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Sample records for cell derived hepatic

  1. Early activated hepatic stellate cell-derived molecules reverse acute hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Ju; Song, Lu-Jun; Yi, Tuo; Shen, Kun-Tang; Wang, Hong-Shan; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Li, Min; Xu, Jian-Min; Niu, Wei-Xin; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test whether hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different activation stages play different roles in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver injury (ALI). METHODS: HSCs were isolated from mouse liver and cultured in vitro. Morphological changes of initiation HSCs [HSCs (5d)] and perpetuation HSCs [HSCs (p3)] were observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. The protective effects of HSC-derived molecules, cell lysates and HSC-conditioned medium (HSC-CM) were tested in vivo by survival and histopathological analyses. Liver injury was determined by measuring aminotransferase levels in the serum and by histologic examination of tissue sections under a light microscope. Additionally, to determine the molecular mediators of the observed protective effects of initiation HSCs, we examined HSC-CM using a high-density protein array. RESULTS: HSCs (5d) and HSCs (p3) had different morphological and phenotypic traits. HSCs (5d) presented a star-shaped appearance with expressing α-SMA at non-uniform levels between cells. However, HSCs (p3) evolved into myofibroblast-like cells without lipid droplets and expressed a uniform and higher level of α-SMA. HSC-CM (5d), but not HSC-CM (p3), provided a significant survival benefit and showed a dramatic reduction of hepatocellular necrosis and panlobular leukocyte infiltrates in mice exposed to APAP. However, this protective effect was abrogated at higher cell masses, indicating a therapeutic window of effectiveness. Furthermore, the protein array screen revealed that HSC-CM (5d) was composed of many chemokines and growth factors that correlated with inflammatory inhibition and therapeutic activity. When compared with HSC-CM (p3), higher levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1γ, hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-10, and matrix metalloproteinase-2, but lower levels of stem cell factor and Fas-Ligand were observed in HSC-CM (5d). CONCLUSION: These data indicated

  2. Clinical translation of bioartificial liver support systems with human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakiyama, Ryoichi; Blau, Brandon J; Miki, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    There is currently a pressing need for alternative therapies to liver transplantation. The number of patients waiting for a liver transplant is substantially higher than the number of transplantable donor livers, resulting in a long waiting time and a high waiting list mortality. An extracorporeal liver support system is one possible approach to overcome this problem. However, the ideal cell source for developing bioartificial liver (BAL) support systems has yet to be determined. Recent advancements in stem cell technology allow researchers to generate highly functional hepatocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). In this mini-review, we summarize previous clinical trials with different BAL systems, and discuss advantages of and potential obstacles to utilizing hPSC-derived hepatic cells in clinical-scale BAL systems. PMID:28373763

  3. Hedgehog-mediated paracrine interaction between hepatic stellate cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Nan Tang Zhaofeng; Deng Meihai; Zhong Yuesi; Lin Jizong; Yang Xuhui; Xiang Peng; Xu Ruiyun

    2008-07-18

    During liver injury, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can migrate and differentiate into hepatocytes. Hepatic stellate cell (SC) activation is a pivotal event in the development of liver fibrosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that SCs may play an important role in regulating MSC proliferation and differentiation through the paracrine signaling pathway. We demonstrate that MSCs and SCs both express hedgehog (Hh) pathway components, including its ligands, receptors, and target genes. Transwell co-cultures of SCs and MSCs showed that the SCs produced sonic hedgehog (Shh), which enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs. These findings demonstrate that SCs indirectly modulate the activity of MSCs in vitro via the Hh pathway, and provide a plausible explanation for the mechanisms of transplanted MSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  4. [Induction of hepatic specification of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Pei, Hai-yun; Guan, Li-dong; Nan, Xue; Bai, Ci-xian; Liu, Hui; Li, Bao-wei; Wang, Yun-fang; Pei, Xue-tao

    2009-07-01

    To induce hepatic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in vitro. hADSCs were isolated from human adipose tissue and treated with improved hepatic medium containing HGF, bFGF and FGF4. After 7 days of culture, OSM was added to the culture media. Cell growth during hepatic differentiation was evaluated by CCK8 assay. Morphology of differentiation was examined under light microscope. Liver specific genes and proteins were detected by RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. And functional characteristics of hepatocytes were also examined. The number of hADSCs cultured in the improved hepatic media was increased significantly in comparison to hADSCs cultured in control media from 5 days to 21 days (t=6.59, 8.69, 15.94 and 24.64, respectively, P<0.05). The hADSCs-derived hepatocyte-like cells exhibited hepatocyte morphology, expressed hepatocyte markers, possessed hepatocyte-specific activities, such as uptake and excretion of indocyanine green, glycogen storage and albumin production. hADSCs can be induced into hepatocyte-like cells in this differentiation system. And this differentiation system promoted the growth of hADSCs.

  5. Hepatic precursors derived from murine embryonic stem cells contribute to regeneration of injured liver.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jeonghoon; Factor, Valentina M; Uren, Tania; Takahama, Yasushi; Lee, Ju-Seog; Major, Marian; Feinstone, Stephen M; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2006-12-01

    We established an efficient system for differentiation, expansion and isolation of hepatic progenitor cells from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and evaluated their capacity to repopulate injured liver. Using mouse ES cells transfected with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene regulated by albumin (ALB) enhancer/promoter, we found that a serum-free chemically defined medium supports formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) and differentiation of hepatic lineage cells in the absence of exogenous growth factors or feeder cell layers. The first GFP+ cells expressing ALB were detected in close proximity to "beating" myocytes after 7 days of EB cultures. GFP+ cells increased in number, acquired hepatocyte-like morphology and hepatocyte-specific markers (i.e., ALB, AAT, TO, and G6P), and by 28 days represented more than 30% of cells isolated from EB outgrowths. The FACS-purified GFP+ cells developed into functional hepatocytes without evidence of cell fusion and participated in the repairing of diseased liver when transplanted into MUP-uPA/SCID mice. The ES cell-derived hepatocytes were responsive to normal growth regulation and proliferated at the same rate as the host hepatocytes after an additional growth stimulus from CCl(4)-induced liver injury. The transplanted GFP+ cells also differentiated into biliary epithelial cells. In conclusion, a highly enriched population of committed hepatocyte precursors can be generated from ES cells in vitro for effective cell replacement therapy.

  6. N-glycoprotein surfaceome of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived hepatic endoderm.

    PubMed

    Mallanna, Sunil K; Waas, Matthew; Duncan, Stephen A; Gundry, Rebekah L

    2017-03-01

    Using cell surface capture technology, the cell surface N-glycoproteome of human-induced pluripotent stem cell derived hepatic endoderm cells was assessed. Altogether, 395 cell surface N-glycoproteins were identified, represented by 1273 N-glycopeptides. This study identified N-glycoproteins that are not predicted to be localized to the cell surface and provides experimental data that assist in resolving ambiguous or incorrectly annotated transmembrane topology annotations. In a proof-of-concept analysis, combining these data with other cell surface proteome datasets is useful for identifying potentially cell type and lineage restricted markers and drug targets to advance the use of stem cell technologies for mechanistic developmental studies, disease modeling, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing interleukin-1 receptor antagonist improve fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Bao; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Zhan-Lian; Lin, Chao-Shuang; Lai, Jing; Gu, Yu-Rong; Lin, Bin-Liang; Xie, Dong-Ying; Xie, Shi-Bin; Peng, Liang; Gao, Zhi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncontrolled hepatic immunoactivation is regarded as the primary pathological mechanism of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). The major acute-phase mediators associated with FHF, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, impair the regeneration of liver cells and stem cell grafts. Amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) have the capacity, under specific conditions, to differentiate into hepatocytes. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) plays an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic role in acute and chronic inflammation, and has been used in many experimental and clinical applications. In the present study, we implanted IL-1Ra-expressing AF-MSCs into injured liver via the portal vein, using D-galactosamine-induced FHF in a rat model. IL-1Ra expression, hepatic injury, liver regeneration, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6), and animal survival were assessed after cell transplantation. Our results showed that AF-MSCs over-expressing IL-1Ra prevented liver failure and reduced mortality in rats with FHF. These animals also exhibited improved liver function and increased survival rates after injection with these cells. Using green fluorescent protein as a marker, we demonstrated that the engrafted cells and their progeny were incorporated into injured livers and produced albumin. This study suggests that AF-MSCs genetically modified to over-express IL-1Ra can be implanted into the injured liver to provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of FHF.

  8. Ionone Derivatives from the Mycelium of Phellinus linteus and the Inhibitory Effect on Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiow-Chyn; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Fu-An; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Three new γ-ionylideneacetic acid derivatives, phellinulins A–C (1–3), were characterized from the mycelium extract of Phellinus linteus. The chemical structures were established based on the spectroscopic analysis. In addition, phellinulin A (1) was subjected to the examination of effects on activated rat hepatic stellate cells and exhibited significant inhibition of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27164091

  9. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine.

  10. Paneth cell-derived IL-17A causes multi-organ dysfunction after hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Brown, Kevin M.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury is a major clinical problem that leads to frequent extra-hepatic complications including intestinal dysfunction and acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we aimed to determine the mechanisms of hepatic IR-induced extra-hepatic organ dysfunction. Mice subjected to 60 min of hepatic IR not only developed severe hepatic injury but also developed significant AKI and small intestinal injury. Hepatic IR induced small intestinal Paneth cell degranulation and increased IL-17A levels in portal vein plasma and small intestine. We also detected increased levels of IL-17A mRNA and protein in Paneth cells after hepatic IR with laser capture dissection. IL-17A neutralizing antibody treatment or genetic deletion of either IL-17A or IL-17A receptors significantly protected against hepatic IR-induced acute liver, kidney and intestinal injury. Leukocyte IL-17A does not contribute to organ injury as infusion of wild type splenocytes failed to exacerbate liver and kidney injury in IL-17A deficient mice after hepatic IR. Depletion of Paneth cell numbers by pharmacological (with dithizone) or genetic intervention (SOX9 flox/flox Villin cre+/− mice) significantly attenuated intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury following liver IR. Finally, depletion of Paneth cell numbers significantly decreased small intestinal IL-17A release and plasma IL-17A levels after liver IR. Taken together, the results show that Paneth cell derived IL-17A plays a critical role in hepatic IR injury and extra-hepatic organ dysfunction. Modulation of Paneth cell dysregulation may have therapeutic implications by reducing systemic complications arising from hepatic IR. PMID:21360570

  11. Cytoglobin as a Marker of Hepatic Stellate Cell-derived Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play important roles in inflammation, fibrosis and tumorigenesis in chronically inflamed liver. Liver myofibroblasts originate from hepatic stellate cells, portal fibroblasts or mesothelial cells, and they are localized in and around fibrotic septum and portal tracts. Liver myofibroblasts are the source of extracellular matrix materials, including type I collagen and multiple fibrogenic growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor. Although a detailed characterization of the function of individual myofibroblasts has not been conducted, owing to the lack of appropriate cell markers, recent lineage-tracing technology has revealed the limited contribution of myofibroblasts that are derived from portal fibroblasts to various types of liver fibrosis, as compared with the contribution of hepatic stellate cells. In addition, cytoglobin, which is the fourth globin in mammals and function as a local gas sensor, provides a new perspective on the involvement of stellate cells in fibrosis and carcinogenesis, possibly through its anti-oxidative properties and is a promising new marker that discriminates between myofibroblasts derived from stellate cells and those from portal fibroblasts. PMID:26617531

  12. Derivation, characterization, and phenotypic variation of hepatic progenitor cell lines isolated from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Sun, Mingzeng; Ilic, Zoran; Leffert, Hyam L; Sell, Stewart

    2002-02-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) cloned from adult rat livers following allyl alcohol injury express hematopoietic stem cell and early hepatic lineage markers when cultured on feeder layers; under these conditions, neither mature hepatocyte nor bile duct, Ito, stellate, Kupffer cell, or macrophage markers are detected. These phenotypes have remained stable without aneuploidy or morphological transformation after more than 100 population doublings. When cultured without feeder layers, the early lineage markers disappear, and mature hepatocyte markers are expressed; mature hepatocytic differentiation and cell size are also augmented by polypeptide and steroidal growth factors. In contrast to hepatocytic potential, duct-like structures and biliary epithelial markers are expressed on Matrigel. Because they were derived without carcinogens or mutagens, these bipotential LPC lines provide novel tools for models of cellular plasticity and hepatocarcinogenesis, as well as lines for use in cellular transplantation, gene therapy, and bioreactor construction.

  13. Exosomal MicroRNAs Derived From Umbilical Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibit Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xijing; Xu, Chen; Fang, Shuo; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Yue; Liu, Houqi; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant global public health problem, causing more than 350,000 deaths every year. Although the development of direct-acting antivirals has improved the sustained virological response rate in HCV patients, novel anti-HCV agents with higher efficacy as well as better tolerance and cheaper production costs are still urgently needed. Cell-based therapy, especially its unique and strong paracrine ability to transfer information to other cells via extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, has become one of the most popular therapeutic methods in recent years. In our study, exosomes secreted from umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (uMSCs), which are widely used in regenerative medicine, inhibited HCV infection in vitro, especially viral replication, with low cell toxicity. Our analysis revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) from uMSC-derived exosomes (uMSC-Exo) had their unique expression profiles, and these functional miRNAs, mainly represented by let-7f, miR-145, miR-199a, and miR-221 released from uMSC-Exo, largely contributed to the suppression of HCV RNA replication. These four miRNAs possessed binding sites in HCV RNA as demonstrated by the target prediction algorithm. In addition, uMSC-Exo therapy showed synergistic effect when combined with U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved interferon-α or telaprevir, enhancing their anti-HCV ability and thus improving the clinical significance of these regenerative substances for future application as optimal adjuvants of anti-HCV therapy. Significance This work reported, for the first time, the identification of stem cell-derived exosomes of antiviral activity. Umbilical mesenchymal stem cell-secreted exosomes inhibited hepatitis C virus infection through transporting a mixture of microRNAs complementing the viral genomes to the host cells. This finding provides insights and prospects for physiologically secreted substances for antiviral therapy. PMID:27496568

  14. Celecoxib derivative OSU-03012 inhibits the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells by inducing cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Zuowei; Luo, Zhongguang; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Liver fibrosis may lead to portal hypertension, liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, and predominantly results from the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells. OSU‑03012, a non‑cyclooxygenase‑inhibiting celecoxib derivative, has been previously demonstrated to promote apoptosis in certain cell types, however, its function in hepatic fibrosis remains unclear. In the current study, the inhibitory effect of OSU‑03012 on the proliferation of the LX2 human hepatic stellate cell line was evaluated by cell counting kit‑8 assay. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to examine the expression of α‑smooth muscle actin and type I collagen, which are representative of LX2 cell activation. The senescence of LX2 cells was measured by senescence‑associated β‑galactosidase staining, and the cell cycle and apoptosis levels were assessed by flow cytometry. The impact of senescence‑associated signaling on protein expression was assessed by western blot analysis. OSU‑03012 was observed to inhibit cell proliferation and prevent the secretion of profibrotic factors in LX2 cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that OSU‑03012 inhibited the proliferation and activation of LX2 via the induction of cell senescence at the G1 phase, rather than via cell apoptosis. The induction of senescence may be via the upregulation of p16, p21 and p27. In conclusion, the current study provided insight into the pharmacological mechanisms of OSU‑03012 in preventing the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells through cell senescence. The current study supports the theory that OSU‑03012 is a novel agent for potential use against liver fibrosis.

  15. Isolation and expansion of human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells by growth factor defined serum-free culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takayuki; Takayama, Kazuo; Hirata, Mitsuhi; Liu, Yu-Jung; Yanagihara, Kana; Suga, Mika; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Furue, Miho K

    2017-03-15

    Limited growth potential, narrow ranges of sources, and difference in variability and functions from batch to batch of primary hepatocytes cause a problem for predicting drug-induced hepatotoxicity during drug development. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells in vitro are expected as a tool for predicting drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Several studies have already reported efficient methods for differentiating hPSCs into hepatocyte-like cells, however its differentiation process is time-consuming, labor-intensive, cost-intensive, and unstable. In order to solve this problem, expansion culture for hPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells, including hepatic stem cells and hepatoblasts which can self-renewal and differentiate into hepatocytes should be valuable as a source of hepatocytes. However, the mechanisms of the expansion of hPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells are not yet fully understood. In this study, to isolate hPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells, we tried to develop serum-free growth factor defined culture conditions using defined components. Our culture conditions were able to isolate and grow hPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells which could differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells through hepatoblast-like cells. We have confirmed that the hepatocyte-like cells prepared by our methods were able to increase gene expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes upon encountering rifampicin, phenobarbital, or omeprazole. The isolation and expansion of hPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells in defined culture conditions should have advantages in terms of detecting accurate effects of exogenous factors on hepatic lineage differentiation, understanding mechanisms underlying self-renewal ability of hepatic progenitor cells, and stably supplying functional hepatic cells.

  16. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  17. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor protects against high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing hepatic PPAR-γ expression

    PubMed Central

    Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Peng, Sophia; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Thorn, Natalie; Farris, Alton B.; Jain, Sanjay; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier; Anania, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice, however, the mechanisms involved are not known. In this study we investigated the effects of GDNF overexpression and nanoparticle delivery of GDNF in mice on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis and the expression of genes involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid uptake and de novo lipogenesis. Transgenic overexpression of GDNF in liver and other metabolically active tissues was protective against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. Mice overexpressing GDNF had significantly reduced P62/sequestosome 1 protein levels suggestive of accelerated autophagic clearance. They also had significantly reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CD36 gene expression and protein levels, and lower expression of mRNA coding for enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis. GDNF-loaded nanoparticles were protective against short-term HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and attenuated liver fibrosis in mice with long-standing HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. They also suppressed the liver expression of steatosis-associated genes. In vitro, GDNF suppressed triglyceride accumulation in Hep G2 cells through enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling and inhibition of PPAR-γ gene promoter activity. These results show that GDNF acts directly in the liver to protect against HFD-induced cellular stress and that GDNF may have a role in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26564715

  18. Antioxidant Activity of Oat Proteins Derived Peptides in Stressed Hepatic HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yichen; Esfandi, Ramak; Willmore, William G.; Tsopmo, Apollinaire

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, for the first time, antioxidant activities of seven peptides (P1–P7) derived from hydrolysis of oat proteins in a cellular model. In the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, it was found that P2 had the highest radical scavenging activity (0.67 ± 0.02 µM Trolox equivalent (TE)/µM peptide) followed by P5, P3, P6, P4, P1, and P7 whose activities were between 0.14–0.61 µM TE/µM). In the hepatic HepG2 cells, none of the peptides was cytotoxic at 20–300 µM. In addition to having the highest ORAC value, P2 was also the most protective (29% increase in cell viability) against 2,2′-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride -induced oxidative stress. P1, P6, and P7 protected at a lesser extent, with an 8%–21% increase viability of cells. The protection of cells was attributed to several factors including reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, increased cellular glutathione, and increased activities of three main endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27775607

  19. A cinnamon-derived procyanidin type A compound inhibits hepatitis C virus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Catherine; Lambotin, Melanie; Heydmann, Laura; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Bhaskaran, Sunil; Vishwaraman, Mohan; Baumert, Thomas F; Moog, Christiane

    2017-07-11

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. Although direct-acting antivirals can cure the large majority of treated patients, important limitations remain, including treatment failure and high costs precluding access to therapy in resource-limited settings. We report herein the anti-HCV effects of IND02, a procyanidin type A molecule, isolated and characterized from cinnamon. Using cellculture-derived HCV (HCVcc), HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp), and subgenomic replicons, we demonstrated that IND02 markedly and dose-dependently inhibited HCV cell entry. Kinetic assays demonstrated that IND02 inhibits HCV entry most likely at a postbinding step. Experiments performed using primary human hepatocytes confirmed inhibition of HCV entry by IND02, demonstrating the functional impact in the most physiological cell-based system for studying HCV-host interactions. The natural compound IND02 exhibits potent HCV cell entry inhibition and provides a novel perspective for development of a low-cost antiviral for treatment of HCV infection.

  20. Expression and clinical significance of myeloid derived suppressor cells in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Rong; Liu, Jing; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Geng-Lin; Li, De-Chang; Lin, Chao-Shuang

    2014-01-01

    We here document discovery of expression profile of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and changes in the course of disease. The study population was composed of 75 outpatient HBV cases and 15 healthy control cases. Peripheral blood samples were collected for separation of mononuclear cells. Levels of MDSCs labeled with Lin-DR-CD11b+CD33+ obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), were revealed to have significant differences between the CHB and other groups. They were 0.414% for health control cases and 0.226% for CHB cases (Z=-2.356, p=0.0189). It also observed that the group of HBeAg positive cases had significant difference in MDSCs/ PBMC median (X(2)=11.877, p=0.003), compared with group of HBeAg negative cases and the healthy control group. It suggested considerable MDSCs might be involved in HBeAg immune tolerance. In addition, negative correlations between MDSCs/PBMC and parameters of ALT, AST and TBil, while positive correlation between MDSCs/ PBMC and ALB parameter were found. Multiple comparisons between the four phases and health control phase again, there was a statistically sifnificant difference (X(2)=17.198, p=0.002). Taken together, these findings may provide a new immunotherapy strategy for reduced the expression levels of MDSCs in CHB patients, through induction of an autoimmune response to virus removal.

  1. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. Results We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. Conclusions We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells. PMID:23870169

  2. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Corbineau, Sébastien; Vernet, Rémi; Gayon, Régis; Dianat, Noushin; Martinet, Clémence; Clay, Denis; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tachdjian, Gérard; Burks, Deborah; Vallier, Ludovic; Bouillé, Pascale; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Weber, Anne

    2013-07-19

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells.

  3. An Occult Hepatitis B-Derived Hepatoma Cell Line Carrying Persistent Nuclear Viral DNA and Permissive for Exogenous Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Chien, Rong-Nan; Lin, Shi-Ming; Ke, Po-Yuan; Lin, Chen-Chun; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is defined as persistence of HBV DNA in liver tissues, with or without detectability of HBV DNA in the serum, in individuals with negative serum HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Despite accumulating evidence suggesting its important clinical roles, the molecular and virological basis of occult hepatitis B remains unclear. In an attempt to establish new hepatoma cell lines, we achieved a new cell line derived from a hepatoma patient with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and occult HBV infection. Characterization of this cell line revealed previously unrecognized properties. Two novel human hepatoma cell lines were established. Hep-Y1 was derived from a male hepatoma patient negative for HCV and HBV infection. Hep-Y2 was derived from a female hepatoma patient suffering from chronic HCV and occult HBV infection. Morphological, cytogenetic and functional studies were performed. Permissiveness to HBV infection was assessed. Both cell lines showed typical hepatocyte-like morphology under phase-contrast and electron microscopy and expressed alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, transferrin, and aldolase B. Cytogenetic analysis revealed extensive chromosomal anomalies. An extrachromosomal form of HBV DNA persisted in the nuclear fraction of Hep-Y2 cells, while no HBsAg was detected in the medium. After treated with 2% dimethyl sulfoxide, both cell lines were permissive for exogenous HBV infection with transient elevation of the replication intermediates in the cytosol with detectable viral antigens by immunoflurescence analysis. In conclusions, we established two new hepatoma cell lines including one from occult HBV infection (Hep-Y2). Both cell lines were permissive for HBV infection. Additionally, Hep-Y2 cells carried persistent extrachromosomal HBV DNA in the nuclei. This cell line could serve as a useful tool to establish the molecular and virological basis of occult HBV infection. PMID:23734258

  4. An occult hepatitis B-derived hepatoma cell line carrying persistent nuclear viral DNA and permissive for exogenous hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Chien, Rong-Nan; Lin, Shi-Ming; Ke, Po-Yuan; Lin, Chen-Chun; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is defined as persistence of HBV DNA in liver tissues, with or without detectability of HBV DNA in the serum, in individuals with negative serum HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Despite accumulating evidence suggesting its important clinical roles, the molecular and virological basis of occult hepatitis B remains unclear. In an attempt to establish new hepatoma cell lines, we achieved a new cell line derived from a hepatoma patient with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and occult HBV infection. Characterization of this cell line revealed previously unrecognized properties. Two novel human hepatoma cell lines were established. Hep-Y1 was derived from a male hepatoma patient negative for HCV and HBV infection. Hep-Y2 was derived from a female hepatoma patient suffering from chronic HCV and occult HBV infection. Morphological, cytogenetic and functional studies were performed. Permissiveness to HBV infection was assessed. Both cell lines showed typical hepatocyte-like morphology under phase-contrast and electron microscopy and expressed alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, transferrin, and aldolase B. Cytogenetic analysis revealed extensive chromosomal anomalies. An extrachromosomal form of HBV DNA persisted in the nuclear fraction of Hep-Y2 cells, while no HBsAg was detected in the medium. After treated with 2% dimethyl sulfoxide, both cell lines were permissive for exogenous HBV infection with transient elevation of the replication intermediates in the cytosol with detectable viral antigens by immunoflurescence analysis. In conclusions, we established two new hepatoma cell lines including one from occult HBV infection (Hep-Y2). Both cell lines were permissive for HBV infection. Additionally, Hep-Y2 cells carried persistent extrachromosomal HBV DNA in the nuclei. This cell line could serve as a useful tool to establish the molecular and virological basis of occult HBV infection.

  5. Prevention of in vitro hepatic stellate cells activation by the adenosine derivative compound IFC305.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela; Pérez-Carreón, Julio Isael; Agüero, José Fernando Cabello; Romero, Pilar Cabrales; Vidrio-Gómez, Susana; Martínez-Pérez, Lidia; Yáñez-Maldonado, Lucia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Macías-Silva, Marina; de Sánchez, Victoria Chagoya

    2010-12-01

    We have previously shown that adenosine and the aspartate salt of adenosine (IFC305) reverse pre-established CCl(4)-induced cirrhosis in rats. However, their molecular mechanism of action is not clearly understood. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in liver fibrogenesis leading to cirrhosis, mainly through their activation, changing from a quiescent adipogenic state to a proliferative myofibrogenic condition. Therefore, we decided to investigate the effect of IFC305 on primary cultured rat HSC. Our results reveal that this compound suppressed the activation of HSC, as demonstrated by the maintenance of a quiescent cell morphology, including lipid droplets content, inhibition of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen α1(I) expression, and up-regulation of MMP-13, Smad7, and PPARγ expression, three key antifibrogenic genes. Furthermore, IFC305 was able to repress the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation of HSC. This inhibition was independent of adenosine receptors stimulation; instead, IFC305 was incorporated into cells by adenosine transporters and converted to AMP by adenosine kinase. On the other hand, addition of pyrimidine ribonucleoside as uridine reversed the suppressive effect of IFC305 on the proliferation and activation of HSC, suggesting that intracellular pyrimidine starvation would be involved in the molecular mechanism of action of IFC305. In conclusion, IFC305 inhibits HSC activation and maintains their quiescence in vitro; these results could explain in part the antifibrotic liver beneficial effect previously described for this compound on the animal model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel Radiolytic Rotenone Derivative, Rotenoisin B with Potent Anti-Carcinogenic Activity in Hepatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Badaboina, Srilatha; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Na, Yun Hee; Park, Chul-Hong; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-07-24

    Rotenone, isolated from roots of derris plant, has been shown to possess various biological activities, which lead to attempting to develop a potent drug against several diseases. However, recent studies have demonstrated that rotenone has the potential to induce several adverse effects such as a neurodegenerative disease. Radiolytic transformation of the rotenone with gamma-irradiation created a new product, named rotenoisin B. The present work was designed to investigate the anticancer activity of rotenoisin B with low toxicity and its molecular mechanism in hepatic cancer cells compared to a parent compound, rotenone. Our results showed rotenoisin B inhibited hepatic cancer cells' proliferation in a dose dependent manner and increased in apoptotic cells. Interestingly, rotenoisin B showed low toxic effects on normal cells compared to rotenone. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential has been decreased, which leads to cytochrome c release. Down regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 levels as well as the up regulation of proapoptotic Bax levels were observed. The cleaved PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) level increased as well. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 slightly up regulated and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased as well as cell cycle arrest predominantly at the G2/M phase observed. These results suggest that rotenoisin B might be a potent anticancer candidate similar to rotenone in hepatic cancer cells with low toxicity to normal cells even at high concentrations compared to rotenone.

  7. Novel Radiolytic Rotenone Derivative, Rotenoisin B with Potent Anti-Carcinogenic Activity in Hepatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badaboina, Srilatha; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Na, Yun Hee; Park, Chul-Hong; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, isolated from roots of derris plant, has been shown to possess various biological activities, which lead to attempting to develop a potent drug against several diseases. However, recent studies have demonstrated that rotenone has the potential to induce several adverse effects such as a neurodegenerative disease. Radiolytic transformation of the rotenone with gamma-irradiation created a new product, named rotenoisin B. The present work was designed to investigate the anticancer activity of rotenoisin B with low toxicity and its molecular mechanism in hepatic cancer cells compared to a parent compound, rotenone. Our results showed rotenoisin B inhibited hepatic cancer cells’ proliferation in a dose dependent manner and increased in apoptotic cells. Interestingly, rotenoisin B showed low toxic effects on normal cells compared to rotenone. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential has been decreased, which leads to cytochrome c release. Down regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 levels as well as the up regulation of proapoptotic Bax levels were observed. The cleaved PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) level increased as well. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 slightly up regulated and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased as well as cell cycle arrest predominantly at the G2/M phase observed. These results suggest that rotenoisin B might be a potent anticancer candidate similar to rotenone in hepatic cancer cells with low toxicity to normal cells even at high concentrations compared to rotenone. PMID:26213921

  8. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchi; Greenhough, Sebastian; Medine, Claire N.; Hay, David C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays. PMID:20169088

  9. Injury mechanism dictates contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to murine hepatic vascular regeneration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from adult marrow have been shown to regenerate vascular cells in response to injury. However, it is unclear whether the type of injury dictates the contribution of such cells to neovascularization and which subpopulations of cells contribute to vascular regeneratio...

  10. Tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells exacerbate immune-mediated hepatitis in mice in a CD40-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Manns, Michael P; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-04-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing (TB) mice. We studied hepatic MDSCs in two murine models of immune-mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of TB mice with Concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide resulted in increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum levels in comparison to tumor-free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSCs into naïve mice exacerbated Con A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells revealed a polarized proinflammatory gene signature after Con A treatment. An IFN-γ-dependent upregulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells along with an upregulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Con A treatment was observed. Con A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSCs as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSCs led to increased arginase activity upon Con A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40(-/-) tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased ROS production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSCs act as proinflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner.

  11. Completion of the Entire Hepatitis C Virus Life Cycle in Vero Cells Derived from Monkey Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Asako; Sugiyama, Nao; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hepatitis C virus (HCV) cell culture system incorporating the JFH-1 strain and the human hepatoma cell line HuH-7 enabled the production of infectious HCV particles. Several host factors were identified as essential for HCV replication. Supplementation of these factors in nonhepatic human cell lines enabled HCV replication and particle production. Vero cells established from monkey kidney are commonly used for the production of vaccines against a variety of viruses. In this study, we aimed to establish a novel Vero cell line to reconstruct the HCV life cycle. Unmodified Vero cells did not allow HCV infection or replication. The expression of microRNA 122 (miR-122), an essential factor for HCV replication, is notably low in Vero cells. Therefore, we supplemented Vero cells with miR-122 and found that HCV replication was enhanced. However, Vero cells that expressed miR-122 still did not allow HCV infection. We supplemented HCV receptor molecules and found that scavenger receptor class B type I (SRBI) was essential for HCV infection in Vero cells. The supplementation of apolipoprotein E (ApoE), a host factor important for virus production, enabled the production of infectious virus in Vero cells. Finally, we created a Vero cell line that expressed the essential factors miR-122, SRBI, and ApoE; the entire HCV life cycle, including infection, replication, and infectious virus production, was completed in these cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that miR-122, SRBI, and ApoE were necessary and sufficient for the completion of the entire HCV life cycle in nonhuman, nonhepatic Vero cells. PMID:27302754

  12. X-pep, a novel cell-penetrating peptide motif derived from the hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Krissansen, Geoffrey W

    2014-10-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to penetrate the plasma membrane and gain access to the interior of any replicating or non-replicating cell, and are being considered as drug delivery agents. Here we describe the serendipitous discovery of a novel CPP motif (MAARLCCQ), designated X-pep, located at the extreme N-terminus of the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. X-pep, and a C-terminally truncated form of the peptide (MAARL), readily penetrated HepG2 cells. Further truncation by removal of the terminal leucine residue impaired the cell-penetrating activity of peptide, indicating that MAARL is the active core of the peptide. X-pep is located adjacent to another CPP, namely Xentry, and like Xentry is unable to penetrate unactivated resting lymphocytes suggesting selective cell uptake. A D-isomeric form of the MAARL peptide was not cell-permeable, indicating that the cell-penetrating function of the peptide involves stereoselective interaction with a chiral receptor. The discovery of X-pep, which bears no resemblance to known CPPs, allows studies to be undertaken to determine additional characteristics of this novel CPP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G; Wenzel, Jürgen J; Johne, Reimar

    2016-09-29

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown.

  14. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Wenzel, Jürgen J.; Johne, Reimar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown. PMID:27690085

  15. Cell Fusion Reprogramming Leads to a Specific Hepatic Expression Pattern during Mouse Bone Marrow Derived Hepatocyte Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arza, Elvira; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fabregat, Isabel; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Meza, Nestor W.; Segovia, Jose C.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells with hepatocytes to generate BM derived hepatocytes (BMDH) is a natural process, which is enhanced in damaged tissues. However, the reprogramming needed to generate BMDH and the identity of the resultant cells is essentially unknown. In a mouse model of chronic liver damage, here we identify a modification in the chromatin structure of the hematopoietic nucleus during BMDH formation, accompanied by the loss of the key hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1/Sfpi1 (SFFV proviral integration 1) and gain of the key hepatic transcriptional regulator HNF-1A homeobox A (HNF-1A/Hnf1a). Through genome-wide expression analysis of laser captured BMDH, a differential gene expression pattern was detected and the chromatin changes observed were confirmed at the level of chromatin regulator genes. Similarly, Tranforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and neurotransmitter (e.g. Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 [Ptger4]) pathway genes were over-expressed. In summary, in vivo BMDH generation is a process in which the hematopoietic cell nucleus changes its identity and acquires hepatic features. These BMDHs have their own cell identity characterized by an expression pattern different from hematopoietic cells or hepatocytes. The role of these BMDHs in the liver requires further investigation. PMID:22457803

  16. Relationship between signal transduction and PPAR alpha-regulated genes of lipid metabolism in rat hepatic-derived Fao cells.

    PubMed

    Latruffe, N; Passilly, P; Jannin, B; Motojima, K; Cherkaoui Malki, M; Schohn, H; Clemencet, M C; Boscoboinik, D; Dauça, M

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize phosphorylated proteins and to evaluate the changes in their phosphorylation level under the influence of a peroxisome proliferator (PP) with hypolipidemic activity of the fibrate family. The incubation of rat hepatic derived Fao cells with ciprofibrate leads to an overphosphorylation of proteins, especially one of 85 kDa, indicating that kinase (or phosphatase) activities are modified. Moreover, immunoprecipitation of 32P-labeled cell lysates shows that the nuclear receptor, PP-activated receptor, alpha isoform, can exist in a phosphorylated form, and its phosphorylation is increased by ciprofibrate. This study shows that PP acts at different steps of cell signaling. These steps can modulate gene expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and lipid homeostasis, as well as in detoxication processes.

  17. Evolution of a Cell Culture-Derived Genotype 1a Hepatitis C Virus (H77S.2) during Persistent Infection with Chronic Hepatitis in a Chimpanzee

    PubMed Central

    Yi, MinKyung; Hu, Fengyu; Joyce, Michael; Saxena, Vikas; Welsch, Christoph; Chavez, Deborah; Guerra, Bernadette; Yamane, Daisuke; Veselenak, Ronald; Pyles, Rick; Walker, Christopher M.; Tyrrell, Lorne; Bourne, Nigel; Lanford, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persistent infection is a key feature of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, chimpanzee infections with cell culture-derived viruses (JFH1 or related chimeric viruses that replicate efficiently in cell culture) have been limited to acute-transient infections with no pathogenicity. Here, we report persistent infection with chronic hepatitis in a chimpanzee challenged with cell culture-derived genotype 1a virus (H77S.2) containing 6 cell culture-adaptive mutations. Following acute-transient infection with a chimeric H77/JFH1 virus (HJ3-5), intravenous (i.v.) challenge with 106 FFU H77S.2 virus resulted in immediate seroconversion and, following an unusual 4- to 6-week delay, persistent viremia accompanied by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation, intrahepatic innate immune responses, and diffuse hepatopathy. This first persistent infection with cell culture-produced HCV provided a unique opportunity to assess evolution of cell culture-adapted virus in vivo. Synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates were greatest during the first 8 weeks of infection. Of 6 cell culture-adaptive mutations in H77S.2, Q1067R (NS3) had reverted to Q1067 and S2204I (NS5A) was replaced by T2204 within 8 weeks of infection. By 62 weeks, 4 of 6 mutations had reverted to the wild-type sequence, and all reverted to the wild-type sequence by 194 weeks. The data suggest H77S.2 virus has greater potential for persistence and pathogenicity than JFH1 and demonstrate both the capacity of a nonfit virus to persist for weeks in the liver in the absence of detectable viremia as well as strong selective pressure against cell culture-adaptive mutations in vivo. IMPORTANCE This study shows that mutations promoting the production of infectious genotype 1a HCV in cell culture have the opposite effect and attenuate replication in the liver of the only fully permissive animal species other than humans. It provides the only example to date of persistent infection in a chimpanzee

  18. Kupffer cell heterogeneity: functional properties of bone marrow derived and sessile hepatic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ingo; Cornejo, Judith C; Polakos, Noelle K; John, Beena; Wuensch, Sherry A; Topham, David J; Pierce, Robert H; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2007-12-01

    Kupffer cells form a large intravascular macrophage bed in the liver sinusoids. The differentiation history and diversity of Kupffer cells is disputed; some studies argue that they are derived from blood monocytes, whereas others support a local origin from intrahepatic precursor cells. In the present study, we used both flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry to distinguish 2 subsets of Kupffer cells that were revealed in the context both of bone marrow transplantation and of orthotopic liver transplantation. One subset was radiosensitive and rapidly replaced from hematogenous precursors, whereas the other was relatively radioresistant and long-lived. Both were phagocytic but only the former population was recruited into inflammatory foci in response to CD8(+) T-cell activation. We propose the name "sessile" for the radioresistant Kupffer cells that do not participate in immunoinflammatory reactions. However, we found no evidence that these sessile Kupffer cells arise from immature intrahepatic precursors. Our conclusions resolve a long-standing controversy and explain how different experimental approaches may reveal one or both of these subsets.

  19. Anti-Gr-1 antibody depletion fails to eliminate hepatic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Kapanadze, Tamar; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies show that the liver is a preferred organ for the accumulation of MDSC. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic RB6-8C5 treatment on hepatic MDSC in tumor-bearing mice. EL4 tumor-bearing mice were injected i.p. with RB6-8C5, and hepatic, splenic, and blood MDSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, hepatic MDSC remained in the liver, although RB6-8C5 completely eliminated them from the spleen and peripheral blood 24 h after treatment. Secondary antibody staining confirmed the presence of RB6-8C5-bound MDSC in the liver of mice with s.c. tumors. Similar observations were made in two other (colon and melanoma) tumor models. Whereas RB6-8C5 injection induced cell death of hepatic MDSC, as shown by Annexin V/7-AAD staining, these cells were replaced immediately, leading to a constant, increased frequency of hepatic MDSC. Adoptively transferred MDSC migrated preferentially to the liver after RB6-8C5 treatment, suggesting that hepatic MDSCs are reconstituted rapidly after depletion. Finally, hepatic MDSC remained immunosuppressive despite RB6-8C5 injection. Our study demonstrates that RB6-8C5 is not suitable for depletion of hepatic MDSCs and analysis of their function.

  20. Persistent growth of a human plasma-derived hepatitis C virus genotype 1b isolate in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Erica; Mihalik, Kathleen; Ulitzky, Laura; Plant, Ewan P; Puig, Montserrat; Gagneten, Sara; Yu, Mei-ying W; Kaushik-Basu, Neerja; Feinstone, Stephen M; Taylor, Deborah R

    2010-05-20

    HCV (hepatitis C virus) research, including therapeutics and vaccine development, has been hampered by the lack of suitable tissue culture models. Development of cell culture systems for the growth of the most drug-resistant HCV genotype (1b) as well as natural isolates has remained a challenge. Transfection of cultured cells with adenovirus-associated RNA(I) (VA RNA(I)), a known interferon (IFN) antagonist and inhibitor of dsRNA-mediated antiviral pathways, enhanced the growth of plasma-derived HCV genotype 1b. Furthermore, persistent viral growth was achieved after passaging through IFN-alpha/beta-deficient VeroE6 cells for 2 years. Persistently infected cells were maintained in culture for an additional 4 years, and the virus rescued from these cells induced strong cytopathic effect (CPE). Using a CPE-based assay, we measured inhibition of viral production by anti-HCV specific inhibitors, including 2'-C-Methyl-D-Adenosine, demonstrating its utility for the evaluation of HCV antivirals. This virus constitutes a novel tool for the study of one of the most relevant strains of HCV, genotype 1b, which will now be available for HCV life cycle research and useful for the development of new therapeutics.

  1. MicroRNA-27b Enhances the Hepatic Regenerative Properties of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Den; Huang, Kuang-Tzu; Lin, Chih-Che; Weng, Wei-Teng; Hsu, Li-Wen; Goto, Shigeru; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, Chia-Yun; Kung, Chao-Pin; Chiu, King-Wah; Wang, Chih-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ma, Yen-Ying; Chen, Chao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are readily available multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells and have become an attractive therapeutic tool for regenerative medicine. We herein investigated the mechanistic role of how miR-27b modulated regenerative capacities of ASCs. Intravenous administration of miR-27b-transfected ASCs (ASCs-miR-27b) was conducted after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). After PH, rats injected with ASCs-miR-27b had decreased inflammatory cytokines and increased hepatocyte growth factor and other related growth factors. We showed that the nature of ASCs-miR-27b to inhibit hepatic stellate cell activation was dependent upon peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in vitro. Moreover, expression of miR-27b in ASCs induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), resulting in increased production of ATP, protective cytokines/growth factors, and genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis revealed drastic transcriptional changes in livers treated with ASCs-miR-27b after PH. The differentially expressed genes classified into “regeneration,” “fibrosis,” and “mitochondrial biogenesis” clusters were mainly mitochondrial. The potential biological context reflecting the effects of PGC-1α by ASCs-miR-27b treatment was also observed by the subnetwork analysis with HO-1 and PGC-1α being the top-ranked regulatory genes. We demonstrate autologous ASCs-miR-27b enhances liver regeneration and, importantly, preserves hepatic function through paracrine actions which offers a viable therapeutic option to facilitate rapid recovery after liver injury. PMID:26836372

  2. Human Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial-Hepatic Platform for Efficacy Testing of Vascular-Protective Metabolites from Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Narmada, Balakrishnan Chakrapani; Goh, Yeek Teck; Li, Huan; Sinha, Sanjay; Yu, Hanry; Cheung, Christine

    2017-03-01

    Atherosclerosis underlies many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Nutraceuticals are emerging as a therapeutic moiety for restoring vascular health. Unlike small-molecule drugs, the complexity of ingredients in nutraceuticals often confounds evaluation of their efficacy in preclinical evaluation. It is recognized that the liver is a vital organ in processing complex compounds into bioactive metabolites. In this work, we developed a coculture system of human pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hPSC-ECs) and human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hPSC-HEPs) for predicting vascular-protective effects of nutraceuticals. To validate our model, two compounds (quercetin and genistein), known to have anti-inflammatory effects on vasculatures, were selected. We found that both quercetin and genistein were ineffective at suppressing inflammatory activation by interleukin-1β owing to limited metabolic activity of hPSC-ECs. Conversely, hPSC-HEPs demonstrated metabolic capacity to break down both nutraceuticals into primary and secondary metabolites. When hPSC-HEPs were cocultured with hPSC-ECs to permit paracrine interactions, the continuous turnover of metabolites mitigated interleukin-1β stimulation on hPSC-ECs. We observed significant reductions in inflammatory gene expressions, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB, and interleukin-8 production. Thus, integration of hPSC-HEPs could accurately reproduce systemic effects involved in drug metabolism in vivo to unravel beneficial constituents in nutraceuticals. This physiologically relevant endothelial-hepatic platform would be a great resource in predicting the efficacy of complex nutraceuticals and mechanistic interrogation of vascular-targeting candidate compounds. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:851-863. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  3. Hepatic progenitor cell lines from allyl alcohol-treated adult rats are derived from gamma-irradiated mouse STO cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2003-01-01

    In attempts to recharacterize several markers of putative rat liver progenitor cells, single-stage reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses failed to confirm the reported immunochemical detection of albumin, alpha(1)-fetoprotein, and cytochrome P450-1A2 in the clonal line, 3(8)#21, and the cloned derivative, 3(8)#21-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein). Undetectable expression occurred whether or not both lines were cultured on or off feeder layers of gamma-irradiated mouse embryonic STO (SIM [Sandoz inbred Swiss mouse] thioguanine-resistant ouabain-resistant) cells. PCR amplification of liver progenitor cell chromosomal (rat and mouse Pigr, rat INS1, mouse INS2) and mitochondrial (rat and mouse COX1) genes revealed only mouse sequences. Further analyses of rat and mouse COX1 sequences in cells from untampered storage vials of all 11 reported liver progenitor cell lines and strains revealed only mouse sequences. In addition, uniquely similar metaphase spreads were observed in STO, 3(8)#21, and 3(8)#21-EGFP cells. The combined results suggest that the previously reported "rat" liver progenitor cell lines were most likely generated during early derivation in cell culture from gamma-radiation-resistant or ineffectively irradiated mouse STO cells used as the feeder layers. These findings reveal new types of artifacts encountered in cocultures of tissue progenitor cells and feeder layer cell lines, and they sound a cautionary note: phenotypic and genotypic properties of feeder layers should be well-characterized before and during coculture with newly derived stem cells and clonal derivatives.

  4. Effect of Secreted Molecules of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Acute Hepatic Failure Model.

    PubMed

    Lotfinia, Majid; Kadivar, Mehdi; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Sardari, Soroush; Sodeifi, Niloofar; Sayahpour, Forugh-Azam; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-12-15

    Adult tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show tremendous promise for a wide array of therapeutic applications predominantly through paracrine activity. Recent reports showed that human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived MSCs are an alternative for regenerative cellular therapy due to manufacturing large quantities of MSCs from a single donor. However, no study has been reported to uncover the secretome of human ESC-MSCs as treatment of an acute liver failure (ALF) mouse model. We demonstrated that human ESC-MSCs showed similar morphology and cell surface markers compared with bone marrow-derived MSCs. ESC-MSCs exhibited a higher growth rate during early in vitro expansion, along with adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. Treatment with ESC-MSC-conditioned medium (CM) led to statistically significant enhancement of primary hepatocyte viability and increased immunomodulatory interleukin-10 secretion from lipopolysaccharide-induced human blood mononuclear cells. Analysis of the MSCs secretome by a protein array screen showed an association between higher frequencies of secretory proteins such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and regulation of cell proliferation, cell migration, the development process, immune system process, and apoptosis. In this thioacetamide-induced mouse model of acute liver injury, we observed that systemic infusion of VEGF led to significant survival. These data have provided the first experimental evidence of the therapeutic potential of human ESC-MSC-derived molecules. These molecules show trophic support to hepatocytes, which potentially creates new avenues for the treatment of ALF, as an inflammatory condition.

  5. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Danna; Li, Tong; Heraud, Philip; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation. PMID:27242905

  6. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ye, Danna; Li, Tong; Heraud, Philip; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation.

  7. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigen-pulsed monocyte-derived dendritic cells from HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma patients significantly enhance specific T cell responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, M; Qian, S; Chen, W-W; Zhang, H; Zhang, B; Tang, Z-R; Zhang, Z; Wang, F-S

    2007-02-01

    To investigate whether hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigen-pulsed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) could mount a T cell response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients associated with chronic HBV infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 36 HBV-associated HCC patients were induced into MoDC and pulsed with hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), alone and in combination. Co-stimulatory molecules CD80, CD86 and CD40, as well as human leucocyte antigens D-related (HLA-DR) were found to express at the highest level on MoDC pulsed with HBcAg or HBsAg + HBcAg, at a median level on MoDC pulsed with HBcAg or HBsAg alone, and at the lowest level on non-antigen-pulsed MoDC. Interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12 cytokines were released by antigen-pulsed MoDC at increased levels in the order: no-antigen < HBsAg < HBcAg < HBcAg + HBsAg. MoDC pulsed with HBcAg or HBsAg + HBcAg also had the strongest ability to stimulate autologous T cell proliferation and intracellular interferon (IFN)-gamma production. HBcAg- or HBsAg + HBcAg-pulsed MoDC could also induce HBV core peptide-specific CD8(+) T cell proliferation determined by tetramer staining. In addition, the antigen-pulsed MoDC were found to have a stronger capacity to produce IL-12 and induce T cell response in vitro for patients with higher alanine transaminase (ALT) levels than those with lower ALT levels, indicating that antigen pulse could substantially reverse the impaired function of MoDC in primary HCC patients with active chronic hepatitis B. In conclusion, HBV antigen-pulsed MoDC from HCC patients with chronic hepatitis B could induce HBV-specific T cell response in vitro.

  8. Innate immune responses in human hepatocyte-derived cell lines alter genotype 1 hepatitis E virus replication efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Devhare, Pradip B.; Desai, Swapnil; Lole, Kavita S.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a significant health problem in developing countries causing sporadic and epidemic forms of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis E is a self-limiting disease; however, chronic HEV infections are being reported in immunocompromised individuals. The disease severity is more during pregnancy with high mortality (20–25%), especially in third trimester. Early cellular responses after HEV infection are not completely understood. We analyzed innate immune responses associated with genotype-I HEV replication in human hepatoma cell lines (Huh7, Huh7.5 and HepG2/C3A) using HEV replicon system. These cells supported HEV replication with different efficiencies due to the cell type specific innate immune responses. HepG2/C3A cells were less supportive to HEV replication as compared to Huh7.5 and S10-3 cells. Reconstitution of the defective RIG-I and TLR3 signaling in Huh7.5 cells enabled them to induce higher level antiviral responses and restrict HEV replication, suggesting the involvement of both RIG-I and TLR3 in sensing HEV RNA and downstream activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) to generate antiviral responses. Inhibition of IRF3 mediated downstream responses in HepG2/C3A cells by pharmacological inhibitor BX795 significantly improved HEV replication efficiency implying the importance of this study in establishing a better cell culture system for future HEV studies. PMID:27230536

  9. In vitro and in vivo infectivity and pathogenicity of the lymphoid cell-derived woodchuck hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lew, Y Y; Michalak, T I

    2001-02-01

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and human hepatitis B virus are closely related, highly hepatotropic mammalian DNA viruses that also replicate in the lymphatic system. The infectivity and pathogenicity of hepadnaviruses propagating in lymphoid cells are under debate. In this study, hepato- and lymphotropism of WHV produced by naturally infected lymphoid cells was examined in specifically established woodchuck hepatocyte and lymphoid cell cultures and coculture systems, and virus pathogenicity was tested in susceptible animals. Applying PCR-based assays discriminating between the total pool of WHV genomes and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), combined with enzymatic elimination of extracellular viral sequences potentially associated with the cell surface, our study documents that virus replicating in woodchuck lymphoid cells is infectious to homologous hepatocytes and lymphoid cells in vitro. The productive replication of WHV from lymphoid cells in cultured hepatocytes was evidenced by the appearance of virus-specific DNA, cccDNA, and antigens, transmissibility of the virus through multiple passages in hepatocyte cultures, and the ability of the passaged virus to infect virus-naive animals. The data also revealed that WHV from lymphoid cells can initiate classical acute viral hepatitis in susceptible animals, albeit small quantities (approximately 10(3) virions) caused immunovirologically undetectable (occult) WHV infection that engaged the lymphatic system but not the liver. Our results provide direct in vitro and in vivo evidence that lymphoid cells in the infected host support propagation of infectious hepadnavirus that has the potential to induce hepatitis. They also emphasize a principal role of the lymphatic system in the maintenance and dissemination of hepadnavirus infection, particularly when infection is induced by low virus doses.

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are associated with viral persistence and downregulation of TCR ζ chain expression on CD8(+) T cells in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qing-Lei; Yang, Bin; Sun, Hong-Qi; Feng, Guo-Hua; Jin, Lei; Zou, Zheng-Sheng; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Ji-Yuan; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play an important role in impairing the function of T cells. We characterized MDSCs in two chronic hepatitis C (CHC) cohorts: a cross-sectional group that included 61 treatment-naive patients with CHC, 14 rapid virologic response (RVR) cases and 22 early virologic response (EVR) cases; and a longitudinal group of 13 cases of RVR and 10 cases of EVR after pegylated-interferon-α/ribavirin treatment for genotype 1b HCV infection. Liver samples from 32 CHC patients and six healthy controls were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis. MDSCs frequency in treatment-naive CHC was significantly higher than in RVR, EVR, or healthy subjects and was positively correlated with HCV RNA. Patients infected with HCV genotype 2a had a significantly higher frequency of MDSCs than those infected with genotype 1b. Decreased T cell receptor (TCR) ζ expression on CD8(+) T cells was significantly associated with an increased frequency of MDSCs in treatment-naive CHC patients and was restored by L-arginine treatment in vitro. Increased numbers of liver arginase-1(+) cells were closely associated with the histological activity index in CHC. The TCR ζ chain was significantly downregulated on hepatic CD8(+) T cells in CHC. During antiviral follow up, MDSCs frequency in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was directly correlated with the HCV RNA load in the plasma and inversely correlated with TCR ζ chain expression in CD8(+) T cells in both RVR and EVR cases. Notably, the RVR group had a higher frequency of MDSCs at baseline than the EVR group. Collectively, this study provides evidence that MDSCs might be associated with HCV persistence and downregulation of CD8 ζ chain expression.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Suppress NK Cell IFN-γ Production by Altering Cellular Metabolism via Arginase-1.

    PubMed

    Goh, Celeste C; Roggerson, Krystal M; Lee, Hai-Chon; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Rosen, Hugo R; Hahn, Young S

    2016-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼ 200 million people worldwide. The majority of infected individuals develop persistent infection, resulting in chronic inflammation and liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The ability of HCV to establish persistent infection is partly due to its ability to evade the immune response through multiple mechanisms, including suppression of NK cells. NK cells control HCV replication during the early phase of infection and regulate the progression to chronic disease. In particular, IFN-γ produced by NK cells limits viral replication in hepatocytes and is important for the initiation of adaptive immune responses. However, NK cell function is significantly impaired in chronic HCV patients. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired NK cell function in HCV infection are not well defined. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of human NK cells with CD33(+) PBMCs that were exposed to HCV. We found that NK cells cocultured with HCV-conditioned CD33(+) PBMCs produced lower amounts of IFN-γ, with no effect on granzyme B production or cell viability. Importantly, this suppression of NK cell-derived IFN-γ production was mediated by CD33(+)CD11b(lo)HLA-DR(lo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) via an arginase-1-dependent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin activation. Suppression of IFN-γ production was reversed by l-arginine supplementation, consistent with increased MDSC arginase-1 activity. These novel results identify the induction of MDSCs in HCV infection as a potent immune evasion strategy that suppresses antiviral NK cell responses, further indicating that blockade of MDSCs may be a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate chronic viral infections in the liver.

  12. Contact-dependent depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is a novel mechanism of myeloid-derived suppressor cell induction operating in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Resheq, Yazid J; Li, Ka-Kit; Ward, Stephen T; Wilhelm, Annika; Garg, Abhilok; Curbishley, Stuart M; Blahova, Miroslava; Zimmermann, Henning W; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mackensen, Andreas; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent a unique cell population with distinct immunosuppressive properties that have been demonstrated to shape the outcome of malignant diseases. Recently, human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) have been reported to induce monocytic-MDSC from mature CD14(+) monocytes in a contact-dependent manner. We now report a novel and unexpected mechanism by which CD14(+)HLADR(low/-) suppressive cells are induced by catalase-mediated depletion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation of CD14(+) monocytes with catalase led to a significant induction of functional MDSC compared with media alone, and H2O2 levels inversely correlated with MDSC frequency (r = -0.6555, p < 0.05). Catalase was detected in primary HSC and a stromal cell line, and addition of the competitive catalase inhibitor hydroxylamine resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of MDSC induction and concomitant increase of H2O2 levels. The NADPH-oxidase subunit gp91 was significantly increased in catalase-induced MDSC as determined by quantitative PCR outlining the importance of oxidative burst for the induction of MDSC. These findings represent a so far unrecognized link between immunosuppression by MDSC and metabolism. Moreover, this mechanism potentially explains how stromal cells can induce a favorable immunological microenvironment in the context of tissue oxidative stress such as occurs during cancer therapy.

  13. Aucubin and its hydrolytic derivative attenuate activation of hepatic stellate cells via modulation of TGF-β stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Pei-Yu; Feng, Han; Huang, Wei-Hua; Tian, Ying-Ying; Wang, Ya-Qin; Qin, Yu-Hua; Li, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Kai; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Ouyang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Eucommia ulmoides is an important traditional Chinese medicine and has been used as a tonic with a long history. Aucubin is an active component extracted from Eucommia ulmoides, which has liver-protection effects. However the mechanisms are still unclear. To investigate the inhibitory effects and the underlying mechanisms of aucubin on TGF-β1-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells and ECM deposition, Human hepatic stellate cells (LX-2 cells) were incubated with TGF-β1 to evaluate the anti-fibrotic effect of aucubin. Western blot was used to investigate the expression of α-SMA, Col I, Col III, MMP-2 and TIMP-1. ROS production was monitored using DCFH-DA probe, and NOX4 expression was detected by Real-time PCR. Results indicated that TGF-β1 stimulated the activation and ECM deposition of LX-2 cells. Compared with the control group, aucubin and aucubigenin both reduced the protein expression of α-SMA, Col I, Col III and MMP-2 in LX-2 cells. Aucubin and aucubigenin also suppressed the generation of ROS and down-regulated the NOX4 mRNA expression. Taken together, aucubin and aucubigenin both inhibit the activation and ECM deposition of LX-2 cells activated by TGF-β1. Aucubin and aucubigenin are potential therapeutic candidate drugs for liver fibrosis.

  14. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-04

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model.

  15. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model. PMID:28374759

  16. Enhanced expression of hepatocyte-specific microRNAs in valproic acid mediated hepatic trans-differentiation of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Raut, Akshata; Khanna, Aparna

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the control of cell fate determination during differentiation. In this study, we analyzed the expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs) during hepatic trans-differentiation. The protocol employed the use of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), valproic acid (VPA) to induce hepatic trans-differentiation of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs). The differentiated hepatocyte like cells (HLCs) from hUC-MSCs shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including morphology, expression of hepatocyte -specific genes at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, the functionality of HLCs was confirmed through various liver function tests such as periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain for glycogen accumulation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for synthesis of albumin and release of urea. The aim of the present work was to examine the effect of VPA treatment on miRNA expression during hepatic trans-differentiation. The analysis at miRNA level showed that there was a significant increase in expression of miRNAs involved in hepatic differentiation, due to VPA pre-treatment during differentiation. The study, thus demonstrated that improved expression of hepatocyte-specific miRNAs, miR-23b cluster (miR-27b-3p, miR-24-1-5p and miR-23b-3p), miR-30a-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-148a-3p, miR-192-5p, miR-122-5p due to VPA pre-treatment contributed to a more efficient hepatic trans-differentiation from hUC-MSCs. The putative targets of these upregulated miRNAs were predicted using Bioinformatics analysis. Finally, miR-122-5p, highly upregulated miRNA during hepatic differentiation, was selected for target verification studies. Thus, this study also provides the basis for the function of miR-122-5p during hepatic differentiation of hUC-MSCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Snykers, Sarah; Vanhaecke, Tamara; De Becker, Ann; Papeleu, Peggy; Vinken, Mathieu; Van Riet, Ivan; Rogiers, Vera

    2007-01-01

    Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS) and dexamethasone)] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone), however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK)18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA) considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF)-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), CK18, albumin (ALB), HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)α, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells. PMID:17407549

  18. Generalized Liver- and Blood-Derived CD8+ T-Cell Impairment in Response to Cytokines in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Burke Schinkel, Stephanie C; Carrasco-Medina, Lorna; Cooper, Curtis L; Crawley, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    Generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the contribution of liver-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells to the immunopathogenesis of this infection remain poorly understood. It is hypothesized that this impairment is partially due to reduced CD8+ T-cell activity in response to cytokines such as IL-7, particularly within the liver. To investigate this, the phenotype and cytokine responsiveness of blood- and liver-derived CD8+ T-cells from healthy controls and individuals with HCV infection were compared. In blood, IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression on bulk CD8+ T-cells in HCV infection was no different than controls yet was lower on central memory T-cells, and there were fewer naïve cells. IL-7-induced signalling through phosphorylated STAT5 was lower in HCV infection than in controls, and differed between CD8+ T-cell subsets. Production of Bcl-2 following IL-7 stimulation was also lower in HCV infection and inversely related to the degree of liver fibrosis. In liver-derived CD8+ T-cells, STAT5 activation could not be increased with cytokine stimulation and basal Bcl-2 levels of liver-derived CD8+ T-cells were lower than blood-derived counterparts in HCV infection. Therefore, generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in HCV infection is characterized, in part, by impaired IL-7-mediated signalling and survival, independent of CD127 expression. This impairment is more pronounced in the liver and may be associated with an increased potential for apoptosis. This generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment represents an important immune dysfunction in chronic HCV infection that may alter patient health.

  19. Rat hepatitis E virus derived from wild rats (Rattus rattus) propagates efficiently in human hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jirintai, Suljid; Tanggis; Mulyanto; Suparyatmo, Joseph Benedictus; Takahashi, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tominari; Nagashima, Shigeo; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-06-24

    Although rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been identified in wild rats, no cell culture systems for this virus have been established. A recent report suggesting the presence of antibodies against rat HEV in human sera encouraged us to cultivate rat HEV in human cells. When liver homogenates obtained from wild rats (Rattus rattus) in Indonesia were inoculated onto human hepatocarcinoma cells, the rat HEV replicated efficiently in PLC/PRF/5, HuH-7 and HepG2 cells, irrespective of its genetic group (G1-G3). The rat HEV particles released from cultured cells harbored lipid-associated membranes on their surface that were depleted by treatment with detergent and protease, with the buoyant density in sucrose shifting from 1.15-1.16 g/ml to 1.27-1.28 g/ml. A Northern blotting analysis revealed genomic RNA of 7.0 kb and subgenomic RNA of 2.0 kb in the infected cells. The subgenomic RNA of G1-G3 each possessed the extreme 5'-end sequence of GUAGC (nt 4933-4937), downstream of the highly conserved sequence of GAAUAACA (nt 4916-4923). The establishment of culture systems for rat HEV would allow for extended studies of the mechanisms of viral replication and functional roles of HEV proteins. Further investigation is required to clarify the zoonotic potential of rat HEV.

  20. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated cell proliferation through a prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype in rat hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Koide, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2004-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell (HSC) mitogenesis. PGE-specific receptors are divided into four subtypes that are coupled either to Ca2+ mobilization (EP1 and EP3) or to the stimulation of adenyl cyclase (EP2 and EP4). The aims of the current study were to identify PGE receptor subtypes in cultured rat HSC and to examine which PGE receptor subtype(s) mediates the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated proliferation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to detect PGE receptor subtype mRNA expression. Cell proliferation was determined by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation, and intracellular cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cultured rat HSC expressed mRNAs for all four subtypes of PGE receptor. PGE2- and EP2-selective agonist produced dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PDGF-stimulated proliferation. Neither EP1-, EP3-, nor EP4-selective agonists showed any inhibitory effect. An adenylate cyclase inhibitor strongly blunted the inhibition of DNA synthesis elicited by PGE2 and the EP2 agonist. The EP2 agonist generated higher and more prolonged increases in intracellular cyclic AMP than the EP4 agonist. Activation of the PGE EP2 receptor has an antiproliferative effect in HSC that may be mediated by cyclic AMP-related signal transduction pathways.

  1. Hepatic immune regulation by stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Schildberg, Frank A; Sharpe, Arlene H; Turley, Shannon J

    2015-02-01

    A metabolic organ, the liver also has a central role in tolerance induction. Stromal cells lining the hepatic sinusoids, such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), are the first liver cells to encounter gut-derived and systemic antigens, thereby shaping local and systemic tolerance. Recent studies have demonstrated that stromal cells can modulate immune responses by antigen-dependent and independent mechanisms. Stromal cells interfere with the function of other antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induce non-responsive T cells as well as regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The immunosuppressive microenvironment thus created provides a means to protect the liver from tissue damage. Such tolerized surroundings, however, can be exploited by certain pathogens, promoting persistent liver infections.

  2. Donor-Dependent and Other Nondefined Factors Have Greater Influence on the Hepatic Phenotype Than the Starting Cell Type in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Heslop, James A; Kia, Richard; Pridgeon, Christopher S; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Elmasry, Mohamed; Fenwick, Stephen W; Mills, John S; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Chris E; Park, Bong K

    2017-05-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is the greatest cause of post-marketing drug withdrawal; therefore, substantial resources are directed toward triaging potentially dangerous new compounds at all stages of drug development. One of the major factors preventing effective screening of new compounds is the lack of a predictive in vitro model of hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes offer a metabolically relevant model for which the molecular initiating events of hepatotoxicity can be examined; however, these cells vary greatly between donors and dedifferentiate rapidly in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) offer a reproducible, physiologically relevant and genotypically normal model cell; however, current differentiation protocols produce HLCs with a relatively immature phenotype. During the reprogramming of somatic cells, the epigenome undergoes dramatic changes; however, this "resetting" is a gradual process, resulting in an altered differentiation propensity, skewed toward the lineage of origin, particularly in early passage cultures. We, therefore, performed a comparison of human hepatocyte- and dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs, assessing the impact of epigenetic memory at all stages of HLC differentiation. These results provide the first isogenic assessment of the starting cell type in human iPSC-derived HLCs. Despite a trend toward improvement in hepatic phenotype in albumin secretion and gene expression, few significant differences in hepatic differentiation capacity were found between hepatocyte and fibroblast-derived iPSCs. We conclude that the donor and inter-clonal differences have a greater influence on the hepatocyte phenotypic maturity than the starting cell type. Therefore, it is not necessary to use human hepatocytes for generating iPSC-derived HLCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1321-1331. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Alpha

  3. Enhanced hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in spheroidal aggregate culture on a decellularized liver scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xie, Mingjun; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the combination of aggregate culture and decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) promoted the hepatic differentiation of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) into high yields of mature hepatocytes in vitro. Four culturing methods for differentiation [single cell (2D), spheroids (3D), 2D + DLS and 3D + DLS] were studied. To determine the differentiation stages of the MSCs, RT-qPCR of the hepatocyte genes, immunostaining of hepatocyte markers, and functional analyses were all performed. Compared with the other groups, hepatocyte-like cells which differentiated from BM-MSC spheroids on extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited more intensive staining of stored glycogen, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis and albumin secretion as well as the higher expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Our results indicated that DLSs combined with spheroidal aggregate culture may be used as an effective method to facilitate the hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and may have future applications in stem cell-based liver regenerative medicine. PMID:27314916

  4. Construction of bone marrow mesenchymal cells-derived engineered hepatic tissue and its therapeutic effect in rats with 90% subtotal hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Yuan, J; Xu, R

    2014-09-16

    Engineered hepatic tissue (EHT) is considered as a promising strategy for healing acute liver failure (ALF), therefore, in the present study we evaluated the therapeutic potential of the EHT which engaged with bone marrow mesenchymal cells (BMSCs) derived hepatocytes (BMSCs—Hepas) in ALF rats. After characterization of isolated BMSCs, we seeded passage 3 BMSCs which have being cultured in medium containing 20 ng/ml hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and 10 ng/ml epidermal growth factor (EGF) for 14 days on three scaffolds individually in Transwell system, and then cultured for more than 3 days to construct three kinds of EHT named EHT1, EHT2, and EHT3. Based on morphology and urea production assays, we chose an optimal one and transplanted it into ALF rat with 90% subtotal hepatectomy and assessed its therapeutic potential by survival time, hepatic encephalopathy score (HES) and related liver function test. The remnant liver was acquired, sectioned and identified by con-focal scanning microscopy. The isolated cells possessed basic properties of BMSCs, when cultured in hepatogenic medium for 2 weeks, BMSCs would restore to the functional properties of primary rats' hepatocytes, expressing albumin (ALB) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) simultaneously. Transplantation of EHT3 significantly prolonged the survival time, increased HES, and ameliorated the liver function. BMSC will be a newly cell source for the construction of EHT. Importantly, the EHT transplantation may be an effective strategy to treat ALF in clinic.

  5. Evaluation of a hybrid artificial liver module based on a spheroid culture system of embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Kinya; Ikeda, Kaoru; Kusumi, Tomoaki; Inamori, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Kohji; Ijima, Hiroyuki; Funatsu, Kazumori; Kajiwara, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid artificial liver (HAL) is an extracorporeal circulation system comprised of a bioreactor containing immobilized functional liver cells. It is expected to not only serve as a temporary liver function support system, but also to accelerate liver regeneration in recovery from hepatic failure. One of the most difficult problems in developing a hybrid artificial liver is obtaining an adequate cell source. In this study, we attempt to differentiate embryonic stem (ES) cells by hepatic lineage using a polyurethane foam (PUF)/spheroid culture in which the cultured cells spontaneously form spherical multicellular aggregates (spheroids) in the pores of the PUF. We also demonstrate the feasibility of the PUF-HAL system by comparing ES cells to primary hepatocytes in in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Mouse ES cells formed multicellular spheroids in the pores of PUF. ES cells expressed liver-specific functions (ammonia removal and albumin secretion) after treatment with the differentiation-promoting agent, sodium butyrate (SB). We designed a PUF-HAL module comprised of a cylindrical PUF block with many medium-flow capillaries for hepatic differentiation of ES cells. The PUF-HAL module cells expressed ammonia removal and albumin secretion functions after 2 weeks of SB culture. Because of high proliferative activity of ES cells and high cell density, the maximum expression level of albumin secretion function per unit volume of module was comparable to that seen in primary mouse hepatocyte culture. In the animal experiments with rats, the PUF-HAL differentiating ES cells appeared to partially contribute to recovery from liver failure. This outcome indicates that the PUF module containing differentiating ES cells may be a useful biocomponent of a hybrid artificial liver support system.

  6. NKT cells act through third party bone marrow-derived cells to suppress NK cell activity in the liver and exacerbate hepatic melanoma metastases.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, Leila; Chen, Peter W; Brown, Joseph R; Han, Zhiqiang; Niederkorn, Jerry Y

    2015-09-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common intraocular tumor in adults and liver metastasis is the leading cause of death in UM patients. We have previously shown that NKT cell-deficient mice develop significantly fewer liver metastases from intraocular melanomas than do wild-type (WT) mice. Here, we examine the interplay between liver NKT cells and NK cells in resistance to liver metastases from intraocular melanomas. NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice and WT C57BL/6 mice treated with anti-CD1d antibody developed significantly fewer liver metastases than WT mice following either intraocular or intrasplenic injection of B16LS9 melanoma cells. The increased number of metastases in WT mice was associated with reduced liver NK cytotoxicity and decreased production of IFN-γ. However, liver NK cell-mediated cytotoxic activity was identical in non-tumor bearing NKT cell-deficient mice and WT mice, indicating that liver metastases were crucial for the suppression of liver NK cells. Depressed liver NK cytotoxicity in WT mice was associated with production of IL-10 by bone marrow-derived liver cells that were neither Kupffer cells nor myeloid-derived suppressor cells and by increased IL-10 receptor expression on liver NK cells. IL-10(-/-) mice had significantly fewer liver metastases than WT mice, but were not significantly different from NKT cell-deficient mice. Thus, development of melanoma liver metastases is associated with upregulation of IL-10 in the liver and an elevated expression of IL-10 receptor on liver NK cells. This impairment of liver NK activity is NKT cell-dependent and only occurs in hosts with melanoma liver metastases.

  7. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) peptide promotes the expansion of hepatic stem/progenitor cells via ERK and STAT3-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells (HPC) have been considered as a potential cell source of an alternative to liver transplantation. Production of large numbers of autologous HPC from small pieces of live tissue is crucial for the application of HPC-based liver therapy. In this study, we demonstrated that a synthetic 44-amino acid peptide (44-mer) derived from pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) can facilitate the production of a large number of actively dividing HPC from normal adult rat livers in a 35-day culture period. The phenotypic properties of HPC were characterized by morphological observation, colony formation and high expression of classical HPC markers including epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) and tumor-associated calcium signal transducer (TROP2). The 44-mer stimulated HPC proliferation in vitro and in mouse livers injured by a single intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride. In addition, the 44-mer induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 in HPC. Blocking the activity of ERK or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of the 44-mer on the induction of HPC proliferation. The long-term expanded HPC still possessed a bipotent ability to differentiate towards bile duct cells and mature hepatocytes. These results imply that the PEDF peptide may be a simple and effective agent to improve HPC-based liver therapy.

  8. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) peptide promotes the expansion of hepatic stem/progenitor cells via ERK and STAT3-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chen, Show-Li; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells (HPC) have been considered as a potential cell source of an alternative to liver transplantation. Production of large numbers of autologous HPC from small pieces of live tissue is crucial for the application of HPC-based liver therapy. In this study, we demonstrated that a synthetic 44-amino acid peptide (44-mer) derived from pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) can facilitate the production of a large number of actively dividing HPC from normal adult rat livers in a 35-day culture period. The phenotypic properties of HPC were characterized by morphological observation, colony formation and high expression of classical HPC markers including epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) and tumor-associated calcium signal transducer (TROP2). The 44-mer stimulated HPC proliferation in vitro and in mouse livers injured by a single intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride. In addition, the 44-mer induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 in HPC. Blocking the activity of ERK or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of the 44-mer on the induction of HPC proliferation. The long-term expanded HPC still possessed a bipotent ability to differentiate towards bile duct cells and mature hepatocytes. These results imply that the PEDF peptide may be a simple and effective agent to improve HPC-based liver therapy. PMID:28386338

  9. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies.

  10. Inhibitory effect of isothiocyanate derivant targeting AGPS by computer-aid drug design on proliferation of glioma and hepatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Wen-Ming; Zhang, Ling; Xue, Jing; Zhao, Meng; Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lipids metabolism was involved in the process of many types of tumor and alkylglycerone phosphate synthase (AGPS) was considered implicated in tumor process. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) showed the inhibitory effect of tumor and AGPS activity, therefore, we screened a group of small molecular compound based on BITC by computer-aid design targeting AGPS and the results showed that the derivants could suppress the proliferation, the expression of tumor related genes such as survivin and Bcl-2, and the level of ether lipids such as lysophosphatidic acid ether (LPAe) and platelet activating factor ether (PAFe); however, the activity of caspase-3/8 was improved in glioma U87MG and hepatic carcinoma HepG2 cells in vitro.

  11. A Novel Matrine Derivative WM130 Inhibits Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Attenuates Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Liver Fibrosis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Peng, Zhangxiao; Ji, Weidan; Li, Xiang; Lin, Xuejing; Qian, Liqiang; Li, Xiaoya; Chai, Xiaoyun; Wu, Qiuye; Gao, Quangen; Su, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a critical event in process of hepatic fibrogenesis and cirrhosis. Matrine, the active ingredient of Sophora, had been used for clinical treatment of acute/chronic liver disease. However, its potency was low. We prepared a high potency and low toxicity matrine derivate, WM130 (C30N4H40SO5F), which exhibited better pharmacological activities on antihepatic fibrosis. This study demonstrated that WM130 results in a decreased proliferative activity of HSC-T6 cells, with the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 68 μM. WM130 can inhibit the migration and induce apoptosis in HSC-T6 cells at both concentrations of 68 μM (IC50) and 34 μM (half IC50). The expression of α-SMA, Collagen I, Collagen III, and TGF-β1 could be downregulated, and the protein phosphorylation levels of EGFR, AKT, ERK, Smad, and Raf (p-EGFR, p-AKT, p-ERK, p-Smad, and p-Raf) were also decreased by WM130. On the DMN-induced rat liver fibrosis model, WM130 can effectively reduce the TGF-β1, AKT, α-SMA, and p-ERK levels, decrease the extracellular matrix (ECM) formation, and inhibit rat liver fibrosis progression. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that WM130 can significantly inhibit the activation of HSC-T6 cells and block the rat liver fibrosis progression by inducing apoptosis, suppressing the deposition of ECM, and inhibiting TGF-β/Smad and Ras/ERK pathways.

  12. A novel, helminth-derived immunostimulant enhances human recall responses to hepatitis C virus and tetanus toxoid and is dependent on CD56+ cells for its action.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A J; Libri, N A; Lustigman, S; Barker, S J; Whelan, M A; Semper, A E; Rosenberg, W M

    2008-05-01

    We have described previously an immunostimulant derived from Onchocerca volvulus, the helminth parasite that causes onchocerciasis. Recombinant O. volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (rOv-ASP-1) was a potent adjuvant for antibody and cellular responses to protein, polypeptide and small peptide antigens. Our aims were to determine whether rOv-ASP-1 is immunostimulatory for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and, if so, whether it could augment cellular responses against human pathogen antigens in vitro. Cytokines from rOv-ASP-1-stimulated human PBMC were measured by a fluorescence activated cell sorter-based multiplex assay. Recall responses of normal healthy donor (NHD) and chronic hepatitis C virus (c-HCV)-infected patient PBMC to tetanus toxoid (TT) or HCV core (HCVco) antigen, respectively, were measured by interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assays. Interferon-gamma was the predominant cytokine induced by rOv-ASP-1. 77.3% of NHD anti-TT and 88.9% of c-HCV anti-HCVco responses were enhanced by rOv-ASP-1. The immunostimulant effect was dependent upon contact between CD56+ and CD56- fractions of PBMC. We have described a helminth-derived protein that can act as an immunostimulant for human recall responses in vitro to TT and, perhaps more importantly, HCV antigens in patients with chronic HCV infection. Our longer-term goal would be to boost anti-viral responses in chronic infections such as HCV.

  13. A novel, helminth-derived immunostimulant enhances human recall responses to hepatitis C virus and tetanus toxoid and is dependent on CD56+ cells for its action

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A J; Libri, N A; Lustigman, S; Barker, S J; Whelan, M A; Semper, A E; Rosenberg, W M

    2008-01-01

    We have described previously an immunostimulant derived from Onchocerca volvulus, the helminth parasite that causes onchocerciasis. Recombinant O. volvulus activation-associated secreted protein-1 (rOv-ASP-1) was a potent adjuvant for antibody and cellular responses to protein, polypeptide and small peptide antigens. Our aims were to determine whether rOv-ASP-1 is immunostimulatory for human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and, if so, whether it could augment cellular responses against human pathogen antigens in vitro. Cytokines from rOv-ASP-1-stimulated human PBMC were measured by a fluorescence activated cell sorter-based multiplex assay. Recall responses of normal healthy donor (NHD) and chronic hepatitis C virus (c-HCV)-infected patient PBMC to tetanus toxoid (TT) or HCV core (HCVco) antigen, respectively, were measured by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays. Interferon-γ was the predominant cytokine induced by rOv-ASP-1. 77·3% of NHD anti-TT and 88·9% of c-HCV anti-HCVco responses were enhanced by rOv-ASP-1. The immunostimulant effect was dependent upon contact between CD56+ and CD56− fractions of PBMC. We have described a helminth-derived protein that can act as an immunostimulant for human recall responses in vitro to TT and, perhaps more importantly, HCV antigens in patients with chronic HCV infection. Our longer-term goal would be to boost anti-viral responses in chronic infections such as HCV. PMID:18341617

  14. Prevention of TGF-β-induced early liver fibrosis by a maleic acid derivative anti-oxidant through suppression of ROS, inflammation and hepatic stellate cells activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun-Lin; Chang, Wen-Teng; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Hung, Kuo-Chen; Chuang, Chia-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Current anti-fibrotic effect of antioxidants in vivo is disappointing due probably to the fact that once liver fibrogenesis is established it is too advanced to be reversed by anti-oxidation mechanism. We consider antioxidant may only act on the early phase of fibrogenesis. Thus, we had previously established an early liver fibrosis animal model using an inducible expression vector (pPK9a), which contains TGF-β gene and was hydro-dynamically transferred into mice to induce a transient liver fibrosis. TGF-β1 has been well documented to up-regulate the expression of α2(1) collagen (Col 1A2) gene in the liver via the reactive oxygen species (ROS); the process triggers inflammation, leading to hepatic stellate cells (HSC) activation and liver fibrogenesis. Using our animal model and ROS, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and Col 1A2 promoter assays as screening targets, we report here that a maleic acid derivative isolated from the Antrodia camphorata mycelium strongly decreases ROS production, promoter activity of Cox-2 and Col 1A2, intracellular calcium, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), Smad4-p-Smad2/3 co-localization in cell nucleus and the DNA binding activity of Sp1. Our results suggest that the maleic acid derivative prevents liver fibrosis at an early phase both in vitro and in vivo through the inhibition of ROS, inflammation and the activation of HSC. PMID:28384213

  15. Adoptive cell transfer in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive cell transfer is an intervention in which autologous immune cells that have been expanded ex vivo are re-introduced to mitigate a pathological process. Tregs, mesenchymal stromal cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells have been transferred in diverse immune-mediated diseases, and Tregs have been the focus of investigations in autoimmune hepatitis. Transferred Tregs have improved histological findings in animal models of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis. Key challenges relate to discrepant findings among studies, phenotypic instability of the transferred population, uncertain side effects and possible need for staged therapy involving anti-inflammatory drugs. Future investigations must resolve issues about the purification, durability and safety of these cells and consider alternative populations if necessary.

  16. Pigment epithelium-derived factor 34-mer peptide prevents liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cell activation through down-regulation of the PDGF receptor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tung-Han; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Liu, Ming-Ying; Chen, Show-Li; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has been shown previously to prevent liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. By investigating the functional domains in PEDF, we identified a 34-mer peptide (residues Asp44-Asn77) that harbors the same function as the full-length PEDF protein. Not only did the 34-mer suppress the development of fibrosis in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated mouse liver but it also upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) expression in HSCs in vivo. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a crucial role on the process of HSC activation in response to liver damage. The 34-mer suppressed PDGF-induced cell proliferation and expression of myofibroblastic marker proteins in primary rat HSC culture, increased the levels of PPARγ mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner and markedly reduced the level of active β-catenin protein, an HSC activating factor, in HSC-T6 cells. Similarly, IWR-1, an inhibitor of the Wnt response, displayed the same effect as the 34-mer in preventing HSC-T6 activation. The Wnt signaling-mediated PPARγ suppression was abolished by both the IWR-1 inhibitor and a small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting β-catenin and the Wnt coreceptor, LRP6. Both PEDF and the 34-mer down-regulated PDGF receptor-α/β expression and blocked the PDGF-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on PDGF receptor expression was abolished by PPARγ antagonists and PPARγ siRNA. Our observations indicate that the PEDF-derived 34-mer peptide can mimic PEDF in attenuating HSC activation. Investigation of this 34-mer peptide led to the identification of a signaling mechanism involving PPARγ induction, suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and down-regulation of the PDGF receptor-α/β.

  17. Alternative Cell Sources to Adult Hepatocytes for Hepatic Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2017-01-01

    Adult hepatocyte transplantation is limited by scarce availability of suitable donor liver tissue for hepatocyte isolation. New cell-based therapies are being developed to supplement whole-organ liver transplantation, to reduce the waiting-list mortality rate, and to obtain more sustained and significant metabolic correction. Fetal livers and unsuitable neonatal livers for organ transplantation have been proposed as potential useful sources of hepatic cells for cell therapy. However, the major challenge is to use alternative cell sources for transplantation that can be derived from reproducible methods. Different types of stem cells with hepatic differentiation potential are eligible for generating large numbers of functional hepatocytes for liver cell therapy to treat degenerative disorders, inborn hepatic metabolic diseases, and organ failure. Clinical trials are designed to fully establish the safety profile of such therapies and to define target patient groups and standardized protocols.

  18. Immunogenicity of transgenic plant-derived hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Thanavala, Y; Yang, Y F; Lyons, P; Mason, H S; Arntzen, C

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the Children's Vaccine Initiative is to encourage the discovery of technology that will make vaccines more readily available to developing countries. Our strategy has been to genetically engineer plants so that they can be used as inexpensive alternatives to fermentation systems for production of subunit antigens. In this paper we report on the immunological response elicited in vivo by using recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg) purified from transgenic tobacco leaves. The anti-hepatitis B response to the tobacco-derived rHBsAg was qualitatively similar to that obtained by immunizing mice with yeast-derived rHBsAg (commercial vaccine). Additionally, T cells obtained from mice primed with the tobacco-derived rHBsAg could be stimulated in vitro by the tobacco-derived rHBsAg, yeast-derived rHBsAg, and by a synthetic peptide that represents part of the a determinant located in the S region (139-147) of HBsAg. Further support for the integrity of the T-cell epitope of the tobacco-derived rHBsAg was obtained by testing the ability of the primed T cells to proliferate in vitro after stimulation with a monoclonal anti-idiotype and an anti-idiotype-derived peptide, both of which mimic the group-specific a determinant of HBsAg. In total, we have conclusively demonstrated that both B- and T-cell epitopes of HBsAg are preserved when the antigen is expressed in a transgenic plant. PMID:7724566

  19. Ligustrazine attenuates oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by interrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor-mediated ERK and p38 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ni, Chunyan; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2012-11-15

    Hepatic fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing reactions with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis. Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress is concomitant with liver fibrosis irrespective of the underlying etiology. Natural antioxidant ligustrazine exhibits potent antifibrotic activities, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Our studies were to investigate the ligustrazine effects on HSC activation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative stress in liver fibrogenesis, and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 μM significantly stimulated HSC proliferation and expression of marker genes of HSC activation; whereas ligustrazine dose-dependently suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-activated HSCs, and attenuated expression of fibrotic marker genes. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ligustrazine reduced platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR) expression and blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase, two downstream effectors of PDGF-βR. Further molecular evidence suggested that ligustrazine interruption of ERK and p38 pathways was dependent on the blockade of PDGF-βR and might be involved in ligustrazine reduction of fibrotic marker gene expression under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation. Furthermore, ligustrazine modulated some proteins critical for HSC activation and ECM homeostasis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HSCs. These data collectively indicated that ligustrazine could attenuate HSC activation caused by oxidative stress, providing novel insights into ligustrazine as a therapeutic option for hepatic fibrosis. Highlights: ► Ligustrazine inhibits oxidative stress-induced HSC activation.

  20. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Da; Wang, Jianmin; Tian, Yuepeng; Li, Qiuguo; Yan, Haixiong; Wang, Biao; Xiong, Li; Li, Qinglong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rational: Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm which expresses both myogenic and melanocytic markers. PEComas are found in a variety locations in the body, but up to now only approximately 30 cases about hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor are reported in English language worldwide. Patient concerns: A 32-year-old woman was admitted in our hospital with intermittent right upper quadrant pain for 1 month and recent (1 day) progressive deterioration. Diagnoses: Based on the results of the laboratory examinations and the findings of the computed tomography, the diagnosis of hepatic hamartoma or the hepatocecullar carcinoma with hemorrhage was made. Interventions: The patient underwent a segmentectomy of the liver, and the finally diagnosis of hepatic PEComa was made with immunohistochemical confirmation with HMB-45 and SMA. Outcomes: There is no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence 9 months after surgery. Lessons: This kind of tumor is extremely rare and the natural history of PEComa is uncertain, as the treatment protocol for hepatic PEComa has not reached a consensus. But the main treatment of the disease may be surgical resection. Only after long term follow-up can we know whether the tumor is benign or malignant. It appears that longer clinical follow-up is necessary in all patients with hepatic PEComas. PMID:28002331

  1. Inversely repeating integrated hepatitis B virus DNA and cellular flanking sequences in the human hepatoma-derived cell line huSP.

    PubMed Central

    Mizusawa, H; Taira, M; Yaginuma, K; Kobayashi, M; Yoshida, E; Koike, K

    1985-01-01

    Among recombinant phages carrying integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA sequences cloned from the human hepatoma-derived cell line huSP, one clone, lambda hu-489, revealed some unusual features. The 2.25-kilobase Eco D fragment from the insert of this clone hybridized to the HBV DNA probe only and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The viral sequence, as well as a cellular flanking sequence, showed extensive rearrangement accompanied by inverted repetition. The Eco D fragment contained HBV DNA from the 5'-end region of gene S to the middle of gene X, followed by a long cellular flanking sequence. Moreover, a part of gene X was found inversely repeated at the head of the same gene S in a head-to-head configuration truncated by the same cellular sequence. Therefore, the same junction sequence of viral DNA and the cellular sequence was found at two different sites in the Eco D fragment in opposite polarities. Images PMID:2982143

  2. Hepatic differentiation of embryonic stem cells by murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ikai, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, it has been technically difficult to differentiate ESCs into mature hepatocytes because the definitive growth factors and molecular mechanisms governing hepatocyte differentiation have not yet been well defined. The CD45(-)CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+) mesenchymal cells that reside in murine fetal livers induce hepatic progenitor cells to differentiate into mature hepatocytes by direct cell-cell contact. Utilizing these cells, we employ a two-step procedure for hepatic maturation of ESCs: first, ESCs are differentiated into endodermal cells or hepatic progenitor cells, and second, ESC-derived endodermal cells are matured into functional hepatocytes by coculture with murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells. The ESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess hepatic functions, including ammonia removal activity, albumin secretion ability, glycogen synthesis and storage, and cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity.

  3. Analysis of monocytic and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells subsets in patients with hepatitis C virus infection and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ning, Gang; She, Lanhui; Lu, Lirong; Liu, Ying; Zeng, Yingfu; Yan, Ying; Lin, Chaoshuang

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to inhibit T-cell responses in many diseases, but, in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients, MDSCs are still poorly studied. In this assay, we investigated the phenotype and frequency of two new populations of MDSCs denoted as monocytic and granulocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs and G-MDSCs) in HCV infected patients and analyzed their clinical significance in these patients respectively. We found that the frequency of CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) cells (M-MDSCs) from HCV infected patients (mean ± SE, 3.134% ± 0.340%) was significantly increased when compared to healthy controls (mean ± SE, 1.764% ± 0.461%) (Z = -2.438, P = 0.015), while there was no statistical difference between the frequency of HLA-DR(-/low)CD33(+)CD11b(+)CD15(+) (G-MDSCs) of HCV infected patients and healthy donors (0.201% ± 0.038% versus 0.096% ± 0.026%, P > 0.05), which suggested that HCV infection could cause the proliferation of M-MDSCs instead of G-MDSCs. Besides, we found that the frequency of M-MDSCs in HCV infected patients had certain relevance with age (r = 0.358, P = 0.003); patients older than 40 years old group (mean ± SE, 3.673% ± 0.456%) had a significantly higher frequency of M-MDSCs than that of age less than 40 years old group (mean ± SE, 2.363% ± 0.482%) (Z = -2.685, P = 0.007). The frequency of M-MDSCs, however, had no correlation with HCV RNA loads, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and the level of liver inflammation degree.

  4. A novel matrine derivate inhibits differentiated human hepatoma cells and hepatic cancer stem-like cells by suppressing PI3K/AKT signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Qi, Yang; Bai, Zhi-hui; Ni, Chen-xu; Ren, Qi-hui; Xu, Wei-heng; Xu, Jing; Hu, Hong-gang; Qiu, Lei; Li, Jian-zhong; He, Zhi-gao; Zhang, Jun-ping

    2017-01-01

    Matrine is an alkaloid extracted from a Chinese herb Sophora flavescens Ait, which has shown chemopreventive potential against various cancers. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer efficacy of a novel derivative of matrine, (6aS, 10S, 11aR, 11bR, 11cS)-10- methylamino-dodecahydro- 3a,7a-diazabenzo (de) (MASM), against human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and their corresponding sphere cells in vitro and in vivo. Human HCC cell lines (Hep3B and Huh7) were treated with MASM. Cell proliferation was assessed using CCK8 and colony assays; cell apoptosis and cell cycle distributions were examined with flow cytometry. The expression of cell markers and signaling molecules was detected using Western blot and qRT-PCR analyses. A sphere culture technique was used to enrich cancer stem cells (CSC) in Hep3B and Huh7 cells. The in vivo antitumor efficacy of MASM was evaluated in Huh7 cell xenograft model in BALB/c nude mice, which were administered MASM (10 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 3 weeks. After the treatment was completed, tumor were excised and weighed. A portion of tumor tissue was enzymatically dissociated to obtain a single cell suspension for the spheroid formation assays. MASM (2, 10, 20 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of HCC cells, and induced apoptosis, which correlated with a reduction in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in PARP cleavage. MASM also induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, which was accompanied by increased p27 and decreased Cyclin D1 expression. Interestingly, MASM (2, 10, and 20 μmol/L) drastically reduced the EpCAM+/CD133+ cell numbers, suppressed the sphere formation, inhibited the expression of stem cell marker genes and promoted the expression of mature hepatocyte markers in the Hep3B and Huh7 spheroids. Additionally, MASM dose-dependently suppressed the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathways in Hep3B and Huh7 cells. In Huh7 xenograft bearing nude mice, MASM administration significantly

  5. Construction of bioengineered hepatic tissue derived from human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells via aggregation culture in porcine decellularized liver scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Shi, Yujun; Bao, Ji; Bu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    An individualized, tissue-engineered liver suitable for transplanting into a patient with liver disease would be of great benefit to the patient and the healthcare system. The tissue-engineered liver would possess the functions of the original healthy organ. Two fields of study, (i) using decellularized tissue as cell scaffolding, and (ii) stem cell differentiation into functional cells, are coming together to make this concept feasible. The decellularized liver scaffolds (DLS) can interact with cells to promote cell differentiation and signal transduction and three-dimensional (3D) stem cell aggregations can maintain the phenotypes and improve functions of stem cells after differentiation by undergoing cell-cell contact. Although the effects of DLS and stem cell aggregation culture have been intensively studied, few observations about the interaction between the two have been achieved. We established a method that combines the use of decellularized liver scaffolds and aggregation culture of MSCs (3D-DLS) and explored the effects of the two on hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) in bioengineered hepatic tissue. A higher percentage of albumin-producing cells, higher levels of liver-specific transcripts, higher urea cycle-related transcripts, and lower levels of stem cell-specific transcripts were observed in the 3D-DLS group when compared to that of hUC-MSCs in monolayer culture (2D), aggregation culture (3D), monolayer on DLS culture (2D-DLS). The gene arrays also indicated that 3D-DLS induced the differentiation from the hUC-MSC phenotype to the PHH phenotype. Liver-specific proteins albumin, CK-18, and glycogen storage were highly positive in the 3D-DLS group. Albumin secretion and ammonia conversion to urea were more effective with a higher cell survival rate in the 3D-DLS group for 14 days. This DLS and aggregation combination culture system provides a novel method to improve hepatic differentiation, maintain

  6. Mouse white adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells gain pericentral and periportal hepatocyte features after differentiation in vitro, which are preserved in vivo after hepatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Winkler, S; Hempel, M; Brückner, S; Mallek, F; Weise, A; Liehr, T; Tautenhahn, H-M; Bartels, M; Christ, B

    2015-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, they are considered a novel cell resource for the treatment of various liver diseases. Here, the aim was to demonstrate that mesenchymal stem cells may adopt both perivenous and periportal hepatocyte-specific functions in vitro and in vivo. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from immunodeficient C57BL/6 (B6.129S6-Rag2(tm1Fwa) Prf1(tm1Clrk) ) mice and differentiated into the hepatocytic phenotype by applying a simple protocol. Their physiological and metabolic functions were analysed in vitro and after hepatic transplantation in vivo. Mesenchymal stem cells changed their morphology from a fibroblastoid into shapes of osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes and hepatocytes. Typical for mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic marker genes were not expressed. CD90, which is not expressed on mature hepatocytes, decreased significantly after hepatocytic differentiation. Markers indicative for liver development like hepatic nuclear factor 4 alpha, or for perivenous hepatocyte specification like cytochrome P450 subtype 3a11, and CD26 were significantly elevated. Periportal hepatocyte-specific markers like carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1, the entry enzyme of the urea cycle, were up-regulated. Consequently, cytochrome P450 enzyme activity and urea synthesis increased significantly to values comparable to cultured primary hepatocytes. Both perivenous and periportal qualities were preserved after hepatic transplantation and integration into the host parenchyma. Adult mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells featuring both periportal and perivenous functions. Hence, they are promising candidates for the treatment of region-specific liver cell damage and may support organ regeneration in acute and chronic liver diseases. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis of the BRL rat hepatic cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Teng, Feixiang; Chen, Weiwei; Ji, Yinglei; Gu, Zhenyong

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), is a member of the novel family of endogenous gaseous transmitters, termed "gasotransmitters exhibiting diverse physiological activities, and is generated in mammalian tissues mainly by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) in conjunction with cysteine (aspartate) aminotranferase (CAT). The distributions of these enzymes are species- and tissue-specific. The liver, as the main organ that generates H(2)S in vivo, functions in biotransformation and metabolism. However, the liver is vulnerable to damage from internal and external factors, including inflammatory mediators, drugs and poisons. The present study evaluated the endogenous CBS-H(2)S synthesis regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced apoptosis of hepatic cells. The rat hepatic cell line, BRL, was incubated with LPS for various time periods to establish a cell-damage model. Incubation with LPS resulted in a significant increase in CBS expression and H(2)S production. It also stimulated apoptosis and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment with the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) or CBS small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased LPS-enhanced H(2)S production. Notably, apoptosis increased for a short period and then decreased gradually, while the mitochondrial membrane potential demonstrated the opposite trend. These results showed that endogenous CBS-H(2)S synthesis demonstrated early anti-apoptotic activity and subsequent pro-apoptotic activity in LPS-induced apoptosis. These results suggest a new approach for developing novel drugs for this condition.

  8. The induction of human myeloid derived suppressor cells through hepatic stellate cells is dose-dependently inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib and sorafenib, but not sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Heine, Annkristin; Schilling, Judith; Grünwald, Barbara; Krüger, Achim; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Held, Stefanie Andrea Erika; Garbi, Natalio; Kurts, Christian; Brossart, Peter; Knolle, Percy; Diehl, Linda; Höchst, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Increased numbers of immunosuppressive myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) correlate with a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapy for the treatment of several neoplastic diseases. However, TKIs not only exert effects on the malignant cell clone itself but also affect immune cells. Here, we investigate the effect of TKIs on the induction of MDSCs that differentiate from mature human monocytes using a new in vitro model of MDSC induction through activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). We show that frequencies of monocytic CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) MDSCs derived from mature monocytes were significantly and dose-dependently reduced in the presence of dasatinib, nilotinib and sorafenib, whereas sunitinib had no effect. These regulatory effects were only observed when TKIs were present during the early induction phase of MDSCs through activated HSCs, whereas already differentiated MDSCs were not further influenced by TKIs. Neither the MAPK nor the NFκB pathway was modulated in MDSCs when any of the TKIs was applied. When functional analyses were performed, we found that myeloid cells treated with sorafenib, nilotinib or dasatinib, but not sunitinib, displayed decreased suppressive capacity with regard to CD8+ T cell proliferation. Our results indicate that sorafenib, nilotinib and dasatinib, but not sunitinib, decrease the HSC-mediated differentiation of monocytes into functional MDSCs. Therefore, treatment of cancer patients with these TKIs may in addition to having a direct effect on cancer cells also prevent the differentiation of monocytes into MDSCs and thereby differentially modulate the success of immunotherapeutic or other anti-cancer approaches.

  9. The antioxidant (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits rat hepatic stellate cell proliferation in vitro by blocking the tyrosine phosphorylation and reducing the gene expression of platelet-derived growth factor-beta receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anping; Zhang, Li

    2003-06-27

    During hepatic fibrogenesis, quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSC) become active and trans-differentiate into myofibroblast-like cells. This process coincides with an increase in cell proliferation, loss of stored vitamin A droplets, and excessive production and deposition of extracellular matrix components. HSC activation is coupled with the sequential expression of cytokine receptors, including platelet-derived growth factor-beta receptor (PDGF-betaR). Although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood, it is widely accepted that oxidative stress plays critical roles in activation of HSC during hepatic fibrogenesis. We have recently demonstrated that the antioxidant (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component in green tea extracts, significantly inhibited the proliferation of passaged HSC. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Since PDGF is a potent mitogen for HSC and mediates the early proliferative response, it was hypothesized that EGCG might inhibit HSC proliferation by interfering with the PDGF signal transduction. In this report, we demonstrated that EGCG, in two steps, significantly and effectively inhibited the proliferation of primary and passaged HSC. The polyphenolic compound initiated its inhibitory action by rapidly blocking the phosphorylation of tyrosines in PDGF-betaR elicited by PDGF in serum. This action was short lived, persisting for a few hours. In addition, this antioxidant inhibited the gene expression of PDGF-betaR by blocking the activation of transcription factors activator protein-1 and NF-kappaB, which were required for the gene transcription. The latter action remained effective for no less than 48 hours. These results provided a novel insight into the mechanisms by which EGCG inhibits HSC growth. The inhibitory effect of the natural antioxidant, its long history of beverage consumption without adverse health effects, and higher potent antioxidant capability make it a good

  10. Hepatic SATB1 induces paracrine activation of hepatic stellate cells and is upregulated by HBx

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jin; Tu, Wei; Han, Jian; He, Jiayi; Liu, Jingmei; Han, Ping; Wang, Yunwu; Li, Mengke; Liu, Mei; Liao, Jiazhi; Tian, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver diseases, but its involvement in hepatic fibrogenesis remains unclear. Special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1) has been implicated in reprogramming chromatin organization and transcription profiles in many cancers and non-cancer-related conditions. We found that hepatic SATB1 expression was significantly up-regulated in fibrotic tissues from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients and HBV transgenic (HBV-Tg) mouse model. Knockdown of SATB1 in the liver significantly alleviated CCl4-induced fibrosis in HBV-Tg mouse model. Moreover, we suggested HBV encoded x protein (HBx) induced SATB1 expression through activation of JNK and ERK pathways. Enforced expression of SATB1 in hepatocytes promoted the activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) by secretion of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and platelet derived growth factor-A (PDGF-AA). Our findings demonstrated that HBx upregulated hepatic SATB1 which exerted pro-fibrotic effects by paracrine activation of stellate cells in HBV-related fibrosis. PMID:27883059

  11. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  12. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4.

  13. Control of Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Mouse Liver-Derived Cells by MAVS-Dependent Production of Type I and Type III Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Anggakusuma; Frentzen, Anne; Gürlevik, Engin; Yuan, Qinggong; Steinmann, Eike; Ott, Michael; Staeheli, Peter; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Kuehnel, Florian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) efficiently infects only humans and chimpanzees. Although the detailed mechanisms responsible for this narrow species tropism remain elusive, recent evidence has shown that murine innate immune responses efficiently suppress HCV replication. Therefore, poor adaptation of HCV to evade and/or counteract innate immune responses may prevent HCV replication in mice. The HCV NS3-4A protease cleaves human MAVS, a key cellular adaptor protein required for RIG-I-like receptor (RLR)-dependent innate immune signaling. However, it is unclear if HCV interferes with mouse MAVS function equally well. Moreover, MAVS-dependent signaling events that restrict HCV replication in mouse cells were incompletely defined. Thus, we quantified the ability of HCV NS3-4A to counteract mouse and human MAVS. HCV NS3-4A similarly diminished both human and mouse MAVS-dependent signaling in human and mouse cells. Moreover, replicon-encoded protease cleaved a similar fraction of both MAVS variants. Finally, FLAG-tagged MAVS proteins repressed HCV replication to similar degrees. Depending on MAVS expression, HCV replication in mouse liver cells triggered not only type I but also type III IFNs, which cooperatively repressed HCV replication. Mouse liver cells lacking both type I and III IFN receptors were refractory to MAVS-dependent antiviral effects, indicating that the HCV-induced MAVS-dependent antiviral state depends on both type I and III IFN receptor signaling. IMPORTANCE In this study, we found that HCV NS3-4A similarly diminished both human and mouse MAVS-dependent signaling in human and mouse cells. Therefore, it is unlikely that ineffective cleavage of mouse MAVS per se precludes HCV propagation in immunocompetent mouse liver cells. Hence, approaches to reinforce HCV replication in mouse liver cells (e.g., by expression of essential human replication cofactors) should not be thwarted by the poor ability of HCV to counteract MAVS-dependent antiviral signaling

  14. Interaction between amiodarone and hepatitis-C virus nucleotide inhibitors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and HEK-293 Cav1.2 over-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Lagrutta, Armando; Zeng, Haoyu; Imredy, John; Balasubramanian, Bharathi; Dech, Spencer; Lis, Edward; Wang, Jixin; Zhai, Jin; DeGeorge, Joseph; Sannajust, Frederick

    2016-10-01

    Several clinical cases of severe bradyarrhythmias have been reported upon co-administration of the Hepatitis-C NS5B Nucleotide Polymerase Inhibitor (HCV-NI) direct-acting antiviral agent, sofosbuvir (SOF), and the Class-III anti-arrhythmic amiodarone (AMIO). We model the cardiac drug-drug interaction (DDI) between AMIO and SOF, and between AMIO and a closely-related SOF analog, MNI-1 (Merck Nucleotide Inhibitor #1), in functional assays of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), to provide mechanistic insights into recently reported clinical cases. AMIO co-applied with SOF or MNI-1 increased beating rate or field potential (FP) rate and decreased impedance (IMP) and Ca(2+) transient amplitudes in hiPSC-CM syncytia. This action resembled that of Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs) in the model, but CCBs did not substitute for AMIO in the DDI. AMIO analog dronedarone (DRON) did not substitute for, but competed with AMIO in the DDI. Ryanodine and thapsigargin, decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and SEA-0400, a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 (NCX1) inhibitor, partially antagonized or suppressed DDI effects. Other agents affecting FP rate only exerted additive or subtractive effects, commensurate with their individual effects. We also describe an interaction between AMIO and MNI-1 on Cav1.2 ion channels in an over-expressing HEK-293 cell line. MNI-1 enhanced Cav1.2 channel inhibition by AMIO, but did not affect inhibition of Cav1.2 by DRON, verapamil, nifedipine, or diltiazem. Our data in hiPSC-CMs indicate that HCV-NI agents such as SOF and MNI-1 interact with key intracellular Ca(2+)-handling mechanisms. Additional study in a Cav1.2 HEK-293 cell-line suggests that HCV-NIs potentiate the inhibitory action of AMIO on L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  15. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  16. Human T cell microparticles circulate in blood of hepatitis patients and induce fibrolytic activation of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Kornek, Miroslaw; Popov, Yury; Libermann, Towia A.; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Schuppan, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Microparticles (MP) are small cell membrane vesicles which are released from cells during apoptosis or activation. While circulating platelet MP have been studied in some detail, the existence and functional role of T cell MP remain elusive. We show that blood from patients with active hepatitis C (ALT>100 IU/ml) contains elevated numbers of T cell MP compared to patients with mild hepatitis C (ALT<40 IU/ml) and healthy controls. T cell MP fuse with cell membranes of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the major effector cells for excess matrix deposition in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. MP uptake is partly ICAM-1 dependent and leads to activation of NFkB and ERK1/2 and subsequent upregulation of fibrolytic genes in HSC, to downregulation of procollagen α1(I) mRNA, and blunting of profibrogenic activities of TGFβ1. Ex vivo the induced fibrolytic activity is evident in MP derived from activated CD4+ T cells, and highest with MP from activated and apoptotic CD8+ T cells. Mass spectrometry, FACS analysis and function blocking antibodies revealed CD147/Emmprin as candidate transmembrane molecule in HSC fibrolytic activation by CD8+ T cell MP. We conclude that 1) circulating T cell MP are a novel diagnostic marker for inflammatory liver diseases, and 2) in vivo induction of T cell MP may be a novel strategy to induce regression of liver fibrosis. PMID:20979056

  17. (+)-Catechin attenuates activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bragança de Moraes, Cristina Machado; Bitencourt, Shanna; de Mesquita, Fernanda Cristina; Mello, Denizar; de Oliveira, Leticia Paranhos; da Silva, Gabriela Viegas; Lorini, Vinicius; Caberlon, Eduardo; de Souza Basso, Bruno; Schmid, Julia; Ferreira, Gabriela Acevedo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues

    2014-04-01

    (+)-Catechin is a type of catechin present in large amounts in açaí fruits and cocoa seeds. Besides its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, little is known about its effects in the liver, especially during hepatic fibrosis. We report here the effects of (+)-catechin on hepatic stellate cells. (+)-Catechin induced quiescent phenotype in GRX cells, along with an increase in lipid droplets. Proliferator-activated receptor γ mRNA expression was upregulated, whereas type I collagen mRNA expression was downregulated. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were not influenced by (+)-catechin, whereas the levels of interleukin 10 were significantly increased. The data provide evidence that (+)-catechin can reduce hepatic stellate cell activation.

  18. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-05

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor- (PDGFR- ), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR- to deliver interferon (IFN)- to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN- showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN- mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN- showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN- were less than those treated with SSL-IFN- , IFN- and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN- was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN- might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nicola F; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Jennings, Elliott; Osburn, William; Lissauer, Samantha; Wilson, Garrick K; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D; Baumert, Thomas F; Balfe, Peter; Afford, Simon; McKeating, Jane A

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects the liver and hepatocytes are the major cell type supporting viral replication. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes derive from a common hepatic progenitor cell that proliferates during inflammatory conditions, raising the possibility that cholangiocytes may support HCV replication and contribute to the hepatic reservoir. We screened cholangiocytes along with a panel of cholangiocarcinoma-derived cell lines for their ability to support HCV entry and replication. While primary cholangiocytes were refractory to infection and lacked expression of several entry factors, two cholangiocarcinoma lines, CC-LP-1 and Sk-ChA-1, supported efficient HCV entry; furthermore, Sk-ChA-1 cells supported full virus replication. In vivo cholangiocarcinomas expressed all of the essential HCV entry factors; however, cholangiocytes adjacent to the tumour and in normal tissue showed a similar pattern of receptor expression to ex vivo isolated cholangiocytes, lacking SR-BI expression, explaining their inability to support infection. This study provides the first report that HCV can infect cholangiocarcinoma cells and suggests that these heterogeneous tumours may provide a reservoir for HCV replication in vivo.

  20. Immunomodulation of activated hepatic stellate cells by mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parekkadan, Biju; Poll, Daan van; Megeed, Zaki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Tilles, Arno W.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2007-11-16

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to prevent the development of liver fibrosis in a number of pre-clinical studies. Marked changes in liver histopathology and serological markers of liver function have been observed without a clear understanding of the therapeutic mechanism by which stem cells act. We sought to determine if MSCs could modulate the activity of resident liver cells, specifically hepatic stellate cells (SCs) by paracrine mechanisms using indirect cocultures. Indirect coculture of MSCs and activated SCs led to a significant decrease in collagen deposition and proliferation, while inducing apoptosis of activated SCs. The molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of SC activity by MSCs were examined. IL-6 secretion from activated SCs induced IL-10 secretion from MSCs, suggesting a dynamic response of MSCs to the SCs in the microenvironment. Blockade of MSC-derived IL-10 and TNF-{alpha} abolished the inhibitory effects of MSCs on SC proliferation and collagen synthesis. In addition, release of HGF by MSCs was responsible for the marked induction of apoptosis in SCs as determined by antibody-neutralization studies. These findings demonstrate that MSCs can modulate the function of activated SCs via paracrine mechanisms provide a plausible explanation for the protective role of MSCs in liver inflammation and fibrosis, which may also be relevant to other models of tissue fibrosis.

  1. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 mediates formation of bile ducts and hepatic maturation of fetal hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Sei; Kamiya, Akihide; Goto, Fumio; Kaneko, Shun; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Asano, Yu; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nitta, Sayuri; Nakata, Toru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; and others

    2016-01-22

    Fetal hepatic stem/progenitor cells, called hepatoblasts, play central roles in liver development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the phenotype of these cells have not been completely elucidated. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 is a type I transmembrane proteinase regulating pericellular proteolysis of the extracellular matrix and is essential for the activation of several MMPs and cytokines. However, the physiological functions of MMP-14 in liver development are unknown. Here we describe a functional role for MMP-14 in hepatic and biliary differentiation of mouse hepatoblasts. MMP-14 was upregulated in cells around the portal vein in perinatal stage liver. Formation of bile duct-like structures in MMP-14–deficient livers was significantly delayed compared with wild-type livers in vivo. In vitro biliary differentiation assays showed that formation of cholangiocytic cysts derived from MMP-14–deficient hepatoblasts was completely impaired, and that overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatoblasts promoted the formation of bile duct-like cysts. In contrast, the expression of molecules associated with metabolic functions in hepatocytes, including hepatic nuclear factor 4α and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, were significantly increased in MMP-14–deficient livers. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly upregulated in MMP-14–deficient livers. We demonstrate that MMP-14–mediated signaling in fetal hepatic progenitor cells promotes biliary luminal formation around the portal vein and negatively controls the maturation of hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Loss of MMP-14 delayed formation of bile duct-like structures in perinatal liver. • Overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatobalsts promoted the biliary formation in vitro. • Loss of MMP-14 promoted hepatocyte maturation of hepatoblasts in vivo. • MMP-14–mediated signaling regulates terminal differentiation of

  3. The Last Ten Years of Advancements in Plant-Derived Recombinant Vaccines against Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Young Hee; Park, Se Hee; Moon, Ki-Beom; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Cho, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Disease prevention through vaccination is considered to be the greatest contribution to public health over the past century. Every year more than 100 million children are vaccinated with the standard World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended vaccines including hepatitis B (HepB). HepB is the most serious type of liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV), however, it can be prevented by currently available recombinant vaccine, which has an excellent record of safety and effectiveness. To date, recombinant vaccines are produced in many systems of bacteria, yeast, insect, and mammalian and plant cells. Among these platforms, the use of plant cells has received considerable attention in terms of intrinsic safety, scalability, and appropriate modification of target proteins. Research groups worldwide have attempted to develop more efficacious plant-derived vaccines for over 30 diseases, most frequently HepB and influenza. More inspiring, approximately 12 plant-made antigens have already been tested in clinical trials, with successful outcomes. In this study, the latest information from the last 10 years on plant-derived antigens, especially hepatitis B surface antigen, approaches are reviewed and breakthroughs regarding the weak points are also discussed. PMID:27754367

  4. The Last Ten Years of Advancements in Plant-Derived Recombinant Vaccines against Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Joung, Young Hee; Park, Se Hee; Moon, Ki-Beom; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Cho, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soon

    2016-10-13

    Disease prevention through vaccination is considered to be the greatest contribution to public health over the past century. Every year more than 100 million children are vaccinated with the standard World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended vaccines including hepatitis B (HepB). HepB is the most serious type of liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV), however, it can be prevented by currently available recombinant vaccine, which has an excellent record of safety and effectiveness. To date, recombinant vaccines are produced in many systems of bacteria, yeast, insect, and mammalian and plant cells. Among these platforms, the use of plant cells has received considerable attention in terms of intrinsic safety, scalability, and appropriate modification of target proteins. Research groups worldwide have attempted to develop more efficacious plant-derived vaccines for over 30 diseases, most frequently HepB and influenza. More inspiring, approximately 12 plant-made antigens have already been tested in clinical trials, with successful outcomes. In this study, the latest information from the last 10 years on plant-derived antigens, especially hepatitis B surface antigen, approaches are reviewed and breakthroughs regarding the weak points are also discussed.

  5. Hepatic nutrient and hormonal regulation of the PANcreatic-DERived factor (PANDER) promoter.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Whitney A; Athanason, Mark G; Chechele, Alicia C; Kuehl, Melanie N; Fernandez, Amanda M; MarElia, Catherine B; Burkhardt, Brant R

    2015-09-15

    PANcreatic-DERived factor (PANDER, FAM3B) has been shown to regulate glycemic levels via interactions with both pancreatic islets and the liver. Although PANDER is predominantly expressed from the endocrine pancreas, recent work has provided sufficient evidence that the liver may also be an additional tissue source of PANDER production. At physiological levels, PANDER is capable of disrupting insulin signaling and promoting increased hepatic glucose production. As shown in some animal models, strong expression of PANDER, induced by viral delivery within the liver, induces hepatic steatosis. However, no studies to date have explicitly characterized the transcriptional regulation of PANDER from the liver. Therefore, our investigation elucidated the nutrient and hormonal regulation of the hepatic PANDER promoter. Initial RNA-ligated rapid amplification of cDNA ends identified a novel transcription start site (TSS) approximately 26 bp upstream of the PANDER translational start codon not previously revealed in pancreatic β-cell lines. Western evaluation of various murine tissues demonstrated robust expression in the liver and brain. Promoter analysis identified strong tissue-specific activity of the PANDER promoter in both human and murine liver-derived cell lines. The minimal element responsible for maximal promoter activity within hepatic cell lines was located between -293 and -3 of the identified TSS. PANDER promoter activity was inhibited by both insulin and palmitate, whereas glucose strongly increased expression. The minimal element was responsible for maximal glucose-responsive and basal activity. Co-transfection reporter assays, chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) increased PANDER promoter activity and interacted with the PANDER promoter. E-box 3 was shown to be critical for basal and glucose responsive expression. In summary, in-vitro and in-vivo glucose

  6. Hepassocin regulates cell proliferation of the human hepatic cells L02 and hepatocarcinoma cells through different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Meng-Meng; Xu, Wang-Xiang; Li, Chang-Yan; Cao, Chuan-Zeng; Wang, Zhi-Dong; Yao, Jia-Wei; Yu, Miao; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Tang, Liu-Jun; Chen, Hui; Li, Wei; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2011-10-01

    Hepassocin (HPS) is a specific mitogenic active factor for hepatocytes, and inhibits growth by overexpression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. However, the mechanism of HPS regulation on growth of liver-derived cells still remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that HPS was expressed and secreted into the extracellular medium in cultured L02 human hepatic cells; conditional medium of L02 cells promoted proliferation of L02 cells and this activity could be blocked by anti-HPS antibody. Moreover, we identified the presence of receptor for HPS on L02 cells and HepG2 human hepatoma cells. Overproduction of truncated HPS, which signal peptide was deleted, significantly inhibited the proliferation of HCC cells and induced cell cycle arrest. These findings suggest that HPS promotes hepatic cell line L02 cells proliferation via an autocrine mechanism and inhibits HCC cells proliferation by an intracrine pathway.

  7. Maternally-derived passive immunity to enterotropic mouse hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Homberger, F R

    1992-01-01

    Maternally-derived antibody to enterotropic mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) strain Y was transferred to pups by both intrauterine (IgG) and lactogenic (IgA and IgG) routes. Antibody present in the gastric whey of pups suckling immune dams dropped to undetectable levels by weaning age (21 days post partum). MHV-specific IgG was found in the serum of passively immune pups up to 10 weeks of age. Immune dams transferred equal levels of antibody to 3 consecutive litters of pups, without evidence of decline. Immunoblots showed that IgA and IgG in whey and serum were directed against nucleoprotein N and glycoprotein S. MHV-specific IgM was not detected in any sample.

  8. Cell survival curve for primary hepatic carcinoma cells and relationship between SF2 of hepatic carcinoma cells and radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Zhong; Huang, Wen-Ying; Lin, Ju-Sheng; Li, Xiao-Sheng; Lan, Xiao; Cai, Xiao-Kun; Liang, Kuo-Huan; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish the cell survival curve for primary hepatic carcinoma cells and to study the relationship between SF2 of primary hepatic carcinoma cells and radiosensitivity. METHODS: Hepatic carcinoma cells were cultured in vitro using 39 samples of hepatic carcinoma at stages II-IV. Twenty-nine samples were cultured successfully in the fifth generation cells. After these cells were radiated with different dosages, the cell survival ratio and SF2 were calculated by clonogenic assay and SF2 model respectively. The relationship between SF2 and the clinical pathological feature was analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-nine of thirty-nine samples were successfully cultured. After X-ray radiation of the fifth generation cells with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy, the cell survival rate was 41%, 36.5%, 31.0%, 26.8%, and 19%, respectively. There was a negative correlation between cell survival and irradiation dosage (r = -0.973, P<0.05). SF2 ranged 0.28-0.78 and correlated with the clinical stage and pathological grade of hepatic carcinoma (P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between SF2 and D0.5 (r = 0.773, P<0.05). CONCLUSION: SF2 correlates with the clinical stage and pathological grade of hepatic carcinoma and is a marker for predicting the radiosensitivity of hepatic carcinomas. PMID:16437614

  9. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  10. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling.

  11. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-01

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR-β to deliver interferon (IFN)-γ to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN-γ were less than those treated with SSL-IFN-γ, IFN-γ and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN-γ was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN-γ might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  12. Effect of melanoma cells on proliferation and migration of activated hepatic stellate cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Theresa; Koch, Andreas; Ebert, Eva-Vanessa; Czech, Barbara; Mueller, Martina; Bosserhoff, Anja; Lang, Sven Arke; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2017-04-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor of the skin. The clinical outcome is determined by the presence or absence of metastases, and the liver is a common site of distant metastases. Hepatic metastasis is causing activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which form the stroma of hepatic metastases and are increasingly recognized as a crucial component of the pro- metastatic liver microenvironment. Most studies have focused on the effects of HSC on (metastasizing) tumor cells. Here, we aimed to analyze functional in vitro effects of conditioned medium (CM) of twelve different human melanoma cell lines on LX2 cells and HSC(htert) cells, two well established human activated HSC cell lines. CM from melanoma cells significantly induced HSC proliferation and acted as chemoattractant for HSC in Boyden chamber assays. The CM effects significantly varied between different HSC as well as melanoma cells. Interestingly, CM from melanoma cell lines derived from melanoma metastases (WM239A, WM9, WM1158, WM1232, 451Lu and 1205Lu) had a stronger effect on proliferation of HSC(htert) cells than CM derived from primary melanoma tumors (SbCl2, WM3211, WM35, WM278, WM1366 and WM793). Moreover, we observed a significant correlation between the chemoattractive effects of CM from the different melanoma cells on HSC(htert) and LX2 cells. In contrast, the melanoma CM effects on the proliferation of the two HSC lines did not show a significant correlation. In summary, our data indicate that melanoma cells metastasizing to the liver have the potential to attract HSC and to induce HSC proliferation, respectively. Still, it appears that melanoma effects on HSC migration and proliferation are mediated via different soluble factors indicating the complexity of melanoma-HSC interaction. Furthermore, the intensity of at least some functional effects varies between different human tumor cells and HSC which may point to mechanisms explaining diverse hepatic metastasis in melanoma patients

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor signal via c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent Smad2/3 phosphorylation in rat hepatic stellate cells after acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Katsunori; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Mori, Shigeo; Tahashi, Yoshiya; Yamagata, Hideo; Furukawa, Fukiko; Seki, Toshihito; Nishizawa, Mikio; Fujisawa, Junichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2005-04-01

    After liver injury, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) regulate the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and tissue remodeling. Mechanisms of PDGF signaling in the TGF-beta-triggered cascade are not completely understood. TGF-beta signaling involves phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 at linker and C-terminal regions. Using antibodies to distinguish Smad2/3 phosphorylated at linker regions from those phosphorylated at C-terminal regions, we investigated Smad2/3-mediated signaling in rat liver injured by CCl(4) administration and in cultured HSCs. In acute liver injury, Smad2/3 were transiently phosphorylated at both regions. Although linker-phosphorylated Smad2 remained in the cytoplasm of alpha-smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive mesenchymal cells adjacent to necrotic hepatocytes in centrilobular areas, linker-phosphorylated Smad3 accumulated in the nuclei. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated HSCs directly phosphorylated Smad2/3 at linker regions. Co-treatment of primary cultured HSCs with TGF-beta and PDGF activated the JNK pathway, subsequently inducing endogenous linker phosphorylation of Smad2/3. The JNK pathway may be involved in migration of resident HSCs within the space of Disse to the sites of tissue damage because the JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited HSC migration induced by TGF-beta and PDGF signals. Moreover, treatment of HSCs with both TGF-beta and PDGF increased transcriptional activity of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 through linker phosphorylation of Smad3. In conclusion, TGF-beta and PDGF activate HSCs by transmitting their signals through JNK-mediated Smad2/3 phosphorylation at linker regions, both in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Ciprofibrate stimulates protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of an 85 kDa protein in rat Fao hepatic derived cells.

    PubMed

    Passilly-Degrace, P; Jannin, B; Boscoboinik, D; Motojima, K; Latruffe, N

    2000-08-01

    The effect of ciprofibrate on early events of signal transduction was previously studied in Fao cells. Protein kinase C (PKC) assays performed on permeabilized cells showed a more than two-fold increase in PKC activity in cells treated for 24 h with 500 microM ciprofibrate. To show the subsequent effect of this increase on protein phosphorylation, the in vitro phosphorylation on particulate fractions obtained from Fao cells was studied. Among several modifications, the phosphorylation of protein(s) with an apparent molecular mass of 85 kDa was investigated. This modification appeared in the first 24 h of treatment with 500 microM ciprofibrate. It was shown to occur on Ser/Thr residue(s). It was calcium but not calmodulin-dependent. The phosphorylation level of this/these protein(s) was reduced with kinase inhibitors and especially with 300 nM GF-109203X, a specific inhibitor of PKC. All these results suggest that the phosphorylation of the 85 kDa protein(s) is due to a PKC or to another Ser/Thr kinase activated via a PKC pathway. A possible biochemical candidate for 85 kDa protein seems to be the beta isoform of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulatory subunit.

  15. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-28

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection.

  16. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection. PMID:26819513

  17. Side Population Cells From an Immortalized Human Liver Epithelial Cell Line Exhibit Hepatic Stem-Like Cell Properties.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Takayoshi; Yamazaki, Taisuke; Enosawa, Shin

    2012-01-01

    The existence of hepatic stem cells in human livers is controversial. We investigated whether the side population (SP) cells derived from an immortalized human liver epithelial cell line THLE-5b possess the properties of hepatic stem-like cells. SP cells derived from THLE-5b were isolated using flow cytometry and were assayed for the expression of phenotypic markers by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. THLE-5b SP cells retained the capacity to generate both SP and non-SP cells, showed a capacity for self-renewal, and were more efficient in colony formation than non-SP cells. Neither the SP nor the non-SP cells formed tumors when transplanted into athymic nude mice or severe combined immunodeficient mice. The expression level of stem cell-associated markers such as an ATP-binding cassette membrane transporter, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, c-kit, Thy-1, and octomer binding transcription factor 4 was higher in SP cells than in non-SP cells. When cultivated as rotation-mediated aggregates, the expression of liver-specific genes including tryptophan oxygenase and CYP3A4 was up-regulated in SP cells, suggesting that THLE-5b SP cells have the ability to differentiate into a hepatocyte phenotype. One of the clonal cell lines derived from the SP cells expressed stem cell-associated markers. These results indicate that SP cells derived from THLE-5b possess hepatic stem-like cell properties and suggest that THLE-5b can be used as a model of normal human liver progenitor or stem cell line.

  18. Cell entry of hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bartosch, Birke . E-mail: Birke.Bartosch@ens-lyon.fr; Cosset, Francois-Loic . E-mail: Francois-Loic.Cosset@ens-lyon.fr

    2006-04-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen, is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus classified in the hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Cell attachment of flaviviruses generally leads to endocytosis of bound virions. Systems that support HCV replication and particle formation in vitro are emerging only now, 16 years after the discovery of the virus. Albeit this limitation, the route of HCV cell entry as well as 'capture' molecules involved in low-affinity interactions for the initial contact of HCV with target cells and potential high-affinity receptor candidates that may mediate HCV trafficking and fusion has been described. The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of different HCV model systems to our current knowledge about structure of the HCV GPs E1 and E2 and their roles in cell entry comprising cell attachment, interactions with cellular receptors, endocytosis, and fusion.

  19. Connexin 32-mediated cell-cell communication is essential for hepatic differentiation from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jinhua; Chang, Mingyang; Wang, Shuyong; Liu, Zhenbo; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Yan, Fang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Bowen; Dou, Guifang; Liu, Jiang; Pei, Xuetao; Wang, Yunfang

    2016-01-01

    Gap junction-mediated cell-cell interactions are highly conserved and play essential roles in cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and patterning. We report that Connexin 32 (Cx32)-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is necessary for human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hESC-Heps) during step-wise hepatic lineage restriction and maturation. Vitamin K2, previously shown to promote Cx32 expression in mature hepatocytes, up-regulated Cx32 expression and GJIC activation during hepatic differentiation and maturation, resulting in significant increases of hepatic markers expression and hepatocyte functions. In contrast, negative Cx32 regulator 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate blocked hESC-to-hepatocyte maturation and muted hepatocyte functions through disruption of GJIC activities. Dynamic gap junction organization and internalization are phosphorylation-dependent and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway (MAPK) can negatively regulate Cxs through phosphorylation-dependent degradation of Cxs. We found that p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 improved maturation of hESC-Heps correlating with up-regulation of Cx32; by contrast, the p38 MAPK activator, anisomycin, blocked hESC-Heps maturation correlating with down-regulation of Cx32. These results suggested that Cx32 is essential for cell-cell interactions that facilitate driving hESCs through hepatic-lineage maturation. Regulators of both Cx32 and other members of its pathways maybe used as a promising approach on regulating hepatic lineage restriction of pluripotent stem cells and optimizing their functional maturation. PMID:27874032

  20. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC’s anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue. PMID:27063397

  1. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-04-11

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC's anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue.

  2. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC’s anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue.

  3. A plant-derived edible vaccine against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, J; Modelska, A; Figlerowicz, M; Pniewski, T; Letellier, M; Lisowa, O; Yusibov, V; Koprowski, H; Plucienniczak, A; Legocki, A B

    1999-10-01

    The infectious hepatitis B virus represents 42 nm spherical double-shelled particles. However, analysis of blood from hepatitis B virus carriers revealed the presence of smaller 22 nm particles consisting of a viral envelope surface protein. These particles are highly immunogenic and have been used in the design of hepatitis B virus vaccine produced in yeast. Upon expression in yeast, these proteins form virus-like particles that are used for parenteral immunization. Therefore, the DNA fragment encoding hepatitis B virus surface antigen was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404 and used to obtain transgenic lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Burpee Bibb expressing envelope surface protein. Mice that were fed the transgenic lupin tissue developed significant levels of hepatitis B virus-specific antibodies. Human volunteers, fed with transgenic lettuce plants expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen, developed specific serum-IgG response to plant produced protein.

  4. [Effects of acupuncture intervention on hepatic platelet-derived growth factor signaling pathway in CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis rats].

    PubMed

    Kong, De-Song; Ma, Jin; Lu, Yin; Ni, Guang-Xia; Ni, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Jiao; Wang, Ai-Yun; Chen, Wen-Xing; Zheng, Shi-Zhong

    2012-04-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture stimulation of "Taichong" (LR 3), "Qimen" (LR 14), etc. on hepatic platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signal pathway activity at the protein and mRNA levels in hepatic fibrosis rats. Forty-six SD rats were randomly divided into control (10 rats), model (12 rats), acupuncture (12 rats) and non-acupoint (12 rats) groups. Hepatic fibrosis model was established by intraperitoneal injection of mixture solution of 50% CCl4 and olive oil [1:1, 3 times on the 1st week (W), twice/W thereafter for 5 more weeks]. During modeling, acupuncture stimulation of "Taichong" (LR 3), "Qimen" (LR 14), "Ganshu" (BL 18) and "Zusanli" (ST 36) was conducted simultaneously. At the end of the experiments, all the rats were sacrificed for collecting their liver and blood samples, followed by separation of the hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ELISA, Western blot and Real-time quantitative PCR techniques were used to detect the content of serum PDGF and expression levels of PDGF-beta receptor (PDGF-beta R), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and P 38 genes and proteins of HSCs, respectively. Compared to the control group, serum PDGF content, and expression levels of PDGF-beta R mRNA and protein, ERK mRNA and protein and P 38 protein of HSCs in the model group were upregulated significantly (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). In comparison with the model group, serum PDGF content, and the expression levels of PDGF-beta R mRNA and protein, ERK mRNA and protein of HSCs in the acupuncture group were down-regulated apparently (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No significant differences were found between the acupuncture and non-acupoint groups in serum PDGF content and between the model group and non-acupoint group in the expression levels of PDGF-beta R mRNA and protein, ERK mRNA and protein, JNK protein and P 38 protein of HSCs, as well as between the model group and acupuncture group in the expression levels of JNK protein and P 38 protein of

  5. Hepatitis C virus load in parenchyma cells correlates with hepatic injury in infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Lin, Ji-Zong; Lin, Guo-Li; Wei, Fang-Fang; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Ying; Ke, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2017-01-01

    The association between serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) load and hepatic injury in HCV-infected patients has been extensively investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the association between HCV load in hepatic parenchyma cells and hepatic injury in HCV-infected patients. A total of 56 HCV-infected patients were included in the present retrospective study. The serum HCV mRNA was determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, while the hepatic parenchyma cell volume and HCV mRNA in hepatic parenchyma cells were also determined. Hepatic injury was evaluated on the basis of the severity of inflammation and fibrosis. The results demonstrated that there were evident differences in the mean serum HCV RNA levels and the HCV load/parenchyma cell volume among the various grades of hepatic inflammation (G1-G4) when groups with the least and most inflammation were compared (G1 vs. G4; P<0.05). Significant differences in the HCV load existed between groups divided according to the fibrosis grade; in addition, differences existed between fibrosis grades S1 and S2, and S2 and S4 when comparing serum HCV RNA levels (P<0.05). Similarly, differences existed between every two fibrosis stages (S0 vs. S4, S2 vs. S3, and S2 vs. S4; P<0.05) when viral loads and parenchyma cell volumes were compared (F=2.860, P<0.05). Furthermore, the fibrosis staging was correlated with the viral load/parenchyma cell volume (F=2.670, P<0.05). In conclusion, hepatic fibrosis grade was found to be associated with HCV load in parenchyma cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that the viral load in parenchyma cells is a more appropriate index compared with the serum viral load for evaluating HCV replication in hepatocytes, and may function as an important factor in HCV-infected hepatic injury evaluation. PMID:28123484

  6. Hepatic Stellate Cells: Protean, Multifunctional, and Enigmatic Cells of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell has surprised and engaged physiologists, pathologists, and hepatologists for over 130 years, yet clear evidence of its role in hepatic injury and fibrosis only emerged following the refinement of methods for its isolation and characterization. The paradigm in liver injury of activation of quiescent vitamin A-rich stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic myofibroblasts has launched an era of astonishing progress in understanding the mechanistic basis of hepatic fibrosis progression and regression. But this simple paradigm has now yielded to a remarkably broad appreciation of the cell's functions not only in liver injury, but also in hepatic development, regeneration, xenobiotic responses, intermediary metabolism, and immunoregulation. Among the most exciting prospects is that stellate cells are essential for hepatic progenitor cell amplification and differentiation. Equally intriguing is the remarkable plasticity of stellate cells, not only in their variable intermediate filament phenotype, but also in their functions. Stellate cells can be viewed as the nexus in a complex sinusoidal milieu that requires tightly regulated autocrine and paracrine cross-talk, rapid responses to evolving extracellular matrix content, and exquisite responsiveness to the metabolic needs imposed by liver growth and repair. Moreover, roles vital to systemic homeostasis include their storage and mobilization of retinoids, their emerging capacity for antigen presentation and induction of tolerance, as well as their emerging relationship to bone marrow-derived cells. As interest in this cell type intensifies, more surprises and mysteries are sure to unfold that will ultimately benefit our understanding of liver physiology and the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. PMID:18195085

  7. Hepatic stellate cells in liver development, regeneration, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chunyue; Evason, Kimberley J.; Asahina, Kinji; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are liver-specific mesenchymal cells that play vital roles in liver physiology and fibrogenesis. They are located in the space of Disse and maintain close interactions with sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatic epithelial cells. It is becoming increasingly clear that hepatic stellate cells have a profound impact on the differentiation, proliferation, and morphogenesis of other hepatic cell types during liver development and regeneration. In this Review, we summarize and evaluate the recent advances in our understanding of the formation and characteristics of hepatic stellate cells, as well as their function in liver development, regeneration, and cancer. We also discuss how improved knowledge of these processes offers new perspectives for the treatment of patients with liver diseases. PMID:23635788

  8. [Hepatic cell transplantation. Technical and methodological aspects].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Martínez, Amparo; Cortés, Miriam; Bonora, Ana; Moya, Angel; Sanjuán, Fernando; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Mir, José

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic cell transplantation consists of grafting already differentiated cells such as hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes are viable and functionally active. Liver cell transplantation is carried out by means of a 3-step method: isolation of hepatocytes from donor liver rejected for orthotopic transplantation, preparing a cell suspension for infusion and, finally, hepatocytes are implanted into the recipient. There are established protocols for the isolation of human hepatocytes from unused segments of donor livers, based on collagenase digestion of cannulated liver tissue at 37 degrees C. The hepatocytes can be used fresh or cryopreserved. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes would then be available for planned use. In cell transplant, the important aspects are: infusion route, number of cells, number of infusions and viability of the cells. The cells are infused into the patient through a catheter inserted via portal vein or splenic artery. Liver cell transplantation allows liver tissue to be used that would, otherwise, be discarded, enabling multiple patients to be treated with hepatocytes from a single tissue donor. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Exosome-Mediated Intercellular Communication between Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Hepatocytes and Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Devhare, Pradip B; Sasaki, Reina; Shrivastava, Shubham; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Ray, Ranjit; Ray, Ratna B

    2017-03-15

    Fibrogenic pathways in the liver are principally regulated by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Fibrosis is associated with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, although the mechanism is poorly understood. HSC comprise the major population of nonparenchymal cells in the liver. Since HCV does not replicate in HSC, we hypothesized that exosomes secreted from HCV-infected hepatocytes activate HSC. Primary or immortalized human hepatic stellate (LX2) cells were exposed to exosomes derived from HCV-infected hepatocytes (HCV-exo), and the expression of fibrosis-related genes was examined. Our results demonstrated that HCV-exo internalized to HSC and increased the expression of profibrotic markers. Further analysis suggested that HCV-exo carry miR-19a and target SOCS3 in HSC, which in turn activates the STAT3-mediated transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathway and enhances fibrosis marker genes. The higher expression of miR-19a in exosomes was also observed from HCV-infected hepatocytes and in sera of chronic HCV patients with fibrosis compared to healthy volunteers and non-HCV-related liver disease patients with fibrosis. Together, our results demonstrated that miR-19a carried through the exosomes from HCV-infected hepatocytes activates HSC by modulating the SOCS-STAT3 axis. Our results implicated a novel mechanism of exosome-mediated intercellular communication in the activation of HSC for liver fibrosis in HCV infection.IMPORTANCE HCV-associated liver fibrosis is a critical step for end-stage liver disease progression. However, the molecular mechanisms for hepatic stellate-cell activation by HCV-infected hepatocytes are underexplored. Here, we provide a role for miR-19a carried through the exosomes in intercellular communication between HCV-infected hepatocytes and HSC in fibrogenic activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the role of exosomal miR-19a in activation of the STAT3-TGF-β pathway in HSC. This study contributes to the

  10. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  11. New Pyrazolobenzothiazine Derivatives as Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Palm Site I Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified the pyrazolobenzothiazine scaffold as a promising chemotype against hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase, a validated and promising anti-HCV target. Herein we describe the design, synthesis, enzymatic, and cellular characterization of new pyrazolobenzothiazines as anti-HCV inhibitors. The binding site for a representative derivative was mapped to NS5B palm site I employing a mutant counterscreen assay, thus validating our previous in silico predictions. Derivative 2b proved to be the best selective anti-HCV derivative within the new series, exhibiting a IC50 of 7.9 μM against NS5B polymerase and antiviral effect (EC50 = 8.1 μM; EC90 = 23.3 μM) coupled with the absence of any antimetabolic effect (CC50 > 224 μM; SI > 28) in a cell based HCV replicon system assay. Significantly, microscopic analysis showed that, unlike the parent compounds, derivative 2b did not show any significant cell morphological alterations. Furthermore, since most of the pyrazolobenzothiazines tested altered cell morphology, this undesired aspect was further investigated by exploring possible perturbation of lipid metabolism during compound treatment. PMID:24654886

  12. Effects of platelet-derived growth factor and interleukin-10 on Fas/Fas-ligand and Bcl-2/Bax mRNA expression in rat hepatic stellate cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Sheng-Jun; Chen, Yun-Xin; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Huang, Yue-Hong; Zhang, Li-Juan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) on Fas/Fas-ligand and Bcl-2/Bax mRNA expressions in rat hepatic stellate cells. METHODS: Rat hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated and purified from rat liver by in situ digestion of collagenase and pronase and single-step density Nycodenz gradient. After activated by culture in vitro, HSCs were divided into 4 groups and treated with nothing (group N), PDGF (group P), IL-10 (group I) and PDGF in combination with IL-10 (group C), respectively. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was employed to compare the mRNA expression levels of Fas/FasL and Bcl-2/Bax in HSCs of each group. RESULTS: The expression levels of Fas between the 4 groups had no significant differences (P > 0.05). FasL mRNA level in normal culture-activated HSCs (group N) was very low. It increased obviously after HSCs were treated with IL-10 (group I) (0.091 ± 0.007 vs 0.385 ± 0.051, P < 0.01), but remained the low level after treated with PDGF alone (group P) or PDGF in combination with IL-10 (group C). Contrast to the control group, after treated with PDGF and IL-10, either alone or in combination, Bcl-2 mRNA expression was down-regulated and Bax mRNA expression was up-regulated, both following the turn from group P, group I to group C. Expression of Bcl-2 mRNA in group C was significantly lower than that in group P (0.126 ± 0.008 vs 0.210 ± 0.024, P < 0.01). But no significant difference was found between group C and group I, as well as between group I and group P (P > 0.05). Similarly, the expression of Bax in group C was higher than that in group P (0.513 ± 0.016 vs 0.400 ± 0.022, P < 0.01). No significant difference was found between group I and group P (P > 0.05). But compared with group C, Bax expressions in group I tended to decrease (0.449 ± 0.028 vs 0.513 ± 0.016, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: PDGF may promote proliferation of HSCs but is

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... have liver damage because of it. What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  14. The human constitutive androstane receptor promotes the differentiation and maturation of hepatic-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fengming; Zamule, Stephanie M.; Coslo, Denise M.; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is enriched in the mature mammalian liver and increasingly recognized for its prominent role in regulating a myriad of processes including biotransformation, chemical transport, energy metabolism and lipid homeostasis. Previously, we demonstrated that CAR levels were markedly enhanced during the differentiation of hepatic-like cells derived from hESCs, prompting the hypothesis that CAR contributes a key functional role in directing human hepatogenesis. Here we demonstrate that over-expression of CAR in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), transduced by a lentiviral vector, accelerates the maturation of hepatic-like cells, with CAR over-expressing cells exhibiting a 2.5-fold increase in albumin secretion by day 20 in culture differentiation, and significantly enhanced levels of mRNA expression of several liver-selective markers, including hepatic transcription factors, plasma proteins, biotransformation enzymes, and metabolic enzymes. CAR over-expressing cells also exhibited enhanced CITCO-inducible CYP3A7 enzymatic activity. Knockdown of CAR via siRNA attenuated the differentiation-dependent expression programs. In contrast, expression levels of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor most similar to CAR in primary sequence, were negligible in human fetal liver tissues or in the differentiating hESCs, and stable over-expression of PXR in hepatic-induced hESCs failed to enhance expression of hepatic phenotype markers. Together, these results define a novel role for human CAR in hepatic lineage commitment. PMID:24144921

  15. In vitro differentiated hepatic oval-like cells enhance hepatic regeneration in CCl4 -induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Awan, Sana Javaid; Baig, Maria Tayyab; Yaqub, Faiza; Tayyeb, Asima; Ali, Gibran

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic oval cells are likely to be activated during advanced stage of liver fibrosis to reconstruct damaged hepatic tissue. However, their scarcity, difficulties in isolation, and in vitro expansion hampered their transplantation in fibrotic liver. This study was aimed to investigate the repair potential of in vitro differentiated hepatic oval-like cells in CCl4 -induced liver fibrosis. BMSCs and oval cells were isolated and characterized from C57BL/6 GFP(+) mice. BMSCs were differentiated into oval cells by preconditioning with HGF, EGF, SCF, and LIF and analyzed for the oval cells-specific genes. Efficiency of oval cells to reduce hepatocyte injury was studied by determining cell viability, release of LDH, and biochemical tests in a co-culture system. Further, in vivo repair potential of differentiated oval cells was determined in CCl4 -induced fibrotic model by gene expression analysis, biochemical tests, mason trichrome, and Sirius red staining. Differentiated oval cells expressed hepatic oval cells-specific markers AFP, ALB, CK8, CK18, CK19. These differentiated cells when co-cultured with injured hepatocytes showed significant hepato-protection as measured by reduction in apoptosis, LDH release, and improvement in liver functions. Transplantation of differentiated oval cells like cells in fibrotic livers exhibited enhanced homing, reduced liver fibrosis, and improved liver functions by augmenting hepatic microenvironment by improved liver functions. This preconditioning strategy to differentiate BMSCs into oval cell leads to improved survival and homing of transplanted cells. In addition, reduction in fibrosis and functional improvement in mice with CCl4 -induced liver fibrosis was achieved.

  16. Nuclear Receptor PPARα Agonist Wy-14,643 Ameliorates Hepatic Cell Death in Hepatic IKKβ-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyeong; Wahyudi, Lilik Duwi; Gonzalez, Frank J; Kim, Jung-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    Inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase beta (IKKβ) plays a critical role in cell proliferation and inflammation in various cells by activating NF-κB signaling. However, the interrelationship between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and IKKβ in cell proliferation is not clear. In this study, we investigated the possible role of PPARα in the hepatic cell death in the absence of IKKβ gene using liver-specific Ikkb-null (Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre)) mice. To examine the function of PPARα activation in hepatic cell death, wild-type (Ikkb(F/F)) and Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre) mice were treated with PPARα agonist Wy-14,643 (0.1% w/w chow diet) for two weeks. As a result of Wy-14,643 treatment, apoptotic markers including caspase-3 cleavage, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and TUNEL-positive staining were significantly decreased in the Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre) mice. Surprisingly, Wy-14,643 increased the phosphorylation of p65 and STAT3 in both Ikkb and Ikkb(F/F-AlbCre) mice. Furthermore, BrdU-positive cells were significantly increased in both groups after treatment with Wy-14,643. Our results suggested that IKKβ-derived hepatic apoptosis could be altered by PPARα activation in conjunction with activation of NF-κB and STAT3 signaling.

  17. Hepatic zonation of carbon and nitrogen fluxes derived from glutamine and ammonia transformations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glutaminase predominates in periportal hepatocytes and it has been proposed that it determines the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. Glutamine-derived urea production should, thus, be considerably faster in periportal hepatocytes. This postulate, based on indirect observations, has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated, making a direct investigation of ureogenesis from glutamine highly desirable. Methods Zonation of glutamine metabolism was investigated in the bivascularly perfused rat liver with [U-14C]glutamine infusion (0.6 mM) into the portal vein (antegrade perfusion) or into the hepatic vein (retrograde perfusion). Results Ammonia infusion into the hepatic artery in retrograde and antegrade perfusion allowed to promote glutamine metabolism in the periportal region and in the whole liver parenchyma, respectively. The results revealed that the space-normalized glutamine uptake, indicated by 14CO2 production, gluconeogenesis, lactate production and the associated oxygen uptake, predominates in the periportal region. Periportal predominance was especially pronounced for gluconeogenesis. Ureogenesis, however, tended to be uniformly distributed over the whole liver parenchyma at low ammonia concentrations (up to 1.0 mM); periportal predominance was found only at ammonia concentrations above 1 mM. The proportions between the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in periportal cells are not the same along the liver acinus. Conclusions In conclusion, the results of the present work indicate that the glutaminase activity in periportal hepatocytes is not the rate-controlling step of the glutamine-derived nitrogen flow through the urea cycle. The findings corroborate recent work indicating that ureogenesis is also an important ammonia-detoxifying mechanism in cells situated downstream to the periportal region. PMID:20055990

  18. EUS-derived criteria for distinguishing benign from malignant metastatic solid hepatic masses.

    PubMed

    Fujii-Lau, Larissa L; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Bruno, Marco J; Chang, Kenneth J; DeWitt, John M; Fockens, Paul; Forcione, David; Napoleon, Bertrand; Palazzo, Laurent; Topazian, Mark D; Wiersema, Maurits J; Chak, Amitabh; Clain, Jonathan E; Faigel, Douglas O; Gleeson, Ferga C; Hawes, Robert; Iyer, Prasad G; Rajan, Elizabeth; Stevens, Tyler; Wallace, Michael B; Wang, Kenneth K; Levy, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Detection of hepatic metastases during EUS is an important component of tumor staging. To describe our experience with EUS-guided FNA (EUS-FNA) of solid hepatic masses and derive and validate criteria to help distinguish between benign and malignant hepatic masses. Retrospective study, survey. Single, tertiary-care referral center. Medical records were reviewed for all patients undergoing EUS-FNA of solid hepatic masses over a 12-year period. EUS-FNA of solid hepatic masses. Masses were deemed benign or malignant according to predetermined criteria. EUS images from 200 patients were used to create derivation and validation cohorts of 100 cases each, matched by cytopathologic diagnosis. Ten expert endosonographers blindly rated 15 initial endosonographic features of each of the 100 images in the derivation cohort. These data were used to derive an EUS scoring system that was then validated by using the validation cohort by the expert endosonographer with the highest diagnostic accuracy. A total of 332 patients underwent EUS-FNA of a hepatic mass. Interobserver agreement regarding the initial endosonographic features among the expert endosonographers was fair to moderate, with a mean diagnostic accuracy of 73% (standard deviation 5.6). A scoring system incorporating 7 EUS features was developed to distinguish benign from malignant hepatic masses by using the derivation cohort with an area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of 0.92; when applied to the validation cohort, performance was similar (AUC 0.86). The combined positive predictive value of both cohorts was 88%. Single center, retrospective, only one expert endosonographer deriving and validating the EUS criteria. An EUS scoring system was developed that helps distinguish benign from malignant hepatic masses. Further study is required to determine the impact of these EUS criteria among endosonographers of all experience. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by

  19. EUS-derived criteria for distinguishing benign from malignant metastatic solid hepatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.; Bruno, Marco J.; Chang, Kenneth J.; DeWitt, John M.; Fockens, Paul; Forcione, David; Napoleon, Bertrand; Palazzo, Laurent; Topazian, Mark D.; Wiersema, Maurits J.; Chak, Amitabh; Clain, Jonathan E.; Faigel, Douglas O.; Gleeson, Ferga C.; Hawes, Robert; Iyer, Prasad G.; Rajan, Elizabeth; Stevens, Tyler; Wallace, Michael B.; Wang, Kenneth K.; Levy, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Detection of hepatic metastases during EUS is an important component of tumor staging. Objective To describe our experience with EUS-guided FNA (EUS-FNA) of solid hepatic masses and derive and validate criteria to help distinguish between benign and malignant hepatic masses. Design Retrospective study, survey. Setting Single, tertiary-care referral center. Patients Medical records were reviewed for all patients undergoing EUS-FNA of solid hepatic masses over a 12-year period. Interventions EUS-FNA of solid hepatic masses. Main Outcome Measurements Masses were deemed benign or malignant according to predetermined criteria. EUS images from 200 patients were used to create derivation and validation cohorts of 100 cases each, matched by cytopathologic diagnosis. Ten expert endosonographers blindly rated 15 initial endosonographic features of each of the 100 images in the derivation cohort. These data were used to derive an EUS scoring system that was then validated by using the validation cohort by the expert endosonographer with the highest diagnostic accuracy. Results A total of 332 patients underwent EUS-FNA of a hepatic mass. Interobserver agreement regarding the initial endosonographic features among the expert endosonographers was fair to moderate, with a mean diagnostic accuracy of 73% (standard deviation 5.6). A scoring system incorporating 7 EUS features was developed to distinguish benign from malignant hepatic masses by using the derivation cohort with an area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) of 0.92; when applied to the validation cohort, performance was similar (AUC 0.86). The combined positive predictive value of both cohorts was 88%. Limitations Single center, retrospective, only one expert endosonographer deriving and validating the EUS criteria. Conclusion An EUS scoring system was developed that helps distinguish benign from malignant hepatic masses. Further study is required to determine the impact of these EUS criteria among

  20. Isolation and characterization of hepatic mast cells from cholestatic rats

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Laura; Graf-Eaton, Allyson; Kennedy, Lindsey; Demieville, Jennifer; Owens, Jennifer; Hodges, Kyle; Ladd, Brittany; Francis, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are immune cells that release histamine and other mediators. MC number increases after bile duct ligation (BDL) and blocking mast cell-derived histamine decrease biliary proliferation. We aimed to isolate and characterize MCs from cholestatic livers. Rats were subjected to BDL starting at 6 hrs and up to 14 days. MC infiltration was evaluated by toluidine blue. BDL rats were perfused using standard collagenase perfusion. Following enzymatic digestion, tissue was passed through a fine gauge needle. Suspensions were incubated with MAb AA4, washed and incubated with goat anti-mouse coated Dynal® beads. MCs were stained with toluidine blue, and in isolated MCs, the expression of FCεRI and MC proteases was measured. The expression of histidine decarboxylase, histamine receptors, VEGF-receptors and TIE 1 and 2 was evaluated by qPCR. Histamine and VEGF-A secretion was measured in MC supernatants. MC purity was evaluated by CK-19, CK-8, albumin, VAP-1 and α-SMA expression. In vitro, cholangiocytes and HSCs were treated with isolated MC supernatants from BDL rats treated with either NaCl or cromolyn sodium (to block MC histamine release) and biliary proliferation and hepatic fibrosis were measured. MCs infiltrate the liver and surround bile ducts starting at day 2. We isolated a virtually pure preparation of mature, functional MCs. TEM images reveal distinct secretory granules and isolated MCs secrete histamine. MCs express FCεRI, chymase, tryptase, RMCPI and RMCPII, but were virtually void of other cell markers. Biliary proliferation and fibrosis increased following treatment with MC supernatants from BDL rats + NaCl and these parameters decreased in cells treated with MC supernatants from BDL + cromolyn sodium. In conclusion, we have isolated and characterized MCs from cholestatic livers. MCs regulate cholestatic liver injury and hepatic fibrosis. This tool provides a better understanding of the paracrine influence of mast cells on biliary

  1. Viral hepatitis: A new HCV cell culture model for the next clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in hepatitis C treatment, substantial clinical hurdles remain to achieve universal cure and global control of infection. Saeed et al. identified SEC14L2 as a host factor permitting replication of clinical HCV isolates in cell culture, providing a novel system to model infection of patient-derived viruses.

  2. An Hepatic Abscess in a Patient With Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Marissa D; Chaudhary, Manu; Kaplan, Sheldon L

    2016-11-01

    We present a case of hepatic abscess in a transfusion-dependent 16-year-old patient with sickle cell disease. There have been 10 such cases in sickle cell disease patients reported, with the last report published greater than a decade ago. The diagnosis of hepatic abscess merits consideration in sickle cell disease patients presenting with fever without a source and/or abdominal pain.

  3. Ribozyme-independent replication of a defective hepatitis D virus RNA derived from hepatitis B/D patients receiving antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Wei; Yeh, Chau-Ting

    2014-07-18

    Novel hepatitis D virus (HDV) RNA mutants carrying large fragment deletions were identified in the serum samples of two hepatitis B/D patients receiving antiviral therapy. Sequence analysis revealed that the deleted regions encompassed both ribozyme domains. The mutant persisted in the serum samples for at least 2 and 10 months, respectively in the two patients, raising the question of whether such mutants could replicate in the absence of ribozyme domains. Thirty anti-HDV antibody-positive serum samples derived from 17 patients receiving antiviral therapy were submitted for RT-PCR detection of HDV RNA deletion mutants. Large fragment HDV RNA deletions were found in 4 patients. Of them, two had liver biopsy samples available. Northern blot analysis revealed high molecular weight HDV RNA replication intermediates, genomic and anti-genomic senses, in the liver tissues. Transfection of an in vitro transcribed HDV RNA deletion mutant (1.28 kb) into Huh7 and HepG2 cells also resulted in generation of high molecular weight HDV RNA species in the hepatoma cells (>6.5 kb) with secretion of a 6.5 kb HDV RNA species into the medium. In conclusion, we discovered novel large fragment deletion mutants of HDV RNA in hepatitis B/D patients receiving antiviral therapy. Such mutants did not contain ribozyme domains but could replicate in the liver cells to generate high molecular weight but not unit-length HDV RNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuronal cell death in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F

    2007-12-01

    It is generally assumed that neuronal cell death is minimal in liver failure and is insufficient to account for the neuropsychiatric symptoms characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy. However, contrary to this assumption, neuronal cell damage and death are well documented in liver failure patients, taking the form of several distinct clinical entities namely acquired (non-Wilsonian) hepatocerebral degeneration, cirrhosis-related Parkinsonism, post-shunt myelopathy and cerebellar degeneration. In addition, there is evidence to suggest that liver failure contributes to the severity of neuronal loss in Wernicke's encephalopathy. The long-standing nature of the thalamic and cerebellar lesions, over 80% of which are missed by routine clinical evaluation, together with the probability that they are nutritional in origin, underscores the need for careful nutritional management (adequate dietary protein, Vitamin B(1)) in liver failure patients. Mechanisms identified with the potential to cause neuronal cell death in liver failure include NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity, lactic acidosis, oxidative/nitrosative stress and the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The extent of neuronal damage in liver failure may be attenuated by compensatory mechanisms that include down-regulation of NMDA receptors, hypothermia and the presence of neuroprotective steroids such as allopregnanolone. These findings suggest that some of the purported "sequelae" of liver transplantation (gait ataxia, memory loss, confusion) could reflect preexisting neuropathology.

  5. A novel method of mouse ex utero transplantation of hepatic progenitor cells into the fetal liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, Mima; Asahina, Kinji; Iseki, Sachiko Teramoto, Kenichi; Nishida, Tomohiro; Shimizu-Saito, Keiko; Ota, Masato; Eto, Kazuhiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2009-04-03

    Avoiding the limitations of the adult liver niche, transplantation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells into fetal liver is desirable to analyze immature cells in a hepatic developmental environment. Here, we established a new monitor tool for cell fate of hepatic progenitor cells transplanted into the mouse fetal liver by using ex utero surgery. When embryonic day (ED) 14.5 hepatoblasts were injected into the ED14.5 fetal liver, the transplanted cells expressed albumin abundantly or {alpha}-fetoprotein weakly, and contained glycogen in the neonatal liver, indicating that transplanted hepatoblasts can proliferate and differentiate in concord with surrounding recipient parenchymal cells. The transplanted cells became mature in the liver of 6-week-old mice. Furthermore, this method was applicable to transplantation of hepatoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. These data indicate that this unique technique will provide a new in vivo experimental system for studying cell fate of hepatic stem/progenitor cells and liver organogenesis.

  6. Structural characterization of plant-derived hepatitis B surface antigen employed in oral immunization studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark L; Richter, Lizabeth; Arntzen, Charles J; Shuler, Michael L; Mason, Hugh S

    2003-09-08

    Several subunit vaccine antigens have been successfully expressed in plants and recently the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), expressed in potatoes, was shown to be orally immunogenic in animal studies. However, to date, a detailed analysis of the plant-derived antigen is lacking. Herein, we comprehensively characterize the structure and post-translational processing of HBsAg from potato tuber and two plant cell suspension cultures. The HBsAg was found to accumulate intracellularly as tubular structures, with a complex size distribution, differing substantially from the virus-like particle (VLP) preparations of the current commercial vaccines. Extensive disulfide-bond cross-linking, which is important for immunogenicity, was evident and 21-37% of total HBsAg protein displayed epitopes which correlate with vaccine potency. The significance of these results with regard to the production of cost-effective orally delivered vaccines is discussed.

  7. Discovery, Optimization, and Characterization of Novel Chlorcyclizine Derivatives for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported that chlorcyclizine (CCZ, Rac-2), an over-the-counter antihistamine piperazine drug, possesses in vitro and in vivo activity against hepatitis C virus. Here, we describe structure–activity relationship (SAR) efforts that resulted in the optimization of novel chlorcyclizine derivatives as anti-HCV agents. Several compounds exhibited EC50 values below 10 nM against HCV infection, cytotoxicity selectivity indices above 2000, and showed improved in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. The optimized molecules can serve as lead preclinical candidates for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and as probes to study hepatitis C virus pathogenesis and host–virus interaction. PMID:26599718

  8. [Exosomes derived from dendritic cells].

    PubMed

    Amigorena, S

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells and the only ones capable of inducing primary cytotoxic immune responses both in vivo and vitro. DCs secrete a 60-80 nm membrane vesicle population of endocytic origin, called exosomes. The protein composition of exosomes was analyzed using a systematic proteomic approach. Besides MHC and costimulatory molecules, exosomes bear several adhesion proteins, probably involved in their specific targeting. Exosomes also accumulate several cytosolic factors, most likely involved in exoxome's biogenesis in late endosomes. Like DCs, exosomes induce potent anti tumor immune responses in vivo. Indeed, a single injection of DC-derived exosomes sensitized with tumor peptides induced the eradication of established mouse tumors. Tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes were found in the spleen of exosome treated mice, and depletion of CD8+ T cells in vivo inhibited the anti tumor effect of exosomes. These results strongly support the implementation of human DC-derived exosomes for cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Systemic IL-12 Administration Alters Hepatic Dendritic Cell Stimulation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tim; Back, Timothy C.; Subleski, Jeffrey J.; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Ortaldo, John R.; Wiltrout, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The liver is an immunologically unique organ containing tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) that maintain an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Although systemic IL-12 administration can improve responses to tumors, the effects of IL-12-based treatments on DC, in particular hepatic DC, remain incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate systemic IL-12 administration induces a 2–3 fold increase in conventional, but not plasmacytoid, DC subsets in the liver. Following IL-12 administration, hepatic DC became more phenotypically and functionally mature, resembling the function of splenic DC, but differed as compared to their splenic counterparts in the production of IL-12 following co-stimulation with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Hepatic DCs from IL-12 treated mice acquired enhanced T cell proliferative capabilities similar to levels observed using splenic DCs. Furthermore, IL-12 administration preferentially increased hepatic T cell activation and IFNγ expression in the RENCA mouse model of renal cell carcinoma. Collectively, the data shows systemic IL-12 administration enables hepatic DCs to overcome at least some aspects of the inherently suppressive milieu of the hepatic environment that could have important implications for the design of IL-12-based immunotherapeutic strategies targeting hepatic malignancies and infections. PMID:22428016

  10. JMJD3 aids in reprogramming of bone marrow progenitor cells to hepatic phenotype through epigenetic activation of hepatic transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Kochat, Veena; Equbal, Zaffar; Baligar, Prakash; Kumar, Vikash; Srivastava, Madhulika; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2017-01-01

    The strictly regulated unidirectional differentiation program in some somatic stem/progenitor cells has been found to be modified in the ectopic site (tissue) undergoing regeneration. In these cases, the lineage barrier is crossed by either heterotypic cell fusion or direct differentiation. Though studies have shown the role of coordinated genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in cellular development and differentiation, how the lineage fate of adult bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs) is reprogrammed during liver regeneration and whether this lineage switch is stably maintained are not clearly understood. In the present study, we wanted to decipher genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that involve in lineage reprogramming of BMPCs into hepatocyte-like cells. Here we report dynamic transcriptional change during cellular reprogramming of BMPCs to hepatocytes and dissect the epigenetic switch mechanism of BM cell-mediated liver regeneration after acute injury. Genome-wide gene expression analysis in BM-derived hepatocytes, isolated after 1 month and 5 months of transplantation, showed induction of hepatic transcriptional program and diminishing of donor signatures over the time. The transcriptional reprogramming of BM-derived cells was found to be the result of enrichment of activating marks (H3K4me3 and H3K9Ac) and loss of repressive marks (H3K27me3 and H3K9me3) at the promoters of hepatic transcription factors (HTFs). Further analyses showed that BMPCs possess bivalent histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3) at the promoters of crucial HTFs. H3K27 methylation dynamics at the HTFs was antagonistically regulated by EZH2 and JMJD3. Preliminary evidence suggests a role of JMJD3 in removal of H3K27me3 mark from promoters of HTFs, thus activating epigenetically poised hepatic genes in BMPCs prior to partial nuclear reprogramming. The importance of JMJD3 in reprogramming of BMPCs to hepatic phenotype was confirmed by inhibiting catalytic function of the enzyme using small molecule

  11. Regulatory T Cells in Hepatitis B and C Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are hepatotropic viruses that establish chronic persistent infection by effectively escaping the host immune response and can cause immune-mediated liver injury. It has recently become apparent that regulatory T (Treg) cells, specifically CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, modulate viral diseases by suppressing antiviral immune responses and regulating inflammatory host injury. The roles of Treg cells in HBV and HCV infections range from suppressing antiviral T cell responses to protecting the liver from immune-mediated damage. This review describes Treg cells and subpopulations and focuses on the roles of these cells in HBV and HCV infections. PMID:28035208

  12. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  14. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem with the liver itself What Is Hepatitis A? Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is contagious, usually spreading to others ... objects contaminated by feces (poop) containing HAV. The hepatitis A vaccine has helped to make the infection rare ...

  15. Cell surface expression of hepatitis B surface and core antigens in transfected rat fibroblast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Siddiqui, A; Vierling, J M

    1990-04-01

    Hepatocellular necrosis during hepatitis B virus infection is hypothesized to result from host immune responses against either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen expressed on the surface membrane of infected hepatocytes. To study the capacity of hepatitis B deoxyribonucleic acid to induce membrane expression of either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen in vitro, we assessed transfected rat fibroblast cell lines by indirect immunofluorescence. Rat fibroblasts were transfected with plasmid vectors containing the natural promoters, native enhancer, and uninterrupted sequences of either the Pre S/S gene or core gene. Resulting cell lines produced hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen/hepatitis B e antigen, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry showed that hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen were expressed in a granular pattern in the surface membrane of transfected cells. We conclude that surface membrane expression of both hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen is an intrinsic consequence of expression of either the Pre S/S or core gene.

  16. In vitro use of autologous dendritic cells improves detection of T cell responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens.

    PubMed

    Carotenuto, Patrizia; Artsen, Andrè; Niesters, Hubert G; Osterhaus, Albert D; Pontesilli, Oscar

    2009-02-01

    T lymphocyte responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen (HBcAg) are vigorous and easily detectable in vitro during recovery from acute hepatitis B but significantly weaker in patients with chronic HBV infection. In contrast, T cell responses to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) are almost undetectable during infection and even in a substantial fraction of subjects receiving vaccination with HBsAg. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dendritic cells (DCs) in an in vitro assay could increase the detection of HBV-specific T cells in these conditions. Autologous monocyte-derived DCs, compared to direct HBsAg addition to the cultures, increased the stimulation of HBs- specific T cells. These were detected in 73% of healthy subjects who had recently received hepatitis B vaccine and in 43% of patients recovering from acute hepatitis B. Likewise, proliferation in response to DC-presented HBcAg was detected in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from the majority of chronic hepatitis B patients. A longitudinal evaluation of HBc-specific T cell responses during and after a 1-year treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN)-alpha showed that HBc-specific CD4(+) T cell responses had no correlation with sustained virus suppression whereas CD8(+) T cell responses were more frequently detected in patients able to control HBV replication after therapy interruption. The use of autologous DCs as antigen-presenting cells appears applicable to clinically relevant in vitro evaluation of T cell responses, particularly in those conditions characterized by low frequency of circulating antigen-specific cells and suboptimal in vivo activation. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Hepatic CD206-positive macrophages express amphiregulin to promote the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T cells in HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Sun, Xiaomei; Yang, Lihua; Gong, Zuojiong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a major cause of chronic liver inflammation worldwide. Innate and adaptive immune responses work together to restrain or eliminate hepatitis B virus in the liver. Compromised or failed adaptive immune response results in persistent virus replication and spread. How to promote antiviral immunity is a research focus for hepatitis B virus prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in the regulation of antiviral immunity. We found that F4/80(+)CD206(+)CD80(lo/+) macrophages were a particular hepatic macrophage subset that expressed amphiregulin in our mouse hepatitis B virus infection model. CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin promoted the immunosuppressive activity of intrahepatic regulatory T cells, demonstrated by higher expression of CTLA-4, ICOS, and CD39, as well as stronger inhibition of antiviral function of CD8(+) T cells. Amphiregulin-neutralizing antibody diminished the effect of CD206(+) macrophages on regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin activated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in regulatory T cells, and this mammalian target of rapamycin activation was essential for promotion of regulatory T cell activity by CD206(+) macrophages. Adoptive transfer of CD206(+) macrophages into hepatitis B virus-infected mice increased cytoplasmic hepatitis B virus DNA in hepatocytes and also increased serum hepatitis B surface antigen. The antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells was decreased after macrophage transfer. Therefore, our research indicated that amphiregulin produced by CD206(+) macrophages plays an important role in modulating regulatory T cell function and subsequently restrains the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells. Our study offers new insights into the immunomodulation in hepatitis B virus infection.

  18. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  19. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  20. Overactivation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-antioxidant response element pathway in hepatocytes decreases hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lung-Yi; Harberg, Calvin; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Cook, Shelly; Roenneburg, Drew; Werner, Sabine; Johnson, Jeffrey; Foley, David P

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) is a critical component of hepatic surgery. Oxidative stress has long been implicated as a key player in IRI. In this study, we examine the cell-specific role of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element pathway in warm hepatic IRI. Nrf2 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) animals and novel transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (caNrf2) mutant in hepatocytes (AlbCre+/caNrf2+) and their littermate controls underwent partial hepatic ischemia or sham surgery. The animals were killed 6 hours after reperfusion, and their serum and tissue were collected for analysis. As compared to WT animals after ischemia/reperfusion (IR), Nrf2 KO mice had increased hepatocellular injury with increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, Suzuki score, apoptosis, an increased inflammatory infiltrate, and enhanced inflammatory cytokine expression. On the other hand, AlbCre+/caNrf2+ that underwent IR had significantly reduced serum transaminases, less necrosis on histology, and a less pronounced inflammatory infiltrate and inflammatory cytokine expression as compared to the littermate controls. However, there were no differences in apoptosis. Taken together, Nrf2 plays a critical role in our murine model of warm hepatic IRI, with Nrf2 deficiency exacerbating hepatic IRI and hepatocyte-specific Nrf2 overactivation providing protection against warm hepatic IRI.

  1. Resistin mediates the hepatic stellate cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi-Xia; Su, Lin; Brymora, Joanne; Bird, Claire; Xie, Qing; George, Jacob; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe the role of resistin in liver fibrosis. METHODS: For the in vivo animal study, Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) for 4 wk. Rat liver, adipose tissue (epididymal fat) and serum were analyzed for resistin expression. For the in vitro experiment, rat primary hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells (KCs) were used. HSCs were exposed to recombinant resistin, and collagen I, transforming growth factor β1, α smooth muscle actin, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 and connective tissue growth factor expression were analyzed. Resistin gene and protein expression was quantified as was the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). The effects of resistin on HSC proliferation, migration and apoptosis were determined. The effects of resistin on KCs were also investigated. RESULTS: Following BDL, rat epididymal fat and serum rather than liver showed higher resistin expression compared to control rats. In liver, resistin was expressed in quiescent HSCs and KCs. Resistin treatment resulted in enhancement of TNFα, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 gene expression and increased IL-6 and MCP-1 protein in HSCs. Resistin activated HSC phospho-MAPK/p38, and p38 inhibition diminished IL-6 and MCP-1 expression. Furthermore, resistin facilitated HSC proliferation and migration, but decreased apoptosis which was via an IL-6 and MCP-1 mechanism. Finally, resistin-induced transforming growth factor β1 from KCs enhanced HSC collagen Iexpression. CONCLUSION: Resistin directly and indirectly modulates HSC behavior towards a more pro-fibrogenic phenotype. PMID:23901222

  2. Synthesis and assembly of Hepatitis B virus envelope protein-derived particles in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Onbe, Keisuke; Liu, Qiushi; Iijima, Masumi; Tatematsu, Kenji; Seno, Masaharu; Tada, Hiroko; Kuroda, Shun' Ichi

    2017-08-19

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope particles have been synthesized in eukaryotic cells (e.g., mammalian cells, insect cells, and yeast cells) as an HB vaccine immunogen and drug delivery system (DDS) nanocarrier. Many researchers had made attempts to synthesize the particles in Escherichia coli for minimize the cost and time for producing HBV envelope particles, but the protein was too deleterious to be synthesized in E. coli. In this study, we generated deletion mutants of HBV envelope L protein (389 amino acid residues (aa)) containing three transmembrane domains (TM1, TM2, TM3). The ΔNC mutant spanning from TM2 to N-terminal half of TM3 (from 237 aa to 335 aa) was found as a shortest form showing spontaneous particle formation. After the N-terminal end of ΔNC mutant was optimized by the N-end rule for E. coli expression, the modified ΔNC mutant (mΔNC) was efficiently expressed as particles in E. coli. The molecular mass of mΔNC particle was approx. 670 kDa, and the diameter was 28.5 ± 6.2 nm (mean ± SD, N = 61). The particle could react with anti-HBV envelope S protein antibody, indicating the particles exhibited S antigenic domain outside as well as HBV envelope particles. Taken together, the E. coli-derived mΔNC particles could be used as a substitute of eukaryotic cell-derived HBV envelope particles for versatile applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatic Stellate Cells Regulate Immune Response via Induction of Myeloid Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Yang, Horng-Ren; Wang, Lianfu; Arakawa, Yusuke; Brown, Kathleen; Wu, Qingyu; Lin, Feng; Peters, Marion; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2011-01-01

    Although organ transplants have been applied for decades, outcomes of somatic cell transplants remain disappointing, presumably due to lack of appropriate supporting stromal cells. Thus, cotransplantation with liver stromal cells, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), achieves long-term survival of islet allografts in mice via induction of effector T cell apoptosis and generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in vivo that HSC can promote generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). HSC-induced MDSC demonstrate potent immune inhibitory activity. Induction of MDSC is dependent on intact IFN-γ signaling pathway in HSC, and is mediated by soluble factors, suggesting that the specific tissue stromal cells, such as HSC, play a crucial role in regulating immune response via inflammation-induced generation of MDSC. Large amounts of MDSC can be propagated in vitro from bone marrow derived myeloid precursor cells under the influence of HSC. Cotransplantation with in vitro generated MDSC can effectively protects islet allografts from host immune attack. Local delivery of potent immune suppressor cells for cell transplants holds a great clinical application potential. PMID:21374665

  4. CD133(+) human umbilical cord blood stem cells enhance angiogenesis in experimental chronic hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Elkhafif, Nagwa; El Baz, Hanan; Hammam, Olfat; Hassan, Salwa; Salah, Faten; Mansour, Wafaa; Mansy, Soheir; Yehia, Hoda; Zaki, Ahmed; Magdy, Ranya

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo angiogenic potential of transplanted human umbilical cord blood (UCB) CD133(+) stem cells in experimental chronic hepatic fibrosis induced by murine schistosomiasis was studied. Enriched cord blood-derived CD133(+) cells were cultured in primary medium for 3 weeks. Twenty-two weeks post-Schistosomiasis infection in mice, after reaching the chronic hepatic fibrotic stage, transplantation of stem cells was performed and mice were sacrificed 3 weeks later. Histopathology and electron microscopy showed an increase in newly formed blood vessels and a decrease in the fibrosis known for this stage of the disease. By immunohistochemical analysis the newly formed blood vessels showed positive expression of the human-specific angiogenic markers CD31, CD34 and von Willebrand factor. Few hepatocyte-like polygonal cells showed positive expression of human vascular endothelial growth factor and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The transplanted CD133(+) human stem cells primarily enhanced hepatic angiogenesis and neovascularization and contributed to repair in a paracrine manner by creating a permissive environment that enabled proliferation and survival of damaged cells rather than by direct differentiation to hepatocytes. A dual advantage of CD133(+) cell therapy in hepatic disease is suggested based on its capability of hematopoietic and endothelial differentiation.

  5. Catalase ameliorates hepatic fibrosis by inhibition of hepatic stellate cells activation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuwei; Qu, Ying; Xu, Mingyi; Wang, Xingpeng; Lu, Lungen

    2014-01-01

    Catalase, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, is thought to have rescue effects on hepatic fibrosis. In this study, the regulation of catalase in CCl₄-induced hepatic fibrogenesis was investigated. Our results indicated that catalase expression was decreased upon CCl₄ treatment in a time-dependent manner, while the expression of several profibrosis and proangiogenic factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and angiopoietin 1 were significantly increased. To assess the role of catalase in hepatic fibrosis, catalase was overexpressed in HSC-T6 cells. This overexpression resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migratory activity, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, key features that characterize activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Overexpression of catalase led to a decrease in the secretion of collagen type 1 and angiopoietin 1. These results indicate that loss of catalase activity is involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis caused by the activation of HSCs.

  6. In hepatic fibrosis, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells acquire enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Michael K; Bedrosian, Andrea S; Malhotra, Ashim; Henning, Justin R; Ibrahim, Junaid; Vera, Valery; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E; Hassan, Burhan U; Pachter, H Leon; Cohen, Steven; Frey, Alan B; Miller, George

    2010-08-15

    The normal liver is characterized by immunologic tolerance. Primary mediators of hepatic immune tolerance are liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). LSECs block adaptive immunogenic responses to Ag and induce the generation of T regulatory cells. Hepatic fibrosis is characterized by both intense intrahepatic inflammation and altered hepatic immunity. We postulated that, in liver fibrosis, a reversal of LSEC function from tolerogenic to proinflammatory and immunogenic may contribute to both the heightened inflammatory milieu and altered intrahepatic immunity. We found that, after fibrotic liver injury from hepatotoxins, LSECs become highly proinflammatory and secrete an array of cytokines and chemokines. In addition, LSECs gain enhanced capacity to capture Ag and induce T cell proliferation. Similarly, unlike LSECs in normal livers, in fibrosis, LSECs do not veto dendritic cell priming of T cells. Furthermore, whereas in normal livers, LSECs are active in the generation of T regulatory cells, in hepatic fibrosis LSECs induce an immunogenic T cell phenotype capable of enhancing endogenous CTLs and generating potent de novo CTL responses. Moreover, depletion of LSECs from fibrotic liver cultures mitigates the proinflammatory milieu characteristic of hepatic fibrosis. Our findings offer a critical understanding of the role of LSECs in modulating intrahepatic immunity and inflammation in fibro-inflammatory liver disease.

  7. Hepatitis C virus in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Hasan, Syed; Giday, Samuel; Alamgir, Laila; Banks, Alpha; Frederick, Winston; Smoot, Duane; Castro, Oswaldo

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies (anti-HCV) in patients with sickle cell disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 1983 and 2001, 150 patients from the Howard University Hospital Center for Sickle Cell Disease were screened for HCV antibody (52% women, 48% men, mean age 34 years). Frozen serum samples from 56 adult sickle cell patients who had participated in previous surveys (1983-92) of HIV and HTLV-1 serology and who were tested in 1992 for anti-HCV antibody--when commercial ELISA test (Ortho) became available--were included in this paper. Of the 150 patients in the study, 132 had sickle cell anemia genotype (SS), 15 had sickle cell hemoglobin-C disease (SC) and three had sickle beta thalassemia. Clinical charts were reviewed for history of blood transfusion, IV drug abuse, homosexuality, tattooing, iron overload, and alcohol abuse. RESULTS: Antibodies to HCV were detected in 53 patients (35.3%). Of the 55 patients who had frozen serum samples tested in 1992, 32 (58%) were reactive for anti-HCV, while only 21 of the 95 patients (22%) tested after 1992 were positive for HCV antibodies (P<0.001). Thirty-nine of 77 patients (51%) who received more than 10 units of packed red blood cells were positive for HCV antibody, and only 14 of 61 patients (23%) who received less than 10 units of packed red blood cells transfusion were positive for HCV antibodies (P<0.001). None of the 12 patients who never received transfusion were positive for HCV antibody. In the 53 anti-HCV positive patients, the mean alanine amino-transferase (ALT) value was 98- and 81 U/L, respectively, for males and females. These values were normal for the HCV-antibody negative patients. The aspartate amino-transferase (AST) and the total bilirubin were also higher in the anti-HCV positive patients compared to patients in the anti-HCV negative group. Forty-four patients (57.1%) who were transfused more than 10 units developed iron overload defined by a serum ferritin

  8. Donor-Derived Hepatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: Pause Before Proceeding With Liver Retransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azzawi, Yasir; Stein, Lance L.; Shrestha, Roshan; Bhasin, Devina; Citron, Steven J.; Rubin, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare but the age-adjusted incidence in the United States has increased, possibly due to improved radiographic and endoscopic detection. In advanced NET, hepatic metastases are common. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is currently considered an acceptable therapy for selected patients with limited hepatic disease or liver metastases where complete resection is thought to have curative intent. The development of NET of donor origin is very uncommon after organ transplant, and it is unclear if the same treatment strategies applied to hepatic NET would also be efficacious after OLT. Here, we describe a unique case of an OLT recipient with a donor-derived NET that was treated with redo OLT as the primary therapy. The donor-derived NET recurred in the recipient's second liver allograft suggesting an extrahepatic reservoir. This case describes the natural history of such a rare event. Here, we highlight the treatment options for hepatic NET and challenge the role of OLT for a donor-derived hepatic NET. PMID:27830182

  9. Efficacy of a topical bovine-derived thrombin solution as a hemostatic agent in a rodent model of hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosselli, Desiree D.; Brainard, Benjamin M.; Schmiedt, Chad W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage is a major concern in patients undergoing hepatic surgery or in those with hepatic trauma. In these cases, employing traditional hemostatic strategies can be problematic due to the diffuse nature of hepatic hemorrhage and limited opportunities for direct hemostasis. This study assessed the efficacy of a bovine-derived thrombin solution, (BT), as a topical liquid agent to augment hemostasis and survival following severe hepatic hemorrhage in a rat model. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), packed cell volume (PCV), and overall survival were evaluated in 54 rats randomly assigned to receive topical application of BT, saline, or suture ligation applied immediately to a liver lobe following controlled laceration. Six additional rats received liver laceration with no applied treatment. Intravenous fluid resuscitation was initiated and HR and ABP were recorded for 60 min, after which survivors were recovered from anesthesia. Rats were then monitored for 72 h, after which survivors were euthanized. There was no significant difference in survival time, percentage survival, intra-operative ABP or HR, or post-operative PCV between treatment groups. There is insufficient evidence to recommend BT as the sole therapy using this delivery method for mitigating severe hemorrhage from liver injury. PMID:26424911

  10. Efficacy of a topical bovine-derived thrombin solution as a hemostatic agent in a rodent model of hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Rosselli, Desiree D; Brainard, Benjamin M; Schmiedt, Chad W

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage is a major concern in patients undergoing hepatic surgery or in those with hepatic trauma. In these cases, employing traditional hemostatic strategies can be problematic due to the diffuse nature of hepatic hemorrhage and limited opportunities for direct hemostasis. This study assessed the efficacy of a bovine-derived thrombin solution, (BT), as a topical liquid agent to augment hemostasis and survival following severe hepatic hemorrhage in a rat model. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), packed cell volume (PCV), and overall survival were evaluated in 54 rats randomly assigned to receive topical application of BT, saline, or suture ligation applied immediately to a liver lobe following controlled laceration. Six additional rats received liver laceration with no applied treatment. Intravenous fluid resuscitation was initiated and HR and ABP were recorded for 60 min, after which survivors were recovered from anesthesia. Rats were then monitored for 72 h, after which survivors were euthanized. There was no significant difference in survival time, percentage survival, intra-operative ABP or HR, or post-operative PCV between treatment groups. There is insufficient evidence to recommend BT as the sole therapy using this delivery method for mitigating severe hemorrhage from liver injury.

  11. Hepatic stellate cell interferes with NK cell regulation of fibrogenesis via curcumin induced senescence of hepatic stellate cell.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huanhuan; Jia, Yan; Yao, Zhen; Huang, Jingjing; Hao, Meng; Yao, Shunyu; Lian, Naqi; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Chenxi; Chen, Xingran; Bian, Mianli; Shao, Jiangjuan; Wu, Li; Chen, Anping; Zheng, Shizhong

    2017-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis, a common scarring response to various forms of chronic liver injury, is a precursor to cirrhosis and liver cancer. During liver fibrosis, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) initially activate and proliferate, which are responsible for the secretion of extracellular matrix components. However, these cells eventually senesce and are cleared by natural killer (NK) cells. Our previous researches have shown that the natural product curcumin could promote the senescence of activated HSC. In this study, we investigated how NK cells target senescent HSC and assessed the effect of this process on liver fibrosis. We found that senescent HSC induced by curcumin are susceptible to NK cells killing, due to the increased expression of NK cell activating ligand major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A (MICA) and UL16-binding proteins 2 (ULBP2), but not Poliovirus Receptor (PVR). Further studies displayed that the interaction between NK cells and senescent LX2 cells stimulated granule exocytosis. Moreover, the inhibition of granule exocytosis weakened the cytotoxicity of NK cells and promoted the accumulation of senescent LX2 cells. Therefore, these aggregated data indicated that NK cells mediated clearance of senescent LX2 cells and granule exocytosis could play a protective role in the improvement of liver fibrosis.

  12. Hepatic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regulates Recruitment of Rat Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Lei; Chiu, Jenny D.; van de Ven, Gijs; Gaarde, William A.; DeLeve, Laurie D.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims After liver injury, bone marrow-derived liver sinusoidal endothelial cell progenitor cells (BM SPCs) repopulate the sinusoid as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). After partial hepatectomy, BM SPCs provide hepatocyte growth factor, promote hepatocyte proliferation, and are necessary for normal liver regeneration. We examined how hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates recruitment of BM SPC and their effects on liver injury. Methods Rats were given injections of dimethylnitrosamine to induce liver injury, which was assessed by histology and transaminase assays. Recruitment of SPCs was analyzed by examining BM SPC proliferation, mobilization to the circulation, engraftment in liver, and development of fenestration (differentiation). Results Dimethylnitrosamine caused extensive denudation of LSEC at 24 hours, followed by centrilobular hemorrhagic necrosis at 48 hours. Proliferation of BM SPCs, number of SPCs in the bone marrow, and mobilization of BM SPCs to the circulation increased 2- to 4-fold by 24 hours after injection of dimethylnitrosamine; within 5 days, 40% of all LSEC came from engrafted BM SPC. Allogeneic resident SPCs, infused 24 hours after injection of dimethylnitrosamine, repopulated the sinusoid as LSEC and reduced liver injury. Expression of hepatic VEGF mRNA and protein increased 5-fold by 24 hours after dimethylnitrosamine injection. Knockdown of hepatic VEGF with antisense oligonucleotides completely prevented dimethylnitrosamine-induced proliferation of BM SPCs and their mobilization to the circulation, reduced their engraftment by 46%, completely prevented formation of fenestration after engraftment as LSEC, and exacerbated dimethylnitrosamine injury. Conclusions BM SPC recruitment is a repair response to dimethylnitrosamine liver injury in rats. Hepatic VEGF regulates recruitment of BM SPCs to liver and reduces this form of liver injury. PMID:22902870

  13. HHV-6A in syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Potenza, Leonardo; Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Rossi, Giulio; Cocchi, Stefania; Codeluppi, Mauro; Pecorari, Monica; Masetti, Michele; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Gennari, William; Portolani, Marinella; Gerunda, Giorgio Enrico; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Landini, Maria Paola; Schulz, Thomas F; Torelli, Giuseppe; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2008-08-07

    Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis is a rare but severe form of hepatitis that is associated with autoimmune diseases, drug reactions, and viral infections. We used serologic, molecular, and immunohistochemical methods to search for an infectious cause in a case of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis that developed in a liver-transplant recipient who had latent infection with variant B of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6B) and who had received the organ from a donor with variant A latent infection (HHV-6A). At the onset of the disease, the detection of HHV-6A (but not HHV-6B) DNA in plasma, in affected liver tissue, and in single micromanipulated syncytial giant cells with the use of two different polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assays indicated the presence of active HHV-6A infection in the patient. Expression of the HHV-6A-specific early protein, p41/38, but not of the HHV-6B-specific late protein, p101, was demonstrated only in liver syncytial giant cells in the absence of other infectious pathogens. The same markers of HHV-6A active infection were documented in serial follow-up samples from the patient and disappeared only at the resolution of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis. Neither HHV-6B DNA nor late protein was identified in the same follow-up samples from the patient. Thus, HHV-6A may be a cause of syncytial giant-cell hepatitis.

  14. Hepatic Stellate Cells: Partners in Crime for Liver Metastases?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ningling; Gores, Gregory; Shah, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells were recently postulated as a component of the prometastatic liver microenvironment because they can transdifferentiate into highly proliferative and motile myofibroblasts that are implicated in the desmoplastic reaction and metastatic growth. This review focuses on bidirectional interactions between tumor cells and HSC in the liver microenvironment and discusses mechanisms whereby tumor derived factors activate HSC, and in turn, activated HSC promote metastatic growth. Bidirectional interactions between tumors and HSC may function as an “amplification loop” to further enhance metastatic growth in the liver. The activation of HSC is a complex process regulated by multiple factors such as TGF-β and PDGF signaling pathways, which may present as therapeutic targets in the prevention and treatment of liver metastases. Targeting HSC/myofibroblasts with TGF-β or PDGF antagonists in coordination with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery may prove to be effective at reducing liver metastases and increasing the survival benefit of patients by targeting both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21520207

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    While conventional anticancer therapies, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy, are relatively efficient at eliminating primary tumors, these treatment modalities are largely ineffective against metastases. At least in part, this reflects the rather inefficient delivery of conventional anticancer agents to metastatic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) can be used as cellular missiles to selectively deliver a radioisotope-coupled attenuated variant of Listeria monocytogenes to both primary and metastatic neoplastic lesions in mice with pancreatic cancer. This novel immunotherapeutic intervention robustly inhibited tumor growth while promoting a dramatic decrease in the number of metastases. PMID:24427545

  16. Efficient generation of hepatic cells from multipotent adult mouse germ-line stem cells using an OP9 co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Jende, Jörg; Cheng, I-Fen; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Guan, Kaomei

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of their self-renewal capacity and their ability to differentiate into derivatives of all three germ layers, germ line-derived multipotent adult stem cells (maGSCs) from mouse testis might serve as one of preferable sources for pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine. In our study, we aimed for an efficient hepatic differentiation protocol that is applicable for both maGSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We attempted to accomplish this goal by using a new established co-culture system with OP9 stroma cells for direct differentiation of maGSCs and ESCs into hepatic cells. We found that the hepatic differentiation of maGSCs was induced by the OP9 co-culture system in comparison to the gelatin culture. Furthermore, we showed that the combination of OP9 co-culture with activin A resulted in the increased expression of endodermal and early hepatic markers Gata4, Sox17, Foxa2, Hnf4, Afp, and Ttr compared to differentiated cells on gelatin or on OP9 alone. Moreover, the hepatic progenitors were capable of differentiating further into mature hepatic cells, demonstrated by the expression of liver-specific markers Aat, Alb, Tdo2, Krt18, Krt8, Krt19, Cps1, Sek, Cyp7a1, Otc, and Pah. A high percentage of maGSC-derived hepatic progenitors (51% AFP- and 61% DLK1-positive) and mature hepatic-like cells (26% ALB-positive) were achieved using this OP9 co-culture system. These generated hepatic cells successfully demonstrated in vitro functions associated with mature hepatocytes, including albumin and urea secretion, glycogen storage, and uptake of low-density lipoprotein. The established co-culture system for maGSCs into functional hepatic cells might serve as a suitable model to delineate the differentiation process for the generation of high numbers of mature hepatocytes in humans without genetic manipulations and make germ line-derived stem cells a potential autologous and alternative cell source for hepatic transplants in metabolic liver disorders.

  17. Regulatory T Cells in Autoimmune and Viral Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In both autoimmune liver disease and chronic viral hepatitis, the injury results from an immune-mediated cytotoxic T cell response to liver cells. As such, it is not surprising that CD4(+) regulatory T cells, a key regulatory population of T cells able to curb immune responses, could be involved in both autoimmune hepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis. The liver can induce the conversion of naïve CD4(+) T cells to CD4(+) regulatory T cells and induce tolerance to locally expressed antigens. This tolerance mechanism is carefully regulated in physiological conditions but any imbalance could be pathological. An overly tolerant immune response can lead to chronic infections while an overreactive and unbridled immune response can lead to autoimmune hepatitis. With the recent advent of monoclonal antibodies able to target regulatory T cells (daclizumab) and improve immune responses and several ongoing clinical trials analysing the impact of regulatory T cell infusion on autoimmune liver disease or liver transplant tolerance, modulation of immunological tolerance through CD4(+) regulatory T cells could be a key element of future immunotherapies for several liver diseases allowing restoring the balance between proper immune responses and tolerance.  .

  18. Retinoic acid suppresses the response to platelet-derived growth factor in human hepatic Ito-cell-like myofibroblasts: a post-receptor mechanism independent of raf/fos/jun/egr activation.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Coll, D; Beno, D W

    1993-01-01

    Activated Ito-cell-like myofibroblasts proliferate in vivo during human liver injury and subsequent fibrogenesis. To examine the associated regulatory mechanisms, human liver myofibroblasts were characterized after culture purification from mixed liver-cell isolates obtained from perfused normal human livers. The cells resembled rat Ito-cell-derived myofibroblasts expressing desmin and alpha-smooth-muscle actin filaments as well as the interstitial collagens type I and III. [3H]Thymidine incorporation was inducible with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and was suppressible with retinoic acid (RAc) in a concentration-dependent fashion. RAc suppression did not alter PDGF alpha- or beta-receptor abundance or activation. In addition, RAc functioned via a pathway distal or independent of cytoplasmic raf activation (i.e. phosphorylation, kinase function and perinuclear translocation) and nuclear fos, jun and egr expression, as these steps were similarly unaffected by RAc treatment. Since normal Ito cells contain abundant amounts of vitamin A which is lost during activation, these data suggest that retinoids could contribute to the maintenance of the quiescent non-proliferative state by suppressing mitogenesis at a post-cytokine receptor step distal from or independent of fos/jun/egr [e.g. via changes in activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding]. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8379934

  19. Host cell kinases and the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Lupberger, Joachim; Doerig, Christian; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection relies on virus-host interactions with human hepatocytes, a context in which host cell kinases play critical roles in every step of the HCV life cycle. During viral entry, cellular kinases, including EGFR, EphA2 and PKA, regulate the localization of host HCV entry factors and induce receptor complex assembly. Following virion internalization, viral genomes replicate on endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranous webs. The formation of membranous webs depends on interactions between the HCV NS5a protein and PI4KIIIα. The phosphorylation status of NS5a, regulated by PI4KIIIα, CKI and other kinases, also acts as a molecular switch to virion assembly, which takes place on lipid droplets. The formation of lipid droplets is enhanced by HCV activation of IKKα. In view of the multiple crucial steps in the viral life cycle that are mediated by host cell kinases, these enzymes also represent complementary targets for antiviral therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  1. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  3. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma associated with choroidal infiltration and syncytial giant cell hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Amer, Radgonde; Pe'er, Jacob; Pappo, Orit; Dotan, Shlomo

    2005-09-01

    A 31-year-old woman developed necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG), a thickened choroid, and syncytial giant cell hepatitis, a previously unreported association. NXG and syncytial giant cell hepatitis may have a common autoimmune pathogenesis.

  4. Inhibitory effect of kaolin minerals compound against hepatitis C virus in Huh-7 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated to infect 200 million individuals in the globe, including approximately 10 million in Pakistan causing both acute and chronic hepatitis. The standard treatment against HCV is pegylated interferon therapy in combination with a nucleoside analogue ribavirin. In addition, several herbal extracts and phytochemicals derivatives are used traditionally in the treatment of liver diseases as well as HCV infection. The present study determines the inhibitory effect of kaolin minerals compound against hepatitis C virus in Huh-7 cell lines. Methods Huh-7 cell lines were used for the in vitro HCV replication by using HCV positive sera from different patients with known HCV genotypes and viral titer/load. Total RNA was extracted from these infected cells and was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR). The viral titer was compared with the control samples to determine the anti-HCV activity of kaolin derived compounds. Kaolin is a group of clay minerals, with the chemical composition Al2 Si2O5 (OH)4. Results The results showed promising effectiveness of local kaolin derived anti-HCV compounds by causing 28% to 77% decrease in the HCV titer, when applied to infected Huh-7 cell lines. This study provides the basis for future work on these compounds especially to determine the specific pathway and mechanism for inhibitory action in the replicon systems of viral hepatitis. Conclusions Kaolin mineral derivatives show promising inhibitory effects against HCV genotypes 3a and 1a infection, which suggests its possible use as complementary and alternative medicine for HCV viral infection. PMID:24742271

  5. Inhibitory effect of kaolin minerals compound against hepatitis C virus in Huh-7 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Idrees, Muhammad; Ali, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Ur Rehman, Irshad; Ali, Amjad; Iqbal, Syed Abbas; Kamel, Eyad Hassan

    2014-04-17

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated to infect 200 million individuals in the globe, including approximately 10 million in Pakistan causing both acute and chronic hepatitis. The standard treatment against HCV is pegylated interferon therapy in combination with a nucleoside analogue ribavirin. In addition, several herbal extracts and phytochemicals derivatives are used traditionally in the treatment of liver diseases as well as HCV infection. The present study determines the inhibitory effect of kaolin minerals compound against hepatitis C virus in Huh-7 cell lines. Huh-7 cell lines were used for the in vitro HCV replication by using HCV positive sera from different patients with known HCV genotypes and viral titer/load. Total RNA was extracted from these infected cells and was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-time PCR). The viral titer was compared with the control samples to determine the anti-HCV activity of kaolin derived compounds. Kaolin is a group of clay minerals, with the chemical composition Al2 Si2O5 (OH)4. The results showed promising effectiveness of local kaolin derived anti-HCV compounds by causing 28% to 77% decrease in the HCV titer, when applied to infected Huh-7 cell lines. This study provides the basis for future work on these compounds especially to determine the specific pathway and mechanism for inhibitory action in the replicon systems of viral hepatitis. Kaolin mineral derivatives show promising inhibitory effects against HCV genotypes 3a and 1a infection, which suggests its possible use as complementary and alternative medicine for HCV viral infection.

  6. Hepatic T Cell Tolerance Induction in An Inflammatory Environment.

    PubMed

    Dywicki, Janine; Noyan, Fatih; Misslitz, Ana Clara; Hapke, Martin; Galla, Melanie; Schlue, Jerome; Liblau, Roland S; Taubert, Richard; Manns, Michael P; Jaeckel, Elmar; Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias

    2017-10-12

    For the development of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), genetic predisposition and environmental triggers are of major importance. Although experimental AIH can be induced in genetically susceptible mice, the low precursor frequency of autoreactive T cells hampers a deeper analysis of liver-specific T cells. Here, we established a system where the model antigen hemagglutinin (HA) is expressed exclusively in hepatocytes of Rosa26-HA mice following administration of a replication deficient adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase (Ad-Cre). Under these conditions, hepatocytes mimic the generation of altered-self neoantigens. To follow autoreactive T cells during AIH, we adoptively transferred HA-specific Cl4-TCR and 6.5-TCR T cells into Ad-Cre infected Rosa26-HA mice. Alternatively, Rosa26-HA mice have been crossed with TCR transgenic mice that were infected with Ad-Cre to break hepatic tolerance and induce the expression of the HA antigen as a hepatic self-antigen. Surprisingly, neither adoptive transfer nor a very high precursor frequency of autoreactive T cells was able to break tolerance in the context of adenoviral infection. The low proliferation of the antigen experienced autoreactive T cells despite the presence of the autoantigen and inflammation points to anergy as a potential tolerance mechanism. This model underscores the crucial importance of genetic susceptibility to break tolerance against hepatic autoantigens. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Acute seronegative hepatitis C manifesting itself as adult giant cell hepatitis--a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kryczka, Wiesław; Walewska-Zielecka, Bozena; Dutkiewicz, Ewa

    2003-08-01

    Adult giant cell hepatitis (AGCH) is a rare event and only about 100 cases have been reported within the last 20 years. The AGCH has been observed in association with viral infection, drug reactions or autoimmune disorders but in many cases its etiology remains unclear. AGCH manifests clinically as severe form of hepatitis histologically characterized by diffuse giant cell transformation of hepatocytes. We report the case of a 39-yr-old man with acute community-acquired hepatitis without previous pathology of the liver. Laboratory data revealed slight hypergammaglobulinemia and high titer of anti-smooth-muscle antibody with negative serology of hepatotropic viruses and absence of other known causes of hepatitis. Preliminary diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis was established, additionally confirmed by excellent clinical and biochemical improvement during corticosteroid treatment. A liver biopsy showed the typical findings of panlobular syncytial giant cell hepatitis and positive HCV-RNA both in serum and liver. The above verified the diagnosis of acute type C hepatitis manifested histologically as adult giant cell hepatitis. After three months of treatment we withdrew corticosteroids as spontaneous clearance of HCV occurred and the lack of autoantibodies in serum as well as significant improvement of liver histology was ascertained. Within 30 months of the follow-up we have not observed biochemical and immunological abnormalities and control liver biopsy has shown no signs of hepatitis.

  8. Generation of Functional Human Hepatic Endoderm from Human iPS cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Gareth J.; Hay, David C.; Park, In-Hyun; Fletcher, Judy; Hannoun, Zara; Payne, Catherine M.; Dalgetty, Donna; Black, James R.; Ross, James A.; Samuel, Kay; Wang, Gang; Daley, George Q.; Lee, Je-Hyuk; Church, George M.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Iredale, John P.; Wilmut, Ian

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, it is now feasible to generate iPSCs with a defined genotype or disease state. When coupled with direct differentiation of defined lineage, such as hepatic endoderm (HE). iPSC would revolutionise the way we study human liver biology and generate efficient “off the shelf” models of human liver disease. Here we show the `proof of concept' that iPSC lines representing both male and female sexes and two ethnic origins can be differentiated to HE at efficiencies of between 70–90%, using a method mimicking a physiological condition. iPSC-derived HE exhibited hepatic morphology, and expressed the hepatic markers, Albumin and E-Cadherin as assessed by immuno-histochemistry. They also expressed alpha fetal protein (AFP), HNF4a, and a metabolic marker, Cyp7A1, demonstrating a definitive endodermal lineage differentiation. Furthermore, iPSC-derived hepatocytes produced and secreted the plasma proteins, fibrinogen, fibronectin, transthyretin (TTR) and AFP, an essential feature for functional HE. Additionally iPSC-derived HE supported both CYP1A2 and 3A4 metabolism, which is essential for drug and toxicology testing. Conclusion This work is first to demonstrate the efficient generation of hepatic endodermal lineage from human iPSC that exhibits key attributes of hepatocytes, and the potential application of iPSC-derived HE in studying human liver biology. In particular, iPSC from individuals representing highly polymorphic variants in metabolic genes and different ethnic groups will provide pharmaceutical development and toxicology studies a unique opportunity to revolutionise predictive drug toxicology assays and allow the creation of in vitro hepatic disease models. PMID:19877180

  9. Fluorescent primuline derivatives inhibit hepatitis C virus NS3-catalyzed RNA unwinding, peptide hydrolysis and viral replicase formation.

    PubMed

    Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Mukherjee, Sourav; Shadrick, William R; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) multifunctional nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a protease that cleaves viral and host proteins and a helicase that separates DNA and RNA structures in reactions fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Li et al. (2012) recently synthesized a series of new NS3 helicase inhibitors from the benzothiazole dimer component of the fluorescent yellow dye primuline. This study further characterizes a subset of these primuline derivatives with respect to their specificity, mechanism of action, and effect on cells harboring HCV subgenomic replicons. All compounds inhibited DNA and RNA unwinding catalyzed by NS3 from different HCV genotypes, but only some inhibited the NS3 protease function, and few had any effect on HCV NS3 catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. A different subset contained potent inhibitors of RNA stimulated ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the related NS3 protein from Dengue virus. In assays monitoring intrinsic protein fluorescence in the absence of nucleic acids, the compounds cooperatively bound NS3 with K(d)s that reflect their potency in assays. The fluorescent properties of the primuline derivatives both in vitro and in cells are also described. The primuline derivative that was the most active against subgenomic replicons in cells caused a 14-fold drop in HCV RNA levels (IC(50)=5±2μM). In cells, the most effective primuline derivative did not inhibit the cellular activity of NS3 protease but disrupted HCV replicase structures.

  10. Efficient replication systems for hepatitis C virus using a new human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Kato, Nobuyuki; Mori, Kyoko; Abe, Ken-ichi; Dansako, Hiromichi; Kuroki, Misao; Ariumi, Yasuo; Wakita, Takaji; Ikeda, Masanori

    2009-12-01

    Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes chronic liver diseases and is a serious global health problem. Cell culture-based persistent HCV RNA replication systems and infectious HCV production systems are widely used in HCV research. However, persistent HCV production systems have been developed only for HuH-7 hepatoma cells. Here we found a new human hepatoma cell line, Li23, that enables persistent HCV production and anti-HCV reagent assay. Li23's cDNA expression profile differed from HuH-7's, although the two cells had similar liver-specific expression profiles. We used HCV RNA with a specific combination of adaptive mutations to develop an HCV replicon system and genome-length HCV RNA replicating systems including a reporter assay system. Finally, Li23-derived cells persistently produced infectious virus of an HCV strain. Li23-derived cells are potentially useful for understanding the HCV life cycle and for finding antiviral targets.

  11. Rotating microgravity-bioreactor cultivation enhances the hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells on biodegradable polymer scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Yunping; Zhang, Shichang; Peng, Guangyong; Liu, Tao; Li, Yangxin; Xiang, Dedong; Wassler, Michael J; Shelat, Harnath S; Geng, Yongjian

    2012-11-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that are capable of differentiating all the somatic cell lineages, including those in the liver tissue. We describe the generation of functional hepatic-like cells from mouse ES (mES) cells using a biodegradable polymer scaffold and a rotating bioreactor that allows simulated microgravity. Cells derived from ES cells cultured in the three-dimensional (3D) culture system with exogenous growth factors and hormones can differentiate into hepatic-like cells with morphologic characteristics of typical mature hepatocytes. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain-reaction testing, Western blot testing, immunostaining, and flow cytometric analysis show that these cells express hepatic-specific genes and proteins during differentiation. Differentiated cells on scaffolds further exhibit morphologic traits and biomarkers characteristic of liver cells, including albumin production, cytochrome P450 activity, and low-density lipoprotein uptake. When these stem cell-bearing scaffolds are transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice, the 3D constructs remained viable, undergoing further differentiation and maturation of hepatic-like cells in vivo. In conclusion, the growth and differentiation of ES cells in a biodegradable polymer scaffold and a rotating microgravity bioreactor can yield functional and organizational hepatocytes useful for research involving bioartificial liver and engineered liver tissue.

  12. Synthesis of C-4-Substituted Steviol Derivatives and Their Inhibitory Effects against Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shwu-Jiuan; Su, Ta-Chi; Chu, Chin-Nan; Chang, Yi-Chih; Yang, Li-Ming; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Tsurng-Juhn

    2016-12-23

    ent-13-Hydroxykaur-16-ene-19-N-butylureide (6) was one of 33 synthesized C-4-substituted steviol derivatives that were evaluated for their effects on hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) secretion. The IC50 (16.9 μM) and SI (57.7) values for inhibiting HBV DNA replication of compound 6 were greater than those of the reference compound, lamivudine (3-TC; IC50: 107.5 μM; SI: 22.0). Thus, the anti-HBV mechanism of 6 was investigated, and it specifically inhibited viral gene expression and reduced viral DNA levels, as well as potently attenuated all of the viral promoter activity of HBV-expressing Huh7 cells. Examination of cellular signaling pathways found that 6 inhibited the activities of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB- and activator protein (AP)-1 element-containing promoters, but had no effects on AP-2 or interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoters in HBV-expressing cells. Meanwhile, it significantly eliminated NF-κB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling-related protein levels and inhibited their phosphorylation in HBV-transfected Huh7 cells. The inhibitory potency of 6 against HBV DNA replication was reversed by cotransfecting the NF-κB p65 expression plasmid. Using the MAPK-specific activator anisomycin also reversed the inhibitory effect of 6 on viral DNA replication. The present findings suggest that the anti-HBV mechanism of 6 is partly mediated through the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

  13. Hepatitis C virus productive infection in mononuclear cells from patients with cryoglobulinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Sansonno, D; Tucci, F A; Lauletta, G; De Re, V; Montrone, M; Troiani, L; Sansonno, L; Dammacco, F

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between the occurrence of cryoglobulins and hepatitis C virus (HCV) productive infection in peripheral blood and bone marrow-derived lymphocytes was explored. HCV minus strand RNA, the viral replicative intermediate, was searched for by a polyA+ tract strand-specific Tth-based reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) in lymphoid cells of 46 patients with acute and chronic infection. The HCV minus strand was demonstrated in RNA extracted from six (13%) and five (11%) peripheral blood and bone marrow-derived lymphocytes, respectively. The HCV replicating form in lymphoid cells was associated strictly with mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MCG), in that it was found in six of 13 (46%) MCG patients, including two with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). No traces of HCV-negative strand RNA were found in four patients with acute hepatitis C, in 15 with chronic active hepatitis without extrahepatic disorders, in seven with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and in seven with B-NHL without MCG. These results emphasize the direct role of the virus in the pathogenesis of MCG and support the contention that HCV is not specifically lymphotropic, its entry and replication in lymphoid cells being determined largely by selective interactions. PMID:17223964

  14. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  15. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  16. Accumulation of I-123 IMP in hepatic cell adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Suto, Yuji; Kodama, Fumiko; Kato, Takashi

    1995-07-01

    I-123 IMP is now widely used as a radioactive material for cerebral blood flow scintigraphy. It is also known that this substance will accumulate in certain types of tumors. The authors present a case of a 47-year-old woman who showed accumulation of I-123 IMP in hepatic cell adenoma. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Liver transplant for giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, H. V.; Rela, M.; Baker, A.; Ball, C.; Portmann, B.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Heaton, N.

    1997-01-01

    

 Giant cell hepatitis (CGH) with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AHA) is a distinct entity with an aggressive course. Immunosuppression may help early disease. A case is reported of a child with GCH and AHA with early disease recurrence after liver transplantation for end stage liver disease. 

 PMID:9370907

  18. Resveratrol Inhibits Protein Translation in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Boylan, Joan M.; Tatar, Marc; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that extends lifespan and healthspan in model organism. Despite extensive investigation, the biological processes mediating resveratrol's effects have yet to be elucidated. Because repression of translation shares many of resveratrol's beneficial effects, we hypothesized that resveratrol was a modulator of protein synthesis. We studied the effect of the drug on the H4-II-E rat hepatoma cell line. Initial studies showed that resveratrol inhibited global protein synthesis. Given the role of the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in regulating protein synthesis, we examined the effect of resveratrol on mTOR signaling. Resveratrol inhibited mTOR self-phosphorylation and the phosphorylation of mTOR targets S6K1 and eIF4E-BP1. It attenuated the formation of the translation initiation complex eIF4F and increased the phosphorylation of eIF2α. The latter event, also a mechanism for translation inhibition, was not recapitulated by mTOR inhibitors. The effects on mTOR signaling were independent of effects on AMP-activated kinase or AKT. We conclude that resveratrol is an inhibitor of global protein synthesis, and that this effect is mediated through modulation of mTOR-dependent and independent signaling. PMID:22242130

  19. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zan, Yanlu; Zhang, Yuxia; Tien, Po

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  20. Forced expression of Hnf1b/Foxa3 promotes hepatic fate of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Ebadifar, Asghar; Fathi, Fardin; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-05-20

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived hepatocytes have the potential to be used for basic research, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery. Recent reports demonstrated that in addition to conventional differentiation inducers such as chemical compounds and cytokines, overexpression of lineage-specific transcription factors could induce ES cells to differentiate to a hepatic fate. Here, we hypothesized that lentivirus-mediated inducible expression of hepatic lineage transcription factors could enhance mouse ES cells to hepatocyte-like cells. We screened the effects of candidate transcription factors Hnf1b, Hnf1a, Hnf4a, Foxa1, Foxa3 and Hex, and determined that the combination of Hnf1b/Foxa3 promoted expression of several hepatic lineage-specific markers and proteins, in addition to glycogen storage, ICG uptake, and secretion of albumin and urea. The differentiated cells were engraftable and expressed albumin when transplanted into a carbon tetrachloride-injured mouse model. These results demonstrated the crucial role of Hnf1b and Foxa3 in hepatogenesis in vitro and provided a valuable tool for the efficient differentiation of HLCs from ES cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ochando, Jordi; Conde, Patricia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

  2. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  3. Oral administered particulate yeast-derived glucan promotes hepatitis B virus clearance in a hydrodynamic injection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Dandan; Shi, Bisheng; Ren, Guangxu; Peng, Xiuhua; Fang, Zhong; Kozlowski, Maya; Zhou, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaonan; Wu, Min; Wang, Cong; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistent infection is associated with ineffective immune response for the clearance of virus. Immunomodulators represent an important class of therapeutics, which potentially could be beneficial for the treatment of HBV infection. The particulate yeast-derived glucan (PYDG) has been shown to enhance the innate and adaptive immune responses. We therefore, assessed the efficacy of PYDG in enhancing HBV specific immune responses by employing the hydrodynamic injection-based (HDI) HBV transfection mouse model. Mice were intragatric administered PYDG daily for 9 weeks post pAAV/HBV1.2 hydrodynamic injection. PYDG treatment significantly promoted HBV DNA clearance and production of HBsAb compared to control mice. PYDG treatment resulted in recruitment of macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and effector T cells to the liver microenvironment, accompanied by a significantly augmented DCs maturation and HBV-specific IFN-γ and TNF-α production by T cell. In addition, enhanced production of Th1 cytokines in liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) was associated with PYDG administration. Live imaging showed the accumulation of PYDG in the mouse liver. Our results demonstrate that PYDG treatment significantly enhances HBV-specific Th1 immune responses, accompanied by clearance of HBV DNA, and therefore holds promise for further development of therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  4. Susceptibility of nonprimate cell lines to hepatitis A virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Dotzauer, A; Feinstone, S M; Kaplan, G

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) has been adapted to grow in primate cell cultures. We investigated replication of HAV in nonprimate cells by inoculating 20 cell lines from different species with the tissue culture-adapted HM175 strain. Slot blot hybridization and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that HAV replicated in GPE, SP 1K, and IB-RS-2 D10 cells of guinea pig, dolphin, and pig origin, respectively. Studies in IB-RS-2 D10 cells were discontinued because cultures were contaminated with classical swine fever virus. A growth curve showed that HAV grew poorly in GPE cells and intermediately in SP 1K cells compared with growth in FRhK-4 cells. Therefore, the cell surface receptor(s) and other host factor(s) required for HAV replication are present in nonprimate as well as primate cells. Images PMID:8057483

  5. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  6. Proteomics Applications in Dental Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Tian, Weidong; Song, Jinlin

    2017-07-01

    At present, the existence of a variety of dental derived stem cells has been documented. These cells displayed promising clinical application potential not only for teeth and its surrounding tissue regeneration, but also for other tissues, such as nerve and bone regeneration. Proteomics is an unbiased, global informatics tool that provides information on all protein expression levels as well as post-translational modification in cells or tissues and is applicable to dental derived stem cells research. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made to study the global proteome, secrotome, and membrane proteome of dental derived stem cells. Here, we present an overview of the proteomics studies in the context of stem cell research. Particular attention is given to dental derived stem cell types as well as current challenges and opportunities. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1602-1610, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hepatic stellate cells promote upregulation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Teruya; Shiraha, Hidenori; Sawahara, Hiroaki; Uchida, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Yasuto; Iwamuro, Masaya; Kataoka, Junro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Kuwaki, Takeshi; Onishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takaki, Akinobu; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-09-01

    Microenvironment plays an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is known as a tumor stemness marker of HCC. To investigate the relationship between microenvironment and stemness, we performed an in vitro co-culture assay. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HuH-7 and PLC/PRF/5) were co-cultured with the TWNT-1 immortalized hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which create a microenvironment with HCC. Cell proliferation ability was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while migration ability was assessed by a wound healing assay. Expression of EpCAM was analyzed by immunoblotting and FCM. HCC cell lines were co-cultured with TWNT-1 treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for TGF-β and HB-EGF; we then analyzed proliferation, migration ability and protein expression using the methods described above. Proliferation ability was unchanged in HCC cell lines co-cultured with TWNT-1. Migration ability was increased in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HuH-7 and PLC/PRF/5) directly (216.2±67.0, 61.0±22.0, 124.0±66.2 and 51.5±40.3%) and indirectly (102.5±22.0, 84.6±30.9, 86.1±25.7 and 73.9±29.7%) co-cultured with TWNT-1 compared with the HCC uni-culture. Immunoblot analysis revealed increased EpCAM expression in the HCC cell lines co-cultured with TWNT-1. Flow cytometry revealed that the population of E-cadherin-/N-cadherin+ and EpCAM-positive cells increased and accordingly, EMT and stemness in the HCC cell line were activated. These results were similar in the directly and indirectly co-cultured samples, indicating that humoral factors were at play. Conversely, HCC cell lines co-cultured with siRNA‑treated TWNT-1 showed decreased migration ability, a decreased population of EpCAM-positive and E-cadherin-/N-cadherin+ cells. Taken together, humoral factors secreted from TWNT-1

  8. An epoxysuccinic acid derivative(loxistatin)-induced hepatic injury in rats and hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, K.; Arai, M.; Kohno, Y.; Suwa, T.; Satoh, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Loxistatin is a possible therapeutic agent of muscular dystrophy. A single oral administration of loxistatin to male rats caused focal necrosis of the liver with inflammatory cell infiltration. The severity of the lesions was dose-dependent up to 200 mg/kg and also manifest by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels decreased with a maximum 20% depletion within 5 hr after the oral administration of loxistatin. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate did not potentiate the loxistatin-induced hepatic injury. On the other hand, the hepatoprotective effect of cysteamine was observed when cysteamine was administered 24 hr before loxistatin dosing, but the effect was not observed when the antidote was administered concomitantly with loxistatin. Pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital or trans-stilbene oxide provided partial protection against the hepatotoxic effect of loxistatin. Pretreatment with SKF-525A resulted in increased hepatic injury, while pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide, cimetidine, or 3-methylcholanthrene had no effect on hepatic damage by loxistatin. Five hours after (14C)loxistatin administration to rats, the covalent binding of the radioactivity to proteins was greatest in the liver, followed by the kidney, then muscle and blood to a lesser extent. (14C)Loxistatin acid, the pharmacologically active form of loxistatin, irreversibly bound to rat liver microsomal proteins; more binding occurred when the NADPH-generating system was omitted and when the microsomes were boiled first. GSH did not alter the extent of irreversible binding, whereas N-ethylmaleimide decreased the binding of (14C)loxistatin acid to rat liver microsomal proteins by 75%. Unlike the rat, administration of loxistatin to hamsters caused neither hepatic injury nor hepatic GSH depletion.

  9. Tumour-activated liver stromal cells regulate myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; He, G; Kong, Y; Chen, Y; Wang, B; Sun, X; Jia, B; Xie, X; Wang, X; Chen, D; Wei, L; Zhang, M; Zeng, H; Chen, H

    2017-04-01

    Regulating mechanisms underlying hepatic myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) accumulation remain to be described. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of tumour-activated liver stromal cells in the process of hepatic MDSCs migration and accumulation. Our data showed an elevated frequency of MDSCs in the liver of tumour-bearing mice. Moreover, tumour-activated liver stromal cells promote MDSC migration into the liver site. Further investigation indicated higher levels of cytokine and chemokine expression in liver stromal cells after exposure to the tumour-conditioned supernatant. Notably, the expression levels of proinflammatory factors, mainly including macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), increased after treatment with tumour-conditioned supernatant, and blockade of MCP-1 or SDF-1 decreased the proportion of tumour infiltrated MDSCs in mice co-transplanted with liver stromal cells and tumour cells, but not in mice with only tumour cells injection. These findings demonstrate that tumour-activated liver stromal cells produce higher levels of chemokines and cytokines, which may contribute to MDSC accumulation into the liver site in patients with liver cancer. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  10. PEGylated Curcumin Derivative Attenuates Hepatic Steatosis via CREB/PPAR-γ/CD36 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Cheng, Fei; Luo, Yuxuan; Zhan, Zhu; Ren, Hong; Tang, Huadong

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin has the potential to cure dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, its therapeutic effects are curbed by poor bioavailability. Our previous work has shown that modification of curcumin with polyethylene glycol (PEG) improves blood concentration and tissue distribution. This study sought to investigate the role of a novel PEGylated curcumin derivative (Curc-mPEG454) in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism in a high-fat-diet- (HFD-) fed C57BL/6J mouse model. Mice were fed either a control chow diet (D12450B), an HFD (D12492) as the NAFLD model, or an HFD with Curc-mPEG454 administered by intraperitoneal injection at 50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg for 16 weeks. We found that Curc-mPEG454 significantly lowered the body weight and serum triglyceride (TG) levels and reduced liver lipid accumulation in HFD-induced NAFLD mice. It was also shown that Curc-mPEG454 suppressed the HFD-induced upregulated expression of CD36 and hepatic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), a positive regulator of CD36. Moreover, Curc-mPEG454 dramatically activated cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein, which negatively controls hepatic PPAR-γ expression. These findings suggest that Curc-mPEG454 reverses HFD-induced hepatic steatosis via the activation of CREB inhibition of the hepatic PPAR-γ/CD36 pathway, which may be an effective therapeutic for high-fat-diet-induced NAFLD. PMID:28770225

  11. Derivation and characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived exocrine pancreatic cell line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment and initial characterization of a pig embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic cell line, PICM-31, and a colony-cloned derivative cell line, PICM-31A, is described. The cell lines were propagated for several months at split ratios of 1:3 or 1:5 at each passage on STO feeder cells af...

  12. Discovery of Aptamer Ligands for Hepatic Stellate Cells Using SELEX.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijin; Liu, Hao; Jain, Akshay; Zhang, Li; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Insulin like growth factor II receptor (IGFIIR) is a transmembrane protein overexpressed in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which are the major target for the treatment of liver fibrosis. In this study, we aim to discover an IGFIIR-specific aptamer that can be potentially used as a targeting ligand for the treatment and diagnosis of liver fibrosis. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) was conducted on recombinant human IGFIIR to identify IGFIIR-specific aptamers. The binding affinity and specificity of the discovered aptamers to IGFIIR and hepatic stellate cells were studied using flow cytometry and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Aptamer-20 showed the highest affinity to recombinant human IGFIIR protein with a Kd of 35.5 nM, as determined by SPR. Aptamer-20 also has a high affinity (apparent Kd 45.12 nM) to LX-2 human hepatic stellate cells. Binding of aptamer-20 to hepatic stellate cells could be inhibited by knockdown of IGFIIR using siRNA, indicating a high specificity of the aptamer. The aptamer formed a chimera with an anti-fibrotic PCBP2 siRNA and delivered the siRNA to HSC-T6 cells to trigger silencing activity. In Vivo biodistribution study of the siRNA-aptamer chimera also demonstrated a high and specific uptake in the liver of the rats with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. These data suggest that aptamer-20 is a high-affinity ligand for antifibrotic and diagnostic agents for liver fibrosis.

  13. Xanthohumol, a chalcon derived from hops, inhibits hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Kraus, Birgit; Motyl, Magdalena; Weiss, Thomas S; Gehrig, Manfred; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-07-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) is a major prenylated chalcone found in hops, which is used to add bitterness and flavor to beer. In this study, we first investigated the effects of XN on hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the central mediators of liver fibrogenesis. XN inhibited the activation of primary human HSC and induced apoptosis in activated HSC in vitro in a dose dependent manner (0-20 microM). In contrast, XN doses as high as 50 microM did not impair viability of primary human hepatocytes. However, in both cell types XN inhibited activation of the transcription factor NFkappaB and expression of NFkappaB dependent proinflammatory genes. In vivo, feeding of XN reduced hepatic inflammation and expression of profibrogenic genes in a murine model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. These data indicate that XN has the potential as functional nutrient for the prevention or treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or other chronic liver disease.

  14. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... low because of routine testing of donated blood. Sexual transmission and transmission among family members through close contact ... associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses ... B Blood, needles, sexual 10% of older children develop chronic infection. 90% ...

  15. Human hepatic stellate cells are not permissive for hepatitis C virus entry and replication.

    PubMed

    Florimond, Alexandre; Chouteau, Philippe; Bruscella, Patrice; Le Seyec, Jacques; Mérour, Emilie; Ahnou, Nazim; Mallat, Ariane; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-06-01

    Chronic HCV infection is associated with the development of hepatic fibrosis. The direct role of HCV in the fibrogenic process is unknown. Specifically, whether HCV is able to infect hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is debated. To assess whether human HSCs are susceptible to HCV infection. We combined a set of original HCV models, including the infectious genotype 2a JFH1 model (HCVcc), retroviral pseudoparticles expressing the folded HCV genotype 1b envelope glycoproteins (HCVpp) and a subgenomic genotype 1b HCV replicon, and two relevant cellular models, primary human HSCs from different patients and the LX-2 cell line, to assess whether HCV can infect/replicate in HSCs. In contrast with the hepatocyte cell line Huh-7, neither infectious HCVcc nor HCVpp infected primary human HSCs or LX-2 cells. The cellular expression of host cellular factors required for HCV entry was high in Huh-7 cells but low in HSCs and LX-2 cells, with the exception of CD81. Finally, replication of a genotype 2a full-length RNA genome and a genotype 1b subgenomic replicon was impaired in primary human HSCs and LX-2 cells, which expressed low levels of cellular factors known to play a key role in the HCV life-cycle, suggesting that human HSCs are not permissive for HCV replication. Human HSCs are refractory to HCV infection. Both HCV entry and replication are deficient in these cells, regardless of the HCV genotype and origin of the cells. Thus, HCV infection of HSCs does not play a role in liver fibrosis. These results do not rule out a direct role of HCV infection of hepatocytes in the fibrogenic process. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Hepatitis B virus X protein activates human hepatic stellate cells through upregulating TGFβ1.

    PubMed

    Chen, H-Y; Chen, Z-X; Huang, R-F; Lin, N; Wang, X-Z

    2014-10-27

    We investigated the effects of the hepatitis B virus X gene (HBV X) on the activation of human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the possible mechanisms underlying the pathway. Recombinant plasmid pHBV-X-IRES2-EGFP was constructed and transfected into HL-7702 cells using a lipid-mediated method. Transfected cells were screened by G418, which detected stable expression of the X gene by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and Western blot analysis, and named L02/x. Cells not subjected to G418-selection were analyzed to confirm the transient expression of the X gene and named L02/48x. Subsequently, L02/x and L02/48x, together with non-HBx-expressing cells, were co-cultured with HSCs in a non-contact transwell system. After 36 h of co-culture, the proliferation and migration of HSCs was detected using different cell counting methods. Finally, the mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, Col I, and TGFβ1 in HSCs were detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that L02/x and L02/48x cells can express HBV X gene mRNA and protein. Additionally, HSCs co-cultured with L02/x or L02/48x cells showed significantly higher proliferation and migration levels than control groups. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of α-SMA, Col I, and TGFβ1 in HSCs co-cultured with HBx-expressing liver cells were higher than those in control groups. HBx protein activated HSCs in vitro, leading to increased proliferation and migration of HSCs and upregulation of α-SMA and Col I. The TGFβ1 gene may be involved in this pathway.

  17. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  18. NADPH oxidase signal transduces angiotensin II in hepatic stellate cells and is critical in hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bataller, Ramón; Schwabe, Robert F.; Choi, Youkyung H.; Yang, Liu; Paik, Yong Han; Lindquist, Jeffrey; Qian, Ting; Schoonhoven, Robert; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Lemasters, John J.; Brenner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a pro-oxidant and fibrogenic cytokine. We investigated the role of NADPH oxidase in Ang II–induced effects in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a fibrogenic cell type. Human HSCs express mRNAs of key components of nonphagocytic NADPH oxidase. Ang II phosphorylated p47phox, a regulatory subunit of NADPH oxidase, and induced reactive oxygen species formation via NADPH oxidase activity. Ang II phosphorylated AKT and MAPKs and increased AP-1 DNA binding in a redox-sensitive manner. Ang II stimulated DNA synthesis, cell migration, procollagen α1(I) mRNA expression, and secretion of TGF-β1 and inflammatory cytokines. These effects were attenuated by N-acetylcysteine and diphenylene iodonium, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, Ang II induced upregulation of genes potentially involved in hepatic wound-healing response in a redox-sensitive manner, as assessed by microarray analysis. HSCs isolated from p47phox–/– mice displayed a blunted response to Ang II compared with WT cells. We also assessed the role of NADPH oxidase in experimental liver fibrosis. After bile duct ligation, p47phox–/– mice showed attenuated liver injury and fibrosis compared with WT counterparts. Moreover, expression of smooth muscle α-actin and expression of TGF-β1 were reduced in p47phox–/– mice. Thus, NADPH oxidase mediates the actions of Ang II on HSCs and plays a critical role in liver fibrogenesis. PMID:14597764

  19. Intradermal hepatitis B vaccine in thalassaemia and sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Q; Underhill, G; Wonke, B; Aldouri, M; Kelsey, M; Jefferies, D

    1989-01-01

    Thirty two patients with beta thalassaemia and sickle cell disease who were having regular blood transfusions were selected to test the efficacy and immunogenicity of low dose (2 micrograms or 0.1 ml) intradermal hepatitis B vaccine compared with the standard (20 micrograms or 1 ml) intramuscular dose. There was no significant difference in the rates of seroconversion, seroconversion had occurred in all patients by seven months. There were no significant differences in antibody titres between the intramuscular and intradermal groups at 1, 2, and 6 months. Although the titres were significantly higher in the intramuscular group at seven months and at 12-18 months, the antibody titre in the intradermal group did not fall below 10 IU/l. The results of this study suggest that low dose intradermal hepatitis B vaccination is an effective and economical way of stimulating an immune response in patients with beta thalassaemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:2526622

  20. The role of curcumin in streptozotocin-induced hepatic damage and the trans-differentiation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Hesham N

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic patients frequently suffer from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The current study aimed to investigate the role of curcumin and the response of hepatic stellate cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hepatic damage. Sixty male rats were divided into three groups. The normal control injected with a citrate buffer vehicle and the diabetic control group which was injected intraperitoneally (IP) with a single-dose of streptozotocin (50mg/kg body weight) and a diabetic group was treated with an oral dose of curcumin at 80 mg/kg body weight daily for 60 days. Curcumin effectively counteracts oxidative stress-mediated hepatic damage and improves biochemical parameters. Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) was significantly reduced, and insulin antibodies showed strong positive immunoreactivity with curcumin administration. These results optimistically demonstrate the potential use of curcumin, which is attributed to its antiradical/antioxidant activities and its potential β-cell regenerative properties. Also, it has the capability to encourage the trans-differentiation of hepatic stellate cells into insulin-producing cells for a period of time. In addition, as it is an anti-fibrotic mediator that inhibits hepatic stellate cell activation and the transition to myofibroblast-like cells, this suggests the possibility of considering curcumin's novel therapeutic effects in reducing hepatic dysfunction in diabetic patients.

  1. Generation of a murine hepatic angiosarcoma cell line and reproducible mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Sonja; Dill, Michael T; Terracciano, Luigi; Makowska, Zuzanna; Quagliata, Luca; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Djonov, Valentin; Heim, Markus H; Semela, David

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare and highly aggressive tumor of endothelial origin with dismal prognosis. Studies of the molecular biology of AS and treatment options are limited as animal models are rare. We have previously shown that inducible knockout of Notch1 in mice leads to spontaneous formation of hepatic AS. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish and characterize a cell line derived from this murine AS, (2) identify molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets, and (3) generate a tumor transplantation model. AS cells retained specific endothelial properties such as tube formation activity, as well as expression of CD31 and Von Willebrand factor. However, electron microscopy analysis revealed signs of dedifferentiation with loss of fenestrae and loss of contact inhibition. Microarray and pathway analysis showed substantial changes in gene expression and revealed activation of the Myc pathway. Exposing the AS cells to sorafenib reduced migration, filopodia dynamics, and cell proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. In addition, sorafenib suppressed ERK phosphorylation and expression of cyclin D2. Injection of AS cells into NOD/SCID mice resulted in formation of undifferentiated tumors, confirming the tumorigenic potential of these cells. In summary, we established and characterized a murine model of spontaneous AS formation and hepatic AS cell lines as a useful in vitro tool. Our data demonstrate antitumor activity of sorafenib in AS cells with potent inhibition of migration, filopodia formation, and cell proliferation, supporting further evaluation of sorafenib as a novel treatment strategy. In addition, AS cell transplantation provides a subcutaneous tumor model useful for in vivo preclinical drug testing.

  2. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes.

  3. Inhibitory Effect of Tanshinone IIA on Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Wei; Huang, Yi-Tsau

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB pathways in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is one therapeutic approach to hepatic fibrosis. Tanshinone IIA (C19H18O3, Tan IIA) is a lipophilic diterpene isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, with reported anti-inflammatory activity. We tested whether Tan IIA could inhibit HSC activation. Materials and Methods The cell line of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6) was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 ng/ml). Cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assay. HSC-T6 cells were pretreated with Tan IIA (1, 3 and 10 µM), then induced by LPS (100 ng/ml). NF-κB activity was evaluated by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Western blotting analysis was performed to measure NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38). Cell chemotaxis was assessed by both wound-healing assay and trans-well invasion assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect gene expression in HSC-T6 cells. Results All concentrations of drugs showed no cytotoxicity against HSC-T6 cells. LPS stimulated NF-κB luciferase activities, nuclear translocation of NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of ERK, JNK and p38, all of which were suppressed by Tan IIA. In addition, Tan IIA significantly inhibited LPS-induced HSCs chemotaxis, in both wound-healing and trans-well invasion assays. Moreover, Tan IIA attenuated LPS-induced mRNA expressions of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, ICAM-1, iNOS, and α-SMA in HSC-T6 cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that Tan IIA decreased LPS-induced HSC activation. PMID:25076488

  4. Natural Killer cells: Multi-faceted players with key roles in Hepatitis C immunity

    PubMed Central

    Golden-Mason, Lucy; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Natural killer cells (NKs) are involved in every stage of hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection, from protection against HCV acquisition and resolution in the acute phase to treatment-induced clearance. In addition to their direct antiviral actions, NKs are involved in the induction and priming of appropriate downstream T-cell responses. In the setting of chronic HCV, overall NK cell levels are decreased, altered subset distribution is altered, and changes in NK receptor (NKR) expression have been demonstrated, although the contribution of individual NKRs to viral clearance or persistence remains to be clarified. Enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity accompanied by insufficient interferon-γ production may promote liver damage in the setting of chronic infection. Treatment-induced clearance is associated with activation of NK cells, and it will be of interest to monitor NK cell responses to triple therapy. Activated NK cells also have antifibrotic properties, and the same hepatic NK cell populations that are actively involved in control of HCV may also be involved in control of HCV-associated liver damage. We still have much to learn, in particular: how do liver-derived NKs influence the outcome of HCV infection? Do NK receptors recognize HCV-specific components? And, are HCV-specific memory NK populations generated? PMID:23947348

  5. Natural killer cells: multifaceted players with key roles in hepatitis C immunity.

    PubMed

    Golden-Mason, Lucy; Rosen, Hugo R

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are involved in every stage of hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection, from protection against HCV acquisition and resolution in the acute phase to treatment-induced clearance. In addition to their direct antiviral actions, NKs are involved in the induction and priming of appropriate downstream T-cell responses. In the setting of chronic HCV, overall NK cell levels are decreased, subset distribution is altered, and changes in NK receptor (NKR) expression have been demonstrated, although the contribution of individual NKRs to viral clearance or persistence remains to be clarified. Enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity accompanied by insufficient interferon-γ production may promote liver damage in the setting of chronic infection. Treatment-induced clearance is associated with activation of NK cells, and it will be of interest to monitor NK cell responses to triple therapy. Activated NK cells also have anti-fibrotic properties, and the same hepatic NK cell populations that are actively involved in control of HCV may also be involved in control of HCV-associated liver damage. We still have much to learn, in particular: how do liver-derived NKs influence the outcome of HCV infection? Do NK receptors recognize HCV-specific components? And, are HCV-specific memory NK populations generated? © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identification of a New Benzimidazole Derivative as an Antiviral against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vausselin, Thibaut; Séron, Karin; Lavie, Muriel; Mesalam, Ahmed Atef; Lemasson, Matthieu; Belouzard, Sandrine; Fénéant, Lucie; Danneels, Adeline; Rouillé, Yves; Cocquerel, Laurence; Foquet, Lander; Rosenberg, Arielle R.; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Meuleman, Philip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aminoquinolines and piperazines, linked or not, have been used successfully to treat malaria, and some molecules of this family also exhibit antiviral properties. Here we tested several derivatives of 4-aminoquinolines and piperazines for their activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV). We screened 11 molecules from three different families of compounds, and we identified anti-HCV activity in cell culture for six of them. Of these, we selected a compound (B5) that is currently ending clinical phase I evaluation for neurodegenerative diseases. In hepatoma cells, B5 inhibited HCV infection in a pangenotypic and dose-dependent manner, and its antiviral activity was confirmed in primary hepatocytes. B5 also inhibited infection by pseudoparticles expressing HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2, and we demonstrated that it affects a postattachment stage of the entry step. Virus with resistance to B5 was selected by sequential passage in the presence of the drug, and reverse genetics experiments indicated that resistance was conferred mainly by a single mutation in the putative fusion peptide of E1 envelope glycoprotein (F291I). Furthermore, analyses of the effects of other closely related compounds on the B5-resistant mutant suggest that B5 shares a mode of action with other 4-aminoquinoline-based molecules. Finally, mice with humanized liver that were treated with B5 showed a delay in the kinetics of the viral infection. In conclusion, B5 is a novel interesting anti-HCV molecule that could be used to decipher the early steps of the HCV life cycle. IMPORTANCE In the last 4 years, HCV therapy has been profoundly improved with the approval of direct-acting antivirals in clinical practice. Nevertheless, the high costs of these drugs limit access to therapy in most countries. The present study reports the identification and characterization of a compound (B5) that inhibits HCV propagation in cell culture and is currently ending clinical phase I evaluation for

  7. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase by S-Trityl-L-Cysteine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Daniel B.; Fournet, Guy; Gurukumar, K. R.; Basu, Amartya; Lee, Jin-Ching; Sakamoto, Naoya; Kozielski, Frank; Musmuca, Ira; Joseph, Benoît; Ragno, Rino; Kaushik-Basu, Neerja

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based studies led to the identification of a constrained derivative of S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) scaffold as a candidate inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. A panel of STLC derivatives were synthesized and investigated for their activity against HCV NS5B. Three STLC derivatives, 9, F-3070, and F-3065, were identified as modest HCV NS5B inhibitors with IC50 values between 22.3 to 39.7 μM. F-3070 and F-3065 displayed potent inhibition of intracellular NS5B activity in the BHK-NS5B-FRLuc reporter and also inhibited HCV RNA replication in the Huh7/Rep-Feo1b reporter system. Binding mode investigations suggested that the STLC scaffold can be used to develop new NS5B inhibitors by further chemical modification at one of the trityl phenyl group. PMID:22280819

  8. In vitro culture of isolated primary hepatocytes and stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-08-01

    Various liver diseases result in terminal hepatic failure, and liver transplantation, cell transplantation and artificial liver support systems are emerging as effective therapies for severe hepatic disease. However, all of these treatments are limited by organ or cell resources, so developing a sufficient number of functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration is a priority. Liver regeneration is a complex process regulated by growth factors (GFs), cytokines, transcription factors (TFs), hormones, oxidative stress products, metabolic networks, and microRNA. It is well-known that the function of isolated primary hepatocytes is hard to maintain; when cultured in vitro, these cells readily undergo dedifferentiation, causing them to lose hepatocyte function. For this reason, most studies focus on inducing stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. In this review, we mainly focus on the nature of the liver regeneration process and discuss how to maintain and enhance in vitro hepatic function of isolated primary hepatocytes or stem cell-derived HLCs for liver regeneration. In this way, hepatocytes or HLCs may be applied for clinical use for the treatment of terminal liver diseases and may prolong the survival time of patients in the near future.

  9. hucMSC Exosome-Derived GPX1 Is Required for the Recovery of Hepatic Oxidant Injury.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongmin; Jiang, Wenqian; Tan, Youwen; Zou, Shengqiang; Zhang, Hongguang; Mao, Fei; Gong, Aihua; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2017-02-01

    Exosomes are small biological membrane vesicles secreted by various cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We previously reported that MSC-derived exosomes (MSC-Ex) can elicit hepatoprotective effects against toxicant-induced injury. However, the success of MSC-Ex-based therapy for treatment of liver diseases and the underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. We used human umbilical cord MSC-derived exosome (hucMSC-Ex) administrated by tail vein or oral gavage at different doses and, in engrafted liver mouse models, noted antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects and rescue from liver failure. A single systemic administration of hucMSC-Ex (16 mg/kg) effectively rescued the recipient mice from carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver failure. Moreover, hucMSC-Ex-derived glutathione peroxidase1 (GPX1), which detoxifies CCl4 and H2O2, reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Knockdown of GPX1 in hucMSCs abrogated antioxidant and anti-apoptotic abilities of hucMSC-Ex and diminished the hepatoprotective effects of hucMSC-Ex in vitro and in vivo. Thus, hucMSC-Ex promote the recovery of hepatic oxidant injury through the delivery of GPX1. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Human embryonic stem cell derivation and directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Trounson, A

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are produced from normal, chromosomally aneuploid and mutant human embryos, which are available from in vitro fertilisation (IVF) for infertility or preimplantation diagnosis. These hESC lines are an important resource for functional genomics, drug screening and eventually cell and gene therapy. The methods for deriving hESCs are well established and repeatable, and are relatively successful, with a ratio of 1:10 to 1:2 hESC lines established to embryos used. hESCs can be formed from morula and blastocyst-stage embryos and from isolated inner cell mass cell (ICM) clusters. The hESCs can be formed and maintained on mouse or human somatic cells in serum-free conditions, and for several passages in cell-free cultures. The hESCs can be transfected with DNA constructs. Their gene expression profiles are being described and immunological characteristics determined. They may be grown indefinitely in culture while maintaining their original karyotype but this must be confirmed from time to time. hESCs spontaneously differentiate in the absence of the appropriate cell feeder layer, when overgrown in culture and when isolated from the ESC colony. All three major embryonic lineages are produced in differentiating attachment cultures and in unattached embryoid bodies. Cell progenitors of interest can be identified by markers, expression of reporter genes and characteristic morphology, and the culture thereafter enriched for further culture to more mature cell types. The most advanced directed differentiation pathways have been developed for neural cells and cardiac muscle cells, but many other cell types including haematopoietic progenitors, endothelial cells, lung alveoli, keratinocytes, pigmented retinal epithelium, neural crest cells and motor neurones, hepatic progenitors and cells that have some markers of gut tissue and pancreatic cells have been produced. The prospects for regenerative medicine are significant and there is much

  11. Autopresentation of hepatitis B virus envelope antigens by T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Pilli, M; Penna, A; Bertoletti, A; Valli, A; Cavalli, A; Pasetti, G; Fiaccadori, F

    1992-01-01

    Processing and presentation by T cells appear to be limited to antigens that can directly interact with the T-cell surface, thereby overcoming the T-cell inefficiency in antigen capture and internalization. Our study provides evidence that the hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins can also be efficiently processed and presented by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to other T cells in a human leukocyte antigen class II-restricted fashion. This phenomenon suggests a receptor-mediated interaction between T cells and the HBV envelope and defines a system that can, we hope, be exploited for the identification of the receptor binding site within the HBV envelope and for the characterization of the putative cellular HBV receptor. PMID:1548778

  12. Bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, Diane S

    2008-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived cells can take on the phenotype of epithelial cells and express epithelial-specific genes in multiple organs. Here, we focus on recent data on the appearance of marrow-derived epithelial cells in the adult lung. These findings have garnered significant skepticism because in most cases marrow-derived epithelial cells are very rare, the marrow cell of origin is not known, the techniques for detection have needed improvement, and there seem to be multiple mechanisms by which this occurs. Recent studies have focused on these concerns. Once these important concerns are addressed, further studies on the function(s) of these cells will need to be performed to determine whether this engraftment has any clinical significance-either beneficial or detrimental.

  13. Active compounds from Saussurea lappa Clarks that suppress hepatitis B virus surface antigen gene expression in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Chou, C K; Lee, S D; Wang, J C; Yeh, S F

    1995-05-01

    We have examined the antiviral activity of the crude extract prepared from the root of Saussurea lappa Clarks, a Chinese medicinal herb which is widely used for many illnesses including cancer. Two active components, costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone, were identified which show strong suppressive effect on the expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in human hepatoma Hep3B cells, but have little effect on the viability of the cells. Both costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone suppress the HBsAg production by Hep3B cells in a dose-dependent manner with IC50s of 1.0 and 2.0 microM, respectively. Northern blotting analysis shows that the suppression of HBsAg gene expression by both costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone were mainly at the mRNA level. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone on HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), a marker for hepatitis B viral genome replication in human liver cells, was also observed in another human hepatoma cell line HepA2 which was derived from HepG2 cells by transfecting a tandemly repeat hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA. Similarly, the mRNA of HBsAg in HepA2 cells was also suppressed by these two compounds. Our findings suggest that costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone may have potential to develop as specific anti-HBV drugs in the future.

  14. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jason R; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2011-10-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of hematopoietic derived cell precursors that can suppress immune responses in a variety of inflammatory settings. Here we review recent studies detailing expansion of phenotypically and functionally disparate MDSC. Findings related to MDSC accumulation, activation, and mechanisms utilized in immune suppression are presented. Further, we discuss recent reports that suggest MDSC are expanded during transplantation and that modulation of MDSC can participate in preventing graft rejection.

  15. Monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis in hepatitis C virus infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Claudia; Dagklis, Antonis; Cottini, Francesca; Scarfò, Lydia; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Finazzi, Renato; Memoli, Massimo; Ghia, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a preclinical condition characterized by an expansion of clonal B cells in the absence of B lymphocytosis (BALC < 5 × 10(9)/L) in the peripheral blood, without clinical signs, suggestive of a lymphoproliferative disorder. B cell clonal expansions are also associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and they can evolve into lymphoproliferative disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). The relationship between MBL and HCV infection has not been established yet. By five-colour flow cytometry, we analyzed 123 HCV positive subjects with diagnosis of chronic hepatitis (94) or cirrhosis (29); 16 of those with cirrhosis had a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. MBL were identified in 35/123 (28.5%), at significantly higher frequency than in the general population. Sixteen/thirty-five were atypical-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) MBL (CD5(+), CD20(bright)), 13/35 were CLL-like MBL (CD5(bright), CD20(dim)), and 6/35 were CD5(-) MBL. Twenty-four/ninety-four (25.5%) patients affected by chronic hepatitis had MBL, whereas 11/29 (37.9%) patients with cirrhosis showed a B cell clone. A biased usage of IGHVgenes similar to HCV-associated NHL was evident. All three types of MBL can be identified in HCV-infected individuals at a higher frequency than in the general population, and their presence appears to correlate with a more advanced disease stage. The phenotypic heterogeneity is reminiscent of the diversity of NHL arising in the context of HCV infection. The persistence of HCV may be responsible for the dysregulation of the immune system and in particular of the B cell compartment. © 2010 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  16. Antiproliferative activity of triterpenoids from Eclipta prostrata on hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyeong; Ha, Na Ry; Yang, Hyekyung; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Gun Hee; Kim, Young Choong

    2008-09-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have been known to play a key role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. In the course of screening antifibrotic activity of natural products employing HSC-T6, a rat hepatic stellate cell line as an in vitro assay system, the methanolic extract of aerial parts of Eclipta prostrata L. showed significant inhibitory activity on HSCs proliferation. Activity-guided fractionation led to the isolation of five oleanane-type triterpenoids, echinocystic acid (1), eclalbasaponin II (2), eclalbasaponin V (3), eclalbasaponin I (4) and eclalbasaponin III (5), which are all echinocystic acid derivatives. Among the five echinocystic acid derivatives isolated, echinocystic acid (1) and eclalbasaponin II (2) significantly inhibited the proliferation of HSCs in dose- and time-dependent manners. Our present study also suggests the importance of free carboxylic acid at C-28 position in echinocystic acid derivatives for the antifibrotic activity. Taken together, antifibrotic activity of E. prostrata and its triterpenoids might suggest the therapeutic potentials against liver fibrosis.

  17. Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Stellate Cells: A PARADOXICAL RELATIONSHIP.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2012-01-01

    In physiology, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by most cells for normal function and as a defense mechanism against foreign particles, microbes and viruses. Hepatic macrophages (Kupffer cells), sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are all capable of generating ROS in physiology and pathology. ROS are also produced by infiltrating inflammatory cells during acute and chronic liver injury. Increased levels of ROS have been implicated in apoptotic/necrotic death of hepatocytes, and liver failure. In contrast to causing injury to hepatocytes, ROS and lipid peroxidation products induce transdifferentiation of the quiescent HSCs into an activated highly proliferative myofibroblast-like phenotype. ROS and lipid peroxidation products also stimulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) by activated HSCs. Deposition of excessive amounts of ECM is the primary mechanism of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver, and interactions between ROS and HSCs appear to play a major role in this pathology. Although these findings suggest that HSCs are resistant to the injurious actions of ROS, there is compelling evidence demonstrating ROS-induced death of activated HSCs. Detailed mechanistic understanding of such paradoxical interactions between ROS and HSCs will be critical for developing therapies for chronic fibrotic liver disease.

  18. The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Effat; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Mohammadi, Seyed Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are suitable choices in autologous stem cell treatment of liver-associated diseases due to their hepatic differentiation potential. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an amphipathic molecule with potential of delivering both lipophilic and hydrophilic agents into cells, also a common cryoprotectant for freezing of the cells. DMSO was used in some protocols for induction of AT-MSCs towards hepatocyte like cells. However, the effect of DMSO on hepatogenic differentiation of AT-MSCs were not surveyed, previously. In the present study, we aimed at evaluation of the effect of DMSO on differentiation of AT-MSCs into hepatic lineage. We isolated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue, and then verifies multi-potency and surface markers of AT-MSCs . Isolated AT-MSCs randomly dispensed in four groups including Group 1: HGF treated, 2: HGF+ DMSO treated, 3: HGF+ DMSO+ OSM treated, and group control for a period of 3 weeks in the expansion medium without serum; EGF and bFGF were also included in the first days of inductions. The morphologic changes during induction period was observed with microscopy. The secretion of albumin (ALB) of the differentiating MSCs was investigated using ELISA, and urea production was evaluated using colorimetric assay. The qRT-PCR was performed for quantitation of hepatocyte marker genes including AFP, ALB, CK18, HNF4a, and HNF6. The glycogen storage of differentiated cells was visualized by periodic-acid Schiff‘s staining. The results demonstrate that DMSO speeds up hepatic differentiation of AT-MSCs characterized by rapid changes in morphology; higher expression of hepatic marker gene (ALB) in both mRNA and protein level (P < 0.05); also increased transcriptional levels of other liver genes including CK18, HNF4a, and HNF6 (P < 0.01); and moreover, greater percentage of glycogen storage(p < 0.05) in DMSO-treated groups. DMSO catalyzes hepatic

  19. The HLA-E(R)/HLA-E(R) genotype affects the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is associated with HLA-E-restricted recognition of an HCV-derived peptide by interferon-gamma-secreting human CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Daniela; Vogel, Martin; Langhans, Bettina; Krämer, Benjamin; Körner, Christian; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Steinberg, Verena; Michalk, Monika; Berg, Thomas; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Spengler, Ulrich; Nattermann, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Recently, we showed chronic hepatitis C to be associated with increased expression of HLA-E and identified peptide hepatitis C virus (HCV) core amino acids 35-44 as a ligand for HLA-E that stabilizes HLA-E expression, favoring inhibition of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Here we describe HLA-E-restricted recognition of peptide HCV core amino acids 35-44 by CD8(+) T cells. Frequency of HLA-E-restricted responses was significantly higher in patients homozygous for the HLA-E(R) allele (60% vs 38%; P = .038). Moreover, we found that the HLA-E(R) allelic variant confers protection against chronic infection with HCV genotypes 2 and 3. Taken together, our data indicate an important immunomodulating function of HLA-E in hepatitis C.

  20. Research Advancements in Porcine Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Dinesh; Shivakumar, Sharath Belame; Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present era of stem cell biology, various animals such as Mouse, Bovine, Rabbit and Porcine have been tested for the efficiency of their mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) before their actual use for stem cell based application in humans. Among them pigs have many similarities to humans in the form of organ size, physiology and their functioning, therefore they have been considered as a valuable model system for in vitro studies and preclinical assessments. Easy assessability, few ethical issues, successful MSC isolation from different origins like bone marrow, skin, umbilical cord blood, Wharton’s jelly, endometrium, amniotic fluid and peripheral blood make porcine a good model for stem cell therapy. Porcine derived MSCs (pMSCs) have shown greater in vitro differentiation and transdifferention potential towards mesenchymal lineages and specialized lineages such as cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. Immunomodulatory and low immunogenic profiles as shown by autologous and heterologous MSCs proves them safe and appropriate models for xenotransplantation purposes. Furthermore, tissue engineered stem cell constructs can be of immense importance in relation to various osteochondral defects which are difficult to treat otherwise. Using pMSCs successful treatment of various disorders like Parkinson’s disease, cardiac ischemia, hepatic failure, has been reported by many studies. Here, in this review we highlight current research findings in the area of porcine mesenchymal stem cells dealing with their isolation methods, differentiation ability, transplantation applications and their therapeutic potential towards various diseases. PMID:26201864

  1. Interaction of epicatechins derived from green tea with rat hepatic cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Y; Das, M; Bickers, D R; Mukhtar, H

    1988-01-01

    Green tea has been used for generations in China and Asia as an antipyretic and diuretic. Prior studies have shown that extracts of green tea inhibit the mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aflatoxin B1. In this study, we investigated the interaction of certain flavonoid components of green tea epicatechin derivatives including (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG), and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) with rat hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450). The addition of EC, EGC, ECG, and EGCG to hepatic microsomes prepared from phenobarbital (PB)-treated rats resulted in spectral changes characterized by absorbance maxima at 420 nm and minima at 380 nm, typical of modified Type II (reverse Type I) binding. Of the epicatechin derivatives, EGCG and ECG showed greater spectral change with oxidized P-450 and time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of the binding of carbon monoxide to dithionite-reduced cytochrome P-450. The addition of EC, EGC, ECG, and EGCG to microsomes prepared from control, PB- or 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cytochrome P-450-dependent aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities. EGCG was the most potent in this regard. Green tea polyphenols and epicatechin derivatives also significantly inhibited NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity. An examination of the structure activity relationship of epicatechin derivatives suggests that the inhibitory effect on the microsomal enzyme system may be due to the galloyl groups or hydroxyl groups on the molecule. Our data indicate that these extracts of green tea may have potential as anticarcinogens.

  2. Human hepatic stem cells from fetal and postnatal donors.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Zhang, Lili; Bruce, Andrew; Wauthier, Eliane; Ludlow, John; Yao, Hsin-lei; Moss, Nicholas; Melhem, Alaa; McClelland, Randall; Turner, William; Kulik, Michael; Sherwood, Sonya; Tallheden, Tommi; Cheng, Nancy; Furth, Mark E; Reid, Lola M

    2007-08-06

    Human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs), which are pluripotent precursors of hepatoblasts and thence of hepatocytic and biliary epithelia, are located in ductal plates in fetal livers and in Canals of Hering in adult livers. They can be isolated by immunoselection for epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive (EpCAM+) cells, and they constitute approximately 0.5-2.5% of liver parenchyma of all donor ages. The self-renewal capacity of hHpSCs is indicated by phenotypic stability after expansion for >150 population doublings in a serum-free, defined medium and with a doubling time of approximately 36 h. Survival and proliferation of hHpSCs require paracrine signaling by hepatic stellate cells and/or angioblasts that coisolate with them. The hHpSCs are approximately 9 microm in diameter, express cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19, CD133/1, telomerase, CD44H, claudin 3, and albumin (weakly). They are negative for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) 1, and for markers of adult liver cells (cytochrome P450s), hemopoietic cells (CD45), and mesenchymal cells (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and desmin). If transferred to STO feeders, hHpSCs give rise to hepatoblasts, which are recognizable by cordlike colony morphology and up-regulation of AFP, P4503A7, and ICAM1. Transplantation of freshly isolated EpCAM+ cells or of hHpSCs expanded in culture into NOD/SCID mice results in mature liver tissue expressing human-specific proteins. The hHpSCs are candidates for liver cell therapies.

  3. Hepatic Abscess After Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Islet-Cell Tumor Hepatic Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Neil B.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Salem, Riad; Ryu, Robert K.

    2010-06-15

    Infectious complications after yttrium-90 (y-90) radioembolization of hepatic tumors are rare. Most reports describe hepatic abscesses as complications of other locoregional therapies, such as transcatheter arterial embolization or chemoembolization. These usually occur in patients with a history of biliary intervention and present several weeks after treatment. We report a case of hepatic abscess formed immediately after y-90 radioembolization of a hepatic metastasis in a patient who had no history of previous biliary instrumentation.

  4. Hepatic abscess after yttrium-90 radioembolization for islet-cell tumor hepatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Neil B; Mulcahy, Mary F; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad; Ryu, Robert K

    2010-06-01

    Infectious complications after yttrium-90 (y-90) radioembolization of hepatic tumors are rare. Most reports describe hepatic abscesses as complications of other locoregional therapies, such as transcatheter arterial embolization or chemoembolization. These usually occur in patients with a history of biliary intervention and present several weeks after treatment. We report a case of hepatic abscess formed immediately after y-90 radioembolization of a hepatic metastasis in a patient who had no history of previous biliary instrumentation.

  5. NK Cells Help Induce Anti-Hepatitis B Virus CD8+ T Cell Immunity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meijuan; Sun, Rui; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-15

    Although recent clinical studies demonstrate that NK cell function is impaired in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-persistent patients, whether or how NK cells play a role in anti-HBV adaptive immunity remains to be explored. Using a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection by hydrodynamic injection of an HBV plasmid, we observed that although serum hepatitis B surface Ag and hepatitis B envelope Ag were eliminated within 3 to 4 wk, HBV might persist for >8 wk in CD8(-/-) mice and that adoptive transfer of anti-HBV CD8(+) T cells restored the ability to clear HBV in HBV-carrier Rag1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that CD8(+) T cells are critical in HBV elimination. Furthermore, NK cells increased IFN-γ production after HBV plasmid injection, and NK cell depletion led to significantly increased HBV persistence along with reduced frequency of hepatitis B core Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ-sufficient NK cells restored donor CD8(+) T cell function, indicating that NK cells positively regulated CD8(+) T cells via secreting IFN-γ. We also observed that NK cell depletion correlated with decreased effector memory CD8(+) T cell frequencies. Importantly, adoptive transfer experiments showed that NK cells were involved in anti-HBV CD8(+) T cell recall responses. Moreover, DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional, but not DX5(-)CD49a(+) liver-resident, NK cells were involved in improving CD8(+) T cell responses against HBV. Overall, the current study reveals that NK cells, especially DX5(+)CD49a(-) conventional NK cells, promote the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cell responses via secreting IFN-γ in a mouse model mimicking acute HBV infection.

  6. Pan-genotypic Hepatitis C Virus Inhibition by Natural Products Derived from the Wild Egyptian Artichoke

    PubMed Central

    Elsebai, Mahmoud Fahmi; Koutsoudakis, George; Saludes, Verónica; Pérez-Vilaró, Gemma; Turpeinen, Ari; Mattila, Sampo; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Fontaine-Vive, Fabien; Mehiri, Mohamed; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver diseases. Water extracts of the leaves of the wild Egyptian artichoke (WEA) [Cynara cardunculus L. var. sylvestris (Lam.) Fiori] have been used for centuries in the Sinai Peninsula to treat hepatitis symptoms. Here we isolated and characterized six compounds from the water extracts of WEA and evaluated their HCV inhibition capacities in vitro. Importantly, two of these compounds, grosheimol and cynaropicrin, inhibited HCV with half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50s) in the low micromolar range. They inhibited HCV entry into target cells and were active against both cell-free infection as well as cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, the antiviral activity of both compounds was pan-genotypic as HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2b, 3a, 4a, 5a, 6a, and 7a were inhibited. Thus, grosheimol and cynaropicrin are promising candidates for the development of new pan-genotypic entry inhibitors of HCV infection. IMPORTANCE Because there is no preventive HCV vaccine available today, the discovery of novel anti-HCV cell entry inhibitors could help develop preventive measures against infection. The present study describes two compounds isolated from the wild Egyptian artichoke (WEA) with respect to their structural elucidation, absolute configuration, and quantitative determination. Importantly, both compounds inhibited HCV infection in vitro. The first compound was an unknown molecule, and it was designated “grosheimol,” while the second compound is the known molecule cynaropicrin. Both compounds belong to the group of sesquiterpene lactones. The mode of action of these compounds occurred during the early steps of the HCV life cycle, including cell-free and cell-cell infection inhibition. These natural compounds present promising candidates for further development into anti-HCV therapeutics. PMID:26656684

  7. Discriminating dengue-infected hepatic cells (WRL-68) using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yafouz, Bashar; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Rothan, Hussin A; Yusof, Rohana; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the induced movement of dielectric particles placed in a nonuniform electric field, has been used as a potential technique for manipulation and separation of many biological samples without destructive consequences to the cell. Cells of the same genotype in different physiological and pathological states have unique morphological and structural features, therefore, it is possible to differentiate between them using their DEP responses. This paper reports the experimental discrimination of normal and dengue-infected human hepatic fetal epithelial cells (WRL-68 cells) based on their DEP crossover frequency, at which no resultant movement occurs in the cells in response to the DEP force. A microarray dot electrode was used to conduct the DEP experiments. The DEP forces applied to the cells were quantified by analyzing the light intensity shift within the electrode's dot region based on the Cumulative Modal Intensity Shift image analysis technique. The differences in dielectric properties between infected and uninfected cells were exploited by plotting a unique DEP spectrum for each set of cells. We observed that the crossover frequency decreased from 220 kHz for the normal WRL-68 cells to 140 kHz after infection with the dengue virus in a medium conductivity of 100 μS/cm. We conclude that the change in the DEP crossover frequency between dengue-infected cells and their healthy counterparts should allow direct characterization of these cell types by exploiting their electrophysiological properties.

  8. Evaluation of hepatocyteprotective and anti-hepatitis B virus properties of Cichoric acid from Cichorium intybus leaves in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Dai, Ling-Hao; Wu, Yi-Hang; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Yong; Guan, Rong-Fa; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B is the most common serious liver infection in the world. To date, there is still no complete cure for chronic hepatitis B. Natural caffeic acid analogues possess prominent antiviral activity, especially anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) and anti-human immunodeficiency virus effects. Cichoric acid is a caffeic acid derivative from Cichorium intybus. In the study, the anti-hepatitis B property of cichoric acid was evaluated by the D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced normal human HL-7702 hepatocyte injury model, the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV)-infected duck fetal hepatocytes and the HBV-transfected cell line HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. The results showed that cichoric acid attenuated significantly D-GalN-induced HL-7702 hepatocyte injury at 10-100 µg/mL and produced a maximum protection rate of 56.26%. Moreover, cichoric acid at 1-100 µg/mL inhibited markedly DHBV DNA replication in infected duck fetal hepatocytes. Also, cichoric acid at 10-100 µg/mL reduced significantly the hepatitis B surface and envelope antigen levels in HepG2.2.15 cells and produced the maximum inhibition rates of 79.94% and 76.41%, respectively. Meanwhile, test compound at 50-100 µg/mL inhibited markedly HBV DNA replication. In conclusion, this study verifies the anti-hepatitis B effect of cichoric acid from Cichorium intybus leaves. In addition, cichoric acid could be used to design the antiviral agents.

  9. Long Term Liver Engraftment of Functional Hepatocytes Obtained from Germline Cell-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Famulari, Elvira Smeralda; Silengo, Lorenzo; Tolosano, Emanuela; Altruda, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    One of the major hurdles in liver gene and cell therapy is availability of ex vivo-expanded hepatocytes. Pluripotent stem cells are an attractive alternative. Here, we show that hepatocyte precursors can be isolated from male germline cell-derived pluripotent stem cells (GPSCs) using the hepatoblast marker, Liv2, and induced to differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. These cells expressed hepatic-specific genes and were functional as demonstrated by their ability to secrete albumin and produce urea. When transplanted in the liver parenchyma of partially hepatectomised mice, Liv2-sorted cells showed regional and heterogeneous engraftment in the injected lobe. Moreover, approximately 50% of Y chromosome-positive, GPSC-derived cells were found in the female livers, in the region of engraftment, even one month after cell injection. This is the first study showing that Liv2-sorted GPSCs-derived hepatocytes can undergo long lasting engraftment in the mouse liver. Thus, GPSCs might offer promise for regenerative medicine. PMID:26323094

  10. Enhanced antioxidant capacity of dental pulp-derived iPSC-differentiated hepatocytes and liver regeneration by injectable HGF-releasing hydrogel in fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Wai-Wah; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chien, Yueh; Sun, Cho-Chin; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Huang, Chi-Shuan; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Liu, Dean-Mo; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Huo, Teh-Ia; Lee, Shou-Dong; Wang, Chien-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury leading to sustained damage and complications. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may be an alternative option for the treatment of AHF. In this study, we reprogrammed human dental pulp-derived fibroblasts into iPSCs, which exhibited pluripotency and the capacity to differentiate into tridermal lineages, including hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps). These iPSC-Heps resembled human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells in gene signature and hepatic markers/functions. To improve iPSC-Heps engraftment, we next developed an injectable carboxymethyl-hexanoyl chitosan hydrogel (CHC) with sustained hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) release (HGF-CHC) and investigated the hepatoprotective activity of HGF-CHC-delivered iPSC-Heps in vitro and in an immunocompromised AHF mouse model induced by thioacetamide (TAA). Intrahepatic delivery of HGF-CHC-iPSC-Heps reduced the TAA-induced hepatic necrotic area and rescued liver function and recipient viability. Compared with PBS-delivered iPSC-Heps, the HGF-CHC-delivered iPSC-Heps exhibited higher antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities that reduced hepatic necrotic area. Importantly, these HGF-CHC-mediated responses could be abolished by administering anti-HGF neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that HGF mediated the enhancement of iPSC-Hep antioxidant/antiapoptotic capacities and hepatoprotection and that HGF-CHC is as an excellent vehicle for iPSC-Hep engraftment in iPSC-based therapy against AHF.

  11. Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Fuel the Fire.

    PubMed

    Achyut, B R; Arbab, Ali S

    2014-08-01

    Low oxygen tension, hypoxia, is a characteristic of many tumors and associated with the poor prognosis. Hypoxia invites bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) from bone marrow to the site of tumor. These recruited CXCR4+ BMDCs provide favorable environment for the tumor growth by acquiring pro-angiogenic phenotype such as CD45+VEGFR2+ Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPC), or CD45+Tie2+ myeloid cells. CD11b+CD13+ myeloid population of the BMDCs modulate tumor progression. These myeloid populations retain immunosuppressive characteristics, for example, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and regulates immune- suppression by inhibiting cytotoxic T cell function. In addition, MDSCs were observed at the premetastatic niche of the distant organs in other tumors. Protumorigenic and prometastatic role of the myeloid cells provides a basis for therapeutic targeting of immunosuppression and thus inhibiting tumor development and metastasis.

  12. Mechanisms of Hepatic Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Substantial improvements in the treatment of chronic liver disease have accelerated interest in uncovering the mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Activation of resident hepatic stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic cells in liver injury remains a dominant theme driving the field. However, several new areas of rapid progress in the past 5–10 years also have taken root, including: (1) identification of different fibrogenic populations apart from resident stellate cells, for example, portal fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and bone-marrow– derived cells, as well as cells derived from epithelial mesenchymal transition; (2) emergence of stellate cells as finely regulated determinants of hepatic inflammation and immunity; (3) elucidation of multiple pathways controlling gene expression during stellate cell activation including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms; (4) recognition of disease-specific pathways of fibrogenesis; (5) re-emergence of hepatic macrophages as determinants of matrix degradation in fibrosis resolution and the importance of matrix cross-linking and scar maturation in determining reversibility; and (6) hints that hepatic stellate cells may contribute to hepatic stem cell behavior, cancer, and regeneration. Clinical and translational implications of these advances have become clear, and have begun to impact significantly on the management and outlook of patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:18471545

  13. History of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, James E; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2013-10-01

    Tumour-induced granulocytic hyperplasia is associated with tumour vasculogenesis and escape from immunity via T cell suppression. Initially, these myeloid cells were identified as granulocytes or monocytes; however, recent studies have revealed that this hyperplasia is associated with populations of multipotent progenitor cells that have been identified as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The study of MDSCs has provided a wealth of information regarding tumour pathobiology, has extended our understanding of neoplastic progression and has modified our approaches to immune adjuvant therapy. In this Timeline article, we discuss the history of MDSCs, their influence on tumour progression and metastasis, and the crosstalk between tumour cells, MDSCs and the host macroenvironment.

  14. Evaluation of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy in Patient-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Niemietz, Christoph J; Sauer, Vanessa; Stella, Jacqueline; Fleischhauer, Lutz; Chandhok, Gursimran; Guttmann, Sarah; Avsar, Yesim; Guo, Shuling; Ackermann, Elizabeth J; Gollob, Jared; Monia, Brett P; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is caused by mutations of the transthyretin (TTR) gene, predominantly expressed in the liver. Two compounds that knockdown TTR, comprising a small interfering RNA (siRNA; ALN-TTR-02) and an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO; IONIS-TTRRx), are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Since primary hepatocytes from FAP patients are rarely available for molecular analysis and commercial tissue culture cells or animal models lack the patient-specific genetic background, this study uses primary cells derived from urine of FAP patients. Urine-derived cells were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with high efficiency. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) showing typical hepatic marker expression were obtained from iPSCs of the FAP patients. TTR mRNA expression of FAP HLCs almost reached levels measured in human hepatocytes. To assess TTR knockdown, siTTR1 and TTR-ASO were introduced to HLCs. A significant downregulation (>80%) of TTR mRNA was induced in the HLCs by both oligonucleotides. TTR protein present in the cell culture supernatant of HLCs was similarly downregulated. Gene expression of other hepatic markers was not affected by the therapeutic oligonucleotides. Our data indicate that urine cells (UCs) after reprogramming and hepatic differentiation represent excellent primary human target cells to assess the efficacy and specificity of novel compounds.

  15. Activated Notch signaling is required for hepatitis B virus X protein to promote proliferation and survival of human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Zhou, Haiyan; Xia, Xiumei; Sun, Qian; Wang, Ying; Cheng, Bin

    2010-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is a multifunctional oncoprotein which plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the exact mechanisms remain controversial. Here we show that HBx strongly stimulated cell growth, promoted cell cycle progression and inhibited apoptosis of human non-tumor hepatic cell line L02 cells. It also accelerated tumor formation of L02 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Furthermore, Notch signaling components were upregulated in HBx-expressing L02 cells compared to normal L02 cells. However, blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) attenuated cell growth, shortened the S phase of cell cycle and promoted apoptosis of HBx-expressing L02 cell in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but normal L02 cells were not significantly affected by Notch signaling blocking. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that HBx could promote the growth of human non-tumor hepatic cell line L02 cells both in vitro and in vivo, which may require the activation of Notch signaling pathway.

  16. Serum-Derived Hepatitis C Virus Infection of Primary Human Hepatocytes Is Tetraspanin CD81 Dependent▿

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Sonia; Castet, Valerie; Pichard-Garcia, Lydiane; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Meurs, Eliane; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Sureau, Camille; Fabre, Jean-Michel; SaCunha, Antonio; Larrey, Dominique; Dubuisson, Jean; Coste, Joliette; McKeating, Jane; Maurel, Patrick; Fournier-Wirth, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus-positive serum (HCVser, genotypes 1a to 3a) or HCV cell culture (JFH1/HCVcc) infection of primary normal human hepatocytes was assessed by measuring intracellular HCV RNA strands. Anti-CD81 antibodies and siRNA-CD81 silencing markedly inhibited (>90%) HCVser infection irrespective of HCV genotype, viral load, or liver donor, while hCD81-large intracellular loop (LEL) had no effect. However, JFH1/HCVcc infection of hepatocytes was modestly inhibited (40 to 60%) by both hCD81-LEL and anti-CD81 antibodies. In conclusion, CD81 is involved in HCVser infection of human hepatocytes, and comparative studies of HCVser versus JFH1/HCVcc infection of human hepatocytes and Huh-7.5 cells revealed that the cell-virion combination is determinant of the entry process. PMID:17942559

  17. Determining the cellular diversity of hepatitis C virus quasispecies by single-cell viral sequencing.

    PubMed

    McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; McLauchlan, John

    2013-12-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants.

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-05-18

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cord blood-derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. RESULTS HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. CONCLUSIONS HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers.

  19. Coinfection of Hepatic Cell Lines with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus Leads to an Increase in Intracellular Hepatitis B Surface Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Iser, David M.; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter A.; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Saleh, Suha; Crane, Megan; Cameron, Paul U.; Bowden, Scott; Nguyen, Tin; Pereira, Cândida F.; Desmond, Paul V.; Locarnini, Stephen A.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2010-01-01

    Liver-related mortality is increased in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. However, interactions between HIV and HBV to explain this observation have not been described. We hypothesized that HIV infection of hepatocytes directly affects the life cycle of HBV. We infected human hepatic cell lines expressing HBV (Hep3B and AD38 cells) or not expressing HBV (Huh7, HepG2, and AD43 cells) with laboratory strains of HIV (NL4-3 and AD8), as well as a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotyped HIV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Following HIV infection with NL4-3 or AD8 in hepatic cell lines, we observed a significant increase in HIV reverse transcriptase activity which was infectious. Despite no detection of surface CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 by flow cytometry, AD8 infection of AD38 cells was inhibited by maraviroc and NL4-3 was inhibited by AMD3100, demonstrating that HIV enters AD38 hepatic cell lines via CCR5 or CXCR4. High-level infection of AD38 cells (50%) was achieved using VSV-pseudotyped HIV. Coinfection of the AD38 cell line with HIV did not alter the HBV DNA amount or species as determined by Southern blotting or nucleic acid signal amplification. However, coinfection with HIV was associated with a significant increase in intracellular HBsAg when measured by Western blotting, quantitative HBsAg, and fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that HIV infection of HBV-infected hepatic cell lines significantly increased intracellular HBsAg but not HBV DNA synthesis and that increased intrahepatic HBsAg secondary to direct infection by HIV may contribute to accelerated liver disease in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals. PMID:20357083

  20. Coinfection of hepatic cell lines with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus leads to an increase in intracellular hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Iser, David M; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter A; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Saleh, Suha; Crane, Megan; Cameron, Paul U; Bowden, Scott; Nguyen, Tin; Pereira, Cândida F; Desmond, Paul V; Locarnini, Stephen A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2010-06-01

    Liver-related mortality is increased in the setting of HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. However, interactions between HIV and HBV to explain this observation have not been described. We hypothesized that HIV infection of hepatocytes directly affects the life cycle of HBV. We infected human hepatic cell lines expressing HBV (Hep3B and AD38 cells) or not expressing HBV (Huh7, HepG2, and AD43 cells) with laboratory strains of HIV (NL4-3 and AD8), as well as a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotyped HIV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Following HIV infection with NL4-3 or AD8 in hepatic cell lines, we observed a significant increase in HIV reverse transcriptase activity which was infectious. Despite no detection of surface CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 by flow cytometry, AD8 infection of AD38 cells was inhibited by maraviroc and NL4-3 was inhibited by AMD3100, demonstrating that HIV enters AD38 hepatic cell lines via CCR5 or CXCR4. High-level infection of AD38 cells (50%) was achieved using VSV-pseudotyped HIV. Coinfection of the AD38 cell line with HIV did not alter the HBV DNA amount or species as determined by Southern blotting or nucleic acid signal amplification. However, coinfection with HIV was associated with a significant increase in intracellular HBsAg when measured by Western blotting, quantitative HBsAg, and fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that HIV infection of HBV-infected hepatic cell lines significantly increased intracellular HBsAg but not HBV DNA synthesis and that increased intrahepatic HBsAg secondary to direct infection by HIV may contribute to accelerated liver disease in HIV-HBV-coinfected individuals.

  1. Inhibitory effect of oestradiol on activation of rat hepatic stellate cells in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, I; Mizobuchi, Y; Yasuda, M; Shiba, M; Ma, Y; Horie, T; Liu, F; Ito, S

    1999-01-01

    Background—Hepatic stellate cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. 
Aims—To examine the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on stellate cell activation. 
Methods—In vivo, hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by dimethylnitrosamine or pig serum. In vitro, rat stellate cells were activated by contact with plastic dishes resulting in their transformation into myofibroblast-like cells. 
Results—In the dimethylnitrosamine and pig serum models, treatment with oestradiol at gestation related doses resulted in a dose dependent suppression of hepatic fibrosis with restored content of hepatic retinyl palmitate, reduced collagen content, lower areas of stellate cells which express α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin, and lower procollagen type I and III mRNA levels in the liver. In cultured stellate cells, oestradiol inhibited type I collagen production, α-SMA expression, and cell proliferation. These findings suggest that oestradiol is a potent inhibitor of stellate cell transformation. 
Conclusion—The antifibrogenic role of oestradiol in the liver may contribute to the sex associated differences in the progression from hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis. 

 Keywords: hepatic stellate cells; hepatic fibrosis; oestradiol; α smooth muscle actin; retinyl palmitate PMID:9862839

  2. Human Skin-Derived Stem Cells as a Novel Cell Source for In Vitro Hepatotoxicity Screening of Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    De Kock, Joery; Branson, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Meganathan, Kesavan; Chaudhari, Umesh; Sachinidis, Agapios; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; De Boe, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are postnatal stem cells with neural crest properties that reside in the dermis of human skin. These cells can be easily isolated from small (fore) skin segments and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. In this study, we show that upon exposure to hepatogenic growth factors and cytokines, hSKP acquire sufficient hepatic features that could make these cells suitable in vitro tools for hepatotoxicity screening of new chemical entities and already existing pharmaceutical compounds. Indeed, hepatic differentiated hSKP [hSKP-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hSKP-HPC)] express hepatic progenitor cell markers (EPCAM, NCAM2, PROM1) and adult hepatocyte markers (ALB), as well as key biotransformation enzymes (CYP1B1, FMO1, GSTA4, GSTM3) and influx and efflux drug transporters (ABCC4, ABCA1, SLC2A5). Using a toxicogenomics approach, we could demonstrate that hSKP-HPC respond to acetaminophen exposure in a comparable way to primary human hepatocytes in culture. The toxicological responses “liver damage”, “liver proliferation”, “liver necrosis” and “liver steatosis” were found to be significantly enriched in both in vitro models. Also genes associated with either cytotoxic responses or induction of apoptosis (BCL2L11, FOS, HMOX1, TIMP3, and AHR) were commonly upregulated and might represent future molecular biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, our data gives a first indication that hSKP-HPC might represent a suitable preclinical model for in vitro screening of hepatotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which human postnatal stem cells derived from skin are described as a potentially relevant cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity testing of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23952781

  3. Human skin-derived stem cells as a novel cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity screening of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; De Kock, Joery; Branson, Steven; Vinken, Mathieu; Meganathan, Kesavan; Chaudhari, Umesh; Sachinidis, Agapios; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; De Boe, Veerle; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are postnatal stem cells with neural crest properties that reside in the dermis of human skin. These cells can be easily isolated from small (fore) skin segments and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell types. In this study, we show that upon exposure to hepatogenic growth factors and cytokines, hSKP acquire sufficient hepatic features that could make these cells suitable in vitro tools for hepatotoxicity screening of new chemical entities and already existing pharmaceutical compounds. Indeed, hepatic differentiated hSKP [hSKP-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hSKP-HPC)] express hepatic progenitor cell markers (EPCAM, NCAM2, PROM1) and adult hepatocyte markers (ALB), as well as key biotransformation enzymes (CYP1B1, FMO1, GSTA4, GSTM3) and influx and efflux drug transporters (ABCC4, ABCA1, SLC2A5). Using a toxicogenomics approach, we could demonstrate that hSKP-HPC respond to acetaminophen exposure in a comparable way to primary human hepatocytes in culture. The toxicological responses "liver damage", "liver proliferation", "liver necrosis" and "liver steatosis" were found to be significantly enriched in both in vitro models. Also genes associated with either cytotoxic responses or induction of apoptosis (BCL2L11, FOS, HMOX1, TIMP3, and AHR) were commonly upregulated and might represent future molecular biomarkers for hepatotoxicity. In conclusion, our data gives a first indication that hSKP-HPC might represent a suitable preclinical model for in vitro screening of hepatotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which human postnatal stem cells derived from skin are described as a potentially relevant cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity testing of pharmaceutical compounds.

  4. Selective proliferation of chemically altered rat liver epithelial cells following hepatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faris, R A; Hixson, D C

    1989-07-01

    Although proliferation of oval cells is often observed during the early stages of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis, the role of these putative hepatic stem cells during the neoplastic process is unknown. In earlier studies our laboratory showed that feeding a choline-deficient (CD) diet containing 0.05% 2-acetylaminofluorene (CD-AAF) to rats produced three subpopulations of oval cells that antigenically resemble biliary duct cells, fetal liver cells, and transitional cells. In the present investigation we have employed a semiallogeneic transplantation protocol in order to study the fate of these nonparenchymal epithelial cells (NPEC) beyond the 4-week endpoint imposed by the lethality of CD-AAF diet. An enriched NPEC suspension containing gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT)-positive oval cells (greater than 75%) was isolated from ACI rats maintained on CD-AAF diet for 3 weeks. The donor cells were transplanted via the portal vein into livers of male F1 progeny (LExACI) that had been fed a CD diet for 7 days prior to receiving a partial hepatectomy and the cell suspension. Host rats were then fed either a CD or choline-supplemented (CS) diet for 12 weeks and killed. Colonies of donor-derived cells identified in frozen sections by their lack of reactivity with ACI anti-LE alloantiserum in indirect immunofluorescence (IF) assays were only observed in rats continuously fed the CD diet. Histochemical analysis indicated that the donor-derived colonies expressed GGT, a preneoplastic marker for liver cancer. IF assays using MAbs previously shown to be capable of distinguishing between oval cells and mature hepatocytes indicated that the donor-derived colonies consisted of a mixture of cells with phenotypes resembling those of mature and immature hepatocytes rather than those of oval or ductal cells. Although the cellular origin of the GGT+ donor-derived colonies has not been unequivocally resolved, our results demonstrate that the livers of rats fed a CD-AAF diet contain a

  5. Reduced Hepatic Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Level in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Garrett; Muturi, Harrison T.; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Bowman, Thomas A.; Ghadieh, Hilda E.; Ghanem, Simona S.; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S.; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of insulin clearance is being increasingly recognized as a critical step in the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes insulin clearance. Null deletion or liver-specific inactivation of Ceacam1 in mice causes a defect in insulin clearance, insulin resistance, steatohepatitis, and visceral obesity. Immunohistological analysis revealed reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obese subjects with fatty liver disease. Thus, we aimed to determine whether this occurs at the hepatocyte level in response to systemic extrahepatic factors and whether this holds across species. Northern and Western blot analyses demonstrate that CEACAM1 mRNA and protein levels are reduced in liver tissues of obese individuals compared to their lean age-matched counterparts. Furthermore, Western analysis reveals a comparable reduction of CEACAM1 protein in primary hepatocytes derived from the same obese subjects. Similar to humans, Ceacam1 mRNA level, assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, is significantly reduced in the livers of obese Zucker (fa/fa, ZDF) and Koletsky (f/f) rats relative to their age-matched lean counterparts. These studies demonstrate that the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obesity occurs at the level of hepatocytes and identify the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 as a common denominator of obesity across multiple species. PMID:28396653

  6. Reduced Hepatic Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Level in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Muturi, Harrison T; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y; DeAngelis, Anthony M; Bowman, Thomas A; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of insulin clearance is being increasingly recognized as a critical step in the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes insulin clearance. Null deletion or liver-specific inactivation of Ceacam1 in mice causes a defect in insulin clearance, insulin resistance, steatohepatitis, and visceral obesity. Immunohistological analysis revealed reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obese subjects with fatty liver disease. Thus, we aimed to determine whether this occurs at the hepatocyte level in response to systemic extrahepatic factors and whether this holds across species. Northern and Western blot analyses demonstrate that CEACAM1 mRNA and protein levels are reduced in liver tissues of obese individuals compared to their lean age-matched counterparts. Furthermore, Western analysis reveals a comparable reduction of CEACAM1 protein in primary hepatocytes derived from the same obese subjects. Similar to humans, Ceacam1 mRNA level, assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, is significantly reduced in the livers of obese Zucker (fa/fa, ZDF) and Koletsky (f/f) rats relative to their age-matched lean counterparts. These studies demonstrate that the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obesity occurs at the level of hepatocytes and identify the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 as a common denominator of obesity across multiple species.

  7. T Cell-Derived Lymphotoxin Regulates Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    TUMANOV, ALEXEI V.; KOROLEVA, EKATERINA P.; CHRISTIANSEN, PETER A.; KHAN, MEHTAB A.; RUDDY, MATTHEW J.; BURNETTE, BYRON; PAPA, SALVATORE; FRANZOSO, GUIDO; NEDOSPASOV, SERGEI A.; FU, YANG-XIN; ANDERS, ROBERT A.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability of the liver to regenerate hepatic mass is essential to withstanding liver injury. The process of liver regeneration is tightly regulated by distinct signaling cascades involving components of the innate immune system, cytokines, and growth factors. However, the role of the adaptive immune system in regulation of liver regeneration is not well-defined. The role of adaptive immune system in liver regeneration was investigated in lymphocyte-deficient mice and in conditional lymphotoxin-deficient mice. Methods A model of liver regeneration after 70% partial hepatectomy was used, followed by examination of liver pathology, survival, DNA synthesis, and cytokine expression. Results We found that mice deficient in T cells show a reduced capacity for liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. Furthermore, surface lymphotoxin, provided by T cells, is critical for liver regeneration. Mice specifically deficient in T-cell lymphotoxin had increased liver damage and a reduced capacity to initiate DNA synthesis after partial hepatectomy. Transfer of splenocytes from wild-type but not lymphotoxin-deficient mice improved liver regeneration in T cell-deficient mice. We found that an agonistic antibody against the lymphotoxin β receptor was able to facilitate liver regeneration by reducing liver injury, increasing interleukin-6 production, hepatocyte DNA synthesis, and survival of lymphocyte-deficient (Rag) mice after partial hepatectomy. Conclusions The adaptive immune system directly regulates liver regeneration via a T cell-derived lymphotoxin axis, and pharmacological stimulation of lymphotoxin β receptor might represent a novel therapeutic approach to improve liver regeneration. PMID:18952083

  8. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-10-07

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  9. Fate tracing reveals hepatic stellate cells as dominant contributors to liver fibrosis independent of its aetiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mederacke, Ingmar; Hsu, Christine C.; Troeger, Juliane S.; Huebener, Peter; Mu, Xueru; Dapito, Dianne H.; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2013-11-01

    Although organ fibrosis causes significant morbidity and mortality in chronic diseases, the lack of detailed knowledge about specific cellular contributors mediating fibrogenesis hampers the design of effective antifibrotic therapies. Different cellular sources, including tissue-resident and bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, pericytes and epithelial cells, have been suggested to give rise to myofibroblasts, but their relative contributions remain controversial, with profound differences between organs and different diseases. Here we employ a novel Cre-transgenic mouse that marks 99% of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a liver-specific pericyte population, to demonstrate that HSCs give rise to 82-96% of myofibroblasts in models of toxic, cholestatic and fatty liver disease. Moreover, we exclude that HSCs function as facultative epithelial progenitor cells in the injured liver. On the basis these findings, HSCs should be considered the primary cellular target for antifibrotic therapies across all types of liver disease.

  10. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  11. Roles for Cell-Cell Adhesion and Contact in Obesity-Induced Hepatic Myeloid Cell Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Yasutaka; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Komiya, Chikara; Shiba, Kumiko; Shimazu, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Deushi, Michiyo; Osaka, Mizuko; Inoue, Kouji; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Kikuta, Junichi; Wake, Kenjiro; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ishii, Masaru; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-14

    Obesity promotes infiltration of inflammatory cells into various tissues, leading to parenchymal and stromal cell interaction and development of cellular and organ dysfunction. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are the first cells that contact portal blood cells and substances in the liver, but their functions in the development of obesity-associated glucose metabolism remain unclear. Here, we find that LSECs are involved in obesity-associated accumulation of myeloid cells via VLA-4-dependent cell-cell adhesion. VLA-4 blockade in mice fed a high-fat diet attenuated myeloid cell accumulation in the liver to improve hepatic inflammation and systemic glucose intolerance. Ex vivo studies further show that cell-cell contact between intrahepatic leukocytes and parenchymal hepatocytes induces gluconeogenesis via a Notch-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that cell-cell interaction between parenchymal and stromal cells regulates hepatic glucose metabolism and offers potential strategies for treatment or prevention of obesity-associated glucose intolerance.

  12. Hepatitis C virus RNA detection in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Cai, Qing; Chen, You-Chun; Zhang, Mu-Sen; Guan, Jian; Li, Xiao-Juan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the existence and clinical significance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatitis C. METHODS: HCV RNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested PCR) in serum and in PBMC of 46 patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) and in 42 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). RESULTS: The positive rate of HCV RNA in PBMC of patients with CHC was markedly higher than that of patients with AHC (P < 0.01). The positive rates of HCV RNA in serum of patients with AHC and CHC and in PBMC of patients with CHC were significantly higher than those of anti-HCV positive patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (P < 0.01). HCV RNA was negative in the serum of two patients, but could be detected in PBMC. In 12 patients, anti HCV was negative while HCV RNA was positive in serum. CONCLUSION: (1) detection of serum HCV RNA by nested PCR might be helpful in the early diagnosis of anti-HCV negative hepatitis C; (2) liver damage in patients with hepatitis C might be correlated with HCV-viremia; (3) infection of PBMC by HCV might play an important role in chronic liver damage in patients with HCV and in the chronicity of its clinical course; and (4) PBMC might be considered as a “reservoir” for HCV. PMID:27041960

  13. Differentiation of human foreskin fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Zhao, Ping; Wan, Zhihong; Jin, Xueyuan; Cheng, Yongqian; Yan, Tao; Qing, Song; Ding, Ning; Xin, Shaojie

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differentiation potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). The iPSCs were firstly induced by transduction of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC into HFFs using retrovirus. Afterwards, expressions of pluripotency factors were identified by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining, and karyotype, embryoid, and teratoma were observed by microscope. Then, iPSCs were gradually differentiated into endoderm cells, hepatic progenitor cells, and mature HLCs by special culture medium. During this process, differentiation efficiency into each kind of cells was evaluated by detecting SOX17, HNF4a, and ALB using flow cytometry, respectively. Besides, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was conducted to detect the secretion of ALB in iPSC-induced HLCs and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of hepatocyte-specific genes. The iPSCs were successfully induced by HFFs, which exhibited typical embryonic stem cells morphology, positive alkaline phosphatase staining, normal diploid karyotype, and positive expression of various pluripotency factors. Meanwhile, spherical embryoid and teratoma with 3 germ layers were formed by iPSCs. The iPSCs were consecutively induced into endoderm cells, hepatic progenitor cells and mature HLCs, and the differentiation efficiency was 55.7 ± 2.9%, 45.7 ± 4.8%, and 35.0 ± 3.9%, respectively. Besides, the secretion of ALB and expression of various hepatocyte-specific genes was highly detected in iPSC-induced HLCs. The iPSCs were successfully derived from HFFs and then differentiated into HLCs, which proved a new source for hepatocyte transplantation.

  14. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Parthenolide-induced apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells and anti-fibrotic effects in an in vivo rat model.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hee; Kim, Sang Wook; Kim, Seong Hun; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae Ghon; Lee, Mi Jin; Park, Woo Hyun

    2012-07-31

    Parthenolide (PT), a sesquiterpene lactone derived from the plant feverfew, has pro-apoptotic activity in a number of cancer cell types. We assessed whether PT induces the apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs) and examined its effects on hepatic fibrosis in an in vivo model. The effects of PT on rat HSCs were investigated in relation to cell growth inhibition, apoptosis, NF-κB binding activity, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and glutathione (GSH) levels. In addition, the anti-fibrotic effects of PT were investigated in a thioacetamide-treated rat model. PT induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in HSCs, as evidenced by cell growth inhibition and apoptosis assays. PT increased the expression of Bax proteins during apoptosis, but decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) proteins. PT also induced a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, and caspase-3 activation. PT inhibited TNF-α-stimulated NF-κB binding activity in HSCs. The pro-apoptotic activity of PT in HSCs was associated with increased intracellular oxidative stress as evidenced by increased intracellular ROS levels and depleted intracellular GSH levels. Furthermore, PT ameliorated hepatic fibrosis significantly in a thioacetamide- treated rat model. In conclusion, PT exhibited pro-apoptotic effects in rat HSCs and ameliorated hepatic fibrosis in a thioacetamide-induced rat model.

  16. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  17. Tracking Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells during and after Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pfafferot, Katja; Heeg, Malte H.J.; Gaudieri, Silvana; Grüner, Norbert; Rauch, Andri; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Zachoval, Reinhart; Pape, Gerd R.; Schraut, Winfried; Santantonio, Teresa; Nitschko, Hans; Obermeier, Martin; Phillips, Rodney; Scriba, Thomas J.; Semmo, Nasser; Day, Cheryl; Weber, Jonathan N.; Fidler, Sarah; Thimme, Robert; Haberstroh, Anita; Baumert, Thomas F.; Klenerman, Paul; Diepolder, Helmut M.

    2007-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. Conclusions/Significance During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists. PMID:17653276

  18. Direct effects of hepatitis C virus on the lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuteru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-11-28

    It has been reported that the direct binding of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and/or the replication of HCV in the extrahepatic organs and, especially, lymphoid cells, might affect the pathogenesis of extrahepatic diseases with HCV infection. More than one decade ago, several reports described the existence of HCV-RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Moreover, many reports describing the existence of HCV in B lymphocytes and B cell lymphoma have been published. In addition to B lymphocytes, it was reported that HCV replication could be detected in T lymphocytes and T cell lines. Among the extrahepatic diseases with HCV infection, mixed cryoglobulinemia-related diseases and autoimmune-related diseases are important for understanding the immunopathogensis of HCV persistent infection. Moreover, HCV persistent infection can cause malignant lymphoma. The biological significance of lymphotropic HCV has not yet become clear. However, several candidates have been considered for a long time. One is that lymphotropic HCV is an HCV reservoir that might contribute to the recurrence of HCV infection and difficult-to-treat disease status. The other important issue is the carcinogenesis of the lymphoid cells and disturbances of the immune responses. Therefore, the extrahepatic diseases might be induced by direct interaction between HCV and lymphoid cells. In this article, we summarize various studies showing the direct effect of HCV on lymphoid cells and discuss the biological significance of lymphotropic HCV.

  19. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid progenitors and precursors at different stages of differentiation into granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Blockade of their differentiation into mature myeloid cells in cancer results in an expansion of this population. High-grade gliomas are the most common malignant tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), with a poor prognosis despite intensive radiation and chemotherapy. Histopathological and flow cytometry analyses of human and rodent experimental gliomas revealed the extensive heterogeneity of immune cells infiltrating gliomas and their microenvironment. Immune cell infiltrates consist of: resident (microglia) and peripheral macrophages, granulocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and T lymphocytes. Intratumoural density of glioma-associated MDSCs correlates positively with the histological grade of gliomas and patient’s survival. MDSCs have the ability to attract T regulatory lymphocytes to the tumour, but block the activation of tumour-reactive CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Immunomodulatory mechanisms employed by malignant gliomas pose an appalling challenge to brain tumour immunotherapy. In this mini-review we describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of MDSCs in humans and rodents, and their occurrence and potential roles in glioma progression. While understanding the complexity of immune cell interactions in the glioma microenvironment is far from being accomplished, there is significant progress that may lead to the development of immunotherapy for gliomas. PMID:28373814

  20. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, whether Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in over 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease. PMID:26192438

  1. Monoclonal anti-envelope antibody AP33 protects humanized mice against a patient-derived hepatitis C virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Desombere, Isabelle; Fafi-Kremer, Samira; Van Houtte, Freya; Pessaux, Patrick; Farhoudi, Ali; Heydmann, Laura; Verhoye, Lieven; Cole, Sarah; McKeating, Jane A; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Baumert, Thomas F; Patel, Arvind H; Meuleman, Philip

    2016-04-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major indication for liver transplantation. However, immediately after transplantation, the liver graft of viremic patients universally becomes infected by circulating virus, resulting in accelerated liver disease progression. Currently available direct-acting antiviral therapies have reduced efficacy in patients with ESLD and prophylactic strategies to prevent HCV recurrence are still highly needed. In this study, we compared the ability of two broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), designated 3/11 and AP33, recognizing a distinct, but overlapping, epitope in the viral E2 glycoprotein to protect humanized mice from a patient-derived HCV challenge. Their neutralizing activity was assessed using the HCV pseudoparticles and cell-culture-derived HCV systems expressing multiple patient-derived envelopes and a human-liver chimeric mouse model. HCV RNA was readily detected in all control mice challenged with a patient-derived HCV genotype 1b isolate, whereas 3 of 4 AP33-treated mice were completely protected. In contrast, only one of four 3/11-treated mice remained HCV-RNA negative throughout the observation period, whereas the other 3 had a viral load that was indistinguishable from that in the control group. The increased in vivo efficacy of AP33 was in line with its higher affinity and neutralizing capacity observed in vitro. Although mAbs AP33 and 3/11 target the same region in E2, only mAb AP33 can efficiently protect from challenge with a heterologous HCV population in vivo. Given that mAb AP33 efficiently neutralizes viral variants that escaped the humoral immune response and reinfected the liver graft of transplant patients, it may be a valuable candidate to prevent HCV recurrence. In addition, our data are valuable for the design of a prophylactic vaccine. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen C; Nagar, Michael; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2010-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of the beta-globin chain of hemoglobin (Hb), resulting in poorly deformable sickled cells that cause microvascular occlusion and hemolytic anemia. The spleen is almost always affected by SCD, with microinfarcts within the first 36 months of life resulting in splenic atrophy. Acute liver disorders causing right-sided abdominal pain include acute vaso-occlusive crisis, liver infarction, and acute hepatic crisis. Chronic liver disease might be due to hemosiderosis and hepatitis and possibly to SCD itself if small, clinically silent microvascular occlusions occur chronically. Black pigment gallstones caused by elevated bilirubin excretion are common. Their small size permits them to travel into the common bile duct but cause only low-grade obstruction, so hyperbilirubinemia rather than bile duct dilatation is typical. Whether cholecystectomy should be done in asymptomatic individuals is controversial. The most common laboratory abnormality is an elevation of unconjugated bilirubin level. Bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase levels correlate with one another, suggesting that chronic hemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis, rather than liver disease, are the sources of hyperbilirubinemia. Abdominal pain is very common in SCD and is usually due to sickling, which resolves with supportive care. Computed tomography scans might be ordered for severe or unremitting pain. The liver typically shows sickled erythrocytes and Kupffer cell enlargement acutely and hemosiderosis chronically. The safety of liver biopsies has been questioned, particularly during acute sickling crisis. Treatments include blood transfusions, exchange transfusions, iron-chelating agents, hydroxyurea, and allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Galactosylated collagen matrix enhanced in vitro maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ghodsizadeh, Arefeh; Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Najarasl, Mostafa; Hiraoka, Yosuke; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Due to their important biomedical applications, functional human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (hESC-HLCs) are an attractive topic in the field of stem cell differentiation. Here, we have initially differentiated hESCs into functional hepatic endoderm (HE) and continued the differentiation by replating them onto galactosylated collagen (GC) and collagen matrices. The differentiation of hESC-HE cells into HLCs on GC substrate showed significant up-regulation of hepatic-specific genes such as ALB, HNF4α, CYP3A4, G6P, and ASGR1. There was more albumin secretion and urea synthesis, as well as more cytochrome p450 activity, in differentiated HLCs on GC compared to the collagen-coated substrate. These results suggested that GC substrate has the potential to be used for in vitro maturation of hESC-HLCs.

  4. The citrus fruit flavonoid naringenin suppresses hepatic glucose production from Fao hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Aparna; Tian, Min; Belury, Martha A

    2009-02-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is the major source of fasting hyperglycemia. Here, we investigated the role of the citrus fruit flavonoid naringenin, in the attenuation of hepatic glucose production from hepatoma (Fao) cells. We show that naringenin, but not its glucoside naringin, suppresses hepatic glucose production. Furthermore, unlike insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production, incubation of hepatocytes with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) inhibitor Ly294002 had no effect on the ability of naringenin to suppress hepatic glucose production. Further, naringenin did not increase phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 or, Thr308, indicating this down-stream target of PI3-kinase is also not a player in naringenin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose production. Importantly, like the dimethylbiguanide, metformin, naringenin significantly decreased cellular ATP levels without increasing cell cytotoxicity. Together, these results suggest that the aglycone, naringenin, has a role in the attenuation of hyperglycemia and may exert this effect in a manner similar to the drug, metformin.

  5. Curcumin attenuates angiogenesis in liver fibrosis and inhibits angiogenic properties of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Zili; Chen, Li; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chunfeng; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is concomitant with sinusoidal pathological angiogenesis, which has been highlighted as novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of chronic liver disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that curcumin has potent antifibrotic activity, but the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The current work demonstrated that curcumin ameliorated fibrotic injury and sinusoidal angiogenesis in rat liver with fibrosis caused by carbon tetrachloride. Curcumin reduced the expression of a number of angiogenic markers in fibrotic liver. Experiments in vitro showed that the viability and vascularization of rat liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and rat aortic ring angiogenesis were not impaired by curcumin. These results indicated that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are characterized as liver-specific pericytes could be potential target cells for curcumin. Further investigations showed that curcumin inhibited VEGF expression in HSCs associated with disrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR)/ERK and mTOR pathways. HSC motility and vascularization were also suppressed by curcumin associated with blocking PDGF-βR/focal adhesion kinase/RhoA cascade. Gain- or loss-of-function analyses revealed that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) was required for curcumin to inhibit angiogenic properties of HSCs. We concluded that curcumin attenuated sinusoidal angiogenesis in liver fibrosis possibly by targeting HSCs via a PPAR-γ activation-dependent mechanism. PPAR-γ could be a target molecule for reducing pathological angiogenesis during liver fibrosis. PMID:24779927

  6. Liver fibrosis and hepatic stellate cells: Etiology, pathological hallmarks and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chong-Yang; Yuan, Wei-Gang; He, Pei; Lei, Jia-Hui; Wang, Chun-Xu

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing process aimed at maintaining organ integrity, and presents as the critical pre-stage of liver cirrhosis, which will eventually progress to hepatocellular carcinoma in the absence of liver transplantation. Fibrosis generally results from chronic hepatic injury caused by various factors, mainly viral infection, schistosomiasis, and alcoholism; however, the exact pathological mechanisms are still unknown. Although numerous drugs have been shown to have antifibrotic activity in vitro and in animal models, none of these drugs have been shown to be efficacious in the clinic. Importantly, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in the initiation, progression, and regression of liver fibrosis by secreting fibrogenic factors that encourage portal fibrocytes, fibroblasts, and bone marrow-derived myofibroblasts to produce collagen and thereby propagate fibrosis. These cells are subject to intricate cross-talk with adjacent cells, resulting in scarring and subsequent liver damage. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis and their relationships with HSCs is essential for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. This comprehensive review outlines the role of HSCs in liver fibrosis and details novel strategies to suppress HSC activity, thereby providing new insights into potential treatments for liver fibrosis. PMID:28082803

  7. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  8. Stemness is Derived from Thyroid Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Risheng; Bonnefond, Simon; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs). Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Furthermore, EMT is a critical process for epithelial tumor progression, local invasion, and metastasis formation. In addition, stemness provides cells with therapeutic resistance and is the likely cause of tumor recurrence. However, the relevance of EMT and stemness in thyroid cancer progression has not been extensively studied. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer, we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E)/TPO-Cre). This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells, which do not express TPO. Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid-specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers, such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15, and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6-week-old BRAFV600E mice indicating the dedifferentiated status of the cells and the fact that stemness was derived in this model from differentiated thyroid cells. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a cancer thyroid cell line (named Marca cells) derived from one of the murine tumors. In this cell line, we also found that overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of

  9. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Prevents Hepatic Fat Storage, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in Dietary Steatohepatitis of Mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takafumi; Akiba, Jun; Matsui, Takanori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Hisamoto, Takao; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Ikezono, Yu; Wada, Fumitaka; Iwamoto, Hideki; Nakamura, Toru; Koga, Hironori; Yamagishi, Sho-Ichi; Torimura, Takuji

    2017-06-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of inflammation through its anti-oxidative property. Since oxidative response is considered to play the pivotal role of the development and progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), it is conceivable that PEDF may play a protective role against NASH. In this study, we examined whether administration of PEDF slowed the progression of NASH in mice models. Mice were fed methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet with or without intramuscular administration of adenovirus-expressing PEDF (Ad-PEDF). Effects of PEDF administration on NASH were histologically and biochemically evaluated. Administration of Ad-PEDF significantly decreased hepatic fat storage as well as serum levels of ALT in MCD diet-fed mice. Dihydroethidium staining showed that MCD diet-triggered oxidative stress was reduced in the liver of Ad-PEDF-administered mice compared to that of PBS- or Ad-LacZ-administered mice. Activation of Kupffer cells and hepatic fibrosis was also inhibited by Ad-PEDF administration. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that MCD diet up-regulated expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, collagen-1, and collagen-3 mRNA, which were also attenuated with Ad-PEDF administration, whereas MCD diet-induced down-regulation of expressions of PPAR-γ mRNA was restored with Ad-PEDF administration. Furthermore, immunoblotting analysis showed that MCD diet-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase components was significantly decreased in Ad-PEDF-administered mice. The present results demonstrated for the first time that PEDF could slow the development and progression of steatohepatitis through the suppression of steatosis and inflammatory response in MCD diet-fed mice. Our study suggests that PEDF supplementation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NASH.

  10. Derivation of hepatocytes from bone marrow cells in mice after radiation-induced myeloablation.

    PubMed

    Theise, N D; Badve, S; Saxena, R; Henegariu, O; Sell, S; Crawford, J M; Krause, D S

    2000-01-01

    Following a report of skeletal muscle regeneration from bone marrow cells, we investigated whether hepatocytes could also derive in vivo from bone marrow cells. A cohort of lethally irradiated B6D2F1 female mice received whole bone marrow transplants from age-matched male donors and were sacrificed at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 and months 2, 4, and 6 posttransplantation (n = 3 for each time point). Additionally, 2 archival female mice of the same strain who had previously been recipients of 200 male fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)-sorted CD34(+)lin(-) cells were sacrificed 8 months posttransplantation under the same protocol. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the Y-chromosome was performed on liver tissue. Y-positive hepatocytes, up to 2.2% of total hepatocytes, were identified in 1 animal at 7 days posttransplantation and in all animals sacrificed 2 months or longer posttransplantation. Simultaneous FISH for the Y-chromosome and albumin messenger RNA (mRNA) confirmed male-derived cells were mature hepatocytes. These animals had received lethal doses of irradiation at the time of bone marrow transplantation, but this induced no overt, histologically demonstrable, acute hepatic injury, including inflammation, necrosis, oval cell proliferation, or scarring. We conclude that hepatocytes can derive from bone marrow cells after irradiation in the absence of severe acute injury. Also, the small subpopulation of CD34(+)lin(-) bone marrow cells is capable of such hepatic engraftment.

  11. Protective Role of Interleukin-17 in Murine NKT Cell-Driven Acute Experimental Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wondimu, Zenebech; Santodomingo-Garzon, Tania; Le, Tai; Swain, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    NKT cells are highly enriched within the liver. On activation NKT cells rapidly release large quantities of different cytokines which subsequently activate, recruit, or modulate cells important for the development of hepatic inflammation. Recently, it has been demonstrated that NKT cells can also produce interleukin-17 (IL-17), a proinflammatory cytokine that is also known to have diverse immunoregulatory effects. The role played by IL-17 in hepatic inflammation is unclear. Here we show that during α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer)-induced hepatitis in mice, a model of hepatitis driven by specific activation of the innate immune system via NKT cells within the liver, NK1.1+ and CD4+ iNKT cells rapidly produce IL-17 and are the main IL-17-producing cells within the liver. Administration of IL-17 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies before αGalCer injection significantly exacerbated hepatitis, in association with a significant increase in hepatic neutrophil and proinflammatory monocyte (ie, producing IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α) recruitment, and increased hepatic mRNA and protein expression for the relevant neutrophil and monocyte chemokines CXCL5/LIX and CCL2/MCP-1, respectively. In contrast, administration of exogenous recombinant murine IL-17 before α-GalCer injection ameliorated hepatitis and inhibited the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes into the liver. Our results demonstrate that hepatic iNKT cells specifically activated with α-GalCer rapidly produce IL-17, and IL-17 produced after α-GalCer administration inhibits the development of hepatitis. PMID:20847291

  12. Generation of Endoderm derived Human iPS cells from Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Ye, Zhaohui; Kim, Yong-Hak; Sharkis, Saul; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research significantly changed our perspective on regenerative medicine. Patient specific iPS cells have been derived not only for disease modeling but also as sources for cell replacement therapy. However, there have been insufficient data to prove that iPS cells are functionally equivalent to hES cells or safer than hES cells. There are several important issues which need to be addressed and foremost are the safety and efficacy of human iPS cells from different origins. Human iPS cells have been derived mostly from cells originated from mesoderm, with a few cases from ectoderm. So far there has been no report of endoderm derived human iPS cells, preventing comprehensive comparative investigations on the quality of human iPS cells from different origins. Here we show for the first time reprogramming of human endoderm derived cells (i.e. primary hepatocytes) to pluripotency. Hepatocyte-derived iPS cells appear indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells in colony morphology, growth properties, expression of pluripotency-associated transcription factors and surface markers, and differentiation potential in embryoid body formation and teratoma assays. In addition, these cells were able to directly differentiate into definitive endoderm, hepatic progenitors, and mature hepatocytes. The technology to develop endoderm derived human iPS cell lines, together with other established cell lines, will provide a foundation to elucidate the mechanisms of cellular reprogramming and to study the safety and efficacy of differentially originated human iPS cells for cell therapy. For studying liver disease pathogenesis, this technology also provides a potentially more amenable system to generate liver disease specific iPS cells. PMID:20432258

  13. Discovery and Mechanistic Study of Benzamide Derivatives That Modulate Hepatitis B Virus Capsid Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuo; Zhao, Qiong; Zhang, Pinghu; Kulp, John; Hu, Lydia; Hwang, Nicky; Zhang, Jiming; Block, Timothy M; Xu, Xiaodong; Du, Yanming; Chang, Jinhong; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2017-08-15

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem. Although the currently approved medications can reliably reduce the viral load and prevent the progression of liver diseases, they fail to cure the viral infection. In an effort toward discovery of novel antiviral agents against HBV, a group of benzamide (BA) derivatives that significantly reduced the amount of cytoplasmic HBV DNA were discovered. The initial lead optimization efforts identified two BA derivatives with improved antiviral activity for further mechanistic studies. Interestingly, similar to our previously reported sulfamoylbenzamides (SBAs), the BAs promote the formation of empty capsids through specific interaction with HBV core protein but not other viral and host cellular components. Genetic evidence suggested that both SBAs and BAs inhibited HBV nucleocapsid assembly by binding to the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) pocket between core protein dimer-dimer interfaces. However, unlike SBAs, BA compounds uniquely induced the formation of empty capsids that migrated more slowly in native agarose gel electrophoresis from A36V mutant than from the wild-type core protein. Moreover, we showed that the assembly of chimeric capsids from wild-type and drug-resistant core proteins was susceptible to multiple capsid assembly modulators. Hence, HBV core protein is a dominant antiviral target that may suppress the selection of drug-resistant viruses during core protein-targeting antiviral therapy. Our studies thus indicate that BAs are a chemically and mechanistically unique type of HBV capsid assembly modulators and warranted for further development as antiviral agents against HBV.IMPORTANCE HBV core protein plays essential roles in many steps of the viral replication cycle. In addition to packaging viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and DNA polymerase complex into nucleocapsids for reverse transcriptional DNA replication to take place, the core protein dimers, existing in several

  14. Indole derivatives inhibit hepatitis C virus replication through induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Jin, G; Kim, D; Son, S; Lee, K; Lee, C

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we discovered a series of indole derivatives as a new class of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication inhibitors by using a target-free chemical genetic strategy. Through a structure-activity relationship study, the compound 12e was identified as the most potent inhibitor of this class (EC50 = 1.1 μmol/l) with minimal cytotoxicity (CC50 = 61.8 μmol/l). In order to gain insight into its detailed antiviral mechanism of action, we performed PCR array analyses and found that 12e was able to activate transcription of a number of pro-inflammatory as well as antiviral cytokine genes including CXCL-8, IL-1α, TNF-α, IL-3, IRAK-1, and DDX58. Their induction by 12e was verified by individual RT-PCR analyses. In addition, 12e was found to stimulate secretion of soluble factors with anti-HCV replication activity. Among the 12e-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, CXCL-8 showed a strong positive correlation between its transcriptional activation and antiviral potency. Interestingly, a recombinant CXCL-8 protein also reduced HCV replication, though only moderately. In conclusion, we found a novel mode of action of indole derivatives in inhibiting HCV replication, particularly the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  15. Cucumber mosaic virus as a presentation system for a double hepatitis C virus-derived epitope.

    PubMed

    Nuzzaci, M; Piazzolla, G; Vitti, A; Lapelosa, M; Tortorella, C; Stella, I; Natilla, A; Antonaci, S; Piazzolla, P

    2007-01-01

    Chimeric plant viruses are emerging as promising vectors for use in innovative vaccination strategies. In this context, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has proven to be a suitable carrier of the hepatitis C virus (HCV)-derived R9 mimotope. In the present work, a new chimeric CMV, expressing on its surface the HCV-derived R10 mimotope, was produced but lost the insert after the first passage on tobacco. A comparative analysis between R10- and R9-CMV properties indicated that R9-CMV stability was related to structural features typical of the foreign insert. Thus, in order to combine high virus viability with strong immuno-stimulating activity, we doubled R9 copies on each of the 180 coat protein (CP) subunits of CMV. One of the chimeras produced by this approach (2R9-CMV) was shown to systemically infect the host, stably maintaining both inserts. Notably, it was strongly recognized by sera of HCV-infected patients and, as compared with R9-CMV, displayed an enhanced ability to stimulate lymphocyte IFN-gamma production. The high immunogen levels achievable in plants or fruits infected with 2R9-CMV suggest that this chimeric form of CMV may be useful in the development of oral vaccines against HCV.

  16. A New Oleanolic Acid Derivative against CCl4-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Hongjun; Han, Yaotian; Zhang, Yuzhong; Yan, Wenqiang; Xu, Bing; Chu, Fuhao; Xie, Tianxin; Jia, Menglu; Yan, Mengmeng; Zhao, Rui; Wang, Penglong; Lei, Haimin

    2017-01-01

    A novel hepatoprotective oleanolic acid derivative, 3-oxours-oleana-9(11), 12-dien-28-oic acid (Oxy-Di-OA), has been reported. In previous studies, we found that Oxy-Di-OA presented the anti-HBV (Hepatitis B Virus) activity (IC50 = 3.13 µg/mL). Remarkably, it is superior to lamivudine in the inhibition of the rebound of the viral replication rate. Furthermore, Oxy-Di-OA showed good performance of anti-HBV activity in vivo. Some studies showed that liver fibrosis may affiliate with HBV gene mutations. In addition, the anti-hepatic fibrosis activity of Oxy-Di-OA has not been studied. Therefore, we evaluated the protective effect of Oxy-Di-OA against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury in rats. Daily intraperitoneally administration of Oxy-Di-OA prevented the development of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, which was evidenced by histological study and immunohistochemical analysis. The entire experimental protocol lasted nine weeks. Oxy-Di-OA significantly suppressed the increases of plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (p < 0.05). Furthermore, Oxy-Di-OA could prevent expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). It is worth noting that the high-dose group Oxy-Di-OA is superior to bifendate in elevating hepatic function. Compared to the model group, Oxy-Di-OA in the high-dose group and low-dose group can significantly reduce the liver and spleen indices (p < 0.05). The acute toxicity test showed that LD50 and a 95% confidence interval (CIs) value of Oxy-Di-OA were 714.83 mg/kg and 639.73–798.73 mg/kg via intraperitoneal injection in mice, respectively. The LD50 value of Oxy-Di-OA exceeded 2000 mg/kg via gavage in mice. In addition, a simple and rapid high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) method was developed and validated to study the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the compound. After single-dose oral administration, time to reach peak concentration of Oxy-Di-OA (Cmax = 8.18

  17. Possible Involvement of Hepatitis B Virus Infection of Hepatocytes in the Attenuation of Apoptosis in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Masato; Nakamoto, Shingo; Haga, Yuki; Wu, Shuang; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background The induction of apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy against hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatic fibrosis. The underlying mechanisms of apoptosis in HSCs, however, are unknown under consideration of HBV infection. In this study, the effects of HBV on apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling in HSCs were examined. Methods The effects of conditioned media (CM) from HepG2.2.15 on apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 in LX-2 and HHSteC were studied in regard to c-Jun. In combination with c-Fos, c-Jun forms the AP-1 early response transcription factor, leading to AP-1 activation, signal transduction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. Results In LX-2 cells, MG132 treatment was associated with the phosphorylation of c-Jun, activation of AP-1 and apoptosis. However, in the presence of CM from HepG2.2.15, these phenomena were attenuated. In HHSteC cells, similar results were observed. HBV genomic DNA is not involved in the process of HSC apoptosis. It is possible that HBeAg has an inhibitory effect on MG132-induced apoptosis in LX-2. We also observed the upregulation of several ER stress-associated genes, such as cAMP responsive element binding protein 3-like 3, inhibin-beta A and solute carrier family 17-member 2, in the presence of CM from HepG2.2.15, or CM from PXB cells infected with HBV. Conclusions HBV inhibits the activation of c-Jun/AP-1 in HSCs, contributing to the attenuation of apoptosis and resulting in hepatic fibrosis. HBV also up-regulated several ER stress genes associated with cell growth and fibrosis. These mechanistic insights might shed new light on a treatment strategy for HBV-associated hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26731332

  18. Human embryonic stem cells derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-06-06

    Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state.

  19. Hepatic compartmentalization of exhausted and regulatory cells in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, L; Trehanpati, N; Poonia, S; Daigh, L; Sarin, S Kumar; Masur, H; Kottilil, S

    2015-03-01

    Accelerated intrahepatic hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis is likely the result of dysregulation within both the innate and adaptive immune compartments, but the exact contribution of peripheral blood and liver lymphocyte subsets remains unclear. Prolonged activation and expansion of immunoregulatory cells have been thought to play a role. We determined immune cell subset frequency in contemporaneous liver and peripheral blood samples from chronic HCV-infected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and biopsy-derived liver-infiltrating lymphocytes from 26 HIV/HCV-coinfected, 10 chronic HCV-infected and 10 HIV-infected individuals were assessed for various subsets of T and B lymphocytes, dendritic cell, natural killer (NK) cell and NK T-cell frequency by flow cytometry. CD8(+) T cells expressing the exhaustion marker PD-1 were increased in HCV-infected individuals compared with uninfected individuals (P = 0.02), and HIV coinfection enhanced this effect (P = 0.005). In the liver, regulatory CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T cells, as well as CD4(+) CD25(+) PD1(+) T cells, were more frequent in HIV/HCV-coinfected than in HCV-monoinfected samples (P < 0.001). HCV was associated with increased regulatory T cells, PD-1(+) T cells and decreased memory B cells, regardless of HIV infection (P ≤ 0.005 for all). Low CD8(+) expression was observed only in PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells from HCV-infected individuals and healthy controls (P = 0.002) and was associated with enhanced expansion of exhausted CD8(+) T cells when exposed in vitro to PHA or CMV peptides. In conclusion, in HIV/HCV coinfection, ongoing HCV replication is associated with increased regulatory and exhausted T cells in the periphery and liver that may impact control of HCV. Simultaneous characterization of liver and peripheral blood highlights the disproportionate intrahepatic compartmentalization of immunoregulatory T cells, which may contribute to establishment of chronicity and

  20. Modeling of hemophilia A using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells derived from urine cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bei; Chen, Shen; Zhao, Zhiju; Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Du, Juan; Wu, Changwei; Chen, Qianyu; Cai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Yanhong; Pei, Duanqing; Zhong, Mei; Pan, Guangjin

    2014-07-11

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a severe, congenital bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII). For years, traditional laboratory animals have been used to study HA and its therapies, although animal models may not entirely mirror the human pathophysiology. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can undergo unlimited self-renewal and differentiate into all cell types. This study aims to generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific iPSCs that differentiate into disease-affected hepatocyte cells. These hepatocytes are potentially useful for in vitro disease modeling and provide an applicable cell source for autologous cell therapy after genetic correction. In this study, we mainly generated iPSCs from urine collected from HA patients with integration-free episomal vectors PEP4-EO2S-ET2K containing human genes OCT4, SOX2, SV40LT and KLF4, and differentiated these iPSCs into hepatocyte-like cells. We further identified the genetic phenotype of the FVIII genes and the FVIII activity in the patient-specific iPSC derived hepatic cells. HA patient-specific iPSCs (HA-iPSCs) exhibited typical pluripotent properties evident by immunostaining, in vitro assays and in vivo assays. Importantly, we showed that HA-iPSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells and the HA-iPSC-derived hepatocytes failed to produce FVIII, but otherwise functioned normally, recapitulating the phenotype of HA disease in vitro. HA-iPSCs, particular those generated from the urine using a non-viral approach, provide an efficient way for modeling HA in vitro. Furthermore, HA-iPSCs and their derivatives serve as an invaluable cell source that can be used for gene and cell therapy in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Hande H; Rana, Naveed; Milani, Cannon; Darko, Angela; Al-Homsi, Samer A

    2012-01-01

    Recognition and management of gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has gained increasing importance as indications and techniques of transplantation have expanded in the last few years. The transplant recipient is at risk for several complications including conditioning chemotherapy related toxicities, infections, bleeding, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) as well as other long-term problems. The severity and the incidence of many complications have improved in the past several years as the intensity of conditioning regimens has diminished and better supportive care and GVHD prevention strategies have been implemented. Transplant clinicians, however, continue to be challenged with problems arising from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched and unrelated donor transplants, expanding transplant indications and age-limit. This review describes the most commonly seen transplant related complications, focusing on their pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and management. PMID:22563164

  2. Profile of Inflammation-associated genes during Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ignatius Irudayam, Joseph; Contreras, Deisy; Spurka, Lindsay; Ren, Songyang; Kanagavel, Vidhya; Ramaiah, Arunachalam; Annamalai, Alagappan; French, Samuel W; Klein, Andrew S; Funari, Vincent; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja

    2015-12-01

    Expression of genes associated with inflammation was analyzed during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to hepatic cells. Messenger RNA transcript profiles of differentiated endoderm (day 5), hepatoblast (day 15) and hepatocyte-like cells (day 21) were obtained by RNA sequencing analysis. When compared to endoderm cells an immature cell type, the hepatic cells (days 15 and 21) had significantly higher expression of acute phase protein genes including complement factors, coagulation factors, serum amyloid A and serpins. Furthermore, hepatic phase of cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines IL18 and IL32 as well as cytokine receptors IL18R1, IL1R1, IL1RAP, IL2RG, IL6R, IL6ST and IL10RB. These cells also produced CCL14, CCL15, and CXCL- 1, 2, 3, 16 and 17 chemokines. Endoderm cells had higher levels of chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, than that of hepatic cells. Sirtuin family of genes involved in aging, inflammation and metabolism were differentially regulated in endoderm and hepatic phase cells. Ligands and receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family as well as downstream signaling factors TRAF2, TRAF4, FADD, NFKB1 and NFKBIB were differentially expressed during hepatic differentiation.

  3. Profile of Inflammation-associated genes during Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ignatius Irudayam, Joseph; Contreras, Deisy; Spurka, Lindsay; Ren, Songyang; Kanagavel, Vidhya; Ramaiah, Arunachalam; Annamalai, Alagappan; French, Samuel W.; Klein, Andrew S.; Funari, Vincent; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja

    2015-01-01

    Expression of genes associated with inflammation was analyzed during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to hepatic cells. Messenger RNA transcript profiles of differentiated endoderm (day 5), hepatoblast (day 15) and hepatocyte-like cells (day 21) were obtained by RNA sequencing analysis. When compared to endoderm cells an immature cell type, the hepatic cells (days 15 and 21) had significantly higher expression of acute phase protein genes including complement factors, coagulation factors, serum amyloid A and serpins. Furthermore, hepatic phase of cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines IL18 and IL32 as well as cytokine receptors IL18R1, IL1R1, IL1RAP, IL2RG, IL6R, IL6ST and IL10RB. These cells also produced CCL14, CCL15, and CXCL- 1, 2, 3, 16 and 17 chemokines. Endoderm cells had higher levels of chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, than that of hepatic cells. Sirtuin family of genes involved in aging, inflammation and metabolism were differentially regulated in endoderm and hepatic phase cells. Ligands and receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family as well as downstream signaling factors TRAF2, TRAF4, FADD, NFKB1 and NFKBIB were differentially expressed during hepatic differentiation. PMID:26702414

  4. Induction of apoptosis by tanshinone I via cytochrome c release in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Nan, Ji-Xing; Zhao, Yu Zhe; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sang Jun; Sohn, Dong Hwan

    2003-04-01

    Hepatic stellate cells play central roles in hepatic fibrosis. The therapeutic goal in hepatic fibrosis is to halt or reverse fibrosis. Apoptosis is suggested to eliminate activated hepatic stellate cells in fibrosis. Salvia miltiorrhiza is a traditional medicine used to improve blood circulation and treat chronic hepatitis and hepatic fibrosis. We investigated the effect of tanshinone I, an ingredient of Salvia miltiorrhiza, on the apoptotic death of rat hepatic stellate cells transformed by simian virus 40 (T-HSC/Cl-6), which retains the features of activated stellate cells. Treatment of T-HSC/Cl-6 cells with tanshinone I resulted in the induction of typical DNA fragmentation and DNA ladder formation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. Treatment of T-HSC/Cl-6 cells with tanshinone I caused activation of caspase-3 and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Tanshinone I induced mitochondrial membrane dipolarization and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that tanshinone I induces apoptosis of T-HSC/Cl-6 cells and that tanshinone I-induced apoptosis involves caspase activation through cytochrome c release and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

  5. New Approaches to Attenuated Hepatitis a Vaccine Development: Cloning and Sequencing of Cell-Culture Adapted Viral cDNA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-13

    reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Hepatitis A Vaccine, Molecular Cloning and Hybridization, 06 13 Strain Differences...cells. Molecular cloning of p16 HM175 virus cDNA. cDNA clones were derived from p16 HM175 virus RNA by cloning cDNA-RNA hybrid molecules into the Pstl... molecular cloning . Clones derived from cDNA synthesized with oligo-dT_12 18 as primer were nearly always restricted to the 3’ terminus of the genome, while

  6. Isolation, synthesis and anti-hepatitis B virus evaluation of p-hydroxyacetophenone derivatives from Artemisia capillaris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Geng, Chang-An; Chen, Hao; Ma, Yun-Bao; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Cao, Tuan-Wu; He, Kang; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2015-04-01

    p-Hydroxyacetophenone (p-HAP), as a main hepatoprotective and choleretic constituent of Artemisia capillaris, was revealed with anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) effects in recent investigation. In addition to p-HAP, four derivatives of p-HAP were also isolated from A. capillaris by various chromatographic methods. Subsequent structural modification on p-HAP and its glycoside led to the synthesis of 28 additional derivatives, of which 13 compounds showed activity inhibiting hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) secretion; and 18 compounds possessed inhibition on HBV DNA replication. The primary structure-activity relationships (SARs) suggested that the conjugated derivatives of p-HAP glycoside and substituted cinnamic acids (2a-2i) obviously enhanced the activity against HBV DNA replication with IC50 values ranged from 5.8 to 74.4 μM.

  7. TIM-1 Promotes Hepatitis C Virus Cell Attachment and Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Qiao, Luhua; Hou, Zhouhua; Luo, Guangxiang

    2017-01-15

    Human TIM and TAM family proteins were recently found to serve as phosphatidylserine (PS) receptors which promote infections by many different viruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Ebola virus, Marburg virus, and Zika virus. In the present study, we provide substantial evidence demonstrating that TIM-1 is important for efficient infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV). The knockdown of TIM-1 expression significantly reduced HCV infection but not HCV RNA replication. Likewise, TIM-1 knockout in Huh-7.5 cells remarkably lowered HCV cell attachment and subsequent HCV infection. More significantly, the impairment of HCV infection in the TIM-1 knockout cells could be restored completely by ectopic expression of TIM-1 but not TIM-3 or TIM-4. Additionally, HCV infection and cell attachment were inhibited by PS but not by phosphatidylcholine (PC), demonstrating that TIM-1-mediated enhancement of HCV infection is PS dependent. The exposure of PS on the HCV envelope was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of HCV particles with a PS-specific monoclonal antibody. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TIM-1 promotes HCV infection by serving as an attachment receptor for binding to PS exposed on the HCV envelope.

  8. Novel cell culture systems for the hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Bartenschlager, R; Lohmann, V

    2001-10-01

    Infections with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are a major cause of acute and chronic liver disease. The high prevalence of the virus, the insidious course of the disease and the poor prognosis for long-term persistent infection make this pathogen a serious medical and socioeconomical problem. The identification of the viral genome approximately 10 years ago rapidly led to the delineation of the genomic organization and the structural and biochemical characterization of several virus proteins. However, studies of the viral life cycle as well as the development of antiviral drugs have been difficult because of the lack of a robust and reliable cell culture system. Numerous attempts have been undertaken in the past few years but only recently a highly efficient cell culture model could be developed. This system is based on the self replication of engineered HCV minigenomes (replicons) in a transfected human hepatoma cell line. A summary of the various HCV cell culture models with a focus on the replicon system and its use for drug development is described.

  9. Exosome Adherence and Internalization by Hepatic Stellate Cells Triggers Sphingosine 1-Phosphate-dependent Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruisi; Ding, Qian; Yaqoob, Usman; de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Verma, Vikas K.; Hirsova, Petra; Cao, Sheng; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Huebert, Robert C.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived extracellular vesicles thought to promote intercellular communication by delivering specific content to target cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether endothelial cell (EC)-derived exosomes could regulate the phenotype of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Initial microarray studies showed that fibroblast growth factor 2 induced a 2.4-fold increase in mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1). Exosomes derived from an SK1-overexpressing EC line increased HSC migration 3.2-fold. Migration was not conferred by the dominant negative SK1 exosome. Incubation of HSCs with exosomes was also associated with an 8.3-fold increase in phosphorylation of AKT and 2.5-fold increase in migration. Exosomes were found to express the matrix protein and integrin ligand fibronectin (FN) by Western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Blockade of the FN-integrin interaction with a CD29 neutralizing antibody or the RGD peptide attenuated exosome-induced HSC AKT phosphorylation and migration. Inhibition of endocytosis with transfection of dynamin siRNA, the dominant negative dynamin GTPase construct Dyn2K44A, or the pharmacological inhibitor Dynasore significantly attenuated exosome-induced AKT phosphorylation. SK1 levels were increased in serum exosomes derived from mice with experimental liver fibrosis, and SK1 mRNA levels were up-regulated 2.5-fold in human liver cirrhosis patient samples. Finally, S1PR2 inhibition protected mice from CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. Therefore, EC-derived SK1-containing exosomes regulate HSC signaling and migration through FN-integrin-dependent exosome adherence and dynamin-dependent exosome internalization. These findings advance our understanding of EC/HSC cross-talk and identify exosomes as a potential target to attenuate pathobiology signals. PMID:26534962

  10. Exosome Adherence and Internalization by Hepatic Stellate Cells Triggers Sphingosine 1-Phosphate-dependent Migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruisi; Ding, Qian; Yaqoob, Usman; de Assuncao, Thiago M; Verma, Vikas K; Hirsova, Petra; Cao, Sheng; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Huebert, Robert C; Shah, Vijay H

    2015-12-25

    Exosomes are cell-derived extracellular vesicles thought to promote intercellular communication by delivering specific content to target cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether endothelial cell (EC)-derived exosomes could regulate the phenotype of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Initial microarray studies showed that fibroblast growth factor 2 induced a 2.4-fold increase in mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1). Exosomes derived from an SK1-overexpressing EC line increased HSC migration 3.2-fold. Migration was not conferred by the dominant negative SK1 exosome. Incubation of HSCs with exosomes was also associated with an 8.3-fold increase in phosphorylation of AKT and 2.5-fold increase in migration. Exosomes were found to express the matrix protein and integrin ligand fibronectin (FN) by Western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Blockade of the FN-integrin interaction with a CD29 neutralizing antibody or the RGD peptide attenuated exosome-induced HSC AKT phosphorylation and migration. Inhibition of endocytosis with transfection of dynamin siRNA, the dominant negative dynamin GTPase construct Dyn2K44A, or the pharmacological inhibitor Dynasore significantly attenuated exosome-induced AKT phosphorylation. SK1 levels were increased in serum exosomes derived from mice with experimental liver fibrosis, and SK1 mRNA levels were up-regulated 2.5-fold in human liver cirrhosis patient samples. Finally, S1PR2 inhibition protected mice from CCl4-induced liver fibrosis. Therefore, EC-derived SK1-containing exosomes regulate HSC signaling and migration through FN-integrin-dependent exosome adherence and dynamin-dependent exosome internalization. These findings advance our understanding of EC/HSC cross-talk and identify exosomes as a potential target to attenuate pathobiology signals.

  11. CD39/ENTPD1 expression by CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells promotes hepatic metastatic tumor growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    SUN, XIAOFENG; WU, YAN; GAO, WENDA; ENJYOJI, KEIICHI; CSIZMADIA, EVA; MÜLLER, CHRISTA E.; MURAKAMI, TAKASHI; ROBSON, SIMON C.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Adenosine mediates immune suppression and is generated by the ectonucleotidases CD39 (ENTPD1) and CD73 that are expressed on vascular endothelial cells and regulatory T cells (Treg). Although tumor-infiltrating immune cells include Foxp3+ Treg, it is not clear whether local adenosine generation by Treg promotes tumor growth in a CD39-dependent manner. In this study, we have examined the impact of CD39 expression by Treg on effector immune cell responses to hepatic metastases in vivo. Methods and Results A model of hepatic metastatic cancer was developed with portal vein infusion of luciferase-expressing melanoma B16/F10 cells and MCA38 colon cancer cells in wild type and mutant mice null for Cd39. Chimeric mice were generated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using Cd39 null or wild type (wt) C57BL6 donors and irradiated recipient mice. We demonstrate that hepatic growth of melanoma metastatic tumors was strongly inhibited in mice with Cd39 null vasculature or in wild type mice with circulating Cd39 null bone marrow-derived cells. We show functional CD39 expression on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg suppressed anti-tumor immunity mediated by NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Lastly, inhibition of CD39 activity by POM-1 (polyoxometalate-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of NTPDase activity, significantly inhibited tumor growth (P < .001). Conclusions CD39 expression on Treg inhibits NK activity and is permissive for metastatic growth. Pharmacological or targeted inhibition of CD39 enzymatic activity may find utility as an adjunct therapy for secondary hepatic malignancies. PMID:20546740

  12. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanghu; Chen, Ren; Hagedorn, Curt H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 μM). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid's structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 μM. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation.

  13. Antifibrotic effects of triptolide on hepatic stellate cells and dimethylnitrosamine-intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lee-Won; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chiu, Yung-Tsung; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Huang, Yi-Tsau

    2011-07-01

    Triptolide (C₃₈H₄₂O₆N₂, TP, a diterpene triepoxide derived from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F.), is a potent immunosuppresive and antiinflammatory agent. The present study investigated whether TP exerted antihepatofibrotic effects in vitro and in vivo. A cell line of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6) was stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. The inhibitory effects of TP on the nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) signaling cascade and fibrosis markers, including α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen, were assessed. An in vivo therapeutic study was conducted in dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-treated rats. The rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups: control rats, DMN rats receiving vehicle only and DMN rats receiving TP (20 μg/kg). Treatment was given by gavage twice daily for 3 weeks starting 1 week after the start of DMN administration. TP (5-100 nM) concentration-dependently inhibited the NFκB transcriptional activity induced by TNF-α, lipopolysaccharide and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in HSC-T6 cells. In addition, TP also suppressed TNF-α and TGF-β1-induced collagen deposition and α-SMA secretion in HSC-T6 cells. In vivo, TP treatment significantly reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen contents, IL-6 and TNF-α levels, and the number of α-SMA and NFκB-positive cells in DMN rats. The results showed that TP exerted antifibrotic effects in both HSC-T6 cells and DMN rats.

  14. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. - Highlights: • Autophagy is closely related to lipid degradation in hepatic stellate cells. • Tetrandrine (Tet) causes lipid accumulation via blockade of autophagy in HSC-T6 cells. • Tet blocked autophagy without affecting lysosomal function unlike bafilomycin A{sub 1}. • Perilipin 1 was specifically co-localized with LC3 in Tet-treated cells. • Perilipin 1 may play potential roles in autophagy-mediated lipid degradation.

  15. Chemokine receptor CXCR6-dependent hepatic NK T Cell accumulation promotes inflammation and liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wehr, Alexander; Baeck, Christer; Heymann, Felix; Niemietz, Patricia Maria; Hammerich, Linda; Martin, Christian; Zimmermann, Henning W; Pack, Oliver; Gassler, Nikolaus; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Ludwig, Andreas; Luedde, Tom; Trautwein, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2013-05-15

    Chronic liver injury characteristically results in hepatic inflammation, which represents a prerequisite for organ fibrosis. Although NKT cells are abundantly present in liver and involved in hepatic inflammation, molecular mechanisms of their recruitment in liver fibrosis remained elusive. We hypothesized that chemokine receptor CXCR6 and its ligand CXCL16 control NKT cell migration and functionality in liver fibrosis. In patients with chronic liver diseases (n = 58), CXCR6 and CXCL16 expression was intrahepatically upregulated compared with controls. In murine liver, Cxcl16 was strongly expressed by endothelium and macrophages, whereas lymphocyte populations (NKT, NK, CD4 T, CD8 T cells) expressed CXCR6. Intravital two-photon microscopy imaging of Cxcr6(+/gfp) and Cxcr6(gfp/gfp) mice and chemotaxis studies in vitro revealed that CXCR6 specifically controls hepatic NKT cell accumulation during the early response upon experimental liver damage. Hepatic invariant NKT cells expressed distinct proinflammatory cytokines including IFN-γ and IL-4 upon injury. CXCR6-deficient mice were protected from liver fibrosis progression in two independent experimental models. Macrophage infiltration and protein levels of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-4 were also reduced in fibrotic livers of Cxcr6(-/-) mice, corroborating that hepatic NKT cells provide essential cytokine signals perpetuating hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis. Adoptive transfer of NKT cells, but not CD4 T cells, isolated from wild type livers restored hepatic fibrosis in Cxcr6(-/-) mice upon experimental steatohepatitis. Our results demonstrate that hepatic NKT cells accumulate CXCR6-dependent early upon injury, thereby accentuating the inflammatory response in the liver and promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Interfering with CXCR6/CXCL16 might therefore bear therapeutic potential in liver fibrosis.

  16. Hepatic and extrahepatic uptake of HDL-derived plasma cholesterol in exercised and sedentary rats

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanathan, S.; Green, M.H.; Kris-Etherton, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    The present investigation was designed to study high density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived plasma cholesterol (C) turnover in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues of sedentary (S) and exercised (E) rats. 4-week-old Long Evans rats were exercised for 1 hr, 6 days weekly, for a period of 38 weeks, on a motor-driven treadmill at 0.8 mph at a 12% grade. Animals were injected with HDL that was labelled in vitro with /sup 3/H-cholesteryl ester. Serial blood samples and tissues were collected. HDL-C concentration was lower in E vs S rats (23.0 +/- 1.2 and 26.6 +/- 1.9 mg/dl, p < 0.01). While total plasma C was not different, liver C was higher in S vs E rats (8.2 +/- 0.8 and 7.2 +/- 0.5 mg/g). Adrenal C was higher in E vs S rats (29.5 +/- 2.3 and 20.7 +/- 2.3 mg/g, p < 0.01). Multicompartmental analysis of plasma and tissue tracer response led to development of an 8-component model (5 physiological; 3 nonphysiological) that depicted HDL-derived plasma C turnover. Plasma fraction of tracer declined more rapidly in E vs S rats. E rats cleared nonphysiological tracer more rapidly than S rats, but delayed release of tracer into the plasma longer. Fractional rate of tracer uptake into adrenals, liver, testes, and carcass was greater in E rats. There was a greater fractional turnover rate of tracer in adrenals and liver in S vs E rats. Hence HDL-derived plasma C turnover is altered with vigorous exercise.

  17. Islet Endothelial Cells Derived From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    The islet endothelium comprises a specialized population of islet endothelial cells (IECs) expressing unique markers such as nephrin and α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) that are not found in endothelial cells in surrounding tissues. However, due to difficulties in isolating and maintaining a pure population of these cells, the information on these islet-specific cells is currently very limited. Interestingly, we have identified a large subpopulation of endothelial cells exhibiting IEC phenotype, while deriving insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These cells were identified by the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and were successfully isolated and subsequently expanded in endothelial cell culture medium. Further analysis demonstrated that the mouse embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (mESC-ECs) not only express classical endothelial markers, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM1), thrombomodulin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but also IEC-specific markers such as nephrin and AAT. Moreover, mESC-ECs secrete basement membrane proteins such as collagen type IV, laminin, and fibronectin in culture and form tubular networks on a layer of Matrigel, demonstrating angiogenic activity. Further, mESC-ECs not only express eNOS, but also its eNOS expression is glucose dependent, which is another characteristic phenotype of IECs. With the ability to obtain highly purified IECs derived from pluripotent stem cells, it is possible to closely examine the function of these cells and their interaction with pancreatic β-cells during development and maturation in vitro. Further characterization of tissue-specific endothelial cell properties may enhance our ability to formulate new therapeutic angiogenic approaches for diabetes.

  18. Cell differentiation mediated by co-culture of human umbilical cord blood stem cells with murine hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Stecklum, Maria; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Purfürst, Bettina; Siegert, Antje; Keil, Marlen; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, purified human cord blood stem cells were co-cultivated with murine hepatic alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells to compare the effect on endodermal stem cell differentiation by either direct cell-cell interaction or by soluble factors in conditioned hepatic cell medium. With that approach, we want to mimic in vitro the situation of preclinical transplantation experiments using human cells in mice. Cord blood stem cells, cultivated with hepatic conditioned medium, showed a low endodermal differentiation but an increased connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx43, and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) and CK19 expression was monitored by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Microarray profiling indicated that in cultivated cord blood cells, 604 genes were upregulated 2-fold, with the highest expression for epithelial CK19 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). On ultrastructural level, there were no major changes in the cellular morphology, except a higher presence of phago(ly)some-like structures observed. Direct co-culture of AML12 cells with cord blood cells led to less incisive differentiation with increased sex-determining region Y-box 17 (SOX17), Cx32 and Cx43, as well as epithelial CK8 and CK19 expressions. On ultrastructural level, tight cell contacts along the plasma membranes were revealed. FACS analysis in co-cultivated cells quantified dye exchange on low level, as also proved by time relapse video-imaging of labelled cells. Modulators of gap junction formation influenced dye transfer between the co-cultured cells, whereby retinoic acid increased and 3-heptanol reduced the dye transfer. The study indicated that the cell-co-cultured model of human umbilical cord blood cells and murine AML12 cells may be a suitable approach to study some aspects of endodermal/hepatic cell differentiation induction.

  19. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijun; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Shao, Ning-Yi; Lee, Won Hee; Chen, Haodong; Snyder, Michael P; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-06-02

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC-derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC-ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31(+) population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC-ECs maintained a higher CD31(+) population than FB-iPSC-ECs and CPC-iPSC-ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation.

  20. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  1. Bioenergetic Changes during Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells along the Hepatic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Branden M.; Kalisz, Mark; Vestentoft, Peter Siig; Juel Rasmussen, Lene; Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated to result in premature aging due to its effects on stem cells. Nevertheless, a full understanding of the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics through differentiation is still lacking. Here we show the bioenergetics profile of human stem cells of embryonic origin differentiating along the hepatic lineage. Our study reveals especially the transition between hepatic specification and hepatic maturation as dependent on mitochondrial respiration and demonstrates that even though differentiating cells are primarily dependent on glycolysis until induction of hepatocyte maturation, oxidative phosphorylation is essential at all stages of differentiation. PMID:28265337

  2. Hepatic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells as microscaled multilayered colonies leading to enhanced homogeneity and maturation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaokang; Jung Jung, Da; Qi, Hao; Kee, Keh Kooi; Du, Yanan

    2014-11-12

    Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards hepatocyte-like cells on planar tissue culture plates has been extensively investigated with great promise to provide alternative cell sources for drug metabolism/toxicity testing. Recently, hepatic differentiation of hESCs in 3D configuration with better mimicry of embryonic liver development represents incremental efforts to improve the differentiation efficiency and cellular maturation. However, most of the present 3D differentiation configurations involved interruptive operations during the multi-staged differentiation process, which might impose unwanted influence on cellular differentiation. Most of the current researches resulted in generation of hepatocytes with high expression of AFP, which is minimally expressed in primary hepatocytes. Here, off-the-shelf micro-stencil arrays are developed to generate adherent multilayered colonies composed of hESCs-derived cells. Uninterrupted cellular differentiation and proliferation is achieved to recapitulate the continuous and multi-stage liver development. Compared with conventional 2D format, the micro-scaled multilayered colonies with uniform and defined sizes constrained within the microwells are composed of more homogenous and mature hepatocyte-like cells with significantly lowered AFP expression and elevated hepatic functions. The multilayered colonies as novel 3D configuration for hepatic differentiation of hESCs represent a significant step toward efficient generation of functional hepatocytes for regenerative medicine and drug discovery.

  3. Interferon-γ facilitates hepatic antiviral T cell retention for the maintenance of liver-induced systemic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhutian; Li, Lu; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Persistent exposure to liver pathogens leads to systemic antigen-specific tolerance, a major cause of chronicity during hepatotropic infection. The mechanism regarding how this systemic tolerance is maintained remains poorly elucidated. In a well established mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence–induced systemic tolerance, we observed that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) deficiency led to complete loss of tolerance, resulting in robust anti-HBV responses upon peripheral vaccination. The recovery of vaccine-induced anti-HBV responses was mainly caused by the retained antigen-specific CD4+ T cells rather than decreased functional inhibitory cells in the periphery. Mechanistically, HBV persistence induced sustained hepatic CD4+ T cell–derived IFN-γ production. IFN-γ was found to promote CXCL9 secretion from liver-resident macrophages. This T cell chemokine facilitated the retention of antiviral CD4+ T cells in the liver in a CXCR3-dependent manner. Hepatic sequestrated antiviral CD4+ T cells subsequently underwent local apoptotic elimination partially via cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated protein 4 ligation. These findings reveal an unexpected tolerogenic role for IFN-γ during viral persistence in the liver, providing new mechanistic insights regarding the maintenance of systemic antigen-specific tolerance during HBV persistence. PMID:27139489

  4. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  5. Hepatic Fibrosis Inhibitory Effect of Peptides Isolated from Navicula incerta on TGF-β1 Induced Activation of LX-2 Human Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyong-Hwa; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Ryu, BoMi; Karadeniz, Fatih; Kim, Daekyung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, novel peptides (NIPP-1, NIPP-2) derived from Navicula incerta (microalgae) protein hydrolysate were explored for their inhibitory effects on collagen release in hepatic fibrosis with the investigation of its underlying mechanism of action. TGF-β1 activated fibrosis in LX-2 cells was examined in the presence or absence of purified peptides NIPP-1 and NIPP-2. Besides the mechanisms of liver cell injury, protective effects of NIPP-1 and NIPP-2 were studied to show the protective mechanism against TGF-β1 stimulated fibrogenesis. Our results showed that the core protein of NIPP-1 peptide prevented fibril formation of type I collagen, elevated the MMP level and inhibited TIMP production in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of NIPP-1 and NIPP-2 on TGF-β1 induced LX-2 cells alleviated hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, α-SMA, TIMPs, collagen and PDGF in the NIPP-1 treated groups were significantly decreased. Therefore, it could be suggested that NIPP-1 has potential to be used in anti-fibrosis treatment. PMID:24471121

  6. Natural killer cells contribute to hepatic injury and help in viral persistence during progression of hepatitis B e-antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Nandi, M; Pal, S; Mukhopadhyay, D; Chakraborty, B C; Khatun, M; Bhowmick, D; Mondal, R K; Das, S; Das, K; Ghosh, R; Banerjee, S; Santra, A; Chatterjee, M; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B e-antigen negative (e(-)) chronic HBV infection (CHI) encompasses a heterogeneous clinical spectrum ranging from inactive carrier (IC) state to e(-) chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. In the backdrop of dysfunctional virus-specific T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are emerging as innate effectors in CHI. We characterized CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells in clinically well-defined, treatment-naive e(-) patients in IC, e(-)CHB or decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) phase to appraise their role in disease progression. The NK cell frequencies increased progressively with disease severity (IC 8.2%, e(-)CHB 13.2% and LC 14.4%). Higher proportion of NK cells from LC/e(-)CHB expressed CD69, NKp46, NKp44, TRAIL and perforin, the last two being prominent features of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK subsets, respectively. The frequencies of CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells together with TRAIL(+) CD56(bright) and Perforin(+) CD56(dim) NK cells correlated positively with serum alanine transaminase levels in e(-)CHB/LC. K562 cell-stimulated NK cells from e(-)CHB/LC exhibited significantly greater degranulation but diminished interferon-γ production than IC. Further, Perforin(+) NK cell frequency inversely correlated with autologous CD4(+) T-cell count in e(-) patients and ligands of NK receptors were over-expressed in CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB/LC relative to IC. Co-culture of sorted CD56(dim) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB showed enhanced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis, which was reduced by perforin inhibitor, concanamycin A, suggesting a possible perforin-dependent NK cell-mediated CD4(+) T-cell depletion. Moreover, greater incidence of perforin-expressing NK cells and decline in CD4(+) T cells were noticed intrahepatically in e(-)CHB than IC. Collectively, NK cells contribute to the progression of e(-)CHI by enhanced TRAIL- and perforin-dependent cytolytic activity and by restraining anti-viral immunity through reduced interferon-γ secretion and

  7. Adoptive transfer of hepatic stellate cells ameliorates liver ischemia reperfusion injury through enriching regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Wang, Quanrongzi; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Guan, Wenxian; Lu, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Our previous study indicated that adoptive transferred regulatory T cells (Tregs) attenuated liver ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Recent studies demonstrated that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were producers of induced Tregs (iTregs) via retinoic acid. This study aimed to investigate the role of adoptive transferred HSCs in liver IRI. Mice were treated with gradient doses of HSCs before surgery at 24h or 72h. The levels of serum aminotransferases and hepatic cytokines were evaluated after reperfusion. Meanwhile, hepatic Tregs and their subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. We found that adoptive transferred HSCs attenuated liver IRI. Administration of HSCs expanded the number of hepatic iTregs and natural Tregs (nTregs) after reperfusion. In addition, we found that the increased Tregs were almost Helios-Tregs before surgery. These Helios-Tregs were considered as iTregs and protected liver from IRI partially. Furthermore, adoptive transferred HSCs stabilized nTregs and prevented nTregs from reducing after reperfusion. These nTregs also attenuated liver IRI partially. Depletion of Tregs abolished the protective effect of HSCs. Thus, we conclude that adoptive transferred HSCs ameliorate liver IRI in Tregs-dependent manner.

  8. Apoptotic Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Cells and Interferon Signaling Intersect in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Martini, Helene; Citro, Alessandra; Martire, Carmela; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Accapezzato, Daniele; Piconese, Silvia; De Marzio, Paolo; Cavallari, Eugenio N; Calvo, Ludovica; Rizzo, Fabiana; Severa, Martina; Coccia, Eliana M; Grazi, Gian Luca; Di Filippo, Simona; Sidney, John; Vullo, Vincenzo; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    CD8(+) T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells represent a principal player in chronic immune activation. Here, we found that both apoptotic epitope-specific and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) T cells were mostly confined within the effector memory (EM) or terminally differentiated EM CD45RA(+) cell subsets expressing a dysfunctional T-helper 1-like signature program in chronic HCV infection. However, apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells produced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 2 at the intrahepatic level significantly more than HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells, despite both populations expressing high levels of programmed death 1 receptor. Contextually, only apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells correlated with both interferon-stimulated gene levels in T cells and hepatic fibrosis score. Together, these data suggest that, compared with HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells, apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells can better sustain chronic immune activation, owing to their capacity to produce tumor necrosis factor α, and exhibit greater resistance to inhibitory signals during chronic HCV infection.

  9. Suppressive effect of interleukin 10 on priming of naive hepatitis C virus-specific CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Niesen, Emanuel; Schmidt, Julia; Flecken, Tobias; Thimme, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the immunomodulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) T-cell failure. To address the possible role of IL-10 during priming, we performed in vitro priming experiments with naive HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells and autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the absence or presence of IL-10. Our results showed that IL-10, when present during priming, significantly reduced the frequency of HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells after coculture; It was directly targeting CD8(+) T cells and led to impaired effector cell differentiation. These results may provide a possible mechanistic basis for the association between early IL-10 elevation, T-cell failure, and viral persistence.

  10. Hepatic NK cell-mediated hypersensitivity to ConA-induced liver injury in mouse liver expressing hepatitis C virus polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuxia; Yan, Shaoduo; Wang, Licui; Duan, Xiangguo; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui; An, Jie; Zhang, Yulong; Zhou, Qianqian; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-08-04

    The role of hepatic NK cells in the pathogenesis of HCV-associated hepatic failure is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of HCV on ConA-induced immunological hepatic injury and the influence of HCV on hepatic NK cell activation in the liver after ConA administration. An immunocompetent HCV mouse model that encodes the entire viral polyprotein in a liver-specific manner based on hydrodynamic injection and φC31o integrase was used to study the role of hepatic NK cells. Interestingly, the frequency of hepatic NK cells was reduced in HCV mice, whereas the levels of other intrahepatic lymphocytes remained unaltered. Next, we investigated whether the reduction in NK cells within HCV mouse livers might elicit an effect on immune-mediated liver injury. HCV mice were subjected to acute liver injury models upon ConA administration. We observed that HCV mice developed more severe ConA-induced immune-mediated hepatitis, which was dependent on the accumulated intrahepatic NK cells. Our results indicated that after the administration of ConA, NK cells not only mediated liver injury through the production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and perforin) with direct antiviral activity, but they also killed target cells directly through the TRAIL/DR5 and NKG2D/NKG2D ligand signaling pathway in HCV mice. Our findings suggest a critical role for NK cells in oversensitive liver injury during chronic HCV infection.

  11. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  12. Antiamoebic and Toxicity Studies of a Carbamic Acid Derivative and Its Therapeutic Effect in a Hamster Model of Hepatic Amoebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; Shibayama, Mineko; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Angeles, Enrique; de la Garza, Mireya

    2005-01-01

    Amoebiasis is an important public health problem in developing countries. Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis, may develop resistance to nitroimidazoles, a group of drugs considered to be the most effective against this parasitic disease. Therefore, research on new drugs for the treatment of this common infection still constitutes an important therapeutic demand. In the present study we determined the effects of a carbamate derivative, ethyl 4-chlorophenylcarbamate (C4), on trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS. C4 was subject to various toxicity tests, including the determination of mutagenicity for bacterial DNA and changes in the enzymatic activities of eukaryotic cells. Genotoxicity studies were performed by the mutagenicity Ames test (plate incorporation and preincubation methods) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, with or without metabolic activation produced by the S9 fraction of rat liver. C4 toxicity studies were performed by measuring enzymatic activity in eukaryotic cells by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-formazan test with Fischer 344 rat hepatocytes. C4 did not induce either frame-shift mutations in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium TA97 or TA98 or base pair substitutions in strains TA100 and TA102. The compound was not toxic for cultured rat hepatic cells. Trophozoites treated with 100 μg of C4 per ml were inhibited 97.88% at 48 h of culture; moreover, damage to the amoebae was also confirmed by electron microscopy. The antiamoebic activity of C4 was evaluated by using an in vivo model of amoebic liver abscess in hamsters. Doses of 75 and 100 mg/100 g of body weight reduced the extent of the amoebic liver abscess by 84 and 94%, respectively. These results justify further studies to clearly validate whether C4 is a new suitable antiamoebic drug. PMID:15728919

  13. Antiamoebic and toxicity studies of a carbamic acid derivative and its therapeutic effect in a hamster model of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; Shibayama, Mineko; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Angeles, Enrique; de la Garza, Mireya

    2005-03-01

    Amoebiasis is an important public health problem in developing countries. Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis, may develop resistance to nitroimidazoles, a group of drugs considered to be the most effective against this parasitic disease. Therefore, research on new drugs for the treatment of this common infection still constitutes an important therapeutic demand. In the present study we determined the effects of a carbamate derivative, ethyl 4-chlorophenylcarbamate (C4), on trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS. C4 was subject to various toxicity tests, including the determination of mutagenicity for bacterial DNA and changes in the enzymatic activities of eukaryotic cells. Genotoxicity studies were performed by the mutagenicity Ames test (plate incorporation and preincubation methods) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, with or without metabolic activation produced by the S9 fraction of rat liver. C4 toxicity studies were performed by measuring enzymatic activity in eukaryotic cells by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-formazan test with Fischer 344 rat hepatocytes. C4 did not induce either frame-shift mutations in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium TA97 or TA98 or base pair substitutions in strains TA100 and TA102. The compound was not toxic for cultured rat hepatic cells. Trophozoites treated with 100 microg of C4 per ml were inhibited 97.88% at 48 h of culture; moreover, damage to the amoebae was also confirmed by electron microscopy. The antiamoebic activity of C4 was evaluated by using an in vivo model of amoebic liver abscess in hamsters. Doses of 75 and 100 mg/100 g of body weight reduced the extent of the amoebic liver abscess by 84 and 94%, respectively. These results justify further studies to clearly validate whether C4 is a new suitable antiamoebic drug.

  14. Broad-spectrum antiviral activity including human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C viruses mediated by a novel retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative.

    PubMed

    Kesel, Andreas J

    2011-05-01

    Aromatic aldehyde-derived thiosemicarbazones 4-6, the S-substituted modified thiosemicarbazones 7/8, and a vitamin A-derived (retinoid) thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 were investigated as inhibitors of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic RNA replicon Huh7 ET (luc-ubi-neo/ET) replication. Compounds 4-6 and 12 were found to be potent suppressors of HCV RNA replicon replication. The trifluoromethoxy-substituted thiosemicarbazone 6 and the retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 were even superior in selectivity to the included reference agent recombinant human alpha-interferon-2b, showing potencies in the nanomolar range of concentration. In addition, compounds 5, 6, 8 and 12 were tested as inhibitors of cytopathic effect (CPE) induced by human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and/or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Compounds 4-6, 8 and 12 were additionally examined as inhibitors of CPE induced by cowpox virus and vaccinia virus. Thiosemicarbazone 4 was inhibitory on cowpox and vaccinia virus replication comparable in potency and selectivity to the reference agent cidofovir. Retinoid thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 was active as micromolar inhibitor of VZV, HCMV, and, in addition, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. These results indicate that thiosemicarbazone derivatives are appropriate lead structures to be evaluated in targeted antiviral therapies for hepatitis C (STAT-C), and that the vitamin A-related thiosemicarbazone derivative 12 emerges as a broad-spectrum antiviral agent, co-suppressing the multiplication of important RNA and DNA viruses.

  15. Osteopontin-Enhanced Hepatic Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianjin; Pan, Chi; Hu, Hanguang; Zheng, Shu; Ding, Ling

    2012-01-01

    Liver metastasis is a major cause of mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC). However, mechanisms underlying this process are largely unknown. Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphorylated glycoprotein that is involved in tumor migration and metastasis. The role of OPN in cancer is currently unclear. In this study, OPN mRNA was examined in tissues from CRC, adjacent normal mucosa, and liver metastatic lesions using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. The protein expression of OPN and its receptors (integrin αv and CD44 v6) was detected by using an immunohistochemical (IHC) method. The role of OPN in liver metastasis was studied in established colon cancer Colo-205 and SW-480 cell lines transfected with sense- or antisense-OPN eukaryotic expression plasmids by flow cytometry and cell adhesion assay. Florescence redistribution after photobleaching (FRAP) was used to study gap functional intercellular communication (GJIC) among OPN-transfected cells. It was found that OPN was highly expressed in metastatic hepatic lesions from CRC compared to primary CRC tissue and adjacent normal mucosa. The expression of OPN mRNA in tumor tissues was significantly related with the CRC stages. OPN expression was also detected in normal hepatocytes surrounding CRC metastatic lesions. Two known receptors of OPN, integrin αv and CD44v6 proteins, were strongly expressed in hepatocytes from normal liver. CRC cells with forced OPN expression exhibited increased heterotypic adhesion with endothelial cells and weakened intercellular communication. OPN plays a significant role in CRC metastasis to liver through interaction with its receptors in hepatocytes, decreased homotypic adhesion, and enhanced heterotypic adhesion. PMID:23112867

  16. Apoptosis of rat hepatic stellate cells induced by diallyl trisulfide and proteomics profiling in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajie; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xu, Lipeng; Wang, Lulu; Liu, Jinling; Ye, Jing; Qiu, Pengxin; Liu, Qinghua

    2016-11-18

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a major garlic derivative, inhibits cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. However, the effects of DATS on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remain unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of DATS on cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as the protein expression profile in rat HSCs. Rat HSCs were treated with or without 12 and 24 μg/mL DATS for various time intervals. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using tetrazolium dye (MTT) colorimetric assay, bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine; BrdU) assay, Hoechst 33342 staining, electroscopy, and flow cytometry. Protein expression patterns in HSCs were systematically studied using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. DATS inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of HSCs in a time-dependent manner. We observed clear morphological changes in apoptotic HSCs and dramatically increased annexin V-positive - propidium iodide negative apoptosis compared with the untreated control group. Twenty-one significant differentially expressed proteins, including 9 downregulated proteins and 12 upregulated proteins, were identified after DATS administration, and most of them were involved in apoptosis. Our results suggest that DATS is an inducer of apoptosis in HSCs, and several key proteins may be involved in the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by DATS.

  17. Determining the Cellular Diversity of Hepatitis C Virus Quasispecies by Single-Cell Viral Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    McLauchlan, John

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants. PMID:24049174

  18. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sense hepatitis C virus-infected cells, produce interferon, and inhibit infection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ken; Asabe, Shinichi; Wieland, Stefan; Garaigorta, Urtzi; Gastaminza, Pablo; Isogawa, Masanori; Chisari, Francis V

    2010-04-20

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus that infects >170 million people worldwide and causes acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite its ability to block the innate host response in infected hepatocyte cell lines in vitro, HCV induces a strong type 1 interferon (IFN) response in the infected liver. The source of IFN in vivo and how it is induced are currently undefined. Here we report that HCV-infected cells trigger a robust IFN response in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by a mechanism that requires active viral replication, direct cell-cell contact, and Toll-like receptor 7 signaling, and we show that the activated pDC supernatant inhibits HCV infection in an IFN receptor-dependent manner. Importantly, the same events are triggered by HCV subgenomic replicon cells but not by free virus particles, suggesting the existence of a novel cell-cell RNA transfer process whereby HCV-infected cells can activate pDCs to produce IFN without infecting them. These results may explain how HCV induces IFN production in the liver, and they reveal a heretofore unsuspected aspect of the innate host response to viruses that can subvert the classical sensing machinery in the cells they infect, and do not infect or directly activate pDCs.

  20. PRODUCTION OF PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES BY MONOCYTES IN LIVER TRANSPLANTED RECIPIENTS WITH DE NOVO AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS IS ENHANCED AND INDUCES TH1-LIKE REGULATORY T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Arterbery, Adam S.; Osafo-Addo, Awo; Avitzur, Yaron; Ciarleglio, Maria; Deng, Yanhong; Lobritto, Steven J.; Martinez, Mercedes; Hafler, David A.; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Ekong, Udeme D.

    2016-01-01

    A subset of human regulatory T cells (Tregs) can secrete IFN-γ or IL-17 and thus share features of TH1 or TH17 effector cells, and lose suppressive function. The main factors driving this differentiation of Tregs towards a pro-inflammatory phenotype include IL-12 for TH1-like and IL-6 for TH17-type Tregs. In this study we show that Tregs of patients with de novo autoimmune hepatitis (dAIH) display increased frequencies of pro-inflammatory IFN-γ and IL-17 cytokines. Irrespective of a fully demethylated FOXP3 locus, Tregs of subjects with de novo autoimmune hepatitis are functionally impaired. In line with the observed Treg phenotype, we detected the presence of two dominant cytokines (IL-12 and IL-6) clustering with CD68+ monocyte/macrophage cells in livers of subjects with de novo autoimmune hepatitis and isolated monocytes of subjects with de novo autoimmune hepatitis secrete high levels of pro-inflammatory IL-12 and IL-6 suggesting that this inflammatory milieu is key for functional impairment of Tregs. Importantly, the blockade of IFN-γ partially restores suppressive function of Tregs of subjects with de novo autoimmune hepatitis indicating that monocyte/macrophage derived triggers might play a central role in Treg dysfunction and pathogenesis of de novo autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27183637

  1. Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Hematopoietic Cell Tissue Factor Are Required for Hepatic Steatosis in Mice Fed a Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kassel, Karen M.; Owens, A. Phillip; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Sullivan, Bradley P.; Wang, Ruipeng; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Guodong; Guo, Grace L.; Mackman, Nigel; Luyendyk, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and liver-related morbidity and mortality. Indeed, obese patients with metabolic syndrome generate greater amounts of thrombin, an indication of coagulation cascade activation. However, the role of the coagulation cascade in Western diet–induced NAFLD has not been investigated. Using an established mouse model of Western diet–induced NAFLD, we tested whether the thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and hematopoietic cell–derived tissue factor (TF) contribute to hepatic steatosis. In association with hepatic steatosis, plasma thrombin-antithrombin levels and hepatic fibrin deposition increased significantly in C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet for 3 months. PAR-1 deficiency reduced hepatic inflammation, particularly monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage accumulation. In addition, PAR-1 deficiency was associated with reduced steatosis in mice fed a Western diet, including reduced liver triglyceride accumulation and CD36 expression. Similar to PAR-1 deficiency, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency was associated with reduced inflammation and reduced steatosis in livers of low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient mice fed a Western diet. Moreover, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency reduced hepatic fibrin deposition. These studies indicate that PAR-1 and hematopoietic cell TF are required for liver inflammation and steatosis in mice fed a Western diet. PMID:21907177

  2. Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Nidal; Olsson, Björn; Edsbagge, Josefina; Küppers-Munther, Barbara; Van Giezen, Mariska; Asplund, Annika; Andersson, Tommy B.; Björquist, Petter; Carén, Helena; Simonsson, Stina; Sartipy, Peter; Synnergren, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs-) derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4) which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models. PMID:26949401

  3. Hepatitis E virus egress depends on the exosomal pathway, with secretory exosomes derived from multivesicular bodies.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Jirintai, Suljid; Takahashi, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tominari; Tanggis; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Kouki, Tom; Yashiro, Takashi; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Our previous studies indicated that hepatitis E virus (HEV) forms membrane-associated particles in the cytoplasm, most likely by budding into intracellular vesicles, and requires the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway to release virus particles, and the released HEV particles with a lipid membrane retain the trans-Golgi network protein 2 on their surface. To examine whether HEV utilizes the exosomal pathway to release the virus particles, we analysed whether the virion release from PLC/PRF/5 cells infected with genotype 3 HEV (strain JE03-1760F) is affected by treatment with bafilomycin A1 or GW4869, or by the introduction of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Rab27A or Hrs. The extracellular HEV RNA titre was increased by treatment with bafilomycin A1, but was decreased by treatment with GW4869. The relative levels of virus particles released from cells depleted of Rab27A or Hrs were decreased to 16.1 and 11.5 %, respectively, of that released from cells transfected with negative control siRNA. Electron microscopic observations revealed the presence of membrane-associated virus-like particles with a diameter of approximately 50 nm within the MVB, which possessed internal vesicles in infected cells. Immunoelectron microscopy showed positive immunogold staining for the HEV ORF2 protein on the intraluminal vesicles within the MVB. Additionally, immunofluorescence analysis indicated the triple co-localization of the ORF2, ORF3 and CD63 proteins in the cytoplasm, as specific loculated signals, supporting the presence of membrane-associated HEV particles within the MVB. These findings indicate that membrane-associated HEV particles are released together with internal vesicles through MVBs by the cellular exosomal pathway.

  4. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  5. Hepatitis B Virus Splice-Generated Protein Induces T-Cell Responses in HLA-Transgenic Mice and Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Bayard, Florence; Soussan, Patrick; Deng, Qiang; Lone, Yu-Chun; Kremsdorf, Dina; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus splice-generated protein (HBSP), encoded by a spliced hepatitis B virus RNA, was recently identified in liver biopsy specimens from patients with chronic active hepatitis B. We investigated the possible generation of immunogenic peptides by the processing of this protein in vivo. We identified a panel of potential epitopes in HBSP by using predictive computational algorithms for peptide binding to HLA molecules. We used transgenic mice devoid of murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and positive for human MHC class I molecules to characterize immune responses specific for HBSP. Two HLA-A2-restricted peptides and one immunodominant HLA-B7-restricted epitope were identified following the immunization of mice with DNA vectors encoding HBSP. Most importantly, a set of overlapping peptides covering the HBSP sequence induced significant HBSP-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B. The response was multispecific, as several epitopes were recognized by CD8+ and CD4+ human T cells. This study provides the first evidence that this protein generated in vivo from an alternative reading frame of the hepatitis B virus genome activates T-cell responses in hepatitis B virus-infected patients. Given that hepatitis B is an immune response-mediated disease, the detection of T-cell responses directed against HBSP in patients with chronic hepatitis B suggests a potential role for this protein in liver disease progression. PMID:17360751

  6. Hepatitis B virus splice-generated protein induces T-cell responses in HLA-transgenic mice and hepatitis B virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Bayard, Florence; Soussan, Patrick; Deng, Qiang; Lone, Yu-Chun; Kremsdorf, Dina; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus splice-generated protein (HBSP), encoded by a spliced hepatitis B virus RNA, was recently identified in liver biopsy specimens from patients with chronic active hepatitis B. We investigated the possible generation of immunogenic peptides by the processing of this protein in vivo. We identified a panel of potential epitopes in HBSP by using predictive computational algorithms for peptide binding to HLA molecules. We used transgenic mice devoid of murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and positive for human MHC class I molecules to characterize immune responses specific for HBSP. Two HLA-A2-restricted peptides and one immunodominant HLA-B7-restricted epitope were identified following the immunization of mice with DNA vectors encoding HBSP. Most importantly, a set of overlapping peptides covering the HBSP sequence induced significant HBSP-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic hepatitis B. The response was multispecific, as several epitopes were recognized by CD8(+) and CD4(+) human T cells. This study provides the first evidence that this protein generated in vivo from an alternative reading frame of the hepatitis B virus genome activates T-cell responses in hepatitis B virus-infected patients. Given that hepatitis B is an immune response-mediated disease, the detection of T-cell responses directed against HBSP in patients with chronic hepatitis B suggests a potential role for this protein in liver disease progression.

  7. Fibrogenic response of hepatic stellate cells in ovariectomised rats exposed to ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Bobowiec, R; Wojcik, M; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Tusinska, E

    2013-02-01

    The discrepancy about the role of estrogens in hepatic fibrogenesis and lack of studies addressed of ketogenic diet (KD) on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), prompted us to investigate the activity of HSC in control, KD- and thioacetamide (TAA)-administrated rats with different plasma concentration of estradiol (E2). HSC were isolated by the collagenase perfusion methods and separated by the Percoll gradient centrifugation. After the 4(th) and 8(th) day of incubation, lysates of HSC and the media were collected for further analysis. The HSC derived from KD-rats released remarkably more transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 than cells obtained from animals fed with a standard diet. The ovariectomy of KD-rats markedly intensified the secretion of this fibrogenic cytokine on the 8(th) day of incubation (201.33 ±1 7.15 pg/ml). In HSC of rats exposed to E2, the TGF-β1 concentration did not exceed 157 ± 34.39 pg/ml. In respect to the collagen type I, the HSC obtained from ovariectomised KD-rats released an augmented amount of this ECM protein after the 8(th) day of culture (1.83 ± 0.14 U/ml). In the same time, higher quantities of ASMA appeared in the KD rats (1.41 ± 0.3 pg/mg protein). Exposition of rats to E2 did not markedly decrease the amount of ASMA. In summary, KD was able to induce morphological and functional changes in HSC, especially derived from rats deprived of ovarian estrogens. However, the preservation of E2 in ovariectomised rats didn't substantially alter the activation of HSC.

  8. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Sören V; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A; Strassburg, Christian P; Schwabe, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs.

  9. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Sören V.; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A.; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  10. Valproic Acid Increases the Hepatic Differentiation Potential of Salivary Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrakova, O. S.; Ashapkin, V. V.; Shtratnikova, V. Y.; Kutueva, L. I.; Vorotelyak, E. A.; Borisov, M. A.; Terskikh, V. V.; Gvazava, I. G.; Vasiliev, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The studies of cell plasticity and differentiation abilities are important problems in modern cellular biology. The use of histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid is a promising approach to increasing the differentiation efficiency of various cell types. In this paper we investigate the ability of mouse submandibular salivary gland cells to differentiate into the hepatic direction and the effect of valproic acid on the efficiency of this differentiation. It was shown that the gene expression levels of hepatocyte markers (Aat, Afp, G6p, Pepck, Tat, Cyp3a13) and liver-enriched transcription factors (Hnf-3α, Hnf-3β, Hnf-4α, Hnf-6) were increased after differentiation in salivary gland cells. Valproic acid increases the specificity of hepatic differentiation, reducing the expression levels of the ductal (Krt19, Hhex1, Cyp7a1) and acinar (Ptf1a) markers. After valproic acid exposure, the efficiency of hepatic differentiation also increases, as evidenced by the increase in the gene expression level of Alb and Tdo, and increase in urea production by differentiated cells. No change was found in DNA methylation of the promoter regions of the genes; however, valproic acid treatment and subsequent hepatic differentiation largely affected the histone H3 methylation of liver-enriched genes. Thus, mouse submandibular salivary gland cells are capable of effective differentiation in the hepatic direction. Valproic acid increases the specificity and efficiency of the hepatic differentiation of these cells. PMID:26798494

  11. Cell-derived microparticles and the lung.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Dario; Neri, Tommaso; Petrini, Silvia; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Cell-derived microparticles are small (0.1-1 μm) vesicles shed by most eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microparticles carry on their surface, and enclose within their cytoplasm, molecules derived from the parental cell, including proteins, DNA, RNA, microRNA and phospholipids. Microparticles are now considered functional units that represent a disseminated storage pool of bioactive effectors and participate both in the maintenance of homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of diseases. The mechanisms involved in microparticle generation include intracellular calcium mobilisation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, kinase phosphorylation and activation of the nuclear factor-κB. The role of microparticles in blood coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation, is well established in in vitro and animal models. The role of microparticles in human pulmonary diseases, both as pathogenic determinants and biomarkers, is being actively investigated. Microparticles of endothelial origin, suggestive of apoptosis, have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of patients with emphysema, lending support to the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and represent a link with cardiovascular comorbidities. Microparticles also have potential roles in patients with asthma, diffuse parenchymal lung disease, thromboembolism, lung cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  12. Aloe emodin suppresses myofibroblastic differentiation of rat hepatic stellate cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Wook; Nan, Ji-Xing; Lee, Sung Hee; Park, Eun-Jeon; Zhao, Yu Zhe; Sohn, Dong Hwan

    2002-04-01

    We have studied the inhibitory effect of aloe emodin on hepatic stellate cells activation and proliferation, as these cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Rat hepatic stellate cells were activated by contact with plastic dishes, resulting in their transformation into myofibroblast-like cells. Primary hepatic stellate cells were exposed to aloe emodin (1-10 microg/ml). Possible cytotoxic effects were measured on stellate cells and hepatocytes using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of aloe emodin on production of type I collagen and smooth muscle cell alpha-actin were examined at the same concentration, by quantitative immunoprecipitation. Antiproliferative effects were examined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Aloe emodin at 10 microg/ml restored the morphological changes characteristic of activated primary stellate cells, reduced DNA synthesis to 95% of control hepatic stellate cells at 10 microg/ml without affecting cell viability, and inhibited type I collagen production and smooth muscle alpha-actin expression by 86.77% and 99%, respectively, which suggest that aloe emodin is a potent inhibitor of stellate cell transformation.

  13. Apelin mediates the induction of profibrogenic genes in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Casals, Gregori; Pauta, Montserrat; Ros, Josefa; Reichenbach, Vedrana; Bataller, Ramon; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Jimenez, Wladimiro

    2010-11-01

    Apelin is a peptide with relevant functions in angiogenesis and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that apelin is overexpressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) of cirrhotic rats. Moreover, patients with cirrhosis show high circulating levels of this peptide. We evaluated the role of endogenous apelin system in fibrogenesis-related gene induction in human HSCs. Messenger expression and immunolocalization of apelin were analyzed in human cirrhotic liver and in control samples. Apelin expression was analyzed in a human HSC line (LX-2) under hypoxic conditions or in the presence of proinflammatory or profibrogenic stimuli. LX-2 cells were stimulated with apelin, and a selected profile of fibrogenesis-related genes was quantified. In vivo inactivation of apelin was analyzed in the liver of fibrotic rats after administrating specific blockers of the molecules triggering apelin induction. Apelin was overexpressed in HSCs from human cirrhotic liver. Neither hypoxia nor proinflammatory substances induced the expression of apelin in LX-2. By contrast, both profibrogenic molecules angiotensin II (AII) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) enhanced apelin expression in these cells. Apelin increased the synthesis of collagen-I and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) in LX-2. AII and ET-1 stimulated collagen-I and PDGFRβ expression, and this induction was drastically reduced when apelin receptor was blocked in these cells. In accordance, AII or ET-1 receptor antagonists reduced the hepatic synthesis of apelin, collagen-I, and PDGFRβ in fibrotic rats. apelin mediates some of the fibrogenic effects triggered by AII and ET-1, thus suggesting that apelin could be an important mediator of fibrogenesis in human liver disease.

  14. Relationship between hepatic progenitor cell-mediated liver regeneration and non-parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Kitade, Mitsuteru; Kaji, Kosuke; Yoshiji, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are thought to reside in the canals of Hering and can be activated and contribute to liver regeneration in response to liver injury by proliferating and differentiating towards both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells. In this setting, several cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors related to liver inflammation and other liver cells comprising the HPC niche, namely hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), play crucial roles in HPC activation and differentiation. In response to several types of liver injury, tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is secreted by several inflammatory cells, including monocytes, T lymphocytes, and macrophages, and acts as an initiator of the HPC niche and HSC activation. Following TWEAK-induced activation of the HPC niche, fibroblast growth factor 7 and hepatocyte growth factor released from activated HSC play central roles in maintaining HPC proliferation. In contrast, HGF-MET and Wnt3a-β-catenin signals are the predominant mediators of the hepatocyte differentiation of HPC, whereas epidermal growth factor receptor-NOTCH signaling controls HPC differentiation towards biliary epithelial cells. These signals are maintained exclusively by activated HSC and inflammatory cells surrounding HPC. Together, HSC and inflammatory cells surrounding HPC are responsible for the precise control of HPC proliferation and differentiation fate. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding of interactions between HPC and other liver cells in HPC-mediated liver regeneration in the setting of liver inflammation. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  15. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  16. Lack of optimal T-cell reactivity against the hepatitis C virus is associated with the development of fibrosis/cirrhosis during chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sreenarasimhaiah, Jayaprakash; Jaramillo, Andrés; Crippin, Jeffrey; Lisker-Melman, Mauricio; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2003-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection develops in 85% of exposed individuals and 20% develop cirrhosis. However, the pathogenesis of this process is not well-understood. The objective of this study was to determine whether HCV-reactive T cells play a role in the process of development of cirrhosis during chronic HCV infection. We analyzed 21 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 patients with chronic HCV infection (9 with histology of inflammation and 12 with histology of fibrosis/cirrhosis). The frequency of CD8(+) T cells reactive to 12 HCV-derived epitopes was determined by an interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. The frequency of CD4(+) Th1 and Th2 cells reactive to the HCV core antigen was determined by interferon-gamma and interleukin-5 ELISPOT assays, respectively. Patients with histology of inflammation showed a significantly higher CD8(+) T-cell response to five HCV-derived epitopes (YLLPRRGPRL [core], CINGVCWTV [NS3], LLCPAGHAV [NS3], ILAGYGAGV [NS4B], and GLQDCTMLV [NS5B]) as compared with patients with histology of fibrosis/cirrhosis. Also, patients with histology of inflammation showed a significantly higher CD4(+) Th1 response to the HCV core antigen as compared to patients with histology of fibrosis/cirrhosis. These results indicate that a lack of an optimal T-cell response to HCV is associated with the development of cirrhosis during chronic HCV infection.

  17. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  18. 15th International Symposium on Cells of the Hepatic Sinusoid, 2010.

    PubMed

    DeLeve, Laurie D; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Kalra, Vijay K; Asahina, Kinji; Brenner, David A; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2011-07-01

    This is a meeting report of the presentations given at the 15th International Symposium on Cells of the Hepatic Sinusoid, held in 2010. The areas covered include the contributions of the various liver cell populations to liver disease, molecular and cellular targets involved in steatohepatitis, hepatic fibrosis and cancer and regenerative medicine. In addition to a review of the science presented at the meeting, this report provides references to recent literature on the topics covered at the meeting.

  19. Relationship between oxidative stress and hepatic glutathione levels in ethanol-mediated apoptosis of polarized hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    McVicker, Benita L; Tuma, Pamela L; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Lee, Serene ML; Tuma, Dean J

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ethanol-mediated cell death of polarized hepatic (WIF-B) cells. METHODS: In this work, WIF-B cultures were treated with pyrazole (inducer of cytochrome P4502E1, CYP2E1) and/or L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a known inhibitor of hepatic glutathione (GSH), followed by evaluation of ROS production, antioxidant levels, and measures of cell injury (apoptosis and necrosis). RESULTS: The results revealed that ethanol treatment alone caused a significant two-fold increase in the activation of caspase-3 as well as a similar doubling in ROS. When the activity of the CYP2E1 was increased by pyrazole pretreatment, an additional two-fold elevation in ROS was detected. However, the CYP2E1-related ROS elevation was not accompanied with a correlative increase in apoptotic cell injury, but rather was found to be associated with an increase in necrotic cell death. Interestingly, when the thiol status of the cells was manipulated using BSO, the ethanol-induced activation of caspase-3 was abrogated. Additionally, ethanol-treated cells displayed enhanced susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis that was blocked by GSH depletion as a result of diminished caspase-8 activity. CONCLUSION: Apoptotic cell death induced as a consequence of ethanol metabolism is not completely dependent upon ROS status but is dependent on sustained GSH levels. PMID:19496190

  20. The Transcriptomic Response of Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells to Endotoxin: Implications for Hepatic Inflammation and Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Ashish; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2013-01-01

    With their location in the perisinusoidal space of Disse, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) communicate with all of the liver cell types both by physical association (cell body as well as cytosolic processes penetrating into sinusoids through the endothelial fenestrations) and by producing several cytokines and chemokines. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), circulating levels of which are elevated in liver diseases and transplantation, stimulates HSCs to produce increased amounts of cytokines and chemokines. Although recent research provides strong evidence for the role of HSCs in hepatic inflammation and immune regulation, the number of HSC-elaborated inflammatory and immune regulatory molecules may be much greater then known at the present time. Here we report time-dependent changes in the gene expression profile of inflammatory and immune-regulatory molecules in LPS-stimulated rat HSCs, and their validation by biochemical analyses. LPS strongly up-regulated LPS-response elements (TLR2 and TLR7) but did not affect TLR4 and down-regulated TLR9. LPS also up-regulated genes in the MAPK, NFκB, STAT, SOCS, IRAK and interferon signaling pathways, numerous CC and CXC chemokines and IL17F. Interestingly, LPS modulated genes related to TGFβ and HSC activation in a manner that would limit their activation and fibrogenic activity. The data indicate that LPS-stimulated HSCs become a major cell type in regulating hepatic inflammatory and immunological responses by altering expression of numerous relevant genes, and thus play a prominent role in hepatic pathophysiology including liver diseases and transplantation. PMID:24349206

  1. Viable transgenic goats derived from skin cells.

    PubMed

    Behboodi, Esmail; Memili, Erdogan; Melican, David T; Destrempes, Margaret M; Overton, Susan A; Williams, Jennifer L; Flanagan, Peter A; Butler, Robin E; Liem, Hetty; Chen, Li How; Meade, Harry M; Gavin, William G; Echelard, Yann

    2004-06-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of expanding transgenic goat herds by means of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) using transgenic goat cells as nucleus donors. Skin cells from adult, transgenic goats were first synchronized at quiescent stage (G0) by serum starvation and then induced to exit G0 and proceed into G1. Oocytes collected from superovulated donors were enucleated, karyoplast-cytoplast couplets were constructed, and then fused and activated simultaneously by a single electrical pulse. Fused couplets were either co-cultured with oviductal cells in TCM-199 medium (in vitro culture) or transferred to intermediate recipient goat oviducts (in vivo culture) until final transfer. The resulting morulae and blastocysts were transferred to the final recipients. Pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography 25-30 days after embryo transfer. In vitro cultured NT embryos developed to morulae and blastocyst stages but did not produce any pregnancies while 30% (6/20) of the in vivo derived morulae and blastocysts produced pregnancies. Two of these pregnancies were resorbed early in gestation. Of the four recipients that maintained pregnancies to term, two delivered dead fetuses 2-3 days after their due dates, and two recipients gave birth to healthy kids at term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed that both kids were transgenic and had integration sites consistent with those observed in the adult cell line.

  2. CD95/CD95L-mediated apoptosis of the hepatic stellate cell. A mechanism terminating uncontrolled hepatic stellate cell proliferation during hepatic tissue repair.

    PubMed Central

    Saile, B.; Knittel, T.; Matthes, N.; Schott, P.; Ramadori, G.

    1997-01-01

    During liver tissue repair, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), a pericyte-like mesenchymal liver cell population, transform from a "quiescent" status ("resting" HSC) into myofibroblast-like cells ("activated" HSC) with the latter representing the principle matrix synthesizing cell of the liver. Presently, the mechanisms that terminate HSC cell proliferation when tissue repair is concluded are poorly understood. Controlled cell death known as apoptosis could be a mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Therefore, apoptosis and its regulation were studied in HSC using an in vitro and in vivo approach. Spontaneous apoptosis became detectable in parallel with HSC activation because resting cells (2 days after isolation) displayed no sign of apoptosis, whereas apoptosis was present in 8% (+/- 5%) of "transitional" cells (day 4) and in 18% (+/- 8%) of fully activated cells (day 7). Both CD95 (APO-1/Fas) and CD95L (APO-1-/Fas-ligand) became increasingly expressed during the course of activation. Apoptosis could be fully blocked by CD95-blocking antibodies in normal cells and HSC already entering the apoptotic cycle. Using CD95-activating antibodies, transition of more than 95% cells into apoptosis was evident at each activation step. The apoptosis-regulating proteins Bcl-2 and p53 could not be detected in resting cells but were found in increasing amounts at days 4 and 7 of cultivation. Whereas p53 expression was induced by the CD95-activating antibody, no change was inducible in Bcl-2 expression. The Bcl-2-related protein bax could be found at days 2 and 4 in similar expression, was considerably up-regulated at day 7, but was not regulated by CD95-agonistic antibodies. In vivo, acute tissue damage was first accompanied by activation and proliferation of HSC displaying no sign of apoptosis. In the recovery phase, apoptotic HSC were detectable in parallel to a reduction in the total number of HSC present in the liver tissue. The data demonstrate that apoptosis becomes detectable

  3. Tuning a cellular lipid kinase activity adapts hepatitis C virus to replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Harak, Christian; Meyrath, Max; Romero-Brey, Inés; Schenk, Christian; Gondeau, Claire; Schult, Philipp; Esser-Nobis, Katharina; Saeed, Mohsan; Neddermann, Petra; Schnitzler, Paul; Gotthardt, Daniel; Perez-Del-Pulgar, Sofia; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph; Thimme, Robert; Meuleman, Philip; Vondran, Florian W R; Francesco, Raffaele De; Rice, Charles M; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Lohmann, Volker

    2016-12-19

    With a single exception, all isolates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) require adaptive mutations to replicate efficiently in cell culture. Here, we show that a major class of adaptive mutations regulates the activity of a cellular lipid kinase, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα (PI4KA). HCV needs to stimulate PI4KA to create a permissive phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate-enriched membrane microenvironment in the liver and in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs). In contrast, in Huh7 hepatoma cells, the virus must acquire loss-of-function mutations that prevent PI4KA overactivation. This adaptive mechanism is necessitated by increased PI4KA levels in Huh7 cells compared with PHHs, and is conserved across HCV genotypes. PI4KA-specific inhibitors promote replication of unadapted viral isolates and allow efficient replication of patient-derived virus in cell culture. In summary, this study has uncovered a long-sought mechanism of HCV cell-culture adaptation and demonstrates how a virus can adapt to changes in a cellular environment associated with tumorigenesis.

  4. Hepatic Stellate Cells Preferentially Induce Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Production of Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Richard M.; Thapa, Manoj; Velazquez, Victoria M.; Elrod, Elizabeth J.; Denning, Timothy L.; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    The liver has long been described as immunosuppressive, although the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a population of liver nonparenchymal cells, are potent producers of the regulatory T cell (Treg)–polarizing molecules TGF-β1 and all-trans retinoic acid, particularly during states of inflammation. HSCs are activated during hepatitis C virus infection and may therefore play a role in the enrichment of Tregs during infection. We hypothesized that Ag presentation in the context of HSC activation will induce naive T cells to differentiate into Foxp3+ Tregs. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the molecular interactions between murine HSCs, dendritic cells, and naive CD4+ T cells. We found that HSCs alone do not present Ag to naive CD4+ T cells, but in the presence of dendritic cells and TGF-β1, preferentially induce functional Tregs. This Treg induction was associated with retinoid metabolism by HSCs and was dependent on all-trans retinoic acid. Thus, we conclude that HSCs preferentially generate Foxp3+ Tregs and, therefore, may play a role in the tolerogenic nature of the liver. PMID:23359509

  5. Azadirachta indica modulates electrical properties and type of cell death in NDEA-induced hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Sanjay; Rishi, Praveen; Koul, Ashwani

    2014-09-01

    Tissue electrical conductivity is an important indicator of tissue structure and composition. Present study demonstrates modulatory effect of Azadirachta indica on the electrical conductivity and cell death in hepatic tumors. Hepatic tumors were generated by intraperitoneal injection of N-nitrosodiethylamine (cumulative dose: 200 μg/g body mass) to male BALB/c mice. Aqueous A. indica leaf extract (AAILE) was administered orally at a dosage of 100 μg/g body mass till the termination of experiment. At the end of experiment, electrical conductivity of hepatic tumors was measured with four-pin electrode method. Tissues and tumors were then processed for TUNEL assay and DNA fragmentation analysis. The levels of TNF-α were also determined in the normal hepatic and tumor tissue. Hepatic tumors had higher electrical conductivity compared to normal liver tissue. An increased necrotic cell percentage along with elevated TNF-α was also observed. Although, AAILE co-treatment resulted in tumors with higher electrical conductivity compared to normal animals. However, the electrical conductivity was decreased significantly compared to untreated tumors. A significant increase in apoptotic cell percentage and concomitant decrease in necrotic cell percentage along with the increased TNF-α level was observed in these tumors. The results suggest that A. indica modulated mode of cell death in tumors and type of cell death had significant contribution in determining hepatic tumor electrical conductivity.

  6. Reconstruction of hepatic stellate cell-incorporated liver capillary structures in small hepatocyte tri-culture using microporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Junichi; Sudo, Ryo; Masuda, Genta; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    In liver sinusoids, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) locate the outer surface of microvessels to form a functional unit with endothelia and hepatocytes. To reconstruct functional liver tissue in vitro, formation of the HSC-incorporated sinusoidal structure is essential. We previously demonstrated capillary formation of endothelial cells (ECs) in tri-culture, where a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) microporous membrane was intercalated between the ECs and hepatic organoids composed of small hepatocytes (SHs), i.e. hepatic progenitor cells, and HSCs. However, the high thickness and low porosity of the membranes limited heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which are essential to form HSC-EC hybrid structures. Here, we focused on the effective use of the thin and highly porous poly( d, l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microporous membranes in SH-HSC-EC tri-culture to reconstruct the HSC-incorporated liver capillary structures in vitro. First, the formation of EC capillary-like structures was induced on Matrigel-coated PLGA microporous membranes. Next, the membranes were stacked on hepatic organoids composed of small SHs and HSCs. When the pore size and porosity of the membranes were optimized, HSCs selectively migrated to the EC capillary-like structures. This process was mediated in part by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signalling. In addition, the HSCs were located along the outer surface of the EC capillary-like structures with their long cytoplasmic processes. In the HSC-incorporated capillary tissues, SHs acquired high levels of differentiated functions, compared to those without ECs. This model will provide a basis for the construction of functional, thick, vascularized liver tissues in vitro.

  7. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from pig somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V. L.; Alexenko, Andrei P.; Sachdev, Shrikesh; Sinha, Sunilima; Roberts, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    For reasons that are unclear the production of embryonic stem cells from ungulates has proved elusive. Here, we describe induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from porcine fetal fibroblasts by lentiviral transduction of 4 human (h) genes, hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF4, and hc-MYC, the combination commonly used to create iPSC in mouse and human. Cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and FGF2. Compact colonies of alkaline phosphatase-positive cells emerged after ≈22 days, providing an overall reprogramming efficiency of ≈0.1%. The cells expressed porcine OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 and had high telomerase activity, but also continued to express the 4 human transgenes. Unlike human ESC, the porcine iPSC (piPSC) were positive for SSEA-1, but negative for SSEA-3 and -4. Transcriptional profiling on Affymetrix (porcine) microarrays and real time RT-PCR supported the conclusion that reprogramming to pluripotency was complete. One cell line, ID6, had a normal karyotype, a cell doubling time of ≈17 h, and has been maintained through >220 doublings. The ID6 line formed embryoid bodies, expressing genes representing all 3 germ layers when cultured under differentiating conditions, and teratomas containing tissues of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm origin in nude mice. We conclude that porcine somatic cells can be reprogrammed to form piPSC. Such cell lines derived from individual animals could provide a means for testing the safety and efficacy of stem cell-derived tissue grafts when returned to the same pigs at a later age. PMID:19541600

  8. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from pig somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Alexenko, Andrei P; Sachdev, Shrikesh; Sinha, Sunilima; Roberts, R Michael

    2009-07-07

    For reasons that are unclear the production of embryonic stem cells from ungulates has proved elusive. Here, we describe induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from porcine fetal fibroblasts by lentiviral transduction of 4 human (h) genes, hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF4, and hc-MYC, the combination commonly used to create iPSC in mouse and human. Cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and FGF2. Compact colonies of alkaline phosphatase-positive cells emerged after approximately 22 days, providing an overall reprogramming efficiency of approximately 0.1%. The cells expressed porcine OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 and had high telomerase activity, but also continued to express the 4 human transgenes. Unlike human ESC, the porcine iPSC (piPSC) were positive for SSEA-1, but negative for SSEA-3 and -4. Transcriptional profiling on Affymetrix (porcine) microarrays and real time RT-PCR supported the conclusion that reprogramming to pluripotency was complete. One cell line, ID6, had a normal karyotype, a cell doubling time of approximately 17 h, and has been maintained through >220 doublings. The ID6 line formed embryoid bodies, expressing genes representing all 3 germ layers when cultured under differentiating conditions, and teratomas containing tissues of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm origin in nude mice. We conclude that porcine somatic cells can be reprogrammed to form piPSC. Such cell lines derived from individual animals could provide a means for testing the safety and efficacy of stem cell-derived tissue grafts when returned to the same pigs at a later age.

  9. Myeloid suppressor cells induced by hepatitis C virus suppress T-cell responses through the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Robert S; Lee, Hai-Chon; Goh, Celeste; Courtney, Jeremy; Polyak, Stephen J; Rosen, Hugo R; Hahn, Young S

    2012-02-01

    Impaired T-cell responses in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients have been reported to be associated with the establishment of HCV persistent infection. However, the mechanism for HCV-mediated T-cell dysfunction is yet to be defined. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a pivotal role in suppressing T-cell responses. In this study we examined the accumulation of MDSCs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following HCV infection. We found that CD33(+) mononuclear cells cocultured with HCV-infected hepatocytes, or with HCV core protein, suppress autologous T-cell responses. HCV core-treated CD33(+) cells exhibit a CD14(+) CD11b(+/low) HLADR(-/low) phenotype with up-regulated expression of p47(phox) , a component of the NOX2 complex critical for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In contrast, immunosuppressive factors, arginase-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), were not up-regulated. Importantly, treatment with an inactivator of ROS reversed the T-cell suppressive function of HCV-induced MDSCs. Lastly, PBMCs of chronic HCV patients mirror CD33(+) cells following treatment with HCV core where CD33(+) cells are CD14(+) CD11b(+) HLADR(-/low) , and up-regulate the expression of p47(phox). These results suggest that HCV promotes the accumulation of CD33(+) MDSC, resulting in ROS-mediated suppression of T-cell responsiveness. Thus, the accumulation of MDSCs during HCV infection may facilitate and maintain HCV persistent infection. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J

    2017-01-30

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization.

  11. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization. PMID:28134251

  12. Erythropoietin-producing cells in the liver of ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN) mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Yamada, Misuzu; Akashi, Naotsugu; Goto, Yasufumi; Anan, Sayuri; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Ogura, Atsuo; Manabe, Noboru

    2006-01-01

    The ICR-derived glomerulonephritis (ICGN) mouse is an appropriate model for anemia associated with chronic renal disorder (CRD). Insufficient renal production of erythropoietin (EPO) induces the anemia associated with CRD. EPO mRNA is expressed in both kidneys and liver of progressing-stage ICGN mice. Hypoxic stimulation induced the EPO mRNA expression in the liver as well as in the kidneys of ICGN mice. The localization of EPO-producing cells in the liver remains controversial. Present study using an amplified in situ hybridization technique identified that nonparenchymal cells were the source of hepatic EPO production in ICGN mice under both normoxia and hypoxia.

  13. Rat-derived amniotic epithelial cells differentiate into mature hepatocytes in vivo with no evidence of cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Michela; Serra, Maria Paola; Contini, Antonella; Sini, Marcella; Strom, Stephen C; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio

    2015-06-15

    Amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from human placenta represent a useful and noncontroversial source for liver-based regenerative medicine. Previous studies suggested that human- and rat-derived AEC differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation. In the retrorsine (RS) model of liver repopulation, clusters of donor-derived cells engrafted in the recipient liver and, importantly, showed characteristics of mature hepatocytes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible involvement of cell fusion in the emergence of hepatocyte clusters displaying a donor-specific phenotype. To this end, 4-week-old GFP(+)/DPP-IV(-) rats were treated with RS and then transplanted with undifferentiated AEC isolated from the placenta of DPP-IV(+) pregnant rats at 16-19 days of gestational age. Results indicated that clusters of donor-derived cells were dipeptidyl peptidase type IV (DPP-IV) positive, but did not express the green fluorescent protein (GFP), suggesting that rat amniotic epithelial cells (rAEC) did not fuse within the host parenchyma, as no colocalization of the two tags was observed. Moreover, rAEC-derived clusters expressed markers of mature hepatocytes (eg, albumin, cytochrome P450), but were negative for the expression of biliary/progenitor markers (eg, epithelial cell adhesion molecule [EpCAM]) and did not express the marker of preneoplastic hepatic nodules glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P). These results extend our previous findings on the potential of AEC to differentiate into mature hepatocytes and suggest that this process can occur in the absence of cell fusion with host-derived cells. These studies support the hypothesis that amnion-derived epithelial cells can be an effective cell source for the correction of liver disease.

  14. Hepatic Stellate Cells and microRNAs in Pathogenesis of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mio; Bloomston, P. Mark

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by either blocking translation or inducing degradation of target mRNA. miRNAs play essential roles in diverse biological and pathological processes, including development of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a central role in development of hepatic fibrosis and there are intricate regulatory effects of miRNAs on their activation, proliferation, collagen production, migration, and apoptosis. There are multiple differentially expressed miRNAs in activated HSCs, and in this review we aim to summarize current data on miRNAs that participate in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Based on this review, miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for diagnosis of liver disease, as well as markers of disease progression. Most importantly, dysregulated miRNAs may potentially be targeted by novel therapies to treat and reverse progression of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26999230

  15. An HNF1α-regulated feedback circuit modulates hepatic fibrogenesis via the crosstalk between hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hui; Deng, Xing; Huang, Zhao-Wei; Wei, Ji; Ding, Chen-Hong; Feng, Ren-Xin; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Yue-Xiang; Ding, Jin; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Zhen-Lin; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang; Zhang, Jun-Ping; Xie, Wei-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes are critical for the maintenance of liver homeostasis, but its involvement in hepatic fibrogenesis remains elusive. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF1α) is a liver-enriched transcription factor that plays a key role in hepatocyte function. Our previous study revealed a significant inhibitory effect of HNF1α on hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we report that the expression of HNF1α is significantly repressed in both human and rat fibrotic liver. Knockdown of HNF1α in the liver significantly aggravates hepatic fibrogenesis in either dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) or bile duct ligation (BDL) model in rats. In contrast, forced expression of HNF1α markedly alleviates hepatic fibrosis. HNF1α regulates the transcriptional expression of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) via directly binding to SHP-1 promoter in hepatocytes. Inhibition of SHP-1 expression abrogates the anti-fibrotic effect of HNF1α in DMN-treated rats. Moreover, HNF1α repression in primary hepatocytes leads to the activation of NF-κB and JAK/STAT pathways and initiates an inflammatory feedback circuit consisting of HNF1α, SHP-1, STAT3, p65, miR-21 and miR-146a, which sustains the deregulation of HNF1α in hepatocytes. More interestingly, a coordinated crosstalk between hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) participates in this positive feedback circuit and facilitates the progression of hepatocellular damage. Our findings demonstrate that impaired hepatocytes play an active role in hepatic fibrogenesis. Early intervention of HNF1α-regulated inflammatory feedback loop in hepatocytes may have beneficial effects in the treatment of chronic liver diseases. PMID:26169608

  16. Inhibition of hepatic cells pyroptosis attenuates CLP-induced acute liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan-Li; Xu, Guo; Liang, Xiao; Wei, Juan; Luo, Jing; Chen, Guan-Nan; Yan, Xiao-Di; Wen, Xue-Ping; Zhong, Ming; Lv, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Pyroptosis is a programmed cell death associated with caspase-1 and accompanied by the secretion of a large number of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the acute stage of sepsis, the release of several pro-inflammatory cytokines aggravates hepatic cell death, and acute liver injury is aggravated with the progress of the disease, resulting in acute liver failure with a very high mortality rate. The present study investigated the effect of inhibiting hepatic cell pyroptosis on the septic acute liver injury. Septic acute liver injury mice model was established by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model). The liver tissues were assessed for inflammatory infiltration by HE, serum concentrations of ALT, AST, IL-1β, and IL-18 were examined by ELISA, hepatic cell pyroptosis was determined by flow cytometry, and expressions of caspase-1 and NLRP3 were assessed by Western blot. CLP-induced acute liver injury was distinct at 24 h post-operation, with the highest hepatic cell pyroptosis rate. The pyroptosis rate and liver injury indexes were positively correlated. Western blot showed that the expressions of pyroptosis-related proteins, caspase-1, and NLRP3, were increased. Normal mouse hepatic cells were cultured in vitro and LPS+ATP introduced to establish the cell model of septic acute liver injury. The expressions of caspase-1, NLRP3, IL-1β, and IL-18 in LPS+ATP group were significantly higher than the control group by Western blot and ELISA. The inhibitors of NLRP3 (Glyburide) and caspase-1 (AC-YVAD-CMK) alone or in combination were used to pre-treat the hepatic cells, which revealed that the pyroptosis rate was decreased and the cell damage alleviated. The in vivo assay in rats showed that post inhibitor treatment, the 10-days survival was significantly improved and the liver damage reduced. Therefore, inhibiting the hepatic cell pyroptosis could alleviate CLP-induced acute liver injury, providing a novel treatment target for septic acute liver injury. PMID:28078039

  17. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-10-13

    To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM(+) cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM(+) cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM(+) cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes.

  18. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y.; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Summary To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM+ cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM+ cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM+ cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. PMID:26365514

  19. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    YIN, LIBO; ZHU, YUHUA; YANG, JIANGANG; NI, YIJIANG; ZHOU, ZHAO; CHEN, YU; WEN, LIXING

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a potential alternative to liver transplantation. The goal of the present study was to examine the in vivo and in vitro hepatic differentiation potential of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) and to explore its therapeutic use. AT-MSCs were isolated and cultured with hepatic differentiation medium. Bioactivity assays were used to study the properties of AT-MSCs. The morphology of differentiated AT-MSCs in serum-free hepatic differentiation medium changed into polygonal epithelial cells, while the morphology of AT-MSCs in a similar medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum remained unchanged. The differentiated cells cultured without serum showed hepatocyte-like cell morphology and hepatocyte-specific markers, including albumin (ALB) and α-fetoprotein. The bioactivity assays revealed that hepatocyte-like cells could take up low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and store glycogen. Furthermore, trichostatin A (TSA) enhanced ALB production and LDL uptake by the hepatocyte-like cells, analogous to the functions of human liver cells. ALB was detected in the livers of the CCl4-injured mice one month post-transplantation. This suggested that transplantation of the human AT-MSCs could relieve the impairment of acute CCl4-injured livers in nude mice. This therefore implied that adipose tissue was a source of multipotent stem cells which had the potential to differentiate into mature, transplantable hepatocyte-like cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the present study determined that TSA was essential to promoting differentiation of human MSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells. The relief of liver injury following treatment with AT-MSCs suggested their potential as a novel therapeutic method for liver disorders or injury. PMID:25395242

  20. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greten, Tim F.; Manns, Michael P.; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described as a heterogeneous cell population with potent immune suppressor function in mice. Limited data are available on MDSC in human diseases. Interpretation of these data is complicated by the fact that different markers have been used to analyze human MDSC subtypes in various clinical settings. Human MDSC are CD11b+, CD33+, HLA-DRneg/low and can be divided into granulocytic CD14− and monocytic CD14+ subtypes. Interleukin 4Rα, VEGFR, CD15 and CD66b have been suggested to be more specific markers for human MDSC, however these markers can only be found on some MDSC subsets. Until today the best marker for human MDSC remains their suppressor function, which can be either direct or indirect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Immune suppressor activity has been associated with high arginase 1 and iNOS activity as well as ROS production by MDSC. Not only in murine models, but even more importantly in patients with cancer, different drugs have been shown to either reverse the immune suppressor function of MDSC or directly target these cells. Systemic treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid has been shown to mature human MDSC and reverse their immune suppressor function. Alternatively, MDSC can be targeted by treatment with the multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. In this review will provide a comprehensive summary of the recent literature on human MDSC. PMID:21237299

  1. Mutations That Alter Use of Hepatitis C Virus Cell Entry Factors Mediate Escape From Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    FAUVELLE, CATHERINE; ZAHID, MUHAMMAD NAUMAN; TUREK, MARINE; HEYDMANN, LAURA; CURY, KARINE; HAYER, JULIETTE; COMBET, CHRISTOPHE; COSSET, FRANÇOIS–LOÏC; PIETSCHMANN, THOMAS; HIET, MARIE–SOPHIE; BARTENSCHLAGER, RALF; HABERSETZER, FRANÇOIS; DOFFOËL, MICHEL; KECK, ZHEN–YONG; FOUNG, STEVEN K. H.; ZEISEL, MIRJAM B.; STOLL–KELLER, FRANÇOISE; BAUMERT, THOMAS F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is limited by rapid viral evasion. HCV entry is the first step of infection; this process involves several viral and host factors and is targeted by host-neutralizing responses. Although the roles of host factors in HCV entry have been well characterized, their involvement in evasion of immune responses is poorly understood. We used acute infection of liver graft as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of viral evasion. METHODS We studied factors that contribute to evasion of host immune responses using patient-derived antibodies, HCV pseudoparticles, and cell culture–derived HCV that express viral envelopes from patients who have undergone liver transplantation. These viruses were used to infect hepatoma cell lines that express different levels of HCV entry factors. RESULTS By using reverse genetic analyses, we identified altered use of host-cell entry factors as a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses. Mutations that alter use of the CD81 receptor also allowed the virus to escape neutralizing antibodies. Kinetic studies showed that these mutations affect virus–antibody interactions during postbinding steps of the HCV entry process. Functional studies with a large panel of patient-derived antibodies showed that this mechanism mediates viral escape, leading to persistent infection in general. CONCLUSIONS We identified a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses, in which use of cell entry factors evolves with escape from neutralizing antibodies. These findings advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection and might be used to develop antiviral strategies and vaccines. PMID:22503792

  2. Mutations that alter use of hepatitis C virus cell entry factors mediate escape from neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fofana, Isabel; Fafi-Kremer, Samira; Carolla, Patric; Fauvelle, Catherine; Zahid, Muhammad Nauman; Turek, Marine; Heydmann, Laura; Cury, Karine; Hayer, Juliette; Combet, Christophe; Cosset, François-Loïc; Pietschmann, Thomas; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Keck, Zhen-Yong; Foung, Steven K H; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Baumert, Thomas F

    2012-07-01

    The development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is limited by rapid viral evasion. HCV entry is the first step of infection; this process involves several viral and host factors and is targeted by host-neutralizing responses. Although the roles of host factors in HCV entry have been well characterized, their involvement in evasion of immune responses is poorly understood. We used acute infection of liver graft as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of viral evasion. We studied factors that contribute to evasion of host immune responses using patient-derived antibodies, HCV pseudoparticles, and cell culture-derived HCV that express viral envelopes from patients who have undergone liver transplantation. These viruses were used to infect hepatoma cell lines that express different levels of HCV entry factors. By using reverse genetic analyses, we identified altered use of host-cell entry factors as a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses. Mutations that alter use of the CD81 receptor also allowed the virus to escape neutralizing antibodies. Kinetic studies showed that these mutations affect virus-antibody interactions during postbinding steps of the HCV entry process. Functional studies with a large panel of patient-derived antibodies showed that this mechanism mediates viral escape, leading to persistent infection in general. We identified a mechanism by which HCV evades host immune responses, in which use of cell entry factors evolves with escape from neutralizing antibodies. These findings advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCV infection and might be used to develop antiviral strategies and vaccines. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatitis E virus derived from different sources exhibits different behaviour in virus inactivation and/or removal studies with plasma derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Mikihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kadue; Urayama, Takeru; Hattori, Shinji; Ideno, Shoji; Furuki, Rie; Sakai, Kaoru; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes viral hepatitis, and is considered a risk factor for blood products. Although some HEV inactivation/removal studies have been reported, detailed investigations of different manufacturing steps as heat treatment, partitioning during cold ethanol fractionation, low pH treatment, and virus filtration have yet to be reported for plasma-derived medicinal products. In this study, human serum- and swine faeces-derived HEVs, with and without detergent treatment, were used. The kinetic patterns of inactivation, log reduction value, or partitioning during the process were evaluated. In addition, the mouse encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and canine and porcine parvoviruses (CPV/PPV) were also evaluated as model viruses for HEV. Small pore size (19 or 15 nm) virus filtration demonstrated effective removal of HEV. Middle pore size (35 nm) virus filtration and 60 °C liquid heating demonstrated moderate inactivation/removal. Ethanol fractionation steps demonstrated limited removal of HEV. Unpurified HEV exhibited different properties than the detergent-treated HEV, and both forms displayed differences when compared with EMCV, CPV, and PPV. Limited or no inactivation of HEV was observed during low pH treatment. Untreated plasma-derived HEV from humans showed different properties compared to that of HEV treated with detergent or derived from swine faeces. Therefore, HEV spike preparation requires more attention.

  4. Resistance to cyclosporin A derives from mutations in hepatitis C virus nonstructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Arai, Masaaki; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Takagi, Asako; Tobita, Yoshimi; Inoue, Kazuaki; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-05-23

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug that targets cyclophilins, cellular cofactors that regulate the immune system. Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is suppressed by CsA, but the molecular basis of this suppression is still not fully understood. To investigate this suppression, we cultured HCV replicon cells (Con1, HCV genotype 1b, FLR-N cell) in the presence of CsA and obtained nine CsA-resistant FLR-N cell lines. We determined full-length HCV sequences for all nine clones, and chose two (clones #6 and #7) of the nine clones that have high replication activity in the presence of CsA for further analysis. Both clones showed two consensus mutations, one in NS3 (T1280V) and the other in NS5A (D2292E). Characterization of various mutants indicated that the D2292E mutation conferred resistance to high concentrations of CsA (up to 2 μM). In addition, the missense mutation T1280V contributed to the recovery of colony formation activity. The effects of these mutations are also evident in two established HCV replicon cell lines-HCV-RMT ([1], genotype 1a) and JFH1 (genotype 2a). Moreover, three other missense mutations in NS5A-D2303H, S2362G, and E2414K-enhanced the resistance to CsA conferred by D2292E; these double or all quadruple mutants could resist approximately 8- to 25-fold higher concentrations of CsA than could wild-type Con1. These four mutations, either as single or combinations, also made Con1 strain resistant to two other cyclophilin inhibitors, N-methyl-4-isoleucine-cyclosporin (NIM811) or Debio-025. Interestingly, the changes in IC50 values that resulted from each of these mutations were the lowest in the Debio-025-treated cells, indicating its highest resistant activity against the adaptive mutation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26691857

  6. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Affò, Silvia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  7. Systemic T Cells Immunosuppression of Glioma Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Is Mediated by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Domenis, Rossana; Cesselli, Daniela; Toffoletto, Barbara; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Caponnetto, Federica; Manini, Ivana; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Di Loreto, Carla

    2017-01-01

    A major contributing factor to glioma development and progression is its ability to evade the immune system. Nano-meter sized vesicles, exosomes, secreted by glioma-stem cells (GSC) can act as mediators of intercellular communication to promote tumor immune escape. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of GCS-derived exosomes on different peripheral immune cell populations. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2, were treated with GSC-derived exosomes. Phenotypic characterization, cell proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion and intracellular cytokine production were analysed by distinguishing among effector T cells, regulatory T cells and monocytes. In unfractionated PBMCs, GSC-derived exosomes inhibited T cell activation (CD25 and CD69 expression), proliferation and Th1 cytokine production, and did not affect cell viability or regulatory T-cell suppression ability. Furthermore, exosomes were able to enhance proliferation of purified CD4+ T cells. In PBMCs culture, glioma-derived exosomes directly promoted IL-10 and arginase-1 production and downregulation of HLA-DR by unstimulated CD14+ monocytic cells, that displayed an immunophenotype resembling that of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs). Importantly, the removal of CD14+ monocytic cell fraction from PBMCs restored T-cell proliferation. The same results were observed with exosomes purified from plasma of glioblastoma patients. Our results indicate that glioma-derived exosomes suppress T-cell immune response by acting on monocyte maturation rather than on direct interaction with T cells. Selective targeting of Mo-MDSC to treat glioma should be considered with regard to how immune cells allow the acquirement of effector functions and therefore counteracting tumor progression. PMID:28107450

  8. Systemic T Cells Immunosuppression of Glioma Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes Is Mediated by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Domenis, Rossana; Cesselli, Daniela; Toffoletto, Barbara; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Caponnetto, Federica; Manini, Ivana; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Di Loreto, Carla; Gri, Giorgia

    2017-01-01

    A major contributing factor to glioma development and progression is its ability to evade the immune system. Nano-meter sized vesicles, exosomes, secreted by glioma-stem cells (GSC) can act as mediators of intercellular communication to promote tumor immune escape. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory properties of GCS-derived exosomes on different peripheral immune cell populations. Healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2, were treated with GSC-derived exosomes. Phenotypic characterization, cell proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion and intracellular cytokine production were analysed by distinguishing among effector T cells, regulatory T cells and monocytes. In unfractionated PBMCs, GSC-derived exosomes inhibited T cell activation (CD25 and CD69 expression), proliferation and Th1 cytokine production, and did not affect cell viability or regulatory T-cell suppression ability. Furthermore, exosomes were able to enhance proliferation of purified CD4+ T cells. In PBMCs culture, glioma-derived exosomes directly promoted IL-10 and arginase-1 production and downregulation of HLA-DR by unstimulated CD14+ monocytic cells, that displayed an immunophenotype resembling that of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (Mo-MDSCs). Importantly, the removal of CD14+ monocytic cell fraction from PBMCs restored T-cell proliferation. The same results were observed with exosomes purified from plasma of glioblastoma patients. Our results indicate that glioma-derived exosomes suppress T-cell immune response by acting on monocyte maturation rather than on direct interaction with T cells. Selective targeting of Mo-MDSC to treat glioma should be considered with regard to how immune cells allow the acquirement of effector functions and therefore counteracting tumor progression.

  9. Chronic hepatitis C and persistent occult hepatitis C virus infection are characterized by distinct immune cell cytokine expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Pham, T N Q; Mercer, S E; Michalak, T I

    2009-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates in immune cells in both chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and occult HCV infection, but the extent of virus replication in this compartment in these opposing infection forms varies greatly. It was unknown whether this could be linked to HCV genotype or to differences in host gene expression shaping the immune response, and whether HCV replication in immune cells is sensitive to endogenous antiviral cytokines. In this study, we uncovered that significantly greater HCV load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not in plasma, coincided with HCV genotypes 2 and 3 in CHC, but with genotype 1 in residual occult infection after clinical resolution of hepatitis C. Moreover, PBMC from individuals with occult infection transcribed significantly greater levels of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, but less interleukin (IL)-10 than those from CHC. In CHC, PBMC with low HCV load expressed significantly more IFN-gamma but less IL-12 than did cells with high virus content. In occult infection, HCV RNA detection in PBMC was associated with much lower IFN-alpha and IL-12 expression. Further, HCV replication in T lymphocytes could be completely eliminated by activation of endogenous IFN-gamma in CHC, but of IFN-alpha in occult infection. In conclusion, CHC and persistent occult HCV infection are characterized by clearly different profiles of antiviral cytokine response in circulating immune cells which are also different from those of healthy individuals. Higher expression of IL-10, combined with lower transcription of IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, is associated with a more robust HCV replication in immune cells.

  10. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as a target in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liepelt, Anke; Tacke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) or CXCL12 is constitutively expressed in healthy liver. However, its expression increases following acute or chronic liver injury. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and malignant hepatocytes are important sources of SDF-1/CXCL12 in liver diseases. CXCL12 is able to activate two chemokine receptors with different downstream signaling pathways, CXCR4 and CXCR7. CXCR7 expression is relevant on LSEC, while HSC, mesenchymal stem cells, and tumor cells mainly respond via CXCR4. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of liver diseases involving this chemokine and its receptors. SDF-1-dependent signaling contributes to modulating acute liver injury and subsequent tissue regeneration. By activating HSC and recruiting mesenchymal cells from bone marrow, CXCL12 can promote liver fibrosis progression, while CXCL12-CXCR7 interactions endorse proregenerative responses in chronic injury. Moreover, the SDF-1 pathway is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and HCC metastasis. High hepatic CXCR4 expression has been suggested as a biomarker indicating poor prognosis of HCC patients. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) also express CXCR4 and migrate toward CXCL12. Thus CXCL12 inhibition might not only directly block HCC growth but also modulate the tumor microenvironment (angiogenesis, MDSC), thereby sensitizing HCC patients to conventional or emerging novel cancer therapies (e.g., sorafenib, regorafenib, nivolumab, pembrolizumab). We herein summarize the current knowledge on the complex interplay between CXCL12 and CXCR4/CXCR7 in liver diseases and discuss approaches on the therapeutic targeting of these axes in hepatitis, fibrosis, and liver cancer. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Disruption of TIM-4 in dendritic cell ameliorates hepatic warm IR injury through the induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Huanqiu

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic ischaemia reperfusion (IR) injury results from the infiltration of multiple immune cells especially dendritic cells (DC). T-cell immunoglobulin-domain and mucin-domain 4 (TIM-4) is a type I cell-surface glycoprotein which is extensively expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) like DC and macrophages. TIM-4 has been demonstrated to be implicated in mucosal allergy, skin allograft rejection and tumour-immune tolerance. However, the role of TIM-4 expressed on DC in hepatic IR injury remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether and how DC expressed TIM-4 was involved in hepatic IR injury. With segmental hepatic warm ischaemia mice models, we demonstrated that promoted DC infiltration and increased TIM-4 expression were induced by hepatic IR. Blockade of TIM-4 by anti-TIM-4 mAb (0.35mg/mouse) markedly ameliorated hepatic injury and reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion. Furthermore, in a DC:CD4+ T cell co-culture system, blockade of TIM-4 on DC significantly inhibited T helper-2 cell differentiation and facilitated induced CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cell (iTreg) expansion. Interleukin-4 (IL-4)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (Stat 6) signalling was shown to be impeded by TIM-4 blockade and involved in iTreg generation. Additionally, adoptive transfer of iTreg produced by TIM-4 blockade into hepatic IR mice models remarkably attenuated liver injury. We conclude that TIM-4 on DC play a critical role in hepatic IR injury and may be an efficient target for the prevention of liver or other organ IR injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  13. Sarcoma derived from cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tolar, Jakub; Nauta, Alma J; Osborn, Mark J; Panoskaltsis Mortari, Angela; McElmurry, Ron T; Bell, Scott; Xia, Lily; Zhou, Ning; Riddle, Megan; Schroeder, Tania M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; McIvor, R Scott; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Szuhai, Karoly; Oseth, Leann; Hirsch, Betsy; Yant, Stephen R; Kay, Mark A; Peister, Alexandra; Prockop, Darwin J; Fibbe, Willem E; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-02-01

    To study the biodistribution of MSCs, we labeled adult murine C57BL/6 MSCs with firefly luciferase and DsRed2 fluorescent protein using nonviral Sleeping Beauty transposons and coinfused labeled MSCs with bone marrow into irradiated allogeneic recipients. Using in vivo whole-body imaging, luciferase signals were shown to be increased between weeks 3 and 12. Unexpectedly, some mice with the highest luciferase signals died and all surviving mice developed foci of sarcoma in their lungs. Two mice also developed sarcomas in their extremities. Common cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in tumor cells isolated from different animals. Original MSC cultures not labeled with transposons, as well as independently isolated cultured MSCs, were found to be cytogenetically abnormal. Moreover, primary MSCs derived from the bone marrow of both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showed cytogenetic aberrations after several passages in vitro, showing that transformation was not a strain-specific nor rare event. Clonal evolution was observed in vivo, suggesting that the critical transformation event(s) occurred before infusion. Mapping of the transposition insertion sites did not identify an obvious transposon-related genetic abnormality, and p53 was not overexpressed. Infusion of MSC-derived sarcoma cells resulted in malignant lesions in secondary recipients. This new sarcoma cell line, S1, is unique in having a cytogenetic profile similar to human sarcoma and contains bioluminescent and fluorescent genes, making it useful for investigations of cellular biodistribution and tumor response to therapy in vivo. More importantly, our study indicates that sarcoma can evolve from MSC cultures.

  14. Hepatic progenitor cell resistance to TGF-{beta}1's proliferative and apoptotic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. Brian; Rice, Lisa; Sadiq, Tim; Brittain, Evan; Song, Lujun; Wang Jian; Gerber, David A. . E-mail: David_Gerber@med.unc.edu

    2005-04-01

    The success of hepatocellular therapies using stem or progenitor cell populations is dependent upon multiple factors including the donor cell, microenvironment, and etiology of the liver injury. The following experiments investigated the impact of TGF-{beta}1 on a previously described population of hepatic progenitor cells (HPC). The majority of the hepatic progenitor cells were resistant to endogenously produced TGF-{beta}1's proapoptotic and anti-proliferative effects unlike more well-differentiated cellular populations (e.g., mature hepatocytes). Surprisingly, in vitro TGF-{beta}1 supplementation significantly inhibited de novo hepatic progenitor cell colony formation possibly via an indirect mechanism(s). Therefore despite the HPC's direct resistance to supplemental TGF-{beta}1, this cytokine's inhibitory effect on colony formation could have a potential negative impact on the use of these cells as a therapy for patients with liver disease.

  15. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells.

  16. Acute hepatitis induced by Shou-Wu-Pian, a herbal product derived from Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Park, G J; Mann, S P; Ngu, M C

    2001-01-01

    Herbal preparations are widely available and generally regarded by the public as harmless remedies for a variety of medical ailments. We report the first case in Australia of acute hepatitis associated with the Chinese herbal medicine Shou-Wu-Pian, prepared from Polygonum multiflorum. Cholestatic hepatitis developed in a Chinese woman taking this preparation for the greying of her hair, and liver biopsy was consistent with a toxic reaction. Clinical and biochemical resolution occurred following cessation of the drug.

  17. Bone marrow-derived monocyte infusion improves hepatic fibrosis by decreasing osteopontin, TGF-β1, IL-13 and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Veruska Cintia Alexandrino; Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Teixeira, Valéria Wanderley; Carvalho, Helotonio; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; D’assunção, Carolline Guimarães; de Barros, Andréia Ferreira; Carvalho, Camila Lima; de Lorena, Virgínia Maria Barros; Costa, Vláudia Maria Assis; Teixeira, Álvaro Aguiar Coelho; Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz; de Oliveira, Sheilla Andrade

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the therapeutic effects of bone marrow-derived CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in a murine model of chronic liver damage. METHODS Chronic liver damage was induced in C57BL/6 mice by administration of carbon tetrachloride and ethanol for 6 mo. Bone marrow-derived monocytes isolated by immunomagnetic separation were used for therapy. The cell transplantation effects were evaluated by morphometry, biochemical assessment, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS CD11b+CD14+ monocyte therapy significantly reduced liver fibrosis and increased hepatic glutathione levels. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β, in addition to pro-fibrotic factors, such as IL-13, transforming growth factor-β1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 also decreased, while IL-10 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased in the monocyte-treated group. CD11b+CD14+ monocyte transplantation caused significant changes in the hepatic expression of α-smooth muscle actin and osteopontin. CONCLUSION Monocyte therapy is capable of bringing about improvement of liver fibrosis by reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as increasing anti-fibrogenic factors. PMID:28811709

  18. 2',4',6'-Tris(methoxymethoxy) chalcone induces apoptosis by enhancing Fas-ligand in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hee; Zhao, Yu-Zhe; Park, Eun-Jeon; Che, Xian-Hua; Seo, Geom Seog; Sohn, Dong Hwan

    2011-05-01

    Suppression of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and proliferation, and induction of apoptosis in activated HSCs have been proposed as therapeutic strategies for the treatment and prevention of the hepatic fibrosis. We previously showed that 2',4',6'-tris(methoxymethoxy) chalcone (TMMC), a synthesized chalcone derivative, inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-induced HSC proliferation at 5-20 μM. Here, we showed that TMMC induces apoptosis in activated HSCs at higher concentrations (30-50 μM), but is not cytotoxic to primary hepatocytes. Moreover, TMMC induces hyperacetylation of histone by inhibiting histone deacetylase (HDAC) in activated HSCs. Interestingly, TMMC treatment remarkably increased Fas-ligand (FasL) mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Cycloheximide treatment reversed the induction of TMMC on apoptosis, indicating that de novo protein synthesis was required for TMMC-induced apoptosis in activated HSCs. In addition, FasL synthesis by TMMC is closely associated with maximal procaspase-3 proteolytic processing. In vivo, TMMC reduced activated HSCs in CCl(4)-intoxicated rats during liver injury recovery, as demonstrated by α-smooth muscle actin expression in rat liver. TMMC treatment also resulted in apoptosis, as demonstrated by cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in rat liver. In conclusion, TMMC may have therapeutic potential by inducing HSC apoptosis for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Proinflammatory and prothrombotic effects on human vascular endothelial cells of Immune-cell-derived LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective LIGHT (TNFSF 14) belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and is expressed by activated T cells as well as various types of antigen presenting cells. LIGHT binds to its cellular receptors TR2 and LTßR and has a co-stimulatory role in T cell activation. Here, we compared the relative expression of LIGHT in different immune cells and the biological activity of immune cell-derived LIGHT on endothelial cells. Methods and Results Surface expression of LIGHT and mRNA production by PBMC and isolated T cells (CD4+ or CD8+) significantly increased after stimulation with PMA (Phorbolester-12-Myristat-13-Acetat) + ionomycin. No LIGHT expression on PMA stimulated monocytes or monocytic-like THP-1 cells could be detected; differentiation of monocytes and THP-1 cells into macrophages, however, resulted in up-regulation of LIGHT. Supernatants of stimulated T cells contained higher concentrations of soluble LIGHT than macrophage supernatants normalized to cell numbers; release of soluble LIGHT was found to be dependent on metalloproteinase activity. Size determination of released soluble LIGHT by size exclusion chromatography revealed a molecular mass of ~60 kDa, suggesting a trimeric form. Released soluble LIGHT induced expression of proinflammatory antigens ICAM-1, tissue factor and IL-8 in human endothelial cells and caused apoptosis of IFN-γ pretreated endothelial cells. Soluble LIGHT was detected at low levels in sera of healthy controls and was significantly enhanced in sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C and rheumatoid arthritis (24.93 ± 9.41 vs.129.53 ± 49.14 and 172.13 ± 77.64; p < 0.0005). Conclusion These findings suggest that among immune cells activated T lymphocytes are the main source of soluble LIGHT with released amounts of soluble LIGHT markedly higher compared to platelets. Immune cell-derived membrane-bound and soluble trimeric LIGHT is biologically active, inducing proinflammatory changes in endothelial cells. Enhanced plasma

  20. iPS cell derived neuronal cells for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Heilker, Ralf; Traub, Stefanie; Reinhardt, Peter; Schöler, Hans R; Sterneckert, Jared

    2014-10-01

    Owing to the inherent disconnect between drug pharmacology in heterologous cellular models and drug efficacy in vivo, the quest for more predictive in vitro systems is one of the most urgent challenges of modern drug discovery. An improved pharmacological in vitro profiling would employ primary samples of the proper drug-targeted human tissue or the bona fide human disease-relevant cells. With the advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology the facilitated access to a variety of disease-relevant target cells is now held out in prospect. In this review, we focus on the use of human iPS cell derived neurons for high throughput pharmaceutical drug screening, employing detection technologies that are sufficiently sensitive to measure signaling in cells with physiological target protein expression levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  2. Ly6Chi monocytes regulate T cell responses in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangao; Chen, Huiyao; Huang, Xiaopei; Jiang, Songfu

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis remains a global health challenge despite recent progress in the development of more effective therapies. Although virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses are essential for viral clearance, it remains largely unknown what regulates T cell–mediated viral clearance. Thus, a better understanding of the regulation of anti-viral T cell immunity would be critical for the design of more effective therapies for viral hepatitis. Using a model of adenovirus-induced hepatitis, here we showed that adenoviral infection induced recruitment of Ly6Chi monocytes to the liver in a CCR2-dependent manner. These recruited Ly6Chi monocytes suppressed CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses to adenoviral infection, leading to a delay in viral clearance. In vivo depletion of Ly6Chi monocytes markedly enhanced anti-viral T cell responses and promoted viral clearance. Mechanistically, we showed that induction of iNOS and the production of NO by Ly6Chi monocytes are critical for the suppression of T cell responses. In addition, a contact-dependent mechanism mediated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interaction is also required for T cell suppression by Ly6Chi monocytes. These findings suggest a critical role for Ly6Chi monocytes in the regulation of T cell immunity in viral hepatitis and may provide new insights into development of more effective therapies for treating viral hepatitis based on targeting the immunosuppressing monocytes. PMID:27777980

  3. Interleukin 17-Producing γδT Cells Promote Hepatic Regeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Graffeo, Christopher S.; Gulati, Rishabh; Jamal, Mohsin; Narayan, Suchithra; Zambirinis, Constantinos; Barilla, Rocky; Deutsch, Michael; Greco, Stephanie; Ochi, Atsuo; Tomkötter, Lena; Blobstein, Reuven; Avanzi, Antonina; Tippens, Daniel M.; Gelbstein, Yisroel; Heerden, Eliza Van; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Subsets of leukocytes synergize with regenerative growth factors to promote hepatic regeneration. γδT cells are early responders to inflammation-induced injury in a number of contexts. We investigated the role of γδT cells in hepatic regeneration using mice with disruptions in Tcrd (encodes the T cell receptor δ chain) and Clec7a (encodes C-type lectin domain family 7 member a, also known as DECTIN1). Methods We performed partial hepatectomies on wild-type C57BL/6, CD45.1, Tcrd−/−, or Clec7a−/− mice. Cells were isolated from livers of patients and mice via mechanical and enzymatic digestion. γδT cells were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Results In mice, partial hepatectomy upregulated expression of CCL20 and ligands of Dectin-1, associated with recruitment and activation of γδT cells and their increased production of interleukin (IL)17 family cytokines. Recruited γδT cells induced production of IL6 by antigen-presenting cells and suppressed expression of interferon γ by natural killer T cells, promoting hepatocyte proliferation. Absence of IL17-producing γδT cells or deletion of Dectin-1 prevented development of regenerative phenotypes in subsets of innate immune cells. This slowed liver regeneration and was associated with reduced expression of regenerative growth factors and cell cycle regulators. Conversely, exogenous administration of IL17 family cytokines or Dectin-1 ligands promoted regeneration. More broadly, we found that γδT cells are required for inflammatory responses mediated by IL17 and Dectin-1. Conclusions γδT cells regulate hepatic regeneration by producing IL22 and IL17, which have direct mitogenic effects on hepatocytes and promote a regenerative phenotype in hepatic leukocytes, respectively. Dectin-1 ligation is required for γδT cells to promote hepatic regeneration. PMID:24801349

  4. Relative rigidity of cell-substrate effects on hepatic and hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yangben, Yanzi; Wang, Hongbing; Zhong, Li; Chiang, Martin Y M; Tan, Qiaoyan; Singh, Gurinder K; Li, Song; Yang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gels with different stiffness and glass were employed as substrates to investigate how substrate stiffness affects the cellular stiffness of adherent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCCLM3) and hepatic (L02) cells. The interaction of how cell-substrate stiffness influences cell migration was also explored. An atom force microscope measured the stiffness of HCCLM3 and L02 cells on different substrates. Further, F-actin assembly was analyzed using immunofluorescence and Western blot. Finally, cell-surface expression of integrin β1 was quantified by flow cytometry. The results show that, while both HCCLM3 and L02 cells adjusted their cell stiffness to comply with the stiffness of the substrate they were adhered to, their tuning capabilities were different. HCCLM3 cell stiffness complied when substrate stiffness was between 1.1 and 33.7 kPa, whereas the analogous stiffness for L02 cells occurred at a higher substrate stiffness, 3.6 kPa up to glass. These ranges correlated with F-actin filament assembly and integrin β1 expression. In a migration assay, HCCLM3 cells migrated faster on a relatively soft substrate, while L02 cells migrated faster on substrates that were relatively rigid. These findings indicate that different tuning capabilities of HCCLM3 and L02 cells may influence cell migration velocity on substrates with different stiffness by regulating cy- toskeleton remodeling and integrin β1 expression.

  5. Generating hepatic cell lineages from pluripotent stem cells for drug toxicity screening

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Melissa A.; Rowe, Cliff; Alder, Jane; Harrison, Sean; Hanley, Karen Piper; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Chris E.; Hanley, Neil A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is an enormous and increasing problem for the pharmaceutical industry. Early detection of problems during the drug discovery pathway is advantageous to minimize costs and improve patient safety. However, current cellular models are sub-optimal. This review addresses the potential use of pluripotent stem cells in the generation of hepatic cell lineages. It begins by highlighting the scale of the problem faced by the pharmaceutical industry, the precise nature of drug-induced liver injury and where in the drug discovery pathway the need for additional cell models arises. Current research is discussed, mainly for generating hepatocyte-like cells rather than other liver cell-types. In addition, an effort is made to identify where some of the major barriers remain in translating what is currently hypothesis-driven laboratory research into meaningful platform technologies for the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20483202

  6. Immortalized human hepatic cell lines for in vitro testing and research purposes

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitous shortage of primary human hepatocytes has urged the scientific community to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. Over the years, several human hepatic cell lines have been produced, whether or not using a combination of viral oncogenes and human telomerase reverse transcriptase protein. Conditional approaches for hepatocyte immortalization have also been established and allow generation of growth-controlled cell lines. A variety of immortalized human hepatocytes have already proven useful as tools for liver-based in vitro testing and fundamental research purposes. The present chapter describes currently applied immortalization strategies and provides an overview of the actually available immortalized human hepatic cell lines and their in vitro applications. PMID:26272134

  7. Cell-culture derived fowl adenovirus serotype 4 inactivated vaccine provides complete protection for virus infection on SPF chickens.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongying; Zhang, Pantao; Li, Xiangdong; Tian, Hui; Cheng, Yi; Sheng, Dongbei; Han, Xueying; Shan, Yihong; Li, Xuefeng; Yuan, Yue; Zhang, Haiyang; Xue, Jingjing; Liu, Wujie; Tian, Kegong

    2017-06-01

    Inclusion body hepatitis and hepatitis-hydropericardium syndrome caused by high-pathogenic fowl adenovirus serotype 4 has recently plagued Chinese poultry industry and caused huge economic losses since 2013. So far, there is no commercial vaccine available to control this disease. In this study, we reported the development of both embryo-adapted and cell-culture derived inactivated FAdV-4 vaccines and evaluated their efficacies in chicken. Compared to embryo-adapted vaccine, cell-culture derived vaccine induced significantly earlier and higher serological response measured by AGP and ELISA. After virus challenge, chicken immunized with cell-culture derived vaccine did not showed any gross and histopathological lesions, whereas inclusion body hepatitis was observed in the liver of chicken vaccinated with embryo-adapted vaccine. No mortality was observed in both the vaccinated groups. The above results suggested that cell-culture derived FAdV-4 inactivated vaccine could be a better vaccine candidate than embryo-adapted vaccine to control FADV-4 infections in China.

  8. Physicochemical properties of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen expressed in mammalian cell (C127).

    PubMed

    Lee, Y S; Kim, B K; Choi, E C

    1998-10-01

    The physicochemical properties of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (r-HBsAg), which was expressed in C127 mammalian cell were studied. Using roller bottle culture in DMEM supplemented with fetal bovine serum, 10-15 mg/L of r-HBsAg was produced with about 31% of purification yield. The purity of r-HBsAg by HPLC was 99.8% and electron microscopic examination showed homogeneous spherical particle with 22 nm in diameter, a morphological characteristic of HBsAg. The density of r-HBsAg by CsCl density gradient method was 1.19 g/ml and the isoelectric point by Mono P HR 5/20 column was 4.6. The analysis of subunit protein pattern using SDS-PAGE followed by scanning densitometry gave 81.3% of S protein and 18.7% of pre-S protein. Fluorophore-assisted-carbohydrate-electrophoresis analysis showed the relative amount of carbohydrate to protein was 1.7% and its major component was N-acetyl glucosamine, which was about 39% of total carbohydrate. The relative amount of lipid to protein determined by vanillin phosphoric acid method was 32.5% and its major component was phospholipid, which was about 70% of total lipid. The physicochemical properties of C127 mammalian cell-derived r-HBsAg are similar to those of p-HBsAg, suggesting that the r-HBsAg can be used in developing a new preventive vaccine against hepatitis B.

  9. Irisin ameliorates hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and enhances cell survival in insulin-resistant human HepG2 cells through adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    So, Wing Yan; Leung, Po Sing

    2016-09-01

    Irisin is a newly identified myokine that promotes the browning of white adipose tissue, enhances glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and modulates hepatic metabolism. However, the signaling pathways involved in the effects on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism have not been resolved. This study aimed to examine the role of irisin in the regulation of hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and cell survival, and whether adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a master metabolic regulator in the liver, is involved in irisin's actions. Human liver-derived HepG2 cells were cultured in normal glucose-normal insulin (NGNI) or high glucose-high insulin (HGHI/insulin-resistant) condition. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism was evaluated by glucose output and glycogen content or triglyceride accumulation assays, respectively. Our results showed that irisin stimulated phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA-carboxylase (ACC) via liver kinase B1 (LKB1) rather than Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) in HepG2 cells. Irisin ameliorated hepatic insulin resistance induced by HGHI condition. Irisin reduced hepatic triglyceride content and glucose output, but increased glycogen content, with those effects reversed by dorsomorphin, an AMPK inhibitor. Furthermore, irisin also stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and promoted cell survival in an AMPK-dependent manner. In conclusion, our data indicate that irisin ameliorates dysregulation of hepatic glucose/lipid metabolism and cell death in insulin-resistant states via AMPK activation. These findings reveal a novel irisin-mediated protective mechanism in hepatic metabolism which provides a scientific basis for irisin as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Klf6/copeb is required for hepatic outgrowth in zebrafish and for hepatocyte specification in mouse ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Monson, Christopher; Gao, Chuan; Gouon-Evans, Valerie; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Sadler, Kirsten C.; Friedman, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 6 (Klf6; copeb in zebrafish) is a zinc-finger transcription factor and tumor suppressor gene. Klf6−/− mice have defects in hematopoiesis and angiogenesis and do not form a liver. However, the vascular abnormalities in Klf6−/− mice obfuscate its role in liver development since these two processes are linked in mammals. We utilized zebrafish and mouse ES cells to investigate the role of copeb in endoderm specification and hepatogenesis separate from its function in angiogenesis. During zebrafish development, copeb expression is enriched in digestive organs. Morpholino knockdown of copeb blocks expansion of the liver, pancreas and intestine, but does not affect their specification, differentiation or the vascularization of the liver. Decreased hepatocyte proliferation in copeb morphants is accompanied by upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor, cdkn1a, a Copeb transcriptional target. A cell autonomous role for Klf6 in endoderm and hepatic development was investigated by manipulating Klf6 expression in mouse ES cells driven to differentiate along the hepatic lineage. Expression of the endoderm markers Hnf3β, Gata4, Sox17, and CxCr4 is not induced in Klf6−/− cells but is upregulated in ES cells over-expressing Klf6. Collectively, these findings indicate that copeb/Klf6 is essential for the development of endoderm-derived organs. PMID:20430021