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Sample records for cell death receptor

  1. Cell death-independent activities of the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Daniela; Lang, Isabell; Wajant, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Since their identification more than 20 years ago, the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2 have been intensively studied with respect to their cell death-inducing activities. These receptors, however, can also trigger a variety of cell death-independent cellular responses reaching from the activation of proinflammatory gene transcription programs over the stimulation of proliferation and differentiation to induction of cell migration. The cell death-inducing signaling mechanisms of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors are well understood. In contrast, despite the increasing recognition of the biological and pathophysiological relevance of the cell death-independent activities of CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2, the corresponding signaling mechanisms are less understood and give no fully coherent picture. This review is focused on the cell death-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors and addresses mainly three questions: (a) how are these receptors linked to noncell death pathways at the molecular level, (b) which factors determine the balance of cell death and cell death-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors at the cellular level, and (c) what are the consequences of the cell death-independent functions of these receptors for their role in cancer and inflammatory diseases. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  3. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0029 TITLE: Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and...CONTRACT NUMBER Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02- 1 -0029...as a means to kill prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells in vitro. The scope of this project involved: ( 1 ) creating adenoviral

  5. Killing Breast Cancer Cells With a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    patients. We are pursuing a totally different approach to targeting VEGF: rather than inhibit VEGF our goal is to convert VEGF to act as a cell death factor...cell lines in vitro. These studies suggest that a receptor such as R2Fas which converts VEGF to act as a cell death factor could yield a new and more aggressive approach to targeting overexpressed VEGF in breast cancer....Toward this aim we created a chimeric receptor (R2Fas) composed of domains from VEGF receptor 2 fused to the intracellular domain of the Fas cell

  6. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A.; Navarro-Villarán, E.; González, R.; Pereira, S.; Soriano-De Castro, L.B.; Sarrias-Giménez, A.; Barrera-Pulido, L.; Álamo-Martínez, J.M.; Serrablo-Requejo, A.; Blanco-Fernández, G.; Nogales-Muñoz, A.; Gila-Bohórquez, A.; Pacheco, D.; Torres-Nieto, M.A.; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J.; Suárez-Artacho, G.; Bernal-Bellido, C.; Marín-Gómez, L.M.; Barcena, J.A.; Gómez-Bravo, M.A.; Padilla, C.A.; Padillo, F.J.; Muntané, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10 nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells. PMID:26233703

  7. Programmed Cell Death of Embryonic Motoneurons Triggered through the FAS Death Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Raoul, Cédric; Henderson, Christopher E.; Pettmann, Brigitte

    1999-01-01

    About 50% of spinal motoneurons undergo programmed cell death (PCD) after target contact, but little is known about how this process is initiated. Embryonic motoneurons coexpress the death receptor Fas and its ligand FasL at the stage at which PCD is about to begin. In the absence of trophic factors, many motoneurons die in culture within 2 d. Most (75%) of these were saved by Fas-Fc receptor body, which blocks interactions between Fas and FasL, or by the caspase-8 inhibitor tetrapeptide IETD. Therefore, activation of Fas by endogenous FasL underlies cell death induced by trophic deprivation. In the presence of neurotrophic factors, exogenous Fas activators such as soluble FasL or anti-Fas antibodies triggered PCD of 40–50% of purified motoneurons over the following 3–5 d; this treatment led to activation of caspase-3, and was blocked by IETD. Sensitivity to Fas activation is regulated: motoneurons cultured for 3 d with neurotrophic factors became completely resistant. Levels of Fas expressed by motoneurons varied little, but FasL was upregulated in the absence of neurotrophic factors. Motoneurons resistant to Fas activation expressed high levels of FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), an endogenous inhibitor of caspase-8 activation. Our results suggest that Fas can act as a driving force for motoneuron PCD, and raise the possibility that active triggering of PCD may contribute to motoneuron loss during normal development and/or in pathological situations. PMID:10579724

  8. Fenretinide-dependent upregulation of death receptors through ASK1 and p38α enhances death receptor ligand-induced cell death in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours.

    PubMed

    White, D E; Burchill, S A

    2010-10-26

    Sustained p38(MAPK) phosphorylation upregulates p75 neurotrophin (p75(NTR)) and induces apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT). As fenretinide induces ESFT death through sustained p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, we hypothesised that this may be effected through upregulation of death receptors (DRs) and that treatment of fenretinide plus DR ligands may enhance apoptosis. DR expression was determined by flow cytometry. Trypan blue exclusion assays, caspase-8 flow cytometry and immunoblotting for Bid were used to measure cell death. Fenretinide upregulated cell surface expression of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, FAS and p75(NTR), in an ASK1- and p38α-dependent manner. Cotreatment with fenretinide and DR ligands resulted in synergistic death compared with either agent alone; caspase-8 and Bid were cleaved in a time-dependent manner. Fenretinide did not increase DR expression in non-malignant cells. Furthermore, fenretinide, TRAIL or a combination of both agents was non-cytotoxic to non-malignant cells. Etoposide and actinomycin D increased expression of all DRs examined, whereas vincristine increased FAS alone. Only actinomycin D and TRAIL, and etoposide with TRAIL or FasL, enhanced death compared with either agent alone. The synergistic death observed with fenretinide and DR ligands suggests that this combination may be an attractive strategy for the treatment of ESFT.

  9. Fenretinide-dependent upregulation of death receptors through ASK1 and p38α enhances death receptor ligand-induced cell death in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours

    PubMed Central

    White, D E; Burchill, S A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sustained p38MAPK phosphorylation upregulates p75 neurotrophin (p75NTR) and induces apoptosis in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT). As fenretinide induces ESFT death through sustained p38MAPK phosphorylation, we hypothesised that this may be effected through upregulation of death receptors (DRs) and that treatment of fenretinide plus DR ligands may enhance apoptosis. Methods: DR expression was determined by flow cytometry. Trypan blue exclusion assays, caspase-8 flow cytometry and immunoblotting for Bid were used to measure cell death. Results: Fenretinide upregulated cell surface expression of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, FAS and p75NTR, in an ASK1- and p38α-dependent manner. Cotreatment with fenretinide and DR ligands resulted in synergistic death compared with either agent alone; caspase-8 and Bid were cleaved in a time-dependent manner. Fenretinide did not increase DR expression in non-malignant cells. Furthermore, fenretinide, TRAIL or a combination of both agents was non-cytotoxic to non-malignant cells. Etoposide and actinomycin D increased expression of all DRs examined, whereas vincristine increased FAS alone. Only actinomycin D and TRAIL, and etoposide with TRAIL or FasL, enhanced death compared with either agent alone. Conclusion: The synergistic death observed with fenretinide and DR ligands suggests that this combination may be an attractive strategy for the treatment of ESFT. PMID:20877355

  10. A promiscuous liaison between IL-15 receptor and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in cell death control

    PubMed Central

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Thon, Lutz; Mamat, Uwe; Bellosta, Paola; Basilico, Claudio; Adam, Dieter; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Discrimination between cytokine receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways is a central paradigm in signal transduction research. Here, we report a ‘promiscuous liaison' between both receptors that enables interleukin (IL)-15 to transactivate the signaling pathway of a tyrosine kinase. IL-15 protects murine L929 fibroblasts from tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced cell death, but fails to rescue them upon targeted depletion of the RTK, Axl; however, Axl-overexpressing fibroblasts are TNFα-resistant. IL-15Rα and Axl colocalize on the cell membrane and co-immunoprecipitate even in the absence of IL-15, whereby the extracellular part of Axl proved to be essential for Axl/IL-15Rα interaction. Most strikingly, IL-15 treatment mimics stimulation by the Axl ligand, Gas6, resulting in a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of both Axl and IL-15Rα, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. This is also seen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from wild-type but not Axl−/− or IL-15Rα−/− mice. Thus, IL-15-induced protection from TNFα-mediated cell death involves a hitherto unknown IL-15 receptor complex, consisting of IL-15Rα and Axl RTK, and requires their reciprocal activation initiated by ligand-induced IL-15Rα. PMID:16308569

  11. A promiscuous liaison between IL-15 receptor and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in cell death control.

    PubMed

    Budagian, Vadim; Bulanova, Elena; Orinska, Zane; Thon, Lutz; Mamat, Uwe; Bellosta, Paola; Basilico, Claudio; Adam, Dieter; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-12-21

    Discrimination between cytokine receptor and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways is a central paradigm in signal transduction research. Here, we report a 'promiscuous liaison' between both receptors that enables interleukin (IL)-15 to transactivate the signaling pathway of a tyrosine kinase. IL-15 protects murine L929 fibroblasts from tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced cell death, but fails to rescue them upon targeted depletion of the RTK, Axl; however, Axl-overexpressing fibroblasts are TNFalpha-resistant. IL-15Ralpha and Axl colocalize on the cell membrane and co-immunoprecipitate even in the absence of IL-15, whereby the extracellular part of Axl proved to be essential for Axl/IL-15Ralpha interaction. Most strikingly, IL-15 treatment mimics stimulation by the Axl ligand, Gas6, resulting in a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of both Axl and IL-15Ralpha, and activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. This is also seen in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from wild-type but not Axl-/- or IL-15Ralpha-/- mice. Thus, IL-15-induced protection from TNFalpha-mediated cell death involves a hitherto unknown IL-15 receptor complex, consisting of IL-15Ralpha and Axl RTK, and requires their reciprocal activation initiated by ligand-induced IL-15Ralpha.

  12. Dual agonist Surrobody™ simultaneously activates death receptors DR4 and DR5 to induce cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Kashyap, Arun K.; Yanagi, Teruki; Wimer, Carina; Zhou, Sihong; O' Neil, Ryann; Kurtzman, Aaron L.; Faynboym, Alexsandr; Xu, Li; Hannum, Charles H.; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Death receptors of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family are found on surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors-4 and -5 (DR4 and DR5) is Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). Since most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody™ technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing pro-apoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 mono-specific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical pro-apoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26516157

  13. Tumour-cell-induced endothelial cell necroptosis via death receptor 6 promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Strilic, Boris; Yang, Lida; Albarrán-Juárez, Julián; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Han, Kang; Müller, Ulrike C; Pasparakis, Manolis; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-08-11

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death in humans. It is a complex multistep process during which individual tumour cells spread primarily through the circulatory system to colonize distant organs. Once in the circulation, tumour cells remain vulnerable, and their metastatic potential largely depends on a rapid and efficient way to escape from the blood stream by passing the endothelial barrier. Evidence has been provided that tumour cell extravasation resembles leukocyte transendothelial migration. However, it remains unclear how tumour cells interact with endothelial cells during extravasation and how these processes are regulated on a molecular level. Here we show that human and murine tumour cells induce programmed necrosis (necroptosis) of endothelial cells, which promotes tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. Treatment of mice with the receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)-inhibitor necrostatin-1 or endothelial-cell-specific deletion of RIPK3 reduced tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis, tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. In contrast, pharmacological caspase inhibition or endothelial-cell-specific loss of caspase-8 promoted these processes. We furthermore show in vitro and in vivo that tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis leading to extravasation and metastasis requires amyloid precursor protein expressed by tumour cells and its receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), on endothelial cells as the primary mediators of these effects. Our data identify a new mechanism underlying tumour cell extravasation and metastasis, and suggest endothelial DR6-mediated necroptotic signalling pathways as targets for anti-metastatic therapies.

  14. GRIM REAPER peptide binds to receptor kinase PRK5 to trigger cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Vainonen, Julia P; Stael, Simon; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Help-Rinta-Rahko, Hanna; Gauthier, Adrien; Kaufholdt, David; Bollhöner, Benjamin; Lamminmäki, Airi; Staes, An; Gevaert, Kris; Tuominen, Hannele; Van Breusegem, Frank; Helariutta, Ykä; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of extracellular peptides by plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins is commonly used in signal transduction. In plants, very little is known about how extracellular peptides are processed and activated in order to allow recognition by receptors. Here, we show that induction of cell death in planta by a secreted plant protein GRIM REAPER (GRI) is dependent on the activity of the type II metacaspase METACASPASE-9. GRI is cleaved by METACASPASE-9 in vitro resulting in the release of an 11 amino acid peptide. This peptide bound in vivo to the extracellular domain of the plasma membrane-localized, atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 5 (PRK5) and was sufficient to induce oxidative stress/ROS-dependent cell death. This shows a signaling pathway in plants from processing and activation of an extracellular protein to recognition by its receptor. PMID:25398910

  15. GRIM REAPER peptide binds to receptor kinase PRK5 to trigger cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Vainonen, Julia P; Stael, Simon; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Help-Rinta-Rahko, Hanna; Gauthier, Adrien; Kaufholdt, David; Bollhöner, Benjamin; Lamminmäki, Airi; Staes, An; Gevaert, Kris; Tuominen, Hannele; Van Breusegem, Frank; Helariutta, Ykä; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2015-01-02

    Recognition of extracellular peptides by plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins is commonly used in signal transduction. In plants, very little is known about how extracellular peptides are processed and activated in order to allow recognition by receptors. Here, we show that induction of cell death in planta by a secreted plant protein GRIM REAPER (GRI) is dependent on the activity of the type II metacaspase METACASPASE-9. GRI is cleaved by METACASPASE-9 in vitro resulting in the release of an 11 amino acid peptide. This peptide bound in vivo to the extracellular domain of the plasma membrane-localized, atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 5 (PRK5) and was sufficient to induce oxidative stress/ROS-dependent cell death. This shows a signaling pathway in plants from processing and activation of an extracellular protein to recognition by its receptor.

  16. Cell-surface galectin-3 confers resistance to TRAIL by impeding trafficking of death receptors in metastatic colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, N; Byrd, J C; Sun, Y; Hafley, M; Ramirez, K; Burks, J; Bresalier, R S

    2012-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis and preferentially kills tumor cells by engaging specific glycosylated death receptors, resulting in the internalization of ligand/receptor complexes and recruitment of the initiator caspase-8 to an activation platform known as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). However, emergence of TRAIL-resistant sub-populations may contribute to therapeutic failure. To investigate resistance mechanisms, we isolated a stable TRAIL-resistant sub-population of the metastatic colon cancer cell line LS-LIM6, designated LIM6-TR. LIM6-TR cells are impaired in endocytosis of TRAIL/death receptors complexes and failed to recruit/activate caspase-8 to the DISC upon TRAIL stimulation. Differential activation of Wnt and JNK pathways is not responsible for acquisition of TRAIL resistance. LIM6-TR cells display a marked increase in cell-surface expression of galectin-3, an endogenous lectin, which co-localizes with and binds death receptors. Silencing of galectin-3 restores TRAIL sensitivity and promotes TRAIL-mediated endocytosis of TRAIL/death receptors complexes. Inhibitors of galectin-3 and glycosylation also re-sensitize LIM6-TR to TRAIL and restore internalization of ligand/receptors complexes. These studies identify a novel TRAIL-resistance mechanism in which galectin-3 impedes trafficking of death receptor by anchoring them in glycan nano-clusters, blocking the execution of the apoptosis signal.

  17. Cannabinoids induce pancreatic β-cell death by directly inhibiting insulin receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wook; Lao, Qizong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Carlson, Olga D; Lee, Eun Kyung; Gorospe, Myriam; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Egan, Josephine M

    2012-03-20

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors have been previously detected in pancreatic β cells, where they attenuate insulin action. We now report that CB1 receptors form a heteromeric complex with insulin receptors and the heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein α subunit Gα(i). Gα(i) inhibited the kinase activity of the insulin receptor in β cells by directly binding to the activation loop in the tyrosine kinase domain of the receptor. Consequently, phosphorylation of proapoptotic protein Bad was reduced and its apoptotic activity was stimulated, leading to β-cell death. Pharmacological blockade or genetic deficiency of CB1 receptors enhanced insulin receptor signaling after injury, leading to reduced blood glucose concentrations and activation of Bad, which increased β-cell survival. These findings provide direct evidence of physical and functional interactions between CB1 and insulin receptors and suggest a mechanism whereby peripherally acting CB1 receptor antagonists improve insulin action in insulin-sensitive tissues independent of the other metabolic effects of CB1 receptors.

  18. AIDS and the death receptors.

    PubMed

    Peter, M E; Ehret, A; Berndt, C; Krammer, P H

    1997-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells involves the CD95 receptor/ligand system. T cell activation through the T cell receptor results in expression of the CD95 ligand (CD95L) that acts on CD95+ cells by direct binding and in a paracrine or autocrine fashion. In AIDS, upregulation of CD95L in T cells is accelerated by two viral gene products, HIV-1 Tat and gp120. The CD95 signaling pathway is, therefore, likely to represent an important road to cell death of the CD4+ T cells in AIDS. Recently, the early events in the CD95 signaling pathway have been identified. A key role hereby plays a receptor-interacting member of the interleukin 1 beta-converting enzymes (ICE), FLICE, that could be a target for therapeutic intervention. In addition to CD95, the role of other members of the TNF receptor superfamily in AIDS is discussed.

  19. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  20. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-04-27

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades.

  1. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Induces Death Receptor-mediated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Sup; Jung, Ji Hyun; Panchanathan, Radha; Yun, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Gon Sup; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Choi, Yung Hyun; Jung, Jin-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Background Bile acids have anti-cancer properties in a certain types of cancers. We determined anticancer activity and its underlying molecular mechanism of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in human DU145 prostate cancer cells. Methods Cell viability was measured with an MTT assay. UDCA-induced apoptosis was determined with flow cytometric analysis. The expression levels of apoptosis-related signaling proteins were examined with Western blotting. Results UDCA treatment significantly inhibited cell growth of DU145 in a dose-dependent manner. It induced cellular shrinkage and cytoplasmic blebs and accumulated the cells with sub-G1 DNA contents. Moreover, UDCA activated caspase 8, suggesting that UDCA-induced apoptosis is associated with extrinsic pathway. Consistent to this finding, UDCA increased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), and TRAIL augmented the UDCA-induced cell death in DU145 cells. In addition, UDCA also increased the expressions of Bax and cytochrome c and decreased the expression of Bcl-xL in DU145 cells. This finding suggests that UDCA-induced apoptosis may be involved in intrinsic pathway. Conclusions UDCA induces apoptosis via extrinsic pathway as well as intrinsic pathway in DU145 prostate cancer cells. UDCA may be a promising anti-cancer agent against prostate cancer. PMID:28382282

  2. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Induces Death Receptor-mediated Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Sup; Jung, Ji Hyun; Panchanathan, Radha; Yun, Jeong Won; Kim, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hye Jung; Kim, Gon Sup; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Choi, Yung Hyun; Jung, Jin-Myung

    2017-03-01

    Bile acids have anti-cancer properties in a certain types of cancers. We determined anticancer activity and its underlying molecular mechanism of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in human DU145 prostate cancer cells. Cell viability was measured with an MTT assay. UDCA-induced apoptosis was determined with flow cytometric analysis. The expression levels of apoptosis-related signaling proteins were examined with Western blotting. UDCA treatment significantly inhibited cell growth of DU145 in a dose-dependent manner. It induced cellular shrinkage and cytoplasmic blebs and accumulated the cells with sub-G1 DNA contents. Moreover, UDCA activated caspase 8, suggesting that UDCA-induced apoptosis is associated with extrinsic pathway. Consistent to this finding, UDCA increased the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), and TRAIL augmented the UDCA-induced cell death in DU145 cells. In addition, UDCA also increased the expressions of Bax and cytochrome c and decreased the expression of Bcl-xL in DU145 cells. This finding suggests that UDCA-induced apoptosis may be involved in intrinsic pathway. UDCA induces apoptosis via extrinsic pathway as well as intrinsic pathway in DU145 prostate cancer cells. UDCA may be a promising anti-cancer agent against prostate cancer.

  3. Protein Kinase Cβ Modulates Ligand-induced Cell Surface Death Receptor Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Heldebrant, Michael P.; Flatten, Karen S.; Loegering, David A.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula A.; Gomez, Timothy S.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Trushin, Sergey A.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; Karp, Judith E.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2010-01-01

    Although treatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) is known to protect a subset of cells from induction of apoptosis by death ligands such as Fas ligand and tumor necrosis factor-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, the mechanism of this protection is unknown. This study demonstrated that protection in short term apoptosis assays and long term proliferation assays was maximal when Jurkat or HL-60 human leukemia cells were treated with 2–5 nm PMA. Immunoblotting demonstrated that multiple PKC isoforms, including PKCα, PKCβ, PKCϵ, and PKCθ, translocated from the cytosol to a membrane-bound fraction at these PMA concentrations. When the ability of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically down-regulated each of these isoforms was examined, PKCβ shRNA uniquely reversed PMA-induced protection against cell death. The PKCβ-selective small molecule inhibitor enzastaurin had a similar effect. Although mass spectrometry suggested that Fas is phosphorylated on a number of serines and threonines, mutation of these sites individually or collectively had no effect on Fas-mediated death signaling or PMA protection. Further experiments demonstrated that PMA diminished ligand-induced cell surface accumulation of Fas and DR5, and PKCβ shRNA or enzastaurin reversed this effect. Moreover, enzastaurin sensitized a variety of human tumor cell lines and clinical acute myelogenous leukemia isolates, which express abundant PKCβ, to tumor necrosis factor-α related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced death in the absence of PMA. Collectively, these results identify a specific PKC isoform that modulates death receptor-mediated cytotoxicity as well as a small molecule inhibitor that mitigates the inhibitory effects of PKC activation on ligand-induced death receptor trafficking and cell death. PMID:19887445

  4. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  5. Erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor signaling induces cell death of primary myeloma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Våtsveen, Thea Kristin; Sponaas, Anne-Marit; Tian, Erming; Zhang, Qing; Misund, Kristine; Sundan, Anders; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Brede, Gaute

    2016-08-31

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable complex disease characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in a hypoxic bone marrow environment. Hypoxia-dependent erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor (EPOR) signaling is central in various cancers, but the relevance of EPOR signaling in multiple myeloma cells has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Myeloma cell lines and malignant plasma cells isolated from bone marrow of myeloma patients were used in this study. Transcript levels were analysed by quantitative PCR and cell surface levels of EPOR in primary cells by flow cytometry. Knockdown of EPOR by short interfering RNA was used to show specific EPOR signaling in the myeloma cell line INA-6. Flow cytometry was used to assess viability in primary cells treated with EPO in the presence and absence of neutralizing anti-EPOR antibodies. Gene expression data for total therapy 2 (TT2), total therapy 3A (TT3A) trials and APEX 039 and 040 were retrieved from NIH GEO omnibus and EBI ArrayExpress. We show that the EPOR is expressed in myeloma cell lines and in primary myeloma cells both at the mRNA and protein level. Exposure to recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) reduced viability of INA-6 myeloma cell line and of primary myeloma cells. This effect could be partially reversed by neutralizing antibodies against EPOR. In INA-6 cells and primary myeloma cells, janus kinase 2 (JAK-2) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2) were phosphorylated by rhEPO treatment. Knockdown of EPOR expression in INA-6 cells reduced rhEPO-induced phospo-JAK-2 and phospho-ERK-1/2. Co-cultures of primary myeloma cells with bone marrow-derived stroma cells did not protect the myeloma cells from rhEPO-induced cell death. In four different clinical trials, survival data linked to gene expression analysis indicated that high levels of EPOR mRNA were associated with better survival. Our results demonstrate for the first time active EPOR signaling in malignant plasma cells. EPO

  6. The P2X7 Receptor Supports Both Life and Death in Fibrogenic Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haanes, Kristian A.; Schwab, Albrecht; Novak, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    The pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) have complex roles in pancreas, including tissue repair and fibrosis. PSCs surround ATP releasing exocrine cells, but little is known about purinergic receptors and their function in PSCs. Our aim was to resolve whether PSCs express the multifunctional P2X7 receptor and elucidate how it regulates PSC viability. The number of PSCs isolated from wild type (WT) mice was 50% higher than those from the Pfizer P2X7 receptor knock out (KO) mice. The P2X7 receptor protein and mRNA of all known isoforms were expressed in WT PSCs, while KO PSCs only expressed truncated versions of the receptor. In culture, the proliferation rate of the KO PSCs was significantly lower. Inclusion of apyrase reduced the proliferation rate in both WT and KO PSCs, indicating importance of endogenous ATP. Exogenous ATP had a two-sided effect. Proliferation of both WT and KO cells was stimulated with ATP in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximum effect at 100 µM. At high ATP concentration (5 mM), WT PSCs, but not the KO PSCs died. The intracellular Ca2+ signals and proliferation rate induced by micromolar ATP concentrations were inhibited by the allosteric P2X7 receptor inhibitor az10606120. The P2X7 receptor-pore inhibitor A438079 partially prevented cell death induced by millimolar ATP concentrations. This study shows that ATP and P2X7 receptors are important regulators of PSC proliferation and death, and therefore might be potential targets for treatments of pancreatic fibrosis and cancer. PMID:23284663

  7. Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation Inhibits Chemotherapy-induced Cell Death in High-grade Serous Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stringer-Reasor, Erica M.; Baker, Gabrielle M.; Skor, Maxwell N.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Lengyel, Ernst; Fleming, Gini F.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation increases resistance to chemotherapy in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGS-OvCa) and that treatment with a GR antagonist will improve sensitivity to chemotherapy. Methods GR expression was assessed in OvCa cell lines by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis and in xenografts and primary human tumors using immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also examined the effect of GR activation versus inhibition on chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in OvCa cell lines and in a xenograft model. Results With the exception of IGROV-1 cells, all OvCa cell lines tested had detectable GR expression by Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis. Twenty-five out of the 27 human primary HGS-OvCas examined expressed GR by IHC. No cell line expressed detectable progesterone receptor (PR) or androgen receptor (AR) by Western blot analysis. In vitro assays showed that in GR-positive HeyA8 and SKOV3 cells, dexamethasone (100 nM) treatment upregulated the pro-survival genes SGK1 and MKP1/DUSP1 and inhibited carboplatin/gemcitabine-induced cell death. Concurrent treatment with two GR antagonists, either mifepristone (100 nM) or CORT125134 (100 nM), partially reversed these effects. There was no anti-apoptotic effect of dexamethasone on chemotherapy-induced cell death in IGROV-1 cells, which did not have detectable GR protein. Mifepristone treatment alone was not cytotoxic in any cell line. HeyA8 OvCa xenograft studies demonstrated that adding mifepristone to carboplatin/gemcitabine increased tumor shrinkage by 48% compared to carboplatin/gemcitabine treatment alone (P=0.0004). Conclusions These results suggest that GR antagonism sensitizes GR+ OvCa to chemotherapy-induced cell death through inhibition of GR-mediated cell survival pathways. PMID:26115975

  8. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Type I Receptor Antagonists Decrease Growth and Induce Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Langenfeld, Elaine; Hong, Charles C.; Lanke, Gandhi; Langenfeld, John

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are highly conserved morphogens that are essential for normal development. BMP-2 is highly expressed in the majority of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) but not in normal lung tissue or benign lung tumors. The effects of the BMP signaling cascade on the growth and survival of cancer cells is poorly understood. We show that BMP signaling is basally active in lung cancer cell lines, which can be effectively inhibited with selective antagonists of the BMP type I receptors. Lung cancer cell lines express alk2, alk3, and alk6 and inhibition of a single BMP receptor was not sufficient to decrease signaling. Inhibition of more than one type I receptor was required to decrease BMP signaling in lung cancer cell lines. BMP receptor antagonists and silencing of BMP type I receptors with siRNA induced cell death, inhibited cell growth, and caused a significant decrease in the expression of inhibitor of differentiation (Id1, Id2, and Id3) family members, which are known to regulate cell growth and survival in many types of cancers. BMP receptor antagonists also decreased clonogenic cell growth. Knockdown of Id3 significantly decreased cell growth and induced cell death of lung cancer cells. H1299 cells stably overexpressing Id3 were resistant to growth suppression and induction of cell death induced by the BMP antagonist DMH2. These studies suggest that BMP signaling promotes cell growth and survival of lung cancer cells, which is mediated through its regulation of Id family members. Selective antagonists of the BMP type I receptors represents a potential means to pharmacologically treat NSCLC and other carcinomas with an activated BMP signaling cascade. PMID:23593444

  9. Fermented Brown Rice Extract Causes Apoptotic Death of Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells via Death Receptor Pathway.

    PubMed

    Horie, Yukiko; Nemoto, Hideyuki; Itoh, Mari; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Morita, Kyoji

    2016-04-01

    Mixture of brown rice and rice bran fermented with Aspergillus oryzae, designated as FBRA, has been reported to reveal anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects in rodents. Then, to test its potential anti-cancer activity, the aqueous extract was prepared from FBRA powder, and the effect of this extract on human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells was directly examined. The exposure to FBRA extract reduced the cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The reduction of the cell viability was accompanied by the DNA fragmentation, and partially restored by treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor. Further studies showed that FBRA extract induced the cleavage of caspase-8, -9, and -3, and decreased Bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, the expression of tBid, DR5, and Fas proteins was enhanced by FBRA extract, and the pretreatment with caspase-8 inhibitor, but not caspase-9 inhibitor, restored the reduction of the cell viability induced by FBRA extract. These findings suggested that FBRA extract could induce the apoptotic death of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells probably through mainly the death receptor-mediated pathway and supplementarily through the tBid-mediated mitochondrial pathway, proposing the possibility that FBRA was a potential functional food beneficial to patients with hematological cancer.

  10. Cabergoline, dopamine D2 receptor agonist, prevents neuronal cell death under oxidative stress via reducing excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H₂O₂ exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H₂O₂ was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H₂O₂, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca²⁺ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H₂O₂. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H₂O₂.

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Daniela S.; Soria, Javier A.; Gaviglio, Emilia A.; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M.; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C.; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS.—Arroyo, D. S., Soria, J. A., Gaviglio, E. A., Garcia-Keller, C., Cancela, L. M., Rodriguez-Galan, M. C., Wang, J. M., Iribarren, P. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy. PMID:23073832

  12. Nitrosylcobalamin Promotes Cell Death via S Nitrosylation of Apo2L/TRAIL Receptor DR4

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhuo; Bauer, Joseph A.; Morrison, Bei; Lindner, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nitrosylcobalamin (NO-Cbl), an analogue of vitamin B12 that delivers nitric oxide (NO), had potent antiproliferative activity against several human cancer cell lines. NO-Cbl induced apoptosis via a death receptor/caspase-8 pathway. In this study, we demonstrate that a functional Apo2L/TRAIL receptor was necessary for the induction of cell death by NO-Cbl. Furthermore, the Apo2L/TRAIL death receptor DR4 (TRAIL R1) was S nitrosylated following NO-Cbl treatment. Human melanoma (A375), renal carcinoma (ACHN), and ovarian carcinoma (NIH-OVCAR-3) cells were treated with NO-Cbl and subjected to the biotin switch assay; S-nitrosylated DR4 was detected in all three cell lines. NO-Cbl treatment did not cause S nitrosylation of DR5. The seven cysteine residues located in the cytoplasmic domain of DR4 were individually point mutated to alanines. NIH-OVCAR-3 cells expressing the DR4 C336A mutation lacked S nitrosylation following NO-Cbl treatment. Overexpression of wild-type DR4 sensitized cells to growth inhibition by NO-Cbl. Cells expressing the DR4 C336A mutant were more resistant to NO-Cbl and Apo2L/TRAIL than were the other six C-A mutations or wild-type cells. The C336A mutant also displayed blunted caspase-8 enzymatic activity following NO-Cbl treatment compared to the other mutants. Thus, DR4 residue C336 becomes S nitrosylated and promotes apoptosis following NO-Cbl treatment. PMID:16847314

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 ligands promote microglial cell death by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Daniela S; Soria, Javier A; Gaviglio, Emilia A; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Cancela, Liliana M; Rodriguez-Galan, Maria C; Wang, Ji Ming; Iribarren, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and become activated in pathological conditions, resulting in microgliosis, manifested by increased cell numbers and inflammation in the affected regions. Thus, controlling microgliosis is important to prevent pathological damage to the brain. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) to microglial survival. We observed that activation of microglial cells with peptidoglycan (PGN) from Staphylococcus aureus and other TLR2 ligands results in cell activation followed by the induction of autophagy and autophagy-dependent cell death. In C57BL/6J mice, intracerebral injection of PGN increased the autophagy of microglial cells and reduced the microglial/macrophage cell number in brain parenchyma. Our results demonstrate a novel role of TLRs in the regulation of microglial cell activation and survival, which are important for the control of microgliosis and associated inflammatory responses in the CNS.

  14. Mediation of Autophagic Cell Death by Type 3 Ryanodine Receptor (RyR3) in Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung Min; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Park, Hyunhee; An, Hyun-Kyu; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Ca(2+) actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), the main Ca(2+) release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca(2+)-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death (ACD). Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs-especially RyR3-were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished ACD of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca(2+) regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca(2+) in neural stem cell biology.

  15. Mediation of Autophagic Cell Death by Type 3 Ryanodine Receptor (RyR3) in Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Jeong, Eun-Ji; Park, Hyunhee; An, Hyun-Kyu; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs), the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death (ACD). Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs—especially RyR3—were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished ACD of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology. PMID:27199668

  16. Critical role for BIM in T cell receptor restimulation-induced death.

    PubMed

    Snow, Andrew L; Oliveira, João B; Zheng, Lixin; Dale, Janet K; Fleisher, Thomas A; Lenardo, Michael J

    2008-08-20

    Upon repeated or chronic antigen stimulation, activated T cells undergo a T cell receptor (TCR)-triggered propriocidal cell death important for governing the intensity of immune responses. This is thought to be chiefly mediated by an extrinsic signal through the Fas-FasL pathway. However, we observed that TCR restimulation still potently induced apoptosis when this interaction was blocked, or genetically impaired in T cells derived from autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) patients, prompting us to examine Fas-independent, intrinsic signals. Upon TCR restimulation, we specifically noted a marked increase in the expression of BIM, a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein known to mediate lymphocyte apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. In fact, T cells from an ALPS type IV patient in which BIM expression is suppressed were more resistant to restimulation-induced death. Strikingly, knockdown of BIM expression rescued normal T cells from TCR-induced death to as great an extent as Fas disruption. Our data implicates BIM as a critical mediator of apoptosis induced by restimulation as well as growth cytokine withdrawal. These findings suggest an important role for BIM in eliminating activated T cells even when IL-2 is abundant, working in conjunction with Fas to eliminate chronically stimulated T cells and maintain immune homeostasis. This article was reviewed by Dr. Wendy Davidson (nominated by Dr. David Scott), Dr. Mark Williams (nominated by Dr. Neil Greenspan), and Dr. Laurence C. Eisenlohr.

  17. Increased Level of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells, Programmed Death Receptor Ligand 1/Programmed Death Receptor 1, and Soluble CD25 in Sokal High Risk Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Christiansson, Lisa; Söderlund, Stina; Svensson, Emma; Mustjoki, Satu; Bengtsson, Mats; Simonsson, Bengt; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Loskog, Angelica S. I.

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy (eg interferon α) in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is currently in clinical trials for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Cancer patients commonly have problems with so called immune escape mechanisms that may hamper immunotherapy. Hence, to study the function of the immune system in CML is of interest. In the present paper we have identified immune escape mechanisms in CML with focus on those that directly hamper T cells since these cells are important to control tumor progression. CML patient samples were investigated for the presence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), expression of programmed death receptor ligand 1/programmed death receptor 1 (PD-L1/PD-1), arginase 1 and soluble CD25. MDSC levels were increased in samples from Sokal high risk patients (p<0,05) and the cells were present on both CD34 negative and CD34 positive cell populations. Furthermore, expression of the MDSC-associated molecule arginase 1, known to inhibit T cells, was increased in the patients (p = 0,0079). Myeloid cells upregulated PD-L1 (p<0,05) and the receptor PD-1 was present on T cells. However, PD-L1 blockade did not increase T cell proliferation but upregulated IL-2 secretion. Finally, soluble CD25 was increased in high risk patients (p<0,0001). In conclusion T cells in CML patients may be under the control of different immune escape mechanisms that could hamper the use of immunotherapy in these patients. These escape mechanisms should be monitored in trials to understand their importance and how to overcome the immune suppression. PMID:23383287

  18. Increased level of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, programmed death receptor ligand 1/programmed death receptor 1, and soluble CD25 in Sokal high risk chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Christiansson, Lisa; Söderlund, Stina; Svensson, Emma; Mustjoki, Satu; Bengtsson, Mats; Simonsson, Bengt; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Loskog, Angelica S I

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy (eg interferon α) in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is currently in clinical trials for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Cancer patients commonly have problems with so called immune escape mechanisms that may hamper immunotherapy. Hence, to study the function of the immune system in CML is of interest. In the present paper we have identified immune escape mechanisms in CML with focus on those that directly hamper T cells since these cells are important to control tumor progression. CML patient samples were investigated for the presence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), expression of programmed death receptor ligand 1/programmed death receptor 1 (PD-L1/PD-1), arginase 1 and soluble CD25. MDSC levels were increased in samples from Sokal high risk patients (p<0.05) and the cells were present on both CD34 negative and CD34 positive cell populations. Furthermore, expression of the MDSC-associated molecule arginase 1, known to inhibit T cells, was increased in the patients (p = 0.0079). Myeloid cells upregulated PD-L1 (p<0.05) and the receptor PD-1 was present on T cells. However, PD-L1 blockade did not increase T cell proliferation but upregulated IL-2 secretion. Finally, soluble CD25 was increased in high risk patients (p<0.0001). In conclusion T cells in CML patients may be under the control of different immune escape mechanisms that could hamper the use of immunotherapy in these patients. These escape mechanisms should be monitored in trials to understand their importance and how to overcome the immune suppression.

  19. Cannabinoid-2 receptor limits inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress and cell death in nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Pan, Hao; Patel, Vivek; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Bátkai, Sándor; Gao, Bin; Haskó, György; Pacher, Pál

    2010-01-01

    Cisplatin is an important chemotherapeutic agent available; however the nephrotoxicity is limiting its clinical use. Enhanced inflammatory response and oxidative/nitrosative stress appear to play a key role in the development of cisplatin-induced nephropathy. Activation of cannabinoid-2 (CB2) receptors with selective agonists exerts anti-inflammatory and tissue protective effects in various disease models. We have investigated the role of CB2 receptors in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using selective CB2 receptor agonist HU-308 and CB2 knockout mice. Cisplatin significantly increased inflammation (leukocyte infiltration, CXCL1/2, MCP-1, TNF-α and IL1β levels), expressions of adhesion molecule ICAM-1 and superoxide generating enzymes NOX2, NOX4 and NOX1, enhanced ROS generation, iNOS expression, nitrotyrosine formation, apoptotic and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent cell death in the kidneys of mice, associated with marked histopathological damage and impaired renal function (elevated serum BUN and creatinine levels) 3 days following the administration of the drug. CB2 agonist attenuated the cisplatin-induced inflammatory response, oxidative/nitrosative stress and cell death in the kidney and improved renal function, while CB2 knockouts developed enhanced inflammation and tissue injury. Thus, the endocannabinoid system through CB2 receptors protects against cisplatin-induced kidney damage by attenuating inflammation and oxidative/nitrosative stress, and selective CB2 agonists may represent a promising novel approach to prevent this devastating complication of chemotherapy. PMID:19969072

  20. Fluid shear stress sensitizes cancer cells to receptor-mediated apoptosis via trimeric death receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Hematogenous metastasis is initiated by intravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the bloodstream, which are then believed to adhere to the luminal surface of the endothelium and extravasate into distal locations. Apoptotic agents such as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), whether in soluble ligand form or expressed on the surface of natural killer cells, have shown promise in treating CTCs to reduce the probability of metastasis. The role of hemodynamic shear forces in altering the cancer cell response to apoptotic agents has not been previously investigated. Here, we report that human colon cancer COLO 205 and prostate cancer PC-3 cells exposed to a uniform fluid shear stress in a cone-and-plate viscometer become sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Shear-induced sensitization directly correlates with the application of fluid shear stress, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis increases in a fluid shear stress force- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, TRAIL-induced necrosis is not affected by the application fluid shear stress. Interestingly, fluid shear stress does not sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis when treated with doxorubicin, which also induces apoptosis in cancer cells. Caspase inhibition experiments reveal that shear stress-induced sensitization to TRAIL occurs via caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results suggest that physiological fluid shear forces can modulate receptor-mediated apoptosis of cancer cells in the presence of apoptotic agents.

  1. CGX-1007 prevents excitotoxic cell death via actions at multiple types of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anitha B; Saunders, Gerald W; Dalpé-Charron, Alexandre; Reilly, Christopher A; Wilcox, Karen S

    2011-08-01

    Glutamate induced excitotoxic injury through over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) plays a critical role in the development of many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of CGX-1007 (Conantokin G) as a neuroprotective agent against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Conantokin G, a cone snail peptide isolated from Conus geographus is reported to selectively inhibit NR2B containing NMDARs with high specificity and is shown to have potent anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects. CGX-1007 significantly reduced the excitotoxic cell death induced by NMDA in organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, ifenprodil, another NR2B specific antagonist failed to offer neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. We further determined that the neuroprotection observed is likely due to the action of CGX-1007 at multiple NMDA receptor subtypes. In a series of electrophysiology experiments, CGX-1007 inhibited NMDA-gated currents in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing NMDA receptors containing either NR1a/NR2B or NR1a/NR2A subunit combinations. CGX-1007 produced a weak inhibition at NR1a/NR2C receptors, whereas it had no effect on NR1a/NR2D receptors. Further, the inhibition of NMDA receptors by CGX-1007 was voltage-dependent with greater inhibition seen at hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The voltage-dependence of CGX-1007 activity was also observed in recordings of NMDA-gated currents evoked in native receptors expressed in cortical neurons in culture. Based on our results, we conclude that CGX-1007 is a potent neuroprotective agent that acts as an antagonist at both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors.

  2. The cytoplasmic nuclear receptor RARγ controls RIP1 initiated cell death when cIAP activity is inhibited.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Jitkaew, Siriporn; Choksi, Swati; Kadigamuwa, Chamila; Qu, Jianhui; Choe, Moran; Jang, Jonathan; Liu, Chengyu; Liu, Zheng-Gang

    2017-09-04

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has a critical role in diverse cellular events including inflammation, apoptosis and necroptosis through different signaling complexes. However, little is known about how the transition from inflammatory signaling to the engagement of death pathways is modulated. Here we report that the cytoplasmic retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARγ) controls receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1)-initiated cell death when cellular inhibitor of apoptosis (cIAP) activity is blocked. Through screening a short hairpin RNA library, we found that RARγ was essential for TNF-induced RIP1-initiated apoptosis and necroptosis. Our data suggests that RARγ initiates the formation of death signaling complexes by mediating RIP1 dissociation from TNF receptor 1. We demonstrate that RARγ is released from the nucleus to orchestrate the formation of the cytosolic death complexes. In addition, we demonstrate that RARγ has a similar role in TNF-induced necroptosis in vivo. Thus, our study suggests that nuclear receptor RARγ provides a key checkpoint for the transition from life to death.The molecular switch between how tumour necrosis factor (TNF) controls inflammation versus cell death is less well defined. Here, the authors show that the nuclear receptor retinoic acid receptor gamma is released from the nucleus to disrupt TNF initiated cell death complexes in the cytoplasm.

  3. Cabergoline, Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonist, Prevents Neuronal Cell Death under Oxidative Stress via Reducing Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Odaka, Haruki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Nakajima, Shingo; Katanuma, Yusuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence demonstrate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Potent antioxidants may therefore be effective in the treatment of such diseases. Cabergoline, a dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antiparkinson drug, has been studied using several cell types including mesencephalic neurons, and is recognized as a potent radical scavenger. Here, we examined whether cabergoline exerts neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress through a receptor-mediated mechanism in cultured cortical neurons. We found that neuronal death induced by H2O2 exposure was inhibited by pretreatment with cabergoline, while this protective effect was eliminated in the presence of a dopamine D2 receptor inhibitor, spiperone. Activation of ERK1/2 by H2O2 was suppressed by cabergoline, and an ERK signaling pathway inhibitor, U0126, similarly protected cortical neurons from cell death. This suggested the ERK signaling pathway has a critical role in cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection. Furthermore, increased extracellular levels of glutamate induced by H2O2, which might contribute to ERK activation, were reduced by cabergoline, while inhibitors for NMDA receptor or L-type Ca2+ channel demonstrated a survival effect against H2O2. Interestingly, we found that cabergoline increased expression levels of glutamate transporters such as EAAC1. Taken together, these results suggest that cabergoline has a protective effect on cortical neurons via a receptor-mediated mechanism including repression of ERK1/2 activation and extracellular glutamate accumulation induced by H2O2. PMID:24914776

  4. Identification of death receptors DR4 and DR5 in HTB-12 astrocytoma cell lines and determination of TRAIL sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Riddick, Elenia; Evans, Shavonda; Rousch, Jeffrey; Gwebu, Ephraim; Banerjee, Hirendra Nath

    2013-12-01

    Astrocytomas are tumors which arise from astrocytes, cells that form the blood-brain barrier. There are very few drugs that successfully treat brain tumors. In this study, the cytotoxic effects on the HTB-12 astrocytoma cell line by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) were studied. The presence of the TRAIL receptors, Death receptor 4 (DR4) and Death receptor 5 (DR5), were detected in HTB-12 cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity assay by Trypan Blue Exclusion Method showed effective cell killing by TRAIL treatment. Thus, the presence of death receptors and TRAIL efficacy raises the therapeutic potential for this type of brain tumor.

  5. Detachment of esophageal carcinoma cells from extracellular matrix causes relocalization of death receptor 5 and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guang-Chao; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Shi-Gui; Gao, Rong; Long, Zhang-Fu; Tao, Ke; Ma, Yuan-Fang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of detachment of esophageal cancer cells from extracellular matrix on the localization of death receptor 5 (DR5) and apoptosis. METHODS: Anchorage-dependent EC9706 cells of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were pretreated or not treated with brefeldin A. Detached cells were harvested by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid digestion. Expression and localization of DR5 in these cells were determined by immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence assays, as well as flow cytometry analysis. Apoptosis of EC9706 cells was detected by flow cytometry after stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled annexin V/propidium iodide. Activation of caspase 8 was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Immunocytochemical assay indicated that DR5 was predominantly perinuclear in adherent cells but was mainly localized in cell membrane in detached cells. In addition, immunofluorescence assay also confirmed the above-mentioned results, and further demonstrated that DR5 was present in the form of coarse granules in detached cells, but in the form of fine granules in adherent cells. Cytometry analysis revealed higher levels of DR5 expression on the surfaces of brefeldin-A-untreated cells than on the surfaces of brefeldin-A-treated cells, but brefeldin A treatment did not affect the total DR5 expression levels. Moreover, nocodazole did not influence the extracelluar DR5 expression levels in EC9706 cells. Apoptosis assay revealed that detached cells were more sensitive to DR5 antibody-induced apoptosis than adherent cells. Western blotting showed that caspase 8 was activated in temporarily detached cells 4 h earlier than in adherent cells. CONCLUSION: Progress from adhesion to detachment of EC9706 cells causes DR5 relocalization, and promotes cytoplasmic translocation of DR5 to cell surfaces via a Golgi-dependent pathway. Moreover, it might also result in DR5 aggregation to render apoptosis of detached cells. PMID:19230044

  6. Modified arabinoxylan rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran) sensitizes human T cell leukemia cells to death receptor (CD95)-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Gollapudi, Sastry

    2003-11-10

    MGN-3, an arabinoxylan extracted from rice bran that is treated enzymatically with an extract from Shiitaki mushrooms, is an effective biological response modifier that increases NK cell activity, and potentiates the activity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of MGN-3 on death receptor-induced apoptosis in the human leukemic HUT 78 cell line. HUT 78 cells were pre-treated with MGN-3, and then were incubated with the agonistic antibody against death receptor (Fas, CD95). Apoptosis was determined by the propidium iodide technique using FACScan. Activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 was determined by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with DIOC(6) dye using FACScan. Expression of CD95 and Bcl-2 were measured by flow cytometry. In a dose-dependent manner, MGN-3 enhanced anti-CD95 antibody-induced apoptosis. Increased cell death was correlated with increased depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9. MGN-3 treatment had no effect on the level of expression of CD95, but it caused down regulation of Bcl-2 expression. These results suggest that MGN-3 increases the susceptibility of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis mediated by death ligands, which may be relevant for anti-cancer activities.

  7. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  8. μ‐Opioid receptor activation prevents acute hepatic inflammation and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chakass, Dania; Philippe, David; Erdual, Edmone; Dharancy, Sébastien; Malapel, Mathilde; Dubuquoy, Caroline; Thuru, Xavier; Gay, Jerome; Gaveriaux‐Ruff, Claire; Dubus, Pierre; Mathurin, Philippe; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Desreumaux, Pierre; Chamaillard, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims The detrimental impact of opioid agonist on the clinical management of inflammatory diseases remains elusive. Given the anti‐inflammatory properties of the μ‐opioid receptor (MOR) agonists at the intestinal barrier, we hypothesised that MOR activation might also dampen acute hepatic inflammation and cell death—major determinants in the pathogenesis of liver diseases. Patients and methods The expression of MOR in liver biopsy specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and controls, primary hepatocytes and cell lines was determined by quantitative PCR, immunoblotting and/or immunohistochemistry. The effects of peripheral MOR agonist (D‐Ala2,NMe‐Phe4,Gly5‐ol (DAMGO)) and/or antagonist (naloxone methiodide) were explored in two models of acute hepatitis in mice. MOR‐deficient mice were used to evaluate the essential regulatory role of MOR during carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)‐induced hepatitis. The role of DAMGO in cell death was investigated using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‐mediated dUTP nick‐end labelling (TUNEL) analysis and quantification of lactate dehydrogenase release. Results The key role of MOR in the prevention of acute hepatic inflammation and cell death in vivo and in vitro is reported. Whereas MOR gene expression increased transiently in the model of acute liver injury and TNFα‐treated HepG2 cells, an impaired expression of MOR mRNA in human chronic hepatitis C samples was found. Furthermore, preventive administration of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO enhanced hepatoprotective‐signalling pathways in vivo that were blocked by using naloxone methiodide. Consistently, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of MOR enhanced the severity associated with experimental hepatotoxin‐induced hepatitis. Finally, treatment with DAMGO was shown to prevent cell death in vitro in HepG2 cells in a MOR‐dependent manner and to prevent concanavalin A

  9. A novel ligand of calcitonin receptor reveals a potential new sensor that modulates programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Furness, SGB; Hare, DL; Kourakis, A; Turnley, AM; Wookey, PJ

    2016-01-01

    We have discovered that the accumulation of an anti-calcitonin receptor (anti-CTR) antibody conjugated to a fluorophore (mAb2C4:AF568) provides a robust signal for cells undergoing apoptotic programmed cell death (PCD). PCD is an absolute requirement for normal development of metazoan organisms. PCD is a hallmark of common diseases such as cardiovascular disease and tissue rejection in graft versus host pathologies, and chemotherapeutics work by increasing PCD. This robust signal or high fluorescent events were verified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry in several cell lines and a primary culture in which PCD had been induced. In Jurkat cells, GBM-L2 and MG63 cells, the percentage undergoing PCD that were positive for both mAb2C4:AF568 and annexin V ranged between 70 and >90%. In MG63 cells induced for the preapoptotic cell stress response (PACSR), the normal expression of α-tubulin, a key structural component of the cytoskeleton, and accumulation of mAb2C4:AF568 were mutually exclusive. Our data support a model in which CTR is upregulated during PACSR and recycles to the plasma membrane with apoptosis. In cells committed to apoptosis (α-tubulin negative), there is accumulation of the CTR-ligand mAb2C4:AF568 generating a high fluorescent event. The reagent mAb2C4:AF568 effectively identifies a novel event linked to apoptosis. PMID:27777788

  10. Fas cell surface death receptor controls hepatic lipid metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Item, Flurin; Wueest, Stephan; Lemos, Vera; Stein, Sokrates; Lucchini, Fabrizio C; Denzler, Rémy; Fisser, Muriel C; Challa, Tenagne D; Pirinen, Eija; Kim, Youngsoo; Hemmi, Silvio; Gulbins, Erich; Gross, Atan; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Stoffel, Markus; Auwerx, Johan; Konrad, Daniel

    2017-09-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders and it tightly associates with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Reduced mitochondrial lipid oxidation contributes to hepatic fatty acid accumulation. Here, we show that the Fas cell surface death receptor (Fas/CD95/Apo-1) regulates hepatic mitochondrial metabolism. Hepatic Fas overexpression in chow-fed mice compromises fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and the abundance of mitochondrial respiratory complexes promoting hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. In line, hepatocyte-specific ablation of Fas improves mitochondrial function and ameliorates high-fat-diet-induced hepatic steatosis, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. Mechanistically, Fas impairs fatty acid oxidation via the BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID). Mice with genetic or pharmacological inhibition of BID are protected from Fas-mediated impairment of mitochondrial oxidation and hepatic steatosis. We suggest Fas as a potential novel therapeutic target to treat obesity-associated fatty liver and insulin resistance.Hepatic steatosis is a common disease closely associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Here Item et al. show that Fas, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction, steatosis development, and insulin resistance under high fat diet.

  11. NR2B-NMDA receptor mediated modulation of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP regulates glutamate induced neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Deb, Ishani; Mukherjee, Saibal; Paul, Surojit

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the role of a neuron-specific tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in excitotoxic cell death. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK, a stress-activated kinase that is known to play a role in the etiology of excitotoxic cell death is a substrate of STEP. Glutamate-mediated NMDA receptor stimulation leads to rapid but transient activation of p38 MAPK, which is primarily dependent on NR2A-NMDA receptor activation. Conversely, activation of NR2B-NMDA receptors leads to dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of STEP, which in turn leads to inactivation of p38 MAPK. Thus during transient NMDA receptor stimulation, increases in STEP activity appears to limit the duration of activation of p38 MAPK and improves neuronal survival. However, if NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation is sustained, protective effects of STEP activation are lost, as these stimuli cause significant degradation of active STEP, leading to secondary activation of p38 MAP kinase. Consistent with this observation, a cell transducible TAT-STEP peptide that constitutively binds to p38 MAPK attenuated neuronal cell death caused by sustained NMDA receptor stimulation. The findings imply that the activation and levels of STEP are dependent on the duration and magnitude of NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation and STEP serves as a modulator of NMDA receptor dependent neuronal injury, through its regulation of p38 MAPK. PMID:21029094

  12. Quercetin enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells by inducing the accumulation of death receptors in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Psahoulia, Faiy H; Drosopoulos, Konstantinos G; Doubravska, Lenka; Andera, Ladislav; Pintzas, Alexander

    2007-09-01

    Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells through engagement of death receptors. Nevertheless, evading apoptosis induced by anticancer drugs characterizes many types of cancers. This results in the need for combination therapy. In this study, we have investigated whether the flavonoid quercetin could sensitize human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We report that quercetin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by causing the redistribution of DR4 and DR5 into lipid rafts. Nystatin, a cholesterol-sequestering agent, prevented quercetin-induced clustering of death receptors and sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in colon adenocarcinoma cells. In addition, our experiments show that quercetin, in combination with TRAIL, triggered the mitochondrial-dependent death pathway, as shown by Bid cleavage and the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol. Together, our findings propose that quercetin, through its ability to redistribute death receptors at the cell surface, facilitates death-inducing signaling complex formation and activation of caspases in response to death receptor stimulation. Based on these results, this study provides a challenging approach to enhance the efficiency of TRAIL-based therapies.

  13. HuR's post-transcriptional regulation of Death Receptor 5 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Danielle M; Rittenhouse, David W; Valley, Christopher C; Cozzitorto, Joseph A; Burkhart, Richard A; Leiby, Benjamin; Winter, Jordan M; Weber, Matthew C; Londin, Eric R; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Yeo, Charles J; Gorospe, Myriam; Witkiewicz, Agnieska K; Sachs, Jonathan N; Brody, Jonathan R

    2012-08-01

    Apoptosis is one of the core signaling pathways disrupted in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor superfamily that is expressed in cancer cells. Binding of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to DR5 is a potent trigger of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and numerous clinical trials are based on DR5-targeted therapies for cancer, including PDA. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein, regulates a select number of transcripts under stress conditions. Here we report that HuR translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of PDA cells upon treatment with a DR5 agonist. High doses of DR5 agonist induce cleavage of both HuR and caspase 8. HuR binds to DR5 mRNA at the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) in PDA cells in response to different cancer-associated stressors and subsequently represses DR5 protein expression; silencing HuR augments DR5 protein production by enabling its translation and thus enhances apoptosis. In PDA specimens (n = 53), negative HuR cytoplasmic expression correlated with elevated DR5 expression (odds ratio 16.1, p < 0.0001). Together, these data demonstrate a feedback mechanism elicited by HuR-mediated repression of the key apoptotic membrane protein DR5.

  14. Hypermethylated promoter region of DR3, the death receptor 3 gene, in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Takami, Nozomi; Osawa, Kayo; Miura, Yasushi; Komai, Koichiro; Taniguchi, Mariko; Shiraishi, Masahiko; Sato, Keizo; Iguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shiozawa, Kazuko; Hashiramoto, Akira; Shiozawa, Shunichi

    2006-03-01

    To examine the promoter activity and protein expression of the death receptor 3 gene DR3, a member of the apoptosis-inducing Fas gene family, with particular reference to the methylation status of its promoter region in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Genomic DNA was prepared from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from healthy individuals and from patients with RA and synovial cells obtained from patients with RA and osteoarthritis. The methylation status of the DR3 promoter was analyzed by bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction techniques. Gene promoter activity and protein expression were examined using the luciferase reporter and Western blotting techniques. The promoter region of the DR3 gene contained many CpG motifs, including one CpG island that was specifically hypermethylated in synovial cells from patients with RA. Promoter assays showed that the promoter CpG island was essential for the transactivation of the DR3 gene and that forced hypermethylation of the CpG island with the bacterial methylase Sss I in vitro resulted in inhibition of the DR3 gene expression. Furthermore, the expression of DR-3 protein was down-modulated in association with methylation of the promoter CpG island in RA synovial cells. The CpG island in the DR3 gene promoter was specifically methylated to down-modulate the expression of DR-3 protein in rheumatoid synovial cells, which may provide resistance to apoptosis in RA synovial cells.

  15. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dichloroacetate potentiates tamoxifen-induced cell death in breast cancer cells via downregulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoonhwa; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Seong, Min-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Song, Jie-Young; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jin Kyung; Noh, Woo Chul; Park, In-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells has recently been recognized as an essential hallmark of neoplasia. In this context, metabolic alterations represent an attractive therapeutic target, and encouraging results with drugs targeting various metabolic processes have been obtained in preclinical studies. Recently, several studies have suggested that dichloroacetate (DCA), a specific pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitor, may be a potential anticancer drug in a large number of diverse tumors. However, the precise mechanism is not fully understood, which is important for the use of DCA in cancer treatment. In the present study, we found that DCA sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death by decreasing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression. The downregulation of EGFR was caused by degradation of the protein. Furthermore, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase played an important role in DCA/tamoxifen-induced EGFR degradation. Finally, DCA also promoted comparable tamoxifen-induced cell death in tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cells, which were established by long-term treatment with tamoxifen. In summary, our results suggest that DCA is an attractive potential drug that sensitizes cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death and overcome tamoxifen resistance via downregulation of EGFR expression in breast cancer cells. PMID:27494858

  17. Gustatory innervation and bax-dependent caspase-2: participants in the life and death pathways of mouse taste receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q; Kwan, A; Oakley, B

    2000-09-04

    In the adult mouse tongue, an average of 11% of the gustatory receptor cells are replaced each day. In investigating homeostatic cell death mechanisms in gustatory renewing epithelium, we observed that taste receptor cells were selectively immunopositive for the bcl-2 family death factor, Bax, and for the protease Caspase-2 (Nedd2/Ich1). We determined that 8-10% of the taste receptor cells of the vallate papilla were Bax positive and that 11% were Caspase-2 positive. Some of these immunopositive taste cells had apoptotic morphological defects. Within the subset of vallate taste cells immunopositive for either Caspase-2 or Bax, up to 79% coexpressed both death factors. Bax and Caspase-2 first appeared in occasional vallate taste receptor cells on the same postnatal day-the day after birth. bax null mutation markedly reduced gustatory Caspase-2 immunoexpression. These observations suggest that taste cell death pathways utilize p53, Bax, and Caspase-2 to dispose of aged receptor cells. Apart from reducing Caspase-2 expression, Bax deficiency also altered taste organ development. bax(-/-) mice had a more profusely innervated vallate papilla, which grew to be 25% longer and taller, with the mean taste bud containing more than twice the normal number of taste cells. This augmentation of taste organ development with increased innervation is complementary to the well-documented reduction in taste organ development with sparse innervation. We propose that additional taste neurons survived programmed cell death in Bax-deficient mice, thereby providing an inductive boost to vallate gustatory development. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition broadly sensitizes glioblastoma cells to death receptor- and drug-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Opel, Daniela; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Bender, Ariane; Braun, Veit; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Fulda, Simone

    2008-08-01

    The aberrant activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been reported to correlate with adverse clinical outcome in human glioblastoma in vivo. However, the question of how this survival network can be successfully targeted to restore the sensitivity of glioblastoma to apoptosis induction has not yet been answered. Here, we report that inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 broadly sensitizes wild-type and mutant PTEN glioblastoma cells to both death receptor- and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, whereas mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition is not sufficient to restore apoptosis sensitivity. LY294002 significantly enhances apoptosis triggered by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), agonistic anti-CD95 antibodies, or several anticancer drugs (i.e., doxorubicin, etoposide, and vincristine) in a highly synergistic manner. In addition, LY294002 cooperates with TRAIL or doxorubicin to suppress colony formation, thus also showing a strong effect on long-term survival. Similarly, genetic knockdown of PI3K subunits p110alpha and/or p110beta by RNA interference (RNAi) primes glioblastoma cells for TRAIL- or doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis. In contrast to PI3K inhibition, pharmacologic or genetic blockade of mTOR by RAD001 (everolimus), rapamycin, or RNAi fails to enhance TRAIL- or doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Analysis of apoptosis pathways reveals that PI3K inhibition acts in concert with TRAIL or doxorubicin to trigger mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, caspase activation, and caspase-dependent apoptosis, which are abolished by the caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Most importantly, PI3K inhibition by LY294002 sensitizes primary cultured glioblastoma cells obtained from surgical specimens to TRAIL- or chemotherapy-induced cell death. By showing that PI3K inhibition broadly primes glioblastoma cells for apoptosis, our findings provide the rationale for using PI3K inhibitors in

  19. Targeting Death Receptor TRAIL-R2 by Chalcones for TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Jaworska, Dagmara; Kłósek, Małgorzata; Czuba, Zenon P.; Król, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in cancer cells without toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL binds to death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5) expressed on cancer cell surface and activates apoptotic pathways. Endogenous TRAIL plays an important role in immune surveillance and defense against cancer cells. However, as more tumor cells are reported to be resistant to TRAIL mediated death, it is important to search for and develop new strategies to overcome this resistance. Chalcones can sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of TRAIL in combination with four chalcones: chalcone, isobavachalcone, licochalcone A and xanthohumol on HeLa cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected using annexin V-FITC staining by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Death receptor expression was analyzed using flow cytometry. The decreased expression of death receptors in cancer cells may be the cause of TRAIL-resistance. Chalcones enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through increased expression of TRAIL-R2. Our study has indicated that chalcones augment the antitumor activity of TRAIL and confirm their cancer chemopreventive properties. PMID:23203129

  20. Targeting a G-protein-coupled receptor overexpressed in endocrine tumors by magnetic nanoparticles to induce cell death.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Claire; El Hajj Diab, Darine; Connord, Vincent; Clerc, Pascal; Meunier, Etienne; Pipy, Bernard; Payré, Bruno; Tan, Reasmey P; Gougeon, Michel; Carrey, Julian; Gigoux, Véronique; Fourmy, Daniel

    2014-02-25

    Nanotherapy using targeted magnetic nanoparticles grafted with peptidic ligands of receptors overexpressed in cancers is a promising therapeutic strategy. However, nanoconjugation of peptides can dramatically affect their properties with respect to receptor recognition, mechanism of internalization, intracellular trafficking, and fate. Furthermore, investigations are needed to better understand the mechanism whereby application of an alternating magnetic field to cells containing targeted nanoparticles induces cell death. Here, we designed a nanoplatform (termed MG-IONP-DY647) composed of an iron oxide nanocrystal decorated with a ligand of a G-protein coupled receptor, the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) that is overexpressed in several malignant cancers. MG-IONP-DY647 did not stimulate inflammasome of Raw 264.7 macrophages. They recognized cells expressing CCK2R with a high specificity, subsequently internalized via a mechanism involving recruitment of β-arrestins, clathrin-coated pits, and dynamin and were directed to lysosomes. Binding and internalization of MG-IONP-DY647 were dependent on the density of the ligand at the nanoparticle surface and were slowed down relative to free ligand. Trafficking of CCK2R internalized with the nanoparticles was slightly modified relative to CCK2R internalized in response to free ligand. Application of an alternating magnetic field to cells containing MG-IONP-DY647 induced apoptosis and cell death through a lysosomal death pathway, demonstrating that cell death is triggered even though nanoparticles of low thermal power are internalized in minute amounts by the cells. Together with pioneer findings using iron oxide nanoparticles targeting tumoral cells expressing epidermal growth factor receptor, these data represent a solid basis for future studies aiming at establishing the proof-of-concept of nanotherapy of cancers using ligand-grafted magnetic nanoparticles specifically internalized via cell surface receptors.

  1. Evaluation of the Contribution of Multiple DAMPs and DAMP Receptors in Cell Death-Induced Sterile Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Zubin; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    When cells die by necrosis in vivo they stimulate an inflammatory response. It is thought that this response is triggered when the injured cells expose proinflammatory molecules, collectively referred to as damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by cells or soluble molecules of the innate or adaptive immune system. Several putative DAMPs and/or their receptors have been identified, but whether and how much they participate in responses in vivo is incompletely understood, and they have not previously been compared side-by-side in the same models. This study focuses on evaluating the contribution of multiple mechanisms that have been proposed to or potentially could participate in cell death-induced inflammation: The third component of complement (C3), ATP (and its receptor P2X7), antibodies, the C-type lectin receptor Mincle (Clec4e), and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). We investigate the role of these factors in cell death-induced inflammation to dead cells in the peritoneum and acetaminophen-induced liver damage. We find that mice deficient in antibody, C3 or PAR2 have impaired inflammatory responses to dying cells. In contrast there was no reduction in inflammation to cell death in the peritoneum or liver of mice that genetically lack Mincle, the P2X7 receptor or that were treated with apyrase to deplete ATP. These results indicate that antibody, complement and PAR2 contribute to cell death-induced inflammation but that Mincle and ATP- P2X7 receptor are not required for this response in at least 2 different in vivo models. PMID:25127469

  2. Both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways are involved in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-induced cell death in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Sun, Ruili; Luo, Hongbo; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Yuan, Chuang; Yang, Li; Hu, Jinyue

    2017-02-01

    Our previous study showed that TLR3 induces apoptosis via both death receptors and mitochondial in human endothelial cells. We report here that the activation of TLR4 induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in moncytic THP-1 cells. LPS treatment of THP-1 cells induced the activation of both caspase 8 and 9, suggesting the involvement of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways. TNFα was induced by TLR4 activation at both mRNA and protein levels, but its neutralization did not down-regulated TLR4-induced cell death. TLR4 activation also induced the up-regulation of TRAIL and its receptors DR4 and DR5, and the neutralization of TRAIL ameliorated TLR4 induced apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of TRAIL and its receptors DR4 and DR5 in LPS-induced cell death. Meanwhile, LPS treatment down-regulated the expression of FLICE inhibitory protein (FLIP), a suppressor of death receptor-induced cell death. In addition, TLR4 activation down-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein bcl-2, and up-regulated the pro-apoptotic proteins Noxa and Puma, suggesting that mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was also involved in LPS-induced cell death. Furthermore, we found that TAP63α might confer to the activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. The treatment of THP-1 cells with LPS induced the translocation of TAP63α from cytoplasm to nucleus. Taken together, our study suggested that both death receptors and mitochondial were involved in TLR4-induced cell death, and TAP63α may be a target for the prevention of LPS-induced cell death.

  3. The role of death receptor 3 in the biological behavior of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YOU CHENG; GUO, LIU QING; CHEN, XIAO; WANG, GEN NIAN; NI, RI; WANG, MAN CAI; WEI, FENG XIAN

    2015-01-01

    Death receptor 3 (DR3) belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, primarily found in lymphoid tissues. Reports have determined that DR3 may also be distributed in numerous types of tumors. Therefore, it is thought that DR3 may have an important role in the process of tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of silencing DR3 expression on hepatocarcinoma cell growth, apoptosis and invasion in order to elucidate the role of DR3 in tumor development. The hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, SMMC7721 and Bel-7402) and normal human liver cells (HL-7702) were transfected with three stealth RNA interference (RNAi) sequences that target the DR3 gene. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression levels of DR3 in hepatocarcinoma cell lines and normal liver HL-7702 cells. MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to determine the rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. Following silencing of the DR3 gene, western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of P53, Fas, Caspase8, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and Caspase3. DR3 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in hepatocarcinoma cell lines was significantly increased compared with that in the normal liver cell line. Three targeted DR3 gene small interfering RNAs significantly inhibited DR3 gene expression in Bel-7402 cells at the nucleic acid level. AF02670.1_stealth_883 and cocktail demonstrated the most efficient inhibition of DR3 gene expression at 48 and 72 h following transfection, with mRNA inhibition rates of 89.46 and 92.75%, and 90.53 and 94.25% (P<0.01), respectively. Cell viability was significantly reduced by AF02670.1_stealth_883 and RNAi cocktail at 24, 48 and 72 h following transfection. The inhibition rates of cell proliferation were 50.76 and 61.76% (P<0.05) at 72 h following transfection. FCM revealed that AF02670.1_stealth_883 and

  4. Receptor-interacting protein kinases modulate noise-induced sensory hair cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, H-W; Chen, J; Sha, S-H

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases promote the induction of necrotic cell death pathways. Here we investigated signaling pathways in outer hair cells (OHCs) of adult male CBA/J mice exposed to noise that causes permanent threshold shifts, with a particular focus on RIP kinase-regulated necroptosis. One hour after noise exposure, nuclei of OHCs in the basal region of the cochlea displayed both apoptotic and necrotic features. RIP1 and RIP3 protein levels increased and caspase-8 was activated. Treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD blocked the activation of caspase-8 and reduced the number of apoptotic nuclei, while increasing levels of RIP1, RIP3, and necrotic OHCs. Conversely, treatment with necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) or RIP3 siRNA (siRIP3) diminished noise-induced increases in RIP1 and RIP3, and decreased necrotic OHC nuclei. This treatment also increased the number of apoptotic nuclei without increasing activation of caspase-8. Consistent with the elevation of levels of RIP1 and RIP3, noise-induced active AMPKα levels increased with ZVAD treatment, but decreased with Nec-1 and siRIP3 treatment. Furthermore, treatment with siRIP3 did not alter the activation of caspase-8, but instead increased activation of caspase-9 and promoted endonuclease G translocation into OHC nuclei. Finally, auditory brainstem response functional measurements and morphological assessment of OHCs showed that ZVAD treatment reduces noise-induced deficits. This protective function is potentiated when combined with siRIP3 treatment. In conclusion, noise-induced OHC apoptosis and necrosis are modulated by caspases and RIP kinases, respectively. Inhibition of either pathway shifts the prevalence of OHC death to the alternative pathway. PMID:24874734

  5. Programmed cell death 1 forms negative costimulatory microclusters that directly inhibit T cell receptor signaling by recruiting phosphatase SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Masako; Kobayashi-Imanishi, Wakana; Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2012-01-01

    Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is a negative costimulatory receptor critical for the suppression of T cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Single cell imaging elucidated a molecular mechanism of PD-1–mediated suppression. PD-1 becomes clustered with T cell receptors (TCRs) upon binding to its ligand PD-L1 and is transiently associated with the phosphatase SHP2 (Src homology 2 domain–containing tyrosine phosphatase 2). These negative costimulatory microclusters induce the dephosphorylation of the proximal TCR signaling molecules. This results in the suppression of T cell activation and blockade of the TCR-induced stop signal. In addition to PD-1 clustering, PD-1–TCR colocalization within microclusters is required for efficient PD-1–mediated suppression. This inhibitory mechanism also functions in PD-1hi T cells generated in vivo and can be overridden by a neutralizing anti–PD-L1 antibody. Therefore, PD-1 microcluster formation is important for regulation of T cell activation. PMID:22641383

  6. α-Hispanolol sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via death receptor up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, Alba; Jiménez-Garcia, Lidia; Herránz, Sandra; Heras, Beatriz de las; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2015-08-01

    Hispanolone derivatives have been previously described as anti-inflammatory and antitumoral agents. However, their effects on overcoming Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) resistance remain to be elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the cytotoxic effects of the synthetic hispanolone derivative α-hispanolol (α-H) in several tumor cell lines, and we evaluated the induction of apoptosis, as well as the TRAIL-sensitizing potential of α-H in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Our data show that α-H decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in HeLa, MDA-MB231, U87 and HepG2 cell lines, with a more prominent effect in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, α-H had no effect on non-tumoral cells. α-H induced activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9 and also increased levels of the proapoptotic protein Bax, decreasing antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, X-IAP and IAP-1) in HepG2 cells. Specific inhibition of caspase-8 abrogated the cascade of caspase activation, suggesting that the extrinsic pathway has a critical role in the apoptotic events induced by α-H. Furthermore, combined treatment of α-H with TRAIL enhanced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, activating caspase-8 and caspase-9. This correlated with up-regulation of both the TRAIL death receptor DR4 and DR5. DR4 or DR5 neutralizing antibodies abolished the effect of α-H on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, suggesting that sensitization was mediated through the death receptor pathway. Our results demonstrate that α-H induced apoptosis in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 through activation of caspases and induction of the death receptor pathway. In addition, we describe a novel function of α-H as a sensitizer on TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. - Highlights: • α-Hispanolol induced apoptosis in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. • α-Hispanolol induced activation of caspases and the death receptor pathway. • α-Hispanolol enhanced

  7. Status epilepticus decreases glutamate receptor 2 mRNA and protein expression in hippocampal pyramidal cells before neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Sonja Y.; Opitz, Thoralf; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Zukin, R. Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus in adult rats leads to delayed, selective death of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3. Death is preceded by down-regulation of glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) mRNA and protein [the subunit that limits Ca2+ permeability of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors] in CA1 and CA3, as indicated by in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, and quantitative Western blotting. GluR1 mRNA and protein are unchanged or slightly increased before cell death. These changes could lead to formation of GluR2-lacking, Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and increased toxicity of endogenous glutamate. GluR2 immunolabeling is unchanged in granule cells of the dentate gyrus, which are resistant to seizure-induced death. Thus, formation of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors may be a critical mediator of delayed neurodegeneration after status epilepticus. PMID:10725374

  8. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  9. EphrinB3 blocks EphB3 dependence receptor functions to prevent cell death following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Theus, M H; Ricard, J; Glass, S J; Travieso, L G; Liebl, D J

    2014-05-08

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ligands, ephrins, have a variety of roles in the developing and adult central nervous system that require direct cell-cell interactions; including regulating axon path finding, cell proliferation, migration and synaptic plasticity. Recently, we identified a novel pro-survival role for ephrins in the adult subventricular zone, where ephrinB3 blocks Eph-mediated cell death during adult neurogenesis. Here, we examined whether EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult forebrain following traumatic brain injury and whether ephrinB3 infusion could limit this effect. We show that EphB3 co-labels with microtubule-associated protein 2-positive neurons in the adult cortex and is closely associated with ephrinB3 ligand, which is reduced following controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In the complete absence of EphB3 (EphB3(-/-)), we observed reduced terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and functional improvements in motor deficits after CCI injury as compared with wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice. We also demonstrated that EphB3 exhibits dependence receptor characteristics as it is cleaved by caspases and induces cell death, which is not observed in the presence of ephrinB3. Following trauma, infusion of pre-clustered ephrinB3-Fc molecules (eB3-Fc) into the contralateral ventricle reduced cortical infarct volume and TUNEL staining in the cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 hippocampus of wild-type and ephrinB3(-/-) mice, but not EphB3(-/-) mice. Similarly, application of eB3-Fc improved motor functions after CCI injury. We conclude that EphB3 mediates cell death in the adult cortex through a novel dependence receptor-mediated cell death mechanism in the injured adult cortex and is attenuated following ephrinB3 stimulation.

  10. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  11. P2X7 receptor promotes intestinal inflammation in chemically induced colitis and triggers death of mucosal regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Figliuolo, Vanessa R; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Safya, Hanaa; Nanini, Hayandra; Bernardazzi, Cláudio; Abalo, Alessandra; de Souza, Heitor S P; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Bobé, Pierre; Coutinho, Cláudia M L M; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2017-03-07

    P2X7 receptor activation contributes to inflammation development in different pathologies. We previously reported that the P2X7 receptor is over-expressed in the gut mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and that P2X7 inhibition protects against chemically induced colitis. Here, we investigated in detail the role of the P2X7 receptor in inflammatory bowel disease development, by treating P2X7 knockout (KO) and WT mice with two different (and established) colitis inductors. P2X7 KO mice were protected against gut inflammation induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or oxazolone, with no weight loss or gut histological alterations after treatment. P2X7 receptor knockout induced regulatory T cell accumulation in the colon, as evaluated by qRT-PCR for FoxP3 expression and immunostaining for CD90/CD45RB(low). Flow cytometry analysis of mesenteric lymph node cells showed that P2X7 activation (by ATP) triggered regulatory T cell death. In addition, such cells from P2X7 KO mice expressed more CD103, suggesting increased migration of regulatory T cells to the colon (relative to the WT). Our results show that the P2X7 has a key role during inflammation development in inflammatory bowel disease, by triggering the death and retention in the mesenteric lymph nodes of regulatory T cells that would otherwise promote immune system tolerance in the gut.

  12. Activation of surrogate death receptor signaling triggers peroxynitrite-dependent execution of cisplatin-resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Seah, S; Low, I C C; Hirpara, J L; Sachaphibulkij, K; Kroemer, G; Brenner, C; Pervaiz, S

    2015-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs remain as the cornerstone of cancer chemotherapy; however, development of multidrug resistance presents a therapeutic challenge. This study aims at understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to cisplatin and unraveling surrogate signaling networks that could revert sensitivity to apoptosis stimuli. We made use of three different sets of cell lines, A549 and H2030 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and A2780 ovarian cancer cells and their cisplatin-resistant variants. Here we report that cisplatin-resistant cell lines displayed a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism and defective mitochondrial signaling were unraveled in the resistant cells. More interestingly, a marked increase in sensitivity of the resistant cells to death receptor-induced apoptosis, in particular TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-mediated execution, was observed. Although this was not associated with an increase in gene transcription, a significant increase in the localization of TRAIL death receptor, DR4, to the lipid raft subdomains of plasma membrane was detected in the resistant variants. Furthermore, exposure of cisplatin-resistant cells to TRAIL resulted in upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increase in nitric oxide (NO) production that triggered the generation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Scavenging ONOO− rescued cells from TRAIL-induced apoptosis, thereby suggesting a critical role of ONOO− in TRAIL-induced execution of cisplatin-resistant cells. Notably, preincubation of cells with TRAIL restored sensitivity of resistant cells to cisplatin. These data provide compelling evidence for employing strategies to trigger death receptor signaling as a second-line treatment for cisplatin-resistant cancers. PMID:26492363

  13. The chemokine growth-related gene product β protects rat cerebellar granule cells from apoptotic cell death through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Limatola, Cristina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Mercanti, Delio; Vacca, Fabrizio; Ragozzino, Davide; Giovannelli, Aldo; Santoni, Angela; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Cultured cerebellar granule neurons are widely used as a cellular model to study mechanisms of neuronal cell death because they undergo programmed cell death when switched from a culture medium containing 25 mM to one containing 5 mM K+. We have found that the growth-related gene product β (GROβ) partially prevents the K+-depletion-induced cell death, and that the neuroprotective action of GROβ on granule cells is mediated through the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type of ionotropic glutamate receptors. GROβ-induced survival was suppressed by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, which is a specific antagonist of AMPA/kainate receptors; it was not affected by the inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was comparable to the survival of granule cells induced by AMPA (10 μM) treatment. Moreover, GROβ-induced neuroprotection was abolished when granule cells were treated with antisense oligonucleotides specific for the AMPA receptor subunits, which significantly reduced receptor expression, as verified by Western blot analysis with subunit-specific antibodies and by granule cell electrophysiological sensitivity to AMPA. Our data demonstrate that GROβ is neurotrophic for cerebellar granule cells, and that this activity depends on AMPA receptors. PMID:10811878

  14. Dexamethasone enhances serum deprivation-induced necrotic death of rat C6 glioma cells through activation of glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Ishimura, K; Tsuruo, Y; Wong, D L

    1999-01-23

    Glucocorticoids have been shown to be neurotoxic and appear to play a role in neuronal cell loss during aging and following neuropathological insults. However, very little is known about the effects of these steroid hormones on glial cells. The effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) on glial cell viability was therefore examined by measuring neutral red uptake into rat C6 glioma cells. Serum deprivation markedly reduced cell viability, and this effect was significantly enhanced by DEX. Electrophoretic analysis showed that the cell damage induced by either serum deprivation alone or in combination with DEX was not accompanied by the degradation of DNA into nucleosomic fragments. Electron microscopic studies confirmed that serum deprivation and glucocorticoid treatment caused necrotic cell death. Furthermore, the effect of DEX on cell viability could be mimicked by the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU28362, and completely prevented by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU38486. These results indicate that dexamethasone can enhance the necrotic death of glioma cells induced by serum deprivation, suggesting that glucocorticoids may be involved in the chronic alteration of brain function arising from neuropathological damage to glial cells.

  15. Leukotriene receptor antagonists, LY293111 and ONO-1078, protect neurons from the sPLA2-IB-induced neuronal cell death independently of blocking their receptors.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Kohma, Hiromi

    2013-09-01

    In the ischemic brain, leukotrienes (LTs) are increased and their receptor antagonists protect neurons. However, it has not yet been sufficiently clarified how antagonists for LT receptors exhibit neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we evaluated protective effects of receptor antagonists for LTB4 (LY293111) and cysteinyl LTs (ONO-1078) in the primary culture of rat cortical neurons. The group IB secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IB)-induced neuronal cell death had been established as the in vitro model for cerebral ischemia. sPLA2-IB triggered the influx of Ca(2+) into neurons via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC). Subsequently, the enzyme produced eicosanoids including LTB4 before neuronal cell death. Neither administration of LTB4 nor cysteinyl LTs such as LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4 killed neurons. However, both LY293111 and ONO-1078 significantly prevented neurons from the neurotoxicity of sPLA2-IB, suggesting that the two LT receptor blockers protected neurons through alternative pathways beside LT receptors. An L-VDCC blocker does not only inhibit the influx of Ca(2+) into neurons but also rescues neurons from the sPLA2-IB-induced neuronal cell death. The two LT receptor antagonists also blocked the sPLA2-IB-induced Ca(2+) influx significantly. Thus, LTs exhibited no neurotoxicity, but their receptor antagonists protected neurons directly in the in vitro ischemic model. Furthermore, the suppression of L-VDCC appeared to be involved in the neuroprotective effects of LY293111 and ONO-1078 independent of blocking their receptors.

  16. Genetic Inhibition of Receptor Interacting Protein Kinase-1 Reduces Cell Death and Improves Functional Outcome After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lule, Sevda; Wu, Limin; McAllister, Lauren M; Edmiston, William J; Chung, Joon Yong; Levy, Emily; Zheng, Yi; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Degterev, Alexei; Lo, Eng H; Whalen, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies using cultured cells and rodent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) models have implicated RIPK1 (receptor interacting protein kinase-1) as a driver of programmed necrosis and secondary injury based on use of chemical inhibitors. However, these inhibitors have off-target effects and cannot be used alone to prove a role for RIPK1. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of genetic inhibition of the kinase domain of RIPK1 in a mouse ICH model. We subjected 2 lines of mice with RIPK1 point mutations of the kinase domain (K45A and D138N), rendering them kinase inactive, to autologous blood ICH and measured acute cell death and functional outcome. Compared with wild-type controls, RIPK1(K45A/K45A) and RIPK1(D138N/D138N) had significantly less cells with plasmalemma permeability, less acute neuronal cell death, less weight loss and more rapid weight gain to baseline, and improved performance in a Morris water maze paradigm after autologous blood ICH. In addition, mice systemically administered GSK'963, a potent, specific, brain penetrant small molecule RIPK1 inhibitor, had reduced acute neuronal death at 24 hours after ICH. The data show that the kinase domain of RIPK1 is a disease driver of ICH, mediating both acute cell death and functional outcome, and support development of RIPK1 inhibitors as therapeutic agents for human ICH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. The zinc finger protein NRIF interacts with the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) and participates in programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Casademunt, E; Carter, B D; Benzel, I; Frade, J M; Dechant, G; Barde, Y A

    1999-11-01

    NRIF (neurotrophin receptor interacting factor) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc finger protein of the Krüppel family which interacts with the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR). The interaction was first detected in yeast and then biochemically confirmed using recombinant GST-NRIF fusions and p75(NTR) expressed by eukaryotic cells. Transgenic mice carrying a deletion in the exon encoding the p75(NTR)-binding domain of NRIF display a phenotype which is strongly dependent upon genetic background. While at the F(2 )generation there is only limited (20%) embryonic lethality, in a congenic BL6 strain nrif(-/-) mice cannot survive beyond E12, but are viable and healthy to adulthood in the Sv129 background. The involvement of NRIF in p75(NTR)/NGF-mediated developmental cell death was examined in the mouse embryonic neural retina. Disruption of the nrif gene leads to a reduction in cell death which is quantitatively indistinguishable from that observed in p75(NTR)(-/-) and ngf(-/-) mice. These results indicate that NRIF is an intracellular p75(NTR)-binding protein transducing cell death signals during development.

  18. Quercetin enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via increased protein stability of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young-Hwa; Heo, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yong J.; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Young-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Aims Quercetin has been shown to enhance tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells via mechanisms that include upregulation of death receptor (DR) 5, a protein reported to play an important role in sensitizing cancer cells to apoptosis. We aimed to determine the specific mechanisms underlying quercetin-induced DR5 expression. Main methods Human prostate cancer cells were exposed to quercetin and TRAIL. Trypan blue assays and terminal transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays evaluated changes in TRAIL resistance after quercetin treatment, and flow cytometry examined quercetin-induced death receptor expression in DU-145 cells. Western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and transiently transfection were utilized to confirm apoptotic patterns of prostate cancer cells. Key findings After stimulation with quercetin, DU-145 cells exhibited stronger sensitization to TRAIL. Quercetin treatment enhanced TRAIL-induced activation proteins in the caspase pathway, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase-3, and caspase-9. Quercetin dose-dependently increased DR5 levels in prostate cancer cells, which was mediated by increased transcription and protein stability, but not mRNA stability. Ectopic expression of DR5 dose-dependently increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Significance Our results showed that the role of quercetin and TRAIL combination therapy may provide a novel strategy for treating prostate cancer by overcoming critical mechanisms of apoptosis resistance. PMID:20096292

  19. Cell death is induced by ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, independently of PPAR{gamma} in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Kim, Hye Ryung; Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Jin Mo; Ryu, Somi; Noh, Yoo Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greater than 30 {mu}M ciglitazone induces cell death in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death by ciglitazone is independent of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CGZ induces cell death by the loss of MMP via decreased Akt. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates multiple signaling pathways, and its agonists induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, their role in cell death is unclear. In this study, the relationship between ciglitazone (CGZ) and PPAR{gamma} in CGZ-induced cell death was examined. At concentrations of greater than 30 {mu}M, CGZ, a synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonist, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis in T98G cells. Treatment of T98G cells with less than 30 {mu}M CGZ effectively induced cell death after pretreatment with 30 {mu}M of the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662, although GW9662 alone did not induce cell death. This cell death was also observed when cells were co-treated with CGZ and GW9662, but was not observed when cells were treated with CGZ prior to GW9662. In cells in which PPAR{gamma} was down-regulated cells by siRNA, lower concentrations of CGZ (<30 {mu}M) were sufficient to induce cell death, although higher concentrations of CGZ ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 30 {mu}M) were required to induce cell death in control T98G cells, indicating that CGZ effectively induces cell death in T98G cells independently of PPAR{gamma}. Treatment with GW9662 followed by CGZ resulted in a down-regulation of Akt activity and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which was accompanied by a decrease in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in Bid cleavage. These data suggest that CGZ is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death independently of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells, by down-regulating Akt activity and inducing MMP collapse.

  20. The histone deacetylase inhibitors LAQ824 and LBH589 do not require death receptor signaling or a functional apoptosome to mediate tumor cell death or therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Leigh; Bots, Michael; Lindemann, Ralph K; Bolden, Jessica E; Newbold, Andrea; Cluse, Leonie A; Scott, Clare L; Strasser, Andreas; Atadja, Peter; Lowe, Scott W; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2009-07-09

    LAQ824 and LBH589 (panobinostat) are histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) developed as cancer therapeutics and we have used the Emu-myc lymphoma model to identify the molecular events required for their antitumor effects. Induction of tumor cell death was necessary for these agents to mediate therapeutic responses in vivo and both HDACi engaged the intrinsic apoptotic cascade that did not require p53. Death receptor pathway blockade had no effect on the therapeutic activities of LAQ824 and LBH589; however, overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-X(L) protected lymphoma cells from HDACi-induced killing and suppressed their therapeutic activities. Deletion of Apaf-1 or Caspase-9 delayed HDACi-induced lymphoma killing in vitro and in vivo, associated with suppression of many biochemical indicators of apoptosis, but did not provide long-term resistance to these agents and failed to inhibit their therapeutic activities. Emu-myc lymphomas lacking a functional apoptosome displayed morphologic and biochemical features of autophagy after treatment with LAQ824 and LBH589, indicating that, in the absence of a complete intrinsic apoptosis pathway involving apoptosome formation, these HDACi can still mediate a therapeutic response. Our data indicate that damage to the mitochondria is the key event necessary for LAQ824 and LBH589 to mediate tumor cell death and a robust therapeutic response.

  1. The histone deacetylase inhibitors LAQ824 and LBH589 do not require death receptor signaling or a functional apoptosome to mediate tumor cell death or therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Bots, Michael; Lindemann, Ralph K.; Bolden, Jessica E.; Newbold, Andrea; Cluse, Leonie A.; Scott, Clare L.; Strasser, Andreas; Atadja, Peter; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    LAQ824 and LBH589 (panobinostat) are histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) developed as cancer therapeutics and we have used the Eμ-myc lymphoma model to identify the molecular events required for their antitumor effects. Induction of tumor cell death was necessary for these agents to mediate therapeutic responses in vivo and both HDACi engaged the intrinsic apoptotic cascade that did not require p53. Death receptor pathway blockade had no effect on the therapeutic activities of LAQ824 and LBH589; however, overexpression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL protected lymphoma cells from HDACi-induced killing and suppressed their therapeutic activities. Deletion of Apaf-1 or Caspase-9 delayed HDACi-induced lymphoma killing in vitro and in vivo, associated with suppression of many biochemical indicators of apoptosis, but did not provide long-term resistance to these agents and failed to inhibit their therapeutic activities. Eμ-myc lymphomas lacking a functional apoptosome displayed morphologic and biochemical features of autophagy after treatment with LAQ824 and LBH589, indicating that, in the absence of a complete intrinsic apoptosis pathway involving apoptosome formation, these HDACi can still mediate a therapeutic response. Our data indicate that damage to the mitochondria is the key event necessary for LAQ824 and LBH589 to mediate tumor cell death and a robust therapeutic response. PMID:19383971

  2. α-Hispanolol sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via death receptor up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Mota, Alba; Jiménez-Garcia, Lidia; Herránz, Sandra; de Las Heras, Beatriz; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2015-08-01

    Hispanolone derivatives have been previously described as anti-inflammatory and antitumoral agents. However, their effects on overcoming Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) resistance remain to be elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the cytotoxic effects of the synthetic hispanolone derivative α-hispanolol (α-H) in several tumor cell lines, and we evaluated the induction of apoptosis, as well as the TRAIL-sensitizing potential of α-H in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Our data show that α-H decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in HeLa, MDA-MB231, U87 and HepG2 cell lines, with a more prominent effect in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, α-H had no effect on non-tumoral cells. α-H induced activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9 and also increased levels of the proapoptotic protein Bax, decreasing antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, X-IAP and IAP-1) in HepG2 cells. Specific inhibition of caspase-8 abrogated the cascade of caspase activation, suggesting that the extrinsic pathway has a critical role in the apoptotic events induced by α-H. Furthermore, combined treatment of α-H with TRAIL enhanced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, activating caspase-8 and caspase-9. This correlated with up-regulation of both the TRAIL death receptor DR4 and DR5. DR4 or DR5 neutralizing antibodies abolished the effect of α-H on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, suggesting that sensitization was mediated through the death receptor pathway. Our results demonstrate that α-H induced apoptosis in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 through activation of caspases and induction of the death receptor pathway. In addition, we describe a novel function of α-H as a sensitizer on TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) induces cell death through MAPK-dependent mechanism in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Hun; Yoo, Chong Il; Kim, Hui Taek; Park, Ji Yeon; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Keun Kim, Yong . E-mail: kim430@pusan.ac.kr

    2006-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) subfamilies in cell death induced by PPAR{gamma} agonists in osteoblastic cells. Ciglitazone and troglitazone, PPAR{gamma} agonists, resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent cell death, which was largely attributed to apoptosis. But a PPAR{alpha} agonist ciprofibrate did not affect the cell death. Ciglitazone caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ciglitazone-induced cell death was prevented by antioxidants, suggesting an important role of ROS generation in the ciglitazone-induced cell death. ROS generation and cell death induced by ciglitazone were inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone treatment caused activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38. Activation of ERK was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that of p38 was independent. Ciglitazone-induced cell death was significantly prevented by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK upstream kinase MEK1/2, and SB203580, a p38 inhibitor. Ciglitazone treatment increased Bax expression and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and its effect was prevented by N-acetylcysteine, PD98059, and SB203580. Ciglitazone induced caspase activation, which was prevented by PD98059 and SB203580. The general caspase inhibitor z-DEVD-FMK and the specific inhibitor of caspases-3 DEVD-CHO exerted the protective effect against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. The EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and suramin protected against the ciglitazone-induced cell death. Taken together, these findings suggest that the MAPK signaling pathways play an active role in mediating the ciglitazone-induced cell death of osteoblasts and function upstream of a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. These data may provide a novel insight into potential therapeutic strategies for treatment of osteoporosis.

  4. Cell-Autonomous Inhibition of α7-Containing Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Prevents Death of Parasympathetic Neurons during Development

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Martin; Nishi, Rae

    2010-01-01

    Neurotrophic molecules are key retrograde influences of cell survival in the developing nervous system, but other influences such as activity are also emerging as important factors. In the avian ciliary ganglion, half the neurons are eliminated between embryonic day 8 (E8) and E14, but it is not known how cell death is initiated. Because systemic application of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonists prevents this cell loss, we examined differences in receptor densities and responses of intracellular calcium to nicotine using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-2. In addition, we determined whether cell-autonomous inhibition of α7 activation in neurons prevented cell death. E8 neurons are heterogeneous with respect to α7-nAChR density, which leads to large increases in [Ca2+]i in some neurons; E8 neurons also exhibit a slower rate of Ca2+decay after nicotinic stimulation than E13 neurons. Expressing α-bungarotoxin that is tethered to the membrane by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage (GPIαbtx) in ciliary ganglion neurons with the retroviral vector RCASBP(A) blocks increases in intracellular calcium induced by nicotine through α7-nAChRs and prevents neurons from dying. Expression of GPIαbtx in surrounding non-neural tissues, but not in neurons, does not prevent cell loss. Furthermore, the GPIαbtx is not efficiently expressed in the accessory oculomotor neurons, eliminating preganglionic inputs as another site for action of the antagonist. These results support the hypothesis that cholinergic inputs facilitate cell death in the developing autonomic nervous system by activating α7-nAChRs, possibly by leading to increases in intracellular calcium that exceed the threshold for cell survival. PMID:17959793

  5. Critical Involvement of Extracellular ATP Acting on P2RX7 Purinergic Receptors in Photoreceptor Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Takeda, Atsunobu; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Enaida, Hiroshi; Kroemer, Guido; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2011-01-01

    Stressed cells release ATP, which participates in neurodegenerative processes through the specific ligation of P2RX7 purinergic receptors. Here, we demonstrate that extracellular ATP and the more specific P2RX7 agonist, 2′- and 3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP, both induce photoreceptor cell death when added to primary retinal cell cultures or when injected into the eyes from wild-type mice, but not into the eyes from P2RX7−/− mice. Photoreceptor cell death was accompanied by the activation of caspase-8 and -9, translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria to nuclei, and TUNEL-detectable chromatin fragmentation. All hallmarks of photoreceptor apoptosis were prevented by premedication or co-application of Brilliant Blue G, a selective P2RX7 antagonist that is already approved for the staining of internal limiting membranes during ocular surgery. ATP release is up-regulated by nutrient starvation in primary retinal cell cultures and seems to be an initializing event that triggers primary and/or secondary cell death via the positive feedback loop on P2RX7. Our results encourage the potential application of Brilliant Blue G as a novel neuroprotective agent in retinal diseases or similar neurodegenerative pathologies linked to excessive extracellular ATP. PMID:21983632

  6. Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces apoptotic hair-cell death independent of afferent and efferent innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of excess glutamate plays a central role in eliciting the pathological events that follow intensely loud noise exposures and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been characterized in cochlear nerve terminals, but much less is known about whether excess glutamate signaling also contributes to pathological changes in sensory hair cells. I therefore examined whether glutamate excitotoxicity damages hair cells in zebrafish larvae exposed to drugs that mimic excitotoxic trauma. Exposure to ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) agonists, kainic acid (KA) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), contributed to significant, progressive hair cell loss in zebrafish lateral-line organs. To examine whether hair-cell loss was a secondary effect of excitotoxic damage to innervating neurons, I exposed neurog1a morphants—fish whose hair-cell organs are devoid of afferent and efferent innervation—to KA or NMDA. Significant, dose-dependent hair-cell loss occurred in neurog1a morphants exposed to either agonist, and the loss was comparable to wild-type siblings. A survey of iGluR gene expression revealed AMPA-, Kainate-, and NMDA-type subunits are expressed in zebrafish hair cells. Finally, hair cells exposed to KA or NMDA appear to undergo apoptotic cell death. Cumulatively, these data reveal that excess glutamate signaling through iGluRs induces hair-cell death independent of damage to postsynaptic terminals. PMID:28112265

  7. Kaempferol induces ATM/p53-mediated death receptor and mitochondrial apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiu-Fang; Yang, Jai-Sing; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chiang, Ni-Na; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Syuan; Chen, Chun; Chen, Fu-An

    2016-05-01

    Kaempferol is a member of the flavonoid compounds found in vegetables and fruits. It is shown to exhibit biological impact and anticancer activity, but no report exists on the angiogenic effect of kaempferol and induction of cell apoptosis in vitro. In this study, we investigated the role of kaempferol on anti-angiogenic property and the apoptotic mechanism of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our results demonstrated that kaempferol decreased HUVEC viability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Kaempferol also induced morphological changes and sub-G1 phase cell population (apoptotic cells). Kaempferol triggered apoptosis of HUVECs as detecting by DNA fragmentation, comet assay and immunofluorescent staining for activated caspase-3. The caspase signals, including caspase-8, -9 and -3, were time-dependently activated in HUVECs after kaempferol exposure. Furthermore, pre-treatment with a specific inhibitor of caspase-8 (Z-IETD-FMK) significantly reduced the activity of caspase-8, -9 and -3, indicating that extrinsic pathway is a major signaling pathway in kaempferol-treated HUVECs. Importantly, kaempferol promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) evaluated using flow cytometric assay in HUVECs. We further investigated the upstream extrinsic pathway and showed that kaempferol stimulated death receptor signals [Fas/CD95, death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5] through increasing the levels of phosphorylated p53 and phosphorylated ATM pathways in HUVECs, which can be individually confirmed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), ATM specific inhibitor (caffeine) and p53 siRNA. Based on these results, kaempferol-induced HUVEC apoptosis was involved in an ROS-mediated p53/ATM/death receptor signaling. Kaempferol might possess therapeutic effects on cancer treatment in anti-vascular targeting.

  8. Pannexin1 channels act downstream of P2X7 receptors in ATP-induced murine T-cell death

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Kenji F; Sáez, Pablo J; Harcha, Paloma A; Aguila, Hector L; Sáez, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Death of murine T cells induced by extracellular ATP is mainly triggered by activation of purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs). However, a link between P2X7Rs and pannexin1 (Panx1) channels, which are non-selective, has been recently demonstrated in other cell types. In this work, we characterized the expression and cellular distribution of pannexin family members (Panxs 1, 2 and 3) in isolated T cells. Panx1 was the main pannexin family member clearly detected in both helper (CD4+) and cytotoxic (CD8+) T cells, whereas low levels of Panx2 were found in both T-cell subsets. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, Panx1 channels were found to mediate most ATP-induced ethidium uptake since this was drastically reduced by Panx1 channel blockers (10Panx1, Probenecid and low carbenoxolone concentration) and absent in T cells derived from Panx1−/− mice. Moreover, electrophysiological measurements in wild-type CD4+ cells treated with ATP unitary current events and pharmacological sensitivity compatible with Panx1 channels were found. In addition, ATP release from T cells treated with 4Br-A23187, a calcium ionophore, was completely blocked with inhibitors of both connexin hemichannels and Panx1 channels. Panx1 channel blockers drastically reduced the ATP-induced T-cell mortality, indicating that Panx1 channels mediate the ATP-induced T-cell death. However, mortality was not reduced in T cells of Panx1−/− mice, in which levels of P2X7Rs and ATP-induced intracellular free Ca2+ responses were enhanced suggesting that P2X7Rs take over Panx1 channels lose-function in mediating the onset of cell death induced by extracellular ATP. PMID:24590064

  9. Nortriptyline induces mitochondria and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in bladder cancer cells and inhibits bladder tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Sheau-Yun; Cheng, Chen-Li; Ho, Hao-Chung; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Chiu, Kun-Yuan; Su, Chung-Kuang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2015-08-15

    Nortriptyline (NTP), an antidepressant, has antitumor effects on some human cancer cells, but its effect on human bladder cancer cells is not known. In this study, we used a cell viability assay to demonstrate that NTP is cytotoxic to human TCCSUP and mouse MBT-2 bladder cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. We also performed cell cycle analysis, annexin V and mitochondrial membrane potential assays, and Western blot analysis to show that NTP inhibits cell growth in these cells by inducing both mitochondria-mediated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Specifically, NTP increases the expression of Fas, FasL, FADD, Bax, Bak, and cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, NTP decreases the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BH3 interacting domain death agonist, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and survivin. Furthermore, NTP-induced apoptosis is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which can be reduced by antioxidants, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Finally, we showed that NTP suppresses tumor growth in mice inoculated with MBT-2 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that NTP induces both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis in human and mouse bladder cancer cells and that it may be a clinically useful chemotherapeutic agent for bladder cancer in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthetic ligands of death receptor 5 display a cell-selective agonistic effect at different oligomerization levels

    PubMed Central

    Beyrath, Julien; Chekkat, Neila; Smulski, Cristian R.; Lombardo, Caterina M.; Lechner, Marie-Charlotte; Seguin, Cendrine; Decossas, Marion; Spanedda, Maria Vittoria; Frisch, Benoît; Guichard, Gilles; Fournel, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    DR4 (Death Receptor 4) and DR5 (Death Receptor 5) are two potential targets for cancer therapy due to their ability to trigger apoptosis of cancer cells, but not normal ones, when activated by their cognate ligand TRAIL (TNF related apoptosis-inducing ligand). Therapies based on soluble recombinant TRAIL or agonist antibodies directed against one of the receptors are currently under clinical trials. However, TRAIL-R positive tumor cells are frequently resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis. The precise mechanisms of this resistance are still not entirely understood. We have previously reported on synthetic peptides that bind to DR5 (TRAILmim/DR5) and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Here, we showed that while hexameric soluble TRAIL is able to efficiently kill the DR5 positive lymphoma Jurkat or the carcinoma HCT116, these cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by the divalent form of TRAILmim/DR5 and are poorly sensitive to apoptosis induced by an anti-DR5 agonist monoclonal antibody. This resistance can be restored by the cross-linking of anti-DR5 agonist antibody but not by the cross-linking of the divalent form of TRAILmim/DR5. Interestingly, the divalent form of TRAILmim/DR5 that induced apoptosis of DR5 positive BJAB cells, acts as an inhibitor of TRAIL-induced apoptosis on Jurkat and HCT116 cells. The rapid internalization of DR5 observed when treated with divalent form of TRAILmim/DR5 could explain the antagonist activity of the ligand on Jurkat and HCT116 cells but also highlights the independence of the mechanisms responsible for internalization and activation when triggering the DR5 apoptotic cascade. PMID:27409341

  11. Multiple Domain Associations within the Arabidopsis Immune Receptor RPP1 Regulate the Activation of Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Karl J.; Bentham, Adam; Williams, Simon J.; Kobe, Bostjan; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Upon recognition of pathogen virulence effectors, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins induce defense responses including localized host cell death. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to this response, we examined the Arabidopsis thaliana NLR protein RECOGNITION OF PERONOSPORA PARASITICA1 (RPP1), which recognizes the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RECOGNIZED1 (ATR1). Expression of the N-terminus of RPP1, including the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain (“N-TIR”), elicited an effector-independent cell death response, and we used allelic variation in TIR domain sequences to define the key residues that contribute to this phenotype. Further biochemical characterization indicated that cell death induction was correlated with N-TIR domain self-association. In addition, we demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding (NB)-ARC1 region of RPP1 self-associates and plays a critical role in cell death activation, likely by facilitating TIR:TIR interactions. Structural homology modeling of the NB subdomain allowed us to identify a putative oligomerization interface that was shown to influence NB-ARC1 self-association. Significantly, full-length RPP1 exhibited effector-dependent oligomerization and, although mutations at the NB-ARC1 oligomerization interface eliminated cell death induction, RPP1 self-association was unaffected, suggesting that additional regions contribute to oligomerization. Indeed, the leucine-rich repeat domain of RPP1 also self-associates, indicating that multiple interaction interfaces exist within activated RPP1 oligomers. Finally, we observed numerous intramolecular interactions that likely function to negatively regulate RPP1, and present a model describing the transition to an active NLR protein. PMID:27427964

  12. Toll-like receptor agonists induce inflammation and cell death in a model of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rydberg, Camilla; Månsson, Anne; Uddman, Rolf; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. The present study describes TLR expression and function in healthy and malignant airway epithelial cells. The squamous cell carcinoma cell line Detroit-562 was compared with the healthy bronchial epithelial cell line NL-20 and primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs). TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5 were present in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Consistent with this, Detroit-562 expressed TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, whereas NL-20 expressed mainly TLR3 and HNECs expressed TLR2-5. In Detroit-562, Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C) and flagellin, ligands for TLR2, TLR3 and TLR5, respectively, induced an up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion and a decrease in cell viability. Additionally, poly(I:C) affected IL-1β production and the migratory behaviour of Detroit-562. NL-20 responded with a slight increase in IL-8 secretion upon poly(I:C) stimulation. Poly(I:C) induced a small increase in IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 production in HNECs, while Pam3CSK4 increased viability. The TLR signalling was transcription-dependent, but the pathways involved differed among TLRs as well as cells. In Detroit-562, TLR2 and TLR5 activation was mediated via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-, p38-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and nuclear factor (NF)-κB-related pathways, while TLR3 was dependent on NF-κB. In NL-20, TLR3 signalled via p38, and in HNECs, NF-κB, JNK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) appeared to be involved. We found that TLR agonists induced a robust response in HNSCCs, characterized by generation of inflammation and cell death. A similar response was not seen in normal epithelial cells. Thus, the TLR system should be considered an important target in future antitumour immunotherapy. PMID:19740321

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of Barley NLR Immune Receptor MLA10 Reveals Its Cell Compartment Specific Activity in Cell Death and Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shiwei; Liu, Jie; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Maekawa, Takaki; Wang, Qiuyun; Xiao, Wenkai; Liu, Yule; Chai, Jijie; Takken, Frank L. W.; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Plant intracellular immune receptors comprise a large number of multi-domain proteins resembling animal NOD-like receptors (NLRs). Plant NLRs typically recognize isolate-specific pathogen-derived effectors, encoded by avirulence (AVR) genes, and trigger defense responses often associated with localized host cell death. The barley MLA gene is polymorphic in nature and encodes NLRs of the coiled-coil (CC)-NB-LRR type that each detects a cognate isolate-specific effector of the barley powdery mildew fungus. We report the systematic analyses of MLA10 activity in disease resistance and cell death signaling in barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. MLA10 CC domain-triggered cell death is regulated by highly conserved motifs in the CC and the NB-ARC domains and by the C-terminal LRR of the receptor. Enforced MLA10 subcellular localization, by tagging with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES), shows that MLA10 activity in cell death signaling is suppressed in the nucleus but enhanced in the cytoplasm. By contrast, nuclear localized MLA10 is sufficient to mediate disease resistance against powdery mildew fungus. MLA10 retention in the cytoplasm was achieved through attachment of a glucocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domain (GR), by which we reinforced the role of cytoplasmic MLA10 in cell death signaling. Together with our data showing an essential and sufficient nuclear MLA10 activity in disease resistance, this suggests a bifurcation of MLA10-triggered cell death and disease resistance signaling in a compartment-dependent manner. PMID:22685408

  14. The Janus Face of Death Receptor Signaling during Tumor Immunoediting

    PubMed Central

    O’ Reilly, Eimear; Tirincsi, Andrea; Logue, Susan E.; Szegezdi, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immune surveillance is essential for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. Malignantly transformed cells can be recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems through different mechanisms. Immune effector cells induce extrinsic cell death in the identified tumor cells by expressing death ligand cytokines of the tumor necrosis factor ligand family. However, some tumor cells can escape immune elimination and progress. Acquisition of resistance to the death ligand-induced apoptotic pathway can be obtained through cleavage of effector cell expressed death ligands into a poorly active form, mutations or silencing of the death receptors, or overexpression of decoy receptors and pro-survival proteins. Although the immune system is highly effective in the elimination of malignantly transformed cells, abnormal/dysfunctional death ligand signaling curbs its cytotoxicity. Moreover, DRs can also transmit pro-survival and pro-migratory signals. Consequently, dysfunctional death receptor-mediated apoptosis/necroptosis signaling does not only give a passive resistance against cell death but actively drives tumor cell motility, invasion, and contributes to consequent metastasis. This dual contribution of the death receptor signaling in both the early, elimination phase, and then in the late, escape phase of the tumor immunoediting process is discussed in this review. Death receptor agonists still hold potential for cancer therapy since they can execute the tumor-eliminating immune effector function even in the absence of activation of the immune system against the tumor. The opportunities and challenges of developing death receptor agonists into effective cancer therapeutics are also discussed. PMID:27843441

  15. Protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism on VX-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yushan; Weiss, M Tracy; Yin, Junfei; Tenn, Catherine C; Nelson, Peggy D; Mikler, John R

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of the central nervous system to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents induces seizures and neuronal cell death. Here we report that the OP nerve agent, VX, induces apoptotic-like cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. The VX effects on neurons were concentration-dependent, with an IC(50) of approximately 30 microM. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) with 50 microM. D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) diminished 30 microM VX-induced total cell death, as assessed by alamarBlue assay and Hoechst staining. In contrast, neither antagonists of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) nor metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) had any effect on VX-induced neurotoxicity. VX-induced neuronal cell death could not be solely attributed to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, since neither the reversible pharmacological cholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, nor the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, affected VX-induced cell death. Importantly, APV was found to be therapeutically effective against VX-induced cell death up to 2 h post VX exposure. These results suggest that NMDARs, but not AMPARs or mGluRs, play important roles in VX-induced cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. Based on their therapeutic effects, NMDAR antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of VX-induced neurotoxicities.

  16. Antitumor effects of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, against gastric cancer cells via death receptor 5 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Sachiko; Endo, Shinji; Saito, Rie; Hirose, Mitsuaki; Ueno, Takunori; Suzuki, Hideo; Yamato, Kenji; Abei, Masato; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    Up-regulated sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+-dependent class III histone deacetylase, deacetylates p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity, leading to cell survival. SIRT1 overexpression has been reported to predict poor survival in some malignancies, including gastric cancer. However, the antitumor effect of SIRT1 inhibition remains elusive in gastric cancer. Here, we investigated the antitumor mechanisms of a sirtuin inhibitor, tenovin-6, in seven human gastric cancer cell lines (four cell lines with wild-type TP53, two with mutant-type TP53, and one with null TP53). Interestingly, tenovin-6 induced apoptosis in all cell lines, not only those with wild-type TP53, but also mutant-type and null versions, accompanied by up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5). In the KatoIII cell line (TP53-null), DR5 silencing markedly attenuated tenovin-6-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the pivotal mechanism behind its antitumor effects is based on activation of the death receptor signal pathway. Although endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by sirtuin inhibitors was reported to induce DR5 up-regulation in other cancer cell lines, we could not find marked activation of its related molecules, such as ATF6, PERK, and CHOP, in gastric cancer cells treated with tenovin-6. Tenovin-6 in combination with docetaxel or SN-38 exerted a slight to moderate synergistic cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, tenovin-6 has potent antitumor activity against human gastric cancer cells via DR5 up-regulation. Our results should be helpful for the future clinical development of sirtuin inhibitors.

  17. The role of death receptors in neural injury.

    PubMed

    Lorz, Corina; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an essential process in the development of the central nervous system (CNS) and is fundamental for the control of the final number of neurons and glial cells. Excessive cell death has been implicated in a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and multiple sclerosis as well as ischemic injury. We review the contribution of death receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)/nerve growth factor (NGF) family to cell death and survival in the context of CNS pathology, indicating the possible value of manipulating cell death induced by these receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases and injury.

  18. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization is an Early Event in Sigma-2 Receptor Ligand Mediated Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Results Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282) localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco). Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Conclusions Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a caspase-dependent death

  19. Heat shock induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species involving mitochondrial and death receptor pathways in corneal cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lin, Hsien-Chung; Wu, Kwou-Yeung; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2011-10-01

    Although many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular consequences of ultraviolet irradiation, little is known about the effect of infrared radiation on ocular disease. In addition to photons, heat is generated as a consequence of infrared irradiation, and heat shock is widely considered to be an environmental stressor. Here, we are the first to investigate the biological effect of heat shock on Statens Seruminstitut Rabbit Cornea (SIRC) cells. Our results indicate that heat shock exhibits effective cell proliferation inhibition by inducing apoptosis. Heat shock triggers the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway indicated by a change in Bax/Bcl-2 ratios, resulting in caspase-9 activity. In addition, heat shock triggered the death receptor apoptotic pathway indicated by a change in Fas ligand expression, resulting in caspase-8 activity. Furthermore, we also found that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical mediator in heat shock-induced apoptosis. In addition, the antioxidant vitamin C significantly decreased heat shock-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest a critical role for ROS involving mitochondrial and death receptor pathways in heat shock-mediated apoptosis of cornea cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces apoptosis by activation of the death receptor and/or mitochondrial pathways in cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Patrick; Ingrassia, Laurent; Rouzeau, Sébastien; Ribaucour, Fabrice; Thomas, Stéphanie; Roland, Isabelle; Darro, Francis; Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Our study has shown that the Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces marked apoptosis-mediated cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts by triggering the activation of the initiator caspases of the death receptor pathway (caspase-8 and caspase-10) at least in human MCF-7 breast and PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells. The formation of the Fas and death receptor 4 (DR4) death-inducing signaling complex was clearly evidenced in MCF-7 and PC-3 cancer cells. Caspase-8 was found to interact with Fas and DR4 receptors on narciclasine treatment. However, narciclasine-induced downstream apoptotic pathways in MCF-7 cells diverged from those in PC-3 cells, where caspase-8 directly activated effector caspases such as caspase-3 in the absence of any further release of mitochondrial proapoptotic effectors. In contrast, in MCF-7 cells, the apoptotic process was found to require an amplification step that is mitochondria-dependent, with Bid processing, release of cytochrome c, and caspase-9 activation. It is postulated that the high selectivity of narciclasine to cancer cells might be linked, at least in part, to this activation of the death receptor pathway. Normal human fibroblasts appear approximately 250-fold less sensitive to narciclasine, which does not induce apoptosis in these cells probably due to the absence of death receptor pathway activation.

  1. The Amaryllidaceae Isocarbostyril Narciclasine Induces Apoptosis By Activation of the Death Receptor and/or Mitochondrial Pathways in Cancer Cells But Not in Normal Fibroblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Patrick; Ingrassia, Laurent; Rouzeau, Sébastien; Ribaucour, Fabrice; Thomas, Stéphanie; Roland, Isabelle; Darro, Francis; Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Our study has shown that the Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces marked apoptosis-mediated cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts by triggering the activation of the initiator caspases of the death receptor pathway (caspase-8 and caspase-10) at least in human MCF-7 breast and PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells. The formation of the Fas and death receptor 4 (DR4) death-inducing signaling complex was clearly evidenced in MCF-7 and PC-3 cancer cells. Caspase-8 was found to interact with Fas and DR4 receptors on narciclasine treatment. However, narciclasine-induced downstream apoptotic pathways in MCF-7 cells diverged from those in PC-3 cells, where caspase-8 directly activated effector caspases such as caspase-3 in the absence of any further release of mitochondrial proapoptotic effectors. In contrast, in MCF-7 cells, the apoptotic process was found to require an amplification step that is mitochondria-dependent, with Bid processing, release of cytochrome c, and caspase-9 activation. It is postulated that the high selectivity of narciclasine to cancer cells might be linked, at least in part, to this activation of the death receptor pathway. Normal human fibroblasts appear approximately 250-fold less sensitive to narciclasine, which does not induce apoptosis in these cells probably due to the absence of death receptor pathway activation. PMID:17898872

  2. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R.; Reddy, G. Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26336104

  3. Nuclear Receptor PPARα Agonist Wy-14,643 Ameliorates Hepatic Cell Death in Hepatic IKKβ-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyeong; Wahyudi, Lilik Duwi; Gonzalez, Frank J; Kim, Jung-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    Inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase beta (IKKβ) plays a critical role in cell proliferation and inflammation in various cells by activating NF-κB signaling. However, the interrelationship between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and IKKβ in cell proliferation is not clear. In this study, we investigated the possible role of PPARα in the hepatic cell death in the absence of IKKβ gene using liver-specific Ikkb-null (Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre)) mice. To examine the function of PPARα activation in hepatic cell death, wild-type (Ikkb(F/F)) and Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre) mice were treated with PPARα agonist Wy-14,643 (0.1% w/w chow diet) for two weeks. As a result of Wy-14,643 treatment, apoptotic markers including caspase-3 cleavage, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and TUNEL-positive staining were significantly decreased in the Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre) mice. Surprisingly, Wy-14,643 increased the phosphorylation of p65 and STAT3 in both Ikkb and Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre) mice. Furthermore, BrdU-positive cells were significantly increased in both groups after treatment with Wy-14,643. Our results suggested that IKKβ-derived hepatic apoptosis could be altered by PPARα activation in conjunction with activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling.

  4. TVB Receptors for Cytopathic and Noncytopathic Subgroups of Avian Leukosis Viruses Are Functional Death Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brojatsch, Jürgen; Naughton, John; Adkins, Heather B.; Young, John A. T.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of TVBS3, a cellular receptor for the cytopathic subgroups B and D of avian leukosis virus (ALV-B and ALV-D), as a tumor necrosis factor receptor-related death receptor with a cytoplasmic death domain, provides a compelling argument that viral Env-receptor interactions are linked to cell death (4). However, other TVB proteins have been described that appear to have similar death domains but are cellular receptors for the noncytopathic subgroup E of ALV (ALV-E): TVBT, a turkey subgroup E-specific ALV receptor, and TVBS1, a chicken receptor for subgroups B, D, and E ALV. To begin to understand the role of TVB receptors in the cytopathic effects associated with infection by specific ALV subgroups, we asked whether binding of a soluble ALV-E surface envelope protein (SU) to its receptor can lead to cell death. Here we report that ALV-E SU-receptor interactions can induce apoptosis in quail or turkey cells. We also show directly that TVBS1 and TVBT are functional death receptors that can trigger cell death by apoptosis via a mechanism involving their cytoplasmic death domains and activation of the caspase pathway. These data demonstrate that ALV-B and ALV-E use functional death receptors to enter cells, and it remains to be determined why only subgroups B and D viral infections lead specifically to cell death. PMID:11090145

  5. FasL-triggered death of Jurkat cells requires caspase 8-induced, ATP-dependent cross-talk between Fas and the purinergic receptor P2X(7).

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adam; Shoji, Kenji F; Sáez, Juan C; Henríquez, Mauricio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-02-01

    Fas ligation via the ligand FasL activates the caspase-8/caspase-3-dependent extrinsic death pathway. In so-called type II cells, an additional mechanism involving tBid-mediated caspase-9 activation is required to efficiently trigger cell death. Other pathways linking FasL-Fas interaction to activation of the intrinsic cell death pathway remain unknown. However, ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic P2X(7) receptors (P2X(7)Rs) favors cell death in some cells. Here, we evaluated the possibility that ATP release downstream of caspase-8 via pannexin1 hemichannels (Panx1 HCs) and subsequent activation of P2X(7)Rs participate in FasL-stimulated cell death. Indeed, upon FasL stimulation, ATP was released from Jurkat cells in a time- and caspase-8-dependent manner. Fas and Panx1 HCs colocalized and inhibition of the latter, but not connexin hemichannels, reduced FasL-induced ATP release. Extracellular apyrase, which hydrolyzes ATP, reduced FasL-induced death. Also, oxidized-ATP or Brilliant Blue G, two P2X(7)R blockers, reduced FasL-induced caspase-9 activation and cell death. These results represent the first evidence indicating that the two death receptors, Fas and P2X(7)R connect functionally via caspase-8 and Panx1 HC-mediated ATP release to promote caspase-9/caspase-3-dependent cell death in lymphoid cells. Thus, a hitherto unsuspected route was uncovered connecting the extrinsic to the intrinsic pathway to amplify death signals emanating from the Fas receptor in type II cells. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands on cell death in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ghatrehsamani, Mahdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Esfahani, Behjat A Moayedi; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Hakemi, Mazdak G; Mossahebimohammadi, Majid; Eskandari, Nahid; Adib, Minoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to diverse outcome in various kinds of cells. AhR activation may induce apoptosis or prevent of apoptosis and cell death. Recent studies suggest that apoptosis effects of AhR can be modulated by inflammatory cytokine like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In this study, we try to investigate the possible interaction of TNF-α with the 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a ligand of AhR, on peripheral lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation on ficoll. Isolated PBMCs were divided into four groups: Control group, TNF-α administered group, TCDD administered group, co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α. Cells were maintained for a week in lymphocyte culture condition. Then, TNF-α was added to group 2 and 4. Finally, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed in all samples using flowcytometry. Result: In group 4, the mean percent of necrosis and apoptosis in TCDD treatment groups was significantly larger than other groups; (P < 0.05). Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the mean percent of cell death in TNF-α administered group and TCDD administered group (P > 0.05). However, the mean percent of cell death in co-administered group with TCDD and TNF-α was significantly lower than other groups; (P < 0.05). Conclusion: TNF-α could significantly inhibit effects of TCDD on lymphocytes apoptosis. Combination effects of TNF-α and TCDD on lymphocyte increase cell survival. PMID:26605245

  7. Multidrug transporter ABCG2 prevents tumor cell death induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor Iressa (ZD1839, Gefitinib).

    PubMed

    Elkind, N Barry; Szentpétery, Zsófia; Apáti, Agota; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Várady, György; Ujhelly, Olga; Szabó, Katalin; Homolya, László; Váradi, András; Buday, László; Kéri, György; Német, Katalin; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2005-03-01

    Iressa (ZD1839, Gefitinib), used in clinics to treat non-small cell lung cancer patients, is a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor that leads to specific decoupling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. Recent data indicate that Iressa is especially effective in tumors with certain EGFR mutations; however, a subset of these tumors does not respond to Iressa. In addition, certain populations have an elevated risk of side effects during Iressa treatment. The human ABCG2 (BCRP/MXR/ABCP) transporter causes cancer drug resistance by actively extruding a variety of cytotoxic drugs, and it functions physiologically to protect our tissues from xenobiotics. Importantly, ABCG2 modifies absorption, distribution, and toxicity of several pharmacologic agents. Previously, we showed that ABCG2 displays a high-affinity interaction with several tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors, including Iressa. Here, we show that the expression of ABCG2, but not its nonfunctional mutant, protects the EGFR signaling-dependent A431 tumor cells from death on exposure to Iressa. This protection is reversed by the ABCG2-specific inhibitor, Ko143. These data, reinforced with cell biology and biochemical experiments, strongly suggest that ABCG2 can actively pump Iressa. Therefore, variable expression and polymorphisms of ABCG2 may significantly modify the antitumor effect as well as the absorption and tissue distribution of Iressa.

  8. Structure and interactions of the human programmed cell death 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoxiao; Veverka, Vaclav; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Waters, Lorna C; Muskett, Frederick W; Morgan, Sara H; Huo, Jiandong; Yu, Chao; Evans, Edward J; Leslie, Alasdair J; Griffiths, Meryn; Stubberfield, Colin; Griffin, Robert; Henry, Alistair J; Jansson, Andreas; Ladbury, John E; Ikemizu, Shinji; Carr, Mark D; Davis, Simon J

    2013-04-26

    PD-1, a receptor expressed by T cells, B cells, and monocytes, is a potent regulator of immune responses and a promising therapeutic target. The structure and interactions of human PD-1 are, however, incompletely characterized. We present the solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structure of the human PD-1 extracellular region and detailed analyses of its interactions with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. PD-1 has typical immunoglobulin superfamily topology but differs at the edge of the GFCC' sheet, which is flexible and completely lacks a C" strand. Changes in PD-1 backbone NMR signals induced by ligand binding suggest that, whereas binding is centered on the GFCC' sheet, PD-1 is engaged by its two ligands differently and in ways incompletely explained by crystal structures of mouse PD-1 · ligand complexes. The affinities of these interactions and that of PD-L1 with the costimulatory protein B7-1, measured using surface plasmon resonance, are significantly weaker than expected. The 3-4-fold greater affinity of PD-L2 versus PD-L1 for human PD-1 is principally due to the 3-fold smaller dissociation rate for PD-L2 binding. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction is entropically driven, whereas PD-1/PD-L2 binding has a large enthalpic component. Mathematical simulations based on the biophysical data and quantitative expression data suggest an unexpectedly limited contribution of PD-L2 to PD-1 ligation during interactions of activated T cells with antigen-presenting cells. These findings provide a rigorous structural and biophysical framework for interpreting the important functions of PD-1 and reveal that potent inhibitory signaling can be initiated by weakly interacting receptors.

  9. Ozone-induced airway epithelial cell death, the neurokinin-1 receptor pathway, and the postnatal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Oslund, Karen L.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Miller, Lisa A.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Children are uniquely susceptible to ozone because airway and lung growth continue for an extensive period after birth. Early-life exposure of the rhesus monkey to repeated ozone cycles results in region-specific disrupted airway/lung growth, but the mediators and mechanisms are poorly understood. Substance P (SP), neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R); and nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) are signaling pathway components involved in ozone-induced cell death. We hypothesize that acute ozone (AO) exposure during postnatal airway development disrupts SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression and that these changes correlate with increased ozone-induced cell death. Our objectives were to 1) spatially define the normal development of the SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway in conducting airways; 2) compare how postnatal age modulates responses to AO exposure; and 3) determine how concomitant, episodic ozone exposure modifies age-specific acute responses. Male infant rhesus monkeys were assigned at age 1 mo to two age groups, 2 or 6 mo, and then to one of three exposure subgroups: filtered air (FA), FA+AO (AO: 8 h/day × 2 days), or episodic biweekly ozone exposure cycles (EAO: 8 h/day × 5 days/14-day cycle+AO). O3 = 0.5 ppm. We found that 1) ozone increases SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression in conducting airways, 2) an ozone exposure cycle (5 days/cycle) delivered early at age 2 mo resulted in an airway that was hypersensitive to AO exposure at the end of 2 mo, and 3) continued episodic exposure (11 cycles) resulted in an airway that was hyposensitive to AO exposure at 6 mo. These observations collectively associate with greater overall inflammation and epithelial cell death, particularly in early postnatal (2 mo), distal airways. PMID:25063800

  10. Ro52/SSA sensitizes cells to death receptor-induced apoptosis by down-regulating c-FLIP(L).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Fang, Lei; Zhu, Xuguo; Qiao, Yiting; Yu, Mei; Wang, Lu; Chen, Yuan; Yin, Wu; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2012-05-01

    Ro52/SSA is an autoantigen that presents in patients with SS (Sjögren's syndrome) and SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus). It increases cell death and redistributes itself to apoptotic blebs, but its pro-apoptotic function has not been completely identified. Overexpression of Ro52/SSA promoted cell apoptosis induced by DR (death receptor) in caspase-8-dependent manner. Ro52/SSA expression down-regulated c-FLIP(L) [cellular (Fas-associated death domain)-like interleukin 1β-converting enzyme-inhibitory protein long form] expression, and Ro52/SSA siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) increased c-FLIP(L) production, indicating that Ro52/SSA plays a role in c-FLIP(L) regulation. Ro52/SSA negatively regulated c-FLIP(L) transcriptional level probably by suppressing NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) signalling. The data suggest that Ro52/SSA is involved in DR-mediated apoptosis by regulating c-FLIP(L).

  11. Activation and suppression of the TRAIL death-receptor pathway in chemotherapy sensitive and resistant follicular lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Klaus W; King, Fred; Nomoto, Ken; Knee, Deborah A; Hampton, Garret; Nasoff, Marc; Deveraux, Quinn L

    2003-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the apoptosis inhibitor bcl-2 provides a survival advantage throughout oncogenesis and can facilitate chemotherapeutic resistance in a variety of human cancers. Follicular lymphoma (FL) for example, is characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(14;18), which results in bcl-2 overexpression and initiates lymphomagenesis. Although FL cells possess ample amounts of bcl-2, they respond remarkably well to standard first-round chemotherapy. However, the vast majority of patients relapses and becomes progressively resistant to therapy. We obtained cell lines derived from chemosensitive and chemoresistant FL patients, that are characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(14;18) and expression of bcl-2, to investigate how chemotherapeutic drugs can circumvent bcl-2 anti-apoptotic function and to identify alterations in those pathways that may facilitate resistance to DNA damaging drugs. In chemosensitive FL cells, we found that DNA damaging drugs promote apoptosis through p53-dependent upregulation of the TRAIL-DR5 receptor, resulting in activation of caspase-8 and downstream executioner caspases, thereby evading bcl-2 mediated suppression of apoptosis. Examination of drug resistant FL cell lines revealed that at least two defects in this pathway can contribute to chemotherapeutic resistance: 1. p53 gene mutations that disable the transcriptional response to DNA damaging drugs, including expression of the TRAIL-DR5 receptor, and 2. transcriptional repression of the cell-death executioner enzyme caspase-3.

  12. ATM Inhibition Potentiates Death of Androgen Receptor-inactivated Prostate Cancer Cells with Telomere Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vidyavathi; Wu, Min; Ciavattone, Nicholas; McKenty, Nathan; Menon, Mani; Barrack, Evelyn R; Reddy, G Prem-Veer; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2015-10-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a role in maintaining telomere stability in prostate cancer cells, as AR inactivation induces telomere dysfunction within 3 h. Since telomere dysfunction in other systems is known to activate ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated)-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathways, we investigated the role of ATM-mediated DDR signaling in AR-inactivated prostate cancer cells. Indeed, the induction of telomere dysfunction in cells treated with AR-antagonists (Casodex or MDV3100) or AR-siRNA was associated with a dramatic increase in phosphorylation (activation) of ATM and its downstream effector Chk2 and the presenceof phosphorylated ATM at telomeres, indicating activation of DDR signaling at telomeres. Moreover, Casodex washout led to the reversal of telomere dysfunction, indicating repair of damaged telomeres. ATM inhibitor blocked ATM phosphorylation, induced PARP cleavage, abrogated cell cycle checkpoint activation and attenuated the formation of γH2AX foci at telomeres in AR-inactivated cells, suggesting that ATM inhibitor induces apoptosis in AR-inactivated cells by blocking the repair of damaged DNA at telomeres. Finally, colony formation assay revealed a dramatic decrease in the survival of cells co-treated with Casodex and ATM inhibitor as compared with those treated with either Casodex or ATM inhibitor alone. These observations indicate that inhibitors of DDR signaling pathways may offer a unique opportunity to enhance the potency of AR-targeted therapies for the treatment of androgen-sensitive as well as castration-resistant prostate cancer. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Endothelial cell death and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 in emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Y; Tuder, R M; Cool, C D; Lynch, D A; Flores, S C; Voelkel, N F

    2001-03-01

    Emphysema due to cigarette smoking is characterized by a loss of alveolar structures. We hypothesize that the disappearance of alveoli involves apoptosis of septal endothelial cells and a decreased expression of lung vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor 2 (VEGF R2). By terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) in combination with immunohistochemistry, we found that the number of TUNEL+ septal epithelial and endothelial cells/lung tissue nucleic acid (microg) was increased in the alveolar septa of emphysema lungs (14.2 +/- 2.0/microg, n = 6) when compared with normal lungs (6.8 +/- 1.3/microg, n = 7) (p < 0.01) and with primary pulmonary hypertensive lungs (2.3 +/- 0.8/microg, n = 5) (p < 0.001). The cell death events were not significantly different between healthy nonsmoker (7.4 +/- 1.9/microg) and smoker (5.7 +/- 0.7/microg) control subjects. The TUNEL results were confirmed by single-stranded DNA and active caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and by DNA ligation assay. Emphysema lungs (n = 12) had increased levels of oligonucleosomal-length DNA fragmentation when compared with normal lungs (n = 11). VEGF, VEGF R2 protein, and mRNA expression were significantly reduced in emphysema. We propose that epithelial and endothelial alveolar septal death due to a decrease of endothelial cell maintenance factors may be part of the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  14. Effects of toxic cellular stresses and divalent cations on the human P2X7 cell death receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hong; Pauloin, Thierry; Brignole-Baudouin, Françoise; Baudouin, Christophe; Warnet, Jean-Michel; Rat, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate responses to toxic cellular stresses in different human ocular epithelia. Methods Reactivity with a specific anti-P2X7 antibody was studied using confocal fluorescence microscopy on conjunctival, corneal, lens, and retinal cell lines as well as using impression cytology on human ocular cells. Activation of the P2X7 receptor by selective agonists (ATP and benzoylbenzoyl-ATP) and inhibition by antagonists (oATP, KN-62, and PPADS) were evaluated using the quinolinium,4-[(3-methyl-2-(3H)-benzoxazolylidene) methyl]-1-[3-(triethylammonio)propyl]di-iodide (YO-PRO-1) test in cytofluorometry. Different specific stresses were then induced by a chemical toxin (benzalkonium chloride) and a chemical oxidant (tert-butyl hydroperoxide) to assess the role of the P2X7 receptor. Modulation of P2X7 receptor activation was performed with several ionic solutions. Results Our data show that four cell lines express the P2X7 cell death purinergic receptor as judged by reactivity with a specific anti-P2X7 antibody, activation by the selective P2X7 agonist benzoylbenzoyl-ATP and to a lesser extent by ATP (YO-PRO-1 dye uptake), and inhibition by three antagonists (oATP, KN-62, and PPADS). Benzalkonium chloride, a widely used preservative, induced dramatic membrane permeabilization through P2X7 pore opening on conjunctival and corneal epithelia. Reactive oxygen species, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, lead to P2X7 receptor activation on retinal pigment epithelium. Modulation of P2X7 receptor activation was obtained with extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ and with a controlled ionization marine solution rich in different divalent cations. This marine solution could be proposed as a new ophthalmic solution. Conclusions Our observations reveal a novel pathway for epithelial cells apoptosis/cytolysis by inducing different toxic stresses and their modulation by using ionic solutions. PMID:18490962

  15. A Novel Role for Programmed Cell Death Receptor Ligand-1 in Sepsis-Induced Intestinal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Youping; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Monaghan, Sean Farrell; Patel, Sima; Huang, Xin; Heffernan, Daithi Seamus; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Studies imply that intestinal barrier dysfunction is a key contributor to morbid events associated with sepsis. Recently, the co-inhibitory molecule programmed death-ligand1 (PD-L1) has been shown to be involved in the regulation of intestinal immune tolerance and/or inflammation. Our previous studies showed that PD-L1 gene deficiency reduced sepsis-induced intestinal injury morphologically. However, it is not known how PD-L1 expression impacts intestinal barrier dysfunction during sepsis. Here we tested the hypothesis that PD-L1 expressed on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) has a role in sepsis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. To address this, C57BL/6 or PD-L1 gene knockout mice were subjected to experimental sepsis and PD-L1 expression, intestinal permeability and tissue cytokine levels were assessed. Subsequently, septic or nonseptic colonic samples (assigned by pathology report) were immunohistochemically stained for PD-L1 in a blinded fashion. Finally, human Caco2 cells were used for in vitro studies. The results demonstrated that PD-L1 was constitutively expressed and sepsis significantly upregulates PD-L1 in IECs from C57BL/6 mice. Concurrently, we observed increased PD-L1 expression in colon tissue samples from septic patients. PD-L1 gene deficiency reduced ileal permeability and tissue levels of IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1, and prevented ileal tight junction protein loss compared with WT after sepsis. Comparatively, while Caco2 cell monolayers also responded to inflammatory cytokine stimulation with elevated PD-L1 expression, increased monolayer permeability and altered/decreased monolayer tight junction protein morphology/expression, these changes were reversed by PD-L1 blocking antibody. Together these data indicate that ligation of PD-L1 plays a novel role in mediating the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. PMID:27782294

  16. Development of hybrid small molecules that induce degradation of estrogen receptor-alpha and necrotic cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okuhira, Keiichiro; Demizu, Yosuke; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Shibata, Norihito; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Okuda, Haruhiro; Kurihara, Masaaki; Naito, Mikihiko

    2013-11-01

    Manipulation of protein stability with small molecules has a great potential for both basic research and clinical therapy. Recently, we have developed a series of hybrid small molecules named SNIPER (Specific and Non-genetic IAP-dependent Protein ERaser) that induces degradation of target proteins via ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we report the activities of SNIPER(ER) that targets estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) for degradation. SNIPER(ER) induced degradation of ERα and inhibited estrogen-dependent expression of pS2 gene in an estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell line MCF-7. A proteasome inhibitor MG132 and siRNA-mediated downregulation of cIAP1 abrogated the SNIPER(ER)-induced ERα degradation, suggesting that the ERα is degraded by proteasome subsequent to cIAP1-mediated ubiquitylation. Intriguingly, after the ERα degradation, the SNIPER(ER)-treated MCF-7 cells undergo rapid cell death. Detailed analysis indicated that SNIPER(ER) caused necrotic cell death accompanied by a release of HMGB1, a marker of necrosis, from the cells. Following the ERα degradation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) was produced in the SNIPER(ER)-treated MCF-7 cells, and an anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited the necrotic cell death. These results indicate that SNIPER(ER) induces ERα degradation, ROS production and necrotic cell death, implying a therapeutic potential of SNIPER(ER) as a lead for the treatment of ERα-positive breast cancers.

  17. D-cyclins Repress Apoptosis in Hematopoietic Cells by Controlling Death Receptor Fas and its Ligand FasL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Saez, Borja; Anders, Lars; Hydbring, Per; Stefano, Joanna; Bacon, Nickolas A.; Cook, Colleen; Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Signoretti, Sabina; Young, Richard A.; Scadden, David T.; Sicinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY D-type cyclins (D1, D2 and D3) are components of the mammalian core cell cycle machinery and function to drive cell proliferation. Here we report that D-cyclins perform a rate-limiting anti-apoptotic function in vivo. We found that acute shutdown of all three D-cyclins in bone marrow of adult mice resulted in massive apoptosis of all hematopoietic cell types. We demonstrate that adult hematopoietic stem cells are particularly dependent on D-cyclins for survival, and they are especially sensitive to cyclin D loss. Surprisingly, we found that the anti-apoptotic function of D-cyclins also operates in quiescent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our analyses revealed that D-cyclins repress the expression of the death receptor Fas and its ligand, FasL. Acute ablation of D-cyclins upregulated these pro-apoptotic genes, and led to Fas- and caspase 8-dependent apoptosis. These results reveal an unexpected function of cell cycle proteins in controlling apoptosis in normal cell homeostasis. PMID:25087893

  18. Dictyostelium cell death

    PubMed Central

    Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Adam, Myriam; Luciani, Marie-Françoise; de Chastellier, Chantal; Blanton, Richard L.; Golstein, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Cell death in the stalk of Dictyostelium discoideum, a prototypic vacuolar cell death, can be studied in vitro using cells differentiating as a monolayer. To identify early events, we examined potentially dying cells at a time when the classical signs of Dictyostelium cell death, such as heavy vacuolization and membrane lesions, were not yet apparent. We observed that most cells proceeded through a stereotyped series of differentiation stages, including the emergence of “paddle” cells showing high motility and strikingly marked subcellular compartmentalization with actin segregation. Paddle cell emergence and subsequent demise with paddle-to-round cell transition may be critical to the cell death process, as they were contemporary with irreversibility assessed through time-lapse videos and clonogenicity tests. Paddle cell demise was not related to formation of the cellulose shell because cells where the cellulose-synthase gene had been inactivated underwent death indistinguishable from that of parental cells. A major subcellular alteration at the paddle-to-round cell transition was the disappearance of F-actin. The Dictyostelium vacuolar cell death pathway thus does not require cellulose synthesis and includes early actin rearrangements (F-actin segregation, then depolymerization), contemporary with irreversibility, corresponding to the emergence and demise of highly polarized paddle cells. PMID:12654899

  19. Death receptors: Targets for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Zafar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis is the cell's intrinsic program to death, which plays an important role in physiologic growth control and homeostasis. Apoptosis can be triggered by death receptors (DRs), without any adverse effects. DRs are the members of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, known to be involved in apoptosis signaling, independent of p53 tumor-supressor gene. Selective triggering of DR-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells is a novel approach in cancer therapy. So far, the best characterized DRs are CD95 (Fas/Apo1), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAILR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). Among these, TRAILR is emerging as most promising agent for cancer therapy, because it induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor and transformed cells without any toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL treatment in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy enhances TRAIL sensitivity or reverses TRAIL resistance by regulating downstream effectors. This review covers the current knowledge about the DRs, summarizes main signaling in DRs and also summarizes the preclinical approaches of these DRs in cancer therapy.

  20. Different Contribution of Redox-Sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Channels to Acetaminophen-Induced Death of Human Hepatoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Heba; Kozai, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Reiko; Numata, Tomohiro; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a safe analgesic antipyretic drug at prescribed doses. Its overdose, however, can cause life-threatening liver damage. Though, involvement of oxidative stress is widely acknowledged in APAP-induced hepatocellular death, the mechanism of this increased oxidative stress and the associated alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis are still unclear. Among members of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels activated in response to oxidative stress, we here identify that redox-sensitive TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, and TRPM7 channels underlie Ca2+ entry and downstream cellular damages induced by APAP in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. Our data indicate that APAP treatment of HepG2 cells resulted in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) depletion, and Ca2+ entry leading to increased apoptotic cell death. These responses were significantly suppressed by pretreatment with the ROS scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid disodium salt monohydrate (Tiron), and also by preincubation of cells with the glutathione inducer Dimethylfumarate (DMF). TRP subtype-targeted pharmacological blockers and siRNAs strategy revealed that suppression of either TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, or TRPM7 reduced APAP-induced ROS formation, Ca2+ influx, and cell death; the effects of suppression of TRPV1 or TRPC1, known to be activated by oxidative cysteine modifications, were stronger than those of TRPM2 or TRPM7. Interestingly, TRPV1 and TRPC1 were labeled by the cysteine-selective modification reagent, 5,5′-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid)-2biotin (DTNB-2Bio), and this was attenuated by pretreatment with APAP, suggesting that APAP and/or its oxidized metabolites act directly on the modification target cysteine residues of TRPV1 and TRPC1 proteins. In human liver tissue, TRPV1, TRPC1, TRPM2, and TRPM7 channels transcripts were localized mainly to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. Our findings strongly suggest that APAP

  1. P2X7 receptor activation mediates retinal ganglion cell death in a human retina model of ischemic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Niyadurupola, Nuwan; Sidaway, Peter; Ma, Ning; Rhodes, Jeremy D; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence implicating ischemia and excitotoxicity in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. ATP-mediated excitotoxicity via activation of the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been proposed to play a role in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration in this disease. The aim of this research was to determine whether stimulation of the P2X7R mediated ischemia-induced RGC death in the human retina. Human organotypic retinal cultures were exposed to the P2X7R agonist 2',3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and simulated ischemia (oxygen/glucose deprivation) in the presence or absence of the P2X7R antagonist, Brilliant Blue G (BBG). Neuronal death in the RGC layer was quantified by neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive cell counts and quantitative real-time PCR for THY-1 mRNA. The P2X7R was localized by immunohistochemistry and P2X7R mRNA profiling using a cryosectioning technique. P2X7R stimulation by BzATP (100 μM) induced loss of RGC markers in human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs), which was inhibited by BBG (1 μM). Simulated ischemia led to loss of RGCs that was also inhibited by BBG, indicating that ischemia-induced RGC degeneration was mediated by the P2X7R. The P2X7R was immunolocalized to the outer and inner plexiform layers of the human retina, and P2X7R mRNA expression was confirmed in the inner retina and ganglion cell layer. These studies demonstrated that stimulation of the P2X7R can mediate RGC death and that this mechanism plays a role in ischemia-induced neurodegeneration in the human retina.

  2. Death receptor-independent FADD signalling triggers hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in mice with liver parenchymal cell-specific NEMO knockout.

    PubMed

    Ehlken, H; Krishna-Subramanian, S; Ochoa-Callejero, L; Kondylis, V; Nadi, N E; Straub, B K; Schirmacher, P; Walczak, H; Kollias, G; Pasparakis, M

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually develops in the context of chronic hepatitis triggered by viruses or toxic substances causing hepatocyte death, inflammation and compensatory proliferation of liver cells. Death receptors of the TNFR superfamily regulate cell death and inflammation and are implicated in liver disease and cancer. Liver parenchymal cell-specific ablation of NEMO/IKKγ, a subunit of the IκB kinase (IKK) complex that is essential for the activation of canonical NF-κB signalling, sensitized hepatocytes to apoptosis and caused the spontaneous development of chronic hepatitis and HCC in mice. Here we show that hepatitis and HCC development in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice is triggered by death receptor-independent FADD-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis. TNF deficiency in all cells or conditional LPC-specific ablation of TNFR1, Fas or TRAIL-R did not prevent hepatocyte apoptosis, hepatitis and HCC development in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice. To address potential functional redundancies between death receptors we generated and analysed NEMO(LPC-KO) mice with combined LPC-specific deficiency of TNFR1, Fas and TRAIL-R and found that also simultaneous lack of all three death receptors did not prevent hepatocyte apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and HCC development. However, LPC-specific combined deficiency in TNFR1, Fas and TRAIL-R protected the NEMO-deficient liver from LPS-induced liver failure, showing that different mechanisms trigger spontaneous and LPS-induced hepatocyte apoptosis in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice. In addition, NK cell depletion did not prevent liver damage and hepatitis. Moreover, NEMO(LPC-KO) mice crossed into a RAG-1-deficient genetic background-developed hepatitis and HCC. Collectively, these results show that the spontaneous development of hepatocyte apoptosis, chronic hepatitis and HCC in NEMO(LPC-KO) mice occurs independently of death receptor signalling, NK cells and B and T lymphocytes, arguing against an immunological trigger as the critical stimulus driving

  3. Programmed cell death

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  4. Fulvestrant-induced cell death and proteasomal degradation of estrogen receptor α protein in MCF-7 cells require the CSK c-Src tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wei-Lan; Shioda, Keiko; Coser, Kathryn R; Rivizzigno, Danielle; McSweeney, Kristen R; Shioda, Toshi

    2013-01-01

    Fulvestrant is a representative pure antiestrogen and a Selective Estrogen Receptor Down-regulator (SERD). In contrast to the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen that bind to estrogen receptor α (ERα) as antagonists or partial agonists, fulvestrant causes proteasomal degradation of ERα protein, shutting down the estrogen signaling to induce proliferation arrest and apoptosis of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells. We performed genome-wide RNAi knockdown screenings for protein kinases required for fulvestrant-induced apoptosis of the MCF-7 estrogen-dependent human breast caner cells and identified the c-Src tyrosine kinase (CSK), a negative regulator of the oncoprotein c-Src and related protein tyrosine kinases, as one of the necessary molecules. Whereas RNAi knockdown of CSK in MCF-7 cells by shRNA-expressing lentiviruses strongly suppressed fulvestrant-induced cell death, CSK knockdown did not affect cytocidal actions of 4-hydroxytamoxifen or paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent. In the absence of CSK, fulvestrant-induced proteasomal degradation of ERα protein was suppressed in both MCF-7 and T47D estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells whereas the TP53-mutated T47D cells were resistant to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant in the presence or absence of CSK. MCF-7 cell sensitivities to fulvestrant-induced cell death or ERα protein degradation was not affected by small-molecular-weight inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Src, suggesting possible involvement of other signaling molecules in CSK-dependent MCF-7 cell death induced by fulvestrant. Our observations suggest the importance of CSK in the determination of cellular sensitivity to the cytocidal action of fulvestrant.

  5. Role of transglutaminase 2 in PAC1 receptor mediated protection against hypoxia-induced cell death and neurite outgrowth in differentiating N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Algarni, Alanood S; Hargreaves, Alan J; Dickenson, John M

    2017-03-15

    The PAC1 receptor and tissue transglutaminase (TG2) play important roles in neurite outgrowth and modulation of neuronal cell survival. In this study, we investigated the regulation of TG2 activity by the PAC1 receptor in retinoic acid-induced differentiating N2a neuroblastoma cells. TG2 transamidase activity was determined using an amine incorporation and a peptide cross linking assay. In situ TG2 activity was assessed by visualising the incorporation of biotin-X-cadaverine using confocal microscopy. TG2 phosphorylation was monitored via immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. The role of TG2 in PAC1 receptor-induced cytoprotection and neurite outgrowth was investigated by monitoring hypoxia-induced cell death and appearance of axonal-like processes, respectively. The amine incorporation and protein crosslinking activity of TG2 increased in a time and concentration-dependent manner following stimulation with pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP-27). PACAP-27 mediated increases in TG2 activity were abolished by the TG2 inhibitors Z-DON and R283 and by pharmacological inhibition of protein kinase A (KT 5720 and Rp-cAMPs), protein kinase C (Ro 31-8220), MEK1/2 (PD 98059), and removal of extracellular Ca(2+). Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated PACAP-27 induced in situ TG2 activity. TG2 inhibition blocked PACAP-27 induced attenuation of hypoxia-induced cell death and outgrowth of axon-like processes. TG2 activation and cytoprotection were also observed in human SH-SY5Y cells. Together, these results demonstrate that TG2 activity was stimulated downstream of the PAC1 receptor via a multi protein kinase dependent pathway. Furthermore, PAC1 receptor-induced cytoprotection and neurite outgrowth are dependent upon TG2. These results highlight the importance of TG2 in the cellular functions of the PAC1 receptor.

  6. Group I mGlu receptor stimulation inhibits activation-induced cell death of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Miglio, Gianluca; Mesturini, Riccardo; Varsaldi, Federica; Mocellin, Marco; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Dianzani, Chiara; Fantozzi, Roberto; Dianzani, Umberto; Lombardi, Grazia

    2006-01-01

    The effects of L-glutamate on activation-induced cell death (AICD) of human activated (1 μg ml−1 phytohemagglutinin plus 2 U ml−1 interleukin-2; 8 days) T lymphocytes were studied by measuring anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (10 μg ml−1; 18 h)-induced cell apoptosis (Annexin V and propidium iodide staining). L-Glutamate (1 × 10−8–1 × 10−4 M) significantly (P⩽0.01) inhibited AICD in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50=6.3 × 10−8 M; maximum inhibition 54.8±6.3% at 1 × 10−6 M). The L-glutamate inhibitory effect was pharmacologically characterized as mediated by group I mGlu receptors, since mGlu receptor agonists reproduced this effect. The EC50 values were: 3.2 × 10−7 M for (1S,3R)-ACPD; 4.5 × 10−8 M for quisqualate; 1.0 × 10−6 M for (S)-3,5-DHPG; 2.0 × 10−5 M for CHPG. Group I mGlu receptor antagonists inhibited the effects of quisqualate 1.0 × 10−6 M. The IC50 values calculated were: 8.7 × 10−5, 4.3 × 10−6 and 6.3 × 10−7 M for AIDA, LY 367385 and MPEP, respectively. L-Glutamate (1 × 10−6 M; 18 h) significantly (P⩽0.05) inhibited FasL expression (40.8±11.3%) (cytofluorimetric analysis), whereas it did not affect Fas signalling. Expression of both mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor mRNA by T lymphocytes and T-cell lines, as demonstrated by reverse transcriptase–PCR analysis, suggests that L-glutamate-mediated inhibition of AICD was exerted on T cells. These data depict a novel role for L-glutamate in the regulation of the immune response through group I mGlu receptor-mediated mechanisms. PMID:16751798

  7. CX-4945, a selective inhibitor of casein kinase 2, synergizes with B cell receptor signaling inhibitors in inducing diffuse large B cell lymphoma cell death.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Elisa; Nunes, Sara Canovas; Zaffino, Fortunato; Casellato, Alessandro; Macaccaro, Paolo; Tubi, Laura Quotti; Visentin, Andrea; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Piazza, Francesco

    2017-04-26

    Approximately one third of Diffuse Large B cell Lymphomas (DLBCL) are refractory or relapse. Novel therapeutic approaches under scrutiny include inhibitors of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling. Protein kinase CK2 propels survival, proliferation and stress response in solid and hematologic malignancies and promotes a "non-oncogene addiction" phenotype. Whether this kinase regulates BCR signaling thus being a suitable pharmacological target in DLBCL is unknown. To establish if CK2 controls DLBCL cell survival and the BCR signaling; to check if the combination of CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 and BCR blockers Ibrutinib and Fostamatinib is more effectively cytotoxic for DLBCL cells than the single agents; to survey the changes in signaling molecules downstream BCR upon CK2 inhibition. A panel of GC and ABC DLBCL cells were treated with CX-4945 and Fostamatinib or Ibrutinib. BCR signaling was assayed by intracellular Ca++ measurement and looking at the phosphorylation of signaling molecules. The effects on cell survival were assessed by flow cytometry, western blot and MTT assays. CK2 inhibition with CX-4945 causes DLBCL cell death. CX-4945 impaired AKT phosphorylation and intracellular Ca++ mobilization upon BCR engagement. The CK2 inhibitor acted synergistically with either the SYK inhibitor Fostamatinib or the BTK inhibitor Ibrutinib in inducing DLBCL cell death. CX-4945 was equally effective in GC and ABC DLBCL subtypes as well as in "double hit" DLBCL cell lines. These findings suggest a role for CK2 downstream of the BCR in controlling survival pathways crucial for cell growth of different DLBCL subtypes. Also, the use of CX-4945 in combination with BCR signaling blockers could represent a novel rational therapeutic approach in DLBCL. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Yasuda, Shusuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. Sulindac sulfide induced the expression of DR5 at the protein and mRNA levels in colon cancer SW480 cells. Furthermore, sulindac sulfide increased DR5 promoter activity. We showed that sulindac sulfide stimulated DR5 promoter activity via the −301 to −253 region. This region contained a putative MZF1-binding site. Site-directed mutations in the site abrogated the enhancement in DR5 promoter activity by sulindac sulfide. MZF1 directly bound to the putative MZF1-binding site of the DR5 promoter and the binding was increased by sulindac sulfide. The expression of MZF1 was also increased by sulindac sulfide, and MZF1 siRNA attenuated the upregulation of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. These results indicate that sulindac sulfide induces the expression of DR5 by up-regulating MZF1. PMID:25102912

  9. Myeloid zinc finger 1 mediates sulindac sulfide-induced upregulation of death receptor 5 of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Horinaka, Mano; Yoshida, Tatsushi; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Yasuda, Shusuke; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2014-08-08

    A combined therapy of sulindac sulfide and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. Sulindac sulfide had been shown to induce the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a receptor for TRAIL, and sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the upregulation of DR5 has not yet been elucidated. We demonstrate here that myeloid zinc finger 1 (MZF1) mediates the induction of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. Sulindac sulfide induced the expression of DR5 at the protein and mRNA levels in colon cancer SW480 cells. Furthermore, sulindac sulfide increased DR5 promoter activity. We showed that sulindac sulfide stimulated DR5 promoter activity via the -301 to -253 region. This region contained a putative MZF1-binding site. Site-directed mutations in the site abrogated the enhancement in DR5 promoter activity by sulindac sulfide. MZF1 directly bound to the putative MZF1-binding site of the DR5 promoter and the binding was increased by sulindac sulfide. The expression of MZF1 was also increased by sulindac sulfide, and MZF1 siRNA attenuated the upregulation of DR5 by sulindac sulfide. These results indicate that sulindac sulfide induces the expression of DR5 by up-regulating MZF1.

  10. Suppression of death receptor 5 enhances cancer cell invasion and metastasis through activation of caspase-8/TRAF2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Yue, Ping; Wang, Dongsheng; Tong, Jing-Shan; Chen, Zhuo G; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The role of death receptor 5 (DR5), a well-known cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, in the negative regulation of invasion and metastasis of human cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown and were hence the focus of this study. In this report, we have demonstrated that DR5 functions to suppress invasion and metastasis of human cancer cells, as evidenced by enhanced cancer cell invasion and metastasis upon genetic suppression of DR5 either by gene knockdown or knockout. When DR5 is suppressed, FADD and caspase-8 may recruit and stabilize TRAF2 to form a metastasis and invasion signaling complex, resulting in activation of ERK and JNK/AP-1 signaling that mediate the elevation and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) and eventual promotion of cancer invasion and metastasis. Our findings thus highlight a novel non-apoptotic function of DR5 as a suppressor of human cancer cell invasion and metastasis and suggest a basic working model elucidating the underlying biology.

  11. Absence of Sigma 1 Receptor Accelerates Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Murine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Saul, Alan; Cui, Xuezhi; Roon, Penny; Smith, Sylvia B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Sigma 1 Receptor (Sig1R) is a novel therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal disease. Sig1R−/− mice have late-onset retinal degeneration with ganglion cell loss that worsens under stress. Whether Sig1R plays a role in maintaining other retinal neurons is unknown, but was investigated here using rd10 mice, a model of severe photoreceptor degeneration. Methods Wild-type, rd10, and rd10/Sig1R−/− mice were subjected to ERG and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess visual function/structure in situ. Retinas imaged microscopically were subjected to morphometric analysis, immunodetection of cones, and analysis of gliosis. Oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was evaluated at mRNA/protein levels. Results Photopic ERG responses were reduced significantly in rd10/Sig1R−/− versus rd10 mice at P28 (31 ± 6 vs. 56 ± 7 μV), indicating accelerated cone loss when Sig1R was absent. At P28, SD-OCT revealed reduced retinal thickness in rd10/Sig1R−/− mice (60% of WT) versus rd10 (80% of WT). Morphometric analysis disclosed profound photoreceptor nuclei loss in rd10/Sig1R−/− versus rd10 mice. rd10/Sig1R−/− mice had 35% and 60% fewer photoreceptors, respectively, at P28 and P35, than rd10. Peanut agglutinin cone labeling decreased significantly; gliosis increased significantly in rd10/Sig1R−/− versus rd10 mice. At P21, NRF2 levels increased in rd10/Sig1R−/− mice versus rd10 and downstream antioxidants increased indicating oxidative stress. At P28, ER stress genes/proteins, especially XBP1, a potent transcriptional activator of the unfolded protein response and CHOP, a proapoptotic transcription factor, increased significantly in rd10/Sig1R−/− mice versus rd10. Conclusions Photoreceptor cell degeneration accelerates and cone function diminishes much earlier in rd10/Sig1R−/− than rd10 mice emphasizing the importance of Sig1R as a modulator of retinal cell survival. PMID

  12. Absence of Sigma 1 Receptor Accelerates Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Murine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Saul, Alan; Cui, Xuezhi; Roon, Penny; Smith, Sylvia B

    2017-09-01

    Sigma 1 Receptor (Sig1R) is a novel therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases, including retinal disease. Sig1R-/- mice have late-onset retinal degeneration with ganglion cell loss that worsens under stress. Whether Sig1R plays a role in maintaining other retinal neurons is unknown, but was investigated here using rd10 mice, a model of severe photoreceptor degeneration. Wild-type, rd10, and rd10/Sig1R-/- mice were subjected to ERG and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to assess visual function/structure in situ. Retinas imaged microscopically were subjected to morphometric analysis, immunodetection of cones, and analysis of gliosis. Oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was evaluated at mRNA/protein levels. Photopic ERG responses were reduced significantly in rd10/Sig1R-/- versus rd10 mice at P28 (31 ± 6 vs. 56 ± 7 μV), indicating accelerated cone loss when Sig1R was absent. At P28, SD-OCT revealed reduced retinal thickness in rd10/Sig1R-/- mice (60% of WT) versus rd10 (80% of WT). Morphometric analysis disclosed profound photoreceptor nuclei loss in rd10/Sig1R-/- versus rd10 mice. rd10/Sig1R-/- mice had 35% and 60% fewer photoreceptors, respectively, at P28 and P35, than rd10. Peanut agglutinin cone labeling decreased significantly; gliosis increased significantly in rd10/Sig1R-/- versus rd10 mice. At P21, NRF2 levels increased in rd10/Sig1R-/- mice versus rd10 and downstream antioxidants increased indicating oxidative stress. At P28, ER stress genes/proteins, especially XBP1, a potent transcriptional activator of the unfolded protein response and CHOP, a proapoptotic transcription factor, increased significantly in rd10/Sig1R-/- mice versus rd10. Photoreceptor cell degeneration accelerates and cone function diminishes much earlier in rd10/Sig1R-/- than rd10 mice emphasizing the importance of Sig1R as a modulator of retinal cell survival.

  13. Lack of the programmed death-1 receptor renders host susceptible to enteric microbial infection through impairing the production of the mucosal natural killer cell effector molecules.

    PubMed

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Frey, Blake F; Billeskov, Rolf; Singer, Steven M; Berzofsky, Jay A; Eckmann, Lars; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2016-03-01

    The programmed death-1 receptor is expressed on a wide range of immune effector cells, including T cells, natural killer T cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and natural killer cells. In malignancies and chronic viral infections, increased expression of programmed death-1 by T cells is generally associated with a poor prognosis. However, its role in early host microbial defense at the intestinal mucosa is not well understood. We report that programmed death-1 expression is increased on conventional natural killer cells but not on CD4(+), CD8(+) or natural killer T cells, or CD11b(+) or CD11c(+) macrophages or dendritic cells after infection with the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Mice genetically deficient in programmed death-1 or treated with anti-programmed death-1 antibody were more susceptible to acute enteric and systemic infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Wild-type but not programmed death-1-deficient mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium showed significantly increased expression of the conventional mucosal NK cell effector molecules granzyme B and perforin. In contrast, natural killer cells from programmed death-1-deficient mice had impaired expression of those mediators. Consistent with programmed death-1 being important for intracellular expression of natural killer cell effector molecules, mice depleted of natural killer cells and perforin-deficient mice manifested increased susceptibility to acute enteric infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Our findings suggest that increased programmed death-1 signaling pathway expression by conventional natural killer cells promotes host protection at the intestinal mucosa during acute infection with a bacterial gut pathogen by enhancing the expression and production of important effectors of natural killer cell function.

  14. Characterization of the Interactions between Calmodulin and Death Receptor 5 in Triple-negative and Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer Cells: AN INTEGRATED EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Romone M; Wang, Lingyun; Schmid, Thomas; Zeng, Qinghua; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Tong; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Song, Yuhua

    2016-06-10

    Activation of death receptor-5 (DR5) leads to the formation of death inducing signaling complex (DISC) for apoptotic signaling. Targeting DR5 to induce breast cancer apoptosis is a promising strategy to circumvent drug resistance and present a target for breast cancer treatment. Calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to regulate DR5-mediated apoptotic signaling, however, its mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we characterized CaM and DR5 interactions in breast cancer cells with integrated experimental and computational approaches. Results show that CaM directly binds to DR5 in a calcium dependent manner in breast cancer cells. The direct interaction of CaM with DR5 is localized at DR5 death domain. We have predicted and verified the CaM-binding site in DR5 being (354)WEPLMRKLGL(363) that is located at the α2 helix and the loop between α2 helix and α3 helix of DR5 DD. The residues of Trp-354, Arg-359, Glu-355, Leu-363, and Glu-367 in DR5 death domain that are important for DR5 recruitment of FADD and caspase-8 for DISC formation to signal apoptosis also play an important role for CaM-DR5 binding. The changed electrostatic potential distribution in the CaM-binding site in DR5 DD by the point mutations of W354A, E355K, R359A, L363N, or E367K in DR5 DD could directly contribute to the experimentally observed decreased CaM-DR5 binding by the point mutations of the key residues in DR5 DD. Results from this study provide a key step for the further investigation of the role of CaM-DR5 binding in DR5-mediated DISC formation for apoptosis in breast cancer cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential effects of grape seed extract against human colorectal cancer cell lines: the intricate role of death receptors and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Derry, Molly; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2013-06-28

    Failure of anti-cancer therapy in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells involves resistance to death mechanisms. We investigated grape seed extract (GSE) ability to target CRC cells and delineated the mechanisms involved in GSE-induced CRC cell death. GSE selectively induced apoptotic death in human CRC cells; efficacy increased as the metastatic potential of the cancer cells increased. Oxidative stress, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, modulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, and involvement of both caspase-dependent/independent apoptotic pathways contributed to GSE-induced CRC cell death. GSE intervention may serve as a multi-targeted CRC therapeutic capable of inducing selective cancer cell death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens.

  18. Programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Oleskin, A V; Lagunova, E M

    2000-08-01

    This paper reviews data on programmed cell death (apoptosis) in animals and plants. Necrosis is a pathological scenario of cell death, which entails an inflammatory response in animal tissues. Apoptosis results in the disintegration of animal/plant cells into membrane vesicles enclosing the intracellular content, which are thereupon engulfed by adjacent or specialized cells (phagocytes) in animals. Plants lack such specialized cells, and plant cell walls prevent phagocytosis. The paper considers the main molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in animals and the pathways of activation of caspases, evolutionarily conserved cysteine proteases. A self-contained section concerns itself with the process of programmed cell death (PCD) in microorganisms including: 1) cell death in the myxomycete Dictyostelium discoideum and the parasitic flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi; 2) PCD in genetically manipulated yeast expressing the proapoptotic Bax and Bak proteins; 3) the death of a part of a prokaryotic cell population upon the depletion of nutrient resources or under stress; 4) the elimination of cells after a loss of a plasmid encoding a stable cytotoxic agent in combination with an unstable antidote; and 5) PCD in phage-infected bacterial cells.

  19. Systems biology of death receptor networks: live and let die

    PubMed Central

    Lavrik, I N

    2014-01-01

    The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by death receptor activation. Death receptor activation leads to the formation of death receptor signaling platforms, resulting in the demolition of the cell. Despite the fact that death receptor-mediated apoptosis has been studied to a high level of detail, its quantitative regulation until recently has been poorly understood. This situation has dramatically changed in the last years. Creation of mathematical models of death receptor signaling led to an enormous progress in the quantitative understanding of the network regulation and provided fascinating insights into the mechanisms of apoptosis control. In the following sections, the models of the death receptor signaling and their biological implications will be addressed. Central attention will be given to the models of CD95/Fas/APO-1, an exemplified member of the death receptor signaling pathways. The CD95 death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) and regulation of CD95 DISC activity by its key inhibitor c-FLIP, have been vigorously investigated by modeling approaches, and therefore will be the major topic here. Furthermore, the non-linear dynamics of the DISC, positive feedback loops and bistability as well as stoichiometric switches in extrinsic apoptosis will be discussed. Collectively, this review gives a comprehensive view how the mathematical modeling supported by quantitative experimental approaches has provided a new understanding of the death receptor signaling network. PMID:24874731

  20. Programmed death-1 receptor suppresses γ-IFN producing NKT cells in human tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar; Dey, Aparajit Ballav; Mohan, Anant; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2014-05-01

    IFN-γ biased Th1 effector immune response is crucial for containment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Various T cell subsets with regulatory function dictate the generation of Th1 like cells. NKT cells are a specialized T cell subset known to be activated early in immune response and control T cell response via release of immunoregulatory cytokines like IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10. M. tuberculosis, with abundance of its cell wall lipids may potently activate NKT cells resulting in cytokine production and PD-1 expression. In this study, among 49 treatment naive active pulmonary tuberculosis patients, we found a higher percentage of PD1(+) NKT cells correlating with sputum bacillary load. Furthermore, blocking PD-1 increased the number of IFN-γ producing NKT cells by inhibiting their apoptosis. Moreover, peripheral frequency of NKT cells declined with therapy suggesting their role in host T cell response. In this study, we concluded that PD-1 preferentially induces apoptosis of IFN-γ producing NKT cells while sparing NKT cells that produce IL-4. Such a polarized NKT cell function may impose a Th2 bias on the ensuing effector T cell response leading to inefficient clearance of M. tuberculosis. Inhibiting PD-1 may therefore alter the T cell response in favor of the host by rescuing type 1 NKT cells from apoptosis and boosting Th1 effector T cell functions against M. tuberculosis.

  1. TRAIL death receptors and cancer therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Ying Sheikh, M. Saeed

    2007-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) also known as Apo2L is an apoptotic molecule that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily of cytokines. It mediates its apoptotic effects via its cognate death receptors including DR4 and DR5. Agonistic monoclonal antibodies have also been developed that selectively activate TRAIL death receptors to mediate apoptosis. Multiple clinically relevant agents also upregulate the expression of TRAIL death receptors, and cooperate with TRAIL as well as DR4 and DR5-specific agonistic antibodies to exhibit tumor cell killing. TRAIL is currently in phase I clinical trials, whereas DR4 and DR5-specific agonistic antibodies have been tested in phase I and II studies. Thus, TRAIL has clearly distinguished itself from the other family members including TNF-alpha and FasL both of which could not make it to the clinic due to their toxic nature. It is therefore, evident that the future of TRAIL-based therapeutic approaches looks brighter.

  2. Colistin-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells: involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic and death receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Li, Jichang; Zhou, Tiezhong; Wang, Chunhua; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Hongjun

    2014-05-01

    Colistin, a cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic that is used to treat infections, may cause neurotoxicity. However, whether colistin can induce apoptosis and the precise mechanism of apoptosis involved in PC12 cells remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to determine reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and DNA damage, as well as apoptotic factors such as p53, cytochrome c, Bax, Bcl-2, Fas, Fas-L and caspase family via western blotting in PC12 cells treated with colistin sulfate. The results showed that colistin sulfate increased ROS levels significantly. An increase of ROS levels induces the release of cytochrome c and DNA damage. DNA damage can activate p53, which leads to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. The imbalance of Bax/Bcl-2 promotes additional release of cytochrome c. The release of cytochrome c contributes to the activation of caspase-9 and the subsequent activation of caspase-3. An increase of Fas and Fas-L induced the activation of caspase-8 leading to the activation of caspases-3, the latter induces apoptosis. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the apoptotic pathway of colistin-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells is involved in both the mitochondrial and death receptor pathway.

  3. Classification of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Baehrecke, EH; Blagosklonny, MV; El-Deiry, WS; Golstein, P; Green, DR; Hengartner, M; Knight, RA; Kumar, S; Lipton, SA; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, ME; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like ‘percentage apoptosis’ and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that ‘autophagic cell death’ is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including ‘entosis’, ‘mitotic catastrophe’, ‘necrosis’, ‘necroptosis’ and ‘pyroptosis’. PMID:18846107

  4. Activation of autophagic flux by epigallocatechin gallate mitigates TRAIL-induced tumor cell apoptosis via down-regulation of death receptors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a major polyphenol in green tea. Recent studies have reported that EGCG can inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis and activate autophagic flux in cancer cells. However, the mechanism behind these processes is unclear. The present study found that EGCG prevents tumor cell death by antagonizing the TRAIL pathway and activating autophagy flux. Our results indicate that EGCG dose-dependently inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis and decreases the binding of death receptor 4 and 5 (DR4 and 5) to TRAIL. In addition, EGCG activates autophagy flux, which is involved in the inhibition of TRAIL cell death. We confirmed that the protective effect of EGCG can be reversed using genetic and pharmacological tools through re-sensitization to TRAIL. The inhibition of autophagy flux affects not only the re-sensitization of tumor cells to TRAIL, but also the restoration of death receptor proteins. This study demonstrates that EGCG inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through the manipulation of autophagic flux and subsequent decrease in number of death receptors. On the basis of these results, we suggest further consideration of the use of autophagy activators such as EGCG in combination anti-tumor therapy with TRAIL. PMID:27582540

  5. TRAIL induces receptor-interacting protein 1-dependent and caspase-dependent necrosis-like cell death under acidic extracellular conditions.

    PubMed

    Meurette, Olivier; Rebillard, Amélie; Huc, Laurence; Le Moigne, Gwenaëlle; Merino, Delphine; Micheau, Olivier; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2007-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potential anticancer agent that induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in most normal cells. How tumor physiology, particularly acidic extracellular pH (pH(e)), would modify sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death is not known. We have previously shown that cancer cells, resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at physiologic pH(e) (7.4), could be sensitized to TRAIL at acidic pH(e) (6.5). However, at this acidic pH(e), cell death was necrotic. We show here that, in spite of a necrosis-like cell death morphology, caspases are activated and are necessary for TRAIL-induced cell death at acidic pH(e) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that, whereas receptor-interacting protein (RIP) was cleaved following TRAIL treatment at physiologic pH(e) (7.4), it was not cleaved following TRAIL treatment at acidic pH(e) (6.5). Moreover, RIP degradation by geldanamycin or decrease expression of RIP by small RNA interference transfection inhibited TRAIL-induced necrosis at acidic pH(e), showing that RIP was necessary for this necrotic cell death pathway. We also show that RIP kinase activity was essential for this cell death pathway. Altogether, we show that, under acidic pH(e) conditions, TRAIL induces a necrosis-like cell death pathway that depends both on caspases and RIP kinase activity. Thus, our data suggest for the first time that RIP-dependent necrosis might be a major death pathway in TRAIL-based therapy in solid tumors with acidic pH(e).

  6. The death receptor CD95 activates adult neural stem cells for working memory formation and brain repair.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Nina S; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Laudenklos, Sabrina; Glagow, Désirée; Kumar, Sachin; Letellier, Elisabeth; Koch, Philipp; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Kleber, Susanne; Klussmann, Stefan; Wiestler, Benedict; Brüstle, Oliver; Mueller, Wolf; Gieffers, Christian; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Seedorf, Matthias; Gretz, Norbert; Sprengel, Rolf; Celikel, Tansu; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2009-08-07

    Adult neurogenesis persists in the subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus and can be induced upon central nervous system injury. However, the final contribution of newborn neurons to neuronal networks is limited. Here we show that in neural stem cells, stimulation of the "death receptor" CD95 does not trigger apoptosis but unexpectedly leads to increased stem cell survival and neuronal specification. These effects are mediated via activation of the Src/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, ultimately leading to a global increase in protein translation. Induction of neurogenesis by CD95 was further confirmed in the ischemic CA1 region, in the naive dentate gyrus, and after forced expression of CD95L in the adult subventricular zone. Lack of hippocampal CD95 resulted in a reduction in neurogenesis and working memory deficits. Following global ischemia, CD95-mediated brain repair rescued behavioral impairment. Thus, we identify the CD95/CD95L system as an instructive signal for ongoing and injury-induced neurogenesis.

  7. Receptor-mediated choreography of life and death.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Anjana; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2003-09-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor was originally identified as a protein that kills tumor cells. So far, 18 distinct members of this family have been identified. All of them regulate cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death, also called apoptosis. The apoptosis induced by TNF, and other members of the family, for example, FasL, VEGI, and TRAIL is mediated through death receptors. The apoptotic signals by these cytokines are transduced by eight different death domain- (DD) containing receptors (TNFR1, also called DR1; Fas, also called DR2; DR3, DR4, DR5, DR6, NGFR, and EDAR). The intracellular portion of all these receptors contains a region approximately 80 amino acids long referred to as the "death domain." Upon activation by its ligand, the DD recruits various proteins that mediate both death and proliferation of the cells. These proteins in turn recruit other proteins via their DDs or death effector domains. The actual destruction of the cell, however, is accomplished by serial activation of a family of proteases referred to as caspases. Cell death is negatively regulated by a family of proteins that includes decoy receptors, silencer of DD, sentrin, cellular FLICE inhibitory protein, cellular inhibitors of apoptosis, and survivin. This review is an attempt to describe how these negative and positive players of cell death perform a harmonious dance with each other.

  8. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  9. Structure/Function analysis of p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor and fas-associated death domain. Effect on necrosis in L929sA cells.

    PubMed

    Boone, E; Vanden Berghe, T; Van Loo, G; De Wilde, G; De Wael, N; Vercammen, D; Fiers, W; Haegeman, G; Vandenabeele, P

    2000-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) induces a typical apoptotic cell death program in various cell lines by interacting with the p55 tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R55). In contrast, triggering of the fibrosarcoma cell line L929sA gives rise to characteristic cellular changes resulting in necrosis. The intracellular domain of TNF-R55 can be subdivided into two parts: a membrane-proximal domain (amino acids 202-325) and a C-terminal death domain (DD) (amino acids 326-413), which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for apoptosis. Structure/function analysis of TNF-R55-mediated necrosis in L929sA cells demonstrated that initiation of necrotic cell death, as defined by swelling of the cells, rapid membrane permeabilization, absence of nuclear condensation, absence of DNA hypoploidy, and generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen intermediates, is also confined to the DD. The striking synergistic effect of the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone on TNF-induced necrosis was also observed with receptors solely containing the DD. TNF-R55-mediated necrosis is not affected by the dominant negative deletion mutant of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD-(80-205)) that lacks the N-terminal death effector domain. Moreover, overexpression of FADD-(80-205) in L929sA is cytotoxic and insensitive to CrmA, while the cytotoxicity due to overexpression of the deletion mutant FADD-(1-111) lacking the DD is prevented by CrmA. These results demonstrate that the death domain of FADD can elicit an active necrotic cell death pathway.

  10. Cholinergic-receptor-independent dysfunction of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ATP depletion underlie necrotic cell death induced by the organophosphate poison mevinphos.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y H; Chan, S H H; Dai, K Y; Cheng, H L; Chou, J L J; Chang, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    Our current understanding of the nature of cell death that is associated with fatal organophosphate poisoning and the underlying cellular mechanisms is surprisingly limited. Taking advantage of the absence in an in vitro system of acetylcholinesterase, the pharmacological target of organophosphate compounds, the present study evaluated the hypothesis that the repertoire of cholinergic receptor-independent cellular events that underlie fatal organophosphate poisoning entails induction of mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by bioenergetic failure that leads to necrotic cell death because of ATP depletion. Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells incubated with the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (0.4 or 4mumol) for 1 or 3h underwent a dose-related and time-dependent loss of cell viability that was not reversed by muscarinic (atropine) or nicotinic (mecamylamine) blockade. This was accompanied by depressed NADH cytochrome c reductase, succinate cytochrome c reductase or cytochrome c oxidase activity in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential, decreased ATP concentration, elevated ADP/ATP ratio, increased lactate dehydrogenase release and necrotic cell death. We conclude that Mev induces cholinergic receptor-independent necrotic cell death by depressing the activity of Complexes I to IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, eliciting reduction in mitochondrial transmembrane potential, depleting intracellular ATP contents and damaging cell membrane integrity.

  11. [Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death].

    PubMed

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E; Gerber, Urs

    2008-02-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing post-ischemic plasticity of NMDA receptors, focusing on the sensitive CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as compared to the relatively resistant neighboring CA3 neurons. Both a change in the equilibrium between protein tyrosine kinases/phosphatases and an increased density of surface NMDA receptors in response to ischemia may explain the selective vulnerability of specific cell types. Implications for the treatment of stroke and reasons for the failures of human clinical trials utilizing NMDA receptor antagonists are also discussed.

  12. P2 receptors in human heart: upregulation of P2X6 in patients undergoing heart transplantation, interaction with TNFalpha and potential role in myocardial cell death.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Cristina; Ferrario, Silvia; De Vincenti, Ombretta; Ceruti, Stefania; Fumagalli, Marta; Mazzola, Alessia; D' Ambrosi, Nadia; Volontè, Cinzia; Fratto, Pasquale; Vitali, Ettore; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Beltrami, Elena; Parolari, Alessandro; Polvani, GianLuca; Biglioli, Paolo; Tremoli, Elena; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2005-12-01

    ATP acts as a neurotransmitter via seven P2X receptor-channels for Na(+) and Ca(2+), and eight G-protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Despite evidence suggesting roles in human heart, the map of myocardial P2 receptors is incomplete, and their involvement in chronic heart failure (CHF) has never received adequate attention. In left myocardia from five to nine control and 5-12 CHF subjects undergoing heart transplantation, we analyzed the full repertoire of P2 receptors and of 10 "orphan" P2Y-like receptors. All known P2Y receptors (i.e. P2Y(1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14)) and two P2Y-like receptors (GPR91 and GPR17) were detected in all subjects. All known P2X(1-7) receptors were also detected; of these, only P2X(6) was upregulated in CHF, as confirmed by quantitative real time-PCR. The potential significance of this change was studied in primary cardiac fibroblasts freshly isolated from young pigs. Exposure of cardiac fibroblasts to ATP or its hydrolysis-resistant-analog benzoylATP induced apoptosis. TNFalpha (a cytokine implicated in CHF progression) exacerbated cell death. Similar effects were induced by ATP and TNFalpha in a murine cardiomyocytic cell line. In cardiac fibroblasts, TNFalpha inhibited the downregulation of P2X(6) mRNA associated to prolonged agonist exposure, suggesting that, by preventing ATP-induced P2X(6) desensitization, TNFalpha may abolish a defense mechanism meant at avoiding Ca(2+) overload and, ultimately, Ca(2+)-dependent cell death. This may provide a basis for P2X(6) upregulation in CHF. In conclusion, we provide the first characterization of P2 receptors in the human heart and suggest that the interaction between TNFalpha and the upregulated P2X(6) receptor may represent a novel pathogenic mechanism in CHF.

  13. Insulin receptor substrate 1 expression enhances the sensitivity of 32D cells to chemotherapy-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Holly A.; Carey, Gregory B.; Keegan, Achsah D.

    2012-08-15

    The adapters IRS1 and IRS2 link growth factor receptors to downstream signaling pathways that regulate proliferation and survival. Both suppress factor-withdrawal-induced apoptosis and have been implicated in cancer progression. However, recent studies suggest IRS1 and IRS2 mediate differential functions in cancer pathogenesis. IRS1 promoted breast cancer proliferation, while IRS2 promoted metastasis. The role of IRS1 and IRS2 in controlling cell responses to chemotherapy is unknown. To determine the role of IRS1 and IRS2 in the sensitivity of cells to chemotherapy, we treated 32D cells lacking or expressing IRS proteins with various concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents. We found that expression of IRS1, in contrast to IRS2, enhanced the sensitivity of 32D cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. When IRS2 was expressed with IRS1, the cells no longer showed enhanced sensitivity. Expression of IRS1 did not alter the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins; however, 32D-IRS1 cells expressed higher levels of Annexin A2. In 32D-IRS1 cells, IRS1 and Annexin A2 were both located in cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. We also found that IRS1 coprecipitated with Annexin A2, while IRS2 did not. Decreasing Annexin A2 levels reduced 32D-IRS1 cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. These results suggest IRS1 enhances sensitivity to chemotherapy in part through Annexin A2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IRS1 enhanced the sensitivity of 32D cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sensitivity is abrogated by the expression of IRS2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expressing IRS1 in 32D cells increased levels of Annexin A2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both IRS1 and Annexin A2 were located in cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreasing Annexin A2 in 32D-IRS1 cells abated their sensitivity to chemotherapy.

  14. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  15. A Fucus vesiculosus extract inhibits estrogen receptor activation and induces cell death in female cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqing; Riby, Jacques E; Conde, Lucia; Grizzle, William E; Cui, Xiangqin; Skibola, Christine F

    2016-05-28

    We previously reported the anti-estrogenic activity of the brown seaweed, Fucus vesiculosus. The present study aimed to further investigate its anti-estrogenic modes of action and to assess other potentially biologically relevant anti-tumorigenic effects in estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent and -independent female cancer cell lines. The CALUX® assay was used to determine the effect of a F. vesiculosus extract (FVE) on activation of the ER. Aromatase enzymatic activity was measured to determine the potential effect of FVE on estradiol (E2) biosynthesis. Transcriptional activity profiling of 248 genes involved in cancer, immunity, hormonal regulation, protein phosphorylation, transcription, metabolism, and cellular structure was conducted using the NanoString nCounter® analysis system in FVE-treated breast, ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. The effects of FVE on cell viability, morphology, membrane integrity, mitochondrial toxicity, induction of apoptotic and autophagic markers, and cell signaling were also analyzed. In co-treatments with 12.5 pM (EC50) E2, FVE (2 %) reduced ER activation by 50 %, exhibiting potent ER antagonistic effects. FVE inhibited aromatase activity in an in vitro assay (IC50 2.0 %). ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell lines showed significantly decreased viability that correlated with increasing FVE concentrations and altered morphological features suggestive of apoptosis and autophagy. Expression of genes that were significantly altered by FVE (p < 0.05) revealed predominantly apoptotic, autophagic and kinase signaling pathways. FVE also effectively inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt, resulting in reduced mTORC1 activities to stimulate autophagy in cells. Concentration-dependent cleavage of PARP and induction of caspase-3 and -7 activities were observed in MDA-MB-231 cells supporting a role for FVE in the promotion of apoptosis. Our study provides new insights into the anti-estrogenic activity of F. vesiculosus

  16. Interplay between lysosomal, mitochondrial and death receptor pathways during manganese-induced apoptosis in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2017-04-04

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal which plays a critical role in brain physiology by acting as a cofactor for several enzymes. However, upon overexposure, Mn preferentially accumulates within the basal ganglia leading to the development of a Parkinsonism known as Manganism. Data from our group have proved that Mn induces oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis in astrocytoma C6 cells. In the present study we described how cathepsins impact on different steps of each apoptotic cascade. Evidence obtained demonstrated that Mn generates lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cathepsin release. Both cathepsins B (Ca-074 Me) and D (Pepstatin A) inhibitors as well as Bafilomycin A1 prevented caspases-3, -7, -8 and -9 activation, FasL upregulation, Bid cleavage, Δφm disruption and cytochrome c release. Results from in vivo studies showed that intrastriatal Mn injection increased cathepsin D levels from corpus striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results point to LMP and lysosomal cathepsins as key mediators in the apoptotic process triggered by Mn. These findings highlight the relevance of targeting the lysosomal pathway for Manganism therapy.

  17. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E.; Ladell, Kristin; Stryhn, Anette; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A.; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection, their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion. The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD244 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), which modulate the functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells. Design and methods: Here, we used an array of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B∗15 : 03 and HLA-B∗42 : 01 tetramers to characterize inhibitory receptor expression as a function of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations (n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. Results: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by effector memory CD8+ T cells. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are influenced by peptide/HLA class I antigen exposure. PMID:24906112

  18. Cell death and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Wang, Min-Xia; Murrell, George A C

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis and necrosis are presently recognized as the two major types of physiological and pathological cell death. Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell deletion process that differs morphologically and biochemically from necrotic cell death. Tendinopathy is defined as a tendon injury that originates from intrinsic and extrinsic etiological factors. Excessive apoptosis has recently been described in degenerative tendon. The increased number of apoptotic tendon cells in degenerative tendon tissue could affect the rate of collagen synthesis and repair. Impaired or dysfunctional protein synthesis may lead to weaker tendon tissue and eventually increase the risk for tendon rupture. Clearly, there are many details to insert into this pathway, but there is hope that if the fine details of the pathway can be fleshed out, then strategies may be able to be developed to break the cycle at one or more points and prevent or treat tendinopathy more effectively.

  19. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  20. TRAIL induces apoptosis in oral squamous carcinoma cells--a crosstalk with oncogenic Ras regulated cell surface expression of death receptor 5.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Jie; Mikelis, Constantinos M; Zhang, Yaqin; Gutkind, J Silvio; Zhang, Baolin

    2013-02-01

    TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its death receptors (DRs) 4 and/or 5 expressed on the surface of target cells. The selectivity of TRAIL towards cancer cells has promoted clinical evaluation of recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) and its agonistic antibodies in treating several major human cancers including colon and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, little is known about their ability in killing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we tested the apoptotic responses of a panel of seven human OSCC cell lines (HN31, HN30, HN12, HN6, HN4, Cal27, and OSCC3) to rhTRAIL and monoclonal antibodies against DR4 or DR5. We found that rhTRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis in most of the oral cancer cell lines tested both in vitro and in vivo. We also showed that DR5 was expressed on the surface of the tested cell lines which correlated with the cellular susceptibility to apoptosis induced by rhTRAIL and anti-DR5 antibody. By contrast, little or no DR4 was detected on the surface of OSCC3 and HN6 cells rendering cellular resistance to DR4 antibody and a reduced sensitivity to rhTRAIL. Notably, the overall TRAIL sensitivity correlated well with the levels of endogenous active Ras in the cell lines tested. Expression of a constitutively active Ras mutant (RasV12) in OSCC3 cells selectively upregulated surface expression of DR5, but not DR4, and restored TRAIL sensitivity. Our findings could have implications for the use of TRAIL receptor targeted therapies in the treatment of human OSCC tumors particularly the ones harboring constitutively active Ras mutant.

  1. Immunogenic cell death.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M; Romano, Erminia; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Currently, it is widely acknowledged that a proactive anticancer immunosurveillance mechanism takes part in the rejection of neoplastic lesions before they progress towards a benign or malignant tumour. However in cases of very aggressive neoplastic lesions consisting of cells with high mutational diversity, cancer cell variants might be formed that are capable of evading host defence systems against uncontrolled proliferation and anticancer immunosurveillance. This is mainly accomplished through the exhibition of low immunogenicity, which is a particularly important stumbling block in the revival of long-lasting as well as stable anticancer immunity. Recently, it has emerged emphatically that inciting a cancer cell death routine, associated with the activation of danger signalling pathways evoking emission of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), markedly increases the immunogenicity of dying cancer cells. This cell death pathway has been termed "immunogenic cell death" (ICD). In the present review we introduce this concept and discuss its characteristics in detail. We also discuss in detail the various molecular, immunological and operational determinants of ICD.

  2. Prostate stem cell antigen is an endogenous lynx1-like prototoxin that antagonizes alpha7 containing nicotinic receptors and prevents programmed cell death of parasympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Martin; Keefe, Julie; Wert, David; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Hulce, Jonathan J.; Ibanez-Tallon, Ines; Nishi, Rae

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate α–bungarotoxin-like molecules of the Ly-6 super family have been implicated as balancers of activity and survival in the adult nervous system. To determine whether a member of this family could be involved in the development of the avian ciliary ganglion, we identified 6 Gallus genes by their homology in structure to mouse lynx1 and lynx2. One of these genes, an ortholog of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), is barely detectable at embryonic day 8, prior to neuronal cell loss in the ciliary ganglion, but increases over 100-fold as the number of neurons begins to decline between E9 and E14. PSCA is highly expressed in chicken and mouse telencephalon and peripheral ganglia and correlates with expression of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs). Misexpressing PSCA prior to cell death in the ciliary ganglion blocks α7-nAChR activation by nicotine and rescues the choroid subpopulation from dying. Thus, PSCA, a molecule previously identified as a marker of prostate cancer, is a member of the Ly-6 neurotoxin-like family in the nervous system, and is likely to play a role as a modulator of α7 signaling induced cell death during development. PMID:19940180

  3. Prostate stem cell antigen is an endogenous lynx1-like prototoxin that antagonizes alpha7-containing nicotinic receptors and prevents programmed cell death of parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Martin; Keefe, Julie; Wert, David; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Hulce, Jonathan J; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines; Nishi, Rae

    2009-11-25

    Vertebrate alpha-bungarotoxin-like molecules of the Ly-6 superfamily have been implicated as balancers of activity and survival in the adult nervous system. To determine whether a member of this family could be involved in the development of the avian ciliary ganglion, we identified 6 Gallus genes by their homology in structure to mouse lynx1 and lynx2. One of these genes, an ortholog of prostate stem cell antigen (psca), is barely detectable at embryonic day (E) 8, before neuronal cell loss in the ciliary ganglion, but increases >100-fold as the number of neurons begins to decline between E9 and E14. PSCA is highly expressed in chicken and mouse telencephalon and peripheral ganglia and correlates with expression of alpha7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7-nAChRs). Misexpressing PSCA before cell death in the ciliary ganglion blocks alpha7-nAChR activation by nicotine and rescues the choroid subpopulation from dying. Thus, PSCA, a molecule previously identified as a marker of prostate cancer, is a member of the Ly-6 neurotoxin-like family in the nervous system, and is likely to play a role as a modulator of alpha7 signaling-induced cell death during development.

  4. Loss-of-function of Arabidopsis receptor-like kinase BIR1 activates cell death and defense responses mediated by BAK1 and SOBIR1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Huang, Xingchuan; Li, Meng; He, Ping; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-11-01

    The Arabidopsis receptor-like kinase (RLK) BIR1 (BAK1-INTERACTING RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 1) functions as a negative regulator of plant immunity. Previous work showed that loss-of-function of BIR1 leads to constitutive activation of cell death and defense responses. These autoimmune phenotypes are partially dependent on another RLK, SOBIR1. In order to identify additional components involved in the BIR1-regulated plant defense signaling pathway, a suppressor screen was carried out in the bir1-1 pad4-1 mutant background. Mutations in the suppressor mutants were identified by genetic mapping and re-sequencing of the mutant genomes. A number of suppressor mutants were found to carry mutations in an additional RLK, BAK1, indicating that BAK1 is required for activation of cell death and defense responses in bir1-1. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that BAK1 and SOBIR1 associate with each other in planta when the function of BIR1 is compromised. Although BAK1 was previously characterized as a negative regulator of cell death, our study highlights a novel role of BAK1 in promoting cell death and defense responses in conjunction with SOBIR1. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Programmed cell death: Superman meets Dr Death.

    PubMed

    Meier, Pascal; Silke, John

    2003-12-01

    This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell death (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell death, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Wnt3a mitigates acute lung injury by reducing P2X7 receptor-mediated alveolar epithelial type I cell death

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Y; Mishra, A; Weng, T; Chintagari, N R; Wang, Y; Zhao, C; Huang, C; Liu, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by pulmonary endothelial and epithelial cell damage, and loss of the alveolar–capillary barrier. We have previously shown that P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a cell death receptor, is specifically expressed in alveolar epithelial type I cells (AEC I). In this study, we hypothesized that P2X7R-mediated purinergic signaling and its interaction with Wnt/β-catenin signaling contributes to AEC I death. We examined the effect of P2X7R agonist 2′-3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and Wnt agonist Wnt3a on AEC I death in vitro and in vivo. We also assessed the therapeutic potential of Wnt3a in a clinically relevant ALI model of intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in ventilated mice. We found that the activation of P2X7R by BzATP caused the death of AEC I by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling through stimulating glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and proteasome. On the other hand, the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Wnt3a, GSK-3β inhibitor, or proteasome inhibitor blocked the P2X7R-mediated cell death. More importantly, Wnt3a attenuated the AEC I damage caused by intratracheal instillation of BzATP in rats or LPS in ventilated mice. Our results suggest that Wnt3a overrides the effect of P2X7R on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling to prevent the AEC I death and restrict the severity of ALI. PMID:24922070

  7. Excitotoxic death induced by released glutamate in depolarized primary cultures of mouse cerebellar granule cells is dependent on GABAA receptors and niflumic acid-sensitive chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Babot, Zoila; Cristòfol, Rosa; Suñol, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Excitotoxic neuronal death has been linked to neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have sought to clarify the involvement of Cl(-) channels in neuronal excitotoxicity using either N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate/kainic acid agonists. In this work we induced excitotoxic death in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells by means of endogenously released glutamate. Excitotoxicity was provoked by exposure to high extracellular K(+) concentrations ([K(+)](o)) for 5 min. Under these conditions, a Ca(2+)-dependent release of glutamate was evoked. When extracellular glutamate concentration rose to between 2 and 4 microM, cell viability was significantly reduced by 30-40%. The NMDA receptor antagonists (MK-801 and D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid) prevented cell death. Exposure to high [K(+)](o) produced a (36)Cl(-) influx which was significantly reduced by picrotoxinin. In addition, the GABA(A) receptor antagonists (bicuculline, picrotoxinin and SR 95531) protected cells from high [K(+)](o)-triggered excitotoxicity and reduced extracellular glutamate concentration. The Cl(-) channel blockers niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid also exerted a neuroprotective effect and reduced extracellular glutamate concentration, even though they did not reduce high [K(+)](o)-induced (36)Cl(-) influx. Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells also contain a population of GABAergic neurons that released GABA in response to high [K(+)](o). Chronic treatment of primary cultures with kainic acid abolished GABA release and rendered granule cells insensitive to high [K(+)](o) exposure, even though NMDA receptors were functional. Altogether, these results demonstrate that, under conditions of membrane depolarization, low micromolar concentrations of extracellular glutamate might induce an excitotoxic process through both NMDA and GABA(A) receptors and niflumic acid-sensitive Cl

  8. Heterologous production of death ligands' and death receptors' extracellular domains: structural features and efficient systems.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Michiro

    2012-08-01

    The extracellular domains of death ligands and those of death receptors are closely related to many serious human diseases through the initiation of apoptosis. Recombinant production of the extracellular domains has been investigated due to demand for a large amount of purified samples, which are a prerequisite for their biochemical characterization and constitute the fundamentals of medical applications. This review focuses on the recombinant production of extracellular domains of the major members of death ligand and death receptor families using non-mammalian expression systems with an emphasis on Fas ligand and Fas receptor. In contrast to the efficient production of the functional extracellular domains of TRAIL, TNFα and LTα by intracellular expression systems using Escherichia coli or Pichia pastoris, that of Fas ligand requires the secretory expression systems using P. pastoris or Dictyostelium discoideum, and the productivity in P. pastoris was largely dependent on tag sequence, potential N-glycosylation site and expressed protein region. On the other hand, the exploitation of insect cell systems is generally useful for the preparation of functional extracellular domains of death receptors containing many disulfide bridges in the absence of extended secondary structure, and a Bombyx mori larvae secretion system presented a superior productivity for human Fas receptor extracellular domain. Based on the results obtained so far, further efforts should be devoted to the artificial control of death ligand - death receptor interactions in order to make a contribution to medicine, represented by the development of novel biopharmaceuticals.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of R,R-tetrahydrochrysene against glutamate-induced cell death through anti-excitotoxic and antioxidant actions involving estrogen receptor-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Xing, J Z; Krukoff, T L

    2009-08-18

    Glutamate-induced neural cell death is mediated by excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Treatment of glutamate toxicity with estrogen and its related compounds for neuroprotection remains controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of selective estrogen receptor (ER) ligands on glutamate toxicity and found that R,R-tetrahydrochrysene (R,R-THC), an antagonist of ERbeta and agonist of ERalpha, has neuroprotective effects against glutamate-induced death in primary rat cortical cells and mouse N29/4 hypothalamic cells. The protective effect of R,R-THC was dose-dependent and was maintained even when added several hours after the initial glutamate exposure. R,R-THC blocked glutamate-induced depletion of intracellular glutathione, increased superoxide dismutase activity, and protected cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced death. R,R-THC also prevented glutamate-induced nuclear translocation of apoptotic inducing factor and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. The protective effect of R,R-THC was blocked by methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (MPP; an ERalpha antagonist) in glutamate-treated cortical cells, and pretreatment with MK-801 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) but not CNQX (an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) increased cell survival. On the other hand, MPP did not block the protective effect of R,R-THC in glutamate-treated N29/4 cells, and neither MK-801 nor CNQX conferred protection. Activation of ERalpha and/or ERbeta with 17beta-estradiol (E2), propyl-pyrazole-triol or diarylpropionitrile did not provide effective neuroprotection, and pretreatment with ICI 182,780 did not inhibit the protective effect of R,R-THC in either type of cell. These results suggest that the use of ER agonists (including E2) has limited beneficial effects when both excitotoxicity and oxidative stress occur. In contrast to agonists of ERs, R,R-THC, which possesses anti-excitotoxic and antioxidant actions via ER-dependent and -independent pathways, provides significant neuroprotection.

  10. Survival advantages conferred to colon cancer cells by E-selectin-induced activation of the PI3K-NFκB survival axis downstream of Death receptor-3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Extravasation of circulating cancer cells is a key event of metastatic dissemination that is initiated by the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells. It requires interactions between adhesion receptors on endothelial cells and their counter-receptors on cancer cells. Notably, E-selectin, a major endothelial adhesion receptor, interacts with Death receptor-3 present on metastatic colon carcinoma cells. This interaction confers metastatic properties to colon cancer cells by promoting the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and triggering the activation of the pro-migratory p38 and pro-survival ERK pathways in the cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated further the mechanisms by which the E-selectin-activated pathways downstream of DR3 confer a survival advantage to colon cancer cells. Methods Cell survival has been ascertained by using the WST-1 assay and by evaluating the activation of the PI3 kinase/NFκB survival axis. Apoptosis has been assayed by determining DNA fragmentation by Hoechst staining and by measuring cleavage of caspases-8 and -3. DR3 isoforms have been identified by PCR. For more precise quantification, targeted PCR reactions were carried out, and the amplified products were analyzed by automated chip-based microcapillary electrophoresis on an Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer instrument. Results Interaction between DR3-expressing HT29 colon carcinoma cells and E-selectin induces the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, p65/RelA, the anti-apoptotic subunit of NFκB, is rapidly translocated to the nucleus in response to E-selectin. This translocation is impaired by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Furthermore, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway increases the cleavage of caspase 8 in colon cancer cells treated with E-selectin and this effect is still further increased when both ERK and PI3K pathways are concomitantly inhibited. Intriguingly, metastatic colon cancer cell lines such as HT29 and SW620 express higher

  11. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  12. Phytosphingosine and C2-phytoceramide induce cell death and inhibit carbachol-stimulated phospholipase D activation in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Min, D S; Park, C; Park, C S; Cho, N J

    2001-06-15

    Sphingolipid metabolites, such as sphingosine and ceramide, are known to play important roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, but the physiological roles of phytosphingosine (PHS) and phytoceramide (PHC) are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the effects of PHS, C2-PHC (N-acetylPHS) and C6-PHC (N-hexanoylPHS) on cell growth and intracellular signalling enzymes. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with PHS, C2-PHC or C6-PHC resulted in cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. C2-PHC induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, whereas PHS or C6-PHC had little if any effect on DNA fragmentation under the same experimental conditions. Both PHS and C2-PHC inhibited carbachol-induced activation of phospholipase D (PLD), but not of phospholipase C (PLC), in CHO cells expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). On the other hand, no significant effect of C6-PHC on PLD or PLC was observed. Our results show that PHS and C2-PHC exert strong cytotoxic effects on CHO cells and modulate the mAChR-mediated signal transduction pathway.

  13. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A.; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin. PMID:23085102

  14. Insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by saporin delivered into cancer cells by an antibody fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Helguera, Gustavo; Rodríguez, José A; Leoh, Lai Sum; Erb, Michael A; Diamante, Graciel; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L

    2013-02-01

    We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) that targets the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and exhibits direct cytotoxicity against malignant B cells in an iron-dependent manner. ch128.1Av is also a delivery system and its conjugation with biotinylated saporin (b-SO6), a plant ribosome-inactivating toxin, results in a dramatic iron-independent cytotoxicity, both in malignant cells that are sensitive or resistant to ch128.1Av alone, in which the toxin effectively inhibits protein synthesis and triggers caspase activation. We have now found that the ch128.1Av/b-SO6 complex induces a transcriptional response consistent with oxidative stress and DNA damage, a response that is not observed with ch128.1Av alone. Furthermore, we show that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially blocks saporin-induced apoptosis suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to DNA damage and ultimately saporin-induced cell death. Interestingly, the toxin was detected in nuclear extracts by immunoblotting, suggesting the possibility that saporin might induce direct DNA damage. However, confocal microscopy did not show a clear and consistent pattern of intranuclear localization. Finally, using the long-term culture-initiating cell assay we found that ch128.1Av/b-SO6 is not toxic to normal human hematopoietic stem cells suggesting that this critical cell population would be preserved in therapeutic interventions using this immunotoxin.

  15. The death receptor 3/TL1A pathway is essential for efficient development of antiviral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Twohig, Jason P.; Marsden, Morgan; Cuff, Simone M.; Ferdinand, John R.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Perks, William V.; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Humphreys, Ian R.; Wang, Eddie C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Death receptor 3 (DR3, TNFRSF25), the closest family relative to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, promotes CD4+ T-cell-driven inflammatory disease. We investigated the in vivo role of DR3 and its ligand TL1A in viral infection, by challenging DR3-deficient (DR3KO) mice and their DR3WT littermates with the β-herpesvirus murine cytomegalovirus or the poxvirus vaccinia virus. The phenotype and function of splenic T-cells were analyzed using flow cytometry and molecular biological techniques. We report surface expression of DR3 by naive CD8+ T cells, with TCR activation increasing its levels 4-fold and altering the ratio of DR3 splice variants. T-cell responses were reduced up to 90% in DR3KO mice during acute infection. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated this was dependent on T-cell-restricted expression of DR3. DR3-dependent CD8+ T-cell expansion was NK and CD4 independent and due to proliferation, not decreased cell death. Notably, impaired immunity in DR3KO hosts on a C57BL/6 background was associated with 4- to 7-fold increases in viral loads during the acute phase of infection, and in mice with suboptimal NK responses was essential for survival (37.5%). This is the first description of DR3 regulating virus-specific T-cell function in vivo and uncovers a critical role for DR3 in mediating antiviral immunity. PMID:22593543

  16. An anthraquinone derivative, emodin sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL induced apoptosis through the induction of death receptors and downregulation of cell survival proteins.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Aruljothi; Loo, Ser Yue; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Manu, Kanjoormana A; Perumal, Ekambaram; Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Park, Joo-In; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Hui, Kam M; Kumar, Alan P; Sethi, Gautam

    2013-10-01

    Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is currently under clinical trials for cancer, however many tumor cells, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Hence, novel agents that can alleviate TRAIL-induced resistance are urgently needed. In the present report, we investigated the potential of emodin to enhance apoptosis induced by TRAIL in HCC cells. As observed by MTT cytotoxicity assay and the externalization of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine, we found that emodin can significantly potentiate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. When investigated for the mechanism(s), we observed that emodin can downregulate the expression of various cell survival proteins, and induce the cell surface expression of both TRAIL receptors, death receptors (DR) 4 as well as 5. In addition, emodin increased the expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in a time-dependent manner. Knockdown of CHOP by siRNA decreased the induction of emodin-induced DR5 expression and apoptosis. Emodin-induced induction of DR5 was mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as N-acetylcysteine blocked the induction of DR5 and the induction of apoptosis. Also, the knockdown of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein by siRNA significantly reduced the sensitization effect of emodin on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Overall, our experimental results clearly indicate that emodin can indeed potentiate TRAIL-induced apoptosis through the downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins, increased expression of apoptotic proteins, and ROS mediated upregulation of DR in HCC cells.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and Fas receptor contribute to cognitive deficits independent of cell death after concussive traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Khuman, Jugta; Meehan, William P; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Qiu, Jianhua; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Zhang, Jimmy; Giovannone, Eric; Lo, Eng H; Whalen, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and Fas receptor contribute to cell death and cognitive dysfunction after focal traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined the role of TNFα/Fas in postinjury functional outcome independent of cell death in a novel closed head injury (CHI) model produced with weight drop and free rotational head movement in the anterior–posterior plane. The CHI produced no cerebral edema or blood–brain barrier damage at 24 to 48 hours, no detectable cell death, occasional axonal injury (24 hours), and no brain atrophy or hippocampal cell loss (day 60). Microglia and astrocytes were activated (48 to 72 hours). Tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA, Fas mRNA, and TNFα protein were increased in the brain at 3 to 6 hours after injury (P<0.001 versus sham injured). In wild-type (WT) mice, CHI produced hidden platform (P=0.009) and probe deficits (P=0.001) in the Morris water maze versus sham. Surprisingly, injured TNFα/Fas knockout (KO) mice performed worse in hidden platform trials (P=0.036) but better in probe trials than did WT mice (P=0.0001). Administration of recombinant TNFα to injured TNFα/Fas KO mice reduced probe trial performance to that of WT. Thus, TNFα/Fas influence cognitive deficits independent of cell death after CHI. Therapies targeting TNFα/Fas together may be inappropriate for patients with concussive TBI. PMID:20940727

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and Fas receptor contribute to cognitive deficits independent of cell death after concussive traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Khuman, Jugta; Meehan, William P; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Qiu, Jianhua; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Zhang, Jimmy; Giovannone, Eric; Lo, Eng H; Whalen, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and Fas receptor contribute to cell death and cognitive dysfunction after focal traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined the role of TNFα/Fas in postinjury functional outcome independent of cell death in a novel closed head injury (CHI) model produced with weight drop and free rotational head movement in the anterior-posterior plane. The CHI produced no cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier damage at 24 to 48 hours, no detectable cell death, occasional axonal injury (24 hours), and no brain atrophy or hippocampal cell loss (day 60). Microglia and astrocytes were activated (48 to 72 hours). Tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA, Fas mRNA, and TNFα protein were increased in the brain at 3 to 6 hours after injury (P<0.001 versus sham injured). In wild-type (WT) mice, CHI produced hidden platform (P=0.009) and probe deficits (P=0.001) in the Morris water maze versus sham. Surprisingly, injured TNFα/Fas knockout (KO) mice performed worse in hidden platform trials (P=0.036) but better in probe trials than did WT mice (P=0.0001). Administration of recombinant TNFα to injured TNFα/Fas KO mice reduced probe trial performance to that of WT. Thus, TNFα/Fas influence cognitive deficits independent of cell death after CHI. Therapies targeting TNFα/Fas together may be inappropriate for patients with concussive TBI.

  19. Lace plant ethylene receptors, AmERS1a and AmERS1c, regulate ethylene-induced programmed cell death during leaf morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rantong, Gaolathe; Evans, Rodger; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2015-10-01

    The lace plant, Aponogeton madagascariensis, is an aquatic monocot that forms perforations in its leaves as part of normal leaf development. Perforation formation occurs through developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD). The molecular basis of PCD regulation in the lace plant is unknown, however ethylene has been shown to play a significant role. In this study, we examined the role of ethylene receptors during perforation formation. We isolated three lace plant ethylene receptors AmERS1a, AmERS1b and AmERS1c. Using quantitative PCR, we examined their transcript levels at seven stages of leaf development. Through laser-capture microscopy, transcript levels were also determined in cells undergoing PCD and cells not undergoing PCD (NPCD cells). AmERS1a transcript levels were significantly lower in window stage leaves (in which perforation formation and PCD are occurring) as compared to all other leaf developmental stages. AmERS1a and AmERS1c (the most abundant among the three receptors) had the highest transcript levels in mature stage leaves, where PCD is not occurring. Their transcript levels decreased significantly during senescence-associated PCD. AmERS1c had significantly higher transcript levels in NPCD compared to PCD cells. Despite being significantly low in window stage leaves, AmERS1a transcripts were not differentially expressed between PCD and NPCD cells. The results suggested that ethylene receptors negatively regulate ethylene-controlled PCD in the lace plant. A combination of ethylene and receptor levels determines cell fate during perforation formation and leaf senescence. A new model for ethylene emission and receptor expression during lace plant perforation formation and senescence is proposed.

  20. Essential oil of Cephalotaxus griffithii needle inhibits proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer cells: involvement of mitochondria-initiated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Dinesh Singh; Laishram, Surbala; Rana, Virendra Singh; Borah, Jagat Chandra; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of Cephalotaxus griffithii needle essential oil (CGNO) on proliferation and migration of human cervical cancer (HCC) cells. CGNO treatment decreased the viability of all the tested HCC (HeLa, ME-180 and SiHa) cells. Morphological and DNA fragmentation analysis of CGNO-treated HeLa cells indicated the involvement of apoptosis in inducing HCC cell death. CGNO increased mitochondrial membrane depolarisation and upregulated the expression of caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. The activity of caspase-8 and caspase-9 was also significantly increased. Wound healing and transwell migration assay demonstrated that CGNO significantly inhibited the migration of HeLa cells to close a scratched wound and also inhibited their migration through filter towards a chemotactic stimulus. Taken together, these results indicated that CGNO inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCC cells. Of note, CGNO induced HeLa cell death through mitochondria-initiated and death receptor-mediated apoptosis pathway.

  1. Liganded thyroid hormone receptor induces nucleosome removal and histone modifications to activate transcription during larval intestinal cell death and adult stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Kenta; Fu, Liezhen; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) plays an important role in regulating multiple cellular and metabolic processes, including cell proliferation, cell death, and energy metabolism, in vertebrates. Dysregulation of T(3) signaling results in developmental abnormalities, metabolic defects, and even cancer. We used T(3)-dependent Xenopus metamorphosis as a model to study how T(3) regulates transcription during vertebrate development. T(3) exerts its metamorphic effects through T(3) receptors (TR). TR recruits, in a T(3)-dependent manner, cofactor complexes that can carry out chromatin remodeling/histone modifications. Whether and how histone modifications change upon gene regulation by TR during vertebrate development is largely unknown. Here we analyzed histone modifications at T(3) target genes during intestinal metamorphosis, a process that involves essentially total apoptotic degeneration of the simple larval epithelium and de novo development of the adult epithelial stem cells, followed by their proliferation and differentiation into the complex adult epithelium. We demonstrated for the first time in vivo during vertebrate development that TR induces the removal of core histones at the promoter region and the recruitment of RNA polymerase. Furthermore, a number of histone activation and repression marks have been defined based on correlations with mRNA levels in cell cultures. Most but not all correlate with gene expression induced by liganded TR during development, suggesting that tissue and developmental context influences the roles of histone modifications in gene regulation. Our findings provide important mechanistic insights on how chromatin remodeling affects developmental gene regulation in vivo.

  2. Andrographolide protects liver cells from H2O2 induced cell death by upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1 mediated via adenosine A2a receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Smriti P K; Khole, Swati; Jagadish, Nidhi; Ghosh, Debjani; Gadgil, Vijay; Sinkar, Vilas; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2016-11-01

    Andrographolide, principle constituent of Andrographis paniculata Nees is used in traditional medicine in Southeast Asia and is known to exhibit various biological activities. Its antioxidant activity is due to its ability to activate one of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is regulated transcriptionally through Nrf-2. However, molecular mechanism underlying activation of Nrf-2/HO-1 has not yet been clearly understood. Protective effect of andrographolide against H2O2 induced cell death, reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation was observed in HepG2 cells. Ability of andrographolide to modulate G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) mediated signalling was determined using in silico docking and gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. We clearly show that andrographolide via adenosine A2A receptor signalling leads to activation of p38 MAP kinase, resulting in upregulation of Nrf-2, its translocation to nucleus and activation of HO-1. Additionally, it activates adenylate cyclase resulting in cAMP formation which in turn activates protein kinase A leading to inhibition of GSK-3β by phosphorylation. Inactivated GSK-3β leads to retention of Nrf-2 in the nucleus leading to sustained expression of HO-1 by binding to its antioxidant response element (ARE). Thus, andrographolide probably by binding to adenosine A2a receptor activates Nrf-2 transcription and also inhibits its exclusion from the nucleus by inactivating GSK-3β, together resulting in activation of HO-1. We speculate that andrographolide can be used as a therapeutic drug to combat oxidative stress implicated in pathogenesis of various diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sialylation of the Fas Death Receptor by ST6Gal-I Provides Protection against Fas-mediated Apoptosis in Colon Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Swindall, Amanda F.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase, ST6Gal-I, adds sialic acid in an α2–6 linkage to the N-glycans of membrane and secreted glycoproteins. Up-regulation of ST6Gal-I occurs in many cancers, including colon carcinoma, and correlates with metastasis and poor prognosis. However, mechanisms by which ST6Gal-I facilitates tumor progression remain poorly understood due to limited knowledge of enzyme substrates. Herein we identify the death receptor, Fas (CD95), as an ST6Gal-I substrate, and show that α2–6 sialylation of Fas confers protection against Fas-mediated apoptosis. Intriguingly, differences in ST6Gal-I activity do not affect the function of DR4 or DR5 death receptors upon treatment with TRAIL, implicating a selective effect of ST6Gal-I on the Fas receptor. Using ST6Gal-I knockdown and forced overexpression colon carcinoma cell models, we find that α2–6 sialylation of Fas prevents apoptosis stimulated by FasL as well as the Fas-activating antibody, CH11, as evidenced by decreased activation of caspases 8 and 3. We also show that α2–6 sialylation of Fas does not alter the binding of CH11, but rather inhibits the capacity of Fas to induce apoptosis by blocking the association of FADD with Fas cytoplasmic tails, an event that initiates death-inducing signaling complex formation. Furthermore, α2–6 sialylation of Fas inhibits Fas internalization, which is required for apoptotic signaling. Although dysregulated Fas activity is a well known mechanism through which tumors evade apoptosis, the current study is the first to link Fas insensitivity to the actions of a specific sialyltransferase. This finding establishes a new paradigm by which death receptor function is impaired for the self-protection of tumors against apoptosis. PMID:21550977

  4. MK2 balances inflammation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Oberst, Andrew

    2017-09-29

    The cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and the toll-like receptors (TLRs) coordinate immune responses by activating inflammatory transcriptional programs, but these signals can also trigger cell death. Recent studies identify the MAP kinase substrate MK2 as a key player in determining whether cells live or die in response to TNF and TLR signalling.

  5. Cell Proliferation, Cell Death, and Size Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Cell Death , and Size Regulation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas E. Baker, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Cell Proliferation, Cell Death , and Size Regulation DAMD17-97-1-7034 6. AUTHOR(S) Nicholas E. Baker, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...Contains unpublished data 5 CELL PROLIFERATION, CELL DEATH , AND SIZE REGULATION INTRODUCTION Cell proliferation and cell death come to attention through

  6. Poxvirus tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-like T2 proteins contain a conserved preligand assembly domain that inhibits cellular TNFR1-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Sedger, Lisa M; Osvath, Sarah R; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Grace; Chan, Francis K-M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2006-09-01

    The poxvirus tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue T2 has immunomodulatory properties; secreted myxoma virus T2 (M-T2) protein binds and inhibits rabbit TNF-alpha, while intracellular M-T2 blocks virus-induced lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we define the antiapoptotic function as inhibition of TNFR-mediated death via a highly conserved viral preligand assembly domain (vPLAD). Jurkat cell lines constitutively expressing M-T2 were generated and shown to be resistant to UV irradiation-, etoposide-, and cycloheximide-induced death. These cells were also resistant to human TNF-alpha, but M-T2 expression did not alter surface expression levels of TNFRs. Previous studies indicated that T2's antiapoptotic function was conferred by the N-terminal region of the protein, and further examination of this region revealed a highly conserved N-terminal vPLAD, which is present in all poxvirus T2-like molecules. In cellular TNFRs and TNF-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors (TRAILRs), PLAD controls receptor signaling competency prior to ligand binding. Here, we show that M-T2 potently inhibits TNFR1-induced death in a manner requiring the M-T2 vPLAD. Furthermore, we demonstrate that M-T2 physically associates with and colocalizes with human TNFRs but does not prevent human TNF-alpha binding to cellular receptors. Thus, M-T2 vPLAD is a species-nonspecific dominant-negative inhibitor of cellular TNFR1 function. Given that the PLAD is conserved in all known poxvirus T2-like molecules, we predict that it plays an important function in each of these proteins. Moreover, that the vPLAD confers an important antiapoptotic function confirms this domain as a potential target in the development of the next generation of TNF-alpha/TNFR therapeutics.

  7. Chaetocin induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and leads to death receptor 5-dependent apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianfang; Guo, Sen; Liu, Xiangguo; Su, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities are associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) initiation and progression. Epigenetic drugs are being studied and in clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis by the epigenetic agents remains unclear. SUV39H1 is an important methyl-transferase for lysine 9 on histone H3 and usually related to gene transcriptional suppression, and chaetocin acts as the inhibitor of SUV39H1. We demonstrated here that chaetocin effectively suppressed the growth of multiple lung cancer cells through inducing apoptosis in a death receptor 5 (DR5)-dependent manner. Chaetocin treatment activated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which gave rise to the up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP. Furthermore, ATF3 and CHOP contributed to the induction of DR5 and subsequent apoptosis. When SUV39H1 was silenced with siRNA, the expression of ATF3, CHOP and DR5 was elevated. Thereafter, knockdown of SUV39H1 induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells. In summary, chaetocin pharmacologically inhibits the activity of SUV39H1 which provokes ER stress and results in up-regulation of ATF3 and CHOP, leading to DR5-dependent apoptosis eventually. These findings provide a novel interpretation on the anti-neoplastic activity of epigenetic drugs as a new therapeutic approach in NSCLC.

  8. Mechanisms Involved in Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    We are using experimental infection with reoviruses as a model to study how viruses induce cell death (apoptosis) and cause dysregulation of the cell...and their ligand (TRAIL). Apoptosis involves both death-receptor (DR) and mitochondrial-associated cell death pathways, and leads to the early

  9. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  10. Dead Cert: Measuring Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Marfell, Brooke J; Scott, Adrian P; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-12-01

    Many cells in the body die at specific times to facilitate healthy development or because they have become old, damaged, or infected. Defects in cells that result in their inappropriate survival or untimely death can negatively impact development or contribute to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, AIDS, autoimmune disorders, and chronic infection. Cell death may also occur following exposure to environmental toxins or cytotoxic chemicals. Although this is often harmful, it can be beneficial in some cases, such as in the treatment of cancer. The ability to objectively measure cell death in a laboratory setting is therefore essential to understanding and investigating the causes and treatments of many human diseases and disorders. Often, it is sufficient to know the extent of cell death in a sample; however, the mechanism of death may also have implications for disease progression, treatment, and the outcomes of experimental investigations. There are a myriad of assays available for measuring the known forms of cell death, including apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, necroptosis, anoikis, and pyroptosis. Here, we introduce a range of assays for measuring cell death in cultured cells, and we outline basic techniques for distinguishing healthy cells from apoptotic or necrotic cells-the two most common forms of cell death. We also provide personal insight into where these assays may be useful and how they may or may not be used to distinguish apoptotic cell death from other death modalities. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. CoCl2 induces apoptosis through the mitochondria- and death receptor-mediated pathway in the mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Ha; Choi, Seong-Ho; Baek, Min-Woo; Kim, Mi-Hwa; Kim, Heong-Jun; Kim, Sun-Hun; Oh, Sang-Jin; Park, Hong-Ju; Kim, Won-Jae; Jung, Ji-Yeon

    2013-07-01

    Embryonic hypoxia/ischemia is a major cause of a poor fetal outcome and future neonatal and adult handicaps. However, biochemical cellular events in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells during hypoxia remains unclear. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of apoptosis in mES cells under CoCl2-induced hypoxic/ischemic conditions. CoCl2 enhanced the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in mES cells. The CoCl2-treated mES cells showed a decrease in cell viability as well as typical apoptotic changes, cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation and an extended G2/M phase of the cell cycle. CoCl2 augmented the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol from the mitochondria with a concomitant loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and upregulated the voltage-dependent anion channel. In addition, CoCl2-induced caspase-3, -8, and -9 activation and upregulation of p53 level, whereas downregulated Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, a member of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family in mES cells. Furthermore, CoCl2 led to the upregulation of Fas and Fas-ligand, which are the death receptor assemblies, as well as the cleavage of Bid in mES cells. These results suggest that CoCl2 induces apoptosis through both mitochondria- and death receptor-mediated pathways that are regulated by the Bcl-2 family in mES cells.

  12. The Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib Affects Chondrosarcoma Cells via the Mitochondria-Caspase Dependent Pathway and Enhances Death Receptor Expression and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker-Frohnwieser, Bibiane; Stuendl, Nicole; Kaltenegger, Heike; Leithner, Andreas; Rinner, Beate

    2016-01-01

    High grade chondrosarcoma is characterized by its lack of response to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, the tendency to develop lung metastases, and low survival rates. Research within the field prioritizes the development and expansion of new treatment options for dealing with unresectable or metastatic diseases. Numerous clinical trials using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib have shown specific efficacy as an active antitumor agent for treating a variety of solid tumors. However, as of yet the effect of bortezomib on chondrosarcoma has not been investigated. In our study, bortezomib decreased cell viability and proliferation in two different chondrosarcoma cell lines in a time- and dose dependent manner. FACS analysis, mRNA- and protein expression studies illustrated that induction of apoptosis developed through the intrinsic mitochondria-caspase dependent pathway. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment significantly increased expression of the death receptors TRAILR-1 and TRAILR-2 in chondrosarcoma cells. An increased expression of the autophagy markers Atg5/12, Beclin, and LC3BI-II supports the interpretation that bortezomib functions as a trigger for autophagy. Our results demonstrated for the first time that bortezomib reduced viability and proliferation of chondrosarcoma cells, induced apoptosis via the mitochondria-caspase dependent pathway and enhanced death receptor expression and autophagy. PMID:27978543

  13. Recovery of cellular E-cadherin precedes replenishment of estrogen receptor and estrogen-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells rescued from a death stimulus.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Claudia; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2002-08-01

    Loss of estrogen-responsiveness and impaired E-cadherin expression/function has been linked to increased metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. In this study, we report that proliferation of breast cancer cells can resume following removal of a toxic stimulus causing severe impairment of cell adhesion and estrogen responsiveness. This type of response was induced by okadaic acid (OA) in MCF-7 cells, and was accompanied by an almost complete block of DNA synthesis, loss of cell-cell contact and cell detachment from culture dishes, loss of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and E-cadherin, whereas only a weak, if any, inhibition of protein synthesis could be observed. These responses were detected in MCF-7 cells after a 1-day treatment with 50 nM OA, and could be reversed if OA-treated cells were recovered in a culture medium devoid of the toxin, so that rescued cells resumed growth 8-12 days after replating. By pulse-chase experiments, we found that protein synthesis was not significantly affected in rescued cells, whose DNA synthesis, instead, was almost completely blocked during the first days of MCF-7 cell rescue from OA treatment. We also analyzed E-cadherin, mitogen activated protein kinase isoforms ERK1 and ERK2, Bcl-2 and BAX proteins during the rescue of MCF-7 cells from OA-induced cell death, and found that their expression followed temporally defined patterns. Cellular levels of E-cadherin returned to control levels within the first days of the rescue, followed by ER, ERK1, and ERK2, and finally by Bcl-2 and BAX proteins. Under our experimental conditions, restoration of cell adhesion did not require a functional ER system, but recovery of a normal ER pool accompanied resumption of estrogen-dependent proliferation of OA-treated MCF-7 cells.

  14. Bleomycin induced sensitivity to TRAIL/Apo-2L-mediated apoptosis in human seminomatous testicular cancer cells is correlated with upregulation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Timur, Mujgan; Cort, Aysegul; Ozdemir, Evrim; Sarikcioglu, Sureyya Bilmen; Sanlioglu, Salih; Sanlioglu, Ahter Dilsad; Ozben, Tomris

    2015-01-01

    The most common solid tumor is testicular cancer among young men. Bleomycin is an antitumor antibiotic used for the therapy of testicular cancer. TRAIL is a proapoptotic cytokine that qualified as an apoptosis inducer in cancer cells. Killing cancer cells selectively via apoptosis induction is an encouraging therapeutic strategy in clinical settings. Combination of TRAIL with chemotherapeutics has been reported to enhance TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of different kinds of cancer cell lines. The molecular ground for sensitization of tumour cells to TRAIL by chemotherapeutics might involve upregulation of TRAIL-R1 (TR/1, DR4) and/or TRAIL-R2 (TR/2, DR5) receptors or activation of proapoptotic proteins including caspases. The curative potential of TRAIL to eradicate cancer cells selectively in testicular cancer has not been studied before. In this study, we investigated apoptotic effects of bleomycin, TRAIL, and their combined application in NTera-2 and NCCIT testicular cancer cell lines. We measured caspase 3 levels as an apoptosis indicator, and TRAIL receptor expressions using flow cytometry. Both NTera-2 and NCCIT cells were fairly resistant to TRAIL's apoptotic effect. Incubation of bleomycin alone caused a significant increase in caspase 3 activity in NCCIT. Combined incubation with bleomycin and TRAIL lead to elevated caspase 3 activity in Ntera-2. Exposure to 72 h of bleomycin increased TR/1, TR/2, and TR/3 cell-surface expressions in NTera-2. Elevation in TR/1 cell-surface expression was evident only at 24 h of bleomycin application in NCCIT. It can be concluded that TRAIL death receptor expressions in particular are increased in testicular cancer cells via bleomycin treatment, and TRAIL-induced apoptosis is initiated.

  15. The G protein-coupled receptor T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) facilitates tumor development by serving as an extracellular pH sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yuichiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Hamano, Fumie; Yanagida, Keisuke; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Kunita, Akiko; Yamori, Takao; Fukayama, Masashi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Tumors often are associated with a low extracellular pH, which induces a variety of cellular events. However, the mechanisms by which tumor cells recognize and react to the acidic environment have not been fully elucidated. T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) is an extracellular pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptor that is overexpressed in various tumors and tumor cell lines. In this report, we show that TDAG8 on the surface of tumor cells facilitates tumor development by sensing the acidic environment. Overexpression of TDAG8 in mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells enhanced tumor development in animal models and rendered LLC cells resistant to acidic culture conditions by increasing activation of protein kinase A and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in vitro. Moreover, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous TDAG8 in NCI-H460 human non-small cell lung cancer cells reduced cell survival in an acidic environment in vitro as well as tumor development in vivo. Microarray analyses of tumor-containing lung tissues of mice injected with TDAG8-expressing LLC cells revealed up-regulation of genes related to cell growth and glycolysis. These results support the hypothesis that TDAG8 enhances tumor development by promoting adaptation to the acidic environment to enhance cell survival/proliferation. TDAG8 may represent a therapeutic target for arresting tumor growth. PMID:20855608

  16. GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 interacts with RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 and suppresses cell death and defense responses in pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Plants use a variety of innate immune regulators to trigger cell death and defense responses against pathogen attack. We identified pepper (Capsicum annuum) GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (CaGRP1) as a RECEPTOR-LIKE CYTOPLASMIC PROTEIN KINASE1 (CaPIK1)-interacting partner, based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation analyses as well as gene silencing and transient expression analysis. CaGRP1 contains an N-terminal RNA recognition motif and a glycine-rich region at the C-terminus. The CaGRP1 protein had DNA- and RNA-binding activity in vitro. CaGRP1 interacted with CaPIK1 in planta. CaGRP1 and CaGRP1-CaPIK1 complexes were localized to the nucleus in plant cells. CaPIK1 phosphorylated CaGRP1 in vitro and in planta. Transient coexpression of CaGRP1 with CaPIK1 suppressed the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response, accompanied by a reduced CaPIK1-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst. The RNA recognition motif region of CaGRP1 was responsible for the nuclear localization of CaGRP1 as well as the suppression of the CaPIK1-triggered cell death response. CaGRP1 silencing in pepper conferred enhanced resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv) infection; however, CaPIK1-silenced plants were more susceptible to Xcv. CaGRP1 interacts with CaPIK1 and negatively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defense responses by suppressing ROS accumulation.

  17. Treatment with gemcitabine and TRA-8 anti-death receptor-5 mAb reduces pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell viability in vitro and growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    DeRosier, Leo Christopher; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Sellers, Jeffrey C; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Vickers, Selwyn M

    2006-11-01

    Gemcitabine is a first line agent for pancreatic cancer, but yields minimal survival benefit. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo effects of a monoclonal antibody (TRA-8) to human death receptor 5, combined with gemcitabine, using two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, S2VP10 and MIA PaCa-2. A subcutaneous model of pancreatic cancer was employed to test in vivo efficacy. S2VP10 and MIA PaCa-2 cells were treated with varying doses of gemcitabine and TRA-8. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined with an adenosine triphosphate assay and annexin V staining, respectively. Mitochondrial membrane destabilization was evaluated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of JC-1 stained cells. Caspase activation was evaluated by Western blot analysis. MIA PaCa-2 subcutaneous xenografts in athymic nude mice were evaluated for response to treatment with 200 mug of TRA-8 (intraperitoneal on days 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, and 27 postimplant) and 120 mg/kg gemcitabine (I.P. on days 10, 17, and 24). Tumor growth was measured with calipers. MIA PaCa-2 and S2VP10 cells receiving combination treatment with TRA-8 and gemcitabine demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity, annexin V staining, and mitochondrial destabilization compared to either agent alone. Combination treatment produced enhanced caspase-3 and -8 activation in both cell lines compared with either agent alone. In vivo studies demonstrated mean subcutaneous tumor surface area (produce of two largest diameters) doubling times of 38 days untreated, 32 days gemcitabine, 49 days TRA-8, and 64 days combination treatment. TRA-8 is an apoptosis-inducing agonistic monoclonal antibody that produced synergistic cytotoxicity in combination with gemcitabine in vitro through enhanced caspase activation. These findings, with substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a mouse pancreatic cancer xenograft model receiving combination therapy, are encouraging for anti-death receptor therapy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  18. TAK1 control of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Mihaly, S R; Ninomiya-Tsuji, J; Morioka, S

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death, a physiologic process for removing cells, is critically important in normal development and for elimination of damaged cells. Conversely, unattended cell death contributes to a variety of human disease pathogenesis. Thus, precise understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying control of cell death is important and relevant to public health. Recent studies emphasize that transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a central regulator of cell death and is activated through a diverse set of intra- and extracellular stimuli. The physiologic importance of TAK1 and TAK1-binding proteins in cell survival and death has been demonstrated using a number of genetically engineered mice. These studies uncover an indispensable role of TAK1 and its binding proteins for maintenance of cell viability and tissue homeostasis in a variety of organs. TAK1 is known to control cell viability and inflammation through activating downstream effectors such as NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). It is also emerging that TAK1 regulates cell survival not solely through NF-κB but also through NF-κB-independent pathways such as oxidative stress and receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) kinase activity-dependent pathway. Moreover, recent studies have identified TAK1's seemingly paradoxical role to induce programmed necrosis, also referred to as necroptosis. This review summarizes the consequences of TAK1 deficiency in different cell and tissue types from the perspective of cell death and also focuses on the mechanism by which TAK1 complex inhibits or promotes programmed cell death. This review serves to synthesize our current understanding of TAK1 in cell survival and death to identify promising directions for future research and TAK1's potential relevance to human disease pathogenesis. PMID:25146924

  19. The type 1 Interleukin 1 receptor is not required for the death of murine hippocampal dentate granule cells and microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Harry, G. Jean; Funk, Jason; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Aoyama, Mineyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the inflammatory process, neuronal death, and glia response have been observed under manipulation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine and subsequent signaling through the type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1). To investigate the influence of IL-1R1 activation in the pathophysiology of a chemical-induced injury to the murine hippocampus, we examined the level and pattern of neuronal death and neuroinflammation in 25-day-old male mice exposed to trimethyltin hydroxide (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.). In IL-1R1 null (IL-1R1−/−) mice, the pattern and severity of dentate granule cell death was similar as compared to wild type mice. In both groups of mice, mRNA levels for TNFα and MIP-1α were elevated and the early activation of microglia, including their ability to progress to a phagocytic phenotype, was maintained. Compared to WT mice, IL-1R1−/− mice displayed a limited glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) astrocytic response, as well as a preferential induction in mRNA levels of Fas signaling components. Cumulatively, these results indicate that IL-1R1 activation is not necessary for TMT-induced death of dentate granule neurons or local activation of microglia; however, IL-1R1 signaling is involved in mediating the structural response of astrocytes to injury and may also regulate apoptotic mechanisms by influencing Fas signaling components. PMID:18191113

  20. The adenosine A3 receptor agonist Cl-IB-MECA induces cell death through Ca²⁺/ROS-dependent down regulation of ERK and Akt in A172 human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Thae Hyun; Kim, Yong Keun; Woo, Jae Suk

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor (A3AR) is coupled to G proteins that are involved in a variety of intracellular signaling pathways and physiological functions. 2-Chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl) adenosine-5'-N-methylcarboxamide (Cl-IB-MECA), an agonist of A3AR, has been reported to induce cell death in various cancer cells. However, the effect of CI-IB-MECA on glioma cell growth is not clear. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of CI-IB-MECA on glioma cell viability and to determine its molecular mechanism. CI-IB-MECA inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of CI-IB-MECA resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) followed by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. EGTA and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) blocked the cell death induced by CI-IB-MECA, suggesting that Ca(2+) and ROS are involved in the Cl-IB-MECA-induced cell death. Western blot analysis showed that CI-IB-MECA induced the down-regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and Akt, which was prevented by EGTA, NAC, and the A3AR antagonist MRS1191. Transfection of constitutively active forms of MEK, the upstream kinase of ERK, and Akt prevented the cell death. CI-IB-MECA induced caspase-3 activation and the CI-IB-MECA-induced cell death was blocked by the caspase inhibitors DEVD-CHO and z-VAD-FMK. In addition, expression of XIAP and Survivin were decreased in cells treated with Cl-IB-MECA. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that CI-IB-MECA induce a caspase-dependent cell death through suppression of ERK and Akt mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and ROS generation in human glioma cells. These suggest that A3AR agonists may be a potential therapeutic agent for induction of apoptosis in human glioma cells.

  1. IL-1β increases necrotic neuronal cell death in the developing rat hippocampus after status epilepticus by activating type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI).

    PubMed

    Medel-Matus, Jesús-Servando; Álvarez-Croda, Dulce-Mariely; Martínez-Quiroz, Joel; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; Morgado-Valle, Consuelo; López-Meraz, María-Leonor

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is associated with seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the adult brain. The contribution of IL-1β to neuronal injury induced by status epilepticus (SE) in the immature brain remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of IL-1β administration on hippocampal neuronal cell death associated with SE in the immature brain, and the role of the type I receptor of IL-1β (IL-1RI). SE was induced with lithium-pilocarpine in 14-days-old (P14) rat pups. Six hours after SE onset, pups were i.c.v. injected in the right ventricle with IL-1β (0, 0.3, 3, 30, or 300 ng), 30 ng of IL-1RI antagonist (IL-1Ra) alone, or 30 ng of IL-1Ra plus 3ng of IL-1β. As control groups, pups without seizures were injected with 3 ng of IL-1β or vehicle. Twenty-four hours after SE onset, neuronal cell death in the CA1 field of dorsal hippocampus was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin, Fluoro-Jade B and in vivo propidium iodide (PI) staining; expression of active caspase-3 (aCas-3) was also determined, using immunohistochemistry. The concentration-response curve of IL-1β showed a bell-shape. Only pups injected with 3 ng of IL-1β after SE showed a significant increase in the number of cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and pyknotic nuclei, as well as F-JB positive cells with respect to the vehicle group. This effect was prevented when IL-1β was injected with IL-1Ra. Injection of 3 ng of IL-1β increased the number of PI-positive cells in CA1 area after SE. Injection of 3 ng of IL-1β did not produce hippocampal cell death in rats without seizures. Active caspase-3 expression was not observed after treatments in hippocampus. The activation of the IL-1β/IL-1RI system increases necrotic neuronal cell death caused by SE in rat pups.

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Deron R.; Reolo, Marie J. Y.; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C.; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2−/− knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. PMID:27080739

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) attenuates reactive oxygen species formation and inhibits cell death: implications for otoprotective therapy.

    PubMed

    Herr, Deron R; Reolo, Marie J Y; Peh, Yee Xin; Wang, Wei; Lee, Chang-Wook; Rivera, Rich; Paterson, Ian C; Chun, Jerold

    2016-04-15

    Ototoxic drugs, such as platinum-based chemotherapeutics, often lead to permanent hearing loss through apoptosis of neuroepithelial hair cells and afferent neurons of the cochlea. There is no approved therapy for preventing or reversing this process. Our previous studies identified a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), S1P2, as a potential mediator of otoprotection. We therefore sought to identify a pharmacological approach to prevent cochlear degeneration via activation of S1P2. The cochleae of S1pr2(-/-) knockout mice were evaluated for accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This showed that loss of S1P2 results in accumulation of ROS that precedes progressive cochlear degeneration as previously reported. These findings were supported by in vitro cell-based assays to evaluate cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and accumulation of ROS following activation of S1P2 in the presence of cisplatin. We show for the first time, that activation of S1P2 with a selective receptor agonist increases cell viability and reduces cisplatin-mediated cell death by reducing ROS. Cumulatively, these results suggest that S1P2 may serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity.

  4. Ionotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters are involved in necrotic neuronal cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation of hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Bonde, C; Noraberg, J; Noer, H; Zimmer, J

    2005-01-01

    Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures represent a feasible model for studies of cerebral ischemia and the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neurodegeneration. New results and a review of existing data are presented in the first part of this paper. The role of glutamate transporters, with special reference to recent results on inhibition of glutamate transporters under normal and energy-failure (ischemia-like) conditions is reviewed in the last part of the paper. The experimental work is based on hippocampal slice cultures derived from 7 day old rats and grown for about 3 weeks. In such cultures we investigated the subfield neuronal susceptibility to oxygen-glucose deprivation, the type of induced cell death and the involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Hippocampal slice cultures were also used in our studies on glutamate transporters reviewed in the last part of this paper. Neurodegeneration was monitored and/or shown by cellular uptake of propidium iodide, loss of immunocytochemical staining for microtubule-associated protein 2 and staining with Fluoro-Jade B. To distinguish between necrotic vs. apoptotic neuronal cell death we used immunocytochemical staining for active caspase-3 (apoptosis indicator) and Hoechst 33342 staining of nuclear chromatin. Our experimental studies on oxygen-glucose deprivation confirmed that CA1 pyramidal cells were the most susceptible to this ischemia-like condition. Judged by propidium iodide uptake, a selective CA1 lesion, with only minor affection on CA3, occurred in cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation for 30 min. Nuclear chromatin staining by Hoechst 33342 and staining for active caspase-3 showed that oxygen-glucose deprivation induced necrotic cell death only. Addition of 10 microM of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801, and 20 microM of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihyroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl

  5. EP2 Receptor Signaling Regulates Microglia Death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Myung-Soon; Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Joe, Eunhye; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The timely resolution of inflammation prevents continued tissue damage after an initial insult. In the brain, the death of activated microglia by apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism to resolve brain inflammation. How microglial death is regulated after activation is still unclear. We reported that exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interleukin (IL)-13 together initially activates and then kills rat microglia in culture by a mechanism dependent on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We show here that activation of the E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2, PTGER2) for prostaglandin E2 mediates microglial death induced by LPS/IL-13, and that EP2 activation by agonist alone kills microglia. Both EP2 antagonists and reactive oxygen scavengers block microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation. By contrast, the homeostatic induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) by LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation protects microglia. Both the Hmox1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin and a compound that releases the Hmox1 product carbon monoxide (CO) attenuated microglial death produced by LPS/IL-13. Whereas CO reduced COX-2 protein expression, EP2 activation increased Hmox1 and COX-2 expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, caspase-1 inhibition prevented microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or low (but not high) concentrations of butaprost, suggestive of a predominantly pyroptotic mode of death. Butaprost also caused the expression of activated caspase-3 in microglia, pointing to apoptosis. These results indicate that EP2 activation, which initially promotes microglial activation, later causes delayed death of activated microglia, potentially contributing to the resolution phase of neuroinflammation. PMID:25715797

  6. Anticancer effects of imperatorin isolated from Angelica dahurica: induction of apoptosis in HepG2 cells through both death-receptor- and mitochondria-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ke-wang; Sun, Jian-guo; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wa; Yang, Lu; Wu, Shi-hua; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Liu, Fei-yan

    2011-01-01

    Imperatorin (IM) is a furanocoumarin isolated from the root of Angelica dahurica, which is reported to have anticonvulsant and anticancer effects. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of IM on 9 human cancer cell lines was examined, and human hepatoma HepG2 cells were chosen as the target for preferential killing by IM. Particularly, the mechanism of IM-induced apoptosis and in vivo animal effects were also studied. Cell viability was measured using MTT assay, and apoptosis was detected by Hoechst staining, annexin V-PI staining, and DNA laddering assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected by JC-1 staining. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. In addition, the in vivo anticancer effect of IM was examined in nude mice bearing HepG2 cells. IM inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells through apoptosis induction in a time- and dose-dependent manner by observation of the nuclear morphology, DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine externalization, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c into cytosol, and activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. As cell death could partly be prevented by the caspase-8 or caspase-9 inhibitor and was evidenced by the results of Western blot analysis, our results also suggest that IM-induced apoptosis is mediated through both death receptor and mitochondrial pathways. In the animal model, IM was found to effectively suppress tumor growth by 31.93 and 63.18% at dosages of 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively, after treatment for 14 days. No significant weight loss or toxicity to the hosts was found. IM can function as a cancer suppressor by inducing apoptosis in HepG2 cells through both death-receptor- and mitochondria-mediated pathways. Furthermore, the in vivo antitumor activities of IM are significant with negligible weight loss and damage to the host. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Chul Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Kim, Joo Hwan; Park, Joo Ho; Ahn, Young Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV) has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL) inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax) was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25068924

  8. Hesperidin from Citrus seed induces human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell apoptosis via both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Wudtiwai, Benjawan; Khaw-On, Patompong; Rachakhom, Wasitta; Duangnil, Natthachai; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2016-01-01

    Citrus seeds are full of phenolic compounds, such as flavonoids. The aims of this study were to identify the types of flavonoids in Citrus seed extracts, the cytotoxic effect, mode of cell death, and signaling pathway in human hepatic cancer HepG2 cells. The flavonoids contain anticancer, free radical scavenging, and antioxidant activities. Neohesperidin, hesperidin, and naringin, active flavanone glycosides, were identified in Citrus seed extract. The cytotoxic effect of three compounds was in a dose-dependent manner, and IC50 levels were determined. The sensitivity of human HepG2 cells was as follows: hesperidin > naringin > neohesperidin > naringenin. Hesperidin induced HepG2 cells to undergo apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as evidenced by the externalization of phosphatidylserine and determined by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide staining using flow cytometry. Hesperidin did not induce the generation of reactive oxygen species, which was determined by using 2',7'-dichlorohydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry method. The number of hesperidin-treated HepG2 cells with the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential increased concentration dependently, using 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide employing flow cytometry. Caspase-9, -8, and -3 activities were activated and increased in hesperidin-treated HepG2 cells. Bcl-xL protein was downregulated whereas Bax, Bak, and tBid protein levels were upregulated after treatment with hesperidin in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the bioflavanone from Citrus seeds, hesperidin, induced human HepG2 cell apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway and death receptor pathway. Citrus seed flavonoids are beneficial and can be developed as anticancer drug or food supplement, which still needs further in vivo investigation in animals and human beings.

  9. Glutathione Efflux and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutathione (GSH) depletion is a central signaling event that regulates the activation of cell death pathways. GSH depletion is often taken as a marker of oxidative stress and thus, as a consequence of its antioxidant properties scavenging reactive species of both oxygen and nitrogen (ROS/RNS). Recent Advances: There is increasing evidence demonstrating that GSH loss is an active phenomenon regulating the redox signaling events modulating cell death activation and progression. Critical Issues: In this work, we review the role of GSH depletion by its efflux, as an important event regulating alterations in the cellular redox balance during cell death independent from oxidative stress and ROS/RNS formation. We discuss the mechanisms involved in GSH efflux during cell death progression and the redox signaling events by which GSH depletion regulates the activation of the cell death machinery. Future Directions: The evidence summarized here clearly places GSH transport as a central mechanism mediating redox signaling during cell death progression. Future studies should be directed toward identifying the molecular identity of GSH transporters mediating GSH extrusion during cell death, and addressing the lack of sensitive approaches to quantify GSH efflux. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1694–1713. PMID:22656858

  10. A new cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist HU-910 attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death associated with hepatic ischaemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Bėla; Magid, Lital; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Park, Ogyi; Tanchian, Galin; Gao, Rachel Y; Goodfellow, Catherine E; Glass, Michelle; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabinoid CB2 receptor activation has been reported to attenuate myocardial, cerebral and hepatic ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We have investigated the effects of a novel CB2 receptor agonist ((1S,4R)-2-(2,6-dimethoxy-4-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenyl)-7,7-dimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-en-1-yl)methanol (HU-910) on liver injury induced by 1 h of ischaemia followed by 2, 6 or 24 h of reperfusion, using a well-established mouse model of segmental hepatic I/R. KEY RESULTS Displacement of [3H]CP55940 by HU-910 from specific binding sites in CHO cell membranes transfected with human CB2 or CB1 receptors (hCB1/2) yielded Ki values of 6 nM and 1.4 µM respectively. HU-910 inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production by hCB2 CHO cells (EC50= 162 nM) and yielded EC50 of 26.4 nM in [35S]GTPγS binding assays using hCB2 expressing CHO membranes. HU-910 given before ischaemia significantly attenuated levels of I/R-induced hepatic pro-inflammatory chemokines (CCL3 and CXCL2), TNF-α, inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1, neutrophil infiltration, oxidative stress and cell death. Some of the beneficial effect of HU-910 also persisted when given at the beginning of the reperfusion or 1 h after the ischaemic episode. Furthermore, HU-910 attenuated the bacterial endotoxin-triggered TNF-α production in isolated Kupffer cells and expression of adhesion molecules in primary human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated with TNF-α. Pretreatment with a CB2 receptor antagonist attenuated the protective effects of HU-910, while pretreatment with a CB1 antagonist tended to enhance them. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS HU-910 is a potent CB2 receptor agonist which may exert protective effects in various diseases associated with inflammation and tissue injury. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph

  11. Combined modality therapy with TRAIL or agonistic death receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Hope M; Oliver, Patsy G; Lee, Choo Hyung; Li, Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies, such as antibodies and small molecule inhibitors have emerged as an important breakthrough in the treatment of many human cancers. One targeted therapy under development is tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) due to its ability to induce apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cell lines and xenografts, while lacking toxicity in most normal cells. TRAIL and apoptosis-inducing agonistic antibodies to the TRAIL death receptors have been the subject of many preclinical and clinical studies in the past decade. However, the sensitivity of individual cancer cell lines of a particular tumor type to these agents varies from highly sensitive to resistant. Various chemotherapy agents have been shown to enhance the apoptosis-inducing capacity of TRAIL receptor-targeted therapies and induce sensitization of TRAIL-resistant cells. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms associated with chemotherapy enhancement of TRAIL receptor-targeted therapies including modulation of the apoptotic (death receptor expression, FLIP and Bcl-2 or inhibitors of apoptosis [IAP] families) as well as cell signaling (NFκB, Akt, p53) pathways. These mechanisms will be important in establishing effective combinations to pursue clinically and in determining relevant targets for future cancer therapies. PMID:21263219

  12. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  13. Mechanisms of drug sensitization to TRA-8, an agonistic death receptor 5 antibody, involve modulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amm, Hope M; Zhou, Tong; Steg, Adam D; Kuo, Huichien; Li, Yufeng; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2011-04-01

    TRA-8, a monoclonal antibody to death receptor 5 induces apoptosis in various cancer cells; however, the degree of sensitivity varies from highly sensitive to resistant. We have previously shown that resistance to TRA-8 can be reversed by using chemotherapeutic agents, but the mechanism underlying this sensitization was not fully understood. Here, we examined the combination of TRA-8 with doxorubicin or bortezomib in breast cancer cells. In TRA-8-resistant BT-474 and T47D cells, both chemotherapy agents synergistically sensitized cells to TRA-8 cytotoxicity with enhanced activation of apoptosis shown by cleavage of caspases and PARP, reduced Bid, increased proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, and increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Doxorubicin or bortezomib combined with TRA-8 also reduced Bcl-XL and X-linked inhibitors of apoptosis (XIAP) in treated cells. Furthermore, targeting these proteins with pharmacologic modulators, AT-101, BH3I-2' and AT-406, produced sensitization to TRA-8. TRA-8 combined with AT-101 or BH3I-2', inhibitors of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, produced synergistic cytotoxicity against ZR-75-1, BT-474, and T47D cells. The IAP-targeting compound, AT-406, was synergistic with TRA-8 in BT-474 cells, and to a lesser extent T47D cells. Activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway was a common mechanism associated with sensitization of TRA-8-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Collectively, these studies show that the Bcl-2 and IAP families of proteins are involved in TRA-8 and chemotherapy resistance via their modulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Targeting these proteins with novel agents sensitized TRA-8-resistant breast cancer cells, suggesting this approach may represent a potent therapeutic strategy in the treatment of breast cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  14. Mechanisms of drug sensitization to TRA-8, an agonistic death receptor 5 antibody, involve modulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Amm, Hope M.; Zhou, Tong; Steg, Adam D.; Kuo, Huichien; Li, Yufeng; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    TRA-8, a monoclonal antibody to death receptor 5 induces apoptosis in various cancer cells; however the degree of sensitivity varies from highly sensitive to resistant. We have previously shown resistance to TRA-8 can be reversed using chemotherapeutic agents, but the mechanism underlying this sensitization was not fully understood. Here, we examined the combination of TRA-8 with doxorubicin or bortezomib in breast cancer cells. In TRA-8 resistant BT-474 and T47D cells, both chemotherapy agents synergistically sensitized cells to TRA-8 cytotoxicity with enhanced activation of apoptosis demonstrated by cleavage of caspases and PARP, reduced Bid, increased pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, and increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Doxorubicin or bortezomib combined with TRA-8 also reduced Bcl-XL and XIAP in treated cells. Furthermore, targeting these proteins with pharmacological modulators, AT-101, BH3I-2′ and AT-406, produced sensitization to TRA-8. TRA-8 combined with AT-101 or BH3I-2′, inhibitors of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, produced synergistic cytotoxicity against ZR-75-1, BT-474, and T47D cells. The IAP targeting compound, AT-406, was synergistic with TRA-8 in BT-474 cells and to a lesser extent T47D cells. Activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway was a common mechanism associated with sensitization of TRA-8 resistant breast cancer cell lines. Collectively, these studies show that the Bcl-2 and IAP families of proteins are involved in TRA-8 and chemotherapy resistance via their modulation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Targeting these proteins with novel agents sensitized TRA-8 resistant breast cancer cells, suggesting this approach may represent a potent therapeutic strategy in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:21357440

  15. Adaptive responses induced by 24S-hydroxycholesterol through liver X receptor pathway reduce 7-ketocholesterol-caused neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Akishi; Urano, Yasuomi; Itoh, Sayoko; Suda, Naoto; Kotani, Rina; Nishimura, Yuki; Saito, Yoshiro; Noguchi, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation products have been known to induce cellular adaptive responses and enhance tolerance against subsequent oxidative stress through up-regulation of antioxidant compounds and enzymes. 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24SOHC) which is endogenously produced oxysterol in the brain plays an important role in maintaining brain cholesterol homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated adaptive responses induced by brain-specific oxysterol 24SOHC in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cells treated with 24SOHC at sub-lethal concentrations showed significant reduction in cell death induced by subsequent treatment with 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) in both undifferentiated and retinoic acid-differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. These adaptive responses were also induced by other oxysterols such as 25-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol which are known to be ligands of liver X receptor (LXR). Co-treatment of 24SOHC with 9-cis retinoic acid, a retinoid X receptor ligand, enhanced the adaptive responses. Knockdown of LXRβ by siRNA diminished the adaptive responses induced by 24SOHC almost completely. The treatment with 24SOHC induced the expression of LXR target genes, such as ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and G1 (ABCG1). The 24SOHC-induced adaptive responses were significantly attenuated by siRNA for ABCG1 but not by siRNA for ABCA1. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that 24SOHC at sub-lethal concentrations induces adaptive responses via transcriptional activation of LXR signaling pathway, thereby protecting neuronal cells from subsequent 7KC-induced cytotoxicity.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ/mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 signaling protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. However, the mechanism of seizure-induced neuronal cell death remains unclear. The mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is expressed in selected regions of the brain and is emerged as an endogenous neuroprotective molecule in many neurological disorders. We evaluated the neuroprotective role of UCP2 against seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death under experimental status epilepticus. Methods In Sprague–Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Oxidized protein level, translocation of Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c between cytosol and mitochondria, and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ (PPARγ) and UCP2 were examined in the hippocampal CA3 subfield following KA-induced status epilepticus. The effects of microinjection bilaterally into CA3 area of a PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone or a PPARγ antagonist, GW9662 on UCP2 expression, induced superoxide anion (O2· -) production, oxidized protein level, mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities, translocation of Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation in bilateral CA3 subfields were examined. Results Increased oxidized proteins and mitochondrial or cytosol translocation of Bax or cytochrome c in the hippocampal CA3 subfield was observed 3–48 h after experimental status epilepticus. Expression of PPARγ and UCP2 increased 12–48 h after KA-induced status epilepticus. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone increased UCP2 expression, reduced protein oxidation, O2· - overproduction and dysfunction of mitochondrial Complex I, hindered the translocation of Bax and cytochrome c, and reduced DNA fragmentation in the CA3 subfield. Pretreatment with GW9662 produced opposite effects. Conclusions Activation of PPARγ upregulated mitochondrial UCP2 expression

  17. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics. © 2013.

  18. Interference with Protease-activated Receptor 1 Alleviates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglial Cells through the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxin; Yang, Wuyang; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Wang, Baocheng; Xu, Shujun; Zhu, Weijie; Yu, Feng; Yuan, Shaoji; Lu, Peigang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive microglial cells activation in response to inflammatory stimuli leads to synaptic loss, dysfunction, and neuronal cell death. Activated microglia are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions and frequently contribute to several complications. Accumulating evidence suggests that signaling through PAR-1 is involved in inflammation, however, its function has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we have demonstrated that the suppression of PAR-1 leads to down-regulation of inflammatory factors including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NO, as well as the prevention of activation of NF-κB in BV2 cells. In addition, we found that a PAR-1 antagonist, SCH, prevented LPS-induced excessive microglial activation in a dose-dependent manner. As a result of SCH treatment, neuronal cell death via up-regulation of Akt-mediated pathways was reduced. Our results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of SCH are linked to its ability to block an inflammatory response. Further, we found that SCH inhibited the death of PC12 neurons from the cytotoxicity of activated BV2 cells via activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These neuro-protective effects appear to be related to inhibition of PAR-1, and represents a novel neuroprotective strategy that could has potential for use in therapeutic interventions of neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:27910893

  19. A novel agonistic anti-human death receptor 5 monoclonal antibody with tumoricidal activity induces caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Yao-Wu; Chen, Ju-Gao; Bai, Hui-Ling; Huang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Jing; Li, Shu-Lian; Liu, Guang-Chao; Jiang, Qi; Chai, Jing; Zhao, Yue-Ping; Ma, Yuan-Fang

    2011-04-01

    An agonistic antibody against TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand death receptor 5 (DR5) is a practicable candidate drug for antitumor therapy. In this study, a novel murine anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody, mDRA-6(IgG1-κ), has been generated. This study aimed to explore the caspase-dependent and mitochondrial mechanisms of mDRA-6 in inducing apoptosis in human leukemia Jurkat cells. The apoptotic effects of mDRA-6 on Jurkat cells, which express DR5 on the cell surface, were detected by flow cytometry and western blot after exposure to different doses of mDRA-6 and at fixed doses of mDRA-6 at different times. It was demonstrated that mDRA-6 can induce Jurkat cell apoptosis via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent pathways. These results indicate that the novel antibody mDRA-6 against DR5 has an antitumor function and may provide a new reagent for tumor therapy.

  20. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induces apoptosis in p53-silenced L02 cells via activation of both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangtao; Zhang, Wenjuan; Qin, Qizhi; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Hongyan; Xiong, Wei; Yuan, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) is one of the main metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. The evidence shows that DEHP may exert its toxic effects primarily via MEHP, which is 10-fold more potent than its parent compound in toxicity in vitro. MEHP-induced apoptosis is mediated by either p53-dependent or -independent pathway. However, the detailed mechanism of its toxicity remains unclear. In this study, immortalized normal human liver cell line L02 was chosen, as an in vitro model of nonmalignant liver, to elucidate the role of p53 in MEHP-induced apoptosis. The cells were treated with MEHP (6.25, 12.50, 25.00, 50.00, and 100.00 μM) for 24 and 36 h, then small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to specifically silence p53 gene of L02 cells. The results indicated that MEHP caused oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in L02 cells were associated with the p53 signaling pathway. Further study found that MEHP (50.00 and 100.00 μM) induced apoptosis in p53-silenced L02 cells, along with the up-regulations of Fas and FasL proteins as well as increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase 3, 8, and 9 activities. Additionally, both FasL inhibitor (AF-016) and Caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp- fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK) could prevent the cell apoptosis induced by MEHP. The findings suggested that MEHP-induced apoptosis in L02 cells involving a Caspases-mediated mitochondrial signaling pathway and/or death receptor pathway. p53 was not absolutely necessary for MEHP-induced L02 cell apoptosis.

  1. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain.

  2. The miR9863 Family Regulates Distinct Mla Alleles in Barley to Attenuate NLR Receptor-Triggered Disease Resistance and Cell-Death Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Cheng, Xiliu; Liu, Da; Xu, Weihui; Wise, Roger; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley. PMID:25502438

  3. Salt stress-induced production of reactive oxygen- and nitrogen species and cell death in the ethylene receptor mutant Never ripe and wild type tomato roots.

    PubMed

    Poór, Péter; Kovács, Judit; Borbély, Péter; Takács, Zoltán; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2015-12-01

    The salt stress triggered by sublethal, 100 mM and lethal, 250 mM NaCl induced ethylene production as well as rapid accumulation of superoxide radical and H2O2 in the root tips of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) wild type and ethylene receptor mutant, Never ripe (Nr/Nr) plants. In the wild type plants superoxide accumulation confined to lethal salt concentration while H2O2 accumulated more efficiently under sublethal salt stress. However, in Nr roots the superoxide production was higher and unexpectedly, H2O2 level was lower than in the wild type under sublethal salt stress. Nitric oxide production increased significantly under sublethal and lethal salt stress in both genotypes especially in mutant plants, while peroxynitrite accumulated significantly under lethal salt stress. Thus, the nitro-oxidative stress may be stronger in Nr roots, which leads to the programmed death of tissues, characterized by the DNA and protein degradation and loss of cell viability under moderate salt stress. In Nr mutants the cell death was induced in the absence of ethylene perception. Although wild type roots could maintain their potassium content under moderate salt stress, K(+) level significantly declined leading to small K(+)/Na(+) ratio in Nr roots. Thus Nr mutants were more sensitive to salt stress than the wild type and the viability of root cells decreased significantly under moderate salt stress. These changes can be attributed to a stronger ionic stress due to the K(+) loss from the root tissues.

  4. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom on colon cancer cell growth by activation of death receptors and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Lee, Hye Lim; Ham, Young Wan; Song, Ho Sueb; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Bee venom (BV) has been used as a traditional medicine to treat arthritis, rheumatism, back pain, cancerous tumors, and skin diseases. However, the effects of BV on the colon cancer and their action mechanisms have not been reported yet. We used cell viability assay and soft agar colony formation assay for testing cell viability, electro mobility shift assay for detecting DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and Western blotting assay for detection of apoptosis regulatory proteins. We found that BV inhibited growth of colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. We also found that the expression of death receptor (DR) 4, DR5, p53, p21, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-8, and cleaved caspase-9 was increased by BV treatment in a dose dependent manner (0–5 μg/ml). Consistent with cancer cell growth inhibition, the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was also inhibited by BV treatment. Besides, we found that BV blocked NF-κB activation by directly binding to NF-κB p50 subunit. Moreover, combination treatment with BV and p50 siRNA or NF-κB inhibitor augmented BV-induced cell growth inhibition. However, p50 mutant plasmid (C62S) transfection partially abolished BV-induced cell growth inhibiton. In addition, BV significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, these results suggested that BV could inhibit colon cancer cell growth, and these anti-proliferative effects may be related to the induction of apoptosis by activation of DR4 and DR5 and inhibition of NF-κB. PMID:26561202

  5. An essential oil and its major constituent isointermedeol induce apoptosis by increased expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c and apical death receptors in human leukaemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Malik, Fayaz; Bhushan, Shashi; Sethi, Vijay K; Shahi, Ashok K; Kaur, Jagdeep; Taneja, Subhash C; Qazi, Ghulam N; Singh, Jaswant

    2008-02-15

    An essential oil from a lemon grass variety of Cymbopogon flexuosus (CFO) and its major chemical constituent sesquiterpene isointermedeol (ISO) were investigated for their ability to induce apoptosis in human leukaemia HL-60 cells because dysregulation of apoptosis is the hallmark of cancer cells. CFO and ISO inhibited cell proliferation with 48 h IC50 of approximately 30 and 20 microg/ml, respectively. Both induced concentration dependent strong and early apoptosis as measured by various end-points, e.g. annexinV binding, DNA laddering, apoptotic bodies formation and an increase in hypo diploid sub-G0 DNA content during the early 6h period of study. This could be because of early surge in ROS formation with concurrent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential observed. Both CFO and ISO activated apical death receptors TNFR1, DR4 and caspase-8 activity. Simultaneously, both increased the expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c protein with its concomitant release to cytosol leading to caspase-9 activation, suggesting thereby the involvement of both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Further, Bax translocation, and decrease in nuclear NF-kappaB expression predict multi-target effects of the essential oil and ISO while both appeared to follow similar signaling apoptosis pathways. The easy and abundant availability of the oil combined with its suggested mechanism of cytotoxicity make CFO highly useful in the development of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  6. [Pathophysiologic programming of cell death].

    PubMed

    Dobryszycka, W

    1998-01-01

    In multicellular organisms homeostasis depends on a balance between cell proliferation and cell death. In this review principles of the physiology of programmed cell death (apoptosis), i.e. biochemical features, involved genes and proteolytic enzymes, are described. Alterations in apoptosis contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, including cancer, viral infections, inflammation, hematopoietic and immunological system defects (e.g. AIDS), neurodegenerative disorders. Specific effect on regulation of apoptosis might lead to new possibilities for treatment. Methods of quantitative determinations of apoptosis are discussed.

  7. Pancreatic β Cell Mass Death

    PubMed Central

    Marrif, Husnia I.; Al-Sunousi, Salma I.

    2016-01-01

    Type two diabetes (T2D) is a challenging metabolic disorder for which a cure has not yet been found. Its etiology is associated with several phenomena, including significant loss of insulin-producing, beta cellcell) mass via progressive programmed cell death and disrupted cellular autophagy. In diabetes, the etiology of β cell death and the role of mitochondria are complex and involve several layers of mechanisms. Understanding the dynamics of those mechanisms could permit researchers to develop an intervention for the progressive loss of β cells. Currently, diabetes research has shifted toward rejuvenation and plasticity technology and away from the simplified approach of hormonal compensation. Diabetes research is currently challenged by questions such as how to enhance cell survival, decrease apoptosis and replenish β cell mass in diabetic patients. In this review, we discuss evidence that β cell development and mass formation are guided by specific signaling systems, particularly hormones, transcription factors, and growth factors, all of which could be manipulated to enhance mass growth. There is also strong evidence that β cells are dynamically active cells, which, under specific conditions such as obesity, can increase in size and subsequently increase insulin secretion. In certain cases of aggressive or advanced forms of T2D, β cells become markedly impaired, and the only alternatives for maintaining glucose homeostasis are through partial or complete cell grafting (the Edmonton protocol). In these cases, the harvesting of an enriched population of viable β cells is required for transplantation. This task necessitates a deep understanding of the pharmacological agents that affect β cell survival, mass, and function. The aim of this review is to initiate discussion about the important signals in pancreatic β cell development and mass formation and to highlight the process by which cell death occurs in diabetes. This review also examines the

  8. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Chen, Lin; Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-02-20

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future.

  9. Lovastatin enhances adenovirus-mediated TRAIL induced apoptosis by depleting cholesterol of lipid rafts and affecting CAR and death receptor expression of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhicheng; Shen, Liangfang; Kao, Chinghai; Hock, Janet M.; Sun, Lunquan; Li, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenovirus and apoptosis inducer TRAIL are promising cancer therapies. Their antitumor efficacy, when used as single agents, is limited. Oncolytic adenoviruses have low infection activity, and cancer cells develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we explored combining prostate-restricted replication competent adenovirus-mediated TRAIL (PRRA-TRAIL) with lovastatin, a commonly used cholesterol-lowering drug, as a potential therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Lovastatin significantly enhanced the efficacy of PRRA-TRAIL by promoting the in vivo tumor suppression, and the in vitro cell killing and apoptosis induction, via integration of multiple molecular mechanisms. Lovastatin enhanced PRRA replication and virus-delivered transgene expression by increasing the expression levels of CAR and integrins, which are critical for adenovirus 5 binding and internalization. Lovastatin enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis by increasing death receptor DR4 expression. These multiple effects of lovastatin on CAR, integrins and DR4 expression were closely associated with cholesterol-depletion in lipid rafts. These studies, for the first time, show correlations between cholesterol/lipid rafts, oncolytic adenovirus infection efficiency and the antitumor efficacy of TRAIL at the cellular level. This work enhances our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that support use of lovastatin, in combination with PRRA-TRAIL, as a candidate strategy to treat human refractory prostate cancer in the future. PMID:25605010

  10. Fas death receptor signalling: roles of Bid and XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, T; Strasser, A; Jost, P J

    2012-01-01

    Fas (also called CD95 or APO-1), a member of a subgroup of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily that contain an intracellular death domain, can initiate apoptosis signalling and has a critical role in the regulation of the immune system. Fas-induced apoptosis requires recruitment and activation of the initiator caspase, caspase-8 (in humans also caspase-10), within the death-inducing signalling complex. In so-called type 1 cells, proteolytic activation of effector caspases (-3 and -7) by caspase-8 suffices for efficient apoptosis induction. In so-called type 2 cells, however, killing requires amplification of the caspase cascade. This can be achieved through caspase-8-mediated proteolytic activation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain (BH)3-only protein BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid), which then causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation. This in turn leads to mitochondrial release of apoptogenic proteins, such as cytochrome c and, pertinent for Fas death receptor (DR)-induced apoptosis, Smac/DIABLO (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase/direct IAP binding protein with low Pi), an antagonist of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), which imposes a brake on effector caspases. In this review, written in honour of Juerg Tschopp who contributed so much to research on cell death and immunology, we discuss the functions of Bid and XIAP in the control of Fas DR-induced apoptosis signalling, and we speculate on how this knowledge could be exploited to develop novel regimes for treatment of cancer. PMID:21959933

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immunosuppression: selective triggering of CD4+ T-cell death by the T-cell receptor-CD3 pathway and not by the CD69 or Ly-6 activation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, M F; DosReis, G A

    1996-01-01

    In a model of experimental Chagas' disease induced with metacyclic forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells undergo T-cell receptor (TCR)-CD3-mediated activation-induced cell death (AICD) in vitro. CD4+ T cells from T. cruzi-infected mice also developed unresponsiveness in proliferative responses to TCR-CD3-mediated stimulation. A linear correlation was found between extent of proliferative unresponsiveness and loss of CD4+ T-cell viability. CD4+ T-cell activation through the CD69 or Ly-6 A/E pathway, on the other hand, did not result in proliferative unresponsiveness compared with controls. Lack of suppression in proliferation assays correlated with lack of AICD by cells stimulated through the CD69 or Ly-6 A/E pathway. Concomitant stimulation through CD69, however, did not rescue CD4+ T cells from CD3-induced death. Flow cytometry study of cells stimulated in vitro showed no defect in interleukin-2 receptor expression by CD4+ T cells from infected donors, which escaped TCR-mediated AICD. In vivo injection of anti-CD3 into acutely infected mice, but not into control mice, led to splenocyte DNA fragmentation and failed to increase splenic CD4+ T-cell numbers. These results show that TCR-CD3-mediated AICD is involved in CD4+ T-cell unresponsiveness in vitro following infection with T. cruzi. In addition, successful activation of these cells through the CD69 and Ly-6 pathways is due to differences in the inability of these stimuli to trigger AICD. Since TCR-CD3-mediated AICD can be induced in vivo in infected mice, these findings may be relevant for the onset of immunological disturbances in the host. PMID:8613360

  12. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib sensitizes cells to killing by death receptor ligand TRAIL via BH3-only proteins Bik and Bim.

    PubMed

    Nikrad, Malti; Johnson, Thomas; Puthalalath, Hamsa; Coultas, Leigh; Adams, Jerry; Kraft, Andrew S

    2005-03-01

    Previously, we showed that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade (formerly PS-341) synergizes with the protein tumor necrosis factor alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a ligand for certain death receptors, to induce apoptosis in cell lines derived from prostate and colon cancers. Because apoptosis is often triggered by BH3-only proteins of the Bcl-2 family, we have explored the hypothesis that bortezomib contributes to the apoptosis by up-regulating their levels. Indeed, bortezomib induced increases of Bik and/or Bim in multiple cell lines but not notably of two other BH3-only proteins (Puma and Bid) nor other family members (Bax, Bak, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL). The increase in Bik levels seems to reflect inhibition by bortezomib of its proteasome-mediated degradation. Importantly, both Bik and Bim seem central to the proapoptotic function of bortezomib, because mouse embryo fibroblasts in which the genes for both Bik and Bim had been disrupted were refractory to its cytotoxic action. Similarly, the synergy between bortezomib and TRAIL in killing human prostate cancer cells was impaired in cells in which both Bik and Bim were down-regulated by RNA interference. Further evidence that bortezomib acts through the mitochondrial pathway regulated by the Bcl-2 family is that deficiency for APAF-1, which acts downstream of Bcl-2, also blocked its apoptotic effect. These results implicate BH3-only proteins, in particular both Bik and Bim, as important mediators of the antitumor action of bortezomib and establish their role in its enhancement of TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

  13. Alternative Cell Death Pathways and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-01-01

    While necroptosis has for long been viewed as an accidental mode of cell death triggered by physical or chemical damage, it has become clear over the last years that necroptosis can also represent a programmed form of cell death in mammalian cells. Key discoveries in the field of cell death research, including the identification of critical components of the necroptotic machinery, led to a revised concept of cell death signaling programs. Several regulatory check and balances are in place in order to ensure that necroptosis is tightly controlled according to environmental cues and cellular needs. This network of regulatory mechanisms includes metabolic pathways, especially those linked to mitochondrial signaling events. A better understanding of these signal transduction mechanisms will likely contribute to open new avenues to exploit our knowledge on the regulation of necroptosis signaling for therapeutic application in the treatment of human diseases. PMID:23401689

  14. Neuronal cell death in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2007-12-01

    It is generally assumed that neuronal cell death is minimal in liver failure and is insufficient to account for the neuropsychiatric symptoms characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. However, contrary to this assumption, neuronal cell damage and death are well documented in liver failure patients, taking the form of several distinct clinical entities namely acquired (non-Wilsonian) hepatocerebral degeneration, cirrhosis-related Parkinsonism, post-shunt myelopathy and cerebellar degeneration. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that liver failure contributes to the severity of neuronal loss in Wernicke's encephalopathy. The long-standing nature of the thalamic and cerebellar lesions, over 80% of which are missed by routine clinical evaluation, together with the probability that they are nutritional in origin, underscores the need for careful nutritional management (adequate dietary protein, Vitamin B(1)) in liver failure patients. Mechanisms identified with the potential to cause neuronal cell death in liver failure include NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity, lactic acidosis, oxidative/nitrosative stress and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The extent of neuronal damage in liver failure may be attenuated by compensatory mechanisms that include down-regulation of NMDA receptors, hypothermia and the presence of neuroprotective steroids such as allopregnanolone. These findings suggest that some of the purported "sequelae" of liver transplantation (gait ataxia, memory loss, confusion) could reflect preexisting neuropathology.

  15. Activation of Type 4 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Death of Neural Stem Cells with Inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichao; Ma, Wen; Wang, Li; Gong, Hanshi; Tian, Yumei; Zhang, Jianshui; Liu, Jianxin; Lu, Haixia

    2015-01-01

    Promoting both endogenous and exogenous neural stem cells' (NSCs) survival in the hostile host environments is essential to cell replacement therapy for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR4), one of the members of mGluRs, has been shown to protect neurons from acute and chronic excitotoxic insults in various brain damages. The present study investigated the preventive effects of mGluR4 on NSC injury induced by oxidative stress. Under challenge with H2O2, loss of cell viability was observed in cultured rat NSCs, and treatment with selective mGluR4 agonist VU0155041 conferred protective effects against the loss of cellular viability in a concentration-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of VU0155041 (30 μM) also inhibited the excessive NSC death induced by H2O2, and group III mGluRs antagonist (RS)-a-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) or gene-targeted knockdown abolished the protective action of mGluR4, indicated by propidium iodide–Hoechst and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Western blot assay demonstrated that mGluR4 activation reversed the decreased procaspase-8/9/3and the destructed Bcl-2/Bax expressing balance, and likewise, MSOP and mGluR4 knockdown abrogated the action of mGluR4 activity. Furthermore, inhibition of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were observed after mGluR4 activation, and as paralleling control, JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 and p38-specific inhibitor SB203580 significantly rescued the H2O2-mediated NSC apoptosis and cleavage of procaspase-3. We suggest that activation of mGluR4 prevents oxidative stress-induced NSC death and apoptotic-associated protein activities with involvement of inhibiting the JNK and p38 pathways in cell culture. Our findings may help to develop strategies for enhancing the resided and transplanted NSC survival

  16. Muscarinic M1 receptor partially modulates higher sensitivity to cadmium-induced cell death in primary basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase variants dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadon, María José; Díaz, María Jesús; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, Gloria Gómez; García, Jimena; Lobo, Margarita; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-06-15

    Cadmium is a toxic compound reported to produce cognitive dysfunctions, though the mechanisms involved are unknown. In a previous work we described how cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces greater cell death in primary cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain. It also induces cell death in SN56 cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain through M1R blockage, alterations in the expression of AChE variants and GSK-3β, and an increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated Tau protein levels. It was observed that the silencing or blockage of M1R altered ChAT activity, GSK-3β, AChE splice variants gene expression, and Aβ and Tau protein formation. Furthermore, AChE-S variants were associated with the same actions modulated by M1R. Accordingly, we hypothesized that cholinergic transmission blockage and higher sensitivity to cadmium-induced cell death of primary basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is mediated by M1R blockage, which triggers this effect through alteration of the expression of AChE variants. To prove this hypothesis, we evaluated, in primary culture from the basal forebrain region, whether M1R silencing induces greater cell death in cholinergic neurons than cadmium does, and whether in SN56 cells M1R mediates the mechanisms described so as to play a part in the cadmium induction of cholinergic transmission blockage and cell death in this cell line through alteration of the expression of AChE variants. Our results prove that M1R silencing by cadmium partially mediates the greater cell death observed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Moreover, all previously described mechanisms for blocking cholinergic transmission and inducing cell death on SN56 cells after cadmium exposure are partially mediated by M1R through the alteration of AChE expression. Thus, our results may explain cognitive dysfunctions observed in cadmium toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pivotal Role of Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 1 and Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-Like in Neuronal Cell Death Induced by the Human Neuroinvasive Coronavirus OC43.

    PubMed

    Meessen-Pinard, Mathieu; Le Coupanec, Alain; Desforges, Marc; Talbot, Pierre J

    2017-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoV) are respiratory pathogens with neuroinvasive, neurotropic, and neurovirulent properties, highlighting the importance of studying the potential implication of these viruses in neurological diseases. The OC43 strain (HCoV-OC43) was reported to induce neuronal cell death, which may participate in neuropathogenesis. Here, we show that HCoV-OC43 harboring two point mutations in the spike glycoprotein (rOC/Us183-241) was more neurovirulent than the wild-type HCoV-OC43 (rOC/ATCC) in mice and induced more cell death in murine and human neuronal cells. To evaluate the role of regulated cell death (RCD) in HCoV-OC43-mediated neural pathogenesis, we determined if knockdown of Bax, a key regulator of apoptosis, or RIP1, a key regulator of necroptosis, altered the percentage of neuronal cell death following HCoV-OC43 infection. We found that Bax-dependent apoptosis did not play a significant role in RCD following infection, as inhibition of Bax expression mediated by RNA interference did not confer cellular protection against the cell death process. On the other hand, we demonstrated that RIP1 and MLKL were involved in neuronal cell death, as RIP1 knockdown and chemical inhibition of MLKL significantly increased cell survival after infection. Taken together, these results indicate that RIP1 and MLKL contribute to necroptotic cell death after HCoV-OC43 infection to limit viral replication. However, this RCD could lead to neuronal loss in the mouse CNS and accentuate the neuroinflammation process, reflecting the severity of neuropathogenesis. Because they are naturally neuroinvasive and neurotropic, human coronaviruses are suspected to participate in the development of neurological diseases. Given that the strain OC43 is neurovirulent in mice and induces neuronal cell death, we explored the neuronal response to infection by characterizing the activation of RCD. Our results revealed that classical apoptosis associated with the Bax protein does not play a

  18. Altered Death Receptor Signaling Promotes Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Acquired Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Antoon, James W.; Lai, Rongye; Struckhoff, Amanda P.; Nitschke, Ashley M.; Elliott, Steven; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Rhodes, Lyndsay V.; Yoon, Nam Seung; Salvo, Virgilio A.; Shan, Bin; Beckman, Barbara S.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Burow, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Altered death receptor signaling and resistance to subsequent apoptosis is an important clinical resistance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of death receptor resistance in breast cancer progression. Resistance of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER)-positive, chemosensitive MCF7 breast cancer cell line to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was associated with loss of ER expression and a multi-drug resistant phenotype. Changes in three major pathways were involved in this transition to a multidrug resistance phenotype: ER, Death Receptor and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resistant cells exhibited altered ER signaling, resulting in decreased ER target gene expression. The death receptor pathway was significantly altered, blocking extrinsic apoptosis and increasing NF-kappaB survival signaling. TNF resistance promoted EMT changes, resulting in a more aggressive phenotype. This first report identifying specific mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to TNF could lead to a better understanding of the progression of breast cancer in response to chemotherapy treatment. PMID:22844580

  19. Nitric Oxide-induced Activation of the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Is Critical for Epileptic Seizure-induced Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Nakaune, Takuya; Suzuki, Junji; Shibata, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Koyama, Ryuta; Murayama, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Saito, Nobuhito; Kakizawa, Sho; Iino, Masamitsu

    2016-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening emergency that can cause neurodegeneration with debilitating neurological disorders. However, the mechanism by which convulsive SE results in neurodegeneration is not fully understood. It has been shown that epileptic seizures produce markedly increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain, and that NO induces Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which occurs through S-nitrosylation of the intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. Here, we show that through genetic silencing of NO-induced activation of the RyR1 intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, neurons were rescued from seizure-dependent cell death. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR1, was protective against neurodegeneration caused by SE. These results demonstrate that NO-induced Ca(2+) release via RyR is involved in SE-induced neurodegeneration, and provide a rationale for the use of RyR1 inhibitors for the prevention of brain damage following SE.

  20. The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase CaPIK1 is involved in plant signaling of defense and cell-death responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-05-01

    Certain protein kinases have been shown to be crucial for plant cell signaling pathways associated with plant immune responses. Here we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase (RLCK) gene (CaPIK1) that is transcriptionally activated by infection with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). Silencing of CaPIK1 in pepper plants confers enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection. Salicylic acid-dependent defense responses are attenuated in the CaPIK1-silenced plants, including expression of salicylic acid-dependent genes, but not of a jasmonic acid-regulated gene. Induction of salicylic acid accumulation by Xcv infection is compromised in CaPIK1-silenced plants. The functional CaPIK1 protein not only autophosphorylates, but also phosphorylates myelin basic protein. CaPIK1 exists in the cytoplasm and also localizes to the plasma membrane of plant cells via its N-terminus. Transient expression of CaPIK1 in pepper leaves leads to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ultimately leading to hypersensitive cell death. Over-expression (OX) of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhances the basal resistance to infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, associated with elevated ROS bursts. Salicylic acid levels in CaPIK1-OX plants are higher than those in wild-type plants. Together, these results suggest that CaPIK1 modulates the signaling required for the salicylic acid-dependent defense response to pathogen infection. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minghui; Monian, Prashant; Pan, Qiuhui; Zhang, Wei; Xiang, Jenny; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-09-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of regulated necrosis. It is implicated in various human diseases, including ischemic organ damage and cancer. Here, we report the crucial role of autophagy, particularly autophagic degradation of cellular iron storage proteins (a process known as ferritinophagy), in ferroptosis. Using RNAi screening coupled with subsequent genetic analysis, we identified multiple autophagy-related genes as positive regulators of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis induction led to autophagy activation and consequent degradation of ferritin and ferritinophagy cargo receptor NCOA4. Consistently, inhibition of ferritinophagy by blockage of autophagy or knockdown of NCOA4 abrogated the accumulation of ferroptosis-associated cellular labile iron and reactive oxygen species, as well as eventual ferroptotic cell death. Therefore, ferroptosis is an autophagic cell death process, and NCOA4-mediated ferritinophagy supports ferroptosis by controlling cellular iron homeostasis.

  2. Inhibitory effect of bufalin on retinoblastoma cells (HXO-RB44) via the independent mitochondrial and death receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingfeng; Zhao, Yan; An, LiXin; Li, Xia; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cinobufacini (Huachansu) is a Chinese medicine prepared from the skin of Bufo bufo gargarizans Cantor (Bufonidae), and has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study, the anti-retinoblastoma constituent bufalin obtained from Cinobufacini was investigated. Treatment of human retinoblastoma (HXO-RB44) cells with bufalin induced apoptosis which was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-9, caspase-8 and caspase-3, as well as changes in the expression of cytochrome C. Bufalin induced the cleavage of caspase-3 and apoptosis, and it was inhibited by both Z-LETD-FMK and Z-IETD-FMK treatment. Taken together, these results demonstrate that bufalin-induced apoptosis in human retinoblastoma (HXO-RB44) cells involved both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:27904697

  3. Cell Proliferation, Cell Death, and Size Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    generated in part by apoptosis of excess cells during development. We identified a mutation named pineapple eye (pie ) that has too few cells in the...predicted to encode a novel 582 amino acid protein, perhaps interacting with molybdopterin. It is possible that the pie gene encodes a novel enzyme protecting against cell death during growth and development.

  4. Camkii-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors Regulates Cell Death In Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Carlo, Mariano N.; Said, Matilde; Ling, Haiyun; Valverde, Carlos A.; De Giusti, Verónica; Sommese, Leandro; Palomeque, Julieta; Aiello, Alejandro E.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Respress, Jonathan L.; Brown, Joan Heller; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Salas, Margarita A.; Mattiazzi, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+-Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) activation is deleterious in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Moreover, inhibition of CaMKII-dependent phosphorylations at the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) prevents CaMKII-induced I/R damage. However, the downstream targets of CaMKII at the SR level, responsible for this detrimental effect, remain unclear. In the present study we aimed to dissect the role of the two main substrates of CaMKII at the SR level, phospholamban (PLN) and ryanodine receptors (RyR2), in CaMKII-dependent I/R injury. In mouse hearts subjected to global I/R (45/120 min), phosphorylation of the primary CaMKII sites, S2814 on cardiac RyR2 and of T17 on PLN, significantly increased at the onset of reperfusion whereas PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 and PLN did not change. Similar results were obtained in vivo, in mice subjected to regional myocardial I/R (1/24 hrs). Knock-in mice with an inactivated serine 2814 phosphorylation site on RyR2 (S2814A), significantly improved post-ischemic mechanical recovery, reduced infarct size and decreased apoptosis. Conversely, knock-in mice, in which CaMKII site of RyR2 is constitutively activated (S2814D), significantly increased infarct size and exacerbated apoptosis. In S2814A and S2814D mice subjected to regional myocardial ischemia, infarct size was also decreased and increased respectively. Transgenic mice with double-mutant non-phosphorylatable PLN (S16A/T17A) in the PLN knockout background (PLNDM) also showed significantly increased post-ischemic cardiac damage. This effect cannot be attributed to PKA-dependent PLN phosphorylation and was not due to the enhanced L-type Ca2+ current, present in these mice. Our results reveal a major role for the phosphorylation of S2814 site on RyR2 in CaMKII-dependent I/R cardiac damage. In contrast, they showed that CaMKII-dependent increase in PLN phosphorylation during reperfusion opposes rather than contributes to I/R damage. PMID:24949568

  5. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    Programmed cell death , or apoptosis, is a genetically regulated process through which a cell is active in bringing about its own death for the sake...delays and inhibits the cell death response, so that the breast cancer cell lines are much less susceptible to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis than...lymphoid cell lines, an observation that parallels the differential susceptibility of breast cancer and lymphomas to chemotherapy-induced cell death in

  6. Cell death at the intestinal epithelial front line.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Maria Eugenia; Grabinger, Thomas; Brunner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents the largest epithelial surface in our body. This single-cell-layer epithelium mediates important functions in the absorption of nutrients and in the maintenance of barrier function, preventing luminal microorganisms from invading the body. Due to its constant regeneration the intestinal epithelium is a tissue not only with very high proliferation rates but also with very prominent physiological and pathophysiological cell death induction. The normal physiological differentiation and maturation of intestinal epithelial cells leads to their shedding and apoptotic cell death within a few days, without disturbing the epithelial barrier integrity. In contrast excessive intestinal epithelial cell death induced by irradiation, drugs and inflammation severely impairs the vital functions of this tissue. In this review we discuss cell death processes in the intestinal epithelium in health and disease, with special emphasis on cell death triggered by the tumour necrosis factor receptor family. © 2015 FEBS.

  7. Lipid peroxidation in cell death.

    PubMed

    Gaschler, Michael M; Stockwell, Brent R

    2017-01-15

    Disruption of redox homeostasis is a key phenotype of many pathological conditions. Though multiple oxidizing compounds such as hydrogen peroxide are widely recognized as mediators and inducers of oxidative stress, increasingly, attention is focused on the role of lipid hydroperoxides as critical mediators of death and disease. As the main component of cellular membranes, lipids have an indispensible role in maintaining the structural integrity of cells. Excessive oxidation of lipids alters the physical properties of cellular membranes and can cause covalent modification of proteins and nucleic acids. This review discusses the synthesis, toxicity, degradation, and detection of lipid peroxides in biological systems. Additionally, the role of lipid peroxidation is highlighted in cell death and disease, and strategies to control the accumulation of lipid peroxides are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of γ-secretase activity synergistically enhances tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced apoptosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells via upregulation of death receptor 5

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Lisa M.; Nathwani, Seema M.; Zisterer, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a rare and aggressive hematopoietic malignancy prone to relapse and drug resistance. Half of all T-ALL patients exhibit mutations in Notch1, which leads to aberrant Notch1 associated signaling cascades. Notch1 activation is mediated by the γ-secretase cleavage of the Notch1 receptor into the active intracellular domain of Notch1 (NCID). Clinical trials of γ-secretase small molecule inhibitors (GSIs) as single agents for the treatment of T-ALL have been unsuccessful. The present study demonstrated, using immunofluorescence and western blotting, that blocking γ-secretase activity in T-ALL cells with N-[(3,5-difluorophenyl) acetyl]-L-alanyl-2-phenyl] glycine-1,1-dimethylethyl ester (DAPT) downregulated NCID and upregulated the tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5 (DR5). Upregulation of DR5 restored the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to TRAIL. Combination index revealed that the combined treatment of DAPT and TRAIL synergistically enhanced apoptosis compared with treatment with either drug alone. TRAIL combined with the clinically evaluated γ-secretase inhibitor 3-[(1r, 4s)-4-(4-chlorophenylsulfonyl)-4-(2, 5-difluorophenyl) cyclohexyl] propanoic acid (MK-0752) also significantly enhanced TRAIL-induced cell death compared with either drug alone. DAPT/TRAIL apoptotic synergy was dependent on the extrinsic apoptotic pathway and was associated with a decrease in BH3 interacting-domain death agonist and x-linked inhibitor of apoptosis. In conclusion, γ-secretase inhibition represents a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance for the treatment of T-ALL. PMID:27698877

  9. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors.

  10. Apoptotic cell death and efferocytosis in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Van Vré, Emily A; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad

    2012-04-01

    Apoptotic cell death is an important feature of atherosclerotic plaques, and it seems to exert both beneficial and detrimental effects depending on the cell type and plaque stage. Because late apoptotic cells can launch proatherogenic inflammatory responses, adequate engulfment of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) by macrophages is important to withstand atherosclerosis progression. Several efferocytosis systems, composed of different phagocytic receptors, apoptotic ligands, and bridging molecules, can be distinguished. Because phagocytes in atherosclerotic plaques are very much solicited, a fully operative efferocytosis system seems to be an absolute requisite. Indeed, recent studies demonstrate that deletion of just 1 of the efferocytosis pathways aggravates atherosclerosis. This review discusses the role of apoptosis in atherosclerosis and general mechanisms of efferocytosis, to end with indirect and direct indications of the significance of effective efferocytosis in atherosclerosis.

  11. Programmed cell death in aging.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2015-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) pathways, including apoptosis and regulated necrosis, are required for normal cell turnover and tissue homeostasis. Mis-regulation of PCD is increasingly implicated in aging and aging-related disease. During aging the cell turnover rate declines for several highly-mitotic tissues. Aging-associated disruptions in systemic and inter-cell signaling combined with cell-autonomous damage and mitochondrial malfunction result in increased PCD in some cell types, and decreased PCD in other cell types. Increased PCD during aging is implicated in immune system decline, skeletal muscle wasting (sarcopenia), loss of cells in the heart, and neurodegenerative disease. In contrast, cancer cells and senescent cells are resistant to PCD, enabling them to increase in abundance during aging. PCD pathways limit life span in fungi, but whether PCD pathways normally limit adult metazoan life span is not yet clear. PCD is regulated by a balance of negative and positive factors, including the mitochondria, which are particularly subject to aging-associated malfunction.

  12. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  13. A polymorphism in a staphylococcal enterotoxin receptor gene (T cell receptor BV3 recombination signal sequence) is not associated with unexplained sudden unexpected death in infancy in an Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Highet, Amanda R; Gibson, Catherine S; Goldwater, Paul N

    2010-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes that influence the expression of toxin receptors could contribute to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and unexplained Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (uSUDI) for which there is evidence of toxin involvement. We aimed to determine whether TCRBV3S1 allele 2 could be involved in a staphylococcal toxic shock hypothesis for uSUDI. Observed frequencies of the TCRBV3S1*2 allele and genotype in 48 Australian uSUDI cases and 96 live comparison infants did not differ. In future the role of other toxin receptor gene polymorphisms deserves investigation.

  14. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280–320 nm) and UV-A (320–390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:23344059

  15. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  16. Sigma-1 (σ₁) receptor deficiency reduces β-amyloid(25-35)-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR2B.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Sha, Sha; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Conghui; Hong, Juan; Jie, Pinghui; Zhou, Rong; Li, Lin; Sokabe, Masahiro; Chen, Ling

    2015-02-01

    In early Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, reduction of sigma-1 receptors (σ1R) is detected. In this study, we employed male heterozygous σ1R knockout (σ1R(+/-)) mice showing normal cognitive performance to investigate association of σ1R deficiency with AD risk. Herein we report that a single injection (i.c.v.) of Aβ(25-35) impaired spatial memory with approximately 25% death of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region of WT mice (Aβ(25-35)-WT mice), whereas it did not cause such impairments in σ1R(+/-) mice (Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice). Compared with WT mice, Aβ(25-35)-WT mice showed increased levels of NMDA-activated currents (INMDA) and NR2B phosphorylation (phospho-NR2B) in the hippocampal CA1 region at 48 h after Aβ25-35-injection (post-Aβ(25-35)) followed by approximately 40% decline at 72 h post-Aβ(25-35) of their respective control levels, which was inhibited by the σ1R antagonist NE100. In Aβ(25-35)-WT mice, the administration of NR2B inhibitor Ro25-6981 or NE100 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) attenuated the memory deficits and loss of pyramidal cells. By contrast, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice showed a slight increase in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B at 48 h or 72 h post-Aβ25-35 compared to σ1R(+/-) mice. Treatment with σ1R agonist PRE084 in Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice caused the same changes in the INMDA density and the phospho-NR2B as those in Aβ(25-35)-WT mice. Furthermore, Aβ(25-35)-σ1R(+/-) mice treated with the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA or PRE084 on day 1-4 post-Aβ(25-35) showed a loss of neuronal cells and memory impairment. These results indicate that the σ1R deficiency can reduce Aβ(25-35)-induced neuronal cell death and cognitive deficits through suppressing Aβ(25-35)-enhanced NR2B phosphorylation.

  17. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  18. Programmed cell death in Giardia.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Susmita; Oniku, Abraham E; Topping, Kate; Mamhoud, Zahra N; Paget, Timothy A

    2012-06-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has been observed in many unicellular eukaryotes; however, in very few cases have the pathways been described. Recently the early divergent amitochondrial eukaryote Giardia has been included in this group. In this paper we investigate the processes of PCD in Giardia. We performed a bioinformatics survey of Giardia genomes to identify genes associated with PCD alongside traditional methods for studying apoptosis and autophagy. Analysis of Giardia genomes failed to highlight any genes involved in apoptotic-like PCD; however, we were able to induce apoptotic-like morphological changes in response to oxidative stress (H2O2) and drugs (metronidazole). In addition we did not detect caspase activity in induced cells. Interestingly, we did observe changes resembling autophagy when cells were starved (staining with MDC) and genome analysis revealed some key genes associated with autophagy such as TOR, ATG1 and ATG 16. In organisms such as Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Blastocystis similar observations have been made but no genes have been identified. We propose that Giardia possess a pathway of autophagy and a form of apoptosis very different from the classical known mechanism; this may represent an early form of programmed cell death.

  19. Melatonin inhibits the caspase-1/cytochrome c/caspase-3 cell death pathway, inhibits MT1 receptor loss and delays disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Cook, Anna; Kim, Jinho; Baranov, Sergei V.; Jiang, Jiying; Smith, Karen; Cormier, Kerry; Bennett, Erik; Browser, Robert P.; Day, Arthur L.; Carlisle, Diane; Ferrante, Robert J.; Wang, Xin; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-mediated cell death contributes to the pathogenesis of motor neuron degeneration in the mutant SOD1G93A transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), along with other factors such as inflammation and oxidative damage. By screening a drug library, we found that melatonin, a pineal hormone, inhibited cytochrome c release in purified mitochondria and prevented cell death in cultured neurons. In this study, we evaluated whether melatonin would slow disease progression in SOD1G93A mice. We demonstrate that melatonin significantly delayed disease onset, neurological deterioration and mortality in ALS mice. ALS-associated ventral horn atrophy and motor neuron death were also inhibited by melatonin treatment. Melatonin inhibited Rip2/caspase-1 pathway activation, blocked the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and reduced the overexpression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, for the first time, we determined that disease progression was associated with the loss of both melatonin and the melatonin receptor 1A (MT1) in the spinal cord of ALS mice. These results demonstrate that melatonin is neuroprotective in transgenic ALS mice, and this protective effect is mediated through its effects on the caspase-mediated cell death pathway. Furthermore, our data suggest that melatonin and MT1 receptor loss may play a role in the pathological phenotype observed in ALS. The above observations indicate that melatonin and modulation of Rip2/caspase-1/cytochrome c or MT1 pathways may be promising therapeutic approaches for ALS. PMID:23537713

  20. Melatonin inhibits the caspase-1/cytochrome c/caspase-3 cell death pathway, inhibits MT1 receptor loss and delays disease progression in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cook, Anna; Kim, Jinho; Baranov, Sergei V; Jiang, Jiying; Smith, Karen; Cormier, Kerry; Bennett, Erik; Browser, Robert P; Day, Arthur L; Carlisle, Diane L; Ferrante, Robert J; Wang, Xin; Friedlander, Robert M

    2013-07-01

    Caspase-mediated cell death contributes to the pathogenesis of motor neuron degeneration in the mutant SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), along with other factors such as inflammation and oxidative damage. By screening a drug library, we found that melatonin, a pineal hormone, inhibited cytochrome c release in purified mitochondria and prevented cell death in cultured neurons. In this study, we evaluated whether melatonin would slow disease progression in SOD1(G93A) mice. We demonstrate that melatonin significantly delayed disease onset, neurological deterioration and mortality in ALS mice. ALS-associated ventral horn atrophy and motor neuron death were also inhibited by melatonin treatment. Melatonin inhibited Rip2/caspase-1 pathway activation, blocked the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and reduced the overexpression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, for the first time, we determined that disease progression was associated with the loss of both melatonin and the melatonin receptor 1A (MT1) in the spinal cord of ALS mice. These results demonstrate that melatonin is neuroprotective in transgenic ALS mice, and this protective effect is mediated through its effects on the caspase-mediated cell death pathway. Furthermore, our data suggest that melatonin and MT1 receptor loss may play a role in the pathological phenotype observed in ALS. The above observations indicate that melatonin and modulation of Rip2/caspase-1/cytochrome c or MT1 pathways may be promising therapeutic approaches for ALS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell death in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Rao, Rammohan V.; Mehlen, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease trigger neuronal cell death through endogenous suicide pathways. Surprisingly, although the cell death itself may occur relatively late in the course of the degenerative process, the mediators of the underlying cell-death pathways have shown promise as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17051206

  2. Cell Death in Chondrocytes, Osteoblasts, and Osteocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Cell death in skeletal component cells, including chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, plays roles in skeletal development, maintenance, and repair as well as in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis are important steps for endochondral ossification. Although the inactivation of P53 and RB is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcomas, the deletion of p53 and inactivation of Rb are insufficient to enhance chondrocyte proliferation, indicating the presence of multiple inhibitory mechanisms against sarcomagenesis in chondrocytes. The inflammatory processes induced by mechanical injury and chondrocyte death through the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are involved in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. The overexpression of BCLXL increases bone volume with a normal structure and maintains bone during aging by inhibiting osteoblast apoptosis. p53 inhibits osteoblast proliferation and enhances osteoblast apoptosis, thereby reducing bone formation, but also exerts positive effects on osteoblast differentiation through the Akt–FoxOs pathway. Apoptotic osteocytes release ATP, which induces the receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (Rankl) expression and osteoclastogenesis, from pannexin 1 channels. Osteocyte death ultimately results in necrosis; DAMPs are released to the bone surface and promote the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which induce Rankl expression, and osteoclastogenesis is further enhanced. PMID:27929439

  3. SHP-1 and SHP-2 associate with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif of programmed death 1 upon primary human T cell stimulation, but only receptor ligation prevents T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chemnitz, Jens M; Parry, Richard V; Nichols, Kim E; June, Carl H; Riley, James L

    2004-07-15

    To study the cis- and trans-acting factors that mediate programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling in primary human CD4 T cells, we constructed a chimeric molecule consisting of the murine CD28 extracellular domain and human PD-1 cytoplasmic tail. When introduced into CD4 T cells, this construct mimics the activity of endogenous PD-1 in terms of its ability to suppress T cell expansion and cytokine production. The cytoplasmic tail of PD-1 contains two structural motifs, an ITIM and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif (ITSM). Mutation of the ITIM had little effect on PD-1 signaling or functional activity. In contrast, mutation of the ITSM abrogated the ability of PD-1 to block cytokine synthesis and to limit T cell expansion. Further biochemical analyses revealed that the ability of PD-1 to block T cell activation correlated with recruitment of Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and SHP-2, and not the adaptor Src homology 2 domain-containing molecule 1A, to the ITSM domain. In TCR-stimulated T cells, SHP-2 associated with PD-1, even in the absence of PD-1 engagement. Despite this interaction, the ability of PD-1 to block T cell activation required receptor ligation, suggesting that colocalization of PD-1 with CD3 and/or CD28 may be necessary for inhibition of T cell activation.

  4. Cell death in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Murray; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Cell death is important for both development and tissue homeostasis in the adult. As such, it is tightly controlled and deregulation is associated with diverse pathologies; for example, regulated cell death is involved in vessel remodelling during development or following injury, but deregulated death is implicated in pathologies such as atherosclerosis, aneurysm formation, ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathies and infarction. We describe the mechanisms of cell death and its role in the normal physiology and various pathologies of the cardiovascular system. PMID:16547202

  5. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  6. Myeloid cell death associated with Toll-like receptor 7/8-mediated inflammatory response. Implication of ASK1, HIF-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Sally A; Oniku, Abraham E; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is an important part of the host innate immune defence, especially against ssRNA viruses (influenza virus, HIV-1, ebola virus, hepatitis C virus and many others). Viral ssRNA is recognised by endosomal Toll-like receptors 7 and 8 (TLR7/8) which induce further stages of immune defence against these pathogens. Some of the immune cells die because of inflammatory stress allowing for the selection of those cells which are resistant to stress-induced apoptosis and which are used in further stages of the host immune response. On the other hand, apoptosis could be used as an instrument to suppress the function of activated inflammatory cells. However, the mechanisms underlying death of the inflammatory cells associated with stress induced by ligands of TLR7/8 remain unclear. In this study we have found that programmed death of human myeloid cells from different cell lines associated with ligand-induced TLR7/8-mediated inflammatory stress depends on activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). This enzyme is, however, not required for the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines - TNF-α and IL-1β. We have found that released IL-1β and TNF-α are involved in apoptosis of myeloid cells associated with TLR7/8-mediated inflammatory stress. The pro-apoptotic effect of released TNF-α in this case is much lower compared to that of IL-1β.

  7. Extracellular signal‑regulated kinase inhibition is required for methanol extract of Smilax china L.‑induced apoptosis through death receptor 5 in human oral mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Ji-Ae; Lee, Syng-Ook; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2014-02-01

    Smilax china L., a well‑known Chinese traditional medicine, has been used as an anti‑inflammatory, anti‑cancer and analgesic agent, but its role has not yet been fully elucidated in oral mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). The present study focused on addressing the anticancer activity and molecular mechanism of methanol extract of Smilax china L. (MESC) in MC‑3 human oral MEC cells. The results indicated that MESC inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in MC‑3 cells. These observations were found to correlate with increases in truncated BH3 interacting‑domain death agonist and B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) interacting mediator of cell death, but not Bcl‑2 homologous antagonist killer, Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, Bcl‑2, B‑cell lymphoma‑extra large and induced myeloid leukemia cell differentiation protein levels. MESC also damaged the mitochondrial membrane potential, cleaved caspase‑8 protein and increased death receptor 5 (DR5) protein levels by enhancing the stability of DR5 protein. Furthermore, MESC affected the phosphorylation of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) only, and did not affect c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase or p38 phosphorylation. Co‑treatment with MESC and an ERK inhibitor (PD98059) significantly increased the expression of DR5 to induce apoptosis in MC‑3 cells. Therefore, these results suggest that MESC may induce apoptosis via the ERK pathway and may be a potential anticancer drug candidate against human oral MEC.

  8. Imaging cell death in vivo.

    PubMed

    Blankenberg, F; Mari, C; Strauss, H W

    2003-12-01

    A technique to image programmed cell death would be useful both in clinical care and in drug development. The most widely studied agent for the in vivo study of apoptosis is radiolabeled annexin V, an endogenous protein labeled with technectium-99m, now undergoing clinical trials in both Europe and the United States. While annexin V has been studied extensively in humans the precise mechanism(s) of uptake this agent in vivo is unclear and needs further study. Other agents are also under development, including radiolabeled forms of Z-VAD.fmk, a potent inhibitor of the enzymatic cascade intimately associated with apoptosis. In addition other technologies, such as diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance imaging with contrast agents, such as small paramagnetic iron oxide particles coated with peptides have also been advocated as methods to monitor apoptotic cell death. The potential applications of imaging apoptosis as a marker of early response to therapy in cancer, acute cerebral and myocardial ischemic injury and infarction, immune mediated inflammatory disease and transplant rejection are reviewed.

  9. Role of programmed cell death in development.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, R M; Nagashree, N R

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of both animal and plant development. In animals, model systems such as Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and mice have shown a general cell death profile of induction, caspase mediation, cell death, and phagocytosis. Tremendous strides have been made in cell death research in animals in the past decade. The ordering of the C. elegans genes Ced-3, 4 and 9, identification of caspase-activated DNase that degrades nuclear DNA during PCD, identification of signal transduction modules involving caspases as well as the caspase-independent pathway, and the involvement of mitochondria are some of the findings of immense value in understanding animal PCDs. Similarly, the caspase inactivation mechanisms of infecting viruses to stall host cell death give a new dimension to the viral infection process. However, plant cell death profiles provide an entirely different scenario. The presence of a cell wall that cannot be phagocytosed, absence of the hallmarks of animal PCDs such as DNA laddering, formation of apoptotic bodies, a cell-death-specific nuclease, a biochemical machinery of killer enzymes such as caspases all point to novel ways of cell elimination. Large gaps in our understanding of plant cell death have prompted speculative inferences and comparisons with animal cell death mechanisms. This paper deals with both animals and plants for a holistic view on cell death in eukaryotes.

  10. Synaptic NMDA Receptors Mediate Hypoxic Excitotoxic Death

    PubMed Central

    Wroge, Christine M.; Hogins, Joshua; Eisenman, Larry; Mennerick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NMDA receptor activation and excitotoxicity underlies pathology in many neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including hypoxia/ischemia. Thus, the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders demands a complete understanding of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation during excitotoxic insults. The extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis posits that synaptic NMDARs are neurotrophic/neuroprotective and extrasynaptic NMDARs are neurotoxic. In part, the extrasynaptic hypothesis is built on observed selectivity for extrasynaptic receptors of a neuroprotective use-dependent NMDAR channel blocker, memantine. In rat hippocampal neurons we found that a neuroprotective concentration of memantine shows little selectivity for extrasynaptic NMDARs when all receptors are tonically activated by exogenous glutamate. This led us to test the extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis using metabolic challenge, where the source of excitotoxic glutamate buildup may be largely synaptic. Three independent approaches suggest strongly that synaptic receptors participate prominently in hypoxic excitotoxicity. First, block of glutamate transporters with a non-substrate antagonist exacerbated rather than prevented damage, consistent with a primarily synaptic source of glutamate. Second, selective, preblock of synaptic NMDARs with a slowly reversible, use-dependent antagonist protected nearly fully against prolonged hypoxic insult. Third, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), which degrades ambient but not synaptic glutamate, did not protect against hypoxia but protected against exogenous glutamate damage. Together, these results suggest that synaptic NMDARs can mediate excitotoxicity, particularly when the glutamate source is synaptic and when synaptic receptor contributions are rigorously defined. Moreover, the results suggest that in some situations therapeutically targeting extrasynaptic receptors may be inappropriate. PMID:22573696

  11. Octylphenol induces vitellogenin production and cell death in fish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, B.H.; Monteverdi, G.H.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of octylphenol (OP) on vitellogenin production and cell death in hepatocytes from brown bullhead catfish (Americurus nebulosus) were studied. Production of vitellogenin was induced in hepatocytes exposed to 10 to 50 {micro}M OP, whereas a higher concentration of OP (100 {micro}M) induced apoptotic cell death. By 3 h after the addition of 100 {micro}M OP, dying cells showed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation as determined by fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Later stages of cell death (nuclear membrane breakdown and cell fragmentation into apoptotic bodies) were identified in cells exposed to OP for at least 6 h. Hepatocytes exposed to 100 {micro}M OP also produced less vitellogenin than cells exposed to 50 {micro}M OP. An estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, greatly decreased vitellogenin production in OP-exposed hepatocytes from male fish but did not decrease cell death in these cells. Thus, although the ability of OP to induce vitellogenin production is likely mediated through interactions with the estrogen receptor, the induction of apoptotic cell death by OP does not appear to be dependent on its estrogenic activity but may be a more general toxic effect.

  12. Cell death: a dynamic response concept.

    PubMed

    Loos, Benjamin; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2009-07-01

    Autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis have previously been described as distinct static processes that induce and execute cell death. Due to an increased use of novel techniques in mapping cellular death-techniques which allow for reporting of real-time data-the existence of "grey zones" between cell death modes and the existence of the "point of no return" within these have been revealed. This revelation demands the integration of new concepts in describing the cellular death process. Furthermore, since the contribution of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is still poorly understood, it is important to accurately describe its function within the dynamic framework of cell death. In this review cell death is viewed as a dynamic and integrative cellular response to ensure the highest likelihood of self-preservation. Suggestions are offered for conceptualizing cell death modes and their morphological features, both individually and in relation to one another. It addresses the need for distinguishing between dying cells and dead cells so as to better locate and control the onset of cell death. Most importantly, the fundamental role of autophagy, autophagic flux, and the effects of the intracellular metabolic environment on the kinetics of the cell death modes are stressed. It also contextualizes the kinetic dimension of cell death as a process and aims to contribute towards a better understanding of autophagy as a key mechanism within this process. Understanding the dynamic nature of the cell death process and autophagy's central role can reveal new insight for therapeutic intervention in preventing cell death.

  13. Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Following treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, responsive ovarian cancer cells undergo apoptotic cell death . Several groups have shown that the...apoptotic protease, caspase 2 (C2), is an essential activator of cell death in ovarian cancer cells treated with cisplatin and we have found, by knock

  14. Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Case Western Reserve...Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer DAMD17-94-J-4451 6. AUTHOR(S) Clark W. Distelhorst, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...cell death , apoptosis, in breast cancer cells has been developed. This model is based on induction of apoptosis by the selective endoplasmic reticulum

  15. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Neitemeier, Sandra; Jelinek, Anja; Laino, Vincenzo; Hoffmann, Lena; Eisenbach, Ina; Eying, Roman; Ganjam, Goutham K; Dolga, Amalia M; Oppermann, Sina; Culmsee, Carsten

    2017-03-09

    Ferroptosis has been defined as an oxidative and iron-dependent pathway of regulated cell death that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis and established pathways of death receptor-mediated regulated necrosis. While emerging evidence linked features of ferroptosis induced e.g. by erastin-mediated inhibition of the Xc(-) system or inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) to an increasing number of oxidative cell death paradigms in cancer cells, neurons or kidney cells, the biochemical pathways of oxidative cell death remained largely unclear. In particular, the role of mitochondrial damage in paradigms of ferroptosis needs further investigation. In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by Xc(-) inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death.

  16. Molecular definitions of cell death subroutines: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2012

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Abrams, J M; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L; El-Deiry, W S; Fulda, S; Gottlieb, E; Green, D R; Hengartner, M O; Kepp, O; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Lu, X; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Mehlen, P; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Piacentini, M; Rubinsztein, D C; Shi, Y; Simon, H-U; Vandenabeele, P; White, E; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G; Kroemer, G

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposed a set of recommendations for the definition of distinct cell death morphologies and for the appropriate use of cell death-related terminology, including ‘apoptosis', ‘necrosis' and ‘mitotic catastrophe'. In view of the substantial progress in the biochemical and genetic exploration of cell death, time has come to switch from morphological to molecular definitions of cell death modalities. Here we propose a functional classification of cell death subroutines that applies to both in vitro and in vivo settings and includes extrinsic apoptosis, caspase-dependent or -independent intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death and mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, we discuss the utility of expressions indicating additional cell death modalities. On the basis of the new, revised NCCD classification, cell death subroutines are defined by a series of precise, measurable biochemical features. PMID:21760595

  17. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) prevents retinal cell death via PEDF Receptor (PEDF-R): identification of a functional ligand binding site.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Preeti; Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Kenealey, Jason; DesJardin, Jacqueline; Notari, Luigi; Becerra, S Patricia

    2013-08-16

    The extracellular pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) displays retina survival activity by interacting with receptor proteins on cell surfaces. We have previously reported that PEDF binds and stimulates PEDF receptor (PEDF-R), a transmembrane phospholipase. However, the PEDF binding site of PEDF-R and its involvement in survival activity have not been identified. The purpose of this work is to identify a biologically relevant ligand-binding site on PEDF-R. PEDF bound the PEDF-R ectodomain L4 (Leu(159)-Met(325)) with affinity similar to the full-length PEDF-R (Met(1)-Leu(504)). Binding assays using synthetic peptides spanning L4 showed that PEDF selectively bound E5b (Ile(193)-Leu(232)) and P1 (Thr(210)-Leu(249)) peptides. Recombinant C-terminal truncated PEDF-R4 (Met(1)-Leu(232)) and internally truncated PEDF-R and PEDF-R4 (ΔHis(203)-Leu(232)) retained phospholipase activity of the full-length PEDF-R. However, PEDF-R polypeptides without the His(203)-Leu(232) region lost the PEDF affinity that stimulated their enzymatic activity. Cell surface labeling showed that PEDF-R is present in the plasma membranes of retina cells. Using siRNA to selectively knock down PEDF-R in retina cells, we demonstrated that PEDF-R is essential for PEDF-mediated cell survival and antiapoptotic activities. Furthermore, preincubation of PEDF with P1 and E5b peptides blocked the PEDF·PEDF-R-mediated retina cell survival activity, implying that peptide binding to PEDF excluded ligand-receptor interactions on the cell surface. Our findings establish that PEDF-R is required for the survival and antiapoptotic effects of PEDF on retina cells and has determinants for PEDF binding within its L4 ectodomain that are critical for enzymatic stimulation.

  18. A novel mechanism of autophagic cell death in dystrophic muscle regulated by P2RX7 receptor large-pore formation and HSP90.

    PubMed

    Young, Christopher N J; Sinadinos, Anthony; Lefebvre, Alexis; Chan, Philippe; Arkle, Stephen; Vaudry, David; Gorecki, Dariusz C

    2015-01-01

    P2RX7 is an ATP-gated ion channel, which can also exhibit an open state with a considerably wider permeation. However, the functional significance of the movement of molecules through the large pore (LP) and the intracellular signaling events involved are not known. Here, analyzing the consequences of P2RX7 activation in primary myoblasts and myotubes from the Dmd(mdx) mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found ATP-induced P2RX7-dependent autophagic flux, leading to CASP3-CASP7-independent cell death. P2RX7-evoked autophagy was triggered by LP formation but not Ca(2+) influx or MAPK1-MAPK3 phosphorylation, 2 canonical P2RX7-evoked signals. Phosphoproteomics, protein expression inference and signaling pathway prediction analysis of P2RX7 signaling mediators pointed to HSPA2 and HSP90 proteins. Indeed, specific HSP90 inhibitors prevented LP formation, LC3-II accumulation, and cell death in myoblasts and myotubes but not in macrophages. Pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of p2rx7 also proved protective against ATP-induced death of muscle cells, as did inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA. The functional significance of the P2RX7 LP is one of the great unknowns of purinergic signaling. Our data demonstrate a novel outcome--autophagy--and show that molecules entering through the LP can be targeted to phagophores. Moreover, we show that in muscles but not in macrophages, autophagy is needed for the formation of this LP. Given that P2RX7-dependent LP and HSP90 are critically interacting in the ATP-evoked autophagic death of dystrophic muscles, treatments targeting this axis could be of therapeutic benefit in this debilitating and incurable form of muscular dystrophy.

  19. A novel mechanism of autophagic cell death in dystrophic muscle regulated by P2RX7 receptor large-pore formation and HSP90

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christopher NJ; Sinadinos, Anthony; Lefebvre, Alexis; Chan, Philippe; Arkle, Stephen; Vaudry, David; Gorecki, Dariusz C

    2015-01-01

    P2RX7 is an ATP-gated ion channel, which can also exhibit an open state with a considerably wider permeation. However, the functional significance of the movement of molecules through the large pore (LP) and the intracellular signaling events involved are not known. Here, analyzing the consequences of P2RX7 activation in primary myoblasts and myotubes from the Dmdmdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we found ATP-induced P2RX7-dependent autophagic flux, leading to CASP3-CASP7-independent cell death. P2RX7-evoked autophagy was triggered by LP formation but not Ca2+ influx or MAPK1-MAPK3 phosphorylation, 2 canonical P2RX7-evoked signals. Phosphoproteomics, protein expression inference and signaling pathway prediction analysis of P2RX7 signaling mediators pointed to HSPA2 and HSP90 proteins. Indeed, specific HSP90 inhibitors prevented LP formation, LC3-II accumulation, and cell death in myoblasts and myotubes but not in macrophages. Pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of p2rx7 also proved protective against ATP-induced death of muscle cells, as did inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA. The functional significance of the P2RX7 LP is one of the great unknowns of purinergic signaling. Our data demonstrate a novel outcome—autophagy—and show that molecules entering through the LP can be targeted to phagophores. Moreover, we show that in muscles but not in macrophages, autophagy is needed for the formation of this LP. Given that P2RX7-dependent LP and HSP90 are critically interacting in the ATP-evoked autophagic death of dystrophic muscles, treatments targeting this axis could be of therapeutic benefit in this debilitating and incurable form of muscular dystrophy. PMID:25700737

  20. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

    PubMed

    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  1. Blockade of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors protects hippocampal neurons against global ischemia-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Yokota, Hidenori; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Castillo, Pablo E.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Bennett, Michael V. L.

    2005-01-01

    Transient global or forebrain ischemia induced experimentally in animals can cause selective, delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. A striking feature is a delayed rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in CA1 neurons just before the onset of histologically detectable cell death. Here we show that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) at Schaffer collateral to CA1 synapses in postischemic hippocampus exhibit properties of Ca2+/Zn2+-permeable, Glu receptor 2 (GluR2)-lacking AMPARs before the rise in Zn2+ and cell death. At 42 h after ischemia, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents exhibited pronounced inward rectification and marked sensitivity to 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (Naspm), a selective channel blocker of GluR2-lacking AMPARs. In control hippocampus, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents were electrically linear and relatively insensitive to Naspm. Naspm injected intrahippocampally at 9-40 h after insult greatly reduced the late rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in postischemic CA1 neurons and afforded partial protection against ischemia-induced cell death. These results implicate GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors in the ischemia-induced rise in free Zn2+ and death of CA1 neurons, although a direct action at the time of the rise in Zn2+ is unproven. This receptor subtype appears to be an important therapeutic target for intervention in ischemia-induced neuronal death in humans. PMID:16093311

  2. The Fas-FADD Death Domain Complex Structure Unravels Signalling by Receptor Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, F.; Stec, B; Pop, C; Dobaczewska, M; Lee, J; Monosov, E; Robinson, H; Salvesen, G; Schwarzenbacher, R; Riedl, S

    2009-01-01

    The death inducing signalling complex (DISC) formed by Fas receptor, FADD (Fas-associated death domain protein) and caspase 8 is a pivotal trigger of apoptosis1, 2, 3. The Fas-FADD DISC represents a receptor platform, which once assembled initiates the induction of programmed cell death. A highly oligomeric network of homotypic protein interactions comprised of the death domains of Fas and FADD is at the centre of DISC formation4, 5. Thus, characterizing the mechanistic basis for the Fas-FADD interaction is crucial for understanding DISC signalling but has remained unclear largely because of a lack of structural data. We have successfully formed and isolated the human Fas-FADD death domain complex and report the 2.7 A crystal structure. The complex shows a tetrameric arrangement of four FADD death domains bound to four Fas death domains. We show that an opening of the Fas death domain exposes the FADD binding site and simultaneously generates a Fas-Fas bridge. The result is a regulatory Fas-FADD complex bridge governed by weak protein-protein interactions revealing a model where the complex itself functions as a mechanistic switch. This switch prevents accidental DISC assembly, yet allows for highly processive DISC formation and clustering upon a sufficient stimulus. In addition to depicting a previously unknown mode of death domain interactions, these results further uncover a mechanism for receptor signalling solely by oligomerization and clustering events.

  3. Pepper suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1 interacts with the receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase1 and type III effector AvrBsT and promotes the hypersensitive cell death response in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Kim, Dae Sung; Chung, Eui Hwan; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-05-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria type III effector protein, AvrBsT, triggers hypersensitive cell death in pepper (Capsicum annuum). Here, we have identified the pepper SGT1 (for suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1) as a host interactor of AvrBsT and also the pepper PIK1 (for receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase1). PIK1 specifically phosphorylates SGT1 and AvrBsT in vitro. AvrBsT specifically binds to the CHORD-containing protein and SGT1 domain of SGT1, resulting in the inhibition of PIK1-mediated SGT1 phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear transport of the SGT1-PIK1 complex. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of the proteolytic peptides of SGT1 identified the residues serine-98 and serine-279 of SGT1 as the major PIK1-mediated phosphorylation sites. Site-directed mutagenesis of SGT1 revealed that the identified SGT1 phosphorylation sites are responsible for the activation of AvrBsT-triggered cell death in planta. SGT1 forms a heterotrimeric complex with both AvrBsT and PIK1 exclusively in the cytoplasm. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated coexpression of SGT1 and PIK1 with avrBsT promotes avrBsT-triggered cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana, dependent on PIK1. Virus-induced silencing of SGT1 and/or PIK1 compromises avrBsT-triggered cell death, hydrogen peroxide production, defense gene induction, and salicylic acid accumulation, leading to the enhanced bacterial pathogen growth in pepper. Together, these results suggest that SGT1 interacts with PIK1 and the bacterial effector protein AvrBsT and promotes the hypersensitive cell death associated with PIK1-mediated phosphorylation in plants.

  4. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-04-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1-CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  5. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1–CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1. PMID:25694549

  6. Analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction during cell death.

    PubMed

    Gogvadze, Vladimir; Orrenius, Sten; Zhivotovsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in various modes of cell death. Analysis of mitochondrial dysfunction and the release of proteins from the intermembrane space of mitochondria represent essential tools in cell death investigation. Here we describe how to evaluate release of intermembrane space proteins during apoptosis, alterations in the mitochondrial membrane potential, and oxygen consumption in apoptotic cells.

  7. Tamoxifen Toxicity in Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Is Mediated by Concurrent Regulated Cell Death Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Leo A.; Amarnani, Dhanesh; Gnanaguru, Gopalan; Tseng, Wen Allen; Vavvas, Demetrios G.; D'Amore, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the mechanism of tamoxifen-induced cell death in human cultured RPE cells, and to investigate concurrent cell death mechanisms including pyroptosis, apoptosis, and necroptosis. Methods. Human RPE cells were cultured until confluence and treated with tamoxifen; cell death was measured by detecting LDH release. Tamoxifen-induced cell death was further confirmed by 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD) and annexin V staining. Lysosomal destabilization was assessed using lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) and acridine orange staining. The roles of lysosomal enzymes cathepsin B and L were examined by blocking their activity. Caspase activity was evaluated by caspase-1, -3, -8, and -9 specific inhibition. Cells were primed with IL-1α and treated with tamoxifen; mature IL-1β production was quantified via ELISA. Caspase activity was verified with the fluorochrome-labeled inhibitor of caspases (FLICA) probe specific for each caspase. Regulated cell necrosis or necroptosis was examined with 7-AAD and inhibition of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase using necrostatin-1 (Nec-1). Results. Cell death occurred within 2 hours of tamoxifen treatment of confluent RPE cells and was accompanied by lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Blockade of cathepsin B and L activity led to a significant decrease in cell death, indicating that lysosomal destabilization and cathepsin release occur prior to regulated cell death. Tamoxifen-induced toxicity was shown to occur through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death pathways. Treatment of RPE cells with caspase inhibitors and Nec-1 resulted in a near complete rescue from cell death. Conclusions. Tamoxifen-induced cell death occurs through concurrent regulated cell death mechanisms. Simultaneous inhibition of caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death pathways is required to protect cells from tamoxifen. Inhibition of upstream activators, such as the cathepsins, may represent a

  8. Ceramide mediates caspase-independent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Thon, Lutz; Möhlig, Heike; Mathieu, Sabine; Lange, Arne; Bulanova, Elena; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schütze, Stefan; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Adam, Dieter

    2005-12-01

    Although numerous studies have implicated the sphingolipid ceramide in the induction of cell death, a causative function of ceramide in caspase-dependent apoptosis remains a highly debated issue. Here, we show that ceramide is a key mediator of a distinct route to programmed cell death (PCD), i.e., caspase-independent PCD. Under conditions where apoptosis is either not initiated or actively inhibited, TNF induces caspase-independent PCD in L929 fibrosarcoma cells, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, human leukemic Jurkat T cells, and lung fibroblasts by increasing intracellular ceramide levels prior to the onset of cell death. Survival is significantly enhanced when ceramide accumulation is prevented, as demonstrated in fibroblasts genetically deficient for acid sphingomyelinase, in L929 cells overexpressing acid ceramidase, by pharmacological intervention, or by RNA interference. Jurkat cells deficient for receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) do not accumulate ceramide and therefore are fully resistant to caspase-independent PCD whereas Jurkat cells overexpressing the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 are partially protected, implicating RIP1 and mitochondria as components of the ceramide death pathway. Our data point to a role of caspases (but not cathepsins) in suppressing the ceramide death pathway under physiological conditions. Moreover, clonogenic survival of tumor cells is clearly reduced by induction of the ceramide death pathway, promising additional options for the development of novel tumor therapies.

  9. Nitric oxide: promoter or suppressor of programmed cell death?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiqin; Chen, Chen; Loake, Gary J; Chu, Chengcai

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous free radical that predominantly functions as a messenger and effector molecule. It affects a variety of physiological processes, including programmed cell death (PCD) through cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent and - independent pathways. In this field, dominant discoveries are the diverse apoptosis networks in mammalian cells, which involve signals primarily via death receptors (extrinsic pathway) or the mitochondria (intrinsic pathway) that recruit caspases as effector molecules. In plants, PCD shares some similarities with animal cells, but NO is involved in PCD induction via interacting with pathways of phytohormones. NO has both promoting and suppressing effects on cell death, depending on a variety of factors, such as cell type, cellular redox status, and the flux and dose of local NO. In this article, we focus on how NO regulates the apoptotic signal cascade through protein S-nitrosylation and review the recent progress on mechanisms of PCD in both mammalian and plant cells.

  10. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  11. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  12. Critical role of the death receptor pathway in the antitumoral effects induced by hispanolone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Través, P G; López-Fontal, R; Cuadrado, I; Luque, A; Boscá, L; de las Heras, B; Hortelano, S

    2013-01-10

    Labdane diterpenoids have a broad spectrum of biological activities including antibacterial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about their possible role in the apoptotic cell death machinery. Here, we report that hispanolone derivatives, a group of labdane diterpenoids, induce apoptosis in different tumor cell lines by activating caspase-8 with subsequent participation of mitochondrial signaling. Activation of caspase-8 by hispanolone derivatives was followed by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of apoptotic factors from mitochondria to the cytosol, and activation of caspases-9 and 3. Hispanolone derivatives also led to a time-dependent cleavage of Bid. Inhibition of caspase-8 abrogated these processes, suggesting that the death receptor pathway has a critical role in the apoptotic events induced by hispanolone derivatives. In addition, silencing death receptors with small interfering RNA s or pretreating cells with neutralizing antibodies to Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNF-R1), and TNF-α receptor 2 (TRAIL) inhibited diterpenoid-induced apoptosis, revealing it to be dependent on these death receptors. Interestingly, hispanolone derivatives had no effect on non-tumor cells. Consistently, in vivo bioluminescence imaging corroborates this antineoplasic effect, as hispanolone derivatives significantly decrease cancer growth in tumor xenograft assays. These data demostrate the antitumoral effects of hispanolone derivatives and provide relevant preclinical validation for the use of these compounds as potent therapeutic agents in cancer treatment.

  13. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  14. P2X7 Cell Death Receptor Activation and Mitochondrial Impairment in Oxaliplatin-Induced Apoptosis and Neuronal Injury: Cellular Mechanisms and In Vivo Approach

    PubMed Central

    Massicot, France; Hache, Guillaume; David, Ludivine; Chen, Dominique; Leuxe, Charlotte; Garnier-Legrand, Laure; Rat, Patrice; Laprévote, Olivier; Coudoré, François

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the cellular mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced painful neuropathy during exposure of patients to this drug. We therefore determined oxidative stress in cultured cells and evaluated its occurrence in C57BL/6 mice. Using both cultured neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell lines and also brain tissues of oxaliplatin-treated mice, we investigated whether oxaliplatin (OXA) induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. Cultured cells were treated with 2–200 µM OXA for 24 h. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative stress or inflammation (N-acetyl cysteine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen) were also tested. Inhibitors were added 30 min before OXA treatment and then in combination with OXA for 24 h. In SH-SY5Y cells, OXA caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in viability, a large increase in ROS and NO production, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment as assessed by a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential, which are deleterious for the cell. An increase in levels of negatively charged phospholipids such as cardiolipin but also phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, was also observed. Additionally, OXA caused concentration-dependent P2X7 receptor activation, increased chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation associated with TNF-α and IL-6 release. The majority of these toxic effects were equally observed in Raw 264.7 which also presented high levels of PGE2. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with pharmacological inhibitors significantly reduced or blocked all the neurotoxic OXA effects. In OXA-treated mice (28 mg/kg cumulated dose) significant cold hyperalgesia and oxidative stress in the tested brain areas were shown. Our study suggests that targeting P2X7 receptor activation and mitochondrial impairment might be a potential therapeutic strategy against OXA-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:23826152

  15. P2X7 Cell Death Receptor Activation and Mitochondrial Impairment in Oxaliplatin-Induced Apoptosis and Neuronal Injury: Cellular Mechanisms and In Vivo Approach.

    PubMed

    Massicot, France; Hache, Guillaume; David, Ludivine; Chen, Dominique; Leuxe, Charlotte; Garnier-Legrand, Laure; Rat, Patrice; Laprévote, Olivier; Coudoré, François

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the cellular mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced painful neuropathy during exposure of patients to this drug. We therefore determined oxidative stress in cultured cells and evaluated its occurrence in C57BL/6 mice. Using both cultured neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell lines and also brain tissues of oxaliplatin-treated mice, we investigated whether oxaliplatin (OXA) induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. Cultured cells were treated with 2-200 µM OXA for 24 h. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative stress or inflammation (N-acetyl cysteine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen) were also tested. Inhibitors were added 30 min before OXA treatment and then in combination with OXA for 24 h. In SH-SY5Y cells, OXA caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in viability, a large increase in ROS and NO production, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment as assessed by a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential, which are deleterious for the cell. An increase in levels of negatively charged phospholipids such as cardiolipin but also phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, was also observed. Additionally, OXA caused concentration-dependent P2X7 receptor activation, increased chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation associated with TNF-α and IL-6 release. The majority of these toxic effects were equally observed in Raw 264.7 which also presented high levels of PGE2. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with pharmacological inhibitors significantly reduced or blocked all the neurotoxic OXA effects. In OXA-treated mice (28 mg/kg cumulated dose) significant cold hyperalgesia and oxidative stress in the tested brain areas were shown. Our study suggests that targeting P2X7 receptor activation and mitochondrial impairment might be a potential therapeutic strategy against OXA-induced neuropathic pain.

  16. Cadmium-induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons mediated by muscarinic M1 receptor blockade, increase in GSK-3β enzyme, β-amyloid and tau protein levels.

    PubMed

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Gabriela; Anadón, María José; Moyano, Paula; Díaz, María Jesús; García, José Manuel; Frejo, María Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium is a neurotoxic compound which induces cognitive alterations similar to those produced by Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism through which cadmium induces this effect remains unknown. In this regard, we described in a previous work that cadmium blocks cholinergic transmission and induces a more pronounced cell death on cholinergic neurons from basal forebrain which is partially mediated by AChE overexpression. Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, as happens in AD, results in memory deficits attributable to the loss of cholinergic modulation of hippocampal synaptic circuits. Moreover, cadmium has been described to activate GSK-3β, induce Aβ protein production and tau filament formation, which have been related to a selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and development of AD. The present study is aimed at researching the mechanisms of cell death induced by cadmium on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. For this purpose, we evaluated, in SN56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line from basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability through muscarinic M1 receptor, AChE splice variants, GSK-3β enzyme, Aβ and tau proteins. This study proves that cadmium induces cell death on cholinergic neurons through blockade of M1 receptor, overexpression of AChE-S and GSK-3β, down-regulation of AChE-R and increase in Aβ and total and phosphorylated tau protein levels. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on cholinergic neurons and suggest that cadmium could mediate these mechanisms by M1R blockade through AChE splices altered expression.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 7 Is Required for TNFα-induced Jun NH2-terminal Kinase Activation and Promotes Cell Death by Regulating Polyubiquitination and Lysosomal Degradation of c-FLIP Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Reale, Carla; Masone, Maria C.; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2012-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α signals both cell survival and death. The biological outcome of TNFα treatment is determined by the balance between survival factors and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which promotes cell death. Here, we show that TRAF7, the most recently identified member of the TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) family of proteins, is essential for activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation. We also show that TRAF6 and TRAF7 promote unconventional polyubiquitination of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIPL and demonstrate that degradation of c-FLIPL also occurs through a lysosomal pathway. RNA interference-mediated depletion of TRAF7 correlates with increased c-FLIPL expression level, which, in turn, results in resistance to TNFα cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results indicate an important role for TRAF7 in the activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation and clearly point to an involvement of this protein in regulating the turnover of c-FLIP and, consequently, cell death. PMID:22219201

  18. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 7 is required for TNFα-induced Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and promotes cell death by regulating polyubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of c-FLIP protein.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Reale, Carla; Masone, Maria C; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2012-02-17

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α signals both cell survival and death. The biological outcome of TNFα treatment is determined by the balance between survival factors and Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which promotes cell death. Here, we show that TRAF7, the most recently identified member of the TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) family of proteins, is essential for activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation. We also show that TRAF6 and TRAF7 promote unconventional polyubiquitination of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP(L) and demonstrate that degradation of c-FLIP(L) also occurs through a lysosomal pathway. RNA interference-mediated depletion of TRAF7 correlates with increased c-FLIP(L) expression level, which, in turn, results in resistance to TNFα cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results indicate an important role for TRAF7 in the activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation and clearly point to an involvement of this protein in regulating the turnover of c-FLIP and, consequently, cell death.

  19. Quercetin enhances apoptotic effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in ovarian cancer cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)-death receptor 5 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Liu; Zongyuan, Yang; Cheng, Gong; Lingyun, Zhang; GuiLian, Yu; Wei, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown efficacy in a phase 2 clinical trial, development of resistance to TRAIL by tumor cells is a major roadblock. We investigated whether quercetin, a flavonoid, can sensitize human ovarian cancer cells to TRAIL. Results indicate that quercetin sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL. The quercetin induced expression of death receptor DR5 but did not affect expression of DR4 in cancer cells. The induction of DR5 was mediated through activation of JNK and through upregulation of a transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP); as silencing of these signaling molecules abrogated the effect of quercetin. Upregulation of DR5 was mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as ROS scavengers reduced the effect of quercetin on JNK activation, CHOP upregulation, DR induction, TRAIL sensitization, downregulated the expression of cell survival proteins and upregulated the proapoptotic proteins. Furthermore, quercetin enhances TRAIL mediated inhibition of tumor growth of human SKOV-3 xenograft was associated with induction of apoptosis, activation of caspase-3, CHOP and DR5. Overall, our data suggest that quercetin enhances apoptotic death of ovarian cancer cells to TRAIL through upregulation of CHOP-induced DR5 expression following ROS mediated endoplasmic reticulum-stress. PMID:24612139

  20. Imipramine protects mouse hippocampus against tunicamycin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-12-05

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in various diseases. Recently, some reports have suggested that the sigma-1 receptor may play a role in ER stress, and many antidepressants have a high affinity for the sigma-1 receptor. In the present study, we focused on imipramine, a widely used antidepressant, and investigated whether it might protect against the neuronal cell death induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. In mouse cultured hippocampal HT22 cells, imipramine inhibited cell death and caspase-3 activation induced by tunicamycin, although it did not alter the elevated expressions of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Interestingly, in such cells application of imipramine normalized the expression of the sigma-1 receptor, which was decreased by treatment with tunicamycin alone. Additionally, NE-100, a selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the protective effect of imipramine against such tunicamycin-induced cell death. Imipramine inhibited the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by tunicamycin, and NE-100 blocked this modulating effect of imipramine. Furthermore, in anesthetized mice intracerebroventricular administration of tunicamycin decreased the number of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) areas, and 7 days' imipramine treatment (10mg/kg/day; i.p.) significantly suppressed these reductions in CA1 and DG. These findings suggest that imipramine protects against ER stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Such protection may be partly due to the sigma-1 receptor.

  1. Tumor therapeutics by design: targeting and activation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    Due to their strong apoptosis-inducing capacity, the death receptor ligands CD95L, TNF and TRAIL have been widely viewed as potential cancer therapeutics. While clinical data with CD95L and TRAIL are not yet available, TNF is a registered drug, albeit only for loco-regional application in a limited number of indications. The TNF experience has told us that specific delivery and restricted action is a major challenge in the development of multifunctional, pleiotropically acting cytokines into effective cancer therapeutics. Thus, gene-therapeutic approaches and new cytokine variants have been designed over the last 10 years with the aim of increasing anti-tumoral activity and reducing systemic side effects. Here, we present our current view of the therapeutic potential of the death receptor ligands TNF, CD95L and TRAIL and of the progress made towards improving their efficacy by tumor targeting, use of gene therapy and genetic engineering. Results generated with newly designed fusion proteins suggest that enhanced tumor-directed activity and prevention of undesirable actions of death receptor ligands is possible, thereby opening up a useful therapeutic window for all of the death receptor ligands, including CD95L.

  2. Carboxylation of multiwalled carbon nanotube attenuated the cytotoxicity by limiting the oxidative stress initiated cell membrane integrity damage, cell cycle arrestment, and death receptor mediated apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenbao; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2015-08-01

    In this study, the effects of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) on human normal liver cell line L02 was compared with that of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs). It was shown that compared with MWCNTs-COOH, p-MWCNTs induced apoptosis, reduced the level of intracellular antioxidant glutathione more significantly, and caused severer cell membrane damage as demonstrated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Cell cycles were arrested by both MWCNTs, while p-MWCNTs induced higher ratio of G0/G1 phase arrestment as compared with MWCNTs-COOH. Caspase-8 was also activated after both MWCNTs exposure, indicating extrinsic apoptotic pathway was involved in the apoptosis induced by MWCNTs exposure, more importantly, MWCNTs-COOH significantly reduced the activation of caspase-8 as compared with p-MWCNTs. All these results suggested that MWCNTs-COOH might be safer for in vivo application as compared with p-MWCNTs.

  3. Attenuation of Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced parallel autophagic and apoptotic cell death by gypenoside XVII through the estrogen receptor-dependent activation of Nrf2/ARE pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xiangbao; Wang, Min; Sun, Guibo; Ye, Jingxue; Zhou, Yanhui; Dong, Xi; Wang, Tingting; Lu, Shan; Sun, Xiaobo

    2014-08-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) has a pivotal function in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate Aβ neurotoxicity, we used an in vitro model that involves Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced cell death in the nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Aβ{sub 25–35} (20 μM) treatment for 24 h caused apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by significant cell viability reduction, LDH release, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in PC12 cells. Aβ{sub 25–35} treatment led to autophagic cell death, as evidenced by augmented GFP-LC3 puncta, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Aβ{sub 25–35} treatment induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by intracellular ROS accumulation and increased production of mitochondrial superoxide, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-OHdG. Phytoestrogens have been proved to be protective against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and regarded as relatively safe targets for AD drug development. Gypenoside XVII (GP-17) is a novel phytoestrogen isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum or Panax notoginseng. Pretreatment with GP-17 (10 μM) for 12 h increased estrogen response element reporter activity, activated PI3K/Akt pathways, inhibited GSK-3β, induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, augmented antioxidant responsive element enhancer activity, upregulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and activity, and provided protective effects against Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. In conclusion, GP-17 conferred protection against Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced neurotoxicity through estrogen receptor-dependent activation of PI3K/Akt pathways, inactivation of GSK-3β and activation of Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways. This finding might provide novel insights into understanding the mechanism for neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens or

  4. Green tea polyphenols precondition against cell death induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation via stimulation of laminin receptor, generation of reactive oxygen species, and activation of protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Gundimeda, Usha; McNeill, Thomas H; Elhiani, Albert A; Schiffman, Jason E; Hinton, David R; Gopalakrishna, Rayudu

    2012-10-05

    As the development of synthetic drugs for the prevention of stroke has proven challenging, utilization of natural products capable of preconditioning neuronal cells against ischemia-induced cell death would be a highly useful complementary approach. In this study using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in PC12 cells, we show that 2-day pretreatment with green tea polyphenols (GTPP) and their active ingredient, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), protects cells from subsequent OGD/R-induced cell death. A synergistic interaction was observed between GTPP constituents, with unfractionated GTPP more potently preconditioning cells than EGCG. GTPP-induced preconditioning required the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR), to which EGCG binds with high affinity. 67LR also mediated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via activation of NADPH oxidase. An exogenous ROS-generating system bypassed 67LR to induce preconditioning, suggesting that sublethal levels of ROS are indeed an important mediator in GTPP-induced preconditioning. This role for ROS was further supported by the fact that antioxidants blocked GTPP-induced preconditioning. Additionally, ROS induced an activation and translocation of protein kinase C (PKC), particularly PKCε from the cytosol to the membrane/mitochondria, which was also blocked by antioxidants. The crucial role of PKC in GTPP-induced preconditioning was supported by use of its specific inhibitors. Preconditioning was increased by conditional overexpression of PKCε and decreased by its knock-out with siRNA. Collectively, these results suggest that GTPP stimulates 67LR and thereby induces NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of ROS, which in turn induces activation of PKC, particularly prosurvival isoenzyme PKCε, resulting in preconditioning against cell death induced by OGD/R.

  5. Green Tea Polyphenols Precondition against Cell Death Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation via Stimulation of Laminin Receptor, Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, and Activation of Protein Kinase Cϵ

    PubMed Central

    Gundimeda, Usha; McNeill, Thomas H.; Elhiani, Albert A.; Schiffman, Jason E.; Hinton, David R.; Gopalakrishna, Rayudu

    2012-01-01

    As the development of synthetic drugs for the prevention of stroke has proven challenging, utilization of natural products capable of preconditioning neuronal cells against ischemia-induced cell death would be a highly useful complementary approach. In this study using an oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) model in PC12 cells, we show that 2-day pretreatment with green tea polyphenols (GTPP) and their active ingredient, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), protects cells from subsequent OGD/R-induced cell death. A synergistic interaction was observed between GTPP constituents, with unfractionated GTPP more potently preconditioning cells than EGCG. GTPP-induced preconditioning required the 67-kDa laminin receptor (67LR), to which EGCG binds with high affinity. 67LR also mediated the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via activation of NADPH oxidase. An exogenous ROS-generating system bypassed 67LR to induce preconditioning, suggesting that sublethal levels of ROS are indeed an important mediator in GTPP-induced preconditioning. This role for ROS was further supported by the fact that antioxidants blocked GTPP-induced preconditioning. Additionally, ROS induced an activation and translocation of protein kinase C (PKC), particularly PKCϵ from the cytosol to the membrane/mitochondria, which was also blocked by antioxidants. The crucial role of PKC in GTPP-induced preconditioning was supported by use of its specific inhibitors. Preconditioning was increased by conditional overexpression of PKCϵ and decreased by its knock-out with siRNA. Collectively, these results suggest that GTPP stimulates 67LR and thereby induces NADPH oxidase-dependent generation of ROS, which in turn induces activation of PKC, particularly prosurvival isoenzyme PKCϵ, resulting in preconditioning against cell death induced by OGD/R. PMID:22879598

  6. Lipoxygenase inhibitors protect acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from ferroptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Probst, Lukas; Dächert, Jasmin; Schenk, Barbara; Fulda, Simone

    2017-09-15

    Ferroptosis has recently been identified as a mode of programmed cell death. However, little is yet known about the signaling mechanism. Here, we report that lipoxygenases (LOX) contribute to the regulation of RSL3-induced ferroptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We show that the glutathione (GSH) peroxidase 4 (GPX4) inhibitor RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in ALL cells. All these events are impeded in the presence of Ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1), a small-molecule inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. Also, lipid peroxidation and ROS production precede the induction of cell death, underscoring their contribution to cell death upon exposure to RSL3. Importantly, LOX inhibitors, including the selective 12/15-LOX inhibitor Baicalein and the pan-LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), protect ALL cells from RSL3-stimulated lipid peroxidation, ROS generation and cell death, indicating that LOX contribute to ferroptosis. RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation and cell death also in FAS-associated Death Domain (FADD)-deficient cells which are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis indicating that the induction of ferroptosis may bypass apoptosis resistance. By providing new insights into the molecular regulation of ferroptosis, our study contributes to the development of novel treatment strategies to reactivate programmed cell death in ALL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of the allosteric agonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 AMN082 on oxygen-glucose deprivation- and kainate-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Domin, Helena; Jantas, Danuta; Śmiałowska, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Although numerous studies demonstrated a neuroprotective potency of unspecific group III mGluR agonists in in vitro and in vivo models of excitotoxicity, little is known about the protective role of group III mGlu receptor activation against neuronal cell injury evoked by ischemic conditions. The aim of the present study was to assess neuroprotective potential of the allosteric agonist of mGlu7 receptor, N,N'-Bis(diphenylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride (AMN082) against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)- and kainate (KA)-evoked neuronal cell damage in primary neuronal cultures, with special focus on its efficacy after delayed application. We demonstrated that in cortical neuronal cultures exposed to a 180 min OGD, AMN082 (0.01-1 µM) in a concentration- and time-dependent way attenuated the OGD-induced changes in the LDH release and MTT reduction assays. AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) produced also neuroprotective effects against KA-evoked neurotoxicity both in cortical and hippocampal cultures. Of particular importance was the finding that AMN082 attenuated excitotoxic neuronal injury after delayed application (30 min after OGD, or 30 min-1 h after KA). In both models of neurotoxicity, namely OGD- and KA-induced injury, the neuroprotective effects of AMN082 (1 µM) were reversed by the selective mGlu7 antagonist, 6-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-(4-pyridinyl)-isoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one hydrochloride (MMPIP, 1 µM), suggesting the mGlu7-dependent mechanism of neuroprotective effects of AMN082. Next, we showed that AMN082 (0.5 and 1 µM) attenuated the OGD-induced increase in the number of necrotic nuclei as well inhibited the OGD-evoked calpain activation, suggesting the participation of these processes in the mechanism of AMN082-mediated protection. Additionally, we showed that protection evoked by AMN082 (1 µM) in KA model was connected with the inhibition of toxin-induced caspase-3 activity, and this effect was abolished by the mGlu7

  8. Programmed cell death 50 (and beyond)

    PubMed Central

    Lockshin, R A

    2016-01-01

    In the 50 years since we described cell death as ‘programmed,' we have come far, thanks to the efforts of many brilliant researchers, and we now understand the mechanics, the biochemistry, and the genetics of many of the ways in which cells can die. This knowledge gives us the resources to alter the fates of many cells. However, not all cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, in either sensitivity to the stimulus or timing of the response. Cells prevented from dying through one pathway may survive, survive in a crippled state, or die following a different pathway. To fully capitalize on our knowledge of cell death, we need to understand much more about how cells are targeted to die and what aspects of the history, metabolism, or resources available to individual cells determine how each cell reaches and crosses the threshold at which it commits to death. PMID:26564398

  9. Correlation of the expression of YY1 and Fas cell surface death receptor with apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the development of multiple organ dysfunction in children with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Reséndiz-Martínez, Judith; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Vega, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) is a lethal complication in children with sepsis. Apoptosis of several cell types is involved in this process, and it is associated with increased Fas cell surface death receptor (Fas) expression. As YY1 transcription factor (YY1) negatively regulates the expression of Fas in cancer models, and is associated with the clinical outcome, it may be important in MOD. The present study aimed to determine the association between the expression of Fas, YY1 and apoptosis in children with sepsis, and its association with MOD, these factors were analyzed in 30 pediatric patients that had been diagnosed with sepsis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from patients, and YY1 and Fas protein expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling. Sepsis was monitored using clinical parameters, pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD) score and the pediatric mortality index. The results demonstrated that Fas expression was directly correlated with apoptosis levels and the expression of YY1 was inversely correlated with apoptosis levels. Patients with high levels of apoptosis exhibited increased disease severity and poor clinical outcome. Notably, the findings of the present study demonstrated that there were higher survival rates in patients with high YY1 expression, compared with those with low YY1 expression. Additionally, patients with MOD exhibited lower proportions of apoptotic cells compared with sepsis patients without MOD. Furthermore, the PELOD score was positively correlated with Fas and inversely correlated with YY1 expression. Finally, high apoptosis and low YY1 expression were prognostic factors associated with poor survival rates. These data suggested that YY1 may be important for apoptosis induction via the regulation of Fas during sepsis. Therefore, Fas may be a potential therapeutic target to prevent MOD through regulation of YY1

  10. FLIP ing the coin? Death receptor-mediated signals during skin tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Leverkus, Martin; Diessenbacher, Philip; Geserick, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Keratinocyte skin cancer is a multi-step process, during which a number of obstacles have to be overcome by the tumor cell to allow the development of a manifest tumor. Beside proliferation and immortality, apoptosis resistance is one additional and critical step during skin carcinogenesis. Over the past two decades, much has been learned about the prototypical membrane-bound inducers of apoptosis, namely the death receptors and their ligands, and the apoptosis signalling pathways activated by death receptors have been elucidated in great detail. In contrast, much less is known about the tissue-specific role of the death receptor/ligands systems during the development of skin cancer. Here, we summarize and discuss the role of this intriguing receptor family and the potential mechanistical impact of the intracellular caspase-8 inhibitor cFLIP for keratinocyte skin cancer. Given more recent data about cFLIP and its isoforms, a more complex regulatory role of cFLIP can be suspected. Indeed, cFLIP may not solely interfere with death receptor-mediated apoptosis signalling pathways, but may positively or negatively influence other, potential harmful signalling pathways such as the production of inflammatory cytokines, tumor cell migration or the activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, considered crucial during skin tumorigenesis. In this respect, cFLIP may act to 'FLIP the coin' during the development of keratinocyte skin cancer.

  11. Herceptin Conjugates Linked by EDC Boost Direct Tumor Cell Death via Programmed Tumor Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Dennis; Esteva, Francisco J.; Liu, Bolin; Chandra, Joya; Li, Shulin

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride), are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment. PMID:21853100

  12. Gangliosides induce autophagic cell death in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jaegyu; Lee, Shinrye; Lee, Jung Tae; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Deok Ryong; Kim, Ho; Park, Hae-Chul; Suk, Kyoungho

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gangliosides, sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, abundant in brain, are involved in neuronal function and disease, but the precise molecular mechanisms underlying their physiological or pathological activities are poorly understood. In this study, the pathological role of gangliosides in the extracellular milieu with respect to glial cell death and lipid raft/membrane disruption was investigated. Experimental approach: We determined the effect of gangliosides on astrocyte death or survival using primary astrocyte cultures and astrocytoma/glioma cell lines as a model. Signalling pathways of ganglioside-induced autophagic cell death of astrocytes were examined using pharmacological inhibitors and biochemical and genetic assays. Key results: Gangliosides induced autophagic cell death in based on the following observations. Incubation of the cells with a mixture of gangliosides increased a punctate distribution of fluorescently labelled microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3), the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I and LC3 flux. Gangliosides also increased the formation of autophagic vacuoles as revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining. Ganglioside-induced cell death was inhibited by either a knockdown of beclin-1/Atg-6 or Atg-7 gene expression or by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in ganglioside-induced autophagic cell death of astrocytes, because gangliosides induced ROS production and ROS scavengers decreased autophagic cell death. In addition, lipid rafts played an important role in ganglioside-induced astrocyte death. Conclusions and implications: Gangliosides released under pathological conditions may induce autophagic cell death of astrocytes, identifying a neuropathological role for gangliosides. PMID:20067473

  13. Cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival

    PubMed Central

    Komissarov, Alexey A.; Rafieva, Lola M.; Kostrov, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic vacuolization (also called cytoplasmic vacuolation) is a well-known morphological phenomenon observed in mammalian cells after exposure to bacterial or viral pathogens as well as to various natural and artificial low-molecular-weight compounds. Vacuolization often accompanies cell death; however, its role in cell death processes remains unclear. This can be attributed to studying vacuolization at the level of morphology for many years. At the same time, new data on the molecular mechanisms of the vacuole formation and structure have become available. In addition, numerous examples of the association between vacuolization and previously unknown cell death types have been reported. Here, we review these data to make a deeper insight into the role of cytoplasmic vacuolization in cell death and survival. PMID:27331412

  14. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  15. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose; Leon, Francisco; Estevez, Francisco

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Newly synthesized quinazolinone HMJ-38 suppresses angiogenetic responses and triggers human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis through p53-modulated Fas/death receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Jo-Hua; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hour, Mann-Jen; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-06-01

    The current study aims to investigate the antiangiogenic responses and apoptotic death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by a newly synthesized compound named 2-(3′-methoxyphenyl)-6-pyrrolidinyl-4-quinazolinone (HMJ-38). This work attempted to not only explore the effects of angiogenesis on in vivo and ex vivo studies but also hypothesize the implications for HUVECs (an ideal cell model for angiogenesis in vitro) and further undermined apoptotic experiments to verify the underlying molecular signaling by HMJ-38. Our results demonstrated that HMJ-38 significantly inhibited blood vessel growth and microvessel formation by the mouse Matrigel plug assay of angiogenesis, and the suppression of microsprouting from the rat aortic ring assay was observed after HMJ-38 exposure. In addition, HMJ-38 disrupted the tube formation and blocked the ability of HUVECs to migrate in response to VEGF. We also found that HMJ-38 triggered cell apoptosis of HUVECs in vitro. HMJ-38 concentration-dependently suppressed viability and induced apoptotic damage in HUVECs. HMJ-38-influenced HUVECs were performed by determining the oxidative stress (ROS production) and ATM/p53-modulated Fas and DR4/DR5 signals that were examined by flow cytometry, Western blotting, siRNA and real-time RT-PCR analyses, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that p53-regulated extrinsic pathway might fully contribute to HMJ-38-provoked apoptotic death in HUVECs. In view of these observations, we conclude that HMJ-38 reduces angiogenesis in vivo and ex vivo as well as induces apoptosis of HUVECs in vitro. Overall, HMJ-38 has a potent anti-neovascularization effect and could warrant being a vascular targeting agent in the future. - Highlights: • HMJ-38 suppresses angiogenic actions in vivo and ex vivo. • Inhibitions of blood vessel and microvessel formation by HMJ-38 are acted. • Cytotoxic effects of HUVECs occur by HMJ-38 challenge. • p53-modulated extrinsic pathway contributes to HMJ-38

  17. Doxorubicin induces cardiotoxicity through upregulation of death receptors mediated apoptosis in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liqun; Zhang, Baolin

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly effective anticancer agent but causes cardiotoxicity in many patients. The mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity remain incompletely understood. Here we investigated doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs). We found that doxorubicin and related anthracycline agents (e.g., daunorubicin, idarubicin, and epirubicin) significantly upregulated the expression of death receptors (DRs) (TNFR1, Fas, DR4 and DR5) in iPS-derived cardiomyocytes at both protein and mRNA levels. The resulting iPS-CMs cells underwent spontaneous apoptosis which was further enhanced by physiologically relevant death ligands including TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Furthermore, TRAIL potentiated doxorubicin-induced decrease in beating rate and amplitude of iPS-derived cardiomyocytes. These data demonstrate that the induction of death receptors in cardiomyocytes is likely a critical mechanism by which doxorubicin causes cardiotoxicity. PMID:28300219

  18. Programmed cell death in plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Cheun, A Y

    2000-10-01

    Reproductive development is a rich arena to showcase programmed cell death in plants. After floral induction, the first act of reproductive development in some plants is the selective killing of cells destined to differentiate into an unwanted sexual organ. Production of functional pollen grains relies significantly on deterioration and death of the anther tapetum, a tissue whose main function appears to nurture and decorate the pollen grains with critical surface molecules. Degeneration and death in a number of anther tissues result ultimately in anther rupture and dispersal of pollen grains. Female sporogenesis frequently begins with the death of all but one of the meiotic derivatives, with surrounding nucellar cells degenerating in concert with embryo sac expansion. Female tissues that interact with pollen undergo dramatic degeneration, including death, to ensure the encounter of compatible male and female gametes. Pollen and pistil interact to kill invading pollen from an incompatible source. Most observations on cell death in reproductive tissues have been on the histological and cytological levels. We discuss various cell death phenomena in reproductive development with a view towards understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes.

  19. Cell Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zebell, Sophia G.; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell-cycle. PMID:26468745

  20. Cell-Cycle Regulators and Cell Death in Immunity.

    PubMed

    Zebell, Sophia G; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-10-14

    Various cell death mechanisms are integral to host defense in both plants and mammals. Plant defense against biotrophic pathogens is associated with programmed cell death (PCD) of the infected cell. This effector-triggered PCD is partly analogous to pyroptosis, an inflammatory host cell death process that plays a crucial role in defense against microbial infections in mammals. Plant effector-triggered PCD also shares with mammalian apoptosis the involvement of cell-cycle regulators as signaling components. Here we explore the similarities between these different cell death programs as they relate to host defense and their relationship to the cell cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lethal activity of FADD death domain in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Justo, P; Sanz, A B; Lorz, C; Egido, J; Ortiz, A

    2006-06-01

    Fas-associated death domain (FADD) is an adaptor protein that is required for the transmission of the death signal from lethal receptors of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. FADD contains a death domain (DD) and a death effector domain (DED). As death receptors contribute to renal tubular injury and tubular cell FADD increases in acute renal failure, we have studied the function of FADD in tubular epithelium. FADD expression was studied in kidney samples from mice. In order to study the contribution of FADD to renal tubular cell survival, FADD or FADD-DD were overexpressed in murine tubular epithelium. FADD is expressed in renal tubules of the healthy kidney. Both FADD and FADD-DD induce apoptosis in primary cultures of murine tubular epithelium and in the murine cortical tubular cell line. Death induced by FADD-DD has apoptotic morphology, but differs from death receptor-induced apoptosis in that it is not blocked by inhibitors of caspases. Neither an inhibitor of serine proteases nor overexpression of antiapoptotic BclxL prevented cell death. However, the combination of caspase and serine protease inhibition was protective. FADD and FADD-DD overexpression decreased nuclear factor kappa B activity. These data suggest that FADD has a death regulatory function in renal tubular cells that is independent of death receptors. FADD-DD is sufficient to induce apoptosis in these cells. This information is relevant to understanding the role of FADD in tubular injury.

  2. Pretreatment with paclitaxel enhances apo-2 ligand/tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by inducing death receptors 4 and 5 protein levels.

    PubMed

    Nimmanapalli, R; Perkins, C L; Orlando, M; O'Bryan, E; Nguyen, D; Bhalla, K N

    2001-01-15

    We have demonstrated that Apo-2 ligand (Apo-2L)/tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis of human prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells in a dose-dependent manner, with PC-3 cells displaying the greatest sensitivity to Apo-2L/TRAIL. Susceptibility of the prostate cancer cell types to Apo-2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis did not appear to correlate with the levels of the Apo-2L/TRAIL receptors death receptor (DR) 4 (TRAIL receptor 1) or DR5 (TRAIL receptor 2), decoy receptor (DcR) 1 and DcR2, Flame-1, or the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins family of proteins. Apo-2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells was associated with the processing of caspase-8, caspase-10, and the proapoptotic Bid protein, resulting in the cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c as well as the processing of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3. Cotreatment with the caspase-8 inhibitor z-IETD-fmk or DR4:Fc significantly inhibited Apo-2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Treatment with paclitaxel or taxotere increased DR4 and/or DR5 protein levels (up to 8-fold) without affecting the protein levels of DcR1 and DcR2, Apo-2L/TRAIL, Fas, or Fas ligand. Up-regulation of DR4 and DR5 was not preceded by the induction of their mRNA levels but was inhibited by cotreatment with cycloheximide. Importantly, sequential treatment of PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells with paclitaxel followed by Apo-2L/TRAIL induced significantly more apoptosis than Apo-2L/TRAIL treatment alone (P < 0.01). This was also associated with greater processing of procaspase-8 and Bid, as well as greater cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c and the processing of caspase-3. These findings indicate that up-regulation of DR4 and DR5 protein levels by treatment with paclitaxel enhances subsequent Apo-2L/TRAIL-induced apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells.

  3. Induction of apoptosis in leukemia cell lines by new copper(II) complexes containing naphthyl groups via interaction with death receptors.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Lopes, Bruna F; Bull, Erika S; Azeredo, Nathália F B; Kanashiro, Milton M; Borges, Franz V; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Pires, Anderson B; Franco, Roberto W A; Almeida, João Carlos de A; Maciel, Leide L F; Resende, Jackson A L C; Schenk, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, physico-chemical characterization and cytotoxicity of four new ligands and their respective copper(II) complexes toward two human leukemia cell lines (THP-1 and U937) are reported (i.e. [(HL1)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL1)]Cl2·H2O (1), [(H2L2)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L2)]Cl2·5H2O (2), [(HL3)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(HL3)]Cl2·4H2O (3), [(H2L4)Cu(μ-Cl)2Cu(H2L4)]Cl2·6H2O (4)). Ligands HL1 and HL3 contain two pyridines, amine and alcohol moieties with a naphthyl pendant unit yielding a N3O coordination metal environment. Ligands H2L2 and H2L4 have pyridine, phenol, amine and alcohol groups with a naphthyl pendant unit providing a N2O2 coordination metal environment. These compounds are likely to be dinuclear in the solid state but form mononuclear species in solution. The complexes have an antiproliferative effect against both leukemia cell lines; complex (2) exhibits higher activity than cisplatin against U937 (8.20 vs 16.25μmoldm(-3)) and a comparable one against THP-1. These human neoplastic cells are also more susceptible than peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) toward the tested compounds. Using C57BL/6 mice an LD50 of 55mgkg(-1) was determined for complex (2), suggesting that this compound is almost four times less toxic than cisplatin (LD50=14.5mgkg(-1)). The mechanism of cell death promoted by ligand H2L2 and by complexes (2) and (4) was investigated by a range of techniques demonstrating that the apoptosis signal triggered at least by complex (2) starts from an extrinsic pathway involving the activation of caspases 4 and 8. This signal is amplified by mitochondria with the concomitant release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase 9.

  4. Regulation of VDAC trafficking modulates cell death

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Ashvini K; Godbole, Ashwini; Mathew, M K

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and mitochondria-associated hexokinase (HxK) have crucial roles in both cell survival and death. Both the individual abundances and their ratio seem to influence the balance of survival and death and are thus critical in scenarios, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. Elevated levels of both VDAC and HxK have been reported in cancerous cells. Physical interaction is surmised and specific residues or regions involved have been identified, but details of the interaction and the mechanism by which it modulates survival are yet to be elucidated. We and others have shown that heterologous expression of VDAC can induce cell death, which can be mitigated by concomitant overexpression of HxK. We have also observed that upon overexpression, fluorescently tagged VDAC is distributed between the cytosol and mitochondria. In this study, we show that cell death ensues only when the protein, which is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, migrates to the mitochondrion. Further, coexpression of rat HxK II (rHxKII) can delay the translocation of human VDAC1 (hVDAC1) protein to mitochondria and thereby inhibit VDAC-induced cell death. Variation in the level of HxK protein as seen endogenously in different cell lines, or as experimentally manipulated by silencing and overexpression, can lead to differential VDAC translocation kinetics and related cell death. The N-terminal region of HxK and the Glu73 residue of hVDAC1, which have previously been implicated in a physical interaction, are required for cytosolic retention of VDAC. Finally, we show that, in otherwise unperturbed cells in culture, there is a small but significant amount of soluble VDAC in the cytosol present in a complex with HxK. This complex could well determine how a cell is poised with respect to incoming thanatopic signals, thereby tilting the survival/death balance in pharmacologically interesting situations, such as neurodegeneration and cancer. PMID:28028442

  5. TRAIL-death receptor endocytosis and apoptosis are selectively regulated by dynamin-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Carlos R.; Chen, Ping-Hung; Bendris, Nawal; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2017-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) constitutes the major pathway for uptake of signaling receptors into eukaryotic cells. As such, CME regulates signaling from cell-surface receptors, but whether and how specific signaling receptors reciprocally regulate the CME machinery remains an open question. Although best studied for its role in membrane fission, the GTPase dynamin also regulates early stages of CME. We recently reported that dynamin-1 (Dyn1), previously assumed to be neuron-specific, can be selectively activated in cancer cells to alter endocytic trafficking. Here we report that dynamin isoforms differentially regulate the endocytosis and apoptotic signaling downstream of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand–death receptor (TRAIL–DR) complexes in several cancer cells. Whereas the CME of constitutively internalized transferrin receptors is mainly dependent on the ubiquitously expressed Dyn2, TRAIL-induced DR endocytosis is selectively regulated by activation of Dyn1. We show that TRAIL stimulation activates ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum stores, leading to calcineurin-mediated dephosphorylation and activation of Dyn1, TRAIL–DR endocytosis, and increased resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. TRAIL–DR-mediated ryanodine receptor activation and endocytosis is dependent on early caspase-8 activation. These findings delineate specific mechanisms for the reciprocal crosstalk between signaling and the regulation of CME, leading to autoregulation of endocytosis and signaling downstream of surface receptors. PMID:28049841

  6. Ethylene insensitivity modulates ozone-induced cell death in birch.

    PubMed

    Vahala, Jorma; Ruonala, Raili; Keinänen, Markku; Tuominen, Hannele; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2003-05-01

    We have used genotypic variation in birch (Betula pendula Roth) to investigate the roles of ozone (O(3))-induced ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid in the regulation of tissue tolerance to O(3). Of these hormones, ET evolution correlated best with O(3)-induced cell death. Disruption of ET perception by transformation of birch with the dominant negative mutant allele etr1-1 of the Arabidopsis ET receptor gene ETR1 or blocking of ET perception with 1-methylcyclopropene reduced but did not completely prevent the O(3)-induced cell death, when inhibition of ET biosynthesis with aminooxyacetic acid completely abolished O(3) lesion formation. This suggests the presence of an ET-signaling-independent but ET biosynthesis-dependent component in the ET-mediated stimulation of cell death in O(3)-exposed birch. Functional ET signaling was required for the O(3) induction of the gene encoding beta-cyanoalanine synthase, which catalyzes detoxification of the cyanide formed during ET biosynthesis. The results suggest that functional ET signaling is required to protect birch from the O(3)-induced cell death and that a decrease in ET sensitivity together with a simultaneous, high ET biosynthesis can potentially cause cell death through a deficient detoxification of cyanide.

  7. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alexandra A.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death) can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection. PMID:28168107

  8. Cell death and cell death responses in liver disease: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets.

  9. Cell Death and Cell Death Responses in Liver Disease: Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets. PMID:25046161

  10. Calcium imaging in neuron cell death.

    PubMed

    Calvo, María; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ is involved in control of a large variety of cell functions including apoptosis and neuron cell death. For example, intracellular Ca2+ overload is critical in neuron cell death induced by excitotoxicity. Thus, single cell monitoring of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt ) in neurons concurrently with apoptosis and neuron cell death is widely required. Procedures for culture and preparation of primary cultures of hippocampal rat neurons and fluorescence imaging of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in Fura2/AM -loaded neurons are described. We also describe a method for apoptosis detection by immunofluorescence imaging. Finally, a simple method for concurrent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt and apoptosis in the same neurons is described.

  11. Cardiac Muscarinic Receptor Overexpression in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Livolsi, Angelo; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Rambaud, Caroline; Olexa, Catherine; Mokni, Walid; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Bousquet, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity were investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Left ventricular samples and blood samples were obtained from autopsies of SIDS and children deceased from non cardiac causes. Binding experiments performed with [3H]NMS, a selective muscarinic ligand, in cardiac membrane preparations showed that the density of cardiac muscarinic receptors was increased as shown by a more than doubled Bmax value in SIDS (n = 9 SIDS versus 8 controls). On average, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity was also significantly increased (n = 9 SIDS versus 11 controls). Conclusions In the present study, it has been shown for the first time that cardiac muscarinic receptor overexpression is associated with SIDS. The increase of acetylcholinesterase enzyme activity appears as a possible regulatory mechanism. PMID:20209124

  12. Upregulation of interleukin 7 receptor alpha and programmed death 1 marks an epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell response that disappears following primary Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sauce, Delphine; Larsen, Martin; Abbott, Rachel J M; Hislop, Andrew D; Leese, Alison M; Khan, Naeem; Papagno, Laura; Freeman, Gordon J; Rickinson, Alan B

    2009-09-01

    In immunocompetent individuals, the stability of the herpesvirus-host balance limits opportunities to study the disappearance of a virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell response. However, we noticed that in HLA-A 0201-positive infectious mononucleosis (IM) patients undergoing primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, the initial CD8 response targets three EBV lytic antigen-derived epitopes, YVLDHLIVV (YVL), GLCTLVAML (GLC), and TLDYKPLSV (TLD), but only the YVL and GLC reactivities persist long-term; the TLD response disappears within 10 to 27 months. While present, TLD-specific cells remained largely indistinguishable from YVL and GLC reactivities in many phenotypic and functional respects but showed unique temporal changes in two markers of T-cell fate, interleukin 7 receptor alpha (IL-7Ralpha; CD127) and programmed death 1 (PD-1). Thus, following the antigen-driven downregulation of IL-7Ralpha seen on all populations in acute IM, in every case, the TLD-specific population recovered expression unusually quickly post-IM. As well, in four of six patients studied, TLD-specific cells showed very strong PD-1 upregulation in the last blood sample obtained before the cells' disappearance. Our data suggest that the disappearance of this individual epitope reactivity from an otherwise stable EBV-specific response (i) reflects a selective loss of cognate antigen restimulation (rather than of IL-7-dependent signals) and (ii) is immediately preceded, and perhaps mediated, by PD-1 upregulation to unprecedented levels.

  13. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Webb, Jeremy S; Thompson, Lyndal S; James, Sally; Charlton, Tim; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Koch, Birgit; Givskov, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2003-08-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids. However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development thereafter, a bacteriophage capable of superinfecting and lysing the P. aeruginosa parent strain was detected in the fluid effluent from the biofilm. The bacteriophage implicated in biofilm killing was closely related to the filamentous phage Pf1 and existed as a prophage within the genome of P. aeruginosa. We propose that prophage-mediated cell death is an important mechanism of differentiation inside microcolonies that facilitates dispersal of a subpopulation of surviving cells.

  14. Cell Death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jeremy S.; Thompson, Lyndal S.; James, Sally; Charlton, Tim; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Koch, Birgit; Givskov, Michael; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids. However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development thereafter, a bacteriophage capable of superinfecting and lysing the P. aeruginosa parent strain was detected in the fluid effluent from the biofilm. The bacteriophage implicated in biofilm killing was closely related to the filamentous phage Pf1 and existed as a prophage within the genome of P. aeruginosa. We propose that prophage-mediated cell death is an important mechanism of differentiation inside microcolonies that facilitates dispersal of a subpopulation of surviving cells. PMID:12867469

  15. Contribution of apoptotic cell death to renal injury.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A; Lorz, C; Justo, P; Catalán, M P; Egido, J

    2001-01-01

    Cell number abnormalities are frequent in renal diseases, and range from the hypercellularity of postinfectious glomerulonephritis to the cell depletion of chronic renal atrophy. Recent research has shown that apoptosis and its regulatory mechanisms contribute to cell number regulation in the kidney. The role of apoptosis ranges from induction to repair and progression of renal injury. Death ligands and receptors, such as TNF and FasL, proapoptotic and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members and caspases have all been shown to participate in apoptosis regulation in the course of renal injury. These proteins represent potential therapeutic targets, which should be further explored.

  16. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  17. Necroptosis: an alternative cell death program defending against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongshi; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is resistance to programmed cell death, which maintains the survival of cells en route to oncogenic transformation and underlies therapeutic resistance. Recent studies demonstrate that programmed cell death is not confined to caspase-dependent apoptosis, but includes necroptosis, a form of necrotic death governed by Receptor-Interacting Protein 1 (RIP1), RIP3, and Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-Like (MLKL). Necroptosis serves as a critical cell-killing mechanism in response to severe stress and blocked apoptosis, and can be induced by inflammatory cytokines or chemotherapeutic drugs. Genetic or epigenetic alterations of necroptosis regulators such as RIP3 and cylindromatosis (CYLD), are frequently found in human tumors. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis elicits a more robust immune response that may function as a defensive mechanism by eliminating tumor-causing mutations and viruses. Furthermore, several classes of anticancer agents currently under clinical development, such as SMAC and BH3 mimetics, can promote necroptosis in addition to apoptosis. A more complete understanding of the interplay among necroptosis, apoptosis, and other cell death modalities is critical for developing new therapeutic strategies to enhance killing of tumor cells. PMID:26968619

  18. Programmed necrosis in the Cross Talk of Cell Death and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Francis Ka-Ming; Luz, Nivea Farias; Moriwaki, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation and cell death are integral elements in maintaining homeostatic balance in metazoans. Disease pathologies ensue when these processes are disturbed. A plethora of evidence indicates that malfunction of cell death can lead to inflammation, autoimmunity or immuno-deficiency. Programmed necrosis or necroptosis is a form of non-apoptotic cell death driven by the receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) and its substrate mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL). RIPK3 partners with its upstream adaptors RIPK1, TRIF or DAI to signal for necroptosis in response to death receptor or toll-like receptor stimulation, pathogen infection, or sterile cell injury. Necroptosis promotes inflammation through leakage of cellular contents from damaged plasma membrane. Intriguingly, many of the signal adaptors of necroptosis have dual functions in innate immune signaling. This unique signature illustrates the cooperative nature of necroptosis and innate inflammatory signaling pathways in managing cell and organismal stresses from pathogen infection and sterile tissue injury. PMID:25493335

  19. Apoptotic Cell Death of Human Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Faussone Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Garrity-Park, Megan M.; Miller, Steven M.; Schmalz, Philip F.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Larson, David W.; Dozois, Eric J.; Camilleri, Michael; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are specialized mesenchyme-derived cells that regulate contractility and excitability of many smooth muscles with loss of ICC seen in a variety of gut motility disorders. Maintenance of ICC numbers is tightly regulated, with several factors known to regulate proliferation. In contrast, the fate of ICC is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate whether apoptosis plays a role in the regulation of ICC numbers in the normal colon. ICC were identified by immunolabeling for the c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase and by electron microscopy. Apoptosis was detected in colon tissue by immunolabeling for activated caspase-3, terminal dUTP nucleotide end labeling, and ultrastructural changes in the cells. Apoptotic ICC were identified and counted in double labeled tissue sections. Apoptotic ICC were identified in all layers of the colonic muscle. In the muscularis propria 1.5 ± 0.2% of ICC were positive for activated caspase-3 and in the circular muscle layer 2.1 ± 0.9% of ICC were positive for TUNEL. Apoptotic ICC were identified by electron microscopy. Apoptotic cell death is ongoing in ICC. The level of apoptosis in ICC in healthy colon indicates that these cells must be continually regenerated to maintain intact networks. PMID:18798796

  20. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Tamara C; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C

    2016-01-01

    Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis.

  1. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Tamara C.; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis. PMID:26567213

  2. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Jerry D.; Rajadinakaran, Gopinath; Smith, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation vs. direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies. PMID:25954154

  3. Induction of necrotic cell death by oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hanus, J; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Liu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wang, S

    2013-12-12

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death and the resultant photoreceptor apoptosis are characteristic of late-stage dry AMD, especially geographic atrophy (GA). Although oxidative stress and inflammation have been associated with GA, the nature and underlying mechanism for RPE cell death remains controversial, which hinders the development of targeted therapy for dry AMD. The purpose of this study is to systematically dissect the mechanism of RPE cell death induced by oxidative stress. Our results show that characteristic features of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activation, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation, were not observed during RPE cell death induced by either hydrogen peroxide or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide. Instead, this kind of cell death can be prevented by RIP kinase inhibitors necrostatins but not caspase inhibitor z-VAD, suggesting necrotic feature of RPE cell death. Moreover, ATP depletion, receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) aggregation, nuclear and plasma membrane leakage and breakdown, which are the cardinal features of necrosis, were observed in RPE cells upon oxidative stress. Silencing of RIPK3, a key protein in necrosis, largely prevented oxidative stress-induced RPE death. The necrotic nature of RPE death is consistent with the release of nuclear protein high mobility group protein B1 into the cytoplasm and cell medium, which induces the expression of inflammatory gene TNFα in healthy RPE and THP-1 cells. Interestingly, features of pyroptosis or autophagy were not observed in oxidative stress-treated RPE cells. Our results unequivocally show that necrosis, but not apoptosis, is a major type of cell death in RPE cells in response to oxidative stress. This suggests that preventing oxidative stress-induced necrotic RPE death may be a viable approach for late-stage dry

  4. Programmed cell death receptor ligand 1 modulates the regulatory T cells' capacity to repress shock/sepsis-induced indirect acute lung injury by recruiting phosphatase SRC homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; Huang, Xin; Ayala, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that adoptively transferred (AT) exogenous CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to wild-type (WT) mice can directly act to repress shock/sepsis-induced experimental indirect acute lung injury (iALI), and this is mediated in part by programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1). In this study, we further determine whether recipient mouse lacking PD-L1, one of the primary ligands for PD-1, contributes to the manipulation of the Tregs' capacity to repress lung injury. To do this, Tregs isolated from the spleen of WT mice were AT into PD-L1 mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent to cecal ligation and puncture to induce iALI. Samples were collected for analyses 24 h after cecal ligation and puncture. We found that in PD-L1-recipient mice, AT WT-Tregs lost the ability to reverse the development of iALI seen in WT recipient mice (i.e., no reduction of lung injury indices assessed by histology and vascular leakage, failure to decrease the lung neutrophil influx [myeloperoxidase activity], or the rise in lung apoptosis [caspase 3 activity]). Also, a significant increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, but no changes in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A levels in lung tissues were seen in these mice compared with iALI mice without AT of Tregs. Furthermore, we noted that the lung tissue tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), but not SHP-2, was activated with the AT of Tregs in PD-L1(-/-) iALI mice. Finally, through local depletion of CD4+ T cells or CD25+ (Tregs) in the lung, prior to inducing iALI, we found that SHP-1 activation was associated with the loss of Tregs' protective effects in vivo. Collectively, our data reveal that PD-L1 is a critical modulator of Tregs' ability to suppress iALI, and this appears to involve SHP-1 activation.

  5. Cell death pathways of particulate matter toxicity.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Milena Simões; de Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe; Batistuzzo de Medeiros, Silvia Regina

    2017-08-22

    Humans are exposed to various complex mixtures of particulate matter (PM) from different sources. Long-term exposure to high levels of these particulates has been linked to a diverse range of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases that have resulted in hospital admission. The evaluation of the effects of PM exposure on the mechanisms related to cell death has been a challenge for many researchers. Therefore, in this review, we have discussed the effects of airborne PM exposure on mechanisms related to cell death. For this purpose, we have compiled literature data on PM sources, the effects of exposure, and the assays and models used for evaluation, in order to establish comparisons between various studies. The analysis of this collected data suggested divergent responses to PM exposure that resulted in different cell death types (apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). In addition, PM induced oxidative stress within cells, which appeared to be an important factor in the determination of cell fate. When the levels of reactive oxygen species were overpowering, the cellular fate was directed toward cell death. This may be the underlying mechanism of the development or exacerbation of respiratory diseases, such as emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. In addition, PM was shown to cause DNA damage and the resulting mutations increased the risk of cancer. Furthermore, several conditions should be considered in the assessment of cell death in PM-exposed models, including the cell culture line, PM composition, and the interaction of the different cells types in in vivo models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. UTX coordinates steroid hormone-mediated autophagy and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Donna; Aung-Htut, May T.; Lorensuhewa, Nirmal; Nicolson, Shannon; Zhu, Wenying; Mills, Kathryn; Cakouros, Dimitrios; Bergmann, Andreas; Kumar, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Correct spatial and temporal induction of numerous cell type-specific genes during development requires regulated removal of the repressive histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) modification. Here we show that the H3K27me3 demethylase dUTX is required for hormone-mediated transcriptional regulation of apoptosis and autophagy genes during ecdysone-regulated programmed cell death of Drosophila salivary glands. We demonstrate that dUTX binds to the nuclear hormone receptor complex Ecdysone Receptor/Ultraspiracle, and is recruited to the promoters of key apoptosis and autophagy genes. Salivary gland cell death is delayed in dUTX mutants, with reduced caspase activity and autophagy that coincides with decreased apoptosis and autophagy gene transcripts. We further show that salivary gland degradation requires dUTX catalytic activity. Our findings provide evidence for an unanticipated role for UTX demethylase activity in regulating hormone-dependent cell death and demonstrate how a single transcriptional regulator can modulate a specific complex functional outcome during animal development. PMID:24336022

  7. Synchronized renal tubular cell death involves ferroptosis.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Skouta, Rachid; Himmerkus, Nina; Mulay, Shrikant R; Dewitz, Christin; De Zen, Federica; Prokai, Agnes; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Krombach, Fritz; Welz, Patrick-Simon; Weinlich, Ricardo; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bleich, Markus; Weinberg, Joel M; Reichel, Christoph A; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Stockwell, Brent R; Green, Douglas R; Krautwald, Stefan

    2014-11-25

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3)-mediated necroptosis is thought to be the pathophysiologically predominant pathway that leads to regulated necrosis of parenchymal cells in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), and loss of either Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) or caspase-8 is known to sensitize tissues to undergo spontaneous necroptosis. Here, we demonstrate that renal tubules do not undergo sensitization to necroptosis upon genetic ablation of either FADD or caspase-8 and that the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) does not protect freshly isolated tubules from hypoxic injury. In contrast, iron-dependent ferroptosis directly causes synchronized necrosis of renal tubules, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy in models of IRI and oxalate crystal-induced acute kidney injury. To suppress ferroptosis in vivo, we generated a novel third-generation ferrostatin (termed 16-86), which we demonstrate to be more stable, to metabolism and plasma, and more potent, compared with the first-in-class compound ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1). Even in conditions with extraordinarily severe IRI, 16-86 exerts strong protection to an extent which has not previously allowed survival in any murine setting. In addition, 16-86 further potentiates the strong protective effect on IRI mediated by combination therapy with necrostatins and compounds that inhibit mitochondrial permeability transition. Renal tubules thus represent a tissue that is not sensitized to necroptosis by loss of FADD or caspase-8. Finally, ferroptosis mediates postischemic and toxic renal necrosis, which may be therapeutically targeted by ferrostatins and by combination therapy.

  8. Viral subversion of immunogenic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Tesniere, Antoine; Schlemmer, Frederic; Madeo, Frank; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-03-15

    While physiological cell death is non-immunogenic, pathogen induced cell death can be immunogenic and hence stimulate an immune response against antigens that derive from dying cells and are presented by dendritic cells (DCs). The obligate immunogenic "eat-me" signal generated by dying cells consists in the exposure of calreticulin (CRT) at the cell surface. This particular "eat-me" signal, which facilitates engulfment by DCs, can only be found on cells that succumb to immunogenic apoptosis, while it is not present on cells dying in an immunologically silent fashion. CRT normally resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), yet can translocate to the plasma membrane surface through a complex pathway that involves elements of the ER stress response (e.g., the eIF2alpha-phosphorylating kinase PERK), the apoptotic machinery (e.g., caspase-8 and its substrate BAP31, Bax, Bak), the anterograde transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, and SNARE-dependent exocytosis. A large panoply of viruses encodes proteins that inhibit eIF2alpha kinases, catalyze the dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha, bind to caspase-8, Bap31, Bax or Bak, or perturb exocytosis. We therefore postulate that obligate intracellular pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to subvert CRT exposure, thereby avoiding immunogenic cell death.

  9. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Barley Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC), nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) intracellular receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at p...

  10. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms.

  11. Cell death pathways associated with PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy leads to both direct and indirect tumor cell death. The latter also involves the consequences of vascular shut-down and immunologic effects. While these factors are a major factor in tumor eradication, there is usually an element of direct cell killing that can reduce the cell population by as much as 2-3 logs. Necrosis was initially believed to represent the predominant PDT death mechanism. An apoptotic response to PDT was first reported by Oleinick in 1991, using a sensitizer that targets the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis leads to fragmentation of DNA and of cells into apoptotic bodies that are removed by phagocytosis. Inflammatory effects are minimized, and the auto- catalytic elements of the process can amplify the death signal. In this study, we examined consequences of Bcl-2 photodamage by a porphycene sensitizer that targets the ER and causes photodamage to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Death patterns after Bcl-2 inactivation by a small-molecular antagonist were also assessed. In addition to apoptosis, we also characterized a hitherto undescribed PDT effect, the initiation of autophagy. Autophagy was initially identified as a cell survival pathway, allowing the recycling of components as nutrients become scarce. We propose that autophagy can also represent both a potential survival pathway after PDT damage to cellular organelles, as well as a cell-death pathway. Recent literature reports indicate that autophagy, as well as apoptosis, can be evoked after down-regulation of Bcl-2, a result consistent with results reported here.

  12. Nanomaterials Toxicity and Cell Death Modalities

    PubMed Central

    De Stefano, Daniela; Carnuccio, Rosa; Maiuri, Maria Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the nanotechnology advancement has developed a plethora of novel and intriguing nanomaterial application in many sectors, including research and medicine. However, many risks have been highlighted in their use, particularly related to their unexpected toxicity in vitro and in vivo experimental models. This paper proposes an overview concerning the cell death modalities induced by the major nanomaterials. PMID:23304518

  13. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date.

  14. Lipids and cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding lipid-induced malfunction represents a major challenge of today's biomedical research. The connection of lipids to cellular and organ dysfunction, cell death, and disease (often referred to as lipotoxicity) is more complex than the sole lipotoxic effects of excess free fatty acids and requires genetically tractable model systems for mechanistic investigation. We herein summarize recent advances in the field of lipid-induced toxicity that employ the established model system for cell death and aging research of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies in yeast have shed light on various aspects of lipotoxicity, including free fatty acid toxicity, sphingolipid-modulated cell death as well as the involvement of cardiolipin and lipid peroxidation in the mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Regimens used range from exogenously applied lipids, genetic modulation of lipolysis and triacylglyceride synthesis, variations in sphingolipid/ceramide metabolism as well as changes in peroxisome function by either genetic or pharmacological means. In future, the yeast model of programmed cell death will further contribute to the clarification of crucial questions of lipid-associated malfunction. PMID:24119111

  15. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Anglogenic Modifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    interesting phenotype of prostate cancer cells, in subsequently increased bone resorption . The enhanced which they behave like osteoblasts. Prostate cancer...cells resorptive process by osteoblasts and osteoclasts leads express both soluble and membrane-bound RANK to "bone pitting" and subsequent colonization...bone resorption , have been shown to reduce can- isoforms and their related receptors which act as para- cer cell colonization in experimental models of

  16. Classification of cell death: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2009.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, G; Galluzzi, L; Vandenabeele, P; Abrams, J; Alnemri, E S; Baehrecke, E H; Blagosklonny, M V; El-Deiry, W S; Golstein, P; Green, D R; Hengartner, M; Knight, R A; Kumar, S; Lipton, S A; Malorni, W; Nuñez, G; Peter, M E; Tschopp, J; Yuan, J; Piacentini, M; Zhivotovsky, B; Melino, G

    2009-01-01

    Different types of cell death are often defined by morphological criteria, without a clear reference to precise biochemical mechanisms. The Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) proposes unified criteria for the definition of cell death and of its different morphologies, while formulating several caveats against the misuse of words and concepts that slow down progress in the area of cell death research. Authors, reviewers and editors of scientific periodicals are invited to abandon expressions like 'percentage apoptosis' and to replace them with more accurate descriptions of the biochemical and cellular parameters that are actually measured. Moreover, at the present stage, it should be accepted that caspase-independent mechanisms can cooperate with (or substitute for) caspases in the execution of lethal signaling pathways and that 'autophagic cell death' is a type of cell death occurring together with (but not necessarily by) autophagic vacuolization. This study details the 2009 recommendations of the NCCD on the use of cell death-related terminology including 'entosis', 'mitotic catastrophe', 'necrosis', 'necroptosis' and 'pyroptosis'.

  17. Lysosomal cell death mechanisms in aging.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sintes, Raquel; Ledesma, María Dolores; Boya, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are degradative organelles essential for cell homeostasis that regulate a variety of processes, from calcium signaling and nutrient responses to autophagic degradation of intracellular components. Lysosomal cell death is mediated by the lethal effects of cathepsins, which are released into the cytoplasm following lysosomal damage. This process of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin release is observed in several physiopathological conditions and plays a role in tissue remodeling, the immune response to intracellular pathogens and neurodegenerative diseases. Many evidences indicate that aging strongly influences lysosomal activity by altering the physical and chemical properties of these organelles, rendering them more sensitive to stress. In this review we focus on how aging alters lysosomal function and increases cell sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and lysosomal cell death, both in physiological conditions and age-related pathologies.

  18. Death Receptor 5 Networks Require Membrane Cholesterol for Proper Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew K; Valley, Christopher C; Peery, Stephen L; Brummel, Benjamin; Braun, Anthony R; Karim, Christine B; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2016-12-04

    Death receptor 5 (DR5) is an apoptosis-inducing member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, whose activity has been linked to membrane cholesterol content. Upon ligand binding, DR5 forms large clusters within the plasma membrane that have often been assumed to be manifestations of receptor co-localization in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. However, we have recently shown that DR5 clusters are more than just randomly aggregated receptors. Instead, these are highly structured networks held together by receptor dimers. These dimers are stabilized by specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, including a disulfide bond in the long isoform of the receptor. The complex relationships among DR5 network formation, transmembrane helix dimerization, membrane cholesterol, and receptor activity has not been established. It is unknown whether the membrane itself plays an active role in driving DR5 transmembrane helix interactions or in the formation of the networks. We show that cholesterol depletion in cells does not inhibit the formation of DR5 networks. However, the networks that form in cholesterol-depleted cells fail to induce caspase cleavage. These results suggest a potential structural difference between active and inactive networks. As evidence, we show that cholesterol is necessary for the covalent dimerization of DR5 transmembrane domains. Molecular simulations and experiments in synthetic vesicles on the DR5 transmembrane dimer suggest that dimerization is facilitated by increased helicity in a thicker bilayer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  20. DRONC coordinates cell death and compensatory proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Shu; Senoo-Matsuda, Nanami; Hiromi, Yasushi; Miura, Masayuki

    2006-10-01

    Accidental cell death often leads to compensatory proliferation. In Drosophila imaginal discs, for example, gamma-irradiation induces extensive cell death, which is rapidly compensated by elevated proliferation. Excessive compensatory proliferation can be artificially induced by "undead cells" that are kept alive by inhibition of effector caspases in the presence of apoptotic stimuli. This suggests that compensatory proliferation is induced by dying cells as part of the apoptosis program. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the Drosophila initiator caspase DRONC governs both apoptosis execution and subsequent compensatory proliferation. We examined mutants of five Drosophila caspases and identified the initiator caspase DRONC and the effector caspase DRICE as crucial executioners of apoptosis. Artificial compensatory proliferation induced by coexpression of Reaper and p35 was completely suppressed in dronc mutants. Moreover, compensatory proliferation after gamma-irradiation was enhanced in drice mutants, in which DRONC is activated but the cells remain alive. These results show that the apoptotic pathway bifurcates at DRONC and that DRONC coordinates the execution of cell death and compensatory proliferation.

  1. Cytofluorometric Quantification of Cell Death Elicited by NLR Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) proteins, also known as NOD-like receptors, are critical components of the molecular machinery that senses intracellular danger signals to initiate an innate immune response against invading pathogens or endogenous sources of hazard. The best characterized effect of NLR signaling is the secretion of various cytokines with immunostimulatory effects, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Moreover, at least under specific circumstances, NLRs can promote regulated variants of cell death. Here, we detail two protocols for the cytofluorometric quantification of cell death-associated parameters that can be conveniently employed to assess the lethal activity of specific NLRs or their ligands.

  2. Berberine induces apoptosis in human HSC-3 oral cancer cells via simultaneous activation of the death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Chung; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Jin-Tang; Fan, Shang; Yu, Fu-Shun; Yang, Jiun-Long; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Kao, Ming-Ching; Huang, An-Cheng; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2007-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that berberine is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many human cancer cell lines. However, there is no available information on the effects of berberine on human oral squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, the effects of berberine on cell growth, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation in human oral squamous carcinoma HSC-3 cells were examined. Berberine induced dose- and time-dependent irreversible inhibition of cell growth and cellular DNA synthesis. This was also confirmed by phase-contrast microscopy which showed that berberine induced morphological changes in HSC-3 cells. Propidium iodide/annexin V staining for flow cytometric analysis showed that berberine-induced apoptosis correlated with caspase-3 activation. Flow cytometric studies of the cell cycle distribution showed that berberine induced mainly G0/G1-phase arrest. Flow cytometric examinations also showed that berberine induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca2+ production, as well as the dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which were correlated with apoptosis. In conclusion, our data support that berberine initially induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response based on ROS and Ca2+ production which is followed by dysfunctions of the mitochondria, resulting in apoptosis of these oral cancer HSC-3 cells. Prolonged exposure of the HSC-3 cells to berberine causes increased apoptosis through reduced levels of MMP, release of cytochrome c and activation of caspase-3.

  3. Ion Channels, Cell Volume, Cell Proliferation and Apoptotic Cell Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Florian; Gulbins, Erich; Szabo, Ildiko; Vereninov, Alexey; Huber, Stephan M.

    At some stage cell proliferation requires an increase in cell volume and a typical hallmark of apoptotic cell death is cell shrinkage. The respective alterations of cell volume are accomplished by altered regulation of ion transport including ion channels. Thus, cell proliferation and apoptosis are both paralleled by altered activity of ion channels, which play an active part in these fundamental cellular mechanisms. Activation of anion channels allows exit of Cl?, osmolyte and HCO3 ? leading to cell shrinkage and acidification of the cytosol. K+ exit through K+ channels leads to cell shrinkage and a decrease in intracellular K+ concentration. K+ channel activity is further important for maintenance of the cell membrane potential - a critical determinant of Ca2+ entry through Ca2+ channels. Cytosolic Ca2+ may both activate mechanisms required for cell proliferation and stimulate enzymes executing apoptosis. The effect of enhanced cytosolic Ca2+ activity depends on the magnitude and temporal organisation of Ca2+ entry. Moreover, a given ion channel may support both cell proliferation and apoptosis, and specific ion channel blockers may abrogate both fundamental cellular mechanisms, depending on cell type, regulatory environment and condition of the cell. Clearly, further experimental effort is needed to clarify the role of ion channels in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  4. Xenopus death receptor-M1 and -M2, new members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, trigger apoptotic signaling by differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Noyama, Tomoko; Ishizawa, Yo-Hei; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Shiba, Tadayoshi; Ito, Michihiko

    2004-02-27

    Signaling through the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily can lead to apoptosis or promote cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. A subset of this family, including TNFR1 and Fas, signals cell death via an intracellular death domain and therefore is termed the death receptor (DR) family. In this study, we identified new members of the DR family, designated xDR-M1 and xDR-M2, in Xenopus laevis. The two proteins, which show high homology (71.7% identity), have characteristics of the DR family, that is, three cysteine-rich domains, a transmembrane domain, and a death domain. To elucidate how members of xDR-M subfamily regulate cell death and survival, we examined the intracellular signaling mediated by these receptors in 293T and A6 cells. Overexpression of xDR-M2 induced apoptosis and activated caspase-8, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and nuclear factor-kappaB, although its death domain to a greater extent than did that of xDR-M1 in 293T cells. A caspase-8 inhibitor potently blocked this apoptosis induced by xDR-M2. In contrast, xDR-M1 showed a greater ability to induce apoptosis through its death domain than did xDR-M2 in A6 cells. Interestingly, a general serine protease inhibitor, but not the caspase-8 inhibitor, blocked the xDR-M1-induced apoptosis. These results imply that activation of caspase-8 or serine protease(s) may be required for the xDR-M2- or xDR-M1-induced apoptosis, respectively. Although xDR-M1 and xDR-M2 are very similar to each other, the difference in their death domains may result in diverse signaling, suggesting distinct roles of xDR-M1 and xDR-M2 in cell death or survival.

  5. Paraptosis-like cell death in Wistar rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ramírez, Nayeli; Escobar, María L; Vázquez-Nin, Gerardo H; Ortiz, Rosario; Echeverría, Olga M

    2016-10-01

    Follicular atresia, a common process present in all mammals, involves apoptotic and autophagic cell death. However, the participation of paraptosis, a type of caspase-independent cell death, during follicular atresia is unknown. This study found swollen endoplasmic reticulum in the granulosa cells of adult Wistar rats. Calnexin was used as a marker of the endoplasmic reticulum at the ultrastructural and optical levels. The cells with swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum were negative to the TUNEL assay and active caspase-3 immunodetection, indicating that this swelling is not part of any apoptotic or autophagic process. Additionally, immunodetection of the CHOP protein was used as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and this confirmed the presence of the paraptosis process. These data suggest that paraptosis-like cell death is associated with the death of granulosa cells during follicular atresia in adult Wistar rats.

  6. ER stress-induced cell death mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Renata; Reed, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by a variety of conditions that disturb folding of proteins in the ER. Eukaryotic cells have developed an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which aims to clear unfolded proteins and restore ER homeostasis. In cases where ER stress cannot be reversed, cellular functions deteriorate, often leading to cell death. Accumulating evidence implicates ER stress-induced cellular dysfunction and cell death as major contributors to many diseases, making modulators of ER stress pathways potentially attractive targets for therapeutics discovery. Here, we summarize recent advances in understanding the diversity of molecular mechanisms that govern ER stress signaling in health and disease. PMID:23850759

  7. Cell Death and Autophagy in TB

    PubMed Central

    Moraco, Andrew H.; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has succeeded in infecting one third of the human race though inhibition or evasion of innate and adaptive immunity. The pathogen is a facultative intracellular parasite that uses the niche provided by mononuclear phagocytes for its advantage. Complex interactions determine whether the bacillus will or will not be delivered to acidified lysosomes, whether the host phagocyte will survive infection or die, and whether the timing and mode of cell death works to the advantage of the host or the pathogen. Here we discuss cell death and autophagy in TB. These fundamental processes of cell biology feature in all aspects of TB pathogenesis and may be exploited to the treatment or prevention of TB disease. PMID:25453227

  8. DRONC Coordinates Cell Death and Compensatory Proliferation‡

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Shu; Senoo-Matsuda, Nanami; Hiromi, Yasushi; Miura, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Accidental cell death often leads to compensatory proliferation. In Drosophila imaginal discs, for example, γ-irradiation induces extensive cell death, which is rapidly compensated by elevated proliferation. Excessive compensatory proliferation can be artificially induced by “undead cells” that are kept alive by inhibition of effector caspases in the presence of apoptotic stimuli. This suggests that compensatory proliferation is induced by dying cells as part of the apoptosis program. Here, we provide genetic evidence that the Drosophila initiator caspase DRONC governs both apoptosis execution and subsequent compensatory proliferation. We examined mutants of five Drosophila caspases and identified the initiator caspase DRONC and the effector caspase DRICE as crucial executioners of apoptosis. Artificial compensatory proliferation induced by coexpression of Reaper and p35 was completely suppressed in dronc mutants. Moreover, compensatory proliferation after γ-irradiation was enhanced in drice mutants, in which DRONC is activated but the cells remain alive. These results show that the apoptotic pathway bifurcates at DRONC and that DRONC coordinates the execution of cell death and compensatory proliferation. PMID:16980627

  9. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  10. Role of ion transport in control of apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Hoffmann, Else K

    2012-07-01

    Cell shrinkage is a hallmark and contributes to signaling of apoptosis. Apoptotic cell shrinkage requires ion transport across the cell membrane involving K(+) channels, Cl(-) or anion channels, Na(+)/H(+) exchange, Na(+),K(+),Cl(-) cotransport, and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. Activation of K(+) channels fosters K(+) exit with decrease of cytosolic K(+) concentration, activation of anion channels triggers exit of Cl(-), organic osmolytes, and HCO3(-). Cellular loss of K(+) and organic osmolytes as well as cytosolic acidification favor apoptosis. Ca(2+) entry through Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels may result in apoptosis by affecting mitochondrial integrity, stimulating proteinases, inducing cell shrinkage due to activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels, and triggering cell-membrane scrambling. Signaling involved in the modification of cell-volume regulatory ion transport during apoptosis include mitogen-activated kinases p38, JNK, ERK1/2, MEKK1, MKK4, the small G proteins Cdc42, and/or Rac and the transcription factor p53. Osmosensing involves integrin receptors, focal adhesion kinases, and tyrosine kinase receptors. Hyperosmotic shock leads to vesicular acidification followed by activation of acid sphingomyelinase, ceramide formation, release of reactive oxygen species, activation of the tyrosine kinase Yes with subsequent stimulation of CD95 trafficking to the cell membrane. Apoptosis is counteracted by mechanisms involved in regulatory volume increase (RVI), by organic osmolytes, by focal adhesion kinase, and by heat-shock proteins. Clearly, our knowledge on the interplay between cell-volume regulatory mechanisms and suicidal cell death is still far from complete and substantial additional experimental effort is needed to elucidate the role of cell-volume regulatory mechanisms in suicidal cell death. 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:2037-2061, 2012.

  11. Cutting edge: regulatory T cells do not mediate suppression via programmed cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Delgoffe, Greg M; Green, Douglas R; Vignali, Dario A A

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the immune system to regulate peripheral tolerance and prevent autoimmunity. However, the relative importance of different mechanisms of Treg function remains obscure. In this article, we reveal a limited role for programmed cell death pathways in mediating Treg suppression of conventional T cells. We show that Tregs are able to suppress the proliferation of conventional T cells that are resistant to apoptosis (Bim(-/-), Bim(-/-)Puma(-/-), Bcl-2 transgenic) or receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis (also referred to as regulated necrosis or necroptosis) (Ripk3(-/-)) in several in vitro and in vivo assays. These data suggest that programmed cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase-dependent necrosis, are not required for Treg-mediated suppression.

  12. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    PubMed

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  13. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  14. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Sara

    2013-01-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm—a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue—were highlighted and discussed. PMID:23833197

  15. Role of polyphenols in cell death control.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Claudio; Masella, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    Dietary consumption of fruit, vegetables, fish, and olive oil has been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on human health. This finding may be due to the high content of antioxidant compounds including polyphenols. Current evidence strongly supports a contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of several chronic degenerative diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, central nervous system disorders, as well as aging. Apoptosis is a genetically controlled and evolutionarily conserved form of cell death of critical importance for the maintenance of tissue homeostasis in the adult organism. The malfunction of the death machinery may play a primary role in various pathologic processes, leading to proliferative or degenerative diseases. Polyphenols can interact with specific steps and/or proteins regulating the apoptotic process in different ways depending on their concentration, the cell system, the type or stage of the pathological process. Because of their ability to modulate cell death, polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. This paper reviews and discusses the last 3-year findings related to the principal molecular mechanisms involved in the control of the balance between apoptosis and cell proliferation exerted by polyphenols.

  16. RIPK1 promotes death receptor-independent caspase-8-mediated apoptosis under unresolved ER stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Estornes, Y; Aguileta, M A; Dubuisson, C; De Keyser, J; Goossens, V; Kersse, K; Samali, A; Vandenabeele, P; Bertrand, M J M

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress and results in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which aims at restoring ER homeostasis. However, when the stress is too severe the UPR switches from being a pro-survival response to a pro-death one, and the molecular mechanisms underlying ER stress-mediated death have remained incompletely understood. In this study, we identified receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)—a kinase at the crossroad between life and death downstream of various receptors—as a new regulator of ER stress-induced death. We found that Ripk1-deficient MEFs are protected from apoptosis induced by ER stressors, which is reflected by reduced caspase activation and PARP processing. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic role of Ripk1 is independent of its kinase activity, is not regulated by its cIAP1/2-mediated ubiquitylation, and does not rely on the direct regulation of JNK or CHOP, two reportedly main players in ER stress-induced death. Instead, we found that ER stress-induced apoptosis in these cells relies on death receptor-independent activation of caspase-8, and identified Ripk1 upstream of caspase-8. However, in contrast to RIPK1-dependent apoptosis downstream of TNFR1, we did not find Ripk1 associated with caspase-8 in a death-inducing complex upon unresolved ER stress. Our data rather suggest that RIPK1 indirectly regulates caspase-8 activation, in part via interaction with the ER stress sensor inositol-requiring protein 1 (IRE1). PMID:25476903

  17. Ah, sweet mystery of death! Galectins and control of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Joseph D; Baum, Linda G

    2002-10-01

    Control of cell death is critical in eukaryotic development, immune system homeostasis, and control of tumorigenesis. The galectin family of lectins is implicated in all of these processes. Other families of molecules function as death receptors or death effectors, but galectins are uniquely capable of acting both extracellularly and intracellularly to control cell death. Extracellularly, galectins cross-link glycan ligands to transduce signals that lead directly to death or that influence other signals regulating cell fate. Intracellular expression of galectins can modulate other signals controlling cell viability. Individual galectins can act on multiple cell types, and multiple galectins can act on the same cell. Understanding how galectins regulate cell viability and function will broaden our knowledge of the roles of galectins in basic biological processes and facilitate development of therapeutic applications for galectins in autoimmunity, transplant-related disease, and cancer.

  18. Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    2013 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Metabolic Regulation of Ovarian Cancer cell death 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1...Introduction 3 2. Keywords 3 3. Overall Project Summary 3-6 4 . Key Research Accomplishments 6-7 5. Conclusion 7 6. Publications, Abstracts, and...synthase inhibitors Fig. 4 ). We were slightly delayed in submitting this work for publication as the first author had to finish his PhD thesis and

  19. Death by Protein Damage in Irradiated Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: M.J. Daly, Death by protein damage in irradiated cells, DNA Repair (2011), doi:10.1016/j.dnarep.2011.10.024...ARTICLE IN PRESSG ModelDNAREP-1629; No. of Pages 10 DNA Repair (2011) – Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect DNA Repair jo u...oxidation Carbonylation DNA double strand break (DSB) repair Manganese (II) antioxidant complexes Reactive oxygen species (ROS) Metabolite accumulation

  20. Xanthohumol induces apoptosis in cultured 40-16 human colon cancer cells by activation of the death receptor- and mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lydia; Becker, Hans; Gerhäuser, Clarissa

    2005-09-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) is one of the major prenylflavonoids found in hop cones (Humulus lupulus L.). In this study, we investigated the cell growth inhibitory potential of XN on cultured human colon cancer cells. Cell proliferation was measured by sulforhodamine B staining. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage, activation of caspases-3, -7, -8, and -9, and Bcl-2 family protein expression were detected by Western blot analyses. XN significantly reduced proliferation of the HCT 116-derived colon cancer cell line 40--16. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations decreased from 4.1 microM after 24 h treatment to 3.6 and 2.6 microM after 48 and 72 h incubation, respectively. Treatment with 15 microM XN for 48 h and with 5 microM for 72 h led to the detection of the cleaved 89 kDa fragment of 116 kDa PARP as an indication of apoptosis induction. Concomitantly, we observed activation and cleavage of the effector caspases-3 and -7, induced by activation of the initiator caspases -8 and -9. Expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was down regulated when the cells were treated with XN for 48--72 h. We conclude that induction of apoptosis by downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of the caspase cascade may contribute to the chemopreventive or therapeutic potential of XN.

  1. Programmed Cell Death of Dendritic Cells in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Wang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is essential for the maintenance of lymphocyte homeostasis and immune tolerance. Dendritic cells (DCs), the most efficient antigen presenting cells, represent a small cell population in the immune system. However, DCs play major roles in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Programmed cell death in DCs is essential for regulating DC homeostasis and consequently, the scope of immune responses. Interestingly, different DC subsets show varied turnover rates in vivo. The conventional DCs are relatively short-lived in most lymphoid organs, while plasmacytoid DCs are long-lived cells. Mitochondrion-dependent programmed cell death plays an important role in regulating spontaneous DC turnover. Antigen-specific T cells are also capable of killing DCs, thereby providing a mechanism for negative feedback regulation of immune responses. It has been shown that a surplus of DCs due to defects in programmed cell death leads to overactivation of lymphocytes and the onset of autoimmunity. Studying programmed cell death in DCs will shed light on the roles for DC turnover in the regulation of the duration and magnitude of immune responses in vivo, and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. PMID:20636805

  2. Neuroprotective effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor group II and III activators against MPP(+)-induced cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: the impact of cell differentiation state.

    PubMed

    Jantas, D; Greda, A; Golda, S; Korostynski, M; Grygier, B; Roman, A; Pilc, A; Lason, W

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have documented that metabotropic glutamate receptors from group II and III (mGluR II/III) are a potential target in the symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), however, the neuroprotective effects of particular mGluR II/III subtypes in relation to PD pathology are recognized only partially. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various mGluR II/III activators in the in vitro model of PD using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line and mitochondrial neurotoxin MPP(+). We demonstrated that all tested mGluR ligands: mGluR II agonist - LY354740, mGluR III agonist - ACPT-I, mGluR4 PAM - VU0361737, mGluR8 agonist - (S)-3,4-DCPG, mGluR8 PAM - AZ12216052 and mGluR7 allosteric agonist - AMN082 were protective against MPP(+)-evoked cell damage in undifferentiated (UN-) SH-SY5Y cells with the highest neuroprotection mediated by mGluR8-specific agents. However, in retinoic acid- differentiated (RA-) SH-SY5Y cells we found protection mediated only by mGluR8 activators. We also demonstrated the cell proliferation stimulating effect for mGluR4 and mGluR8 PAMs. Next, we showed that the protection mediated by mGluR II/III activators in UN-SH-SY5Y was not accompanied by the modulation of caspase-3 activity, however, a decrease in the number of apoptotic nuclei was found. Finally, we showed that the inhibitor of necroptosis, necrostatin-1 blocked the mGluR III-mediated protection. Altogether our comparative in vitro data add a further proof to neuroprotective effects of mGluR agonists or PAMs and point to mGluR8 as a promising target for neuroprotective interventions in PD. The results also suggest the participation of necroptosis-related molecular pathways in neuroprotective effects of mGluR III activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell Death and Deubiquitinases: Perspectives in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Seemana

    2014-01-01

    The process of cell death has important physiological implications. At the organism level it is mostly involved in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. At the cellular level, the strategies of cell death may be categorized as either suicide or sabotage. The mere fact that many of these processes are programmed and that these are often deregulated in pathological conditions is seed to thought. The various players that are involved in these pathways are highly regulated. One of the modes of regulation is via post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination and deubiquitination. In this review, we have first dealt with the different modes and pathways involved in cell death and then we have focused on the regulation of several proteins in these signaling cascades by the different deubiquitinating enzymes, in the perspective of cancer. The study of deubiquitinases is currently in a rather nascent stage with limited knowledge both in vitro and in vivo, but the emerging roles of the deubiquitinases in various processes and their specificity have implicated them as potential targets from the therapeutic point of view. This review throws light on another aspect of cancer therapeutics by targeting the deubiquitinating enzymes. PMID:25121098

  4. 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 up-regulates death receptor 5 gene expression in HCT116 cells: involvement of reactive oxygen species and C/EBP homologous transcription factor gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Su, Rong-Ying; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Huang, Duen-Yi; Tai, Ming-Hui; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2008-10-01

    Although 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15dPGJ(2)) was reported to up-regulate death receptor 5 (DR5) protein expression and sensitize TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity, its action mechanism remains unclear. Using HCT116 colon cancer cells, we found that sensitization of TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity by 15dPGJ(2) resulted from up-regulation of DR5 via gene transcription but was not associated with PPAR-gamma activation. Moreover, 15dPGJ(2) induced GRP78, XBP1, and C/EBP homologous transcription factor (CHOP) expression in HCT116 cells, confirming that 15dPGJ(2) is an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer. Knockdown of the CHOP gene by siRNA attenuated DR5 up-regulation and the sensitized cytotoxicity in colon cancer HCT116 and SW480. With deletion plasmids of DR5 promoters, we found that the CHOP-binding site was involved in activating the DR5 gene by 15dPGJ(2). A mechanistic study showed the contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium in CHOP and DR5 gene up-regulation. 15dPGJ(2) was also found to induce DR5 in two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and PC3. Although in LNCaP DR5 up-regulation was accompanied by CHOP expression by 15dPGJ(2), no significant increase in CHOP expression or DR5 promoter activity was observed in PC3 cells. Intriguingly, 15dPGJ(2) induced ROS and calcium production in PC3 cells. This inability to induce CHOP was not due to the p53-null in PC3 cells, as similar extents of increase in CHOP protein were found due to 15dPGJ(2) in both wild-type and p53-null HCT116 cells. In summary, the effect of up-regulation of DR5 by 15dPGJ(2) in colon cancer cells is independent of PPAR-gamma and p53 but relies on CHOP induction through gene transcription involving ROS and calcium.

  5. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity. PMID:26202785

  6. Toll pathway modulates TNF-induced JNK-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenxi; Chen, Changyan; Dai, Jianli; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yujun; Li, Wenzhe; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos; Xue, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Signalling networks that control the life or death of a cell are of central interest in modern biology. While the defined roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in regulating cell death have been well-established, additional factors that modulate JNK-mediated cell death have yet to be fully elucidated. To identify novel regulators of JNK-dependent cell death, we performed a dominant-modifier screen in Drosophila and found that the Toll pathway participates in JNK-mediated cell death. Loss of Toll signalling suppresses ectopically and physiologically activated JNK signalling-induced cell death. Our epistasis analysis suggests that the Toll pathway acts as a downstream modulator for JNK-dependent cell death. In addition, gain of JNK signalling results in Toll pathway activation, revealed by stimulated transcription of Drosomycin (Drs) and increased cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Dorsal. Furthermore, the Spätzle (Spz) family ligands for the Toll receptor are transcriptionally upregulated by activated JNK signalling in a non-cell-autonomous manner, providing a molecular mechanism for JNK-induced Toll pathway activation. Finally, gain of Toll signalling exacerbates JNK-mediated cell death and promotes cell death independent of caspases. Thus, we have identified another important function for the evolutionarily conserved Toll pathway, in addition to its well-studied roles in embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and innate immunity.

  7. Winter wheat cells subjected to freezing temperature undergo death process with features of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Lyubushkina, Irina V; Grabelnych, Olga I; Pobezhimova, Tamara P; Stepanov, Aleksey V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Voinikov, Victor K

    2014-05-01

    Programmed cell death is a process defined as genetically regulated self-destruction or cell suicide. It can be activated by different internal and external factors, but few studies have investigated whether this process occurs under cold and freezing temperatures. In this study, a freezing treatment (-8 °C for 6 h) induced cell death with features of programmed cell death in suspension cultures of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). This process occurred for 10 days after cold exposure. The death of cells in culture was slow and prolonged, and was accompanied by protoplast shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, and an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species. Other changes observed after the freezing treatment included an increase in the respiration rate, changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential (∆Ψ m ), and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol. These findings indicated that mitochondria are involved in the cell death process that occurs after a freezing treatment in cells of winter wheat.

  8. IFN Regulatory Factor 8 Sensitizes Soft Tissue Sarcoma Cells to Death Receptor-initiated Apoptosis via Repression of FLICE-like Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dafeng; Wang, Suizhao; Brooks, Craig; Dong, Zheng; Schoenlein, Patricia; Kumar, Vijay; Ouyang, Xinshou; Xiong, Huabao; Lahat, Guy; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Lazar, Alexander; Pollock, Raphael; Lev, Dina; Liu, Kebin

    2008-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor 8 (IRF8) has been shown to suppress tumor development at least partly through regulating apoptosis of tumor cells; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying IRF8 regulation of apoptosis are still not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that disrupting IRF8 function resulted in inhibition of cytochrome C release, caspases 9 and 3 activation, and PARP cleavage in soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Inhibition of the mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis signaling cascade is apparently due to blockage of caspase 8 and Bid activation. Analysis of signaling events upstream of caspsse 8 revealed that disrupting IRF8 function dramatically increases FLIP mRNA stability, resulting in increased IRF8 protein level. Furthermore, primary myeloid cells isolated from IRF8 null mice also exhibited increased FLIP protein level, suggesting that IRF8 might be a general repressor of FLIP. Nuclear IRF8 protein was absent in 92% (55/60) of human STS specimens, and 99% (59/60) human STS specimens exhibited FLIP expression, suggesting that the nuclear IRF8 protein level is inversely correlated with FLIP level in vivo. Silencing FLIP expression significantly increased human sarcoma cells to both FasL and TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and ectopic expression of IRF8 also significantly increased the sensitivity of these human sarcoma cells to FasL and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that IRF8 mediates FLIP expression level to regulate apoptosis and targeting IRF8 expression is a potentially effective therapeutic strategy to sensitize apoptosis-resistant human STS to apoptosis, thereby possibly overcoming chemoresistance of STS, currently a major obstacle in human STS therapy. PMID:19155307

  9. The mitochondrial and death receptor pathways involved in the thymocytes apoptosis induced by aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiaofeng; Li, Xiaochong; Jiang, Min; Fang, Jing; Cui, Hengmin; Lai, Weimin; Zhou, Yi; Zhou, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a potent immunosuppressive agent in endotherms, which can be related to the up-regulated apoptosis of immune organs. In this study, we investigated the roles of the mitochondrial, death receptor, and endoplasmic reticulum pathways in Aflatoxin B1 induced thymocytes apoptosis. Chickens were fed an aflatoxin B1 containing diet (0.6 mg/kg AFB1) for 3 weeks. Our results showed that (1) AFB1 diet induced the decrease of T-cell subsets, morphological changes, and excessive apoptosis of thymus. (2) The excessive apoptosis involved the mitochondrial pathway (up-regulation of Bax, Bak, cytC and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and death receptor pathway (up-regulation of FasL, Fas and FADD). (3) Oxidative stress, an apoptosis inducer, was confirmed in the thymus. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that mitochondrial and death receptor pathways involved in AFB1 induced thymocytes apoptosis in broilers. PMID:26933817

  10. Inhibition of programmed cell death by cyclosporin A; preferential blocking of cell death induced by signals via TCR/CD3 complex and its mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, D; Odaka, C; Saito, S; Niizeki, H; Kizaki, H; Tadakuma, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is reported to inhibit programmed cell death. We confirmed this by using T-cell hybridomas which are inducible to programmed cell death by activation with immobilized anti-CD3 antibody or with anti-Thy 1.2 antibody. Cell death and DNA fragmentation, characteristic features of programmed cell death, were almost completely blocked by CsA or FK506. To investigate whether CsA inhibits only the cell death through the signals via the TCR/CD3 complex or all of the programmed cell death induced by various reagents, we further established CD4+8+ thymic lymphomas which result in programmed cell death after activation with calcium ionophore, dexamethasone, cyclic AMP or anti-CD3 antibody. It was revealed that CsA could block only the cell death mediated by the TCR/CD3 complex. For the clarification of the site of action of CsA, Ca2+ influx and endocytosis of receptors after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody were monitored in the presence of CsA, and no significant effects of CsA were observed. Furthermore, prevention of cell death was examined by adding CsA at various periods of time after initiation of culture. CsA was found to exert its effect even when added after 4 h of cultivation, and the kinetic pattern of suppression was similar to that of the suppressive effect on IL-2 production. These observations indicate that in the events of programmed cell death, the major site of action of CsA will not be the inhibition of the immediate membrane events after activation of the TCR/CD3 complex but rather the interference in the function of molecules that transmit signals between membrane events and the activation of genes in the nucleus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1383138

  11. Molecular Theories of Cell Life and Death.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-27

    AD-A195 524 MOLECULAR THEORIES OF CELL LIFE AND DETH(U) RUTGERS - / TH STATE UNIV PI CATAWAY NJ DEPT OF PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY S JI 27 JUL 87...6448 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO0. 61102F 2312 A5 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) M0=M2UAR THEORIES OF CM IFE= AND DEATH 12. PERSONAL...7/27I49 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION The lectures given in the symposium are being assembled into a book entitled, "Molecular Theories of Cell Life and

  12. Death by a thousand cuts: granzyme pathways of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Lieberman, Judy

    2008-01-01

    The granzymes are cell death-inducing enzymes, stored in the cytotoxic granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, that are released during granule exocytosis when a specific virus-infected or transformed target cell is marked for elimination. Recent work suggests that this homologous family of serine esterases can activate at least three distinct pathways of cell death. This redundancy likely evolved to provide protection against pathogens and tumors with diverse strategies for evading cell death. This review discusses what is known about granzyme-mediated pathways of cell death as well as recent studies that implicate granzymes in immune regulation and extracellular proteolytic functions in inflammation.

  13. Cell Death Control by Matrix Metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dirk; Gomez-Barrera, Juan A; Pasule, Christian; Brack-Frick, Ursula B; Sieferer, Elke; Nicholson, Tim M; Pfannstiel, Jens; Stintzi, Annick; Schaller, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that play important roles in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in animals, the proteases responsible for dynamic modifications of the plant cell wall are largely unknown. A possible involvement of MMPs was addressed by cloning and functional characterization of Sl2-MMP and Sl3-MMP from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The two tomato MMPs were found to resemble mammalian homologs with respect to gelatinolytic activity, substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the scissile bond, and catalytic properties. In transgenic tomato seedlings silenced for Sl2/3-MMP expression, necrotic lesions were observed at the base of the hypocotyl. Cell death initiated in the epidermis and proceeded to include outer cortical cell layers. In later developmental stages, necrosis spread, covering the entire stem and extending into the leaves of MMP-silenced plants. The subtilisin-like protease P69B was identified as a substrate of Sl2- and Sl3-MMP. P69B was shown to colocalize with Sl-MMPs in the apoplast of the tomato hypocotyl, it exhibited increased stability in transgenic plants silenced for Sl-MMP activity, and it was cleaved and inactivated by Sl-MMPs in vitro. The induction of cell death in Sl2/3-MMP-silenced plants depended on P69B, indicating that Sl2- and Sl3-MMP act upstream of P69B in an extracellular proteolytic cascade that contributes to the regulation of cell death in tomato. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. A whole-genome RNAi screen identifies an 8q22 gene cluster that inhibits death receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dompe, Nicholas; Rivers, Celina Sanchez; Li, Li; Cordes, Shaun; Schwickart, Martin; Punnoose, Elizabeth A; Amler, Lukas; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Tang, Jerry; Modrusan, Zora; Davis, David P

    2011-10-25

    Deregulation of apoptosis is a common occurrence in cancer, for which emerging oncology therapeutic agents designed to engage this pathway are undergoing clinical trials. With the aim of uncovering strategies to activate apoptosis in cancer cells, we used a pooled shRNA screen to interrogate death receptor signaling. This screening approach identified 16 genes that modulate the sensitivity to ligand induced apoptosis, with several genes exhibiting frequent overexpression and/or copy number gain in cancer. Interestingly, two of the top hits, EDD1 and GRHL2, are found 50 kb apart on chromosome 8q22, a region that is frequently amplified in many cancers. By using a series of silencing and overexpression studies, we show that EDD1 and GRHL2 suppress death-receptor expression, and that EDD1 expression is elevated in breast, pancreas, and lung cancer cell lines resistant to death receptor-mediated apoptosis. Supporting the relevance of EDD1 and GRHL2 as therapeutic candidates to engage apoptosis in cancer cells, silencing the expression of either gene sensitizes 8q22-amplified breast cancer cell lines to death receptor induced apoptosis. Our findings highlight a mechanism by which cancer cells may evade apoptosis, and therefore provide insight in the search for new targets and functional biomarkers for this pathway.

  15. Current and Emerging Biomarkers of Cell Death in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kongning; Wu, Deng; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Lu; Yi, Ying; Miao, Zhengqiang; Jin, Nana; Bi, Xiaoman; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a critical biological process, serving many important functions within multicellular organisms. Aberrations in cell death can contribute to the pathology of human diseases. Significant progress made in the research area enormously speeds up our understanding of the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of cell death. According to the distinct morphological and biochemical characteristics, cell death can be triggered by extrinsic or intrinsic apoptosis, regulated necrosis, autophagic cell death, and mitotic catastrophe. Nevertheless, the realization that all of these efforts seek to pursue an effective treatment and cure for the disease has spurred a significant interest in the development of promising biomarkers of cell death to early diagnose disease and accurately predict disease progression and outcome. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about cell death, survey current and emerging biomarkers of cell death, and discuss the relationship with human diseases. PMID:24949464

  16. Programmed hepatocytes cell death associated with FLIP downregulation in response to extracellular preS1/2.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Masyelly D; Peterson, Darrell L; Barboza, Luisa; Terán-Ángel, Guillermo; Labastida-Moreno, Cesar A; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Salmen, Siham

    2014-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection involves liver damage resulting in continuous cell injury and death. During HBV infection, hepatocytes exhibit changes in death receptor expression and in their susceptibility to death. These changes are observed not only in infected cells but also in bystander cells. Because excess viral surface protein (HBsAg) is secreted in large amounts as soluble particles containing preS proteins, the role of soluble preS1/2 in hepatocyte (HepG2) death modulation is an important issue to be explored. An increase of cell death induced by preS1/2 was observed. Also, cell death was associated with the down-regulation of FLIP and activation of caspase 8, caspase 9, and BID. Additionally, hepatocytes exhibited a sensitization to death mediated by the Fas receptor. These results, may contribute to understanding the role of envelope proteins (preS1/2) in the pathogenesis of HBV infection.

  17. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Angiogenic Modifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    form an active autocrine loop. fibrosis . Luminal epithelial cells of PIA lesions have elev- A recent study indicated the increase of both IL-6 and...its receptor dothelin-3 (ET-3), and endothelin-4 (ET-4) (Cun- ( CXCR4 ), may play a role as prostate cancer bone meta- ningham et al., 1997). All...members of the endothelin stasis homing signals. The level of CXCR4 increased family contain two essential disulfide bridges and six with the malignancy of

  18. Cell death paradigms in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Parandhaman, Dinesh Kumar; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Cell death or senescence is a fundamental event that helps maintain cellular homeostasis, shapes the growth of organism, and provides protective immunity against invading pathogens. Decreased or increased cell death is detrimental both in infectious and non-infectious diseases. Cell death is executed both by regulated enzymic reactions and non-enzymic sudden collapse. In this brief review we have tried to summarize various cell death modalities and their impact on the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24634891

  19. Cell death paradigms in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Parandhaman, Dinesh Kumar; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Cell death or senescence is a fundamental event that helps maintain cellular homeostasis, shapes the growth of organism, and provides protective immunity against invading pathogens. Decreased or increased cell death is detrimental both in infectious and non-infectious diseases. Cell death is executed both by regulated enzymic reactions and non-enzymic sudden collapse. In this brief review we have tried to summarize various cell death modalities and their impact on the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  20. Cell death goes LIVE: technological advances in real-time tracking of cell death.

    PubMed

    Skommer, Joanna; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-06-15

    Cell population can be viewed as a quantum system, which like Schrödinger's cat exists as a combination of survival- and death-allowing states. Tracking and understanding cell-to-cell variability in processes of high spatio-temporal complexity such as cell death is at the core of current systems biology approaches. As probabilistic modeling tools attempt to impute information inaccessible by current experimental approaches, advances in technologies for single-cell imaging and omics (proteomics, genomics, metabolomics) should go hand in hand with the computational efforts. Over the last few years we have made exciting technological advances that allow studies of cell death dynamically in real-time and with the unprecedented accuracy. These approaches are based on innovative fluorescent assays and recombinant proteins, bioelectrical properties of cells, and more recently also on state-of-the-art optical spectroscopy. Here, we review current status of the most innovative analytical technologies for dynamic tracking of cell death, and address the interdisciplinary promises and future challenges of these methods.

  1. Autophagic cell death: Loch Ness monster or endangered species?

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Ming; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    The concept of autophagic cell death was first established based on observations of increased autophagic markers in dying cells. The major limitation of such a morphology-based definition of autophagic cell death is that it fails to establish the functional role of autophagy in the cell death process, and thus contributes to the confusion in the literature regarding the role of autophagy in cell death and cell survival. Here we propose to define autophagic cell death as a modality of non-apoptotic or necrotic programmed cell death in which autophagy serves as a cell death mechanism, upon meeting the following set of criteria: (i) cell death occurs without the involvement of apoptosis; (ii) there is an increase of autophagic flux, and not just an increase of the autophagic markers, in the dying cells; and (iii) suppression of autophagy via both pharmacological inhibitors and genetic approaches is able to rescue or prevent cell death. In light of this new definition, we will discuss some of the common problems and difficulties in the study of autophagic cell death and also revisit some well-reported cases of autophagic cell death, aiming to achieve a better understanding of whether autophagy is a real killer, an accomplice or just an innocent bystander in the course of cell death. At present, the physiological relevance of autophagic cell death is mainly observed in lower eukaryotes and invertebrates such as Dictyostelium discoideum and Drosophila melanogaster. We believe that such a clear definition of autophagic cell death will help us study and understand the physiological or pathological relevance of autophagic cell death in mammals.

  2. Polyunsaturated fatty acids induce ovarian cancer cell death through ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Aiko; Yamamoto, Akane; Murota, Kaeko; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Iwamori, Masao; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-04

    Free fatty acids not only play a role in cell membrane construction and energy production but also exert diverse cellular effects through receptor and non-receptor mechanisms. Moreover, epidemiological and clinical studies have so far suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) could have health benefits and the advantage as therapeutic use in cancer treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms of PUFA-induced cellular effects remained to be cleared. Here, we examined the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs on cell death in ovarian cancer cell lines. ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ω-6 PUFA, γ-linolenic acid (γ-LNA) induced cell death in KF28 cells at the levels of physiological concentrations, but not HAC2 cells. Pharmacological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that cell death induced by DHA and γ-LNA was correlated with activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases, and further an upstream MAP kinase kinase, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, which is stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, an antioxidant vitamin E attenuated PUFA-induced cell death and MAP kinase activation. These findings indicate that PUFA-induced cell death involves ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation and is a cell type-specific action. A further study of the underlying mechanisms for ROS-dependent cell death induced by PUFAs will lead to the discovery of a new target for cancer therapy or diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  4. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…