. Cold nights impair leaf growth and cell cycle progression in maize through transcriptional changes of cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Rymen, Bart; Fiorani, Fabio; Kartal, Fatma; Vandepoele, Klaas; Inzé, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2007-03-01

    Low temperature inhibits the growth of maize (Zea mays) seedlings and limits yield under field conditions. To study the mechanism of cold-induced growth retardation, we exposed maize B73 seedlings to low night temperature (25 degrees C /4 degrees C, day/night) from germination until the completion of leaf 4 expansion. This treatment resulted in a 20% reduction in final leaf size compared to control conditions (25 degrees C/18 degrees C, day/night). A kinematic analysis of leaf growth rates in control and cold-treated leaves during daytime showed that cold nights affected both cell cycle time (+65%) and cell production (-22%). In contrast, the size of mature epidermal cells was unaffected. To analyze the effect on cell cycle progression at the molecular level, we identified through a bioinformatics approach a set of 43 cell cycle genes and analyzed their expression in proliferating, expanding, and mature cells of leaves exposed to either control or cold nights. This analysis showed that: (1) the majority of cell cycle genes had a consistent proliferation-specific expression pattern; and (2) the increased cell cycle time in the basal meristem of leaves exposed to cold nights was associated with differential expression of cell cycle inhibitors and with the concomitant down-regulation of positive regulators of cell division.

  19. Condurango glycoside-rich components stimulate DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and ROS-mediated caspase-3 dependent apoptosis through inhibition of cell-proliferation in lung cancer, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Sourav; Mukherjee, Avinaba; Ghosh, Samrat; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic potential of Condurango glycoside-rich components (CGS) was evaluated in NSCLC, in vitro and in BaP-intoxicated rats, in vivo. NSCLC cells were treated with different concentrations of CGS to test their effect on cell viability. Cellular morphology, DNA-damage, AnnexinV-FITC/PI, cell cycle regulation, ROS-accumulation, MMP, and expressions of related signalling genes were critically analysed. 0.22 μg/μl CGS (IC₅₀ dose at 24 h) was selected for the study. CGS-induced apoptosis via DNA damage was evidenced by DNA-ladder formation, increase of AnnexinV-positive cells, cell cycle arrest at subG0/G1 and differential expressions of apoptotic genes. ROS-elevation and MMP-depolarization with significant caspase-3 activation might lead to apoptotic cell death. Anti-proliferative activity was confirmed by EGFR-expression modulation. ROS accumulation and DNA-nick formation with tissue damage-repair activity after post-cancerous CGS treatment, in vivo, supported the in vitro findings. Overall results advocate considerable apoptosis-inducing potential of CGS against NSCLC, validating its use against lung cancer by CAM practitioners. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-02

    Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a 'minimally perturbed' cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (

  1. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  2. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  3. Apigenin inhibits renal cell carcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuai; Zhu, Yi; Li, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xiao; Liang, Zhen; Li, Shi-Qi; Xu, Xin; Chen, Hong; Liu, Ben; Zheng, Xiang-Yi; Xie, Li-Ping

    2017-03-21

    Apigenin, a natural flavonoid found in vegetables and fruits, has antitumor activity in several cancer types. The present study evaluated the effects and mechanism of action of apigenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. We found that apigenin suppressed ACHN, 786-0, and Caki-1 RCC cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A comet assay suggested that apigenin caused DNA damage in ACHN cells, especially at higher doses, and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest through ATM signal modulation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated p53 knockdown showed that apigenin-induced apoptosis was likely p53 dependent. Apigenin anti-proliferative effects were confirmed in an ACHN cell xenograft mouse model. Apigenin treatment reduced tumor growth and volume in vivo, and immunohistochemical staining revealed lower Ki-67 indices in tumors derived from apigenin-treated mice. These findings suggest that apigenin exposure induces DNA damage, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, p53 accumulation and apoptosis, which collectively suppress ACHN RCC cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Given its antitumor effects and low in vivo toxicity, apigenin is a highly promising agent for treatment of RCC.

  4. Molecular mechanisms controlling the cell cycle in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelalim, Essam M

    2013-12-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are originated from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst stage embryo. They can proliferate indefinitely, maintain an undifferentiated state (self-renewal), and differentiate into any cell type (pluripotency). ES cells have an unusual cell cycle structure, consists mainly of S phase cells, a short G1 phase and absence of G1/S checkpoint. Cell division and cell cycle progression are controlled by mechanisms ensuring the accurate transmission of genetic information from generation to generation. Therefore, control of cell cycle is a complicated process, involving several signaling pathways. Although great progress has been made on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of ES cell cycle, many regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms regulating the cell cycle of ES cells and describes the relationship existing between cell cycle progression and the self-renewal.

  5. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  6. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  7. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-08-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy.

  8. N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase inhibits p53-mediated cell cycle arrest and coordinates with p53 to determine sensitivity to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shanshan; Xing, Guichun; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shan; Yin, Yuxin; Tian, Chunyan; He, Fuchu; Zhang, Lingqiang

    2012-01-01

    Alkylating agents induce genome-wide base damage, which is repaired mainly by N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG). An elevated expression of MPG in certain types of tumor cells confers higher sensitivity to alkylation agents because MPG-induced apurinic/apyrimidic (AP) sites trigger more strand breaks. However, the determinant of drug sensitivity or insensitivity still remains unclear. Here, we report that the p53 status coordinates with MPG to play a pivotal role in such process. MPG expression is positive in breast, lung and colon cancers (38.7%, 43.4% and 25.3%, respectively) but negative in all adjacent normal tissues. MPG directly binds to the tumor suppressor p53 and represses p53 activity in unstressed cells. The overexpression of MPG reduced, whereas depletion of MPG increased, the expression levels of pro-arrest gene downstream of p53 including p21, 14-3-3σ and Gadd45 but not proapoptotic ones. The N-terminal region of MPG was specifically required for the interaction with the DNA binding domain of p53. Upon DNA alkylation stress, in p53 wild-type tumor cells, p53 dissociated from MPG and induced cell growth arrest. Then, AP sites were repaired efficiently, which led to insensitivity to alkylating agents. By contrast, in p53-mutated cells, the AP sites were repaired with low efficacy. To our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence to show that a DNA repair enzyme functions as a selective regulator of p53, and these findings provide new insights into the functional linkage between MPG and p53 in cancer therapy. PMID:22801474

  9. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  10. Small Molecule Inhibition of the Ubiquitin-specific Protease USP2 Accelerates cyclin D1 Degradation and Leads to Cell Cycle Arrest in Colorectal Cancer and Mantle Cell Lymphoma Models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Pragani, Rajan; Fox, Jennifer T; Shen, Min; Parmar, Kalindi; Gaudiano, Emily F; Liu, Li; Tanega, Cordelle; McGee, Lauren; Hall, Matthew D; McKnight, Crystal; Shinn, Paul; Nelson, Henrike; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; D'Andrea, Alan D; Auld, Douglas S; DeLucas, Larry J; Li, Zhuyin; Boxer, Matthew B; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-11-18