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  1. Novel matrine derivative MD-1 attenuates hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting EGFR activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Ying, Hai-Yan; Qu, Ying; Cai, Xiao-Bo; Xu, Ming-Yi; Lu, Lun-Gen

    2016-09-01

    Matrine (MT), the effective component of Sophora flavescens Ait, has been shown to have anti-inflammation, immune-suppressive, anti-tumor, and anti-hepatic fibrosis activities. However, the pharmacological effects of MT still need to be strengthened due to its relatively low efficacy and short half-life. In the present study, we report a more effective thio derivative of MT, MD-1, and its inhibitory effects on the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both cell culture and animal models. Cytological experiments showed that MD-1 can inhibit the proliferation of HSC-T6 cells with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 62 μmol/L. In addition, MD-1 more strongly inhibits the migration of HSC-T6 cells compared to MT and can more effectively induce G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis. Investigating the biological mechanisms underlying anti-hepatic fibrosis in the presence of MD-1, we found that MD-1 can bind the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the surface of HSC-T6 cells, which can further inhibit the phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream protein kinase B (Akt), resulting in decreased expression of cyclin D1 and eventual inhibition of the activation of HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, in rats with dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis, MD-1 slowed the development and progression of hepatic fibrosis, protecting hepatic parenchymal cells and improving hepatic functions. Therefore, MD-1 is a potential drug for anti-hepatic fibrosis.

  2. Extra-hepatic replication and infection of hepatitis E virus in neuronal-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Drave, S A; Debing, Y; Walter, S; Todt, D; Engelmann, M; Friesland, M; Wedemeyer, H; Neyts, J; Behrendt, P; Steinmann, E

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the causative agent of hepatitis E in humans and a member of the genus Orthohepevirus in the family Hepeviridae. Infection usually leads to acute hepatitis that can become fulminant, particularly among pregnant women and in patients with preexisting liver disease, or may evolve to a chronic state, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. HEV has been shown to produce a range of extra-hepatic manifestations including aplastic anaemia, acute thyroiditis, glomerulonephritis as well as neurological disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis. The pathogenesis of these neurological injuries remains largely unknown, and it is also uncertain whether or not HEV can directly infect neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated whether HEV is capable of completing the viral life cycle in human neuronal-derived cell lines such as neuroepithelioma (SK-N-MC), desmoplastic cerebellar medulloblastoma (DAOY), glioblastoma multiforme (DBTRG), glioblastoma astrocytoma (U-373 MG) and oligodendrocytic (M03.13) cells. Following transfection of these cells with HEV Gaussia luciferase reporter virus, all tested cell lines supported HEV RNA replication. Furthermore, extra- and intracellular viral capsid was detected by an HEV antigen ELISA as a marker for virus assembly and release. Permissiveness for HEV cell entry could be demonstrated for the oligodendrocytic cell line M03.13. In conclusion, these results indicate that HEV tropism is not restricted to the liver and HEV can potentially complete the full viral life cycle in neuronal-derived tissues explaining neurologic disorders during HEV infection. PMID:26891712

  3. Stem cells for hepatic regeneration: the role of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Hagiwara, Keitaro; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2010-06-01

    Severe hepatic dysfunctions including hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma are life-threatening conditions for which effective medical treatments are needed. With the only effective treatment to date being orthotropic liver transplantation, alternative approaches are needed because of the limited number of donors and the possibility of immune-rejection. One alternative is regenerative medicine, which holds promise for the development of a cell-based therapy enabling hepatic regeneration through transplantation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) or hepatocyte-like cells generated from AT-MSCs. When compared with embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, the use of AT-MSCs as regenerative cells would be advantageous in regard to ethical and safety issues since AT-MSCs are somatic cells and have the potential to be used without in vitro culture. These autologous cells are immuno-compatible and exhibit controlled differentiation and multi-functional abilities and do not undergo post-transplantation rejection or unwanted differentiation such as formation of teratomas. AT-MSC-based therapies may provide a novel approach for hepatic regeneration and hepatocyte differentiation and thereby support hepatic function in diseased individuals.

  4. Cryopreserved hepatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells can arrest progression of liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Arundhati; Raju, Sheena; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocytes generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are considered to be an excellent candidate for restoring the liver function deficiencies. We have earlier standardized a three-step differentiation protocol to generate functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from hESCs, which expressed the major hepatic markers. We have also found that the HLCs remain stable and functional even after extended period of in vitro culture and cryopreservation. In the present study, we have aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of cryopreserved-thawed hESC-derived hepatic progenitor cells following transplantation in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrotic rat livers. Significant therapeutic effects, including improved hepatic histology and normal serum biochemistry of hepatic enzymes along with increased survival rate, were observed in the cell transplanted rats. This result is an encouraging indication to develop methods for clinical application of hESC-derived hepatic lineage cells.

  5. Hedgehog-mediated paracrine interaction between hepatic stellate cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Nan Tang Zhaofeng; Deng Meihai; Zhong Yuesi; Lin Jizong; Yang Xuhui; Xiang Peng; Xu Ruiyun

    2008-07-18

    During liver injury, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can migrate and differentiate into hepatocytes. Hepatic stellate cell (SC) activation is a pivotal event in the development of liver fibrosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that SCs may play an important role in regulating MSC proliferation and differentiation through the paracrine signaling pathway. We demonstrate that MSCs and SCs both express hedgehog (Hh) pathway components, including its ligands, receptors, and target genes. Transwell co-cultures of SCs and MSCs showed that the SCs produced sonic hedgehog (Shh), which enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs. These findings demonstrate that SCs indirectly modulate the activity of MSCs in vitro via the Hh pathway, and provide a plausible explanation for the mechanisms of transplanted MSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  6. Ionone Derivatives from the Mycelium of Phellinus linteus and the Inhibitory Effect on Activated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiow-Chyn; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Pan, Tai-Long; Chen, Fu-An; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2016-01-01

    Three new γ-ionylideneacetic acid derivatives, phellinulins A–C (1–3), were characterized from the mycelium extract of Phellinus linteus. The chemical structures were established based on the spectroscopic analysis. In addition, phellinulin A (1) was subjected to the examination of effects on activated rat hepatic stellate cells and exhibited significant inhibition of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27164091

  7. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine.

  8. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine. PMID:27373602

  9. Cytoglobin as a Marker of Hepatic Stellate Cell-derived Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play important roles in inflammation, fibrosis and tumorigenesis in chronically inflamed liver. Liver myofibroblasts originate from hepatic stellate cells, portal fibroblasts or mesothelial cells, and they are localized in and around fibrotic septum and portal tracts. Liver myofibroblasts are the source of extracellular matrix materials, including type I collagen and multiple fibrogenic growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor. Although a detailed characterization of the function of individual myofibroblasts has not been conducted, owing to the lack of appropriate cell markers, recent lineage-tracing technology has revealed the limited contribution of myofibroblasts that are derived from portal fibroblasts to various types of liver fibrosis, as compared with the contribution of hepatic stellate cells. In addition, cytoglobin, which is the fourth globin in mammals and function as a local gas sensor, provides a new perspective on the involvement of stellate cells in fibrosis and carcinogenesis, possibly through its anti-oxidative properties and is a promising new marker that discriminates between myofibroblasts derived from stellate cells and those from portal fibroblasts. PMID:26617531

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic cell lines as a new model for host interaction with hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Shun; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Kamiya, Akihide; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Sayuri; Asano, Yu; Nagata, Hiroko; Otani, Satoshi; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Murakawa, Miyako; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Ujino, Saneyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Iwamoto, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is not eradicated by current antiviral therapies due to persistence of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in host cells, and thus development of novel culture models for productive HBV infection is urgently needed, which will allow the study of HBV cccDNA eradication. To meet this need, we developed culture models of HBV infection using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte lineages, including immature proliferating hepatic progenitor-like cell lines (iPS-HPCs) and differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-Heps). These cells were susceptible to HBV infection, produced HBV particles, and maintained innate immune responses. The infection efficiency of HBV in iPS-HPCs predominantly depended on the expression levels of sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), and was low relative to iPS-Heps: however, long-term culture of iPS-Heps was difficult. To provide a model for HBV persistence, iPS-HPCs overexpressing NTCP were established. The long-term persistence of HBV cccDNA was detected in iPS-HPCs overexpressing NTCP, and depended on the inhibition of the Janus-kinase signaling pathway. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that iPS-derived hepatic cell lines can be utilized for novel HBV culture models with genetic variation to investigate the interactions between HBV and host cells and the development of anti-HBV strategies. PMID:27386799

  11. Identification of potential biomarkers of hepatitis B-induced acute liver failure using hepatic cells derived from human skin precursors.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Sachinidis, Agapios; De Boe, Veerle; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; De Kock, Joery

    2015-09-01

    Besides their role in the elucidation of pathogenic processes of medical and pharmacological nature, biomarkers can also be used to document specific toxicological events. Hepatic cells generated from human skin-derived precursors (hSKP-HPC) were previously shown to be a promising in vitro tool for the evaluation of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study, their capacity to identify potential liver-specific biomarkers at the gene expression level was investigated with particular emphasis on acute liver failure (ALF). To this end, a set of potential ALF-specific biomarkers was established using clinically relevant liver samples obtained from patients suffering from hepatitis B-associated ALF. Subsequently, this data was compared to data obtained from primary human hepatocyte cultures and hSKP-HPC, both exposed to the ALF-inducing reference compound acetaminophen. It was found that both in vitro systems revealed a set of molecules that was previously identified in the ALF liver samples. Yet, only a limited number of molecules was common between both in vitro systems and the ALF liver samples. Each of the in vitro systems could be used independently to identify potential toxicity biomarkers related to ALF. It seems therefore more appropriate to combine primary human hepatocyte cultures with complementary in vitro models to efficiently screen out potential hepatotoxic compounds.

  12. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells on human liver progenitor HepaRG-derived acellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kanninen, Liisa K; Porola, Pauliina; Niklander, Johanna; Malinen, Melina M; Corlu, Anne; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo L; Lou, Yan-Ru

    2016-02-15

    Human hepatocytes are extensively needed in drug discovery and development. Stem cell-derived hepatocytes are expected to be an improved and continuous model of human liver to study drug candidates. Generation of endoderm-derived hepatocytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, is a complex, challenging process requiring specific signals from soluble factors and insoluble matrices at each developmental stage. In this study, we used human liver progenitor HepaRG-derived acellular matrix (ACM) as a hepatic progenitor-specific matrix to induce hepatic commitment of hPSC-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells. The DE cells showed much better attachment to the HepaRG ACM than other matrices tested and then differentiated towards hepatic cells, which expressed hepatocyte-specific makers. We demonstrate that Matrigel overlay induced hepatocyte phenotype and inhibited biliary epithelial differentiation in two hPSC lines studied. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the HepaRG ACM, a hepatic progenitor-specific matrix, plays an important role in the hepatic differentiation of hPSCs.

  13. Celecoxib derivative OSU-03012 inhibits the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells by inducing cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Zuowei; Luo, Zhongguang; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Liver fibrosis may lead to portal hypertension, liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, and predominantly results from the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells. OSU‑03012, a non‑cyclooxygenase‑inhibiting celecoxib derivative, has been previously demonstrated to promote apoptosis in certain cell types, however, its function in hepatic fibrosis remains unclear. In the current study, the inhibitory effect of OSU‑03012 on the proliferation of the LX2 human hepatic stellate cell line was evaluated by cell counting kit‑8 assay. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to examine the expression of α‑smooth muscle actin and type I collagen, which are representative of LX2 cell activation. The senescence of LX2 cells was measured by senescence‑associated β‑galactosidase staining, and the cell cycle and apoptosis levels were assessed by flow cytometry. The impact of senescence‑associated signaling on protein expression was assessed by western blot analysis. OSU‑03012 was observed to inhibit cell proliferation and prevent the secretion of profibrotic factors in LX2 cells in a dose‑dependent manner. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that OSU‑03012 inhibited the proliferation and activation of LX2 via the induction of cell senescence at the G1 phase, rather than via cell apoptosis. The induction of senescence may be via the upregulation of p16, p21 and p27. In conclusion, the current study provided insight into the pharmacological mechanisms of OSU‑03012 in preventing the proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells through cell senescence. The current study supports the theory that OSU‑03012 is a novel agent for potential use against liver fibrosis.

  14. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  15. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  16. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor protects against high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing hepatic PPAR-γ expression.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Peng, Sophia; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Thorn, Natalie; Farris, Alton B; Jain, Sanjay; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier; Anania, Frank; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2016-01-15

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice, however, the mechanisms involved are not known. In this study we investigated the effects of GDNF overexpression and nanoparticle delivery of GDNF in mice on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis and the expression of genes involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid uptake and de novo lipogenesis. Transgenic overexpression of GDNF in liver and other metabolically active tissues was protective against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. Mice overexpressing GDNF had significantly reduced P62/sequestosome 1 protein levels suggestive of accelerated autophagic clearance. They also had significantly reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CD36 gene expression and protein levels, and lower expression of mRNA coding for enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis. GDNF-loaded nanoparticles were protective against short-term HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and attenuated liver fibrosis in mice with long-standing HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. They also suppressed the liver expression of steatosis-associated genes. In vitro, GDNF suppressed triglyceride accumulation in Hep G2 cells through enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling and inhibition of PPAR-γ gene promoter activity. These results show that GDNF acts directly in the liver to protect against HFD-induced cellular stress and that GDNF may have a role in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  17. Modulating Innate Immunity Improves Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Replication in Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Sun, Pingnan; Lucendo-Villarin, Baltasar; Angus, Allan G.N.; Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Cameron, Kate; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Patel, Arvind H.; Hay, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this study, human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hESC-Heps) were investigated for their ability to support hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and replication. hESC-Heps were capable of supporting the full viral life cycle, including the release of infectious virions. Although supportive, hESC-Hep viral infection levels were not as great as those observed in Huh7 cells. We reasoned that innate immune responses in hESC-Heps may lead to the low level of infection and replication. Upon further investigation, we identified a strong type III interferon response in hESC-Heps that was triggered by HCV. Interestingly, specific inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway led to an increase in HCV infection and replication in hESC-Heps. Of note, the interferon response was not evident in Huh7 cells. In summary, we have established a robust cell-based system that allows the in-depth study of virus-host interactions in vitro. PMID:25068132

  18. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. Results We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. Conclusions We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells. PMID:23870169

  19. Activated hepatic stellate cells promote liver cancer by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells through cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Li, Jie; Hong, Zaifa; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical mediators of immunosuppression and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous work indicates that HSCs promote HCC progression by enhancing immunosuppressive cell populations including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). MDSCs are induced by inflammatory cytokines (e.g., prostaglandins) and are important in immune suppression. However, how HSCs mediate expansion of MDSCs is uncertain. Thus, we studied activated HSCs that could induce MDSCs from bone marrow cells and noted that HSC-induced MDSCs up-regulated immunosuppressive activity via iNOS, Arg-1, and IL-4Rα. After treating cells with a COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist, we established that HSC-induced MDSC accumulation was mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 signaling. Furthermore, in vivo animal studies confirmed that inhibition of HSC-derived PGE2 could inhibit HSC-induced MDSC accumulation and HCC growth. Thus, our data show that HSCs are required for MDSC accumulation mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 pathway, and these data are the first to link HSC and MDSC subsets in HCC immune microenvironment and provide a rationale for targeting PGE2 signaling for HCC therapy. PMID:26758420

  20. Novel Radiolytic Rotenone Derivative, Rotenoisin B with Potent Anti-Carcinogenic Activity in Hepatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Badaboina, Srilatha; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Na, Yun Hee; Park, Chul-Hong; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, isolated from roots of derris plant, has been shown to possess various biological activities, which lead to attempting to develop a potent drug against several diseases. However, recent studies have demonstrated that rotenone has the potential to induce several adverse effects such as a neurodegenerative disease. Radiolytic transformation of the rotenone with gamma-irradiation created a new product, named rotenoisin B. The present work was designed to investigate the anticancer activity of rotenoisin B with low toxicity and its molecular mechanism in hepatic cancer cells compared to a parent compound, rotenone. Our results showed rotenoisin B inhibited hepatic cancer cells' proliferation in a dose dependent manner and increased in apoptotic cells. Interestingly, rotenoisin B showed low toxic effects on normal cells compared to rotenone. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential has been decreased, which leads to cytochrome c release. Down regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 levels as well as the up regulation of proapoptotic Bax levels were observed. The cleaved PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) level increased as well. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 slightly up regulated and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased as well as cell cycle arrest predominantly at the G2/M phase observed. These results suggest that rotenoisin B might be a potent anticancer candidate similar to rotenone in hepatic cancer cells with low toxicity to normal cells even at high concentrations compared to rotenone. PMID:26213921

  1. Novel Radiolytic Rotenone Derivative, Rotenoisin B with Potent Anti-Carcinogenic Activity in Hepatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Badaboina, Srilatha; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Na, Yun Hee; Park, Chul-Hong; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, isolated from roots of derris plant, has been shown to possess various biological activities, which lead to attempting to develop a potent drug against several diseases. However, recent studies have demonstrated that rotenone has the potential to induce several adverse effects such as a neurodegenerative disease. Radiolytic transformation of the rotenone with gamma-irradiation created a new product, named rotenoisin B. The present work was designed to investigate the anticancer activity of rotenoisin B with low toxicity and its molecular mechanism in hepatic cancer cells compared to a parent compound, rotenone. Our results showed rotenoisin B inhibited hepatic cancer cells’ proliferation in a dose dependent manner and increased in apoptotic cells. Interestingly, rotenoisin B showed low toxic effects on normal cells compared to rotenone. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential has been decreased, which leads to cytochrome c release. Down regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 levels as well as the up regulation of proapoptotic Bax levels were observed. The cleaved PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) level increased as well. Moreover, phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 slightly up regulated and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased as well as cell cycle arrest predominantly at the G2/M phase observed. These results suggest that rotenoisin B might be a potent anticancer candidate similar to rotenone in hepatic cancer cells with low toxicity to normal cells even at high concentrations compared to rotenone. PMID:26213921

  2. Three-dimensional culture of human embryonic stem cell derived hepatic endoderm and its role in bioartificial liver construction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchi; Greenhough, Sebastian; Medine, Claire N; Hay, David C

    2010-01-01

    The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays.

  3. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchi; Greenhough, Sebastian; Medine, Claire N.; Hay, David C.

    2010-01-01

    The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays. PMID:20169088

  4. Identification of a bipotential precursor cell in hepatic cell lines derived from transgenic mice expressing cyto-Met in the liver.

    PubMed

    Spagnoli, F M; Amicone, L; Tripodi, M; Weiss, M C

    1998-11-16

    Met murine hepatocyte (MMH) lines were established from livers of transgenic mice expressing constitutively active human Met. These lines harbor two cell types: epithelial cells resembling the parental populations and flattened cells with multiple projections and a dispersed growth habit that are designated palmate. Epithelial cells express the liver-enriched transcription factors HNF4 and HNF1alpha, and proteins associated with epithelial cell differentiation. Treatments that modulate their differentiation state, including acidic FGF, induce hepatic functions. Palmate cells show none of these properties. However, they can differentiate along the hepatic cell lineage, giving rise to: (a) epithelial cells that express hepatic transcription factors and are competent to express hepatic functions; (b) bile duct-like structures in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. Derivation of epithelial from palmate cells is confirmed by characterization of the progeny of individually fished cells. Furthermore, karyotype analysis confirms the direction of the phenotypic transition: palmate cells are diploid and the epithelial cells are hypotetraploid. The clonal isolation of the palmate cell, an immortalized nontransformed bipotential cell that does not yet express the liver-enriched transcription factors and is a precursor of the epithelial-hepatocyte in MMH lines, provides a new tool for the study of mechanisms controlling liver development. PMID:9817765

  5. Vγ4 γδ T cell-derived IL-17A negatively regulates NKT cell function in Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Hao, Jianlei; Ni, Yuanyuan; Luo, Wei; Liang, Ruifang; Cao, Guangchao; Zhao, Yapu; Wang, Puyue; Zhao, Liqing; Tian, Zhigang; Flavell, Richard; Hong, Zhangyong; Han, Jihong; Yao, Zhi; Wu, Zhenzhou; Yin, Zhinan

    2011-11-15

    Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis is a well-known animal model for acute liver failure. However, the role of γδ T cells in this model is undefined. In this report, using TCR δ(-/-) mice, we demonstrated a protective role of γδ T cells in Con A-induced hepatitis model. TCR δ(-/-) mice showed significantly decreased levels of IL-17A and IL-17F in the Con A-treated liver tissue, and reconstitution of TCR δ(-/-) mice with wild-type (Wt), but not IL-17A(-/-), γδ T cells significantly reduced hepatitis, strongly suggesting a critical role of IL-17A in mediating the protective effect of γδ T cells. Interestingly, only Vγ4, but not Vγ1, γδ T cells exerted such a protective effect. Furthermore, depletion of NKT cells in TCR δ(-/-) mice completely abolished hepatitis, and NKT cells from Con A-challenged liver tissues of TCR δ(-/-) mice expressed significantly higher amounts of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ than those from Wt mice, indicating that γδ T cells protected hepatitis through targeting NKT cells. Finally, abnormal capacity of IFN-γ production by NKT cells of TCR δ(-/-) mice could only be downregulated by transferring Wt, but not IL-17(-/-), Vγ4 γδ T cells, confirming an essential role of Vγ4-derived IL-17A in regulating the function of NKT cells. In summary, our report thus demonstrated a novel function of Vγ4 γδ T cells in mediating a protective effect against Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis through negatively regulating function of NKT cells in an IL-17A-dependent manner, and transferring Vγ4 γδ T cells may provide a novel therapeutic approach for this devastating liver disease.

  6. Hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury in the absence of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sergio; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Naohisa; Suko, Kathryn; Ishikawa, Tomo-O; Busuttil, Ronald W; Herschman, Harvey R; Coito, Ana J

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a mediator of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI). While both global COX-2 deletion and pharmacologic COX-2 inhibition ameliorate liver IRI, the clinical use of COX-2 inhibitors has been linked to increased risks of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, a better understanding of the role of COX-2 in different cell types may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for hepatic IRI. Macrophages of myeloid origin are currently considered to be important sources of the COX-2 in damaged livers. Here, we used a Cox-2flox conditional knockout mouse (COX-2-M/-M) to examine the function of COX-2 expression in myeloid cells during liver IRI. COX-2-M/-M mice and their WT control littermates were subjected to partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. COX-2-M/-M macrophages did not express COX-2 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation and COX-2-M/-M livers showed reduced levels of COX-2 protein post-IRI. Nevertheless, selective deletion of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 failed to ameliorate liver IRI; serum transaminases and histology were comparable in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice. COX-2-M/-M livers, like WT livers, developed extensive necrosis, vascular congestion, leukocyte infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression post-reperfusion. In addition, myeloid COX-2 deletion led to a transient increase in IL-6 levels after hepatic reperfusion, when compared to controls. Administration of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in significantly improved liver function and histology in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice post-reperfusion, providing evidence that COX-2-mediated liver IRI is caused by COX-2 derived from a source(s) other than myeloid cells. In conclusion, these results support the view that myeloid COX-2, including myeloid-macrophage COX-2, is not responsible for the hepatic IRI phenotype.

  7. Completion of the Entire Hepatitis C Virus Life Cycle in Vero Cells Derived from Monkey Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Asako; Sugiyama, Nao; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A hepatitis C virus (HCV) cell culture system incorporating the JFH-1 strain and the human hepatoma cell line HuH-7 enabled the production of infectious HCV particles. Several host factors were identified as essential for HCV replication. Supplementation of these factors in nonhepatic human cell lines enabled HCV replication and particle production. Vero cells established from monkey kidney are commonly used for the production of vaccines against a variety of viruses. In this study, we aimed to establish a novel Vero cell line to reconstruct the HCV life cycle. Unmodified Vero cells did not allow HCV infection or replication. The expression of microRNA 122 (miR-122), an essential factor for HCV replication, is notably low in Vero cells. Therefore, we supplemented Vero cells with miR-122 and found that HCV replication was enhanced. However, Vero cells that expressed miR-122 still did not allow HCV infection. We supplemented HCV receptor molecules and found that scavenger receptor class B type I (SRBI) was essential for HCV infection in Vero cells. The supplementation of apolipoprotein E (ApoE), a host factor important for virus production, enabled the production of infectious virus in Vero cells. Finally, we created a Vero cell line that expressed the essential factors miR-122, SRBI, and ApoE; the entire HCV life cycle, including infection, replication, and infectious virus production, was completed in these cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that miR-122, SRBI, and ApoE were necessary and sufficient for the completion of the entire HCV life cycle in nonhuman, nonhepatic Vero cells. PMID:27302754

  8. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Wenzel, Jürgen J.; Johne, Reimar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown. PMID:27690085

  9. Cell Fusion Reprogramming Leads to a Specific Hepatic Expression Pattern during Mouse Bone Marrow Derived Hepatocyte Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arza, Elvira; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fabregat, Isabel; Garcia-Bravo, Maria; Meza, Nestor W.; Segovia, Jose C.

    2012-01-01

    The fusion of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells with hepatocytes to generate BM derived hepatocytes (BMDH) is a natural process, which is enhanced in damaged tissues. However, the reprogramming needed to generate BMDH and the identity of the resultant cells is essentially unknown. In a mouse model of chronic liver damage, here we identify a modification in the chromatin structure of the hematopoietic nucleus during BMDH formation, accompanied by the loss of the key hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1/Sfpi1 (SFFV proviral integration 1) and gain of the key hepatic transcriptional regulator HNF-1A homeobox A (HNF-1A/Hnf1a). Through genome-wide expression analysis of laser captured BMDH, a differential gene expression pattern was detected and the chromatin changes observed were confirmed at the level of chromatin regulator genes. Similarly, Tranforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and neurotransmitter (e.g. Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 [Ptger4]) pathway genes were over-expressed. In summary, in vivo BMDH generation is a process in which the hematopoietic cell nucleus changes its identity and acquires hepatic features. These BMDHs have their own cell identity characterized by an expression pattern different from hematopoietic cells or hepatocytes. The role of these BMDHs in the liver requires further investigation. PMID:22457803

  10. In vitro assessment of drug-induced liver steatosis based on human dermal stem cell-derived hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Branson, Steven; De Boe, Veerle; Sachinidis, Agapios; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Steatosis, also known as fatty liver disease (FLD), is a disorder in which the lipid metabolism of the liver is disturbed, leading to the abnormal retention of lipids in hepatocytes. FLD can be induced by several drugs, and although it is mostly asymptomatic, it can lead to steatohepatitis, which is associated with liver inflammation and damage. Drug-induced liver injury is currently the major cause of postmarketing withdrawal of pharmaceuticals and discontinuation of the development of new chemical entities. Therefore, the potential induction of steatosis must be evaluated during preclinical drug development. However, robust human-relevant in vitro models are lacking. In the present study, we explore the applicability of hepatic cells (hSKP-HPCs) derived from postnatal skin precursors, a stem cell population residing in human dermis, to investigate the steatosis-inducing effects of sodium valproate (Na-VPA). Exposure of hSKP-HPC to sub-cytotoxic concentrations of this reference steatogenic compound showed an increased intracellular accumulation of lipid droplets, and the modulation of key factors involved in lipid metabolism. Using a toxicogenomics approach, we further compared Na-VPA-treated hSKP-HPC and Na-VPA-treated primary human hepatocytes to liver samples from patients suffering from mild and advanced steatosis. Our data show that in hSKP-HPC exposed to Na-VPA and liver samples of patients suffering from mild steatosis, but not in primary human hepatocytes, "liver steatosis" was efficiently identified as a toxicological response. These findings illustrate the potential of hSKP-HPC as a human-relevant in vitro model to identify hepatosteatotic effects of chemical compounds.

  11. Characterization of a hepatitis C virus-like particle vaccine produced in a human hepatocyte-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Chua, B; Chin, R; Christiansen, D; Johnson, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Vercauteren, K; Mesalam, A; Meuleman, P; Das, S; Boo, I; Drummer, H; Bock, C-T; Gowans, E J; Jackson, D C; Torresi, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    An effective immune response against hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires the early development of multi-specific class 1 CD8+ and class II CD4+ T-cells together with broad neutralizing antibody responses. We have produced mammalian-cell-derived HCV virus-like particles (VLPs) incorporating core, E1 and E2 of HCV genotype 1a to produce such immune responses. Here we describe the biochemical and morphological characterization of the HCV VLPs and study HCV core-specific T-cell responses to the particles. The E1 and E2 glycoproteins in HCV VLPs formed non-covalent heterodimers and together with core protein assembled into VLPs with a buoyant density of 1.22 to 1.28 g cm-3. The HCV VLPs could be immunoprecipited with anti-ApoE and anti-ApoC. On electron microscopy, the VLPs had a heterogeneous morphology and ranged in size from 40 to 80 nm. The HCV VLPs demonstrated dose-dependent binding to murine-derived dendritic cells and the entry of HCV VLPs into Huh7 cells was blocked by anti-CD81 antibody. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with HCV VLPs purified from iodixanol gradients resulted in the production of neutralizing antibody responses while vaccination of humanized MHC class I transgenic mice resulted in the prodution of HCV core-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. Furthermore, IgG purified from the sera of patients chronically infected with HCV genotypes 1a and 3a blocked the binding and entry of the HCV VLPs into Huh7 cells. These results show that our mammalian-cell-derived HCV VLPs induce humoral and HCV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and will have important implications for the development of a preventative vaccine for HCV. PMID:27147296

  12. Modeling Dengue Virus-Hepatic Cell Interactions Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jianshe; Vera, Daniel; Cheng, Yichen; Tang, Hengli

    2016-09-13

    The development of dengue antivirals and vaccine has been hampered by the incomplete understanding of molecular mechanisms of dengue virus (DENV) infection and pathology, partly due to the limited suitable cell culture or animal models that can capture the comprehensive cellular changes induced by DENV. In this study, we differentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into hepatocytes, one of the target cells of DENV, to investigate various aspects of DENV-hepatocyte interaction. hPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) supported persistent and productive DENV infection. The activation of interferon pathways by DENV protected bystander cells from infection and protected the infected cells from massive apoptosis. Furthermore, DENV infection activated the NF-κB pathway, which led to production of proinflammatory cytokines and downregulated many liver-specific genes such as albumin and coagulation factor V. Our study demonstrates the utility of hPSC-derived hepatocytes as an in vitro model for DENV infection and reveals important aspects of DENV-host interactions. PMID:27546535

  13. MicroRNA-27b Enhances the Hepatic Regenerative Properties of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Den; Huang, Kuang-Tzu; Lin, Chih-Che; Weng, Wei-Teng; Hsu, Li-Wen; Goto, Shigeru; Nakano, Toshiaki; Lai, Chia-Yun; Kung, Chao-Pin; Chiu, King-Wah; Wang, Chih-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ma, Yen-Ying; Chen, Chao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) are readily available multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells and have become an attractive therapeutic tool for regenerative medicine. We herein investigated the mechanistic role of how miR-27b modulated regenerative capacities of ASCs. Intravenous administration of miR-27b-transfected ASCs (ASCs-miR-27b) was conducted after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). After PH, rats injected with ASCs-miR-27b had decreased inflammatory cytokines and increased hepatocyte growth factor and other related growth factors. We showed that the nature of ASCs-miR-27b to inhibit hepatic stellate cell activation was dependent upon peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in vitro. Moreover, expression of miR-27b in ASCs induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), resulting in increased production of ATP, protective cytokines/growth factors, and genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in a PGC-1α-dependent manner. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis revealed drastic transcriptional changes in livers treated with ASCs-miR-27b after PH. The differentially expressed genes classified into “regeneration,” “fibrosis,” and “mitochondrial biogenesis” clusters were mainly mitochondrial. The potential biological context reflecting the effects of PGC-1α by ASCs-miR-27b treatment was also observed by the subnetwork analysis with HO-1 and PGC-1α being the top-ranked regulatory genes. We demonstrate autologous ASCs-miR-27b enhances liver regeneration and, importantly, preserves hepatic function through paracrine actions which offers a viable therapeutic option to facilitate rapid recovery after liver injury. PMID:26836372

  14. Hepatitis C virus-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell differentiation and function via the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Zhao, Juan; Dai, Jun; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Wang, Ling; Wu, Xiao Y; Morrison, Zheng D; Li, Guang Y; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Ning, Shun B; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2016-08-01

    T cells play a pivotal role in controlling viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for regulating T-cell differentiation and function during infections are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated an expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), in particular the monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs; CD14(+) CD33(+) CD11b(+) HLA-DR(-/low) ), in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Notably, HCV-induced M-MDSCs express high levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with healthy subjects. Blocking STAT3 signalling reduced HCV-mediated M-MDSC expansion and decreased IL-10 expression. Importantly, we observed a significant increase in the numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells following incubation of healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with MDSCs derived from HCV-infected patients or treated with HCV core protein. In addition, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs led to a significant reduction of Foxp3(+) Treg cells developed during chronic HCV infection. Moreover, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs significantly increased interferon-γ production by CD4(+) T effector (Teff) cells derived from HCV patients. These results suggest that HCV-induced MDSCs promote Treg cell development and inhibit Teff cell function, suggesting a novel mechanism for T-cell regulation and a new strategy for immunotherapy against human viral diseases. PMID:27149428

  15. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ye, Danna; Li, Tong; Heraud, Philip; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation. PMID:27242905

  16. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Danna; Li, Tong; Heraud, Philip; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation. PMID:27242905

  17. Innate immune responses in human hepatocyte-derived cell lines alter genotype 1 hepatitis E virus replication efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Devhare, Pradip B.; Desai, Swapnil; Lole, Kavita S.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a significant health problem in developing countries causing sporadic and epidemic forms of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis E is a self-limiting disease; however, chronic HEV infections are being reported in immunocompromised individuals. The disease severity is more during pregnancy with high mortality (20–25%), especially in third trimester. Early cellular responses after HEV infection are not completely understood. We analyzed innate immune responses associated with genotype-I HEV replication in human hepatoma cell lines (Huh7, Huh7.5 and HepG2/C3A) using HEV replicon system. These cells supported HEV replication with different efficiencies due to the cell type specific innate immune responses. HepG2/C3A cells were less supportive to HEV replication as compared to Huh7.5 and S10-3 cells. Reconstitution of the defective RIG-I and TLR3 signaling in Huh7.5 cells enabled them to induce higher level antiviral responses and restrict HEV replication, suggesting the involvement of both RIG-I and TLR3 in sensing HEV RNA and downstream activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) to generate antiviral responses. Inhibition of IRF3 mediated downstream responses in HepG2/C3A cells by pharmacological inhibitor BX795 significantly improved HEV replication efficiency implying the importance of this study in establishing a better cell culture system for future HEV studies. PMID:27230536

  18. Aggravation of viral hepatitis by platelet-derived serotonin.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Contaldo, Claudio; Georgiev, Panco; El-Badry, Ashraf Mohammad; Recher, Mike; Kurrer, Michael; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Ludewig, Burkhard; Calzascia, Thomas; Bolinger, Beatrice; Merkler, Doron; Odermatt, Bernhard; Bader, Michael; Graf, Rolf; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Löhning, Max; Harris, Nicola L; Ohashi, Pamela S; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M; Lang, Karl S

    2008-07-01

    More than 500 million people worldwide are persistently infected with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus. Although both viruses are poorly cytopathic, persistence of either virus carries a risk of chronic liver inflammation, potentially resulting in liver steatosis, liver cirrhosis, end-stage liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma. Virus-specific T cells are a major determinant of the outcome of hepatitis, as they contribute to the early control of chronic hepatitis viruses, but they also mediate immunopathology during persistent virus infection. We have analyzed the role of platelet-derived vasoactive serotonin during virus-induced CD8(+) T cell-dependent immunopathological hepatitis in mice infected with the noncytopathic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. After virus infection, platelets were recruited to the liver, and their activation correlated with severely reduced sinusoidal microcirculation, delayed virus elimination and increased immunopathological liver cell damage. Lack of platelet-derived serotonin in serotonin-deficient mice normalized hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction, accelerated virus clearance in the liver and reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent liver cell damage. In keeping with these observations, serotonin treatment of infected mice delayed entry of activated CD8(+) T cells into the liver, delayed virus control and aggravated immunopathological hepatitis. Thus, vasoactive serotonin supports virus persistence in the liver and aggravates virus-induced immunopathology.

  19. Isolation and characterization of an Huh.7.5.1-derived cell clone highly permissive to hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Shirasago, Yoshitaka; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Kyoko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Hanada, Kentaro; Kuroda, Makoto; Abe, Ryo; Fukasawa, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    An efficient cell culture and infection system for hepatitis C virus (HCV) facilitates analyses of the complete virus life cycle. Human hepatic Huh7.5.1 cells and an HCV-JFH1 strain have been widely employed in infection experiments. In the present study, cultured Huh7.5.1 cells exhibited heterogeneous phenotypes of HCV infection. Using single-cell cloning of Huh7.5.1 cells, we isolated a clone highly permissive to HCV (Huh7.5.1-8) and a CD81-defective clone nonpermissive to HCV (Huh7.5.1-5). Expression of CD81 in Huh7.5.1-5 cells restored permissiveness to HCV, indicating that CD81 is essential for HCV infection and a defect in CD81 causes nonpermissiveness to HCV in Huh7.5.1-5 cells. Huh7.5.1-8 cells had approximately 10-fold higher HCV replication rates, with cellular HCV RNA copy numbers of >10(9) copies/μg of cellular RNA and viral titers of >10(6) infectious units/ml of culture supernatant. Permissiveness of Huh7.5.1-8 cells to HCV infection was phenotypically very stable because there was no difference in permissiveness after more than 100 passages (1-year culture). This efficient cell culture system for HCV using Huh7.5.1-8 cell provides a powerful tool for studying the HCV life cycle and constructing antiviral strategies.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Suppress NK Cell IFN-γ Production by Altering Cellular Metabolism via Arginase-1.

    PubMed

    Goh, Celeste C; Roggerson, Krystal M; Lee, Hai-Chon; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Rosen, Hugo R; Hahn, Young S

    2016-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼ 200 million people worldwide. The majority of infected individuals develop persistent infection, resulting in chronic inflammation and liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The ability of HCV to establish persistent infection is partly due to its ability to evade the immune response through multiple mechanisms, including suppression of NK cells. NK cells control HCV replication during the early phase of infection and regulate the progression to chronic disease. In particular, IFN-γ produced by NK cells limits viral replication in hepatocytes and is important for the initiation of adaptive immune responses. However, NK cell function is significantly impaired in chronic HCV patients. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired NK cell function in HCV infection are not well defined. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of human NK cells with CD33(+) PBMCs that were exposed to HCV. We found that NK cells cocultured with HCV-conditioned CD33(+) PBMCs produced lower amounts of IFN-γ, with no effect on granzyme B production or cell viability. Importantly, this suppression of NK cell-derived IFN-γ production was mediated by CD33(+)CD11b(lo)HLA-DR(lo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) via an arginase-1-dependent inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin activation. Suppression of IFN-γ production was reversed by l-arginine supplementation, consistent with increased MDSC arginase-1 activity. These novel results identify the induction of MDSCs in HCV infection as a potent immune evasion strategy that suppresses antiviral NK cell responses, further indicating that blockade of MDSCs may be a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate chronic viral infections in the liver. PMID:26826241

  1. Extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 phosphorylation is required for hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yongmin; Zhu, Yuan; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Limin; Sun, Zixuan; Li, Wei; Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to restore liver function by differentiating into hepatocyte like cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have investigated the signals involved in the hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs). hUCMSCs were treated with mouse fetal liver-conditioned medium (FLCM) to induce hepatic differentiation. Flow cytometry, reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array were used to detect the expression of MSC- and hepotocyte-specific markers in FLCM-treated hUCMSCs. Urea production and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity were used as indicators to evaluate liver cell characteristics. Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was analyzed in hUCMSCs by Western blotting. Following FLCM treatment, expression of MSC-specific markers decreased, while hepatocyte-specific gene expression was increased. Urea production, albumin secretion, glycogen storage, and CYP3A4 activity were significantly enhanced in FLCM-treated cells. In addition, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in a time-dependent manner through Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, and phosphorylation was sustained at a high level during hepatic induction. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) and pFLAG-CMV-ERK1(K71R) (negative mutant of ERK1) reversed the expression of liver-specific genes in hUCMSCs and affected hepatic function significantly. In summary, this work shows that ERK1/2 phosphorylation plays an important role in inducing hepatic differentiation of hUCMSCs in FLCM. PMID:25576343

  2. Contact-dependent depletion of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is a novel mechanism of myeloid-derived suppressor cell induction operating in human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Resheq, Yazid J; Li, Ka-Kit; Ward, Stephen T; Wilhelm, Annika; Garg, Abhilok; Curbishley, Stuart M; Blahova, Miroslava; Zimmermann, Henning W; Jitschin, Regina; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mackensen, Andreas; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) represent a unique cell population with distinct immunosuppressive properties that have been demonstrated to shape the outcome of malignant diseases. Recently, human hepatic stellate cells (HSC) have been reported to induce monocytic-MDSC from mature CD14(+) monocytes in a contact-dependent manner. We now report a novel and unexpected mechanism by which CD14(+)HLADR(low/-) suppressive cells are induced by catalase-mediated depletion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation of CD14(+) monocytes with catalase led to a significant induction of functional MDSC compared with media alone, and H2O2 levels inversely correlated with MDSC frequency (r = -0.6555, p < 0.05). Catalase was detected in primary HSC and a stromal cell line, and addition of the competitive catalase inhibitor hydroxylamine resulted in a dose-dependent impairment of MDSC induction and concomitant increase of H2O2 levels. The NADPH-oxidase subunit gp91 was significantly increased in catalase-induced MDSC as determined by quantitative PCR outlining the importance of oxidative burst for the induction of MDSC. These findings represent a so far unrecognized link between immunosuppression by MDSC and metabolism. Moreover, this mechanism potentially explains how stromal cells can induce a favorable immunological microenvironment in the context of tissue oxidative stress such as occurs during cancer therapy.

  3. Hepatic maturation of human iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells by ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Daiki; Takayama, Kazuo; Nagamoto, Yasuhito; Mitani, Seiji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-15

    Hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from human iPS cells (human iPS-HLCs) are expected to be utilized in drug development and research. However, recent hepatic characterization of human iPS-HLCs showed that these cells resemble fetal hepatocytes rather than adult hepatocytes. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to develop a method to enhance the hepatic function of human iPS-HLCs. Because the gene expression levels of the hepatic transcription factors (activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (c/EBPα), and prospero homeobox protein 1 (PROX1)) in adult liver were significantly higher than those in human iPS-HLCs and fetal liver, we expected that the hepatic functions of human iPS-HLCs could be enhanced by adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction. The gene expression levels of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9, 2E1, alpha-1 antitrypsin, transthyretin, Na+/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 and protein expression levels of CYP2C9 and CYP2E1 were upregulated by ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction. These results suggest that the hepatic functions of the human iPS-HLCs could be enhanced by ATF5, c/EBPα, and PROX1 transduction. Our findings would be useful for the hepatic maturation of human iPS-HLCs. PMID:26679606

  4. A Gaussia luciferase cell-based system to assess the infection of cell culture- and serum-derived hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudakis, George; Pérez-del-Pulgar, Sofía; González, Patricia; Crespo, Gonzalo; Navasa, Miquel; Forns, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Robust replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in cell culture occurs only with the JFH-1 (genotype 2a) recombinant genome. The aim of this study was to develop a system for HCV infection quantification analysis and apply it for the selection of patient sera that may contain cell culture infectious viruses, particularly of the most clinically important genotype 1. Initially, a hepatoma cell line (designated Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc) was generated that stably expressed the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused in-frame to the secreted Gaussia luciferase via a recognition sequence of the viral NS3/4A protease. Upon HCV infection, NS3/4A cleaved at its signal and the Gaussia was secreted to the culture medium, thus facilitating the infection quantification. The Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc cell line provided a rapid and highly sensitive quantification of HCV infection in cell culture using JFH-1-derived viruses. Furthermore, the Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc cells were also shown to be a suitable host for the discovery of anti-HCV inhibitors by using known compounds that target distinct stages of the HCV life cycle; the Ź-factor of this assay ranged from 0.72 to 0.75. Additionally, eighty-six sera derived from HCV genotype 1b infected liver transplant recipients were screened for their in vitro infection and replication potential. Approximately 12% of the sera contained in vitro replication-competent viruses, as deduced by the Gaussia signal, real time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and capsid protein secretion. We conclude that the Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc cell line is an excellent system not only for the screening of in vitro replication-competent serum-derived viruses, but also for the subsequent cloning of recombinant isolates. Additionally, it can be utilized for high-throughput screening of antiviral compounds. PMID:23300900

  5. A Gaussia Luciferase Cell-Based System to Assess the Infection of Cell Culture- and Serum-Derived Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Koutsoudakis, George; Pérez-del-Pulgar, Sofía; González, Patricia; Crespo, Gonzalo; Navasa, Miquel; Forns, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Robust replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in cell culture occurs only with the JFH-1 (genotype 2a) recombinant genome. The aim of this study was to develop a system for HCV infection quantification analysis and apply it for the selection of patient sera that may contain cell culture infectious viruses, particularly of the most clinically important genotype 1. Initially, a hepatoma cell line (designated Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc) was generated that stably expressed the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused in-frame to the secreted Gaussia luciferase via a recognition sequence of the viral NS3/4A protease. Upon HCV infection, NS3/4A cleaved at its signal and the Gaussia was secreted to the culture medium, thus facilitating the infection quantification. The Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc cell line provided a rapid and highly sensitive quantification of HCV infection in cell culture using JFH-1-derived viruses. Furthermore, the Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc cells were also shown to be a suitable host for the discovery of anti-HCV inhibitors by using known compounds that target distinct stages of the HCV life cycle; the Ź-factor of this assay ranged from 0.72 to 0.75. Additionally, eighty-six sera derived from HCV genotype 1b infected liver transplant recipients were screened for their in vitro infection and replication potential. Approximately 12% of the sera contained in vitro replication-competent viruses, as deduced by the Gaussia signal, real time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and capsid protein secretion. We conclude that the Huh-7.5/EG(4A/4B)GLuc cell line is an excellent system not only for the screening of in vitro replication-competent serum-derived viruses, but also for the subsequent cloning of recombinant isolates. Additionally, it can be utilized for high-throughput screening of antiviral compounds. PMID:23300900

  6. Rat hepatitis E virus derived from wild rats (Rattus rattus) propagates efficiently in human hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jirintai, Suljid; Tanggis; Mulyanto; Suparyatmo, Joseph Benedictus; Takahashi, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Tominari; Nagashima, Shigeo; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2014-06-24

    Although rat hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been identified in wild rats, no cell culture systems for this virus have been established. A recent report suggesting the presence of antibodies against rat HEV in human sera encouraged us to cultivate rat HEV in human cells. When liver homogenates obtained from wild rats (Rattus rattus) in Indonesia were inoculated onto human hepatocarcinoma cells, the rat HEV replicated efficiently in PLC/PRF/5, HuH-7 and HepG2 cells, irrespective of its genetic group (G1-G3). The rat HEV particles released from cultured cells harbored lipid-associated membranes on their surface that were depleted by treatment with detergent and protease, with the buoyant density in sucrose shifting from 1.15-1.16 g/ml to 1.27-1.28 g/ml. A Northern blotting analysis revealed genomic RNA of 7.0 kb and subgenomic RNA of 2.0 kb in the infected cells. The subgenomic RNA of G1-G3 each possessed the extreme 5'-end sequence of GUAGC (nt 4933-4937), downstream of the highly conserved sequence of GAAUAACA (nt 4916-4923). The establishment of culture systems for rat HEV would allow for extended studies of the mechanisms of viral replication and functional roles of HEV proteins. Further investigation is required to clarify the zoonotic potential of rat HEV.

  7. Generalized Liver- and Blood-Derived CD8+ T-Cell Impairment in Response to Cytokines in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Burke Schinkel, Stephanie C.; Carrasco-Medina, Lorna; Cooper, Curtis L.; Crawley, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the contribution of liver-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells to the immunopathogenesis of this infection remain poorly understood. It is hypothesized that this impairment is partially due to reduced CD8+ T-cell activity in response to cytokines such as IL-7, particularly within the liver. To investigate this, the phenotype and cytokine responsiveness of blood- and liver-derived CD8+ T-cells from healthy controls and individuals with HCV infection were compared. In blood, IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression on bulk CD8+ T-cells in HCV infection was no different than controls yet was lower on central memory T-cells, and there were fewer naïve cells. IL-7-induced signalling through phosphorylated STAT5 was lower in HCV infection than in controls, and differed between CD8+ T-cell subsets. Production of Bcl-2 following IL-7 stimulation was also lower in HCV infection and inversely related to the degree of liver fibrosis. In liver-derived CD8+ T-cells, STAT5 activation could not be increased with cytokine stimulation and basal Bcl-2 levels of liver-derived CD8+ T-cells were lower than blood-derived counterparts in HCV infection. Therefore, generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment in HCV infection is characterized, in part, by impaired IL-7-mediated signalling and survival, independent of CD127 expression. This impairment is more pronounced in the liver and may be associated with an increased potential for apoptosis. This generalized CD8+ T-cell impairment represents an important immune dysfunction in chronic HCV infection that may alter patient health. PMID:27315061

  8. Enhanced hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in spheroidal aggregate culture on a decellularized liver scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Ji; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Yujia; Li, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Wu, Xiujuan; Xie, Mingjun; Bu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether the combination of aggregate culture and decellularized liver scaffolds (DLSs) promoted the hepatic differentiation of murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) into high yields of mature hepatocytes in vitro. Four culturing methods for differentiation [single cell (2D), spheroids (3D), 2D + DLS and 3D + DLS] were studied. To determine the differentiation stages of the MSCs, RT-qPCR of the hepatocyte genes, immunostaining of hepatocyte markers, and functional analyses were all performed. Compared with the other groups, hepatocyte-like cells which differentiated from BM-MSC spheroids on extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited more intensive staining of stored glycogen, an elevated level of urea biosynthesis and albumin secretion as well as the higher expression of hepatocyte-specific genes. Our results indicated that DLSs combined with spheroidal aggregate culture may be used as an effective method to facilitate the hepatic maturation of BM-MSCs and may have future applications in stem cell-based liver regenerative medicine. PMID:27314916

  9. Duck hepatitis B virus integrations in LMH chicken hepatoma cells: identification and characterization of new episomally derived integrations.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, S S; Jensen, A D; Wang, H; Rogler, C E

    1995-01-01

    While the cytoplasmic phase of the hepadnavirus replication cycle is well understood, very little is known about the nuclear phase. In contrast to retroviruses, proviral integration is not required for hepadnavirus replication; however, some of the viral DNAs in the nucleus are diverted into an integration pathway. Under certain conditions these integrations function as carcinogenic agents. In order to study the integration process, we have utilized LMH-D2 cells, which replicate wild-type duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), to develop the first protocol to detect and characterize integrations of DHBV originating from episomal viral DNAs. Contrary to expectations, our results showed that stable new integrations are readily detectable in subclones of LMH-D2 cells. Complete characterization of one integration revealed a single-genome-length integrant with the structure of double-stranded linear (DSL) DHBV DNAs which are produced by in situ priming during viral replication. The integration contained a terminal redundancy of 6 bp from the r region of the virus DNA minus strand as well as a direct repeat of 70 bp of cellular DNA. On the basis of the structure of the integrant and the cellular DNA target site, we propose a molecular model for the integration mechanism that has some similarities to that of retroviruses. Identification of DSL hepadnavirus DNA integration suggests the possibility that modified DSL viral DNAs may be the precursors to a class of simple, unrearranged hepadnavirus integrations. PMID:7494330

  10. Modeling host interactions with hepatitis B virus using primary and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocellular systems.

    PubMed

    Shlomai, Amir; Schwartz, Robert E; Ramanan, Vyas; Bhatta, Ankit; de Jong, Ype P; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Rice, Charles M

    2014-08-19

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects 400 million people worldwide and is a leading driver of end-stage liver disease and liver cancer. Research into the biology and treatment of HBV requires an in vitro cell-culture system that supports the infection of human hepatocytes, and accurately recapitulates virus-host interactions. Here, we report that micropatterned cocultures of primary human hepatocytes with stromal cells (MPCCs) reliably support productive HBV infection, and infection can be enhanced by blocking elements of the hepatocyte innate immune response associated with the induction of IFN-stimulated genes. MPCCs maintain prolonged, productive infection and represent a facile platform for studying virus-host interactions and for developing antiviral interventions. Hepatocytes obtained from different human donors vary dramatically in their permissiveness to HBV infection, suggesting that factors--such as divergence in genetic susceptibility to infection--may influence infection in vitro. To establish a complementary, renewable system on an isogenic background in which candidate genetics can be interrogated, we show that inducible pluripotent stem cells differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps) support HBV infection that can also be enhanced by blocking interferon-stimulated gene induction. Notably, the emergence of the capacity to support HBV transcriptional activity and initial permissiveness for infection are marked by distinct stages of iHep differentiation, suggesting that infection of iHeps can be used both to study HBV, and conversely to assess the degree of iHep differentiation. Our work demonstrates the utility of these infectious systems for studying HBV biology and the virus' interactions with host hepatocyte genetics and physiology. PMID:25092305

  11. Antiproliferative effects of triterpenoidal derivatives, obtained from the marine sponge Siphonochalina sp., on human hepatic and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Alarif, Walied M; Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N; Al-Lihaibi, Sultan S; Hegazy, Mohamed E; Al Mohammadi, Ameen; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Moustafa, Mohamed A A; Banjer, Zainy M; Azhar, Ahmad S

    2016-01-01

    Three triterpenoidal derivatives [Sipholenol A (1), sipholenol L (2) and sipholenone A (3)] were isolated from the Red Sea sponge Siphonochalina sp. The structures were determined based on spectroscopic measurements (NMR, UV, IR and MS). The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines; HepG2, Caco-2 and HT-29. Moreover, the effects of these metabolites on cell cycle progression as well as cell cycle regulating proteins were assessed. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 showed moderate activity against HepG2 cells with IC(50) values of 17.18 ± 1.18, 24.01 ± 0.59 and 35.06 ± 1.10 μM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 exerted a considerable antiproliferative effect with IC(50) values of 4.80 ± 0.18 and 26.64 ± 0.30 μM, respectively, against Caco-2 cells. Finally, 1 and 2 exhibited antiproliferative activity against colorectal cancer cells (HT-29) with IC(50) values of 24.65 ± 0.80 and 4.48 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Cell cycle analysis indicated that these compounds induced cell cycle arrest particularly in G0/G1 and S phases. Furthermore, the triterpenoids increased the expression of cyclin-B1, cyclin-D1 and cleaved caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence, indicating an important role of apoptosis in cell death induced by these compounds. PMID:26845717

  12. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies.

  13. Ligustrazine attenuates oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by interrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor-mediated ERK and p38 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ni, Chunyan; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2012-11-15

    Hepatic fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing reactions with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis. Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress is concomitant with liver fibrosis irrespective of the underlying etiology. Natural antioxidant ligustrazine exhibits potent antifibrotic activities, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Our studies were to investigate the ligustrazine effects on HSC activation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative stress in liver fibrogenesis, and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 μM significantly stimulated HSC proliferation and expression of marker genes of HSC activation; whereas ligustrazine dose-dependently suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-activated HSCs, and attenuated expression of fibrotic marker genes. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ligustrazine reduced platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR) expression and blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase, two downstream effectors of PDGF-βR. Further molecular evidence suggested that ligustrazine interruption of ERK and p38 pathways was dependent on the blockade of PDGF-βR and might be involved in ligustrazine reduction of fibrotic marker gene expression under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation. Furthermore, ligustrazine modulated some proteins critical for HSC activation and ECM homeostasis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HSCs. These data collectively indicated that ligustrazine could attenuate HSC activation caused by oxidative stress, providing novel insights into ligustrazine as a therapeutic option for hepatic fibrosis. Highlights: ► Ligustrazine inhibits oxidative stress-induced HSC activation.

  14. Hepatic stellate cells contribute to progenitor cells and liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2014-12-01

    Retinoid-storing hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have recently been described as a liver-resident mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) population; however, it is not clear whether these cells contribute to liver regeneration or serve as a progenitor cell population with hepatobiliary characteristics. Here, we purified HSCs with retinoid-dependent fluorescence-activated cell sorting from eGFP-expressing rats and transplanted these GFP(+) HSCs into wild-type (WT) rats that had undergone partial hepatectomy in the presence of 2-acetylaminofluorene (2AAF) or retrorsine, both of which are injury models that favor stem cell-based liver repair. Transplanted HSCs contributed to liver regeneration in host animals by forming mesenchymal tissue, progenitor cells, hepatocytes, and cholangiocytes and elevated direct bilirubin levels in blood sera of GUNN rats, indicating recovery from the hepatic bilirubin-handling defect in these animals. Transplanted HSCs engrafted within the bone marrow (BM) of host animals, and HSC-derived cells were isolated from BM and successfully retransplanted into new hosts with injured liver. Cultured HSCs transiently adopted an expression profile similar to that of progenitor cells during differentiation into bile acid-synthesizing and -transporting hepatocytes, suggesting that stellate cells represent a source of liver progenitor cells. This concept connects seemingly contradictory studies that favor either progenitor cells or MSCs as important players in stem cell-based liver regeneration.

  15. The induction of human myeloid derived suppressor cells through hepatic stellate cells is dose-dependently inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors nilotinib, dasatinib and sorafenib, but not sunitinib.

    PubMed

    Heine, Annkristin; Schilling, Judith; Grünwald, Barbara; Krüger, Achim; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Held, Stefanie Andrea Erika; Garbi, Natalio; Kurts, Christian; Brossart, Peter; Knolle, Percy; Diehl, Linda; Höchst, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Increased numbers of immunosuppressive myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) correlate with a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapy for the treatment of several neoplastic diseases. However, TKIs not only exert effects on the malignant cell clone itself but also affect immune cells. Here, we investigate the effect of TKIs on the induction of MDSCs that differentiate from mature human monocytes using a new in vitro model of MDSC induction through activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). We show that frequencies of monocytic CD14(+)HLA-DR(-/low) MDSCs derived from mature monocytes were significantly and dose-dependently reduced in the presence of dasatinib, nilotinib and sorafenib, whereas sunitinib had no effect. These regulatory effects were only observed when TKIs were present during the early induction phase of MDSCs through activated HSCs, whereas already differentiated MDSCs were not further influenced by TKIs. Neither the MAPK nor the NFκB pathway was modulated in MDSCs when any of the TKIs was applied. When functional analyses were performed, we found that myeloid cells treated with sorafenib, nilotinib or dasatinib, but not sunitinib, displayed decreased suppressive capacity with regard to CD8+ T cell proliferation. Our results indicate that sorafenib, nilotinib and dasatinib, but not sunitinib, decrease the HSC-mediated differentiation of monocytes into functional MDSCs. Therefore, treatment of cancer patients with these TKIs may in addition to having a direct effect on cancer cells also prevent the differentiation of monocytes into MDSCs and thereby differentially modulate the success of immunotherapeutic or other anti-cancer approaches. PMID:26786874

  16. Hepatic stellate cells contribute to progenitor cells and liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Retinoid-storing hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have recently been described as a liver-resident mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) population; however, it is not clear whether these cells contribute to liver regeneration or serve as a progenitor cell population with hepatobiliary characteristics. Here, we purified HSCs with retinoid-dependent fluorescence-activated cell sorting from eGFP-expressing rats and transplanted these GFP+ HSCs into wild-type (WT) rats that had undergone partial hepatectomy in the presence of 2-acetylaminofluorene (2AAF) or retrorsine, both of which are injury models that favor stem cell–based liver repair. Transplanted HSCs contributed to liver regeneration in host animals by forming mesenchymal tissue, progenitor cells, hepatocytes, and cholangiocytes and elevated direct bilirubin levels in blood sera of GUNN rats, indicating recovery from the hepatic bilirubin–handling defect in these animals. Transplanted HSCs engrafted within the bone marrow (BM) of host animals, and HSC-derived cells were isolated from BM and successfully retransplanted into new hosts with injured liver. Cultured HSCs transiently adopted an expression profile similar to that of progenitor cells during differentiation into bile acid–synthesizing and –transporting hepatocytes, suggesting that stellate cells represent a source of liver progenitor cells. This concept connects seemingly contradictory studies that favor either progenitor cells or MSCs as important players in stem cell–based liver regeneration. PMID:25401473

  17. Characterization of mouse hepatitis virus-specific cytotoxic T cells derived from the central nervous system of mice infected with the JHM strain.

    PubMed Central

    Stohlman, S A; Kyuwa, S; Polo, J M; Brady, D; Lai, M M; Bergmann, C C

    1993-01-01

    The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity of spleen cells from BALB/c (H-2d) mice immunized with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was stimulated in vitro for 7 days. CTL were tested for recognition of target cells infected with either JHMV or vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the four virus structural proteins. Only target cells infected with either JHMV or the vaccinia virus recombinant expressing the JHMV nucleocapsid protein were recognized. Cytotoxic T cell lines were established by limiting dilution from the brains of mice undergoing acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis after infection with JHMV. Twenty of the 22 lines recognized JHMV-infected but not uninfected syngeneic target cells, indicating that they are specific for JHMV. All T-cell lines except one were CD8+. The specificity of the CTL lines was examined by using target cells infected with vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the JHMV nucleocapsid, spike, membrane, and hemagglutinin-esterase structural proteins. Seventeen lines recognized target cells expressing the nucleocapsid protein. Three of the JHMV-specific T-cell lines were unable to recognize target cells expressing any of the JHMV structural proteins, indicating that they are specific for an epitope of a nonstructural protein(s) of JHMV. These data indicate that the nucleocapsid protein induces an immunodominant CTL response. However, no CTL activity specific for the nucleocapsid protein could be detected in either the spleens or cervical lymph nodes of mice 4, 5, 6, or 7 days after intracranial infection, suggesting that the CTL response to JHMV infection within the central nervous system may be induced or expanded locally. PMID:8230429

  18. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  19. Hepatic stem cells: in search of.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Maggie H; Gerber, David A

    2006-08-01

    The field of stem cell biology has exploded with the study of a wide range of cellular populations involving endodermal, mesenchymal, and ectodermal organs. One area of extensive study has included the identification of hepatic stem and progenitor cell subpopulations. Liver stem cells provide insights into the potential pathways involving liver regeneration that are independent of mature hepatocytes. Hepatic progenitor cells are either bipotent or multipotent and capable of multiple rounds of replication. They have been identified in fetal as well as adult liver. Various injury models have been used to expand this cellular compartment. The nomenclature, origin, and function of the hepatic progenitor cell populations are areas of ongoing debate. In this review, we will discuss the different definitions and functions of hepatic progenitor cells as well as the current research efforts examining their therapeutic potential.

  20. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4

  1. Control of Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Mouse Liver-Derived Cells by MAVS-Dependent Production of Type I and Type III Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Anggakusuma; Frentzen, Anne; Gürlevik, Engin; Yuan, Qinggong; Steinmann, Eike; Ott, Michael; Staeheli, Peter; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Kuehnel, Florian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) efficiently infects only humans and chimpanzees. Although the detailed mechanisms responsible for this narrow species tropism remain elusive, recent evidence has shown that murine innate immune responses efficiently suppress HCV replication. Therefore, poor adaptation of HCV to evade and/or counteract innate immune responses may prevent HCV replication in mice. The HCV NS3-4A protease cleaves human MAVS, a key cellular adaptor protein required for RIG-I-like receptor (RLR)-dependent innate immune signaling. However, it is unclear if HCV interferes with mouse MAVS function equally well. Moreover, MAVS-dependent signaling events that restrict HCV replication in mouse cells were incompletely defined. Thus, we quantified the ability of HCV NS3-4A to counteract mouse and human MAVS. HCV NS3-4A similarly diminished both human and mouse MAVS-dependent signaling in human and mouse cells. Moreover, replicon-encoded protease cleaved a similar fraction of both MAVS variants. Finally, FLAG-tagged MAVS proteins repressed HCV replication to similar degrees. Depending on MAVS expression, HCV replication in mouse liver cells triggered not only type I but also type III IFNs, which cooperatively repressed HCV replication. Mouse liver cells lacking both type I and III IFN receptors were refractory to MAVS-dependent antiviral effects, indicating that the HCV-induced MAVS-dependent antiviral state depends on both type I and III IFN receptor signaling. IMPORTANCE In this study, we found that HCV NS3-4A similarly diminished both human and mouse MAVS-dependent signaling in human and mouse cells. Therefore, it is unlikely that ineffective cleavage of mouse MAVS per se precludes HCV propagation in immunocompetent mouse liver cells. Hence, approaches to reinforce HCV replication in mouse liver cells (e.g., by expression of essential human replication cofactors) should not be thwarted by the poor ability of HCV to counteract MAVS-dependent antiviral signaling

  2. Interaction between amiodarone and hepatitis-C virus nucleotide inhibitors in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and HEK-293 Cav1.2 over-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Lagrutta, Armando; Zeng, Haoyu; Imredy, John; Balasubramanian, Bharathi; Dech, Spencer; Lis, Edward; Wang, Jixin; Zhai, Jin; DeGeorge, Joseph; Sannajust, Frederick

    2016-10-01

    Several clinical cases of severe bradyarrhythmias have been reported upon co-administration of the Hepatitis-C NS5B Nucleotide Polymerase Inhibitor (HCV-NI) direct-acting antiviral agent, sofosbuvir (SOF), and the Class-III anti-arrhythmic amiodarone (AMIO). We model the cardiac drug-drug interaction (DDI) between AMIO and SOF, and between AMIO and a closely-related SOF analog, MNI-1 (Merck Nucleotide Inhibitor #1), in functional assays of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), to provide mechanistic insights into recently reported clinical cases. AMIO co-applied with SOF or MNI-1 increased beating rate or field potential (FP) rate and decreased impedance (IMP) and Ca(2+) transient amplitudes in hiPSC-CM syncytia. This action resembled that of Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs) in the model, but CCBs did not substitute for AMIO in the DDI. AMIO analog dronedarone (DRON) did not substitute for, but competed with AMIO in the DDI. Ryanodine and thapsigargin, decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and SEA-0400, a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 (NCX1) inhibitor, partially antagonized or suppressed DDI effects. Other agents affecting FP rate only exerted additive or subtractive effects, commensurate with their individual effects. We also describe an interaction between AMIO and MNI-1 on Cav1.2 ion channels in an over-expressing HEK-293 cell line. MNI-1 enhanced Cav1.2 channel inhibition by AMIO, but did not affect inhibition of Cav1.2 by DRON, verapamil, nifedipine, or diltiazem. Our data in hiPSC-CMs indicate that HCV-NI agents such as SOF and MNI-1 interact with key intracellular Ca(2+)-handling mechanisms. Additional study in a Cav1.2 HEK-293 cell-line suggests that HCV-NIs potentiate the inhibitory action of AMIO on L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  3. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  4. Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R. E.; Fleming, H.E.; Bhatia, S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Liver disease is an important clinical problem, impacting over 30 million Americans and over 600 million people worldwide. It is the 12th leading cause of death in the United States and the 16th worldwide. Due to a paucity of donor organs, several thousand Americans die yearly while waiting for liver transplantation. Unfortunately, alternative tissue sources such as fetal hepatocytes and hepatic cell lines are unreliable, difficult to reproduce, and do not fully recapitulate hepatocyte phenotype and function. As a consequence, alternative cell sources that do not have these limitations have been sought. Human embryonic stem (hES) cell- and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells may enable cell based therapeutics, the study of the mechanisms of human disease and human development, and provide a platform for pharmacology and toxicology drug screening. iPS cells can be differentiated in a stepwise fashion with high efficiency and reproducibility into hepatocyte-like cells that exhibit morphologic and phenotypic characteristics of hepatocytes. In addition, iPS-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess some functional hepatic activity as they secrete urea, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and albumin. However, the combined phenotypic and functional traits exhibited by iPS-derived hepatocyte-like cells resemble a relatively immature hepatic phenotype that more closely resembles that of fetal hepatocytes rather than adult hepatocytes. Specifically, iPS-derived hepatocyte-like cells express fetal markers such as alpha fetoprotein and lack key mature hepatocyte functions, as reflected by drastically reduced activity (0.1%) of many detoxification enzymes (i.e. CYP2A6, CYP3A4). These key differences between iPS-derived hepatocyte-like cells and adult hepatocytes have limited the use of stem cells as a renewable source of functional adult human hepatocytes for in vitro and in vivo applications. Unfortunately, the developmental pathways that control hepatocyte

  5. Myeloid derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Todd J.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Singhal, Sunil; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of achieving measurable response with cancer immunotherapy requires counteracting the immunosuppressive characteristics of tumors. One of the mechanisms that tumors utilize to escape immunosurveillance is the activation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Upon activation by tumor-derived signals, MDSCs inhibit the ability of the host to mount an anti-tumor immune response via their capacity to suppress both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Despite their relatively recent discovery and characterization, anti-MDSC agents have been identified, which may improve immunotherapy efficacy. PMID:23734336

  6. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  7. Immunomodulation of activated hepatic stellate cells by mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parekkadan, Biju; Poll, Daan van; Megeed, Zaki; Kobayashi, Naoya; Tilles, Arno W.; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2007-11-16

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to prevent the development of liver fibrosis in a number of pre-clinical studies. Marked changes in liver histopathology and serological markers of liver function have been observed without a clear understanding of the therapeutic mechanism by which stem cells act. We sought to determine if MSCs could modulate the activity of resident liver cells, specifically hepatic stellate cells (SCs) by paracrine mechanisms using indirect cocultures. Indirect coculture of MSCs and activated SCs led to a significant decrease in collagen deposition and proliferation, while inducing apoptosis of activated SCs. The molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of SC activity by MSCs were examined. IL-6 secretion from activated SCs induced IL-10 secretion from MSCs, suggesting a dynamic response of MSCs to the SCs in the microenvironment. Blockade of MSC-derived IL-10 and TNF-{alpha} abolished the inhibitory effects of MSCs on SC proliferation and collagen synthesis. In addition, release of HGF by MSCs was responsible for the marked induction of apoptosis in SCs as determined by antibody-neutralization studies. These findings demonstrate that MSCs can modulate the function of activated SCs via paracrine mechanisms provide a plausible explanation for the protective role of MSCs in liver inflammation and fibrosis, which may also be relevant to other models of tissue fibrosis.

  8. Toxicogenomics-based prediction of acetaminophen-induced liver injury using human hepatic cell systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Heymans, Anja; De Boe, Veerle; Sachinidis, Agapios; Chaudhari, Umesh; Govaere, Olivier; Roskams, Tania; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; De Kock, Joery

    2016-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (hHEP), human HepaRG and HepG2 cell lines are the most used human liver-based in vitro models for hepatotoxicity testing, including screening of drug-induced liver injury (DILI)-inducing compounds. hHEP are the reference hepatic in vitro system, but their availability is limited and the cells available for toxicology studies are often of poor quality. Hepatic cell lines on the other hand are highly proliferative and represent an inexhaustible hepatic cell source. However, these hepatoma-derived cells do not represent the population diversity and display reduced hepatic metabolism. Alternatively, stem cell-derived hepatic cells, which can be produced in high numbers and can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are also being evaluated as a cell source for in vitro hepatotoxicity studies. Human skin-derived precursors (hSKP) are post-natal stem cells that, after conversion towards hepatic cells (hSKP-HPC), respond to hepatotoxic compounds in a comparable way as hHEP. In the current study, four different human hepatic cell systems (hSKP-HPC, hHEP, HepaRG and HepG2) are evaluated for their capacity to predict hepatic toxicity. Their hepatotoxic response to acetaminophen (APAP) exposure is compared to data obtained from patients suffering from APAP-induced acute liver failure (ALF). The results indicate that hHEP, HepaRG and hSKP-HPC identify comparable APAP-induced hepatotoxic functions and that HepG2 cells show the slightest hepatotoxic response. Pathway analyses further points out that HepaRG cells show the highest predicted activation of the functional genes related to 'damage of liver', followed by hSKP-HPC and hHEP cells that generated similar results. HepG2 did not show any activation of this function. PMID:26497421

  9. Novel artemisinin derivatives with potential usefulness against liver/colon cancer and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Alba G; Fernandez-Dolon, Manuel; Sanchez-Vicente, Laura; Maestre, Alba D; Gomez-San Miguel, Ana B; Alvarez, Marcelino; Serrano, Maria A; Jansen, Herwig; Efferth, Thomas; Marin, Jose J G; Romero, Marta R

    2013-07-15

    Antitumor and antiviral properties of the antimalaria drug artemisinin from Artemisia annua have been reported. Novel artemisinin derivatives (AD1-AD8) have been synthesized and evaluated using in vitro models of liver/colon cancer and viral hepatitis B and C. Cell viability assays after treating human cell lines from hepatoblastoma (HepG2), hepatocarcinoma (SK-HEP-1), and colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T) with AD1-AD8 for a short (6h) and long (72h) period revealed that AD5 combined low acute toxicity together with high antiproliferative effect (IC50=1-5μM). Since iron-mediated activation of peroxide bond is involved in artemisinin antimalarial activity, the effect of iron(II)-glycine sulfate (ferrosanol) and iron(III)-containing protoporphyrin IX (hemin) was investigated. Ferrosanol, but not hemin, enhanced antiproliferative activity of AD5 if the cells were preloaded with AD5, but not if both compouds were added together. Five derivatives (AD1>AD2>AD7>AD3>AD8) were able to inhibit the cytopathic effect of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), a surrogate in vitro model of hepatitis C virus (HCV), used here to evaluate the anti-Flaviviridae activity. Moreover, AD1 and AD2 inhibited the release of BVDV-RNA to the culture medium. Co-treatment with hemin or ferrosanol resulted in enhanced anti-Flaviviridae activity of AD1. In HepG2 cells permanently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), AD1 and AD4, at non-toxic concentrations for the host cells were able to reduce the release of HBV-DNA to the medium. In conclusion, high pharmacological interest deserving further evaluation in animal models has been identified for novel artemisinin-related drugs potentially useful for the treatment of liver cancer and viral hepatitis B and C. PMID:23685181

  10. Regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Teratani, Takumi; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have an enormous potential; however, their potential clinical application is being arrested due to various limitations such as teratoma formation followed by tumorigenesis, emergent usage, and the quality control of cells, as well as safety issues regarding long-term culture are also delaying their clinical application. In addition, human ES cells have two crucial issues: immunogenicity and ethical issues associated with their clinical application. The efficient generation of human iPS cells requires gene transfer, yet the mechanism underlying pluripotent stem cell induction has not yet been fully elucidated. Otherwise, although human adult regenerative cells including mesenchymal stem cells have a limited capacity for differentiation, they are nevertheless promising candidates for tissue regeneration in a clinical setting. This review highlights the use of regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

  11. Generation and In Vitro Expansion of Hepatic Progenitor Cells from Human iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have the unique properties of self-renewal and multipotency (producing progeny belonging to two or more lineages). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated from somatic cells by simultaneous expression of pluripotent factors (Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc). They share the same properties as embryonic stem (ES) cells and can differentiate into several tissue cells, i.e., neurons, hematopoietic cells, and liver cells. Therefore, iPS cells are suitable candidate cells for regenerative medicine and analyses of disease mechanisms.The liver is the major organ that regulates a multitude of metabolic functions. Hepatocytes are the major cell type populating the liver parenchyma and express several metabolic enzymes that are necessary for liver functions. Although hepatocytes are essential for maintaining homeostasis, it is difficult to alter artificial and transplanted cells because of their multifunctionality, donor shortage, and immunorejection risk. During liver development, hepatic progenitor cells in the fetal liver differentiate into both mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. As hepatic progenitor cells have bipotency and high proliferation ability, they could present a potential source for generating transplantable cells or as a liver study model. Here we describe the induction and purification of hepatic progenitor cells derived from human iPS cells. These cells can proliferate for a long term under suitable culture conditions.

  12. The Last Ten Years of Advancements in Plant-Derived Recombinant Vaccines against Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Young Hee; Park, Se Hee; Moon, Ki-Beom; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Cho, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Disease prevention through vaccination is considered to be the greatest contribution to public health over the past century. Every year more than 100 million children are vaccinated with the standard World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended vaccines including hepatitis B (HepB). HepB is the most serious type of liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV), however, it can be prevented by currently available recombinant vaccine, which has an excellent record of safety and effectiveness. To date, recombinant vaccines are produced in many systems of bacteria, yeast, insect, and mammalian and plant cells. Among these platforms, the use of plant cells has received considerable attention in terms of intrinsic safety, scalability, and appropriate modification of target proteins. Research groups worldwide have attempted to develop more efficacious plant-derived vaccines for over 30 diseases, most frequently HepB and influenza. More inspiring, approximately 12 plant-made antigens have already been tested in clinical trials, with successful outcomes. In this study, the latest information from the last 10 years on plant-derived antigens, especially hepatitis B surface antigen, approaches are reviewed and breakthroughs regarding the weak points are also discussed. PMID:27754367

  13. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-01

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR-β to deliver interferon (IFN)-γ to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN-γ were less than those treated with SSL-IFN-γ, IFN-γ and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN-γ was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN-γ might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  14. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling.

  15. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  16. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  17. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  18. Curcumin-induced recovery from hepatic injury involves induction of apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Priya, S; Sudhakaran, P R

    2008-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) undergo activation and transdifferentiation to myofibroblast like cells in liver injury, leading to liver fibrosis. During recovery from injury, activated HSCs may either revert back to quiescent state or undergo apoptosis or both. In the present study, we have examined whether recovery from hepatic injury involves apoptosis of activated HSCs and tested whether curcumin (the yellow pigment from Curcuma longa Linn.) promotes recovery from hepatic injury by inducing apoptosis of these cells. Hepatic injury was induced by CCl4 and apoptosis was studied in HSCs isolated from liver by MTT assay, DNA fragmentation, and DAPI and annexin staining. Hepatic recovery was assessed by measuring hepatic marker activities, such as serum GOT, GPT and protein. Hepatic recovery occurred within 4 weeks after inducing injury in untreated control, whereas curcumin treatment caused hepatic recovery within 2 weeks, as evidenced by the reduction of hepatic marker activities to near normal levels. HSCs isolated from liver of animals treated with curcumin showed maximum apoptotic marker activities in 2nd week, whereas in HSCs from untreated control recovering from injury, maximum apoptosis was observed in 4th week. Induction of apoptosis in vivo during hepatic recovery was also suggested by increase in caspase-3 activity. Treatment of isolated HSCs in culture with curcumin caused apoptosis during later stages confirming that curcumin induced apoptosis of activated HSCs and not in unactivated quiescent HSCs. These results suggested that hepatoprotective effect of curcumin causing recovery from injury involved apoptosis of activated HSCs. PMID:19069843

  19. Hepatic differentiation of porcine embryonic stem cells for translational research of hepatocyte transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, K M; Hussein, K H; Ghim, J H; Ahn, C; Cha, S H; Lee, G S; Hong, S H; Yang, S; Woo, H M

    2015-04-01

    Porcine embryonic stem cells (ES) are considered attractive preclinical research tools for human liver diseases. Although several studies previously reported generation of porcine ES, none of these studies has described hepatic differentiation from porcine ES. The aim of this study was to generate hepatocytes from porcine ES and analyze their characteristics. We optimized conditions for definitive endoderm induction and developed a 4-step hepatic differentiation protocol. A brief serum-free condition with activin A efficiently induced definitive endoderm differentiation from porcine ES. The porcine ES-derived hepatocyte-like cells highly expressed hepatic markers including albumin and α-fetoprotein, and displayed liver characteristics such as glycogen storage, lipid production, and low-density lipoprotein uptake. For the first time, we describe a highly efficient protocol for hepatic differentiation from porcine ES. Our findings provide valuable information for translational liver research using porcine models, including hepatic regeneration and transplant studies, drug screening, and toxicology.

  20. Natural killer cells in hepatitis C: Current progress

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Joo Chun; Yang, Chang Mo; Song, Youkyong; Lee, Jae Myun

    2016-01-01

    Patients infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are characterized by a high incidence of chronic infection, which results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The functional impairment of HCV-specific T cells is associated with the evolution of an acute infection to chronic hepatitis. While T cells are the important effector cells in adaptive immunity, natural killer (NK) cells are the critical effector cells in innate immunity to virus infections. The findings of recent studies on NK cells in hepatitis C suggest that NK cell responses are indeed important in each phase of HCV infection. In the early phase, NK cells are involved in protective immunity to HCV. The immune evasion strategies used by HCV may target NK cells and might contribute to the progression to chronic hepatitis C. NK cells may control HCV replication and modulate hepatic fibrosis in the chronic phase. Further investigations are, however, needed, because a considerable number of studies observed functional impairment of NK cells in chronic HCV infection. Interestingly, the enhanced NK cell responses during interferon-α-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C indicate successful treatment. In spite of the advances in research on NK cells in hepatitis C, establishment of more physiological HCV infection model systems is needed to settle unsolved controversies over the role and functional status of NK cells in HCV infection. PMID:26819513

  1. Cell entry of hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Bartosch, Birke . E-mail: Birke.Bartosch@ens-lyon.fr; Cosset, Francois-Loic . E-mail: Francois-Loic.Cosset@ens-lyon.fr

    2006-04-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen, is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus classified in the hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Cell attachment of flaviviruses generally leads to endocytosis of bound virions. Systems that support HCV replication and particle formation in vitro are emerging only now, 16 years after the discovery of the virus. Albeit this limitation, the route of HCV cell entry as well as 'capture' molecules involved in low-affinity interactions for the initial contact of HCV with target cells and potential high-affinity receptor candidates that may mediate HCV trafficking and fusion has been described. The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of different HCV model systems to our current knowledge about structure of the HCV GPs E1 and E2 and their roles in cell entry comprising cell attachment, interactions with cellular receptors, endocytosis, and fusion.

  2. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC’s anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue.

  3. Single cell analysis in native tissue: Quantification of the retinoid content of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Galler, Kerstin; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Glaser, Uwe; Markwart, Robby; Bocklitz, Thomas; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are retinoid storing cells in the liver: The retinoid content of those cells changes depending on nutrition and stress level. There are also differences with regard to a HSC’s anatomical position in the liver. Up to now, retinoid levels were only accessible from bulk measurements of tissue homogenates or cell extracts. Unfortunately, they do not account for the intercellular variability. Herein, Raman spectroscopy relying on excitation by the minimally destructive wavelength 785 nm is introduced for the assessment of the retinoid state of single HSCs in freshly isolated, unprocessed murine liver lobes. A quantitative estimation of the cellular retinoid content is derived. Implications of the retinoid content on hepatic health state are reported. The Raman-based results are integrated with histological assessments of the tissue samples. This spectroscopic approach enables single cell analysis regarding an important cellular feature in unharmed tissue. PMID:27063397

  4. Hepatic Stellate Cells: Protean, Multifunctional, and Enigmatic Cells of the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    The hepatic stellate cell has surprised and engaged physiologists, pathologists, and hepatologists for over 130 years, yet clear evidence of its role in hepatic injury and fibrosis only emerged following the refinement of methods for its isolation and characterization. The paradigm in liver injury of activation of quiescent vitamin A-rich stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic myofibroblasts has launched an era of astonishing progress in understanding the mechanistic basis of hepatic fibrosis progression and regression. But this simple paradigm has now yielded to a remarkably broad appreciation of the cell's functions not only in liver injury, but also in hepatic development, regeneration, xenobiotic responses, intermediary metabolism, and immunoregulation. Among the most exciting prospects is that stellate cells are essential for hepatic progenitor cell amplification and differentiation. Equally intriguing is the remarkable plasticity of stellate cells, not only in their variable intermediate filament phenotype, but also in their functions. Stellate cells can be viewed as the nexus in a complex sinusoidal milieu that requires tightly regulated autocrine and paracrine cross-talk, rapid responses to evolving extracellular matrix content, and exquisite responsiveness to the metabolic needs imposed by liver growth and repair. Moreover, roles vital to systemic homeostasis include their storage and mobilization of retinoids, their emerging capacity for antigen presentation and induction of tolerance, as well as their emerging relationship to bone marrow-derived cells. As interest in this cell type intensifies, more surprises and mysteries are sure to unfold that will ultimately benefit our understanding of liver physiology and the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease. PMID:18195085

  5. A plant-derived edible vaccine against hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, J; Modelska, A; Figlerowicz, M; Pniewski, T; Letellier, M; Lisowa, O; Yusibov, V; Koprowski, H; Plucienniczak, A; Legocki, A B

    1999-10-01

    The infectious hepatitis B virus represents 42 nm spherical double-shelled particles. However, analysis of blood from hepatitis B virus carriers revealed the presence of smaller 22 nm particles consisting of a viral envelope surface protein. These particles are highly immunogenic and have been used in the design of hepatitis B virus vaccine produced in yeast. Upon expression in yeast, these proteins form virus-like particles that are used for parenteral immunization. Therefore, the DNA fragment encoding hepatitis B virus surface antigen was introduced into Agrobacterium tumerifacience LBA4404 and used to obtain transgenic lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cv. Burpee Bibb expressing envelope surface protein. Mice that were fed the transgenic lupin tissue developed significant levels of hepatitis B virus-specific antibodies. Human volunteers, fed with transgenic lettuce plants expressing hepatitis B virus surface antigen, developed specific serum-IgG response to plant produced protein.

  6. [Hepatic cell transplantation. Technical and methodological aspects].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Martínez, Amparo; Cortés, Miriam; Bonora, Ana; Moya, Angel; Sanjuán, Fernando; Gómez-Lechón, M José; Mir, José

    2010-03-01

    Hepatic cell transplantation consists of grafting already differentiated cells such as hepatocytes. Human hepatocytes are viable and functionally active. Liver cell transplantation is carried out by means of a 3-step method: isolation of hepatocytes from donor liver rejected for orthotopic transplantation, preparing a cell suspension for infusion and, finally, hepatocytes are implanted into the recipient. There are established protocols for the isolation of human hepatocytes from unused segments of donor livers, based on collagenase digestion of cannulated liver tissue at 37 degrees C. The hepatocytes can be used fresh or cryopreserved. Cryopreservation of isolated human hepatocytes would then be available for planned use. In cell transplant, the important aspects are: infusion route, number of cells, number of infusions and viability of the cells. The cells are infused into the patient through a catheter inserted via portal vein or splenic artery. Liver cell transplantation allows liver tissue to be used that would, otherwise, be discarded, enabling multiple patients to be treated with hepatocytes from a single tissue donor.

  7. Natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-fei; Wang, Wen-jing; Gao, Yue-qiu

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells are a unique type of lymphocytes with cytotoxic capacity, and play important roles against tumors and infections. Recently, natural killer cells have been increasingly valued in their effects in hepatitis B virus infection. Since hepatitis B virus is not cytopathic, the subsequent antiviral immune responses of the host are responsible for sustaining the liver injury, which may result in cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Many studies have confirmed that natural killer cells participate in anti-hepatitis B virus responses both in the early phase after infection and in the chronic phase via cytolysis, degranulation, and cytokine secretion. However, natural killer cells play dichotomic roles: they exert antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst contribute to the pathogenesis of liver injury. Here, we review the roles of natural killer cells in hepatitis B virus infection, introducing novel therapeutic strategies for controlling hepatitis B virus infection via the modulation of natural killer cells.

  8. Bile acids induce hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawitza, Iris; Kordes, Claus; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and their therapeutic potential has become obvious. In the liver, MSC are represented by stellate cells which have the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes after stimulation with growth factors. Since bile acids can promote liver regeneration, their influence on liver-resident and bone marrow-derived MSC was investigated. Physiological concentrations of bile acids such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid were able to initiate hepatic differentiation of MSC via the farnesoid X receptor and transmembrane G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 as investigated with knockout mice. Notch, hedgehog, transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein family and non-canonical Wnt signalling were also essential for bile acid-mediated differentiation, whereas β-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling was able to attenuate this process. Our findings reveal bile acid-mediated signalling as an alternative way to induce hepatic differentiaion of stem cells and highlight bile acids as important signalling molecules during liver regeneration. PMID:26304833

  9. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  10. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  11. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  12. Generation of functional hepatic cells from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songyan; Bourdon, Alice; Hamou, Wissam; Dziedzic, Noelle; Goldman, Orit; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Liver diseases affect millions of people worldwide, especially in developing country. According to the American Liver Foundation, nearly 1 in every 10 Americans suffers from some form of liver disease. Even though, the liver has great ability to self-repair, in end-stage liver diseases including fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer induced by viral hepatitis and drugs, the liver regenerative capacity is exhausted. The only successful treatment for chronic liver failure is the whole liver transplantation. More recently, some clinical trials using hepatocyte transplantation have shown some clinical improvement for metabolic liver diseases and acute liver failure. However, the shortage of donor livers remains a life-threatening challenge in liver disease patients. To overcome the scarcity of donor livers, hepatocytes generated from embryonic stem cell or induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation cultures could provide an unlimited supply of such cells for transplantation. This review provides an updated summary of hepatic differentiation protocols published so far, with a characterization of the hepatic cells generated in vitro and their ability to regenerate damaged livers in vivo following transplantation in pre-clinical liver deficient mouse models. PMID:25364624

  13. Donor-dependent variations in hepatic differentiation from human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Masatoshi; Aoi, Takashi; Okita, Keisuke; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Haruhisa; Takayama, Naoya; Endo, Hiroshi; Eto, Koji; Toguchida, Junya; Uemoto, Shinji; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2012-07-31

    Hepatocytes generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are unprecedented resources for pharmaceuticals and cell therapy. However, the in vitro directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into mature hepatocytes remains challenging. Little attention has so far been paid to variations among hiPSC lines in terms of their hepatic differentiation. In the current study, we developed an improved hepatic differentiation protocol and compared 28 hiPSC lines originated from various somatic cells and derived using retroviruses, Sendai viruses, or episomal plasmids. This comparison indicated that the origins, but not the derivation methods, may be a major determinant of variation in hepatic differentiation. The hiPSC clones derived from peripheral blood cells consistently showed good differentiation efficiency, whereas many hiPSC clones from adult dermal fibroblasts showed poor differentiation. However, when we compared hiPSCs from peripheral blood and dermal fibroblasts from the same individuals, we found that variations in hepatic differentiation were largely attributable to donor differences, rather than to the types of the original cells. These data underscore the importance of donor differences when comparing the differentiation propensities of hiPSC clones.

  14. A novel method of mouse ex utero transplantation of hepatic progenitor cells into the fetal liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, Mima; Asahina, Kinji; Iseki, Sachiko Teramoto, Kenichi; Nishida, Tomohiro; Shimizu-Saito, Keiko; Ota, Masato; Eto, Kazuhiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2009-04-03

    Avoiding the limitations of the adult liver niche, transplantation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells into fetal liver is desirable to analyze immature cells in a hepatic developmental environment. Here, we established a new monitor tool for cell fate of hepatic progenitor cells transplanted into the mouse fetal liver by using ex utero surgery. When embryonic day (ED) 14.5 hepatoblasts were injected into the ED14.5 fetal liver, the transplanted cells expressed albumin abundantly or {alpha}-fetoprotein weakly, and contained glycogen in the neonatal liver, indicating that transplanted hepatoblasts can proliferate and differentiate in concord with surrounding recipient parenchymal cells. The transplanted cells became mature in the liver of 6-week-old mice. Furthermore, this method was applicable to transplantation of hepatoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. These data indicate that this unique technique will provide a new in vivo experimental system for studying cell fate of hepatic stem/progenitor cells and liver organogenesis.

  15. Depletion of β-arrestin2 in hepatic stellate cells reduces cell proliferation via ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wu-Yi; Song, Yang; Hu, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Tong; Wu, Hua-Xun; Chen, Jing-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2013-05-01

    β-Arrestins are multifunctional adaptor proteins. Recently, some new roles of β-arrestins in regulating intracellular signaling networks have been discovered, which regulate cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Though, the role of β-arrestins expression in the pathology of hepatic fibrosis remains unclear. In this study, the possible relationship between the expression of β-arrestins with the experimental hepatic fibrosis and the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were investigated. Porcine serum induced liver fibrosis was established in this study. At five time points, the dynamic expression of β-arrestin1, β-arrestin2, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in rat liver tissues, was measured by immunohistochemical staining, double immunofluorescent staining, and Western blotting. This study showed that aggravation of hepatic fibrosis with gradually increasing expression of β-arrestin2 in the hepatic tissues, but not β-arrestin1. Further, as hepatic fibrosis worsens, β-arrestin2-expressing activated HSCs accounts for an increasingly larger percentage of all activated HSCs. And the expression of β-arrestin2 had a significant positive correlation with the expression of α-SMA, an activated HSCs marker. In vitro studies, the dynamic expression of β-arrestin1 and β-arrestin2 in platelet derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) stimulated HSCs was assessed by Western blotting. The expression of β-arrestin2 was remarkably increased in PDGF-BB stimulated HSCs. Furthermore, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique was used to explore the effect of β-arrestins on the proliferation of HSCs and the activation of ERK1/2. Transfection of siRNA targeting β-arrestin2 mRNA (siβ-arrestin2) into HSCs led to a 68% and 70% reduction of β-arrestin2 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. siβ-arrestin2 abolished the effect of PDGF-BB on the proliferation of HSCs. In addition, siβ-arrestin2 exerted the inhibition of the activation of ERK1/2 in HSCs. The

  16. Primary Hepatic Small-Cell Carcinoma Developed during Antiviral Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suk Bae

    2015-01-01

    Previously reported cases of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma were all detected at progressed state with associated symptoms. Therefore, the natural course of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma remains unknown. This case shows the natural course of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma. We detected a 1.2 cm hypodense nodule 6 months ago in a patient with cirrhosis who had been taking entecavir. It was suspected to be a regenerating or degenerating nodule. Three months later, liver computed tomography (CT) revealed that the mass was increased to 2.1 cm with the same characteristics. The patient wanted to do a follow-up CT scan after 3 months instead of a biopsy. Another 3 months later, the mass was markedly increased, involving the whole left lobe and was confirmed as small-cell carcinoma on biopsy. Here, we report the first case of primary hepatic small-cell carcinoma developed during treatment for chronic hepatitis B with cirrhosis. PMID:26951743

  17. Discovery, Optimization, and Characterization of Novel Chlorcyclizine Derivatives for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported that chlorcyclizine (CCZ, Rac-2), an over-the-counter antihistamine piperazine drug, possesses in vitro and in vivo activity against hepatitis C virus. Here, we describe structure–activity relationship (SAR) efforts that resulted in the optimization of novel chlorcyclizine derivatives as anti-HCV agents. Several compounds exhibited EC50 values below 10 nM against HCV infection, cytotoxicity selectivity indices above 2000, and showed improved in vivo pharmacokinetic properties. The optimized molecules can serve as lead preclinical candidates for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and as probes to study hepatitis C virus pathogenesis and host–virus interaction. PMID:26599718

  18. A Conserved Inhibitory Mechanism of a Lycorine Derivative against Enterovirus and Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Yaxin; Cao, Lin; Wang, Peng; Qing, Jie; Zheng, Qizhen; Shang, Luqing

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) (Picornaviridae family) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) (Flaviviridae family) are the causative agents of human hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) and hepatitis C, resulting in a severe pandemic involving millions of infections in the Asia-Pacific region and worldwide. The great impact of EV71 and HCV on public health highlights the need to further our understanding of the biology of these two viruses and develop effective therapeutic antivirals. Here, we evaluated a total of 32 lycorine derivatives and demonstrated that 1-acetyllycorine suppressed the proliferation of multiple strains of EV71 in various cells. The results of the drug resistance analysis revealed that 1-acetyllycorine targeted a phenylalanine (F76) in EV71 2A protease (2Apro) to stabilize the conformation of a unique zinc finger. Most interestingly, the zinc binding site in EV71 2Apro is the exclusive homolog of HCV NS3 among all viruses. Further analysis revealed that 1-acetyllycorine also inhibits HCV with high efficacy, and the mutation on R118 in HCV NS3, which corresponds to F76 in EV71 2Apro, confers the resistance of HCV to 1-acetyllycorine. These results revealed a conserved mechanism of 1-acetyllycorine against EV71 and HCV through targeting viral proteases. We also documented the significant synergistic anti-EV71 and anti-HCV effects of 1-acetyllycorine with reported inhibitors, supporting potential combination therapy for the treatment of EV71 and HCV infections. PMID:26596952

  19. Carbon monoxide-bound red blood cell resuscitation ameliorates hepatic injury induced by massive hemorrhage and red blood cell resuscitation via hepatic cytochrome P450 protection in hemorrhagic shock rats.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2014-07-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are the gold standard in cases of massive hemorrhage, but induce hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury, a serious complication associated with hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation. Thus, the development of a novel resuscitable fluid that is not associated with hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury would be desirable. It was reported that exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) treatment ameliorated hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury accompanying liver transplantation. This suggests that transfusions with CO-bound RBC (CO-RBC) might protect against hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury following massive hemorrhage and resuscitation compared with RBC resuscitation. To investigate this, we created a hemorrhagic shock model rat, followed by resuscitation with RBC and CO-RBC. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury and the destruction of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) were significantly ameliorated in the CO-RBC resuscitation group compared with the RBC resuscitation group. The free heme derived from the destruction of hepatic CYP was correlated with hepatic oxidation and injury, suggesting that CO-RBC was a major factor in the amelioration of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury induced by hemorrhage and resuscitation via hepatic CYP protection. These results indicate that CO-RBC has potential for use as a resuscitative fluid in blood transfusion and does not suffer from the limitations associated with the RBC transfusions that are currently in use.

  20. Epigenetic Changes during Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Götze, Silke; Schumacher, Eva C.; Kordes, Claus; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which can participate in liver regeneration and fibrogenesis, have recently been identified as liver-resident mesenchymal stem cells. During their activation HSC adopt a myofibroblast-like phenotype accompanied by profound changes in the gene expression profile. DNA methylation changes at single genes have been reported during HSC activation and may participate in the regulation of this process, but comprehensive DNA methylation analyses are still missing. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of DNA methylation during in vitro activation of HSC. Methods and Results The analysis of DNA methylation changes by antibody-based assays revealed a strong decrease in the global DNA methylation level during culture-induced activation of HSC. To identify genes which may be regulated by DNA methylation, we performed a genome-wide Methyl-MiniSeq EpiQuest sequencing comparing quiescent and early culture-activated HSC. Approximately 400 differentially methylated regions with a methylation change of at least 20% were identified, showing either hypo- or hypermethylation during activation. Further analysis of selected genes for DNA methylation and expression were performed revealing a good correlation between DNA methylation changes and gene expression. Furthermore, global DNA demethylation during HSC activation was investigated by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay and L-mimosine treatment showing that demethylation was independent of DNA synthesis and thereby excluding a passive DNA demethylation mechanism. Conclusions In summary, in vitro activation of HSC initiated strong DNA methylation changes, which were associated with gene regulation. These results indicate that epigenetic mechanisms are important for the control of early HSC activation. Furthermore, the data show that global DNA demethylation during activation is based on an active DNA demethylation mechanism. PMID:26065684

  1. Hepatitis delta virus: protein composition of delta antigen and its hepatitis B virus-derived envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, F; Heermann, K H; Rizzetto, M; Gerlich, W H

    1986-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV)-associated particles were purified from the serum of an experimentally infected chimpanzee by size chromatography and by density centrifugation. Hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) was detected after mild detergent treatment at a column elution volume corresponding to 36-nm particles and banded at a density of 1.25 g/ml. The serum had an estimated titer of 10(9) to 10(10) HDV-associated particles and had only a 10-fold excess of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) not associated with HDAg. Therefore, HDV appears to be much more efficiently packed and secreted than is its helper virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV), which is usually accompanied by a 1,000-fold excess of HBsAg. The protein compositions of the HDAg-containing particles were analyzed by immunoblotting with HDAg-, HBsAg-, and hepatitis B core antigen-specific antisera and monoclonal antibodies to HBV surface gene products. The HBsAg envelope of HDAg contained approximately 95% P24/GP27s, 5% GP33/36s, and 1% P39/GP42s proteins. This protein composition was more similar to that of the 22-nm particles of HBsAg than to that of complete HBV. The significant amount of GP33/36s suggests that the HBsAg component of the HDV-associated particle carries the albumin receptor. Two proteins of 27 and 29 kilodaltons which specifically bound antibody to HDAg but not HBV-specific antibodies were detected in the interior of the 36-nm particle. Since these proteins were structural components of HDAg and were most likely coded for by HDV, they were designated P27d and P29d. Images PMID:3701932

  2. In Hepatic Fibrosis, Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Acquire Enhanced Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Michael K.; Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Malhotra, Ashim; Henning, Justin R.; Ibrahim, Junaid; Vera, Valery; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Hassan, Burhan U.; Pachter, H. Leon; Cohen, Steven; Frey, Alan B.; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    The normal liver is characterized by immunologic tolerance. Primary mediators of hepatic immune tolerance are liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). LSECs block adaptive immunogenic responses to Ag and induce the generation of T regulatory cells. Hepatic fibrosis is characterized by both intense intrahepatic inflammation and altered hepatic immunity. We postulated that, in liver fibrosis, a reversal of LSEC function from tolerogenic to proinflammatory and immunogenic may contribute to both the heightened inflammatory milieu and altered intrahepatic immunity. We found that, after fibrotic liver injury from hepatotoxins, LSECs become highly proinflammatory and secrete an array of cytokines and chemokines. In addition, LSECs gain enhanced capacity to capture Ag and induce T cell proliferation. Similarly, unlike LSECs in normal livers, in fibrosis, LSECs do not veto dendritic cell priming of T cells. Furthermore, whereas in normal livers, LSECs are active in the generation of T regulatory cells, in hepatic fibrosis LSECs induce an immunogenic T cell phenotype capable of enhancing endogenous CTLs and generating potent de novo CTL responses. Moreover, depletion of LSECs from fibrotic liver cultures mitigates the proinflammatory milieu characteristic of hepatic fibrosis. Our findings offer a critical understanding of the role of LSECs in modulating intrahepatic immunity and inflammation in fibro-inflammatory liver disease. PMID:20639479

  3. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  4. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  5. The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel YC-1 derivatives as potent anti-hepatic fibrosis agents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Jin, Chunmei; Liu, Zhixue; Guo, Shujing; Zhang, Xiaochuan; Zhou, Xin; Wu, Xue

    2015-07-14

    1-Benzyl-3-(substituted aryl)-5-methylfuro[3,2-c]pyrazole (YC-1) is a well-known synthetic compound with various satisfactory pharmacological activities, such as the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and the inhibition of hypoxia-induced factor-1α (HIF-1α). Recently, YC-1 has been demonstrated to have a potent activity on anti-fibrotic activity. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-fibrotic activity is still largely unknown. To this end, we presented here the design and synthesis of YC-1 and its novel derivatives, as well as the evaluation of their anti-fibrotic effects on activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) LX-2. Moreover, the possible underlying mechanism of anti-fibrotic activity was also investigated for the first time by means of a CCK-8 assay, cell apoptosis analysis, and western blot analysis. Our study revealed that YC-1 and its derivatives suppressed activated LX-2 cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Western blot data demonstrated that these derivatives not only decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), but also increased the expression of caspase-3, resulting in cell apoptosis. These findings strongly indicated that YC-1 and its derivatives, especially AC, could significantly inhibit LX-2 cell activation and induce LX-2 cell apoptosis by inhibiting α-SMA protein expression and promoting caspase-3 expression, respectively. In summary, our findings suggested that YC-1 derivatives might be potential agents for hepatic fibrosis therapy.

  6. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  7. Creation and characterization of a cell-death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhilei; Simeon, Rudo; Chockalingam, Karuppiah; Rice, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes the creation and characterization of a hepatoma cell line, n4mBid, that supports all stages of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle and strongly reports HCV infection by a cell-death phenotype. The n4mBid cell line is derived from the highly HCV-permissive Huh-7.5 hepatoma cell line and contains a modified Bid protein (mBid) that is cleaved and activated by the HCV serine protease NS3-4A. N4mBid exhibited a 10–20 fold difference in cell viability between the HCV-infected and mock-infected states, while the parental Huh-7.5 cells showed <2 fold difference under the same conditions. The pronounced difference in n4mBid cell viability between the HCV- and mock-infected states in a 96-well plate format points to its usefulness in cell survival-based high-throughput screens for anti-HCV molecules. The degree of cell death was found to be proportional to the intracellular load of HCV. HCV-low n4mBid cells, expressing an anti-HCV short hairpin RNA, showed a significant growth advantage over naïve cells and could be rapidly enriched after HCV infection, suggesting the possibility of using n4mBid cells for the cell survival-based selection of genetic anti-HCV factors. PMID:20188762

  8. Givinostat inhibition of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Gang; Xu, Ling; Wang, Ting; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wen-Ying; Wang, Na; Shi, Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat on proteins related to regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation. METHODS: The cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry were used to observe changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle in hepatic stellate cells treated with givinostat. Western blot was used to observe expression changes in p21, p57, CDK4, CDK6, cyclinD1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 in hepatic stellate cells exposed to givinostat. The scratch assay was used to analyze the effect of givinostat on cell migration. Effects of givinostat on the reactive oxygen species profile, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in JS-1 cells were observed by laser confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Givinostat significantly inhibited JS-1 cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis, leading to cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases. Treatment with givinostat downregulated protein expression of CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D1, whereas expression of p21 and p57 was significantly increased. The givinostat-induced apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells was mainly mediated through p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Givinostat treatment increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and promoted mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Acetylation of superoxide dismutase (acetyl K68) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (acetyl K310) was upregulated, while there was no change in protein expression. Moreover, the notable beneficial effect of givinostat on liver fibrosis was also confirmed in the mouse models. CONCLUSION: Givinostat has antifibrotic activities via regulating the acetylation of nuclear factor-κB and superoxide dismutase 2, thus inhibiting hepatic stellate cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. PMID:26217084

  9. Synthesis of some benzimidazole derivatives endowed with 1,2,3-triazole as potential inhibitors of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Youssif, Bahaa G M; Mohamed, Yaseen A M; Salim, Mohammed T A; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Mukai, Chisato; Abdu-Allah, Hajjaj H M

    2016-06-01

    New derivatives of 2-thiobenzimidazole incorporating triazole moiety were synthesized, characterized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Their cytotoxicity was determined by the reduction in the number of viable cell. All of the synthesized compounds are inactive against HBV and some showed activity against HCV. In particular, two compounds showed significant activity, 2-{4-[(1-benzoylbenzimidazol-2-ylthio)methyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl}-N-(p-nitro-phenyl)-acetamide (13) and 2-(4-{[1-(p-chlorobenzoyl)-benzimidazol-2-ylthio)methyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl}-N-(p-nitrophenyl)-acetamide (17). The results give an insight into the importance of the substituent at position 2 of benzimidazole for the inhibition of HCV. PMID:27279065

  10. A Novel Pyridazinone Derivative Inhibits Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Inducing Genome-Free Capsid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Juan; Lu, Dong; Xu, Yi-Bin; Xing, Wei-Qiang; Tong, Xian-Kun; Wang, Gui-Feng; Feng, Chun-Lan; He, Pei-Lan; Zuo, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Here we first identified a novel pyridazinone derivative, compound 3711, as a nonnucleosidic hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitor in a cell model system. 3711 decreased extracellular HBV DNA levels by 50% (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) at 1.5 ± 0.2 μM and intracellular DNA levels at 1.9 ± 0.1 μM, which demonstrated antiviral activity at levels far below those associated with toxicity. Both the 3TC/ETV dually resistant L180M/M204I mutant and the adefovir (ADV)-resistant A181T/N236T mutant were as susceptible to 3711 as wild-type HBV. 3711 treatment induced the formation of genome-free capsids, a portion of which migrated faster on 1.8% native agarose gel. The induced genome-free capsids sedimented more slowly in isopycnic CsCl gradient centrifugation without significant morphological changes. 3711 treatment decreased levels of HBV DNA contained in both secreted enveloped virion and naked virus particles in supernatant. 3711 could interfere with capsid formation of the core protein (Cp) assembly domain. A Cp V124W mutant, which strengthens capsid interdimer interactions, recapitulated the effect of 3711 on capsid assembly. Pyridazinone derivative 3711, a novel chemical entity and HBV inhibitor, may provide a new opportunity to combat chronic HBV infection. PMID:26349829

  11. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  12. Definition of the transcription initiation site of human plasminogen gene in liver and non hepatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Malgaretti, N; Bruno, L; Pontoglio, M; Candiani, G; Meroni, G; Ottolenghi, S; Taramelli, R

    1990-12-31

    We have mapped the cap site of the human plasminogen mRNA by primer extension and PCR techniques and found that it is located at position -161 relative to the first ATG, 97 bases upstream to the 5' end of the previously isolated cDNA clone. Seven human hepatic and non hepatic cell lines and fresh liver cells were tested for human plasminogen mRNA expression: the liver and the liver derived HepG2 cell line represent the major site of plasminogen RNA synthesis while the other cell lines (Hep3B, HeLa, IMR, 293 CaCo and SW626) show much lower levels.

  13. Regulation of the differentiation of diploid and some aneuploid rat liver epithelial (stemlike) cells by the hepatic microenvironment.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, W. B.; Wennerberg, A. E.; Smith, G. J.; Grisham, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Following intrahepatic transplantation in adult syngeneic Fischer 344 rats, diploid cultured rat liver epithelial cells (WB-F344), modified to carry the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase reporter gene and/or the fluorescent membrane dye PKH26-GL, integrate into hepatic plates and acquire the size and nuclear structure of mature hepatocytes. Additionally, of two aneuploid, neoplastically transformed derivatives of WB-F344 cells, both of which produce aggressively growing tumors when transplanted subcutaneously, cells of one line (GN6TF) do not produce tumors in the liver but integrate into hepatic plates and morphologically differentiate. The other transformed line (GP7TB) retains tumorigenicity in the liver, but cells in the intrahepatic tumors are more differentiated morphologically than are tumors at subcutaneous sites. These results suggest that WB-F344 cells are stemlike cells for hepatocytes and that the hepatic microenvironment induces them to incorporate into hepatic plates and differentiate. Our results also suggest that the hepatic microenvironment regulates the differentiation of some neoplastically transformed hepatic stemlike cells, thereby eliminating or reducing their tumorigenic potential. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494041

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets accelerate liver regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Itaba, Noriko; Matsumi, Yoshiaki; Okinaka, Kaori; Ashla, An Afida; Kono, Yohei; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Morimoto, Minoru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Shiota, Goshi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for cell therapy. Based on our hypothesis that suppression of Wnt/β-catenin signal enhances hepatic differentiation of human MSCs, we developed human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets by a small molecule compound. Screening of 10 small molecule compounds was performed by WST assay, TCF reporter assay, and albumin mRNA expression. Consequently, hexachlorophene suppressed TCF reporter activity in time- and concentration-dependent manner. Hexachlorophene rapidly induced hepatic differentiation of human MSCs judging from expression of liver-specific genes and proteins, PAS staining, and urea production. The effect of orthotopic transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets against acute liver injury was examined in one-layered to three-layered cell sheets system. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cell-engineered hepatic cell sheets enhanced liver regeneration and suppressed liver injury. The survival rates of the mice were significantly improved. High expression of complement C3 and its downstream signals including C5a, NF-κB, and IL-6/STAT-3 pathway was observed in hepatic cell sheets-grafted tissues. Expression of phosphorylated EGFR and thioredoxin is enhanced, resulting in reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that orthotopic transplantation of hepatic cell sheets manufactured from MSCs accelerates liver regeneration through complement C3, EGFR and thioredoxin. PMID:26553591

  15. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to hepatitis C virus-derived peptides containing the HLA A2.1 binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, A; McHutchison, J G; Pasquinelli, C; Brown, M E; Brothers, M A; Grabscheid, B; Fowler, P; Houghton, M; Chisari, F V

    1995-01-01

    The HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a major defense mechanism in viral infections. It has been suggested that the CTL response may contribute to viral clearance and liver cell injury during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To test this hypothesis requires an understanding of the characteristics of HCV-specific cytotoxic effector cells and identification of the target antigens to which they respond. To begin this process we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a group of HLA-A2 positive patients with chronic hepatitis C with a panel of 130 HCV-derived peptides containing the HLA-A2 binding motif. Effector cells were tested for their capacity to lyse HLA-A2-matched target cells that were either sensitized with peptide or infected with a vaccinia virus construct containing HCV sequences. Using this approach we have identified nine immunogenic peptides in HCV, three of which are derived from the putative core protein, three from the nonstructural (NS) 3 domain, two from NS4 and one from NS5. Selected responses were shown to be HLA-A2 restricted, mediated by CD8+ T cells and to recognize endogenously synthesized viral antigen. Unexpectedly, peptide-specific CTL responses could also be induced in sero-negative individuals, suggesting in vitro activation of naive CTL precursors. The precursor frequency of peptide-specific CTL was 10 to 100-fold higher in infected patients compared to uninfected controls, and the responses were greatly diminished by removal of CD45 RO+ (memory) T cells. Further quantitative studies are clearly required to establish whether a correlation exists between the HCV-specific CTL response and the clinical course of this disease. Definition of the molecular targets of the human CTL response to HCV creates this opportunity, and may also contribute to the development of a T cell-based HCV vaccine. PMID:7860734

  16. Alcoholic hepatitis: The pivotal role of Kupffer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda B; Weeratunga, Ashley N; Hu, Robert W; Pandol, Stephen J; Hu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). It is believed that alcohol increases the gut permeability that results in raised levels of serum endotoxins containing lipopolysaccharides (LPS). LPS binds to LPS-binding proteins and presents it to a membrane glycoprotein called CD14, which then activates Kupffer cells via a receptor called toll-like receptor 4. This endotoxin mediated activation of Kupffer cells plays an important role in the inflammatory process resulting in alcoholic hepatitis. There is no effective treatment for AH, although notable progress has been made over the last decade in understanding the underlying mechanism of alcoholic hepatitis. We specifically review the current research on the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of AH and the treatment strategies. We suggest that the imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and the anti-inflammatory process as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species eventually lead to hepatocyte injury, the final event of alcoholic hepatitis. PMID:26600966

  17. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  18. 5-azacytidine promotes terminal differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Cui, Jiejie; He, Tongchuan; Bi, Yang

    2015-08-01

    5-azacytidine (5-azaC) is known to induce cardiomyocyte differentiation. However, its function in hepatocyte differentiation is unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro capability of 5-azaC to promote maturation and differentiation of mouse embryonic hepatic progenitor cells, with the aim of developing an approach for improving hepatic differentiation. Mouse embryonic hepatic progenitor cells (HP14.5 cells) were treated with 5-azaC at concentrations from 0 to 20 μmol/l, in addition to hepatocyte induction culture medium. Hepatocyte induction medium induces HP14.5 cell differentiation. 5-azaC may enhance the albumin promotor-driven Gaussia luciferase (ALB-GLuc) activity in induced HP14.5 cells. In the present study 2 μmol/l was found to be the optimum concentration with which to achieve this. The expression of hepatocyte-associated factors was not significantly different between the group treated with 5-azaC alone and the control group. The mRNA levels of ALB; cytokeratin 18 (CK18); tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT); and cytochrome p450, family 1, member A1 (CYP1A1); in addition to the protein levels of ALB, CK18 and uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) in the induced group with 5-azaC, were higher than those in the induced group without 5-azaC, although no significant differences were detected in expression of the hepatic stem cell markers, DLK and α-fetoprotein, between the two groups. Treatment with 5-azaC alone did not affect glycogen synthesis or indocyanine green (ICG) metabolic function in HP14.5 cells, although it significantly increased ICG uptake and periodic acid-Schiff-positive cell numbers amongst HP14.5 cells. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that treatment with 5-azaC alone exerted no effects on the maturation and differentiation of HP14.5 cells. However, 5-azaC exhibited a synergistic effect on the terminal differentiation of induced hepatic progenitor cells in association with a hepatic induction medium. PMID

  19. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  20. Hepatitis B virus e antigen induces activation of rat hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zan, Yanlu; Zhang, Yuxia; Tien, Po

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •HBeAg expression in HSCs induced production of ECM protein and liver fibrotic markers. •The activation and proliferation of HSCs were mediated by TGF-β. •HBeAg protein purified from cell medium directly activated HSCs. -- Abstract: Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a major cause of hepatic fibrosis, leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) is an accessory protein of HBV, not required for viral replication but important for natural infection in vivo. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major producers of excessive extracellular matrix during liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, we examined the influence of HBeAg on HSCs. The rat HSC line HSC-T6 was transfected with HBeAg plasmids, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β), and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. The proliferation of HSCs was determined by MTS analysis. HBeAg transduction induced up-regulation of these fibrogenic genes and proliferation of HSCs. We found that HBeAg induced TGF-β secretion in HSCs, and the activation of HSCs was prevented by a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. Depletion and addition of HBeAg protein in conditioned medium from HSC-T6 cells transduced with HBeAg indicated that HBeAg directly induced the activation and proliferation of rat primary HSCs. Taken together, HBeAg induces the activation and proliferation of HSCs, mainly mediated by TGF-β, and HBeAg protein purified from cell medium can directly activate HSCs.

  1. Summary of clinical findings on Engerix-B, a genetically engineered yeast derived hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    André, F E; Safary, A

    1987-01-01

    Between February 1984 and August 1986 results have been obtained in 58 completed or ongoing clinical studies by 33 investigators in 19 countries on a yeast-derived recombinant DNA hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B). Among the 6100 subjects enrolled in these studies, 5664 subjects (150 normal neonates, 178 neonates of hepatitis B carrier mothers, 330 children aged 3-10 years, 3697 young healthy adults, 438 homosexual males, 110 older healthy adults, 139 drug addicts, 262 institutionalized mentally retarded patients, 59 thalassaemics, 25 sicklaemics, 270 patients on chronic haemodialysis and 6 haemophiliacs) received one or more (up to 4) injections of different doses of the yeast-derived vaccine according to either a 0, 1, 2, and 12 month or a 0, 1, and 6 month vaccination schedule. In randomized comparative studies 436 subjects received either one of two commercially available plasma-derived vaccines. The results reviewed in the present summary have shown that Engerix-B is safe, clinically well tolerated, gives an anti-HBs response which is qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that obtained with plasma-derived vaccines and confers protection against infection and disease. Engerix-B can be considered as a valid alternative to existing hepatitis B vaccines. PMID:3317357

  2. Forced expression of Hnf1b/Foxa3 promotes hepatic fate of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Ebadifar, Asghar; Fathi, Fardin; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-05-20

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived hepatocytes have the potential to be used for basic research, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery. Recent reports demonstrated that in addition to conventional differentiation inducers such as chemical compounds and cytokines, overexpression of lineage-specific transcription factors could induce ES cells to differentiate to a hepatic fate. Here, we hypothesized that lentivirus-mediated inducible expression of hepatic lineage transcription factors could enhance mouse ES cells to hepatocyte-like cells. We screened the effects of candidate transcription factors Hnf1b, Hnf1a, Hnf4a, Foxa1, Foxa3 and Hex, and determined that the combination of Hnf1b/Foxa3 promoted expression of several hepatic lineage-specific markers and proteins, in addition to glycogen storage, ICG uptake, and secretion of albumin and urea. The differentiated cells were engraftable and expressed albumin when transplanted into a carbon tetrachloride-injured mouse model. These results demonstrated the crucial role of Hnf1b and Foxa3 in hepatogenesis in vitro and provided a valuable tool for the efficient differentiation of HLCs from ES cells. PMID:27107701

  3. Expression of Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 and of Its Receptor CXCR4 in Liver Regeneration from Oval Cells in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mavier, Philippe; Martin, Nadine; Couchie, Dominique; Préaux, Anne-Marie; Laperche, Yannick; Zafrani, Elie Serge

    2004-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 is a chemokine that plays a major role during embryogenesis. Since stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its unique receptor CXCR4 are involved in the differentiation of progenitor cells, we studied the expression of this chemokine and of its receptor in hepatic regeneration from precursor oval cells. Hepatic regeneration was induced by treating rats with 2-acetylaminofluorene, and followed by partial hepatectomy. Oval cell accumulation, which predominated in periportal regions, reached a maximum at days 9 to 14 after hepatectomy and declined thereafter. Oval cells strongly expressed stromal cell-derived factor-1 protein and mRNA. CXCR4 mRNA hepatic level paralleled the number of oval cells and in situ hybridization showed CXCR4 mRNA expression by these cells. Treatment of rats with fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide which binds to stromal cell-derived factor-1 and blocks its biological effects, markedly decreased oval cell accumulation in five of the seven treated rats. In conclusion, our data demonstrate an expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and of its receptor CXCR4 in oval cells during hepatic regeneration and strongly suggest that stromal cell-derived factor-1 stimulates the proliferation of these precursor cells through an autocrine/paracrine pathway. PMID:15579440

  4. Spontaneous origin from human embryonic stem cells of liver cells displaying conjoint meso-endodermal phenotype with hepatic functions

    PubMed Central

    Bandi, Sriram; Cheng, Kang; Joseph, Brigid; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the identity of lineage-specific cells arising during manipulations of stem cells is necessary for developing their potential applications. For instance, replacement of crucial functions in organ failure by transplantation of suitable stem-cell-derived cells will be applicable to numerous disorders, but requires insights into the origin, function and fate of specific cell populations. We studied mechanisms by which the identity of differentiated cells arising from stem cells could be verified in the context of natural liver-specific stem cells and whether such differentiated cells could be effective for supporting the liver following cell therapy in a mouse model of drug-induced acute liver failure. By comparing the identity of naturally occurring fetal human liver stem cells, we found that cells arising in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) recapitulated an early fetal stage of liver cells, which was characterized by conjoint meso-endoderm properties. Despite this fetal stage, hESC-derived cells could provide liver support with appropriate metabolic and ammonia-fixation functions, as well as cytoprotection, such that mice were rescued from acute liver failure. Therefore, spontaneous or induced differentiation of human embryonic stem cells along the hepatic endoderm will require transition through fetal-like stages. This offers opportunities to prospectively identify whether suitable cells have been generated through manipulation of stem cells for cell therapy and other applications. PMID:22349702

  5. Development of hepatitis C virus production reporter-assay systems using two different hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Midori; Ikeda, Masanori; Ariumi, Yasuo; Wakita, Takaji; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    A hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection system was developed previously using the HCV JFH-1 strain (genotype 2a) and HuH-7 cells, and this cell culture is so far the only robust production system for HCV. In patients with chronic hepatitis C, the virological effects of pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy differ depending on the HCV strain and the genetic background of the host. Recently, we reported the hepatoma-derived Li23 cell line, in which the JFH-1 life cycle is reproduced at a level almost equal to that in HuH-7-derived RSc cells. To monitor the HCV life cycle more easily, we here developed JFH-1 reporter-assay systems using both HuH-7- and Li23-derived cell lines. To identify any genetic mutations by long-term cell culture, HCV RNAs in HuH-7 cells were amplified 130 days after infection and subjected to sequence analysis to find adaptive mutation(s) for robust virus replication. We identified two mutations, H2505Q and V2995L, in the NS5B region. V2995L but not H2505Q enhanced JFH-1 RNA replication. However, we found that H2505Q but not V2995L enhanced HCV RNA replication of strain O (genotype 1b). We also selected highly permissive D7 cells by serial subcloning of Li23 cells. The expression levels of claudin-1 and Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 in D7 cells are higher than those in parental Li23 cells. In this study, we developed HCV JFH-1 reporter-assay systems using two distinct hepatoma cell lines, HuH-7 and Li23. The mutations in NS5B resulted in different effects on strains O and JFH-1 HCV RNA replication. PMID:22456614

  6. An epoxysuccinic acid derivative(loxistatin)-induced hepatic injury in rats and hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, K.; Arai, M.; Kohno, Y.; Suwa, T.; Satoh, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Loxistatin is a possible therapeutic agent of muscular dystrophy. A single oral administration of loxistatin to male rats caused focal necrosis of the liver with inflammatory cell infiltration. The severity of the lesions was dose-dependent up to 200 mg/kg and also manifest by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities. Hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels decreased with a maximum 20% depletion within 5 hr after the oral administration of loxistatin. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate did not potentiate the loxistatin-induced hepatic injury. On the other hand, the hepatoprotective effect of cysteamine was observed when cysteamine was administered 24 hr before loxistatin dosing, but the effect was not observed when the antidote was administered concomitantly with loxistatin. Pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital or trans-stilbene oxide provided partial protection against the hepatotoxic effect of loxistatin. Pretreatment with SKF-525A resulted in increased hepatic injury, while pretreatment with piperonyl butoxide, cimetidine, or 3-methylcholanthrene had no effect on hepatic damage by loxistatin. Five hours after (14C)loxistatin administration to rats, the covalent binding of the radioactivity to proteins was greatest in the liver, followed by the kidney, then muscle and blood to a lesser extent. (14C)Loxistatin acid, the pharmacologically active form of loxistatin, irreversibly bound to rat liver microsomal proteins; more binding occurred when the NADPH-generating system was omitted and when the microsomes were boiled first. GSH did not alter the extent of irreversible binding, whereas N-ethylmaleimide decreased the binding of (14C)loxistatin acid to rat liver microsomal proteins by 75%. Unlike the rat, administration of loxistatin to hamsters caused neither hepatic injury nor hepatic GSH depletion.

  7. Bone marrow cell transplantation is associated with fibrogenic cells apoptosis during hepatic regeneration in cholestatic rats.

    PubMed

    Nunes de Carvalho, Simone; da Cunha Lira, Dalvaci; Costa Cortez, Erika Afonso; de Andrade, Daniela Caldas; Thole, Alessandra Alves; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; de Carvalho, Lais

    2013-04-01

    Liver fibrosis is accompanied by hepatocyte death and proliferation of α-SMA(+) fibrogenic cells (activated hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts), which synthesize extracellular matrix components that contribute to disorganization of the hepatic parenchyma and loss of liver function. Therefore, apoptosis of these fibrogenic cells is important to hepatic regeneration. This study aimed to analyze the effect of cell therapy using bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) transplantation on α-SMA expression and on apoptosis of hepatic cells during liver fibrosis induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Livers were collected from normal rats, fibrotic rats after 14 and 21 days of BDL, and rats that received BMMNC at 14 days of BDL and were analyzed after 7 days. Apoptosis in fibrogenic cells was analyzed by immunoperoxidase, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting, and liver regeneration was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining. Results showed that caspase-3 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression were significantly increased in the BMMNC-treated group. Additionally, confocal microscopy analysis showed cells coexpressing α-SMA and caspase-3 in these animals, suggesting fibrogenic cell death. These results suggest a novel role for BMMNC in liver regeneration during fibrotic disease by stimulating fibrogenic cells apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation, probably through secretion of specific cytokines that modulate the hepatic microenvironment toward an antifibrogenic balance.

  8. Effects of extracellular matrixes and growth factors on the hepatic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamichi; Fukumitsu, Ken; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Adachi, Keiko; Kawase, Eihachiro; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Ikai, Iwao; Uemoto, Shinji

    2008-08-01

    Hepatocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, the definitive factors that are responsible for hepatic differentiation of hESCs remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate the effects of various extracellular matrixes and growth factors on endodermal differentiation and to optimize the culture conditions to induce hepatic differentiation of hESCs. The transgene vector that contained enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) enhancer/promoter was transfected into hESC lines. The transgenic hESCs were cultured on extracellular matrixes (collagen type I, laminin, and Matrigel) in the presence or absence of growth factors including hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), bone morphogenetic protein 4, fibroblast growth factor 4, all-trans-retinoic acid, and activin A. The expression of AFP-EGFP was measured by flow cytometry. The culture on Matrigel-coated dishes with 100 ng/ml activin A showed 19.5% of EGFP-positive proportions. Moreover, the sequential addition of 100 ng/ml activin A and 20 ng/ml HGF resulted in 21.7% and produced a higher yield of EGFP-positive cells than the group stimulated by activin A alone. RT-PCR and immunocytochemical staining revealed these EGFP-positive cells to differentiate into mesendoderm-like cells by use of activin A and then into hepatic endoderm cells by use of HGF. Two other hESC lines also differentiated into endoderm on the hepatic lineage by our method. In conclusion, we therefore found this protocol to effectively differentiate multiple hESC lines to early hepatocytes using activin A and HGF on Matrigel.

  9. Association of colonic regulatory T cells with hepatitis C virus pathogenesis and liver pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hetta, Helal F; Mekky, Mohamed A; Khalil, Nasr K; Mohamed, Wegdan A; El-Feky, Mohamed A; Ahmed, Shabaan H; Daef, Enas A; Nassar, Mahmoud I; Medhat, Ahmed; Sherman, Kenneth E; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Forkhead box protein P3 (FoxP3)+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a fundamental role in maintaining the balance between the tissue-damaging and protective immune response to chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. Herein, we investigated the frequency of Treg cells in the colon and their potential relationship to the various CHC outcomes and hepatic histopathology. Methods Colonic biopsies were collected from three groups with CHC: treatment naïve (TN; n = 20), non-responders (NR; n = 20), sustained virologic response (SVR; n = 20), and a fourth healthy control group (n = 10). The plasma viral loads and cytokines levels were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and ELISA, respectively. Liver biopsies were examined to assess inflammatory score and fibrosis stage. Colonic Treg frequency was estimated by immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy. Results A significant increase in the frequency of colonic Treg was found in TN, and NR groups compared with the control and SVR group. The frequency of colonic Treg, plasma interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-4 levels were significantly positively correlated with viral load and negatively correlated with METAVIR inflammatory score, and fibrosis stages. Conclusion Colonic Treg cells are negatively correlated with liver inflammation and hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load, which suggests a strong linkage between gut-derived Treg cell populations and HCV infection. PMID:25708446

  10. Successful Interferon Therapy Reverses Enhanced Hepatic Progenitor Cell Activation in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Hidenao; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Ooba, Yukimasa; Matsunaga, Erika; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Shimoyama, Shin; Yamazaki, Satoru; Chida, Takeshi; Kawata, Kazuhito; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced accumulation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) is related to the risk of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interferon (IFN) treatment reduces HCC risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IFN treatment on HPC activation in HCV patients. Immunohistochemical detection and computer-assisted quantitative image analyses of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) were performed to evaluate HPC activation in paired pre- and post-treatment liver biopsies from 18 HCV patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to IFN-based therapy and from 23 patients without SVR, as well as normal liver tissues obtained from surgical resection specimens of 10 patients. Pretreatment HCV livers showed increased CK7 immunoreactivity, compared with normal livers (HCV: median, 1.38%; normal: median, 0.69%, P=0.006). IFN treatment reduced hepatic CK7 immunoreactivity (median, 1.57% pre-IFN vs. 0.69% post-IFN, P=0.006) in SVR patients, but not in non-SVR patients. The development of HCC following IFN treatment was encountered in 3 non-SVR patients who showed high post-IFN treatment CK7 immunoreactivity (>4%). Successful IFN therapy can reverse enhanced HPC activation in HCV patients, which may contribute to the reduced risk of HCC development in these patients.

  11. Inhibition of cytokine-induced microvascular arrest of tumor cells by recombinant endostatin prevents experimental hepatic melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Lorea; Valcárcel, María; Carrascal, Teresa; Egilegor, Eider; Salado, Clarisa; Sim, B Kim Lee; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    We investigated effects of endostatin (ES) in the prometastatic microenvironment of inflammation occurring during the microvascular phase of cancer cell infiltration in the liver. We used a model of intrasplenic injection of B16 melanoma (B16M) cells leading to hepatic metastasis through vascular cell adhesion molecule-(VCAM-1)-mediated capillary arrest of cancer cells via interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent mechanism. We show that administration of 50 mg/kg recombinant human (rh) ES 30 min before B16M, plus repetition of same dose for 3 additional days decreased metastasis number by 60%. A single dose of rhES before B16M injection reduced hepatic microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M by 40% and inhibited hepatic production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-18 and VCAM-1 expression by hepatic sinusoidal endothelia (HSE). Consistent with these data, rhES inhibited VCAM-1-dependent B16M cell adhesion to primary cultured HSE receiving B16M conditioned medium, and it abolished the HSE cell production of TNF-alpha and IL-18 induced by tumor-derived vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). rhES abrogated recombinant murine VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/flk-1 receptor in HSE cells, preventing the proinflammatory action of tumor-derived VEGF on HSE. rhES also abolished hepatic production of TNF-alpha, microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M, and adhesion of B16M cells to isolated HSE cells, all of them induced in mice given 5 micro g/kg recombinant murine VEGF for 18 h. This capillary inflammation-deactivating capability constitutes a nonantiangiogenic antitumoral action of endostatin that decreases cancer cell arrest within liver microvasculature and prevents metastases promoted by proinflammatory cytokines induced by VEGF. PMID:14729638

  12. NADPH oxidase signal transduces angiotensin II in hepatic stellate cells and is critical in hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bataller, Ramón; Schwabe, Robert F.; Choi, Youkyung H.; Yang, Liu; Paik, Yong Han; Lindquist, Jeffrey; Qian, Ting; Schoonhoven, Robert; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Lemasters, John J.; Brenner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a pro-oxidant and fibrogenic cytokine. We investigated the role of NADPH oxidase in Ang II–induced effects in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a fibrogenic cell type. Human HSCs express mRNAs of key components of nonphagocytic NADPH oxidase. Ang II phosphorylated p47phox, a regulatory subunit of NADPH oxidase, and induced reactive oxygen species formation via NADPH oxidase activity. Ang II phosphorylated AKT and MAPKs and increased AP-1 DNA binding in a redox-sensitive manner. Ang II stimulated DNA synthesis, cell migration, procollagen α1(I) mRNA expression, and secretion of TGF-β1 and inflammatory cytokines. These effects were attenuated by N-acetylcysteine and diphenylene iodonium, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, Ang II induced upregulation of genes potentially involved in hepatic wound-healing response in a redox-sensitive manner, as assessed by microarray analysis. HSCs isolated from p47phox–/– mice displayed a blunted response to Ang II compared with WT cells. We also assessed the role of NADPH oxidase in experimental liver fibrosis. After bile duct ligation, p47phox–/– mice showed attenuated liver injury and fibrosis compared with WT counterparts. Moreover, expression of smooth muscle α-actin and expression of TGF-β1 were reduced in p47phox–/– mice. Thus, NADPH oxidase mediates the actions of Ang II on HSCs and plays a critical role in liver fibrogenesis. PMID:14597764

  13. Enrichment of a bipotent hepatic progenitor cell from naive adult liver tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Natasha; Samuelson, Lisa; Walkup, Maggie H.; Chandrasekaran, Prakash; Gerber, David A.

    2008-02-08

    Background/Aim: Recent interest in the liver stem cell field has led to the identification and characterization of several hepatic progenitor cell populations from fetal and adult tissues. We isolated a hepatic progenitor cell from naive adult liver and the current studies focus on differentiation and growth. Results: A Sca-1{sup +} hepatic progenitor cell was identified within the liver parenchyma. This cell expresses numerous liver related genes and transcription found in the developing and/or adult liver. It is located in the peri-portal region and expresses markers associated with undifferentiated hepatic cell populations, mature hepatocytes and biliary cells which distinguish it from the Sca-1{sup -} fraction. Conclusion: This hepatic progenitor cell from uninjured liver has features of both hepatocytic and biliary populations and demonstrates proliferative potential. Further studies will focus on sca-HPC subsets and conditions that regulate differentiation towards hepatic or biliary lineages.

  14. Hepatic Progenitor Cells in Action: Liver Regeneration or Fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savneet; Siddiqui, Hamda; Bhat, Mohsin H

    2015-09-01

    Liver injury caused by drugs, viruses, and toxins that impede the proliferation of mature hepatocytes results in the activation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), which then participate in the restoration of the damaged liver tissue. HPCs are known to be bipotential cells, capable of forming both hepatocytes and cholangiocytes when regeneration by mature hepatocytes is plagued or impaired. Both clinical studies of liver disease and certain experimental animal models of liver injury conspicuously show the presence of activated HPC response and proliferation. However, in addition to regeneration, the proliferation of HPCs also determines the appearance of a ductular reaction that has been correlated with progressive portal fibrosis, suggesting intricate links between activation of HPCs and fibrogenesis. The current review highlights the role of activated HPCs in both hepatic regeneration and fibrosis during liver injury.

  15. Inhibition of microRNA-214 ameliorates hepatic fibrosis and tumor incidence in platelet-derived growth factor C transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hikari; Honda, Masao; Campbell, Jean S; Takegoshi, Kai; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Taro; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Takabatake, Riuta; Nakamura, Mikiko; Tanaka, Takuji; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Differentially regulated microRNA (miRNA) are associated with hepatic fibrosis; however, their potential usefulness for blocking hepatic fibrosis has not been exploited fully. We examined the expression of miRNA in the liver of a transgenic mouse model in which platelet-derived growth factor C (PDGF-C) is overexpressed (Pdgf-c Tg), resulting in hepatic fibrosis and steatosis and the eventual development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Robust induction of miR-214 correlated with fibrogenesis in the liver of Pdgf-c Tg mice, atherogenic high-fat diet-induced NASH mice, and patients with chronic hepatitis B or C. Pdgf-c Tg mice were injected with locked nucleic acid (LNA)-antimiR-214 via the tail vein using Invivofectamine 2.0 and the degree of hepatic fibrosis and tumor incidence were evaluated. Pdgf-c Tg mice treated with LNA-antimiR-214 showed a marked reduction in fibrosis and tumor incidence compared with saline or LNA-miR-control-injected control mice. In vitro, LNA-antimiR-214 significantly ameliorated TGF-β1-induced pro-fibrotic gene expression in Lx-2 cells. MiR-214 targets a negative regulator of EGFR signaling, Mig-6. Mimic-miR-214 decreased the expression of Mig-6 and increased the levels of EGF-mediated p-EGFR (Y1173 and Y845) and p-Met (Tyr1234/1235) in Huh-7 cells. Conversely, LNA-antimiR-214 repressed the expression of these genes. In conclusion, miR-214 appears to participate in the development of hepatic fibrosis by modulating the EGFR and TGF-β signaling pathways. LNA-antimiR-214 is a potential therapy for the prevention of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26122702

  16. Epirubicin-Adsorbed Nanodiamonds Kill Chemoresistant Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Epirubicin to nanodiamonds creates a rapidly synthesized and stable nanodiamond–drug complex that promotes endocytic uptake and enhanced tumor cell retention. These attributes mediate the effective killing of both cancer stem cells and noncancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Enhanced treatment of both tumor cell populations results in an improved impairment of secondary tumor formation in vivo compared with treatment by unmodified chemotherapeutics. On the basis of these results, nanodiamond-mediated drug delivery may serve as a powerful method for overcoming chemoresistance in cancer stem cells and markedly improving overall treatment against hepatic cancers. PMID:25437772

  17. Cytoskeletal toxicity of pectenotoxins in hepatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Espiña, B; Louzao, M C; Ares, I R; Cagide, E; Vieytes, M R; Vega, F V; Rubiolo, J A; Miles, C O; Suzuki, T; Yasumoto, T; Botana, L M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose. Pectenotoxins are macrocyclic lactones found in dinoflagellates of the genus Dinophysis, which induce severe liver damage in mice after i.p. injection. Here, we have looked for the mechanism(s) underlying this hepatotoxicity. Experimental approach. Effects of pectenotoxin (PTX)-1, PTX-2, PTX-2 seco acid (PTX-2SA) and PTX-11 were measured in a hepatocyte cell line with cancer cell characteristics (Clone 9) and in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Cell morphology was assessed by confocal microscopy; F- and G-actin were selectively stained and cell viability measured by Alamar Blue fluorescence. Key results. Clone 9 cells and primary hepatocytes showed a marked depolymerization of F-actin with PTX-1, PTX-2 and PTX-11 (1–1000 nM) associated with an increase in G-actin level. However, morphology was only clearly altered in Clone 9 cells. PTX-2SA had no effect on the actin cytoskeleton. Despite the potent F-actin depolymerizing effect, PTX-1, PTX-2 or PTX-11 did not decrease the viability of Clone 9 cells after 24-h treatment. Only prolonged incubation (>48 h) with PTXs induced a fall in viability, and under these conditions, morphology of both Clone 9 and primary hepatocytes was drastically changed. Conclusions and implications. Although the actin cytoskeleton was clearly altered by PTX-1, PTX-2 and PTX-11 in the hepatocyte cell line and primary hepatocytes, morphological assessments indicated a higher sensitivity of the cancer-like cell line to these toxins. However, viability of both cell types was not altered. PMID:18776914

  18. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  19. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  20. Hepatic progenitor cells express SerpinB3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the setting of liver injury hepatic progenitor cells are activated, counterbalancing the inhibited regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes. Chronic activation of this compartment may give rise to a subset of liver tumours with poor prognosis. SerpinB3, a serpin over-expressed in injured liver and in primary liver cancer, has been shown to induce apoptosis resistance, epithelial to mesenchymal transition and to increase TGF-beta and Myc expression. Aim of the present study was to explore the presence of SerpinB3 in hepatic progenitor cells in human livers and in a mouse model of liver stem/progenitor cell activation. Hepatic progenitor cells were analysed in foetal and adult livers at protein and transcriptional levels. To induce experimental activation of the liver stem/progenitor compartment, C57BL/6J mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide plus D-galactosamine and were sacrificed at different time points. Liver cDNA was amplified using specific primers for mouse-homologous SerpinB3 isoforms and automatically sequenced. Results The presence of SerpinB3 in the progenitor cell compartment was detected in sorted human foetal and adult epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive liver cells. By immunohistochemistry SerpinB3 was found in human cirrhotic livers in portal areas with progenitor cell activation showing ductular proliferation. CK-7, CK-19, EpCAM and CD-90 positive cell were also positive for SerpinB3. In the animal model, time course analysis in liver specimens revealed a progressive increase of SerpinB3 and a parallel decrease of activated caspase 3, which was barely detectable at 20 hours. Transcription analysis confirmed the presence of SerpinB3-homologous only in the liver of injured mice and sequence analysis proved its belonging to mouse Serpinb3b. Conclusion SerpinB3 is highly expressed in hepatic stem/progenitor cell compartment of both foetal and adult livers. PMID:24517394

  1. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (Pdx1) down-regulates hepatic transcription factor 1 alpha (HNF1α) expression during reprogramming of human hepatic cells into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Donelan, William; Li, Shiwu; Wang, Hai; Lu, Shun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Dongqi; Chang, Lung-Ji; Yang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Pdx1 triggers rapid hepatocyte dedifferentiation by down-regulating liver-enriched transcription factors and liver-specific functional genes such as hepatic nuclear factor-1α (HNF1α), albumin, and AAT. However, the links between Pdx1 over-expression and hepatic gene down-regulation are incompletely understood. HNF1α and HNF4α are important transcription factors that establish and maintain the hepatocyte phenotype. The human HNF4α gene contains two promoters (P1 and P2) that drive expression of P1-(HNF4α 1-6) or P2-(HNF4α 7-9)-derived isoforms, which are used in different tissues and at different times during development. We hypothesized that the relative expression of HNF1α and HNF4α following ectopic Pdx1 expression may promote hepatic cell dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation toward pancreatic beta-cells. We produced lentiviruses expressing Pdx1, Pdx1-VP16, and Ngn3, along with dual-color reporter genes to indicate hepatic and pancreatic beta-cell phenotype changes. Using these PTF alone or in combinations, we demonstrated that Pdx1 not only activates specific beta-cell genes but down-regulates HNF1α. Pdx1-mediated reduction of HNF1α is accompanied by altered expression of its major activator, HNF4α isoforms, down-regulating hepatic genes ALB and AAT. Pdx1 up-regulates HNF4α via the P2 promoter. These P2-driven isoforms compete with P1-driven isoforms to suppress target gene transcription. In Huh7 cells, the AF-1 activation domain is more important for transactivation, whereas in INS1 cells, the F inhibitory domain is more important. The loss and gain of functional activity strongly suggests that Pdx1 plays a central role in reprogramming hepatocytes into beta-cells by suppressing the hepatic phenotype. PMID:26279745

  2. Distinct proteomic features of two fibrogenic liver cell populations: hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bosselut, Nelly; Housset, Chantal; Marcelo, Paulo; Rey, Colette; Burmester, Thorsten; Vinh, Jöelle; Vaubourdolle, Michel; Cadoret, Axelle; Baudin, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    In chronic liver diseases, the accumulation of extracellular matrix leading to fibrosis is caused by myofibroblasts, the origins of which are debatable. We performed a comparative proteomic study to identify markers and gain insight into distinct functions of myofibroblasts derived either from hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or from portal mesenchymal cells. After isolation from normal liver and culture in similar conditions, myofibroblastic HSCs (MF-HSCs) presented enlarged cytoplasms whereas portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) were more proliferative, and formed more stress fibers. The two cell types were subjected to comparative analyses by 2-D MS/MS. Six proteins were overexpressed in PMFs, with myofibroblast-related typical functions. Among them, cofilin-1 showed the greatest difference in expression and a lower pI than expected. Immunoblot demonstrated higher levels of phosphorylation, a modification of the protein implicated in stress fiber formation. Eleven proteins, mostly involved in stress response, were overexpressed in MF-HSCs. Cytoglobin had the highest level of overexpression, as confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemical analyses. These results identify cytoglobin as the best marker for distinguishing MF-HSCs from PMFs and suggest different functions for the two cell populations in the liver wound healing response, with a prominent role for PMFs in scar formation.

  3. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and regulatory T cells in acute viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnaba, V; Tamburrini, E; Laghi, V; Cauda, R; Levrero, M; Ruocco, G; Ortona, L; Balsano, F

    1985-01-01

    During acute viral hepatitis, we observed a significant decrease in OKT4/OKT8 ratio with a significant increase in the OKT8 positive subset in acute type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis. This altered ratio persisted in type B for a long time until HBsAg antibody became detectable, while it soon returned to normal in type A and non-A-non-B hepatitis. In the majority of acute hepatitis the altered ratio is because of an increase and not to a decrease in the whole T cell population, as described in chronic HBV infection. The number of HNK-1 positive cells remained raised during the recovery phase of type B and non-A-non-B hepatitis, a finding consistent with the hypothesis that NK cells play a role in the host defence against B and non-A-non-B virus infections. Serum beta 2-microglobulin concentrations were increased only in acute hepatitis B and non-A-non-B where immunological mechanisms are suspected to be involved, and showed a good correlation with the population of activated OKIa positive cells. PMID:2862096

  4. Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Stellate Cells: A PARADOXICAL RELATIONSHIP

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2016-01-01

    In physiology, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by most cells for normal function and as a defense mechanism against foreign particles, microbes and viruses. Hepatic macrophages (Kupffer cells), sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are all capable of generating ROS in physiology and pathology. ROS are also produced by infiltrating inflammatory cells during acute and chronic liver injury. Increased levels of ROS have been implicated in apoptotic/necrotic death of hepatocytes, and liver failure. In contrast to causing injury to hepatocytes, ROS and lipid peroxidation products induce transdifferentiation of the quiescent HSCs into an activated highly proliferative myofibroblast-like phenotype. ROS and lipid peroxidation products also stimulate the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) by activated HSCs. Deposition of excessive amounts of ECM is the primary mechanism of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver, and interactions between ROS and HSCs appear to play a major role in this pathology. Although these findings suggest that HSCs are resistant to the injurious actions of ROS, there is compelling evidence demonstrating ROS-induced death of activated HSCs. Detailed mechanistic understanding of such paradoxical interactions between ROS and HSCs will be critical for developing therapies for chronic fibrotic liver disease.

  5. Hepatitis B Virus Infection of a Mouse Hepatic Cell Line Reconstituted with Human Sodium Taurocholate Cotransporting Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Lempp, Florian A; Qu, Bingqian; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Urban, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) enters hepatocytes via its receptor, human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (hNTCP). So far, HBV infection has been achieved only in human hepatic cells reconstituted with hNTCP and not in cells of mouse origin. Here, the first mouse liver cell line (AML12) which gains susceptibility to HBV upon hNTCP expression is described. Thus, HBV infection of receptor-expressing mouse hepatocytes does not principally require a human cofactor but can be triggered by endogenous murine determinants.

  6. CD81 is dispensable for hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell transmission in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Evans, Matthew J; Bitzegeio, Julia; Koutsoudakis, George; Owsianka, Ania M; Angus, Allan G N; Keck, Zhen-Yong; Foung, Steven K H; Pietschmann, Thomas; Rice, Charles M; Patel, Arvind H

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects cells by the direct uptake of cell-free virus following virus engagement with specific cell receptors such as CD81. Recent data have shown that HCV is also capable of direct cell-to-cell transmission, although the role of CD81 in this process is disputed. Here, we generated cell culture infectious strain JFH1 HCV (HCVcc) genomes carrying an alanine substitution of E2 residues W529 or D535 that are critical for binding to CD81 and infectivity. Co-cultivation of these cells with naïve cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) resulted in a small number of cells co-expressing both EGFP and HCV NS5A, showing that the HCVcc mutants are capable of cell-to-cell spread. In contrast, no cell-to-cell transmission from JFH1(DeltaE1E2)-transfected cells occurred, indicating that the HCV glycoproteins are essential for this process. The frequency of cell-to-cell transmission of JFH1(W529A) was unaffected by the presence of neutralizing antibodies that inhibit E2-CD81 interactions. By using cell lines that expressed little or no CD81 and that were refractive to infection with cell-free virus, we showed that the occurrence of viral cell-to-cell transmission is not influenced by the levels of CD81 on either donor or recipient cells. Thus, our results show that CD81 plays no role in the cell-to-cell spread of HCVcc and that this mode of transmission is shielded from neutralizing antibodies. These data suggest that therapeutic interventions targeting the entry of cell-free HCV may not be sufficient in controlling an ongoing chronic infection, but need to be complemented by additional strategies aimed at disrupting direct cell-to-cell viral transmission. PMID:19088272

  7. Characterization of trans-immortalized hepatic cell lines established from transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Perraud, F; Dalemans, W; Gendrault, J L; Dreyer, D; Ali-Hadji, D; Faure, T; Pavirani, A

    1991-07-01

    Hepato-specific regulatory (promoter/enhancer) DNA sequences were used for targeting the expression of onc genes, such as murine c-myc and Simian Virus 40 T Antigen, to hepatocytes of transgenic mice which subsequently developed hepatocellular carcinomas after a variable period of time (depending on the type of onc gene employed). Several trans-immortalized cell lines were established and compared with respect to the expression of adult hepatic markers and response to growth factors. Despite the morphological differences observed between trans-hepatomas, owing to the expression of the two different onc genes, all tumor-derived cell lines behaved in a comparable fashion during long-term culture displaying an adult hepatic phenotype for at least 40 passages. They differed, however, in response to epidermal growth factor. When the gene coding for human alpha 1-antitrypsin was placed under the control of the same hepato-specific promoter/enhancer, high levels of the human recombinant protein could be harvested from the supernatants of trans-hepatoma-derived cell lines. PMID:1711473

  8. Liver stem cell-derived β-cell surrogates for treatment of type 1 diabetes☆

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with the common embryonic origin of liver and pancreas as well the similar glucose-sensing systems in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, it should not be surprising that liver stem cells/hepatocytes can transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under high-glucose culture conditions or by genetic reprogramming. Persistent expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx1) transcription factor or its super-active form Pdx1-VP16 fusion protein in hepatic cells reprograms these cells into pancreatic β-cell precursors. In vitro culture at elevated glucose concentrations or in vivo exposure to a hyperglycemia are required for further differentiation and maturation of liver-derived pancreatic β-cell precursor into functional insulin-producing pancreatic β-like cells. Under appropriate conditions, multiple pancreatic transcription factors can work in concert to reprogram liver stem/adult liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. If such autologous liver-derived insulin-producing cells can be made to escape the type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity, they may serve as a valuable cell source for future cell replacement therapy without the need for life-long immunosuppression. PMID:16890895

  9. Efficient hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells in a three-dimensional microscale culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran-Ran; Takebe, Takanori; Miyazaki, Leina; Takayama, Maho; Koike, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Masaki; Enomura, Masahiro; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Sekine, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a novel source of hepatocytes for drug development, disease modeling studies, and regenerative therapy for the treatment of liver diseases. A number of protocols for generating functional hepatocytes have been reported worldwide; however, reproducible and efficient differentiation remained challenging under conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture. In this study, we describe an efficient differentiation protocol for generating functional hepatocyte-like cells from human iPSC-derived homogenous hepatic endoderm cells combined with three-dimensional (3D) microscale culture system. First, hepatic endoderm cells (iPSC-HEs) were directly differentiated using two-step approaches, and then cultured in the 3D micropattern plate. Human iPSC-HEs quickly reaggregated and formed hundreds of round-shaped spheroids at day 4 of cell plating. The size distribution of iPSC-HEs derived spheroids was relatively uniform around 100-200 μm in diameter. After 14 days, iPSC-HEs efficiently differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in terms of hepatic maker gene expression compared with conventional 2D approach. We conclude that our scalable and three-dimensional culture system would be one promising approach to generate a huge number of hepatocyte-like cells from human iPSCs aiming at future industrial and clinical applications. PMID:25173165

  10. Establishment and characterization of an immortalized rat hepatic stellate cell line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Leng, Xi-Sheng; Zhu, Ji-Ye; Wang, Fu-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play an important role in liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. This study established a new rat HSC cell line LSC-1. Liver ex vivo perfusion with collagenase IV and density gradient centrifugation were used to isolate rat HSC. Cells have been maintained in culture for multiple passages. LSC-1 cell biological characteristics were studied. LSC-1 cell have been maintained in culture over 100 passages. This new HSC cell line express telomerase reverse transcriptase (TRT) and p53, suggesting that it is immortalized spontaneously. LSC-1 cells have a doubling time of 46 hours and their growth is serum-dependent. Karyotypic analysis revealed that LSC-1 cells possess normal chromosome phenotype. Moreover, LSC-1 cells do not grow in soft agar or induce tumors in nude mice, suggesting that they are not transformed. LSC-1 cells express desmin, glial fibrillary acidic proteins (GFAP), collagen type I and III, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). TGF-β1 stimulation increased collagen type I and III expression in LSC-1 cells. Additionally, LSC-1 cells proliferate in response to PDGF-BB, and contract in response to endothelin-1 (ET-1). In summary, LSC-1 cells exhibit activated HSC phenotype characteristics, and therefore are useful tool to study the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. PMID:26722391

  11. Pan-genotypic Hepatitis C Virus Inhibition by Natural Products Derived from the Wild Egyptian Artichoke

    PubMed Central

    Elsebai, Mahmoud Fahmi; Koutsoudakis, George; Saludes, Verónica; Pérez-Vilaró, Gemma; Turpeinen, Ari; Mattila, Sampo; Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Fontaine-Vive, Fabien; Mehiri, Mohamed; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver diseases. Water extracts of the leaves of the wild Egyptian artichoke (WEA) [Cynara cardunculus L. var. sylvestris (Lam.) Fiori] have been used for centuries in the Sinai Peninsula to treat hepatitis symptoms. Here we isolated and characterized six compounds from the water extracts of WEA and evaluated their HCV inhibition capacities in vitro. Importantly, two of these compounds, grosheimol and cynaropicrin, inhibited HCV with half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50s) in the low micromolar range. They inhibited HCV entry into target cells and were active against both cell-free infection as well as cell-cell transmission. Furthermore, the antiviral activity of both compounds was pan-genotypic as HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2b, 3a, 4a, 5a, 6a, and 7a were inhibited. Thus, grosheimol and cynaropicrin are promising candidates for the development of new pan-genotypic entry inhibitors of HCV infection. IMPORTANCE Because there is no preventive HCV vaccine available today, the discovery of novel anti-HCV cell entry inhibitors could help develop preventive measures against infection. The present study describes two compounds isolated from the wild Egyptian artichoke (WEA) with respect to their structural elucidation, absolute configuration, and quantitative determination. Importantly, both compounds inhibited HCV infection in vitro. The first compound was an unknown molecule, and it was designated “grosheimol,” while the second compound is the known molecule cynaropicrin. Both compounds belong to the group of sesquiterpene lactones. The mode of action of these compounds occurred during the early steps of the HCV life cycle, including cell-free and cell-cell infection inhibition. These natural compounds present promising candidates for further development into anti-HCV therapeutics. PMID:26656684

  12. Mechanisms of Hepatic Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Substantial improvements in the treatment of chronic liver disease have accelerated interest in uncovering the mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Activation of resident hepatic stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic cells in liver injury remains a dominant theme driving the field. However, several new areas of rapid progress in the past 5–10 years also have taken root, including: (1) identification of different fibrogenic populations apart from resident stellate cells, for example, portal fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and bone-marrow– derived cells, as well as cells derived from epithelial mesenchymal transition; (2) emergence of stellate cells as finely regulated determinants of hepatic inflammation and immunity; (3) elucidation of multiple pathways controlling gene expression during stellate cell activation including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms; (4) recognition of disease-specific pathways of fibrogenesis; (5) re-emergence of hepatic macrophages as determinants of matrix degradation in fibrosis resolution and the importance of matrix cross-linking and scar maturation in determining reversibility; and (6) hints that hepatic stellate cells may contribute to hepatic stem cell behavior, cancer, and regeneration. Clinical and translational implications of these advances have become clear, and have begun to impact significantly on the management and outlook of patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:18471545

  13. Enhanced antioxidant capacity of dental pulp-derived iPSC-differentiated hepatocytes and liver regeneration by injectable HGF-releasing hydrogel in fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Wu, Wai-Wah; Li, Hsin-Yang; Chien, Yueh; Sun, Cho-Chin; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Lin, Alex Tong-Long; Huang, Chi-Shuan; Lai, Ying-Hsiu; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Chang, Yuh-Lih; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Liu, Dean-Mo; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Huo, Teh-Ia; Lee, Shou-Dong; Wang, Chien-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury leading to sustained damage and complications. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may be an alternative option for the treatment of AHF. In this study, we reprogrammed human dental pulp-derived fibroblasts into iPSCs, which exhibited pluripotency and the capacity to differentiate into tridermal lineages, including hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps). These iPSC-Heps resembled human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells in gene signature and hepatic markers/functions. To improve iPSC-Heps engraftment, we next developed an injectable carboxymethyl-hexanoyl chitosan hydrogel (CHC) with sustained hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) release (HGF-CHC) and investigated the hepatoprotective activity of HGF-CHC-delivered iPSC-Heps in vitro and in an immunocompromised AHF mouse model induced by thioacetamide (TAA). Intrahepatic delivery of HGF-CHC-iPSC-Heps reduced the TAA-induced hepatic necrotic area and rescued liver function and recipient viability. Compared with PBS-delivered iPSC-Heps, the HGF-CHC-delivered iPSC-Heps exhibited higher antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities that reduced hepatic necrotic area. Importantly, these HGF-CHC-mediated responses could be abolished by administering anti-HGF neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that HGF mediated the enhancement of iPSC-Hep antioxidant/antiapoptotic capacities and hepatoprotection and that HGF-CHC is as an excellent vehicle for iPSC-Hep engraftment in iPSC-based therapy against AHF.

  14. Research Advancements in Porcine Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Dinesh; Shivakumar, Sharath Belame; Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present era of stem cell biology, various animals such as Mouse, Bovine, Rabbit and Porcine have been tested for the efficiency of their mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs before their actual use for stem cell based application in humans. Among them pigs have many similarities to humans in the form of organ size, physiology and their functioning, therefore they have been considered as a valuable model system for in vitro studies and preclinical assessments. Easy assessability, few ethical issues, successful MSC isolation from different origins like bone marrow, skin, umbilical cord blood, Wharton's jelly, endometrium, amniotic fluid and peripheral blood make porcine a good model for stem cell therapy. Porcine derived MSCs (pMSCs have shown greater in vitro differentiation and transdifferention potential towards mesenchymal lineages and specialized lineages such as cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. Immunomodulatory and low immunogenic profiles as shown by autologous and heterologous MSCs proves them safe and appropriate models for xenotransplantation purposes. Furthermore, tissue engineered stem cell constructs can be of immense importance in relation to various osteochondral defects which are difficult to treat otherwise. Using pMSCs successful treatment of various disorders like Parkinson's disease, cardiac ischemia, hepatic failure, has been reported by many studies. Here, in this review we highlight current research findings in the area of porcine mesenchymal stem cells dealing with their isolation methods, differentiation ability, transplantation applications and their therapeutic potential towards various diseases. PMID:26201864

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. Material/Methods Cord blood–derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. Results HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. Conclusions HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers. PMID:27188537

  16. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cord blood-derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. RESULTS HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. CONCLUSIONS HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers. PMID:27188537

  17. Hepatitis C virus RNA detection in serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Cai, Qing; Chen, You-Chun; Zhang, Mu-Sen; Guan, Jian; Li, Xiao-Juan

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the existence and clinical significance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatitis C. METHODS: HCV RNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (Nested PCR) in serum and in PBMC of 46 patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) and in 42 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). RESULTS: The positive rate of HCV RNA in PBMC of patients with CHC was markedly higher than that of patients with AHC (P < 0.01). The positive rates of HCV RNA in serum of patients with AHC and CHC and in PBMC of patients with CHC were significantly higher than those of anti-HCV positive patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (P < 0.01). HCV RNA was negative in the serum of two patients, but could be detected in PBMC. In 12 patients, anti HCV was negative while HCV RNA was positive in serum. CONCLUSION: (1) detection of serum HCV RNA by nested PCR might be helpful in the early diagnosis of anti-HCV negative hepatitis C; (2) liver damage in patients with hepatitis C might be correlated with HCV-viremia; (3) infection of PBMC by HCV might play an important role in chronic liver damage in patients with HCV and in the chronicity of its clinical course; and (4) PBMC might be considered as a “reservoir” for HCV. PMID:27041960

  18. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  19. Long Term Liver Engraftment of Functional Hepatocytes Obtained from Germline Cell-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fagoonee, Sharmila; Famulari, Elvira Smeralda; Silengo, Lorenzo; Tolosano, Emanuela; Altruda, Fiorella

    2015-01-01

    One of the major hurdles in liver gene and cell therapy is availability of ex vivo-expanded hepatocytes. Pluripotent stem cells are an attractive alternative. Here, we show that hepatocyte precursors can be isolated from male germline cell-derived pluripotent stem cells (GPSCs) using the hepatoblast marker, Liv2, and induced to differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. These cells expressed hepatic-specific genes and were functional as demonstrated by their ability to secrete albumin and produce urea. When transplanted in the liver parenchyma of partially hepatectomised mice, Liv2-sorted cells showed regional and heterogeneous engraftment in the injected lobe. Moreover, approximately 50% of Y chromosome-positive, GPSC-derived cells were found in the female livers, in the region of engraftment, even one month after cell injection. This is the first study showing that Liv2-sorted GPSCs-derived hepatocytes can undergo long lasting engraftment in the mouse liver. Thus, GPSCs might offer promise for regenerative medicine. PMID:26323094

  20. Anti-fibrotic effect of thymoquinone on hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Ghazwani, Mohammed; Zhang, Yifei; Gao, Xiang; Fan, Jie; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-02-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major cell type involved in the production of extracellular matrix in liver. After liver injury, HSCs undergo transdifferentiation process from quiescent state to activated state, which plays an important role in liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown that thymoquinone (TQ) might have protective effect against liver fibrosis in animal models; however, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine whether TQ has any direct effect on HSCs. Our results showed that pretreatment of mice with TQ has protective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury compared to control group (untreated), which is consistent with previous studies. Moreover, our in vivo study showed that COL1A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by TQ treatment. Similarly, in vitro study confirmed that TQ downregulated COL1A1, COL3A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels in activated rat HSCs and LX2 cells, an immortalized human hepatic stellate cell line. Pretreatment with TQ also inhibited the LPS-induced proinflammatory response in LX2 cells as demonstrated by reduced mRNA expression of IL-6 and MCP-1. Mechanistically, inactivation of NF-κB pathway is likely to play a role in the TQ-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory response in HSCs. Finally, we have shown that TQ inhibited the culture-triggered transdifferentiation of freshly isolated rat HSCs as shown by significant downregulation of mRNA expression of several fibrosis-related genes. In conclusion, our study suggests that TQ has a direct effect on HSCs, which may contribute to its overall antifibrotic effect. PMID:24182989

  1. Anti-fibrotic effect of thymoquinone on hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Ghazwani, Mohammed; Zhang, Yifei; Gao, Xiang; Fan, Jie; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-02-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major cell type involved in the production of extracellular matrix in liver. After liver injury, HSCs undergo transdifferentiation process from quiescent state to activated state, which plays an important role in liver fibrosis. Previous studies have shown that thymoquinone (TQ) might have protective effect against liver fibrosis in animal models; however, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to examine whether TQ has any direct effect on HSCs. Our results showed that pretreatment of mice with TQ has protective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury compared to control group (untreated), which is consistent with previous studies. Moreover, our in vivo study showed that COL1A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by TQ treatment. Similarly, in vitro study confirmed that TQ downregulated COL1A1, COL3A1 and α-SMA mRNA levels in activated rat HSCs and LX2 cells, an immortalized human hepatic stellate cell line. Pretreatment with TQ also inhibited the LPS-induced proinflammatory response in LX2 cells as demonstrated by reduced mRNA expression of IL-6 and MCP-1. Mechanistically, inactivation of NF-κB pathway is likely to play a role in the TQ-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory response in HSCs. Finally, we have shown that TQ inhibited the culture-triggered transdifferentiation of freshly isolated rat HSCs as shown by significant downregulation of mRNA expression of several fibrosis-related genes. In conclusion, our study suggests that TQ has a direct effect on HSCs, which may contribute to its overall antifibrotic effect.

  2. Evaluation of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy in Patient-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niemietz, Christoph J.; Sauer, Vanessa; Stella, Jacqueline; Fleischhauer, Lutz; Chandhok, Gursimran; Guttmann, Sarah; Avsar, Yesim; Guo, Shuling; Ackermann, Elizabeth J.; Gollob, Jared; Monia, Brett P.; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut H. -J.

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is caused by mutations of the transthyretin (TTR) gene, predominantly expressed in the liver. Two compounds that knockdown TTR, comprising a small interfering RNA (siRNA; ALN-TTR-02) and an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO; IONIS-TTRRx), are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Since primary hepatocytes from FAP patients are rarely available for molecular analysis and commercial tissue culture cells or animal models lack the patient-specific genetic background, this study uses primary cells derived from urine of FAP patients. Urine-derived cells were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with high efficiency. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) showing typical hepatic marker expression were obtained from iPSCs of the FAP patients. TTR mRNA expression of FAP HLCs almost reached levels measured in human hepatocytes. To assess TTR knockdown, siTTR1 and TTR-ASO were introduced to HLCs. A significant downregulation (>80%) of TTR mRNA was induced in the HLCs by both oligonucleotides. TTR protein present in the cell culture supernatant of HLCs was similarly downregulated. Gene expression of other hepatic markers was not affected by the therapeutic oligonucleotides. Our data indicate that urine cells (UCs) after reprogramming and hepatic differentiation represent excellent primary human target cells to assess the efficacy and specificity of novel compounds. PMID:27584576

  3. Evaluation of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy in Patient-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niemietz, Christoph J.; Sauer, Vanessa; Stella, Jacqueline; Fleischhauer, Lutz; Chandhok, Gursimran; Guttmann, Sarah; Avsar, Yesim; Guo, Shuling; Ackermann, Elizabeth J.; Gollob, Jared; Monia, Brett P.; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut H. -J.

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is caused by mutations of the transthyretin (TTR) gene, predominantly expressed in the liver. Two compounds that knockdown TTR, comprising a small interfering RNA (siRNA; ALN-TTR-02) and an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO; IONIS-TTRRx), are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Since primary hepatocytes from FAP patients are rarely available for molecular analysis and commercial tissue culture cells or animal models lack the patient-specific genetic background, this study uses primary cells derived from urine of FAP patients. Urine-derived cells were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with high efficiency. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) showing typical hepatic marker expression were obtained from iPSCs of the FAP patients. TTR mRNA expression of FAP HLCs almost reached levels measured in human hepatocytes. To assess TTR knockdown, siTTR1 and TTR-ASO were introduced to HLCs. A significant downregulation (>80%) of TTR mRNA was induced in the HLCs by both oligonucleotides. TTR protein present in the cell culture supernatant of HLCs was similarly downregulated. Gene expression of other hepatic markers was not affected by the therapeutic oligonucleotides. Our data indicate that urine cells (UCs) after reprogramming and hepatic differentiation represent excellent primary human target cells to assess the efficacy and specificity of novel compounds. PMID:27584576

  4. Evaluation of Therapeutic Oligonucleotides for Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy in Patient-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Niemietz, Christoph J; Sauer, Vanessa; Stella, Jacqueline; Fleischhauer, Lutz; Chandhok, Gursimran; Guttmann, Sarah; Avsar, Yesim; Guo, Shuling; Ackermann, Elizabeth J; Gollob, Jared; Monia, Brett P; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is caused by mutations of the transthyretin (TTR) gene, predominantly expressed in the liver. Two compounds that knockdown TTR, comprising a small interfering RNA (siRNA; ALN-TTR-02) and an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO; IONIS-TTRRx), are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Since primary hepatocytes from FAP patients are rarely available for molecular analysis and commercial tissue culture cells or animal models lack the patient-specific genetic background, this study uses primary cells derived from urine of FAP patients. Urine-derived cells were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with high efficiency. Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) showing typical hepatic marker expression were obtained from iPSCs of the FAP patients. TTR mRNA expression of FAP HLCs almost reached levels measured in human hepatocytes. To assess TTR knockdown, siTTR1 and TTR-ASO were introduced to HLCs. A significant downregulation (>80%) of TTR mRNA was induced in the HLCs by both oligonucleotides. TTR protein present in the cell culture supernatant of HLCs was similarly downregulated. Gene expression of other hepatic markers was not affected by the therapeutic oligonucleotides. Our data indicate that urine cells (UCs) after reprogramming and hepatic differentiation represent excellent primary human target cells to assess the efficacy and specificity of novel compounds. PMID:27584576

  5. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure Exposure on Hepatic Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Recker, Stephanie; Bukovec, Melani; Sparks, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) have the potential to regenerate healthy tissue in the setting of chronic liver disease. The goal of this study was to characterize the mechanosensitivity of HPCs to sustained hydrostatic pressure (20 mmHg) similar to that observed in liver cirrhosis. Bipotential Murine Oval Liver (BMOL) cells, an HPC-like cell line, were cultured in a hydrostatic pressure controlled chamber at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 4 days (to 90% confluency) or 12 days (superconfluency). Controls were run for each time point in a standard incubator without pressure. Nuclei were stained with DAPI and cells were viewed under a Zeiss 710 laser scanning confocal microscope with 40x objective. Nuclei were measured with Image J software (170 to 398 distinct cell nucleus area measurements per group). Two-way ANOVA was used to examine the influence of pressure and confluency on nuclear size. Cells exposed to pressure (mean nuclear area 126.7µm2, S.D. 56.9) had significantly larger nuclei than control cells (mean nuclear area 102.3µm2, S.D. 84.1), p<.001. The pressure*confluency interaction was also significant (p<.05). Results suggest that HPCs are sensitive to low-level hydrostatic pressure associated with chronic liver disease. Further experiments include analyzing cellular proliferation, morphology, and differentiation effects associated with pressure exposure.

  6. Copper ions stimulate the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells via oxygen stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, San-qing; Zhu, Hui-yun; Lin, Jian-guo; Su, Tang-feng; Liu, Yan; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the effect of copper ions on the proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the role of oxidative stress in this process in order to gain insight into the mechanism of hepatic fibrosis in Wilson's disease. LX-2 cells, a cell line of human HSCs, were cultured in vitro and treated with different agents including copper sulfate, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) for different time. The proliferation of LX-2 cells was measured by non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β subunit (PDGFβR), ELISA to determine the level of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), dichlorofluorescein assay to measure the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid hydroperoxide assay to quantify the level of lipid peroxide (LPO). The results showed that copper sulfate over a certain concentration range could promote the proliferation of LX-2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effect was most manifest when LX-2 cells were treated with copper sulfate at a concentration of 100 μmol/L for 24 h. Additionally, copper sulfate could dose-dependently increase the levels of ROS and LPO, and decrease the ratio of GSH/GSSG in LX-2 cells. The copper-induced increase in mRNA and protein expression of PDGFβR was significantly inhibited in LX-2 cells pre-treated with NAC, a precursor of GSH, and this phenomenon could be reversed by the intervention of BSO, an inhibitor of NAC. It was concluded that copper ions may directly stimulate the proliferation of HSCs via oxidative stress. Anti-oxidative stress therapies may help suppress the copper-induced activation and proliferation of HSCs.

  7. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, whether Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in over 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease. PMID:26192438

  8. Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis with Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruno; Costa, Francisco; Lopes, Joanne; Castro, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare proliferative disorder of Langerhans cells of unknown etiology. It can involve multiple organ systems with different clinical presentation, which complicates the diagnosis. It can range from isolated to multisystem disease with different prognosis. Although common among children, liver involvement is relatively rare in adults and frequently overlooked. Natural history of liver LCH fits into two stages: an early stage with infiltration by histiocytes and a late stage with sclerosis of the biliary tree. Pulmonary findings are more common and include multiple nodules in different stages of cavitation, predominantly in the upper lobes. We present a case of adult LCH with pulmonary and biopsy proven liver involvement with resolution of the hepatic findings after treatment. PMID:25977828

  9. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei-Yu; Bird, Thomas G; Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self-renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, but whether hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in more than 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease.

  10. Immunogenicity difference between two hepatitis E vaccines derived from genotype 1 and 4.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiyue; Behloul, Nouredine; Dai, Xing; Dong, Chen; Liang, Jiuhong; Zhang, Min; Shi, Chengbo; Meng, Jihong

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the immunogenicity difference between hepatitis E vaccine p239 derived from hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 1 and vaccine p179 derived from HEV genotype 4; and the presence of genotype-specific neutralizing epitopes. HEV ORF2 recombinant proteins (p166W01, p166Mex, p166US and p166Chn) derived from the four HEV genotypes were used to detect anti-HEV IgGs in sera of mice and humans vaccinated with p179 or p239 and in sera of rhesus monkey challenged with HEV genotype 1 or 4 strains. Then monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against genotype 1 or 4 ORF2 recombinant proteins were prepared and their immunoreactivity was assessed using ELISA and Western blotting; their neutralizing activity was evaluated by an in vitro PCR-based neutralization assay. The results revealed significant immunogenicity difference between the two vaccines: p239-induced IgGs reacted more strongly against p166W01 and p166Mex than against p166US and p166Chn in mice and humans. By contrast, p179-induced IgGs showed a stronger reactivity against p166US and p166Chn than against p166W01 and p166Mex. This difference has also been observed in the sera of rhesus monkeys challenged with HEV genotype 1 or 4 strains. Moreover, besides the two common neutralizing mAbs 3G1 and 5G5, two genotype-specific neutralizing mAbs, 2B1 and 4C5, were obtained. 2B1 could specifically bind to recombinant proteins derived from genotypes 1 and 2 and neutralized only genotypes 1 and 2 strains, while 4C5 immunoreacted specifically against recombinant proteins derived from genotypes 3 and 4 and neutralized only genotypes 3 and 4 strains. These findings revealed the existence of immunogenicity difference between the p179 and p239 vaccines and demonstrated that this difference could be due to the presence of HEV genotype-specific neutralization epitopes.

  11. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Sepulveda, Sonia A; Bryan-Marrugo, Owen L; Cordova-Fletes, Carlos; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Maria C; Rivas-Estilla, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can induce cellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an important role in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggered when the concentration of oxygen species in the extracellular or intracellular environment exceeds antioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulate oxidative stress through the interplay of intracellular antioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH) and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase, and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural and synthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine, glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone, quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) has already shown promising results as co-adjuvants in HCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it is not known how different agents with antiviral activity can interfere with the modulation of the cell redox state induced by HCV and decrease viral replication. This review describes an evidence-based consensus on molecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication and their relationship with cell damage induced by oxidative stress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviral machinery. It also describes some molecules that modify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infected cells. PMID:26692473

  12. Hhex Is Necessary for the Hepatic Differentiation of Mouse ES Cells and Acts via Vegf Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arterbery, Adam S.; Bogue, Clifford W.

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in the differentiation of stem cells to hepatic cells is critical for both understanding normal developmental processes as well as for optimizing the generation of functional hepatic cells for therapy. We performed in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) with a null mutation in the homeobox gene Hhex and show that Hhex-/- mESCs fail to differentiate from definitive endoderm (Sox17+/Foxa2+) to hepatic endoderm (Alb+/Dlk+). In addition, hepatic culture elicited a >7-fold increase in Vegfa mRNA expression in Hhex-/- cells compared to Hhex+/+ cells. Furthermore, we identified VEGFR2+/ALB+/CD34- in early Hhex+/+ hepatic cultures. These cells were absent in Hhex-/- cultures. Finally, through manipulation of Hhex and Vegfa expression, gain and loss of expression experiments revealed that Hhex shares an inverse relationship with the activity of the Vegf signaling pathway in supporting hepatic differentiation. In summary, our results suggest that Hhex represses Vegf signaling during hepatic differentiation of mouse ESCs allowing for cell-type autonomous regulation of Vegfr2 activity independent of endothelial cells. PMID:26784346

  13. Compartmentalization of T lymphocytes to the site of disease: intrahepatic CD4+ T cells specific for the protein NS4 of hepatitis C virus in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The adult liver is an organ without constitutive lymphoid components. Therefore, any intrahepatic T cell found in chronic hepatitis should have migrated to the liver after infection and inflammation. Because of the little information available on the differences between intrahepatic and peripheral T cells, we used recombinant proteins of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) to establish specific T cell lines and clones from liver biopsies of patients with chronic hepatitis C and compared them with those present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We found that the protein nonstructural 4 (NS4) was able to stimulate CD4+ T cells isolated from liver biopsies, whereas with all the other HCV proteins we consistently failed to establish liver- derived T cell lines from 16 biopsies. We then compared NS4-specific T cell clones obtained on the same day from PBMC and liver of the same patient. We found that the 22 PBMC-derived T cell clones represent, at least, six distinct clonal populations that differ in major histocompatibility complex restriction and response to superantigens, whereas the 27 liver-derived T cell clones appear all identical, as further confirmed by cloning and sequencing of the T cell receptor (TCR) variable and hypervariable regions. Remarkably, none of the PBMC- derived clones has a TCR identical to the liver-derived clone, and even with polymerase chain reaction oligotyping we did not find the liver- derived clonotypic TCR transcript in the PBMC, indicating a preferential intrahepatic localization of these T cells. Functionally, the liver-derived T cells provided help for polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)A production by B cells in vitro that is 10-fold more effective than that provided by the PBMC-derived clones, whereas there is no difference in the help provided for IgM and IgG production. Altogether these results demonstrate that the protein NS4 is highly immunogenic for intrahepatic CD4+ T cells primed by HCV in vivo, and that there can be

  14. Scalable production of embryonic stem cell-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stephen M; Zandstra, Peter W

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the ability to self-renew as well as differentiate into any cell type in the body. These traits make ES cells an attractive "raw material" for a variety of cell-based technologies. However, uncontrolled cell aggregation in ES cell differentiation culture inhibits cell proliferation and differentiation and thwarts the use of stirred suspension bioreactors. Encapsulation of ES cells in agarose microdrops prevents physical interaction between developing embryoid bodies (EBs) that, in turn, prevents EB agglomeration. This enables use of stirred suspension bioreactors that can generate large numbers of ES-derived cells under controlled conditions.

  15. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  16. In vitro differentiation of unrestricted somatic stem cells into functional hepatic-like cells displaying a hepatocyte-like glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Waclawczyk, Simon; Buchheiser, Anja; Flögel, Ulrich; Radke, Teja F; Kögler, Gesine

    2010-11-01

    The hepatic-like phenotype resulting from in vitro differentiation of unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSC) derived from human umbilical cord blood (CB) was analyzed with regard to functional and metabolic aspects. USSC can be differentiated into cells of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo and, although they share many features with mesenchymal stroma cells (MSC), can be distinguished from these by their expression of DLK1 as well as a restricted adipogenic differentiation potential. For the differentiation procedure described herein, a novel three-stage differentiation protocol resembling embryonic developmental processes of hepatic endoderm was applied. Hepatic pre-induction was performed by activinA and FGF4 resulting in enhanced SOX17 and FOXA2 expression. Further differentiation was achieved sequentially by retinoic acid, FGF4, HGF, EGF, and OSM resulting in a hepatic endodermal identity, characterized by the expression of AFP and HNF1alpha. Thereafter, expression of G6PC, ARG1, FBP1, and HNF4alpha was observed, thus indicating progressive differentiation. Functional studies concerning albumin secretion, urea formation, and cytochrome-p450-3A4 (CYP3A4) enzyme activity confirmed the hepatic-like phenotype. In order to characterize the differentiated cells at a metabolic level, USSC were incubated with [1-(13)C]glucose. By tracing the fate of the molecule's label via isotopomer analysis using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, formation of both glycogen and some gluconeogenetic activity could be observed providing evidence of a hepatocyte-like glucose metabolism in differentiated USSC. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that USSC represent a stem cell source with a substantial hepatic differentiation capacity which hold the potential for clinical applications. PMID:20458755

  17. In vitro differentiation of unrestricted somatic stem cells into functional hepatic-like cells displaying a hepatocyte-like glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Waclawczyk, Simon; Buchheiser, Anja; Flögel, Ulrich; Radke, Teja F; Kögler, Gesine

    2010-11-01

    The hepatic-like phenotype resulting from in vitro differentiation of unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSC) derived from human umbilical cord blood (CB) was analyzed with regard to functional and metabolic aspects. USSC can be differentiated into cells of all three germ layers in vitro and in vivo and, although they share many features with mesenchymal stroma cells (MSC), can be distinguished from these by their expression of DLK1 as well as a restricted adipogenic differentiation potential. For the differentiation procedure described herein, a novel three-stage differentiation protocol resembling embryonic developmental processes of hepatic endoderm was applied. Hepatic pre-induction was performed by activinA and FGF4 resulting in enhanced SOX17 and FOXA2 expression. Further differentiation was achieved sequentially by retinoic acid, FGF4, HGF, EGF, and OSM resulting in a hepatic endodermal identity, characterized by the expression of AFP and HNF1alpha. Thereafter, expression of G6PC, ARG1, FBP1, and HNF4alpha was observed, thus indicating progressive differentiation. Functional studies concerning albumin secretion, urea formation, and cytochrome-p450-3A4 (CYP3A4) enzyme activity confirmed the hepatic-like phenotype. In order to characterize the differentiated cells at a metabolic level, USSC were incubated with [1-(13)C]glucose. By tracing the fate of the molecule's label via isotopomer analysis using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, formation of both glycogen and some gluconeogenetic activity could be observed providing evidence of a hepatocyte-like glucose metabolism in differentiated USSC. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that USSC represent a stem cell source with a substantial hepatic differentiation capacity which hold the potential for clinical applications.

  18. Human Hepatic Stem Cell and Maturational Liver Lineage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Rachael; Lozoya, Oswaldo; Wang, Yunfang; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alpini, Gianfranco; Mendel, Gemma; Wauthier, Eliane; Barbier, Claire; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M.

    2011-01-01

    Livers are comprised of maturational lineages of cells beginning extrahepatically in the hepato-pancreatic common duct near the duodenum and intrahepatically in zone 1 by the portal triads. The extrahepatic stem cell niches are the peribiliary glands deep within the walls of the bile ducts; those intrahepatically are the canals of Hering in postnatal livers and that derive from ductal plates in fetal livers. Intrahepatically, there are at least 8 maturational lineage stages from the stem cells in zone 1 (periportal), through the midacinar region (zone 2), to the most mature cells and apoptotic cells found pericentrally in zone 3. Those found in the biliary tree are still being defined. Parenchymal cells are closely associated with lineages of mesenchymal cells, and their maturation is coordinated. Each lineage stage consists of parenchymal and mesenchymal cell partners distinguishable by their morphology, ploidy, antigens, biochemical traits, gene expression, and ability to divide. They are governed by changes in chromatin (e.g. methylation), gradients of paracrine signals (soluble factors and insoluble extracellular matrix components), mechanical forces, and feedback loop signals derived from late lineage cells. Feedback loop signals, secreted by late lineage stage cells into bile, flow back to the periportal area and regulate the stem cells and other early lineage stage cells, in mechanisms dictating the size of the liver mass. Recognition of maturational lineage biology and its regulation by these multiple mechanisms offers new understandings of liver biology, pathologies, and strategies for regenerative medicine. PMID:21374667

  19. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  20. Effects of sodium butyrate on the differentiation of pancreatic and hepatic progenitor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Meng; Yan, Li; Shang, Chang-Zhen; Cao, Jun; Lu, Li-Hong; Min, Jun; Cheng, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Recently significant progress has been made in differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells toward pancreatic cells. However, little is known about the generation and identification of pancreatic progenitor cells from ES cells. Here we explored the influence of sodium butyrate on pancreatic progenitor differentiation, and investigated the different effects of sodium butyrate on pancreatic and hepatic progenitor formation. Our results indicated that different concentration and exposure time of sodium butyrate led to different differentiating trends of ES cells. A relatively lower concentration of sodium butyrate with shorter exposure time induced more pancreatic progenitor cell formation. When stimulated by a higher concentration and longer exposure time of sodium butyrate, ES cells differentiated toward hepatic progenitor cells rather than pancreatic progenitor cells. These progenitor cells could further mature into pancreatic and hepatic cells with the supplement of exogenous inducing factors. The resulting pancreatic cells expressed specific markers such as insulin and C-peptide, and were capable of insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. The differentiated hepatocytes were characterized by the expression of a number of liver-associated genes and proteins, and had the capability of glycogen storage. Thus, the current study demonstrated that sodium butyrate played different roles in inducing ES cells toward pancreatic or hepatic progenitor cells. These progenitor cells could be further induced into mature pancreatic cells and hepatocytes. This finding may facilitate the understanding of pancreatic and hepatic cell differentiation from ES cells, and provide a potential source of transplantable cells for cell-replacement therapies.

  1. Hepatic compartmentalization of exhausted and regulatory cells in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, L; Trehanpati, N; Poonia, S; Daigh, L; Sarin, S Kumar; Masur, H; Kottilil, S

    2015-03-01

    Accelerated intrahepatic hepatitis C virus (HCV) pathogenesis is likely the result of dysregulation within both the innate and adaptive immune compartments, but the exact contribution of peripheral blood and liver lymphocyte subsets remains unclear. Prolonged activation and expansion of immunoregulatory cells have been thought to play a role. We determined immune cell subset frequency in contemporaneous liver and peripheral blood samples from chronic HCV-infected and HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and biopsy-derived liver-infiltrating lymphocytes from 26 HIV/HCV-coinfected, 10 chronic HCV-infected and 10 HIV-infected individuals were assessed for various subsets of T and B lymphocytes, dendritic cell, natural killer (NK) cell and NK T-cell frequency by flow cytometry. CD8(+) T cells expressing the exhaustion marker PD-1 were increased in HCV-infected individuals compared with uninfected individuals (P = 0.02), and HIV coinfection enhanced this effect (P = 0.005). In the liver, regulatory CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T cells, as well as CD4(+) CD25(+) PD1(+) T cells, were more frequent in HIV/HCV-coinfected than in HCV-monoinfected samples (P < 0.001). HCV was associated with increased regulatory T cells, PD-1(+) T cells and decreased memory B cells, regardless of HIV infection (P ≤ 0.005 for all). Low CD8(+) expression was observed only in PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells from HCV-infected individuals and healthy controls (P = 0.002) and was associated with enhanced expansion of exhausted CD8(+) T cells when exposed in vitro to PHA or CMV peptides. In conclusion, in HIV/HCV coinfection, ongoing HCV replication is associated with increased regulatory and exhausted T cells in the periphery and liver that may impact control of HCV. Simultaneous characterization of liver and peripheral blood highlights the disproportionate intrahepatic compartmentalization of immunoregulatory T cells, which may contribute to establishment of chronicity and

  2. Profile of Inflammation-associated genes during Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ignatius Irudayam, Joseph; Contreras, Deisy; Spurka, Lindsay; Ren, Songyang; Kanagavel, Vidhya; Ramaiah, Arunachalam; Annamalai, Alagappan; French, Samuel W; Klein, Andrew S; Funari, Vincent; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja

    2015-12-01

    Expression of genes associated with inflammation was analyzed during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to hepatic cells. Messenger RNA transcript profiles of differentiated endoderm (day 5), hepatoblast (day 15) and hepatocyte-like cells (day 21) were obtained by RNA sequencing analysis. When compared to endoderm cells an immature cell type, the hepatic cells (days 15 and 21) had significantly higher expression of acute phase protein genes including complement factors, coagulation factors, serum amyloid A and serpins. Furthermore, hepatic phase of cells expressed proinflammatory cytokines IL18 and IL32 as well as cytokine receptors IL18R1, IL1R1, IL1RAP, IL2RG, IL6R, IL6ST and IL10RB. These cells also produced CCL14, CCL15, and CXCL- 1, 2, 3, 16 and 17 chemokines. Endoderm cells had higher levels of chemokine receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, than that of hepatic cells. Sirtuin family of genes involved in aging, inflammation and metabolism were differentially regulated in endoderm and hepatic phase cells. Ligands and receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family as well as downstream signaling factors TRAF2, TRAF4, FADD, NFKB1 and NFKBIB were differentially expressed during hepatic differentiation. PMID:26702414

  3. Endothelial cells are damaged by autophagic induction before hepatocytes in Con A-induced acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chen; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2010-08-01

    We have reported both T-cell-dependent and -independent hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficiency mice, respectively, after intravenous injection of Con A in mice. The mode of hepatocyte cell death is different: autophagy for T-cell-independent hepatitis in contrast to apoptosis for T-cell-dependent one. In this study, we further demonstrate that liver blood vessels are the first target in both modes. The infused Con A bond to the hepatic vascular endothelial cells and cause its damage with autophagy. Before the elevation of the serum alanine aminotransferase at 6 h post-injection, the plasma leakage and hemorrhage occur at 1-3 h without inflammation. Con A induces autophagy of endothelial cells and hemorrhage that is enhanced by IFN-gamma. Using the endothelial cell line HMEC-1, a dose- and time-dependent cell death with autophagic LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3) conversion was induced by Con A and was enhanced by IFN-gamma. In conclusion, Con A induced autophagy on hepatic endothelial cells; the damage of liver blood vessel occurs before the induction of T-cell-dependent hepatitis via apoptosis or T-cell-independent hepatitis via autophagy.

  4. Cloned mice derived from somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, K; Ohi, S; Ando, A; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K

    2000-12-01

    In 1997, a cloned sheep "Dolly" was produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell. The first birth of cloned mice derived from some somatic cells were succeeded in 1998. At present, it is shown that somatic cells, cumulus cells, fibroblasts and Sertoli cells can be used to the study of cloned animal as nuclear donor. In this study investigation was designed to compare with efficiency on the production of cloned embryos by using the microinjection and the electrofusion methods for nuclear transfer. Oocyte enucleation was performed with a micromanipulator. The oocyte was held by holding pipette, and was enucleated using a beveled pipette. Microinjection method: Cell's nucleus injection was carried out by piezo-micromanipulator. Cytochalasin B treated cumulus cell was aspirated into a injection pipette, and was broken its plasma membrane using the injection pipette. Then, the cumulus cell was injected into the enucleated ooplasm directly. Electrofusion method: The cell was aspirated into a beveled pipette, and then an aspirated cell was inserted into perivitelline space. Then, the pair of enucleated oocyte and cell was fused using electrical cell fusion apparatus. The reconstituted embryos were activated after nuclear transfer using St2+. Reconstituted embryos had been produced by the microinjection showed the embryonic development to over 8-cell stages. But, the rate of fragmentation of reconstituted embryos by the microinjection showed a little high rate in comparison with the electrofusion. When some reconstituted embryos by the microinjection were transplanted to pseudopregnant females' oviduct, 9 fetuses were observed at 14 days post coitum. PMID:11329940

  5. Hepatic lipase is localized at the parenchymal cell microvilli in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Breedveld, B; Schoonderwoerd, K; Verhoeven, A J; Willemsen, R; Jansen, H

    1997-01-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is thought to be located at the vascular endothelium in the liver. However, it has also been implicated in the binding and internalization of chylomicron remnants in the parenchymal cells. In view of this apparent discrepancy between localization and function, we re-investigated the localization of HL in rat liver using biochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. The binding of HL to endothelial cells was studied in primary cultures of rat liver endothelial cells. Endothelial cells bound HL in a saturable manner with high affinity. However, the binding capacity accounted for at most 1% of the total HL activity present in the whole liver. These results contrasted with earlier studies, in which non-parenchymal cell (NPC) preparations had been found to bind HL with a high capacity. To study HL binding to the different components of the NPC preparations, we separated endothelial cells, Kupffer cells and blebs by counterflow elutriation. Kupffer cells and endothelial cells showed a relatively low HL-binding capacity. In contrast, the blebs, representing parenchymal-cell-derived material, had a high HL-binding capacity (33 m-units/mg of protein) and accounted for more than 80% of the total HL binding in the NPC preparation. In contrast with endothelial and Kupffer cells, the HL-binding capacity of parenchymal cells could account for almost all the HL activity found in the whole liver. These data strongly suggest that HL binding occurs at parenchymal liver cells. To confirm this conclusion in situ, we studied HL localization by immunocytochemical techniques. Using immunofluorescence, we confirmed the sinusoidal localization of HL. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that virtually all HL was located at the microvilli of parenchymal liver cells, with a minor amount at the endothelium. We conclude that, in rat liver, HL is localized at the microvilli of parenchymal cells. PMID:9020876

  6. Hepatic cell lines for drug hepatotoxicity testing: limitations and strategies to upgrade their metabolic competence by gene engineering.

    PubMed

    Donato, M Teresa; Jover, Ramiro; Gómez-Lechón, M José

    2013-11-01

    One key issue in the pharmaceutical development of new compounds is knowledge on metabolism, the enzymes involved and the potential hepatotoxicity of a drug. Primary cultured hepatocytes are a valuable in vitro model for drug metabolism studies. However, human hepatocytes show phenotypic instability and have restricted accessibility and high batch-to-batch functional variability, which seriously complicates their use in routine testing. Therefore, several liver-derived cell models have been developed for drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity screening to circumvent these drawbacks. Hepatoma cell lines offer important advantages, availability, an unlimited life span and a stable phenotype, thus rendering them suitable models for such studies. However, currently available human hepatoma cell lines are not a good alternative to cultured hepatocytes as they show very limited expression for most drug-metabolising enzymes. Other approaches have been developed to generate immortalised hepatic cells with metabolic competence (use of plasmids encoding immortalising genes to transform human hepatocytes, cell lines obtained from transgenic animals, hepatocytomes or hydrid cells). Recombinant models heterologously expressing cytochrome P450 enzymes in hepatoma cells have also been generated, and are widely used in drug metabolism and toxicity evaluations. In recent years, new approaches to up-regulate the expression of drug-biotransformation enzymes in human cell lines (i.e., transfection with the expression vectors encoding key hepatic transcription factors) have also been investigated. This paper reviews the features of liver-derived cell lines, their suitability for drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity studies, and the state-of-the-art strategies pursued to generate metabolically competent hepatic cell lines.

  7. Detection of surface asialoglycoprotein receptor expression in hepatic and extra-hepatic cells using a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Kil Lyong; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2006-07-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a heterodimeric membrane protein which is involved in the internalization of desialylated glycoproteins and also in the binding and uptake of various pathogenic viruses. To facilitate the analysis of ASGPR expression, we generated a monoclonal antibody, termed ASSA-1, that is specific to the ASGPR H1 subunit based on ELISA and Western blots analysis. ASSA-1 also reacted to surface-displayed ASGPR in live cells thus enabling analysis of ASGPR expression by immunofluorescence flow cytometry, which we used to analyze established human liver cell lines previously confirmed to be positive for ASGPR mRNA expression. In agreement with previous reports, surface ASGPR was also detected in extra-hepatic cells and, surprisingly, even in human T cell lines, which was then further confirmed in activated, but not in resting, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. These observations suggest that ASGPR has a broad pattern of expression that even extends into cells from the immune system, which biological meanings still have to be analyzed. We expect that monoclonal antibody ASSA-1 will serve as a new powerful tool in analyzing the biological role of ASGPR in hepatic and extra-hepatic cells.

  8. Proteomic identification of potential Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Fengyu; Hu, Xuchu; Chen, Wenjun; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence demonstrated that Clonorchis sinensis is an important risk factor of hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma. C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (CsESPs) are protein complex including proteases, antioxidant enzymes, and metabolic enzymes, which may contribute to pathogenesis of liver fluke-associated hepatobiliary diseases. However, potential CsESP candidates involved into hepatic fibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma still remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we performed proteomic identification of CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cell line LX-2. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the interaction of CsESPs with LX-2 cell membrane. LX-2 cells could be stimulated by CsESPs from 24 h post incubation (p < 0.05). Specifically, 50 μg/ml of CsESPs showed the strongest effect on cell proliferation in methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay which could also be demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis (p < 0.01). Furthermore, expression level of human type III collagen in LX-2 cells treated with CsESPs was significantly higher than that in control cells measured by molecular beacon and semiquantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR approaches (p < 0.01). Finally, CsESPs before and after incubation with LX-2 cells were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis and matrix associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis. Nine proteins with abundance change above threefold were Rho GTPase-activating protein, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va, α-enolase, phospholipase C, interleukin-15, insect-derived growth factor, cytochrome c oxidase subunit VI, DNAH1 protein, and kinesin light chain. Taken together, we identified potential CsESP candidates capable of binding and activating human hepatic stellate cells, providing more direct evidences that are previously unknown to accelerate strategies

  9. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 μM). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid’s structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 μM. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation. PMID:26186636

  10. Tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells alleviate concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, So-Yeon; Kim, Ye-Ryung; Woo, So-Youn; Sung, Sun Hee; Kim, Han Su; Jung, Sung-Chul; Jo, Inho; Park, Joo-Won

    2014-08-01

    Acute liver failure, the fatal deterioration of liver function, is the most common indication for emergency liver transplantation, and drug-induced liver injury and viral hepatitis are frequent in young adults. Stem cell therapy has come into the limelight as a potential therapeutic approach for various diseases, including liver failure and cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated therapeutic effects of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) in concanavalin A (ConA)- and acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury. ConA-induced hepatitis resembles viral and immune-mediated hepatic injury, and acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the United States and Europe. Intravenous administration of T-MSCs significantly reduced ConA-induced hepatic toxicity, but not acetaminophen-induced liver injury, affirming the immunoregulatory capacity of T-MSCs. T-MSCs were successfully recruited to damaged liver and suppressed inflammatory cytokine secretion. T-MSCs expressed high levels of galectin-1 and -3, and galectin-1 knockdown which partially diminished interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α secretion from cultured T-cells. Galectin-1 knockdown in T-MSCs also reversed the protective effect of T-MSCs on ConA-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that galectin-1 plays an important role in immunoregulation of T-MSCs, which contributes to their protective effect in immune-mediated hepatitis. Further, suppression of T-cell activation by frozen and thawed T-MSCs implies great potential of T-MSC banking for clinical utilization in immune-mediated disease. PMID:24954408

  11. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  12. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-07-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin's lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they seem to

  13. Myeloid derived suppressor cells and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Boros, Peter; Ochando, Jordi; Zeher, Margit

    2016-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells with immunoregulatory function. When activated and expanded, these cells can suppress T cell functions via cell-to cell interactions as well as soluble mediators. Recent studies investigated the involvement of MDSC in autoimmune diseases. Some papers have described beneficial effect of MDSC during the course of autoimmune diseases, and suggest a potential role as a treatment option, while others failed to detect these effects. Their contributions to autoimmune diseases are not fully understood, and many questions and some controversies remain as to the expansion, activation, and inhibitory functions of MDSC. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of MDSC in autoimmune disorders. PMID:27240453

  14. Cell differentiation mediated by co-culture of human umbilical cord blood stem cells with murine hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Stecklum, Maria; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Purfürst, Bettina; Siegert, Antje; Keil, Marlen; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, purified human cord blood stem cells were co-cultivated with murine hepatic alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells to compare the effect on endodermal stem cell differentiation by either direct cell-cell interaction or by soluble factors in conditioned hepatic cell medium. With that approach, we want to mimic in vitro the situation of preclinical transplantation experiments using human cells in mice. Cord blood stem cells, cultivated with hepatic conditioned medium, showed a low endodermal differentiation but an increased connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx43, and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) and CK19 expression was monitored by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Microarray profiling indicated that in cultivated cord blood cells, 604 genes were upregulated 2-fold, with the highest expression for epithelial CK19 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). On ultrastructural level, there were no major changes in the cellular morphology, except a higher presence of phago(ly)some-like structures observed. Direct co-culture of AML12 cells with cord blood cells led to less incisive differentiation with increased sex-determining region Y-box 17 (SOX17), Cx32 and Cx43, as well as epithelial CK8 and CK19 expressions. On ultrastructural level, tight cell contacts along the plasma membranes were revealed. FACS analysis in co-cultivated cells quantified dye exchange on low level, as also proved by time relapse video-imaging of labelled cells. Modulators of gap junction formation influenced dye transfer between the co-cultured cells, whereby retinoic acid increased and 3-heptanol reduced the dye transfer. The study indicated that the cell-co-cultured model of human umbilical cord blood cells and murine AML12 cells may be a suitable approach to study some aspects of endodermal/hepatic cell differentiation induction. PMID:25270685

  15. Hepatic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells as microscaled multilayered colonies leading to enhanced homogeneity and maturation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaokang; Jung Jung, Da; Qi, Hao; Kee, Keh Kooi; Du, Yanan

    2014-11-12

    Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards hepatocyte-like cells on planar tissue culture plates has been extensively investigated with great promise to provide alternative cell sources for drug metabolism/toxicity testing. Recently, hepatic differentiation of hESCs in 3D configuration with better mimicry of embryonic liver development represents incremental efforts to improve the differentiation efficiency and cellular maturation. However, most of the present 3D differentiation configurations involved interruptive operations during the multi-staged differentiation process, which might impose unwanted influence on cellular differentiation. Most of the current researches resulted in generation of hepatocytes with high expression of AFP, which is minimally expressed in primary hepatocytes. Here, off-the-shelf micro-stencil arrays are developed to generate adherent multilayered colonies composed of hESCs-derived cells. Uninterrupted cellular differentiation and proliferation is achieved to recapitulate the continuous and multi-stage liver development. Compared with conventional 2D format, the micro-scaled multilayered colonies with uniform and defined sizes constrained within the microwells are composed of more homogenous and mature hepatocyte-like cells with significantly lowered AFP expression and elevated hepatic functions. The multilayered colonies as novel 3D configuration for hepatic differentiation of hESCs represent a significant step toward efficient generation of functional hepatocytes for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. PMID:25059765

  16. Natural killer cells contribute to hepatic injury and help in viral persistence during progression of hepatitis B e-antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Nandi, M; Pal, S; Mukhopadhyay, D; Chakraborty, B C; Khatun, M; Bhowmick, D; Mondal, R K; Das, S; Das, K; Ghosh, R; Banerjee, S; Santra, A; Chatterjee, M; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B e-antigen negative (e(-)) chronic HBV infection (CHI) encompasses a heterogeneous clinical spectrum ranging from inactive carrier (IC) state to e(-) chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. In the backdrop of dysfunctional virus-specific T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are emerging as innate effectors in CHI. We characterized CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells in clinically well-defined, treatment-naive e(-) patients in IC, e(-)CHB or decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) phase to appraise their role in disease progression. The NK cell frequencies increased progressively with disease severity (IC 8.2%, e(-)CHB 13.2% and LC 14.4%). Higher proportion of NK cells from LC/e(-)CHB expressed CD69, NKp46, NKp44, TRAIL and perforin, the last two being prominent features of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK subsets, respectively. The frequencies of CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells together with TRAIL(+) CD56(bright) and Perforin(+) CD56(dim) NK cells correlated positively with serum alanine transaminase levels in e(-)CHB/LC. K562 cell-stimulated NK cells from e(-)CHB/LC exhibited significantly greater degranulation but diminished interferon-γ production than IC. Further, Perforin(+) NK cell frequency inversely correlated with autologous CD4(+) T-cell count in e(-) patients and ligands of NK receptors were over-expressed in CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB/LC relative to IC. Co-culture of sorted CD56(dim) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB showed enhanced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis, which was reduced by perforin inhibitor, concanamycin A, suggesting a possible perforin-dependent NK cell-mediated CD4(+) T-cell depletion. Moreover, greater incidence of perforin-expressing NK cells and decline in CD4(+) T cells were noticed intrahepatically in e(-)CHB than IC. Collectively, NK cells contribute to the progression of e(-)CHI by enhanced TRAIL- and perforin-dependent cytolytic activity and by restraining anti-viral immunity through reduced interferon-γ secretion and

  17. Natural killer cells contribute to hepatic injury and help in viral persistence during progression of hepatitis B e-antigen-negative chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Nandi, M; Pal, S; Mukhopadhyay, D; Chakraborty, B C; Khatun, M; Bhowmick, D; Mondal, R K; Das, S; Das, K; Ghosh, R; Banerjee, S; Santra, A; Chatterjee, M; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B e-antigen negative (e(-)) chronic HBV infection (CHI) encompasses a heterogeneous clinical spectrum ranging from inactive carrier (IC) state to e(-) chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation. In the backdrop of dysfunctional virus-specific T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are emerging as innate effectors in CHI. We characterized CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells in clinically well-defined, treatment-naive e(-) patients in IC, e(-)CHB or decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) phase to appraise their role in disease progression. The NK cell frequencies increased progressively with disease severity (IC 8.2%, e(-)CHB 13.2% and LC 14.4%). Higher proportion of NK cells from LC/e(-)CHB expressed CD69, NKp46, NKp44, TRAIL and perforin, the last two being prominent features of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK subsets, respectively. The frequencies of CD3(-) CD56(+) NK cells together with TRAIL(+) CD56(bright) and Perforin(+) CD56(dim) NK cells correlated positively with serum alanine transaminase levels in e(-)CHB/LC. K562 cell-stimulated NK cells from e(-)CHB/LC exhibited significantly greater degranulation but diminished interferon-γ production than IC. Further, Perforin(+) NK cell frequency inversely correlated with autologous CD4(+) T-cell count in e(-) patients and ligands of NK receptors were over-expressed in CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB/LC relative to IC. Co-culture of sorted CD56(dim) NK cells and CD4(+) T cells from e(-)CHB showed enhanced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis, which was reduced by perforin inhibitor, concanamycin A, suggesting a possible perforin-dependent NK cell-mediated CD4(+) T-cell depletion. Moreover, greater incidence of perforin-expressing NK cells and decline in CD4(+) T cells were noticed intrahepatically in e(-)CHB than IC. Collectively, NK cells contribute to the progression of e(-)CHI by enhanced TRAIL- and perforin-dependent cytolytic activity and by restraining anti-viral immunity through reduced interferon-γ secretion and

  18. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  19. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ashish; Murray, John M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  20. Genetic abolishment of hepatocyte proliferation activates hepatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yoko; Zhang, Mingjun; Yamaji, Sachie; Cang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Quiescent hepatic stem cells (HSCs) can be activated when hepatocyte proliferation is compromised. Chemical injury rodent models have been widely used to study the localization, biomarkers, and signaling pathways in HSCs, but these models usually exhibit severe promiscuous toxicity and fail to distinguish damaged and non-damaged cells. Our goal is to establish new animal models to overcome these limitations, thereby providing new insights into HSC biology and application. We generated mutant mice with constitutive or inducible deletion of Damaged DNA Binding protein 1 (DDB1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, in hepatocytes. We characterized the molecular mechanism underlying the compensatory activation and the properties of oval cells (OCs) by methods of mouse genetics, immuno-staining, cell transplantation and gene expression profiling. We show that deletion of DDB1 abolishes self-renewal capacity of mouse hepatocytes in vivo, leading to compensatory activation and proliferation of DDB1-expressing OCs. Partially restoring proliferation of DDB1-deficient hepatocytes by ablation of p21, a substrate of DDB1 E3 ligase, alleviates OC proliferation. Purified OCs express both hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers, form colonies in vitro, and differentiate to hepatocytes after transplantation. Importantly, the DDB1 mutant mice exhibit very minor liver damage, compared to a chemical injury model. Microarray analysis reveals several previously unrecognized markers, including Reelin, enriched in oval cells. Here we report a genetic model in which irreversible inhibition of hepatocyte duplication results in HSC-driven liver regeneration. The DDB1 mutant mice can be broadly applied to studies of HSC differentiation, HSC niche and HSCs as origin of liver cancer. PMID:22384083

  1. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  2. Hepatitis B virus efficiently infects non-adherent hepatoma cells via human sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamashita, Atsuya; Yasumoto, Jun; Chen, Wenjia; Okamoto, Toru; Maekawa, Shinya; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) has been reported as a functional receptor for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, HBV could not efficiently infect HepG2 cells expressing NTCP (NTCP-HepG2 cells) under adherent monolayer-cell conditions. In this study, NTCP was mainly detected in the basolateral membrane region, but not the apical site, of monolayer NTCP-HepG2 cells. We hypothesized that non-adherent cell conditions of infection would enhance HBV infectivity. Non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells were prepared by treatment with trypsin and EDTA, which did not degrade NTCP in the membrane fraction. HBV successfully infected NTCP-HepG2 cells at a viral dose 10 times lower in non-adherent phase than in adherent phase. Efficient infection of non-adherent NTCP-HepG2 cells with blood-borne or cell-culture-derived HBV was observed and was remarkably impaired in the presence of the myristoylated preS1 peptide. HBV could also efficiently infect HepaRG cells under non-adherent cell conditions. We screened several compounds using our culture system and identified proscillaridin A as a potent anti-HBV agent with an IC50 value of 7.2 nM. In conclusion, non-adherent host cell conditions of infection augmented HBV infectivity in an NTCP-dependent manner, thus providing a novel strategy to identify anti-HBV drugs and investigate the mechanism of HBV infection. PMID:26592202

  3. Determining the Cellular Diversity of Hepatitis C Virus Quasispecies by Single-Cell Viral Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    McLauchlan, John

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants. PMID:24049174

  4. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  5. Highly Synchronized Expression of Lineage-Specific Genes during In Vitro Hepatic Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Nidal; Olsson, Björn; Edsbagge, Josefina; Küppers-Munther, Barbara; Van Giezen, Mariska; Asplund, Annika; Andersson, Tommy B.; Björquist, Petter; Carén, Helena; Simonsson, Stina; Sartipy, Peter; Synnergren, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells- (hPSCs-) derived hepatocytes have the potential to replace many hepatic models in drug discovery and provide a cell source for regenerative medicine applications. However, the generation of fully functional hPSC-derived hepatocytes is still a challenge. Towards gaining better understanding of the differentiation and maturation process, we employed a standardized protocol to differentiate six hPSC lines into hepatocytes and investigated the synchronicity of the hPSC lines by applying RT-qPCR to assess the expression of lineage-specific genes (OCT4, NANOG, T, SOX17, CXCR4, CER1, HHEX, TBX3, PROX1, HNF6, AFP, HNF4a, KRT18, ALB, AAT, and CYP3A4) which serve as markers for different stages during liver development. The data was evaluated using correlation and clustering analysis, demonstrating that the expression of these markers is highly synchronized and correlated well across all cell lines. The analysis also revealed a distribution of the markers in groups reflecting the developmental stages of hepatocytes. Functional analysis of the differentiated cells further confirmed their hepatic phenotype. Taken together, these results demonstrate, on the molecular level, the highly synchronized differentiation pattern across multiple hPSC lines. Moreover, this study provides additional understanding for future efforts to improve the functionality of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and thereby increase the value of related models. PMID:26949401

  6. Valproic Acid Increases the Hepatic Differentiation Potential of Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Petrakova, O S; Ashapkin, V V; Shtratnikova, V Y; Kutueva, L I; Vorotelyak, E A; Borisov, M A; Terskikh, V V; Gvazava, I G; Vasiliev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The studies of cell plasticity and differentiation abilities are important problems in modern cellular biology. The use of histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid is a promising approach to increasing the differentiation efficiency of various cell types. In this paper we investigate the ability of mouse submandibular salivary gland cells to differentiate into the hepatic direction and the effect of valproic acid on the efficiency of this differentiation. It was shown that the gene expression levels of hepatocyte markers (Aat, Afp, G6p, Pepck, Tat, Cyp3a13) and liver-enriched transcription factors (Hnf-3α, Hnf-3β, Hnf-4α, Hnf-6) were increased after differentiation in salivary gland cells. Valproic acid increases the specificity of hepatic differentiation, reducing the expression levels of the ductal (Krt19, Hhex1, Cyp7a1) and acinar (Ptf1a) markers. After valproic acid exposure, the efficiency of hepatic differentiation also increases, as evidenced by the increase in the gene expression level of Alb and Tdo, and increase in urea production by differentiated cells. No change was found in DNA methylation of the promoter regions of the genes; however, valproic acid treatment and subsequent hepatic differentiation largely affected the histone H3 methylation of liver-enriched genes. Thus, mouse submandibular salivary gland cells are capable of effective differentiation in the hepatic direction. Valproic acid increases the specificity and efficiency of the hepatic differentiation of these cells.

  7. Stem cell-derived liver cells for drug testing and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew D; Ware, Brenton R; Khetani, Salman R

    2015-05-01

    Differences between animals and humans in liver pathways now necessitate the use of in vitro models of the human liver for several applications such as drug screening. However, isolated primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) are a limited resource for building such models given shortages of donor organs. In contrast, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be propagated nearly indefinitely and differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro using soluble factors inspired from liver development. Additionally, iPSCs can be generated from patients with specific genetic backgrounds to study genotype-phenotype relationships. While current protocols to differentiate hESCs and iPSCs into human hepatocyte-like cells (hESC-HHs and iPSC-HHs) still need improvement to yield cells functionally similar to the adult liver, proof-of-concept studies have already shown utility of these cells in drug development and modeling liver diseases such as α1-antitrypsin deficiency, hepatitis B/C viral infections, and malaria. Here, we present an overview of hESC-HH and iPSC-HH culture platforms that have been utilized for the aforementioned applications. We also discuss the use of semiconductor-driven microfabrication tools to precisely control the microenvironment around these cells to enable higher and longer-term liver functions in vitro. Finally, we discuss areas for improvement in creating next generation stem cell-derived liver models. In the future, stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells could provide a sustainable cell source for high-throughput drug screening, enabling better mechanistic understanding of human liver diseases for the development of more efficacious and safer therapeutics, and personalized cell-based therapies in the clinic.

  8. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  9. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Sören V.; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A.; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  10. Cholestatic hepatitis C after chemotherapy containing rituximab in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pellicelli, Adriano M; D'Ambrosio, Cecilia; Dessanti, Maria L; Villani, Roberto; Fondacaro, Lucia; Miglioresi, Lucia; Grillo, Lucia R; Andreoli, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that is a widely used for the treatment of B cells non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The use of chemotherapy regimens containing rituximab in HCV-positive patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma has been associated with liver dysfunction, but no cases of cholestatic hepatitis C were described. To our knowledge, this is the first case of cholestatic hepatitis C in an HCV-positive patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma describes in the literature. We discuss the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this severe form of hepatitis and describe its evolution after antiviral treatment.

  11. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  12. Antiamoebic and Toxicity Studies of a Carbamic Acid Derivative and Its Therapeutic Effect in a Hamster Model of Hepatic Amoebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; Shibayama, Mineko; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Angeles, Enrique; de la Garza, Mireya

    2005-01-01

    Amoebiasis is an important public health problem in developing countries. Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis, may develop resistance to nitroimidazoles, a group of drugs considered to be the most effective against this parasitic disease. Therefore, research on new drugs for the treatment of this common infection still constitutes an important therapeutic demand. In the present study we determined the effects of a carbamate derivative, ethyl 4-chlorophenylcarbamate (C4), on trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS. C4 was subject to various toxicity tests, including the determination of mutagenicity for bacterial DNA and changes in the enzymatic activities of eukaryotic cells. Genotoxicity studies were performed by the mutagenicity Ames test (plate incorporation and preincubation methods) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, with or without metabolic activation produced by the S9 fraction of rat liver. C4 toxicity studies were performed by measuring enzymatic activity in eukaryotic cells by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-formazan test with Fischer 344 rat hepatocytes. C4 did not induce either frame-shift mutations in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium TA97 or TA98 or base pair substitutions in strains TA100 and TA102. The compound was not toxic for cultured rat hepatic cells. Trophozoites treated with 100 μg of C4 per ml were inhibited 97.88% at 48 h of culture; moreover, damage to the amoebae was also confirmed by electron microscopy. The antiamoebic activity of C4 was evaluated by using an in vivo model of amoebic liver abscess in hamsters. Doses of 75 and 100 mg/100 g of body weight reduced the extent of the amoebic liver abscess by 84 and 94%, respectively. These results justify further studies to clearly validate whether C4 is a new suitable antiamoebic drug. PMID:15728919

  13. Fibrogenic response of hepatic stellate cells in ovariectomised rats exposed to ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Bobowiec, R; Wojcik, M; Jaworska-Adamu, J; Tusinska, E

    2013-02-01

    The discrepancy about the role of estrogens in hepatic fibrogenesis and lack of studies addressed of ketogenic diet (KD) on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), prompted us to investigate the activity of HSC in control, KD- and thioacetamide (TAA)-administrated rats with different plasma concentration of estradiol (E2). HSC were isolated by the collagenase perfusion methods and separated by the Percoll gradient centrifugation. After the 4(th) and 8(th) day of incubation, lysates of HSC and the media were collected for further analysis. The HSC derived from KD-rats released remarkably more transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 than cells obtained from animals fed with a standard diet. The ovariectomy of KD-rats markedly intensified the secretion of this fibrogenic cytokine on the 8(th) day of incubation (201.33 ±1 7.15 pg/ml). In HSC of rats exposed to E2, the TGF-β1 concentration did not exceed 157 ± 34.39 pg/ml. In respect to the collagen type I, the HSC obtained from ovariectomised KD-rats released an augmented amount of this ECM protein after the 8(th) day of culture (1.83 ± 0.14 U/ml). In the same time, higher quantities of ASMA appeared in the KD rats (1.41 ± 0.3 pg/mg protein). Exposition of rats to E2 did not markedly decrease the amount of ASMA. In summary, KD was able to induce morphological and functional changes in HSC, especially derived from rats deprived of ovarian estrogens. However, the preservation of E2 in ovariectomised rats didn't substantially alter the activation of HSC.

  14. Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Joseph; Wesolowski, Robert; Papenfuss, Tracey; Brooks, Taylor R.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a population of immature myeloid cells defined by their suppressive actions on immune cells such as T cells, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. MDSCs typically are positive for the markers CD33 and CD11b but express low levels of HLADR in humans. In mice, MDSCs are typically positive for both CD11b and Gr1. These cells exert their suppressive activity on the immune system via the production of reactive oxygen species, arginase, and cytokines. These factors subsequently inhibit the activity of multiple protein targets such as the T cell receptor, STAT1, and indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase. The numbers of MDSCs tend to increase with cancer burden while inhibiting MDSCs improves disease outcome in murine models. MDSCs also inhibit immune cancer therapeutics. In light of the poor prognosis of metastatic breast cancer in women and the correlation of increasing levels of MDSCs with increasing disease burden, the purposes of this review are to 1) discuss why MDSCs may be important in breast cancer, 2) describe model systems used to study MDSCs in vitro and in vivo, 3) discuss mechanisms involved in MDSC induction/function in breast cancer, and 4) present pre-clinical and clinical studies that explore modulation of the MDSC-immune system interaction in breast cancer. MDSCs inhibit the host immune response in breast cancer patients and diminishing MDSC actions may improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23828498

  15. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  16. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations.

  17. Reconstruction of hepatic stellate cell-incorporated liver capillary structures in small hepatocyte tri-culture using microporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Junichi; Sudo, Ryo; Masuda, Genta; Mitaka, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    In liver sinusoids, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) locate the outer surface of microvessels to form a functional unit with endothelia and hepatocytes. To reconstruct functional liver tissue in vitro, formation of the HSC-incorporated sinusoidal structure is essential. We previously demonstrated capillary formation of endothelial cells (ECs) in tri-culture, where a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) microporous membrane was intercalated between the ECs and hepatic organoids composed of small hepatocytes (SHs), i.e. hepatic progenitor cells, and HSCs. However, the high thickness and low porosity of the membranes limited heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which are essential to form HSC-EC hybrid structures. Here, we focused on the effective use of the thin and highly porous poly( d, l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microporous membranes in SH-HSC-EC tri-culture to reconstruct the HSC-incorporated liver capillary structures in vitro. First, the formation of EC capillary-like structures was induced on Matrigel-coated PLGA microporous membranes. Next, the membranes were stacked on hepatic organoids composed of small SHs and HSCs. When the pore size and porosity of the membranes were optimized, HSCs selectively migrated to the EC capillary-like structures. This process was mediated in part by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signalling. In addition, the HSCs were located along the outer surface of the EC capillary-like structures with their long cytoplasmic processes. In the HSC-incorporated capillary tissues, SHs acquired high levels of differentiated functions, compared to those without ECs. This model will provide a basis for the construction of functional, thick, vascularized liver tissues in vitro.

  18. Hepatic Stellate Cells and microRNAs in Pathogenesis of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mio; Bloomston, P. Mark

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by either blocking translation or inducing degradation of target mRNA. miRNAs play essential roles in diverse biological and pathological processes, including development of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a central role in development of hepatic fibrosis and there are intricate regulatory effects of miRNAs on their activation, proliferation, collagen production, migration, and apoptosis. There are multiple differentially expressed miRNAs in activated HSCs, and in this review we aim to summarize current data on miRNAs that participate in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Based on this review, miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for diagnosis of liver disease, as well as markers of disease progression. Most importantly, dysregulated miRNAs may potentially be targeted by novel therapies to treat and reverse progression of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:26999230

  19. Adaptation of hepatitis A virus to high titre growth in diploid and permanent cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, J P; Mehdi, S; Mauler, R

    1988-01-01

    A hepatitis A virus isolate originally obtained from the feces of a clinically ill patient and passaged in diploid human embryonic kidney and lung cells was adapted to grow in MRC-5, Cercopithecus aethiops muscle and in Vero cells. Three different adaptation methods were applied. Either method proved to be suitable to finally give high virus titres of cell-bound as well as cell-free virus in the supernatant of infected cultures during 10 to 15 passages. An easily performable immunoperoxidase staining method was used for the titration of hepatitis A virus in microtitre plates. Cytopathogenic changes in MRC-5 cell cultures infected with fully adapted virus are described.

  20. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Link Hyperinsulinemia to Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Accili, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Insulin signaling in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is critical to maintain endothelial function but also to mediate insulin action on peripheral glucose disposal. However, gene knockout studies have reached disparate conclusions. Thus, insulin receptor inactivation in ECs does not impair insulin action, whereas inactivation of Irs2 does. Previously, we have shown that endothelial ablation of the three Foxo genes protects mice from atherosclerosis. Interestingly, here we show that mice lacking FoxO isoforms in ECs develop hepatic insulin resistance through excessive generation of nitric oxide (NO) that impairs insulin action in hepatocytes via tyrosine nitration of insulin receptors. Coculture experiments demonstrate that NO produced in liver sinusoidal ECs impairs insulin’s ability to suppress glucose production in hepatocytes. The effects of liver sinusoidal ECs can be mimicked by NO donors and can be reversed by NO inhibitors in vivo and ex vivo. The findings are consistent with a model in which excessive, rather than reduced, insulin signaling in ECs predisposes to systemic insulin resistance, prompting a reevaluation of current approaches to insulin sensitization. PMID:23349480

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells redirected against hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sautto, Giuseppe A; Wisskirchen, Karin; Clementi, Nicola; Castelli, Matteo; Diotti, Roberta A; Graf, Julia; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto; Protzer, Ulrike; Mancini, Nicasio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recent availability of novel antiviral drugs has raised new hope for a more effective treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and its severe sequelae. However, in the case of non-responding or relapsing patients, alternative strategies are needed. To this end we have used chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), a very promising approach recently used in several clinical trials to redirect primary human T cells against different tumours. In particular, we designed the first CARs against HCV targeting the HCV/E2 glycoprotein (HCV/E2). Design Anti-HCV/E2 CARs were composed of single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) obtained from a broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralising human monoclonal antibody (mAb), e137, fused to the intracellular signalling motif of the costimulatory CD28 molecule and the CD3ζ domain. Activity of CAR-grafted T cells was evaluated in vitro against HCV/E2-transfected cells as well as hepatocytes infected with cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc). Results In this proof-of-concept study, retrovirus-transduced human T cells expressing anti-HCV/E2 CARs were endowed with specific antigen recognition accompanied by degranulation and secretion of proinflammatory and antiviral cytokines, such as interferon γ, interleukin 2 and tumour necrosis factor α. Moreover, CAR-grafted T cells were capable of lysing target cells of both hepatic and non-hepatic origin expressing on their surface the HCV/E2 glycoproteins of the most clinically relevant genotypes, including 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 4 and 5. Finally, and more importantly, they were capable of lysing HCVcc-infected hepatocytes. Conclusions Clearance of HCV-infected cells is a major therapeutic goal in chronic HCV infection, and adoptive transfer of anti-HCV/E2 CARs-grafted T cells represents a promising new therapeutic tool. PMID:25661083

  2. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  3. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  4. Risk factors and prognosis of hepatic acute GvHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kanda, J; Nakasone, H; Kondo, T; Uchida, N; Fukuda, T; Ohashi, K; Kaida, K; Iwato, K; Eto, T; Kanda, Y; Nakamae, H; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Morishima, Y; Hirokawa, M; Atsuta, Y; Murata, M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic acute GvHD (aGvHD) is associated with high mortality owing to poor response to immunosuppressive therapy. The pathogenesis of hepatic aGvHD differs from that of other lesions, and specific risk factors related to pre-transplant liver conditions should be determined. We conducted a cohort study by using a Japanese transplant registry database (N=8378). Of these subjects, 1.5% had hepatitis C virus Ab (HCV-Ab) and 9.4% had liver dysfunction (elevated transaminase or bilirubin levels) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). After HCT, the cumulative incidence of hepatic aGvHD was 6.7%. On multivariate analyses, HCV-Ab positivity (hazard ratio (HR), 1.93; P=0.02) and pre-transplant liver dysfunction (HR, 1.85; P<0.01), as well as advanced HCT risk, unrelated donors, HLA mismatch and cyclosporine as GvHD prophylaxis, were significant risk factors for hepatic aGvHD, whereas hepatitis B virus surface Ag was not. Hepatic aGvHD was a significant risk factor for low overall survival and high transplant-related mortality in all aGvHD grades (P<0.01). This study is the first to show the relationship between pre-transplant liver conditions and hepatic aGvHD. A prospective study is awaited to validate the results of this study and establish a new strategy especially for high-risk patients. PMID:26367230

  5. Substrate-mediated commitment of human embryonic stem cells for hepatic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ashtiani, Mohammad Kazemi; Zandi, Mojgan; Barzin, Jalal; Tahamtani, Yaser; Ghanian, Mohammad Hossein; Moradmand, Azadeh; Ehsani, Morteza; Nezari, Hossein; Larijani, Mehran Rezaei; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived endodermal cells are of interest for the development of cellular therapies to treat disorders such as liver failure. The soluble form of activin A (Act) has been widely used as an in vitro inducer of definitive endoderm (DE). In this study, we have developed a nanofibrous poly (ɛ-caprolactone) substrate, biofunctionalized with Act, for directed differentiation of hESCs into DE. Bioconjugation of Act on nanofibrous meshes was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunostaining. In order to investigate the bioactivity of immobilized Act (iAct), hESCs were cultivated on the Act-conjugated nanofibers for five days. The nanofibers with covalent iAct significantly increased expression levels of the endodermal markers SOX17, FOXA2, and CXCR4, compared with physically adsorbed Act (aAct) or without Act (noAct). In addition, iAct retained its bioactivity after storage for five days in the absence of cell seeding. The capability of cultivated cells to generate the DE-derived lineage was evaluated through further differentiation of seeded cells into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Interestingly, the iAct sample showed a higher level of hepatic markers compared to the aAct sample. We also demonstrated that iAct in the presence of soluble Act (sAct) could improve the conventional protocol to generate HLCs from hESCs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2861-2872, 2016. PMID:27391166

  6. Immunogenicity of umbilical cord tissue derived cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Patricia S; Messina, Darin J; Hirsh, Erica L; Chi, Nina; Goldman, Stephanie N; Lo, Diana P; Harris, Ian R; Popma, Sicco H; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A

    2008-01-01

    Umbilical cord tissue provides a unique source of cells with potential for tissue repair. Umbilical cord tissue-derived cells (UTCs) are MHC class I (MHCI) dull and negative for MHC class II (MHCII), but can be activated to increase MHCI and to express MHCII with IFN-gamma stimulation. Mesenchymal stem cells with similar characteristics have been inferred to be nonimmunogenic; however, in most cases, immunogenicity was not directly assessed. Using UTC from Massachusetts General Hospital MHC-defined miniature swine, we assessed immunogenicity across a full MHC barrier. Immunogenicity was assessed by in vitro assays including mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and flow cytometry to detect serum alloantibody. A single injection of MHC-mismatched unactivated UTCs did not induce a detectable immune response. When injected in an inflamed region, injected repeatedly in the same region or stimulated with IFN-gamma prior to injection, UTCs were immunogenic. As clinical cellular repair strategies may involve injection of allogeneic cells into inflamed regions of damaged tissue or repeated doses of cells to achieve the desired benefit, our results on the immunogenicity of these cells in these circumstances may have important implications for optimal success and functional improvement for this cellular treatment strategy for diseased tissues. PMID:17909081

  7. Disruption of TIM-4 in dendritic cell ameliorates hepatic warm IR injury through the induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaoliang; Liu, Huanqiu

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic ischaemia reperfusion (IR) injury results from the infiltration of multiple immune cells especially dendritic cells (DC). T-cell immunoglobulin-domain and mucin-domain 4 (TIM-4) is a type I cell-surface glycoprotein which is extensively expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC) like DC and macrophages. TIM-4 has been demonstrated to be implicated in mucosal allergy, skin allograft rejection and tumour-immune tolerance. However, the role of TIM-4 expressed on DC in hepatic IR injury remains largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether and how DC expressed TIM-4 was involved in hepatic IR injury. With segmental hepatic warm ischaemia mice models, we demonstrated that promoted DC infiltration and increased TIM-4 expression were induced by hepatic IR. Blockade of TIM-4 by anti-TIM-4 mAb (0.35mg/mouse) markedly ameliorated hepatic injury and reduced inflammatory cytokine secretion. Furthermore, in a DC:CD4+ T cell co-culture system, blockade of TIM-4 on DC significantly inhibited T helper-2 cell differentiation and facilitated induced CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cell (iTreg) expansion. Interleukin-4 (IL-4)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (Stat 6) signalling was shown to be impeded by TIM-4 blockade and involved in iTreg generation. Additionally, adoptive transfer of iTreg produced by TIM-4 blockade into hepatic IR mice models remarkably attenuated liver injury. We conclude that TIM-4 on DC play a critical role in hepatic IR injury and may be an efficient target for the prevention of liver or other organ IR injury.

  8. Hepatic Tumor Metastases Cause Enhanced PEGylated Liposome Uptake by Kupffer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Fujiwara, Yukako; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells in livers bearing tumor metastases were found to have promoted tumor invasion and exacerbated the metastasis. This implies that the function of Kupffer cells might differ between animals bearing hepatic metastases and those that are healthy. Kupffer cells are considered responsible for the accumulation of liposomes in the liver. In this study, we hypothesized that the alteration in the function of Kupffer cells by hepatic metastasis would also affect the biodistribution of liposomes following intravenous administration. The hepatic accumulation and the blood concentration of PEGylated liposomes were compared between healthy mice and tumor-bearing mice. We noted that hepatic accumulation and elimination from the blood were significantly accelerated in tumor-bearing mice, indicating that our hypothesis was correct. In the tumor-bearing mice, the proportion of Kupffer cells taking up liposomes was significantly increased. Intravenous injection of oxaliplatin (l-OHP) containing PEGylated liposomes decreased the fraction of Kupffer cells, but this administration caused no injury to the hepatocytes. These results suggest that PEGylated liposomes containing l-OHP may have the potential to treat metastatic hepatic cancer-not only via the direct killing of the cancer cells but also via a reduction in tumor-supportive Kupffer cells. PMID:26830481

  9. Differential effect of p7 inhibitors on hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell transmission☆

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, L.W.; Zitzmann, N.; McKeating, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors targeting the hepatitis C virus (HCV) encoded viroporin, p7 prevent virus release in vitro. HCV can transmit by cell-free particle infection of new target cells and via cell-to-cell dependent contact with limited exposure to the extracellular environment. The role of assembly inhibitors in preventing HCV transmission via these pathways has not been studied. We compared the efficacy of three published p7 inhibitors to inhibit cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission of two chimeric HCV strains encoding genotype 2 (GT2) or 5 (GT5) p7 using a recently developed single cycle co-culture assay. The inhibitors reduced the infectivity of extracellular GT2 and GT5 virus by 80–90% and GT2 virus cell-to-cell transmission by 50%. However, all of the p7 inhibitors had minimal effect on GT5 cell contact dependent transmission. Screening a wider panel of diverse viral genotypes demonstrated that p7 viroporin inhibitors were significantly more effective at blocking cell-free virus than cell-to-cell transmission. These results suggest an altered assembly or trafficking of cell-to-cell transmitted compared to secreted virus. These observations have important implications for the validation, therapeutic design and testing of HCV assembly inhibitors. PMID:24157306

  10. The Origin, Biology, and Therapeutic Potential of Facultative Adult Hepatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soona; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    The liver plays an essential role in glucose and lipid metabolism, synthesis of plasma proteins, and detoxification of xenobiotics and other toxins. Chronic disease of this important organ is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Following loss of tissue, liver mass can be restored by two mechanisms. Under normal conditions, or after massive loss of parenchyma by surgical resection, liver mass is maintained by division of hepatocytes. After chronic injury, or when proliferation of hepatocytes is impaired, facultative adult hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) proliferate and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes (biliary epithelial cells). HPCs are attractive candidates for cell transplantation because of their potential contribution to liver regeneration. However, until recently, the lack of highly specific markers has hampered efforts to better understand the origin and physiology of HPCs. Recent advances in cell isolation methods and genetic lineage tracing have enabled investigators to explore multiple aspects of HPC biology. In this review, we describe the potential origins of HPCs, the markers used to detect them, the contribution of HPCs to recovery, and the signaling pathways that regulate their biology. We end with an examination of the therapeutic potential of HPCs and their derivatives. PMID:24439810

  11. Three Peptides from Soy Glycinin Modulate Glucose Metabolism in Human Hepatic HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Carmen; Zanoni, Chiara; Arnoldi, Anna

    2015-11-16

    Ile-Ala-Val-Pro-Gly-Glu-Val-Ala (IAVPGEVA), Ile-Ala-Val-Pro-Thr-Gly-Val-Ala (IAVPTGVA) and Leu-Pro-Tyr-Pro (LPYP), three peptides deriving from soy glycinin hydrolysis, are known to regulate cholesterol metabolism in human hepatic HepG2 cells. We have recently demonstrated that the mechanism of action involves the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). This fact suggested a potential activity of the same peptides on glucose metabolism that prompted us to also investigate this aspect in the same cells. After treatment with IAVPGEVA, IAVPTGVA and LPYP, HepG2 cells were analyzed using a combination of molecular techniques, including western blot analysis, glucose uptake experiments and fluorescence microscopy evaluation. The results showed that these peptides are indeed able to enhance the capacity of HepG2 cells to uptake glucose, via glucose transporter 1 GLUT1 and glucose transporter 4 GLUT4 activation, through the stimulation of protein kinase B Akt and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase AMPK pathways, both involved in glucose metabolism.

  12. Cell-derived microparticles and the lung.

    PubMed

    Nieri, Dario; Neri, Tommaso; Petrini, Silvia; Vagaggini, Barbara; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Cell-derived microparticles are small (0.1-1 μm) vesicles shed by most eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microparticles carry on their surface, and enclose within their cytoplasm, molecules derived from the parental cell, including proteins, DNA, RNA, microRNA and phospholipids. Microparticles are now considered functional units that represent a disseminated storage pool of bioactive effectors and participate both in the maintenance of homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of diseases. The mechanisms involved in microparticle generation include intracellular calcium mobilisation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, kinase phosphorylation and activation of the nuclear factor-κB. The role of microparticles in blood coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation, is well established in in vitro and animal models. The role of microparticles in human pulmonary diseases, both as pathogenic determinants and biomarkers, is being actively investigated. Microparticles of endothelial origin, suggestive of apoptosis, have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of patients with emphysema, lending support to the hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and represent a link with cardiovascular comorbidities. Microparticles also have potential roles in patients with asthma, diffuse parenchymal lung disease, thromboembolism, lung cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27581826

  13. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  14. Ly6Chi monocytes regulate T cell responses in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangao; Chen, Huiyao; Huang, Xiaopei; Jiang, Songfu

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis remains a global health challenge despite recent progress in the development of more effective therapies. Although virus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses are essential for viral clearance, it remains largely unknown what regulates T cell–mediated viral clearance. Thus, a better understanding of the regulation of anti-viral T cell immunity would be critical for the design of more effective therapies for viral hepatitis. Using a model of adenovirus-induced hepatitis, here we showed that adenoviral infection induced recruitment of Ly6Chi monocytes to the liver in a CCR2-dependent manner. These recruited Ly6Chi monocytes suppressed CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses to adenoviral infection, leading to a delay in viral clearance. In vivo depletion of Ly6Chi monocytes markedly enhanced anti-viral T cell responses and promoted viral clearance. Mechanistically, we showed that induction of iNOS and the production of NO by Ly6Chi monocytes are critical for the suppression of T cell responses. In addition, a contact-dependent mechanism mediated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interaction is also required for T cell suppression by Ly6Chi monocytes. These findings suggest a critical role for Ly6Chi monocytes in the regulation of T cell immunity in viral hepatitis and may provide new insights into development of more effective therapies for treating viral hepatitis based on targeting the immunosuppressing monocytes. PMID:27777980

  15. Viable transgenic goats derived from skin cells.

    PubMed

    Behboodi, Esmail; Memili, Erdogan; Melican, David T; Destrempes, Margaret M; Overton, Susan A; Williams, Jennifer L; Flanagan, Peter A; Butler, Robin E; Liem, Hetty; Chen, Li How; Meade, Harry M; Gavin, William G; Echelard, Yann

    2004-06-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of expanding transgenic goat herds by means of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) using transgenic goat cells as nucleus donors. Skin cells from adult, transgenic goats were first synchronized at quiescent stage (G0) by serum starvation and then induced to exit G0 and proceed into G1. Oocytes collected from superovulated donors were enucleated, karyoplast-cytoplast couplets were constructed, and then fused and activated simultaneously by a single electrical pulse. Fused couplets were either co-cultured with oviductal cells in TCM-199 medium (in vitro culture) or transferred to intermediate recipient goat oviducts (in vivo culture) until final transfer. The resulting morulae and blastocysts were transferred to the final recipients. Pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography 25-30 days after embryo transfer. In vitro cultured NT embryos developed to morulae and blastocyst stages but did not produce any pregnancies while 30% (6/20) of the in vivo derived morulae and blastocysts produced pregnancies. Two of these pregnancies were resorbed early in gestation. Of the four recipients that maintained pregnancies to term, two delivered dead fetuses 2-3 days after their due dates, and two recipients gave birth to healthy kids at term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed that both kids were transgenic and had integration sites consistent with those observed in the adult cell line.

  16. Hepatitis E virus derived from different sources exhibits different behaviour in virus inactivation and/or removal studies with plasma derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Mikihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kadue; Urayama, Takeru; Hattori, Shinji; Ideno, Shoji; Furuki, Rie; Sakai, Kaoru; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes viral hepatitis, and is considered a risk factor for blood products. Although some HEV inactivation/removal studies have been reported, detailed investigations of different manufacturing steps as heat treatment, partitioning during cold ethanol fractionation, low pH treatment, and virus filtration have yet to be reported for plasma-derived medicinal products. In this study, human serum- and swine faeces-derived HEVs, with and without detergent treatment, were used. The kinetic patterns of inactivation, log reduction value, or partitioning during the process were evaluated. In addition, the mouse encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and canine and porcine parvoviruses (CPV/PPV) were also evaluated as model viruses for HEV. Small pore size (19 or 15 nm) virus filtration demonstrated effective removal of HEV. Middle pore size (35 nm) virus filtration and 60 °C liquid heating demonstrated moderate inactivation/removal. Ethanol fractionation steps demonstrated limited removal of HEV. Unpurified HEV exhibited different properties than the detergent-treated HEV, and both forms displayed differences when compared with EMCV, CPV, and PPV. Limited or no inactivation of HEV was observed during low pH treatment. Untreated plasma-derived HEV from humans showed different properties compared to that of HEV treated with detergent or derived from swine faeces. Therefore, HEV spike preparation requires more attention. PMID:27461242

  17. Tryptase inhibitor APC 366 prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis induced by tryptase/protease-activated receptor 2 interactions in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Sun, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by mast cell tryptase. PAR-2 activation augments profibrotic pathways through the induction of extracellular matrix proteins. PAR-2 is widely expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but the role of tryptase/PAR-2 interaction in liver fibrosis is unclear. We studied the development of bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with mast cell tryptase inhibitor APC 366, and showed that APC 366 reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen content and serum biochemical parameters. Reduced fibrosis was associated with decreased expression of PAR-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our findings demonstrate that mast cell tryptase induces PAR-2 activation to augment HSC proliferation and promote hepatic fibrosis in rats. Treatment with tryptase antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

  18. Tryptase inhibitor APC 366 prevents hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis induced by tryptase/protease-activated receptor 2 interactions in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Baian; Li, Shengli; Sun, Quan

    2014-06-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by mast cell tryptase. PAR-2 activation augments profibrotic pathways through the induction of extracellular matrix proteins. PAR-2 is widely expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), but the role of tryptase/PAR-2 interaction in liver fibrosis is unclear. We studied the development of bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats treated with mast cell tryptase inhibitor APC 366, and showed that APC 366 reduced hepatic fibrosis scores, collagen content and serum biochemical parameters. Reduced fibrosis was associated with decreased expression of PAR-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Our findings demonstrate that mast cell tryptase induces PAR-2 activation to augment HSC proliferation and promote hepatic fibrosis in rats. Treatment with tryptase antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:24735816

  19. Immortalized human hepatic cell lines for in vitro testing and research purposes

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitous shortage of primary human hepatocytes has urged the scientific community to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. Over the years, several human hepatic cell lines have been produced, whether or not using a combination of viral oncogenes and human telomerase reverse transcriptase protein. Conditional approaches for hepatocyte immortalization have also been established and allow generation of growth-controlled cell lines. A variety of immortalized human hepatocytes have already proven useful as tools for liver-based in vitro testing and fundamental research purposes. The present chapter describes currently applied immortalization strategies and provides an overview of the actually available immortalized human hepatic cell lines and their in vitro applications. PMID:26272134

  20. Induction of cell cycle progression by hepatitis B virus HBx gene expression in quiescent mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, K; Moriya, K; Yotsuyanagi, H; Iino, S; Kurokawa, K

    1994-01-01

    The HBx gene of hepatitis B virus has been shown to induce hepatic tumors in transgenic mice and is implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis in human hepatitis B virus infection. To further characterize the role of HBx gene in carcinogenesis, we established mouse fibroblast cell lines in which the expression of HBx gene could be controlled by glucocorticoid hormone and examined the effect of HBx gene expression on cell growth in vitro. Along with the expression of HBx gene, most cells in the G0/G1 phase moved into the S phase in 24 h, and the cell cycle progressed further toward 48 h. Induction of DNA synthesis was also demonstrated by bromo-deoxyuridine labeling analysis. These results indicate that HBx gene has a function to trigger the synthesis of cellular DNA and suggest that HBx gene may play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis in human infection by driving deregulated cell cycle progression. Images PMID:8040286

  1. Rat-derived amniotic epithelial cells differentiate into mature hepatocytes in vivo with no evidence of cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Michela; Serra, Maria Paola; Contini, Antonella; Sini, Marcella; Strom, Stephen C; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio

    2015-06-15

    Amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from human placenta represent a useful and noncontroversial source for liver-based regenerative medicine. Previous studies suggested that human- and rat-derived AEC differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation. In the retrorsine (RS) model of liver repopulation, clusters of donor-derived cells engrafted in the recipient liver and, importantly, showed characteristics of mature hepatocytes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible involvement of cell fusion in the emergence of hepatocyte clusters displaying a donor-specific phenotype. To this end, 4-week-old GFP(+)/DPP-IV(-) rats were treated with RS and then transplanted with undifferentiated AEC isolated from the placenta of DPP-IV(+) pregnant rats at 16-19 days of gestational age. Results indicated that clusters of donor-derived cells were dipeptidyl peptidase type IV (DPP-IV) positive, but did not express the green fluorescent protein (GFP), suggesting that rat amniotic epithelial cells (rAEC) did not fuse within the host parenchyma, as no colocalization of the two tags was observed. Moreover, rAEC-derived clusters expressed markers of mature hepatocytes (eg, albumin, cytochrome P450), but were negative for the expression of biliary/progenitor markers (eg, epithelial cell adhesion molecule [EpCAM]) and did not express the marker of preneoplastic hepatic nodules glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P). These results extend our previous findings on the potential of AEC to differentiate into mature hepatocytes and suggest that this process can occur in the absence of cell fusion with host-derived cells. These studies support the hypothesis that amnion-derived epithelial cells can be an effective cell source for the correction of liver disease.

  2. Rat-Derived Amniotic Epithelial Cells Differentiate into Mature Hepatocytes In Vivo with No Evidence of Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Michela; Serra, Maria Paola; Contini, Antonella; Sini, Marcella; Strom, Stephen C.; Laconi, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from human placenta represent a useful and noncontroversial source for liver-based regenerative medicine. Previous studies suggested that human- and rat-derived AEC differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation. In the retrorsine (RS) model of liver repopulation, clusters of donor-derived cells engrafted in the recipient liver and, importantly, showed characteristics of mature hepatocytes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible involvement of cell fusion in the emergence of hepatocyte clusters displaying a donor-specific phenotype. To this end, 4-week-old GFP+/DPP-IV− rats were treated with RS and then transplanted with undifferentiated AEC isolated from the placenta of DPP-IV+ pregnant rats at 16–19 days of gestational age. Results indicated that clusters of donor-derived cells were dipeptidyl peptidase type IV (DPP-IV) positive, but did not express the green fluorescent protein (GFP), suggesting that rat amniotic epithelial cells (rAEC) did not fuse within the host parenchyma, as no colocalization of the two tags was observed. Moreover, rAEC-derived clusters expressed markers of mature hepatocytes (eg, albumin, cytochrome P450), but were negative for the expression of biliary/progenitor markers (eg, epithelial cell adhesion molecule [EpCAM]) and did not express the marker of preneoplastic hepatic nodules glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P). These results extend our previous findings on the potential of AEC to differentiate into mature hepatocytes and suggest that this process can occur in the absence of cell fusion with host-derived cells. These studies support the hypothesis that amnion-derived epithelial cells can be an effective cell source for the correction of liver disease. PMID:25647334

  3. Xanthohumol uptake and intracellular kinetics in hepatocytes, hepatic stellate cells, and intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Horst; Motyl, Magdalena; Hellerbrand, Claus; Heilmann, Jörg; Kraus, Birgit

    2011-12-28

    Xanthohumol (XN) is the major prenylated chalcone of hops and hence an ingredient of beer. Despite many advances in understanding of the pharmacology of XN, one largely unresolved issue is its low bioavailability in the human organism. Also, not much is known about its actual concentrations and pharmacokinetics in liver and intestinal cells. Therefore, the uptake, intracellular distribution, and kinetics of XN were studied in various cell types, namely, hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HuH-7), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), primary cultured hepatocytes, and colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2). Fluorescent microscopy allowed for the first time visualization and tracing of the uptake and intracellular distribution of XN. A rapid accumulation of XN concentrations that were up to >60-fold higher than the concentration present in the ambient culture medium was observed. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed that most XN molecules are bound to cellular proteins, which may alter properties of cellular factors. PMID:22088086

  4. Curcumin regulates cell fate and metabolism by inhibiting hedgehog signaling in hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Naqi; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Feng; Jin, Huanhuan; Lu, Chunfeng; Wu, Xiafei; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2015-07-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling becomes activated in chronic liver injury and plays a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are Hh-responsive cells and activation of the Hh pathway promotes transdifferentiation of HSCs into myofibroblasts. Targeting Hh signaling may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of liver fibrosis. We previously reported that curcumin has potent antifibrotic effects in vivo and in vitro, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. This study shows that curcumin downregulated Patched and Smoothened, two key elements in Hh signaling, but restored Hhip expression in rat liver with carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis and in cultured HSCs. Curcumin also halted the nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcription activity of Gli1. Moreover, the Hh signaling inhibitor cyclopamine, like curcumin, arrested the cell cycle, induced mitochondrial apoptosis, reduced fibrotic gene expression, restored lipid accumulation, and inhibited invasion and migration in HSCs. However, curcumin's effects on cell fate and fibrogenic properties of HSCs were abolished by the Hh pathway agonist SAG. Furthermore, curcumin and cyclopamine decreased intracellular levels of adenosine triphosphate and lactate, and inhibited the expression and/or function of several key molecules controlling glycolysis. However, SAG abrogated the curcumin effects on these parameters of glycolysis. Animal data also showed that curcumin downregulated glycolysis-regulatory proteins in rat fibrotic liver. These aggregated data therefore indicate that curcumin modulated cell fate and metabolism by disrupting the Hh pathway in HSCs, providing novel molecular insights into curcumin reduction of HSC activation.

  5. Klf6/copeb is required for hepatic outgrowth in zebrafish and for hepatocyte specification in mouse ES cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Monson, Christopher; Gao, Chuan; Gouon-Evans, Valerie; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Sadler, Kirsten C.; Friedman, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 6 (Klf6; copeb in zebrafish) is a zinc-finger transcription factor and tumor suppressor gene. Klf6−/− mice have defects in hematopoiesis and angiogenesis and do not form a liver. However, the vascular abnormalities in Klf6−/− mice obfuscate its role in liver development since these two processes are linked in mammals. We utilized zebrafish and mouse ES cells to investigate the role of copeb in endoderm specification and hepatogenesis separate from its function in angiogenesis. During zebrafish development, copeb expression is enriched in digestive organs. Morpholino knockdown of copeb blocks expansion of the liver, pancreas and intestine, but does not affect their specification, differentiation or the vascularization of the liver. Decreased hepatocyte proliferation in copeb morphants is accompanied by upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor, cdkn1a, a Copeb transcriptional target. A cell autonomous role for Klf6 in endoderm and hepatic development was investigated by manipulating Klf6 expression in mouse ES cells driven to differentiate along the hepatic lineage. Expression of the endoderm markers Hnf3β, Gata4, Sox17, and CxCr4 is not induced in Klf6−/− cells but is upregulated in ES cells over-expressing Klf6. Collectively, these findings indicate that copeb/Klf6 is essential for the development of endoderm-derived organs. PMID:20430021

  6. Syncytial giant cell hepatitis in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    GUPTA, Neil; NJEI, Basile

    2016-01-01

    While it commonly occurs in the pediatric population, syncytial giant cell hepatitis is rare in adults, which is diagnosed histologically by the presence of multinucleated cells in the liver. The literature has recorded only approximately one hundred cases in adults during the past two decades in whom malignancy is rarely associated with giant cell hepatitis. Our patient is a 66-year-old woman who was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and subsequently developed syncytial giant cell hepatitis. This disease is usually linked to virus infection, autoimmune diseases, and drug medications. The association between CLL and giant cell hepatitis is rare, with only three cases reported. In most cases viral particles on electron microscopy are reported and the patients usually have a history of chemotherapy and hypogammaglobulinemia. Unlike such cases, our patient developed giant cell hepatitis in the absence of such confounding variables. The treatment for our patient was a high-dose corticosteroid and rituxan, with improvement in liver enzymes. PMID:26147671

  7. Alginate hydrogel protects encapsulated hepatic HuH-7 cells against hepatitis C virus and other viral infections.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhu-Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Helle, François; Hoffmann, Thomas Walter; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cécile; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation in alginate hydrogel has shown interesting applications in regenerative medicine and the biomedical field through implantation of encapsulated tissue or for bioartificial organ development. Although alginate solution is known to have low antiviral activity, the same property regarding alginate gel has not yet been studied. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential protective effect of alginate encapsulation against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection for a hepatic cell line (HuH-7) normally permissive to the virus. Our results showed that alginate hydrogel protects HuH-7 cells against HCV when the supernatant was loaded with HCV. In addition, alginate hydrogel blocked HCV particle release out of the beads when the HuH-7 cells were previously infected and encapsulated. There was evidence of interaction between the molecules of alginate hydrogel and HCV, which was dose- and incubation time-dependent. The protective efficiency of alginate hydrogel towards HCV infection was confirmed against a variety of viruses, whether or not they were enveloped. This promising interaction between an alginate matrix and viruses, whose chemical mechanisms are discussed, is of great interest for further medical therapeutic applications based on tissue engineering.

  8. Alginate Hydrogel Protects Encapsulated Hepatic HuH-7 Cells against Hepatitis C Virus and Other Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nhu-Mai; Dufresne, Murielle; Helle, François; Hoffmann, Thomas Walter; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Paullier, Patrick; Legallais, Cécile; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation in alginate hydrogel has shown interesting applications in regenerative medicine and the biomedical field through implantation of encapsulated tissue or for bioartificial organ development. Although alginate solution is known to have low antiviral activity, the same property regarding alginate gel has not yet been studied. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential protective effect of alginate encapsulation against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection for a hepatic cell line (HuH-7) normally permissive to the virus. Our results showed that alginate hydrogel protects HuH-7 cells against HCV when the supernatant was loaded with HCV. In addition, alginate hydrogel blocked HCV particle release out of the beads when the HuH-7 cells were previously infected and encapsulated. There was evidence of interaction between the molecules of alginate hydrogel and HCV, which was dose- and incubation time-dependent. The protective efficiency of alginate hydrogel towards HCV infection was confirmed against a variety of viruses, whether or not they were enveloped. This promising interaction between an alginate matrix and viruses, whose chemical mechanisms are discussed, is of great interest for further medical therapeutic applications based on tissue engineering. PMID:25310111

  9. Hepatitis B surface antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in human chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, K R; Tiku, M L; Ogra, P L

    1978-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody (anti-HBs), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and antibody (anti-HBe), the nature of T-cell function, and specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg were determined and evaluated serially in groups of subjects with chronic HBsAg carrier states and in seronegative controls. The techniques of in vitro lymphocyte transformation, spontaneous rosette formation, radioimmunoassay, reverse passive hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination, rheophoresis, and liver function tests were employed for these studies. For the lymphocyte transformation assay, multiple concentrations of phytohemagglutinin and purified HBsAg were used as stimulants. Cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg was detectable in 50% of the chronic HBsAg carriers (responders) at one or more concentrations of HBsAg. The remaining carriers (nonresponders) and controls failed to manifest HBsAg-specific lymphocyte transformation activity. The profile of the responders was characterized by elevated serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of anti-HBe, high HBsAg titers, and the conspicuous absence of HBeAg in the serum. The nonresponders were characterized by normal serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, and lower HBsAg titers. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg in chronic HBsAg carriers who manifest biochemical evidence of liver disease. PMID:80380

  10. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as a target in liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Liepelt, Anke; Tacke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) or CXCL12 is constitutively expressed in healthy liver. However, its expression increases following acute or chronic liver injury. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), hepatic stellate cells (HSC), and malignant hepatocytes are important sources of SDF-1/CXCL12 in liver diseases. CXCL12 is able to activate two chemokine receptors with different downstream signaling pathways, CXCR4 and CXCR7. CXCR7 expression is relevant on LSEC, while HSC, mesenchymal stem cells, and tumor cells mainly respond via CXCR4. Here, we summarize recent developments in the field of liver diseases involving this chemokine and its receptors. SDF-1-dependent signaling contributes to modulating acute liver injury and subsequent tissue regeneration. By activating HSC and recruiting mesenchymal cells from bone marrow, CXCL12 can promote liver fibrosis progression, while CXCL12-CXCR7 interactions endorse proregenerative responses in chronic injury. Moreover, the SDF-1 pathway is linked to development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and HCC metastasis. High hepatic CXCR4 expression has been suggested as a biomarker indicating poor prognosis of HCC patients. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) also express CXCR4 and migrate toward CXCL12. Thus CXCL12 inhibition might not only directly block HCC growth but also modulate the tumor microenvironment (angiogenesis, MDSC), thereby sensitizing HCC patients to conventional or emerging novel cancer therapies (e.g., sorafenib, regorafenib, nivolumab, pembrolizumab). We herein summarize the current knowledge on the complex interplay between CXCL12 and CXCR4/CXCR7 in liver diseases and discuss approaches on the therapeutic targeting of these axes in hepatitis, fibrosis, and liver cancer. PMID:27313175

  11. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yin, Libo; Zhu, Yuhua; Yang, Jiangang; Ni, Yijiang; Zhou, Zhao; Chen, Yu; Wen, Lixing

    2015-03-01

    Cell‑based therapy is a potential alternative to liver transplantation. The goal of the present study was to examine the in vivo and in vitro hepatic differentiation potential of adipose tissue‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT‑MSCs) and to explore its therapeutic use. AT‑MSCs were isolated and cultured with hepatic differentiation medium. Bioactivity assays were used to study the properties of AT‑MSCs. The morphology of differentiated AT‑MSCs in serum‑free hepatic differentiation medium changed into polygonal epithelial cells, while the morphology of AT‑MSCs in a similar medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum remained unchanged. The differentiated cells cultured without serum showed hepatocyte‑like cell morphology and hepatocyte‑specific markers, including albumin (ALB) and α‑fetoprotein. The bioactivity assays revealed that hepatocyte‑like cells could take up low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) and store glycogen. Furthermore, trichostatin A (TSA) enhanced ALB production and LDL uptake by the hepatocyte‑like cells, analogous to the functions of human liver cells. ALB was detected in the livers of the CCl4‑injured mice one month post‑transplantation. This suggested that transplantation of the human AT‑MSCs could relieve the impairment of acute CCl4‑injured livers in nude mice. This therefore implied that adipose tissue was a source of multipotent stem cells which had the potential to differentiate into mature, transplantable hepatocyte‑like cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the present study determined that TSA was essential to promoting differentiation of human MSC towards functional hepatocyte‑like cells. The relief of liver injury following treatment with AT‑MSCs suggested their potential as a novel therapeutic method for liver disorders or injury. PMID:25395242

  12. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in vivo by entry inhibitors derived from the large envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Joerg; Dandri, Maura; Mier, Walter; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Haberkorn, Uwe; Fischer, Lutz; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias; Erbes, Berit; Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    360 million people are chronically infected with the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and are consequently prone to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. As approved therapeutic regimens-which modulate patients' antiviral defenses or inhibit the viral reverse transcriptase-are generally noncurative, strategies interfering with other HBV replication steps are required. Expanding on our demonstration that acylated peptides derived from the large HBV envelope protein block virus entry in vitro, we show their applicability to prevent HBV or woolly monkey hepatitis B virus infection in vivo, using immunodeficient urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) mice repopulated with primary human or Tupaia belangeri hepatocytes. Accumulation of the peptides in the liver, their extraordinary inhibitory potency and specific mode of action permit subcutaneous delivery at very low doses. Inhibition of hepadnavirus entry thus constitutes a therapeutic approach to prevent primary HBV infection, such as after liver transplantation, and might also restrain virus spread in chronically infected patients. PMID:18297057

  13. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yusaku; Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi; Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo; Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho; Nagao, Masaya

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. PMID:27270032

  14. Proinflammatory and prothrombotic effects on human vascular endothelial cells of Immune-cell-derived LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective LIGHT (TNFSF 14) belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and is expressed by activated T cells as well as various types of antigen presenting cells. LIGHT binds to its cellular receptors TR2 and LTßR and has a co-stimulatory role in T cell activation. Here, we compared the relative expression of LIGHT in different immune cells and the biological activity of immune cell-derived LIGHT on endothelial cells. Methods and Results Surface expression of LIGHT and mRNA production by PBMC and isolated T cells (CD4+ or CD8+) significantly increased after stimulation with PMA (Phorbolester-12-Myristat-13-Acetat) + ionomycin. No LIGHT expression on PMA stimulated monocytes or monocytic-like THP-1 cells could be detected; differentiation of monocytes and THP-1 cells into macrophages, however, resulted in up-regulation of LIGHT. Supernatants of stimulated T cells contained higher concentrations of soluble LIGHT than macrophage supernatants normalized to cell numbers; release of soluble LIGHT was found to be dependent on metalloproteinase activity. Size determination of released soluble LIGHT by size exclusion chromatography revealed a molecular mass of ~60 kDa, suggesting a trimeric form. Released soluble LIGHT induced expression of proinflammatory antigens ICAM-1, tissue factor and IL-8 in human endothelial cells and caused apoptosis of IFN-γ pretreated endothelial cells. Soluble LIGHT was detected at low levels in sera of healthy controls and was significantly enhanced in sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C and rheumatoid arthritis (24.93 ± 9.41 vs.129.53 ± 49.14 and 172.13 ± 77.64; p < 0.0005). Conclusion These findings suggest that among immune cells activated T lymphocytes are the main source of soluble LIGHT with released amounts of soluble LIGHT markedly higher compared to platelets. Immune cell-derived membrane-bound and soluble trimeric LIGHT is biologically active, inducing proinflammatory changes in endothelial cells. Enhanced plasma

  15. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  16. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  17. Back to the drawing board: Understanding the complexity of hepatic innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Marotel, Marie; Hasan, Uzma; Viel, Sébastien; Marçais, Antoine; Walzer, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of immune populations in nonlymphoid organs have highlighted the great diversity of the innate lymphoid system. It has also become apparent that mouse and human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have distinct phenotypes and properties. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Harmon et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 2111-2120] characterized human hepatic NK-cell subsets. The authors report that hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells resemble mouse liver ILC1s in that they express CXCR6 and have an immature phenotype. However, unlike mouse ILC1s, they express high levels of Eomes and low levels of T-bet, and upon stimulation with tumor cells, secrete low amounts of cytokines. These unexpected findings further support the differences between human and mouse immune populations and prompt the study of the role of hepatic ILC subsets in immune responses.

  18. Back to the drawing board: Understanding the complexity of hepatic innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Marotel, Marie; Hasan, Uzma; Viel, Sébastien; Marçais, Antoine; Walzer, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of immune populations in nonlymphoid organs have highlighted the great diversity of the innate lymphoid system. It has also become apparent that mouse and human innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have distinct phenotypes and properties. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Harmon et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 2111-2120] characterized human hepatic NK-cell subsets. The authors report that hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells resemble mouse liver ILC1s in that they express CXCR6 and have an immature phenotype. However, unlike mouse ILC1s, they express high levels of Eomes and low levels of T-bet, and upon stimulation with tumor cells, secrete low amounts of cytokines. These unexpected findings further support the differences between human and mouse immune populations and prompt the study of the role of hepatic ILC subsets in immune responses. PMID:27600673

  19. Derivation of epithelial-like cells from eyelid fat-derived stem cells in thermosensitive hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Heidari Keshel, Saeed; Rostampour, Maryam; Khosropour, Golbahar; Bandbon B, Atefehsadat; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrogel is one of the great interests for tissue engineering and cell encapsulation. In the study, the thermosensitive chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerol phosphate (C/G/GP) disodium salt hydrogels were designed and investigated by different analyses. The eye fat-derived stem cells were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of hydrogels based on their phenotypic profile, viability, proliferation, and attachment ability. The results show that the sol/gel transition temperature of the C/G/GP hydrogel was in the range of 31.1-33.8 °C at neutral pH value, the gelation time was shortened, and the gel strength also improved at body temperature when compared with the C/GP hydrogel. In vitro cell culture experiments with eyelid fat-derived stem cells in hydrogel showed beneficial effects on the cell phenotypic morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. Microscopic figures showed that the eyelid fat stem cell were firmly anchored to the substrates and were able to retain a normal stem cell phenotype. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and real-time-PCR results revealed change in the expression profile of eyelid fat stem cells grown with hydrogels when compared to those grown on control in epithelial induction condition. This study indicates that using chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerol phosphate hydrogel for cell culture is feasible and may apply in minimal invasive surgery in the future.

  20. Activated natural killer cells accelerate liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q; Zhu, Y Y; Chen, J; Ye, Y B; Li, J Y; Liu, Y R; Hu, M L; Zheng, Y C; Jiang, J J

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that natural killer (NK) cells may contribute to liver injury in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Because HBV infection progresses through various disease phases, the cytolytic profiles of peripheral and intrahepatic NK cells in HBV-infected patients remain to be defined. In this study, we comprehensively characterized intrahepatic and peripheral NK cells in a cohort of HBV-infected individuals, and investigated their impact on liver pathogenesis during chronic HBV infection. The study population included 34 immune-clearance (IC) patients, 36 immune-tolerant (IT) carriers and 10 healthy subjects. We found that the activity of peripheral NK cells from IC patients was functionally elevated compared to IT carriers and controls, and NK cell activation was indicated by an increased expression of CD69, CD107a, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Further analysis showed that the increased activity of both peripheral and hepatic NK cells was correlated positively with liver injury, which was assessed by serum alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) and the liver histological activity index (HAI). Interestingly, the frequency of peripheral NK cells was reduced in IC patients (especially those with higher HAI scores of 3-4), but there was a concomitant increase in hepatic NK cells. The functionally activated NK cells are enriched preferentially in the livers of IC patients and skew towards cytolytic activity that accelerates liver injury in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients.

  1. Mechanisms of liver fibrosis associated with experimental Fasciola hepatica infection: roles of Fas2 proteinase and hepatic stellate cell activation.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Terashima, Angélica; Yi, Pedro; Andrade, Roy; Cubero, Francisco J; Albanis, Efsevia; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Espinoza, Jose R; Friedman, Scott L

    2011-02-01

    We have evaluated the possible mechanisms of liver fibrosis caused by Fasciola hepatica in an animal model and in culture using immortalized human stellate cells. Liver biopsies of F. hepatica-infected rats were performed at wk 8 and 16. Serum-starved LX-2 cells, a human stellate cell line, were exposed to increasing concentrations of Fas2 antigen. The expression of key fibrosis-related genes was evaluated by qRT-PCR. There was a significant correlation between fibrogenic gene expression and both intensity and duration of infection. LX-2 cells exposed to Fas2 showed progressively increased expression of mRNAs for Collagen I, alpha-smooth muscle-actin, platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II; inhibition of Fas2 cysteine proteinase activity by E-64 abrogated these increases, suggesting that the protease activity of Fas2 is involved in fibrogenic stimulation. In summary, F. hepatica infection is associated with up-regulation of mRNAs associated with hepatic fibrogenesis in vivo and in activated hepatic stellate cells.

  2. Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells restore biochemical markers of acute liver injury in experimental model.

    PubMed

    Gruttadauria, S; Grosso, G; Pagano, D; Biondi, A; Echeverri, G J; Seria, E; Pietrosi, G; Liotta, R; Basile, F; Gridelli, B

    2013-03-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were investigated as prompters of liver regeneration in an experimental model of acute hepatic injury. A model was created in Wistar rats through intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells collected from the long bones of 10 Wistar rats were intravenously infused 24 hours after induction of acute liver failure in 16 rats, group A. In group B, the control group, 16 rats received a peritoneal injection of CCl4, and an intravenous infusion of normal saline solution. All rats were sacrificed at 2, 3, 4, and 7 days post-CCl4 injection to examined biochemical markers and pathological appearances. The platelet counts were higher in group A versus group B on post-CCl4 infusion days 2 (P = .02) and 3 (P = .001), as were the transaminase trends in glutamic oxaloacetic (P = .002), and glutamic-pyruvic transaminases (P < .0001). Pathological examination showed a greater grade of hepatocellular necrosis with neutrophilic infiltration in group B (P = .02). In conclusion, infusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell resulted in a less aggressive picture of hepatic damage.

  3. Mesenchymal Bone Marrow-derived Stem Cells Transplantation in Patients with HCV Related Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lukashyk, Sviatlana P.; Tsyrkunov, Vladimir M.; Isaykina, Yanina I.; Romanova, Oksana N.; Shymanskiy, Artur T.; Aleynikova, Olga V.; Kravchuk, Rimma I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims To evaluate the effect of intraparenchymal transplantation of mesenchymal bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis (LC). Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from patient bone marrow and were passaged several times in vitro in order to reach the required volume. Attributes of the BMSCs were evaluated by the presence of the surface markers CD105+, CD90+, and CD73+. Cells from each passage were evaluated for sterility, and they were transplanted intraparenchymally into liver tissue. Clinical and laboratory data were evaluated and morphological studies of liver biopsy were performed prior to and 6 months after transplantation. Results On clinical evaluation, the general state of these patients was improved at 1 month following transplantation of BMSCs. At 1 and 6 months post-transplantation, jaundice was absent in four (67%) patients. After 6 months, functional hepatic indices were improved, i.e. decrease of ALT and AST activity and bilirubin level. However, these decreases were not statistically different (P>0.05). Expression of CD34 and α-SMA in liver biopsy samples were decreased at 6 months after transplantation, consistent with structural improvements in mitochondria and nuclear compartments. Conclusions Intraparenchymal transplantation of autologous BMSCs improved the functional condition of the liver, stimulated reparative processes in hepatocytes, and decreased extracellular matrix protein (EMP) count in hepatic tissues of patients with LC. It was well tolerated and was not associated with any complications both during and after BMSC transplantation. PMID:26356872

  4. Restoring homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in hepatitis-B-virus-related liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li-Sha; Liu, Yun; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is widely seen during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Unsuccessful immune clearance of HBV results in chronic hepatitis and increases the risk of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV-related liver fibrosis (HBVLF), occurring as a result of HBV-induced chronic hepatitis, is a reversible, intermediate stage of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and liver cirrhosis. Therefore, defining the pathogenesis of HBVLF is of practical significance for achieving better clinical outcomes. Recently, the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells was considered to be pivotal in the process of HBVLF. To better uncover the underlying mechanisms, in this review, we systematically retrospect the impacts of different CD4+ T-cell subsets on CHB and HBVLF. We emphasize CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and the important balance between regulatory T (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells. We discuss some cytokines associated with Treg and Th17 cells such as interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-21, IL-23, IL-10, IL-35 and IL-33, as well as surface molecules such as programmed cell death protein 1, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-containing molecule 3 and cannabinoid receptor 2 that have potential therapeutic implications for the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in CHB and HBVLF. PMID:26478664

  5. FGF2 mediates hepatic progenitor cell formation during human pluripotent stem cell differentiation by inducing the WNT antagonist NKD1

    PubMed Central

    Twaroski, Kirk; Mallanna, Sunil K.; Jing, Ran; DiFurio, Francesca; Urick, Amanda; Duncan, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are required to specify hepatic fate within the definitive endoderm through activation of the FGF receptors (FGFRs). While the signaling pathways involved in hepatic specification are well understood, the mechanisms through which FGFs induce hepatic character within the endoderm are ill defined. Here we report the identification of genes whose expression is directly regulated by FGFR activity during the transition from endoderm to hepatic progenitor cell. The FGFR immediate early genes that were identified include those encoding transcription factors, growth factors, and signaling molecules. One of these immediate early genes encodes naked cuticle homolog 1 (NKD1), which is a repressor of canonical WNT (wingless-type MMTV integration site) signaling. We show that loss of NKD1 suppresses the formation of hepatic progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells and that this phenotype can be rescued by using a pharmacological antagonist of canonical WNT signaling. We conclude that FGF specifies hepatic fate at least in large part by inducing expression of NKD1 to transiently suppress the canonical WNT pathway. PMID:26637527

  6. [Acute liver failure due to T cell lymphoma without hepatic infiltration].

    PubMed

    Ortega López Juan, J; López Espinosa, J; Roqueta Mas, J; Sabado Alvarez, C; Ruiz Marcellan, C; Iglesias Berengué, J

    2003-01-01

    Hepatomegaly and alterations in hepatic function are common to all patients with sickle-cell disease. In these patients, hepatic sickling is a manifestation of severe intrahepatic vaso-oclusive crises, even at levels of 25 % HbS and hematocrits of more than 45-50 %, which in 10 % of cases can lead to acute hepatic failure (AHF). AHF can be due to a variety of causes, including hematologic malignancies, but T cell lymphoma, which is usually secondary to diffuse hepatic infiltration and ischemia, is an exceptional cause, although other mechanisms can be involved. Cytokines released by lymphomas have recently been implicated as a cause of AHF.We describe a black girl with sickle cell disease, who developed AHF due to T cell lymphoma without lymphomatous infiltration of the liver. The only mechanism found to explain the clinical findings was release of cytokines by lymphoma. In patients with AHF of unknown etiology we propose early liver biopsy, because prognosis depends on the presence or absence of hepatic tumour infiltration. If AHF develops in a patient with diagnosed malignant disease, cytokine release may be the cause of AHF. Consequently, early diagnosis of the underlying disease and provision of liver support, as well as direct removal of inflammatory mediators from the circulation by exchange transfusion or other methods, should be the main priorities. PMID:12628121

  7. Coexistence of hepatoma with mantle cell lymphoma in a hepatitis B carrier

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mu-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Ching; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Huang, Hsin-Chih; Kao, Hsiao-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) in the liver is rare. Reports show that these patients have cirrhotic livers or hepatitis virus infections before they develop HCC and NHL. We present a patient with hepatitis B virus infection who was transferred to our hospital with a newly detected liver mass; abdominal computed tomography examination showed one hypodense mass of 7 cm in diameter and multiple mesenteric and mediastinal lymph nodes. A liver tumor biopsy showed a hepatoma, and the pathologic findings from an inguinal lymph node excision showed mantle cell lymphoma. An immunohistochemical stain confirmed that the atypical lymphoid cells within the HCC were positive for the CD20, CD5 and cyclin D1 antigens. Taking these findings into account, the hepatic tumor was determined to be a HCC infiltrated by mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:26668520

  8. Depside derivatives with anti-hepatic fibrosis and anti-diabetic activities from Impatiens balsamina L. flowers.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Cao, Jiaqing; Guo, Zhenghong; Lou, Yuntian; Ding, Meng; Zhao, Yuqing

    2015-09-01

    Eighteen compounds (1-18), seven new (3-9) and eleven previously reported (1, 2, and 10-18), were isolated from the flowers of Impatiens balsamina (Linn). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using different spectroscopic methods, including NMR (1D and 2D), UV, IR, and HR-ESI-MS. Analysis of the bioassay results showed the compounds had notable anti-hepatic fibrosis activity against murine Hepatic Stellate Cells (t-HSC/Cl-6) and anti-diabetics activity against α-glucosidase. Specifically, new compounds 7, 8, 9 showed significant inhibitory activity on t-HSC/Cl-6 cells with IC50 values of 42.12, 109.2, and 34.04 μg/mL respectively, while the IC50 values of positive control Silymarin and Fufang Biejia Ruangan Pian were 202.34 and 231.56 μg/mL, respectively. In addition, compounds 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 17, and 18 exhibited excellent α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Among these compounds, 7 exhibited the highest activity with an IC50 value of 0.72 μg/mL, while the IC50 value of the positive control acarbose was 3.36 μg/mL. This is the first study evaluating the anti-hepatic fibrosis and anti-diabetic activities of compounds isolated from the flowers of I. balsamina.

  9. Small-angle neutron scattering study of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Ito, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Imai, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Takagi, T.

    1995-02-01

    The overall and internal structure of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particles was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering using the contrast variation method. The vaccine is a nearly spherical particle, and its contrast-matching point was determined to be at about 24% D 2O content, indicating that a large part of the vaccine particle is occupied by lipids and carbohydrates from the yeast. The Stuhrmann plot suggests that the surface antigens exist predominantly in the peripheral region of the particle, which is favorable to the induction of anti-virus antibodies.

  10. Murine viral hepatitis involves NK cell depletion associated with virus-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LEHOUX, M; JACQUES, A; LUSIGNAN, S; LAMONTAGNE, L

    2004-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), a coronavirus, is an excellent animal model for the study of immunological disorders related to acute and chronic hepatitis. In this study, we have verified if the fulminant hepatitis induced by MHV3 could be related to an impairment of innate immunity. Groups of three C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 or attenuated YAC-MHV3 viruses, and the natural killer (NK) cell populations from liver, spleen and bone marrow were analysed. The percentage of intrahepatic NK1·1+T cell receptor (TCR)− cells did not increase while NK1·1+TCRinter cells decreased in both L2-MHV3- and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Concurrently, splenic and myeloid NK1·1+ cells decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice. However, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased in liver and decreased in bone marrow from pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice while no modification was detected in YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both normal and larger splenic or myeloid NK cells decreased more in pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice than in attenuated YAC-MHV3-infected mice. In vitro viral infections of interleukin (IL)-15-stimulated lymphoid cells from liver and bone marrow revealed that L2-MHV3 induced higher decreases in cell viability of NK1·1+ cells than the YAC-MHV3 variant. The NK cell decreases were due to the viral permissivity leading to cytopathic effects characterized by cell rounding, syncytia formation and apoptosis. Larger NK+ syncytia were observed in L2-MHV3-infected cells than in YAC-MHV3-infected cells. These results suggest that NK cell production is impaired by viral infection favouring fulminant hepatitis. PMID:15196242

  11. Viral hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Deinhardt, F.; Gust, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Three forms of viral hepatitis can be recognized: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis non-A, non-B. Hepatitis A is caused by a picornavirus, is transmitted by the faceal—oral route, does not become chronic, and no chronic virus carriers exist. The virus can be grown in cell cultures, and killed as well as live attenuated virus vaccines are under development. Hepatitis B is caused by an enveloped virus containing a circular, double-stranded form of DNA. The disease is transmitted parenterally through inoculation of blood or blood products containing virus or through close personal contact with a virus-positive person. Hepatitis B becomes chronic in a certain number of cases and can lead to cirrhosis and primary liver cell carcinoma. The blood and certain body secretions of individuals with a persistent or chronic infection may remain infectious for many years. The hepatitis B virus cannot be grown in cell cultures but the entire genome has been sequenced and cloned in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. An inactivated virus vaccine has been prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen present in the plasma of hepatitis B virus carriers and further vaccines are under development. The agents of hepatitis non-A, non-B have not been identified. It is possible to distinguish between a predominantly parenterally transmitted and an orally transmitted form of hepatitis non-A, non-B. The latter is reported to be caused by a picornavirus that does not, however, have any antigenic relationship with hepatitis A virus. PMID:6817933

  12. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells in a myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus; Kastrup, Jens; Baandrup, Ulrik; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine; Simonsen, Ulf

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal MI models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of MI using a fully grown non-immune-compromised rat model. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive intramyocardial injections of adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, or phosphate-buffered saline 1 week following induction of MI. After 4 weeks, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was improved in the adipose-derived stem cell group, and scar wall thickness was greater compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived as well as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevented left ventricular end diastolic dilation. Neither of the cell groups displayed increased angiogenesis in the myocardium compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived stem cells from a human ischemic patient preserved cardiac function following MI, whereas this could not be demonstrated for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, with only adipose-derived stem cells leading to an improvement in LVEF. Neither of the stem cell types induced myocardial angiogenesis, raising the question whether donor age and health have an effect on the efficacy of stem cells used in the treatment of MI.

  13. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells in a myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus; Kastrup, Jens; Baandrup, Ulrik; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine; Simonsen, Ulf

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal MI models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of MI using a fully grown non-immune-compromised rat model. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive intramyocardial injections of adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, or phosphate-buffered saline 1 week following induction of MI. After 4 weeks, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was improved in the adipose-derived stem cell group, and scar wall thickness was greater compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived as well as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevented left ventricular end diastolic dilation. Neither of the cell groups displayed increased angiogenesis in the myocardium compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived stem cells from a human ischemic patient preserved cardiac function following MI, whereas this could not be demonstrated for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, with only adipose-derived stem cells leading to an improvement in LVEF. Neither of the stem cell types induced myocardial angiogenesis, raising the question whether donor age and health have an effect on the efficacy of stem cells used in the treatment of MI. PMID:23211469

  14. Detection of Bone Marrow Derived Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Krause, Diane S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the ability of bone marrow derived cells to adopt the morphology and protein expression of epithelial cells in vivo have expanded rapidly over the last decade, and hundreds of publications report that bone marrow derived cells can become epithelial cells of multiple organs including lung, liver, GI tract, skin, pancreas and others. In this review, we critically evaluate the literature related to engraftment of bone marrow derived cells as epithelial cells in the lung. Over 40 manuscripts focused on whether bone marrow cells can differentiate into lung epithelial cells have been published, nearly all of which claim to identify marrow derived epithelial cells. A few investigations have concluded that no such cells are present and that the phenomenon of marrow derived epithelial cells is based on detection artifacts. Here we discuss the problems that exist in published papers identifying marrow derived epithelial cells, and propose standards for detection methods that provide the most definitive data. Identification of BM derived epithelial cells requires reliable and sensitive techniques for their detection, which must include cell identification based on the presence of an epithelial marker and the absence of blood cell markers as well as a marker for donor BM origin. In order for these studies to be rigorous, they must also use approaches to rule out cell overlap by microscopy or single cell isolation. Once these stringent criteria for identification of marrow derived epithelial cells are used universally, then the field can move forward to address the critical questions regarding which bone marrow derived cells are responsible for engraftment as epithelial cells, the mechanisms by which this occurs, whether these cells play a role in normal tissue repair, and whether specific cell subsets can be used for therapeutic benefit. PMID:20447442

  15. Universal immunization of infants with low doses of a low-cost, plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Schoub, B. D.; Matai, U.; Singh, B.; Blackburn, N. K.; Levin, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of universal vaccination against viral hepatitis B in South Africa among 18-month-old rural children. METHODS: Children were immunized with a course of low-dose (1.5 microg), plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age, and blood samples from the children were tested for three hepatitis B markers: hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HBs and anti-HBc. FINDINGS: One year after vaccination, a protective anti-HBs antibody titre of at least 10 IU/l was present in 669/769 (87.0%) of blood serum samples tested. Only 3/756 children (0.4%) were HBsAg positive and a fourth child was anti-HBc positive (HBsAg negative). This is a marked decrease compared to the hepatitis B prevalences reported in previous studies. Among rural migrant mine-workers, for example, HBsAg prevalence was 9.9%, and was 10.1% among children 0-6 years of age in the Eastern Cape Province. CONCLUSION: The low-dose, plasma-derived hepatitis B vaccine, which is affordable to most developing countries, was very successful in controlling endemic hepatitis B infection, where the virus is predominantly spread by horizontal transmission among infants and young children. PMID:12075363

  16. Up-regulation of interleukin-22 mediates liver fibrosis via activating hepatic stellate cells in patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Yuan; Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Yuan; Guo, Chaonan; Li, Hanwei; Li, Wenshu; Jin, Xueyuan; Zhang, Keming; Zhao, Ping; Wei, Lai; Zhao, Jingmin

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is known to play a critical role in liver immunity. However, the role of IL-22 in HCV-associated liver fibrosis is poorly understood. In this study, patients with HCV infection disclosed significant increases in peripheral numbers of IL-22-producing cells as well as in IL-22 plasma levels. In the liver, the increased intrahepatic IL-22(+) cells were positively correlated with fibrotic staging scores and clinical progression from CHC to cirrhosis. Moreover, the majority of IL-22(+) cells were located in fibrotic areas in the liver of patients with cirrhosis and co-localized with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In vitro, administration of IL-22 was accompanied with inhibited LX-2 cell apoptosis, promoted LX-2 cell proliferation, increased expression of α-SMA, and up-regulated collagen production by LX-2 cells. Collectively, our data provide evidence that IL-22 may contribute to the fibrogenesis of HCV-associated liver fibrosis by activating HSCs.

  17. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  18. Role of T cell death in maintaining immune tolerance during persistent viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Larrubia, Juan Ramón; Lokhande, Megha Uttam; García-Garzón, Silvia; Miquel, Joaquín; Subirá, Dolores; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Virus-specific T cells play an important role in the resolution of hepatic infection. However, during chronic hepatitis infection these cells lack their effector functions and fail to control the virus. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus have developed several mechanisms to generate immune tolerance. One of these strategies is the depletion of virus-specific T cells by apoptosis. The immunotolerogenic liver has unique property to retain and activate naïve T cell to avoid the over reactivation of immune response against antigens which is exploited by hepatotropic viruses to persist. The deletion of the virus-specific T cells occurs by intrinsic (passive) apoptotic mechanism. The pro-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2 interacting mediator (Bim) has attracted increasing attention as a pivotal involvement in apoptosis, as a regulator of tissue homeostasis and an enhancer for the viral persistence. Here, we reviewed our current knowledge on the evidence showing critical role of Bim in viral-specific T cell death by apoptotic pathways and helps in the immune tolerance. PMID:23569333

  19. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  20. Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate T Cell-Mediated Hepatitis via Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanli; Tang, Yuan; Wang, Shoujie; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Lu, Xiao; Bai, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT) and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ). In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27679638

  1. Hepatitis C and double-hit B cell lymphoma successfully treated by antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Giovanni; Rampa, Lorenzo; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Marino, Mirella; Pisani, Francesco; Cota, Carlo; Guidi, Alessandro; Picardi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    B cells lymphoma is one of the most challenging extra-hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Recently, a new kind of B-cell lymphoma, named double-hit B (DHL), was characterized with an aggressive clinical course whereas a potential association with HCV was not investigated. The new antiviral direct agents (DAAs) against HCV are effective and curative in the majority of HCV infections. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of DHL and HCV-infection successfully treated by new DAAs. According to our experience, a DHL must be suspected in case of HCV-related lymphoma, and an early diagnosis could direct towards a different hematological management because a worse prognosis might be expected. A possible effect of DAAs on DHL regression should be investigated, but eradicating HCV would avoid life-threatening reactivation of viral hepatitis during pharmacological immunosuppression in onco-haematological diseases. PMID:27803769

  2. Retinoic acid alleviates Con A-induced hepatitis and differentially regulates effector production in NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Song, You Chan; Kim, Ga-Young; Choi, Gyeyoung; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Lee, Jung-Mi; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2012-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a diverse regulator of immune responses. Although RA promotes natural killer T (NKT) cell activation in vitro by increasing CD1d expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), the direct effects of RA on NKT-cell responses in vivo are not known. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of RA on the severity of Con A-induced hepatitis and molecular changes of NKT cells. First, we demonstrated that Con A-induced liver damage was ameliorated by RA. In correlation with cytokine levels in serum, RA regulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α by NKT cells without influencing the NKT-cell activation status. However, RA did not alleviate α-GalCer-induced liver injury, even though it reduced IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α levels in serum. This regulation was also detected when liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) or NKT hybridoma cells were treated with RA in vitro. The regulatory effect of RA on NKT cells was mediated by RAR-α, and RA reduced the phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that RA differentially modulates the production of effector cytokines by NKT cells in hepatitis, and the suppressive effect of RA on hepatitis varies with the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury.

  3. Sulfatide-Mediated Activation of Type II Natural Killer T Cells Prevents Hepatic Ischemic Reperfusion Injury In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arrenberg, Philomena; Maricic, Igor; Kumar, Vipin

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major complication of liver transplantation and resectional hepatic surgeries. Natural killer T (NKT) cells predominate in liver, where they recognize lipid antigens bound to CD1d molecules. Type I NKT cells utilize a semi-invariant T-cell receptor and react with α-galactosylceramide; type II NKT cells use diverse T-cell receptors. Some type II NKT cells recognize the self-glycolipid sulfatide. It is not clear whether or how these distinct NKT cell subsets mediate hepatocellular damage following IRI. Methods We examined the roles of type I and type II NKT cells in mice with partial hepatic, warm ischemia and reperfusion injury. Results Mice that lack type I NKT cells (Jα18−/−) were protected from hepatic IRI, indicated by reduced hepatocellular necrosis and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase. Sulfatide-mediated activation of type II NKT cells reduced IFN-γ secretion by type I NKT cells and prevented IRI. Protection from hepatic IRI by sulfatide-mediated inactivation of type I NKT cells was associated with significant reductions in hepatic recruitment of myeloid cell subsets, especially the CD11b+Gr-1int, Gr-1−, and NK cells. Conclusion In mice, subsets of NKT cells have opposing roles in hepatic IRI: type I NKT cells promote injury whereas sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells protect against injury. CD1d activation of NKT cells is conserved from mice to humans, so strategies to modify these processes might be developed to treat patients with hepatic reperfusion injury. PMID:20950612

  4. Evaluation of Interferon Resistance in Newly Established Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Miki; Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Nakagawa, Mina; Watanabe, Takako; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Otani, Satoshi; Goto, Fumio; Nagata, Hiroko; Kaneko, Shun; Nitta, Sayuri; Murakawa, Miyako; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Azuma, Seishin; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kenichi; Yagi, Shintaro; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b is known to exhibit treatment resistance with respect to interferon (IFN) therapy. Substitution of amino acids 70 and 91 in the core region of the 1b genotype is a significant predictor of liver carcinogenesis and poor response to pegylated-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been clearly elucidated because of limitations of the HCV genotype 1b infectious model. Recently, the TPF1-M170T HCV genotype 1b cell culture system was established, in which the clone successfully replicates and infects Huh-7-derived Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare IFN resistance in various HCV clones using this system. Methods: HCV core amino acid substitutions R70Q and L91M were introduced to the TPF1-M170T clone and then transfected into Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. To evaluate the production of each virus, intracellular HCV core antigens were measured. Results were confirmed with Western blot analysis using anti-NS5A antibodies, and IFN sensitivity was subsequently measured. Results: Each clone was transfected successfully compared with JFH-1, with a significant difference in intracellular HCV core antigen (p < 0.05), an indicator of continuous HCV replication. Among all clones, L91M showed the highest increase in the HCV core antigen and HCV protein. There was no significant resistance against IFN treatment in core substitutions; however, IFN sensitivity was significantly different between the wildtype core and JFH-1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A novel genotype 1b HCV cell culture was constructed with core amino acid substitutions, which demonstrated IFN resistance of genotype 1b. This system will be useful for future analyses into the mechanisms of HCV genotype 1b treatment. PMID:27047766

  5. Natural killer cells in highly exposed hepatitis C-seronegative injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Mina, M M; Cameron, B; Luciani, F; Vollmer-Conna, U; Lloyd, A R

    2016-06-01

    Injecting drug use remains the major risk factor for hepatitis C (HCV) transmission. A minority of long-term injecting drug users remain seronegative and aviraemic, despite prolonged exposure to HCV - termed highly exposed seronegative subjects. Natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in this apparent protection. A longitudinal nested, three group case-control series of subjects was selected from a prospective cohort of seronegative injecting drug users who became incident cases (n = 11), remained seronegative (n = 11) or reported transient high-risk behaviour and remained uninfected (n = 11). The groups were matched by age, sex and initial risk behaviour characteristics. Stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed in multicolour flow cytometry to enumerate natural killer cell subpopulations and to assess functional activity using Toll-like receptor ligands before measurement of activation, cytokine production and natural cytotoxicity receptor expression. Principal components were derived to describe the detailed phenotypic characteristics of the major NK subpopulations (based on CD56 and CD16 co-expression), before logistic regression analysis to identify associations with exposed, seronegative individuals. The CD56(dim) CD16(+) (P = 0.05, OR 6.92) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) (P = 0.05, OR 6.07) principal components differed between exposed, seronegative individuals and pre-infection samples of the other two groups. These included CD56(dim) CD16(+) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) subsets with CD56(dim) CD16(+) IFN-γ and TNF-α on unstimulated cells, and CD56(dim) CD16(-) CD69(+) , CD107a(+) , IFN-γ and TNF-α following TLR stimulation. The cytotoxic CD56(dim) NK subset thus distinguished highly exposed, seronegative subjects, suggesting NK cytotoxicity may contribute to protection from HCV acquisition. Further investigation of the determinants of this association and prospective assessment of protection against HCV infection are warranted.

  6. Lipophilic caffeic and ferulic acid derivatives presenting cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Teresa L; Carvalho, Filipa S; Marques, Maria P M; Calheiros, Rita; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Roleira, Fernanda; Silva, Elisiaario T; Holy, Jon; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2011-05-16

    In the present work, lipophilic caffeic and ferulic acid derivatives were synthesized, and their cytotoxicity on cultured breast cancer cells was compared. A total of six compounds were initially evaluated: caffeic acid (CA), hexyl caffeate (HC), caffeoylhexylamide (HCA), ferulic acid (FA), hexyl ferulate (HF), and feruloylhexylamide (HFA). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptotic signaling were investigated in three human breast cancer cell lines, including estrogen-sensitive (MCF-7) and insensitive (MDA-MB-231 and HS578T). Furthermore, direct mitochondrial effects of parent and modified compounds were investigated by using isolated liver mitochondria. The results indicated that although the parent compounds presented no cytotoxicity, the new compounds inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle alterations and cell death, with a predominant effect on MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, cell cycle data indicates that effects on nontumor BJ fibroblasts were predominantly cytostatic and not cytotoxic. The parent compounds and derivatives also promoted direct alterations on hepatic mitochondrial bioenergetics, although the most unexpected and never before reported one was that FA induces the mitochondrial permeability transition. The results show that the new caffeic and ferulic acid lipophilic derivatives show increased cytotoxicity toward human breast cancer cell lines, although the magnitude and type of effects appear to be dependent on the cell type. Mitochondrial data had no direct correspondence with effects on intact cells suggesting that this organelle may not be a critical component of the cellular effects observed. The data provide a rational approach to the design of effective cytotoxic lipophilic hydroxycinnamic derivatives that in the future could be profitably applied for chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic purposes.

  7. Activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Morita, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Yoshito; Toyama, Tetsuya; Fujii, Hideki; Nishioji, Kenichi; Kirishima, Toshihiko; Makiyama, Akiko; Yamauchi, Norihito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2003-10-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine whether or not activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatic injury in mice. METHODS: Con A was administered to Balb/c mice pretreated with or without gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)). Kupffer cell activation was evaluated by their ability to produce superoxide anions in situ under liver perfusion with nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). Hepatic concentration of cytokines was measured by ELISA and the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) was evaluated by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical detection of CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver was also performed. RESULTS: GdCl(3)-pretreatment significantly (P<0.01) reduced the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in Con A-treated mice. Formazan deposition in Kupffer cells, the hepatic concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, the mRNA expression of CXCR3 and the CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver were decreased in GdCl(3)-pretreated mice as compared with those without GdCl(3)-pretreatment (P<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Activated Kupffer cells, which produce superoxide anions, are involved in Con A-induced hepatic necro-inflammation in mice possibly through the activation of Th1-associated immune response mediated by CD4 and/or CXCR3 positive cells recruited into the liver.

  8. [Effects of BaP exposure on ultrastructures of hepatic cells of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris].

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Zheng, Weiyun; Ouyang, Gaoliang; Hong, Wanshu

    2003-10-01

    The changes of ultrastructures of hepatic cells of Boleophthalmus pectinirostris were investigated after the fish were exposed under benzo(a) pyrene in different concentrations under experimental condition. The results showed that the organelles in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostris were damaged to different extents after the fish was exposed under lower concentration of BaP (0.5 mg.L-1) for up to 7 d, in which, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum were the chief organelles affected by BaP exposure. While the fish was exposed under higher concentration of BaP (5 mg.L-1) for 2 h, almost all of the organelles including mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostr were affected by BaP exposure. The structures of liver cells were seriously damaged. It was demonstrated that BaP could produce multiorganalle lesions in hepatic cells of B. pectinirostris, and the severity extent of such lesions was dependent on the concentration level of BaP.

  9. Continuous production of hepatitis A virus in PLC/PRF/5 cell cultures: use of antigen for serology.

    PubMed

    Crance, J M; Passagot, J; Biziagos, E; Deloince, R

    1987-11-01

    The strain CF53 of hepatitis A virus (HAV) previously adapted to growth in PLC/PRF/5 cells was grown in 175 cm2 flasks, at different passages. After infection, cells were incubated at 32 degrees C in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 2.5% foetal calf serum (FCS) for 6-12 months. HAV which was released continuously in the culture medium was harvested weekly. Hepatitis A virus antigen (HAAg) and infectious virus production was stable during each passage. The antigen titre, determined by radioimmunoassay, was about 50 for each passage whereas the infectious virus titre increased from 10(3.7) (passage 7) to 10(6.0) TCID50/ml (passage 13). Virus production was not influenced by the FCS concentration (0-2.5%) in the maintenance medium. The cell culture produced HAAg was used for detection of total anti-HAV antibodies, anti-HAV titration and IgM antibody capture assay and the results were identical to those obtained with commercial kits. HAAg produced by this practical and cheap method could easily replace primate derived antigen for the detection of anti-HAV antibodies.

  10. Thymoquinone attenuates liver fibrosis via PI3K and TLR4 signaling pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ting; Lian, Li-Hua; Wu, Yan-Ling; Wan, Ying; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2013-02-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is the major active compound derived from the medicinal Nigella sativa. In the present study, we investigated the anti-fibrotic mechanism of TQ in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated rat hepatic stellate cells line, T-HSC/Cl-6. T-HSC/Cl-6 cells were treated with TQ (3.125, 6.25 and 12.5μM) prior to LPS (1μg/ml). Our data demonstrated that TQ effectively decreased activated T-HSC/Cl-6 cell viability. TQ significantly attenuated the expression of CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). TQ also significantly inhibited phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. The expression of α-SMA and collagen-I were significantly decreased by TQ. Furthermore, TQ decreased X linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular FLIP (c-FLIPL) expression, which are related with the regulation of apoptosis. Furthermore, TQ significantly increased the survival against LPS challenge in d-galactosamine (d-GlaN)-sensitized mice, and decreased the levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), which were in line with in vitro results. Our data demonstrated that TQ attenuates liver fibrosis partially via blocking TLR4 expression and PI3K phosphorylation on the activated HSCs. Therefore, TQ may be a potential candidate for the therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  11. Integrated hepatitis B virus DNA sequences specifying the major viral core polypeptide are methylated in PLC/PRF/5 cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, R H; Robinson, W S

    1983-05-01

    The methylation of various hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA sequences was examined using the restriction endonucleases Hpa II and Msp I. HBV DNA from virions (Dane particles) and virus-infected liver tissue was digested with Hpa II or Msp I and fractionated by electrophoresis in agarose gels, and the restriction enzyme cleavage pattern was examined by Southern blot analysis. No methylation of the 5' C-C-G-G 3' recognition sequence was detected in either virion DNA or HBV DNA from infected liver tissue. The tissue culture cell line PLC/PRF/5, derived from a human hepatoma, possesses HBV DNA exclusively integrated at several sites. Digestion of PLC/PRF/5 DNA with Hpa II and Msp I revealed that the integrated HBV DNA sequences were methylated. Further analysis using probes specific for various regions of the HBV genome showed that some of the hepatitis B viral DNA sequences, including those specifying the major surface antigen polypeptide, were methylated infrequently or not at all. In contrast, the viral DNA sequences coding for the major core polypeptide were extensively methylated. Because the surface antigen is expressed in these cells while the core antigen is not, our results suggest that DNA methylation could account for the selective expression of HBV genes in this hepatoma cell line.

  12. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  13. Acetylshikonin induces apoptosis of hepatitis B virus X protein-expressing human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Cho, Il-Rae; Kaewpiboon, Chutima; Kaowinn, Sirichat; Lee, Keesook; Jhun, Byung Hak; Choi, Young Whan; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2014-07-15

    Since it has been known that shikonin derived from a medicinal plant possesses anti-cancer activity, we wonder whether acetylshikonin (ASK), a derivate of shikonin, can be used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX), an oncoprotein from hepatitis B virus. When ASK was added to Hep3B cells stably expressing HBX, it induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. ASK induced upregulation and export of Nur77 to the cytoplasm and activation of JNK. Likewise, suppression of Nur77 and JNK inactivation protected the cells from ASK-induced apoptosis, indicating that Nur77 upregulation and JNK activation were required for ASK-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, ASK increased the expression of Bip and ubiquitination levels of cellular proteins, features of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, via the production of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. Suppression of reactive oxygen species with N-acetylcysteine reduced levels of Bip protein and ubiquitination levels of cellular proteins during ASK treatment, leading to protection of cells from apoptosis. Cycloheximide treatment reduced ASK-induced ER stress, suggesting that protein synthesis is involved in ASK-induced ER stress. Moreover, we showed using salubrinal, an ER stress inhibitor that reactive oxygen species production, JNK activation, and Nur77 upregulation and its translocation to cytoplasm are necessary for ER-induced stress. Interestingly, we found that JNK inactivation suppresses ASK-induced ER stress, whereas Nur77 siRNA treatment does not, indicating that JNK is required for ASK-induced ER stress. Accordingly, we report that ASK induces ER stress, which is prerequisite for apoptosis of HBX-expressing hepatocellular carcinoma cells. PMID:24769509

  14. Enhanced Metabolizing Activity of Human ES Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Using a 3D Culture System with Repeated Exposures to Xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jang, Yu Jin; An, Su Yeon; Son, Jeongsang; Lee, Jaehun; Lee, Gyunggyu; Park, Ji Young; Park, Han-Jin; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Han, Jiyou

    2015-09-01

    Highly homogeneous and functional stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are considered a promising option in the cell-based therapy of liver disease and the development of effective in vitro toxicity screening tools. However, the purity of cells and expression and/or activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in stem cell-derived HLCs are usually too low to be useful for clinical or in vitro applications. Here, we describe a highly optimized hepatic differentiation protocol, which produces >90% (BGO1 and CHA15) albumin-positive HLCs with no purification process from human embryonic stem cell lines. In addition, we show that hepatic enzyme gene expressions and activities were significantly improved by generating 3D spheroidal aggregate of HLCs, compared with 2D HLCs. The 3D differentiation method increased expression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that regulate the proper expression of key hepatic enzymes. Furthermore, significantly increased hepatic functions such as albumin and urea secretion were observed in 3D hepatic spheroids, compared with 2D HLCs. HLCs in the spheroid exhibited morphological and ultrastructural features of normal hepatocytes. Importantly, we show that repeated exposures to xenobiotics facilitated further functional maturation of HLC, as confirmed by increased expression of genes for drug metabolizing enzymes and transcription factors. In conclusion, the 3D culture system with repeated exposures to xenobiotics may be a new strategy for enhancing hepatic metabolizing ability of stem cell-derived HLCs as a cell source for in vitro high-throughput hepatotoxicity models. PMID:26089346

  15. [Changes in neuropeptide Y and substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres and immunocompetent cells in hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet

    2015-11-22

    Neuropeptide Y and substance P were thought to play a role in the function of immune cells and in amplification or elimination of the inflammatory processes. In hepatitis the number of both neuropeptide Y and substance P immunoreactive nerve fibres are increased, where the increase of neoropeptide Y is significant. A large number of lymphocytes and mast cells are also stained for neuropeptide Y and substance P. Very close associations (less than 1 µm) were observed between neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve fibres and immune cells stained also with neuropeptide Y. Some immune cells were also found to be immunoreactive for tumor necrosis factor-α and NF-κB. Some of the SP IR immunocells were also stained for TNF-α and nuclear factor kappaB. Based on these data it is hypothesized that neuropeptid Y and substance P released from nerve fibres and immune cells play a role in inflammation and elimination of inflammation in hepatitis.

  16. Antiproliferative effect of isolated isoquinoline alkaloid from Mucuna pruriens seeds in hepatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pranesh; Rawat, Atul; Keshari, Amit K; Singh, Ashok K; Maity, Siddhartha; De, Arnab; Samanta, Amalesh; Saha, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative action of isolated M1 (6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) from Mucuna pruriens seeds using human hepatic carcinoma cell line (Huh-7 cells). Initially, docking studies was performed to find out the binding affinities of M1 to caspase-3 and 8 enzymes. Later, cytotoxic action of M1 was measured by cell growth inhibition (MTT), followed by caspase-3 and 8 enzymes assay colorimetrically. Our results collectively suggested that M1 had strong binding affinity to caspase-8 in molecular modelling. M1 possessed antiproliferative activity on Huh-7 cells (EC50 = 13.97 μM) and also inhibited the action of caspase-8 enzyme, signified process of apoptosis. M1 was active against Huh-7 cells that may be useful for future hepatic cancer treatment. PMID:25774560

  17. Specific CD8+ T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8+ T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8+ T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway.

  18. Specific CD8(+) T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-07-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8(+) T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8(+) T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway. PMID:27605882

  19. Specific CD8+ T cell response immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Cubero, Elia; Larrubia, Juan-Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are characterized by exhaustion of the specific CD8+ T cell response. This process involves enhancement of negative co-stimulatory molecules, such as programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), 2B4, Tim-3, CD160 and LAG-3, which is linked to intrahepatic overexpression of some of the cognate ligands, such as PD-L1, on antigen presenting cells and thereby favouring a tolerogenic environment. Therapies that disrupt these negative signalling mechanisms represent promising therapeutic tools with the potential to restore reactivity of the specific CD8+ T cell response. In this review we discuss the impressive in vitro and in vivo results that have been recently achieved in HCC, CHB and CHC by blocking these negative receptors with monoclonal antibodies against these immune checkpoint modulators. The article mainly focuses on the role of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocking monoclonal antibodies, the first ones to have reached clinical practice. The humanized monoclonal antibodies against CTLA-4 (tremelimumab and ipilimumab) and PD-1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) have yielded good results in testing of HCC and chronic viral hepatitis patients. Trelimumab, in particular, has shown a significant increase in the time to progression in HCC, while nivolumab has shown a remarkable effect on hepatitis C viral load reduction. The research on the role of ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab on HCC is currently underway. PMID:27605882

  20. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells: Master regulators of alcoholic liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Won-Il

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is one of the most common causes of the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the past, alcohol-mediated hepatocyte injury was assumed to be a significantly major cause of ALD. However, a huge number of recent and brilliant studies have demonstrated that hepatic non-parenchymal cells including Kupffer cells, hepatic stellate cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and diverse types of lymphocytes play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of ALD by producing inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, oxidative stress, microRNA, and lipid-originated metabolites (retinoic acid and endocannabinoids) or by directly interacting with parenchymal cells (hepatocytes). Therefore, understanding the comprehensive roles of hepatic non-parenchymal cells during the development of ALD will provide new integrative directions for the treatment of ALD. This review will address the roles of non-parenchymal cells in alcoholic steatosis, inflammation, and liver fibrosis and might help us to discover possible therapeutic targets and treatments involving modulating the non-parenchymal cells in ALD. PMID:26819504

  1. Amnion-derived stem cells: in quest of clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Miki, Toshio

    2011-05-19

    In the promising field of regenerative medicine, human perinatal stem cells are of great interest as potential stem cells with clinical applications. Perinatal stem cells could be isolated from normally discarded human placentae, which are an ideal cell source in terms of availability, the fewer number of ethical concerns, less DNA damage, and so on. Numerous studies have demonstrated that some of the placenta-derived cells possess stem cell characteristics like pluripotent differentiation ability, particularly in amniotic epithelial (AE) cells. Term human amniotic epithelium contains a relatively large number of stem cell marker-positive cells as an adult stem cell source. In this review, we introduce a model theory of why so many AE cells possess stem cell characteristics. We also describe previous work concerning the therapeutic applications and discuss the pluripotency of the AE cells and potential pitfalls for amnion-derived stem cell research.

  2. The isolation and in vitro expansion of hepatic Sca-1 progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Elizabeth

    2009-04-17

    The intra-hepatic population of liver progenitor cells expands during liver injury when hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited. These cells can be purified by density gradient centrifugation and cultured. Separated by size only this population contains small cells of hematopoietic, epithelial and endothelial lineages and is thought to contain liver stem cells. The identity of liver stem cells remains unknown although there is some evidence that tissue Sca1{sup +} CD45{sup -} cells display progenitor cell characteristics. We identified both intra-hepatic and gall bladder Sca1{sup +} cells following liver injury and expanded ex vivo Sca1 cells as part of heterogenous cell culture or as a purified population. We found significant difference between the proliferation of Sca-1 cells when plated on laminin or collagen I while proliferation of heterogenous population was not affected by the extracellular matrix indicating the necessity for culture of Sca1{sup +} cells with laminin matrix or laminin producing cells in long term liver progenitor cell cultures.

  3. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V regulates TGF-β response in hepatic stellate cells and the progression of steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Yoshihiro; Mori, Kanako; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Kiso, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yuichi; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Ishii, Mayuko; Moriwaki, Kenta; Kawada, Norifumi; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2012-06-01

    N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V), catalyzing β1-6 branching in asparagine-linked oligosaccharides, is one of the most important glycosyltransferases involved in tumor metastasis and carcinogenesis. Although the expression of GnT-V is induced in chronic liver diseases, the biological meaning of GnT-V in the diseases remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GnT-V on the progression of chronic hepatitis, using GnT-V transgenic (Tg) mice fed a high fat and high cholesterol (HFHC) diet, an experimental model of murine steatohepatitis. Although enhanced hepatic lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis were observed in wild-type (WT) mice fed the HFHC diet, they were dramatically prevented in Tg mice. In addition, the gene expression of inflammatory Th1 cytokines in the liver was significantly decreased in Tg mice than WT mice. Inhibition of liver fibrosis was due to the dysfunction of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which play pivotal roles in liver fibrosis through the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Although TGF-β1 signaling was enhanced in Tg mouse-derived HSCs (Tg-HSCs) compared with WT mouse-derived HSCs (WT-HSCs), collagen expression was significantly reduced in Tg-HSCs. As a result from DNA microarray, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) expression, known as a negative feedback signal for TGF-β1, was significantly elevated in Tg-HSCs compared with WT-HSCs. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the product of COX2, production was also significantly elevated in Tg-HSCs. COX2 inhibition by celecoxib decreased PGE2 and increased collagen expression in Tg-HSCs. In conclusion, GnT-V prevented steatohepatitis progression through modulating lymphocyte and HSC functions. PMID:22294551

  4. In-vitro cell-mediated cytotoxicity for autologous liver cells in chronic non-A, non-B hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, M; Alberti, A; Tremolada, F; Williams, R; Eddleston, A L; Realdi, G

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possible mechanisms of liver cell injury in chronic non-A, non-B (NANB) hepatitis, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 16 patients with chronic NANB hepatitis were incubated with autologous hepatocytes in a microcytotoxicity assay. Significant cytotoxicity was demonstrated in 11 patients. T-enriched lymphocytes exhibited significantly greater cytotoxicity than non-T enriched cells. No significant inhibition of cytotoxicity was observed following preincubation of the liver cells with either monoclonal or polyclonal anti-HBc, or monoclonal anti-HBs, or addition of either purified HBsAg or recombinant HBcAg to the culture, indicating that there was no detectable cross-reactivity in this system between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and NANB-associated antigen(s). Preincubation of the patients' hepatocytes with polyclonal IgG purified from a serum of a patient who recovered from an acute NANB hepatitis, did not significantly alter cytotoxicity. Liver cell surface-bound IgG was detected by immunofluorescence in only two of the patients, a finding consistent with existing evidence of poor antibody responses to both liver membrane and NANB-associated antigens. Control experiments using PBL from allogeneic normal donors exhibited normal cytotoxicity for the patients' hepatocytes supporting the hypothesis that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is unlikely to play a significant role in this clinical setting. PMID:3082546

  5. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-01-01

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1−/−), CCL2−/− and CCR2−/− mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-γ in T cells. Moreover, interferon-γ treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  6. Chemotherapy-induced fatal hepatitis B virus reactivation in a small-cell lung cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Wang, Fang; Zou, Bing-Wen; Ding, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during chemotherapy is a major concern and is widely reported, particularly in association with hematological malignancies and lymphomas. While lung cancer ranks first in incidence and mortality worldwide, HBV reactivation has been largely overlooked in this disease. As regards small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), HBV reactivation has rarely been reported. We herein report the case of a hepatitis B surface antigen-seropositive SCLC patient in whom HBV was reactivated during the course of chemotherapy, despite preemptive use of lamivudine. The patient developed fulminant viral hepatitis and succumbed to liver failure. The aim of this report was to highlight the major but overlooked issue of HBV reactivation in SCLC, and suggest that agents more potent than lamivudine may be more efficacious in high-risk patients. PMID:27699030

  7. Chemotherapy-induced fatal hepatitis B virus reactivation in a small-cell lung cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Wang, Fang; Zou, Bing-Wen; Ding, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during chemotherapy is a major concern and is widely reported, particularly in association with hematological malignancies and lymphomas. While lung cancer ranks first in incidence and mortality worldwide, HBV reactivation has been largely overlooked in this disease. As regards small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), HBV reactivation has rarely been reported. We herein report the case of a hepatitis B surface antigen-seropositive SCLC patient in whom HBV was reactivated during the course of chemotherapy, despite preemptive use of lamivudine. The patient developed fulminant viral hepatitis and succumbed to liver failure. The aim of this report was to highlight the major but overlooked issue of HBV reactivation in SCLC, and suggest that agents more potent than lamivudine may be more efficacious in high-risk patients.

  8. Indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression by monocytes and dendritic cell populations in hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S; Landi, A; Garg, R; Wilson, J A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the induction of the primary immune response to infection. DCs may express the tryptophan-catabolizing enzyme indolamine2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which is an inducer of immune tolerance. Because there is evidence that chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to functional impairment of certain DC populations, we analysed IDO expression in DCs and monocytes from chronically infected and recovered HCV patients. The IDO1 and -2 expression was increased significantly in the monocytes of chronic HCV patients but, interestingly, not in those from recovered patients. The myeloid DCs from chronically infected HCV patients also showed enhanced IDO1 expression, while no change in either IDO1 or -2 was found for plasmacytoid DCs. Up-regulation of IDO1 gene expression was confirmed by the presence of enhanced kynurenine/tryptophan ratios in the plasma from chronic HCV patients. Increased IDO1 and -2 expression was also observed in monocytes from healthy donors infected with an adapted mutant of the HCV JFH-1 strain ex vivo, confirming a direct effect of HCV infection. These changes in IDO expression could be prevented by treatment with the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl tryptophan (1-mT). Furthermore, maturation of monocyte-derived DCs from chronically infected HCV patients, as well as well as monocyte-derived DCs infected ex vivo with HCV, was impaired, but this was reversed by 1-mT treatment. This suggests that IDO inhibitors may be used to treat chronic HCV patients in vivo, in conjunction with current therapies, or to activate DCs from patients ex vivo, such that they can be administered back as a DC-based therapeutic vaccine. PMID:25605587

  9. Different cytokeratin and neuronal cell adhesion molecule staining patterns in focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatic adenoma and their significance

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Anita; Robert, Marie E.; Bifulco, Carlo B.; Salem, Ronald R.; Jain, Dhanpat

    2013-01-01

    Summary Differentiating focal nodular hyperplasia from hepatic adenoma can be challenging. Cytokeratin 7, neuronal cell adhesion molecule, and cytokeratin 19 are differentially expressed in hepatocytes, biliary epithelium, and possibly hepatic progenitor/stem cells. CD34 is known to have altered expression patterns in the hepatic endothelium in conditions associated with abnormal perfusion and in hepatocellular carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression pattern of these markers in focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatic adenoma and assess their diagnostic use. Ten resection specimens each of hepatic adenoma and focal nodular hyperplasia (including a case of telangiectatic focal nodular hyperplasia) were selected for the study. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using antibodies against cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, neuronal cell adhesion molecule, and CD34 on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from each case. The staining patterns and intensity for each marker were analyzed. In hepatic adenoma, the cytokeratin 7 stain revealed strong positivity in hepatocytes in patches, with a gradual decrease in the staining intensity as the cells differentiated towards mature hepatocytes. Although bile ducts were typically absent in hepatic adenoma, occasional ductules could be identified with cytokeratin 7 stain. In focal nodular hyperplasia, cytokeratin 7 showed strong staining of the biliary epithelium within the fibrous septa and staining of the peripheral hepatocytes of most lobules that was focal and weaker than hepatic adenoma. Cytokeratin 19 and neuronal cell adhesion molecule showed patchy and moderate staining in the biliary epithelium of the ductules in focal nodular hyperplasia. While in the hepatic adenoma, cytokeratin 19 showed only rare positivity in occasional cells within ductules, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule marked occasional isolated cells in the lesion. CD34 showed staining of sinusoids in the inflow areas

  10. Cryo-chemical decellularization of the whole liver for mesenchymal stem cells-based functional hepatic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Yen, Meng-Hua; Chang, Yin; Yang, Vincent W; Lee, Oscar K

    2014-04-01

    Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for severe hepatic failure to date. However, the limited supply of donor organs has severely hampered this treatment. So far, great potentials of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to replenish the hepatic cell population have been shown; nevertheless, there still is a lack of an optimal three-dimensional scaffold for generation of well-transplantable hepatic tissues. In this study, we utilized a cryo-chemical decellularization method which combines physical and chemical approach to generate acellular liver scaffolds (ALS) from the whole liver. The produced ALS provides a biomimetic three-dimensional environment to support hepatic differentiation of MSCs, evidenced by expression of hepatic-associated genes and marker protein, glycogen storage, albumin secretion, and urea production. It is also found that hepatic differentiation of MSCs within the ALS is much more efficient than two-dimensional culture in vitro. Importantly, the hepatic-like tissues (HLT) generated by repopulating ALS with MSCs are able to act as functional grafts and rescue lethal hepatic failure after transplantation in vivo. In summary, the cryo-chemical method used in this study is suitable for decellularization of liver and create acellular scaffolds that can support hepatic differentiation of MSCs and be used to fabricate functional tissue-engineered liver constructs.

  11. Cryo-chemical decellularization of the whole liver for mesenchymal stem cells-based functional hepatic tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Yen, Meng-Hua; Chang, Yin; Yang, Vincent W.; Lee, Oscar K.

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for severe hepatic failure to date. However, the limited supply of donor organs has severely hampered this treatment. So far, great potentials of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to replenish the hepatic cell population have been shown; nevertheless, there still is a lack of an optimal three-dimensional scaffold for generation of well-transplantable hepatic tissues. In this study, we utilized a cryo-chemical decellularization method which combines physical and chemical approach to generate acellular liver scaffolds (ALS) from the whole liver. The produced ALS provides a biomimetic three-dimensional environment to support hepatic differentiation of MSCs, evidenced by expression of hepatic-associated genes and marker protein, glycogen storage, albumin secretion, and urea production. It is also found that hepatic differentiation of MSCs within the ALS is much more efficient than two-dimensional culture in vitro. Importantly, the hepatic-like tissues (HLT) generated by repopulating ALS with MSCs are able to act as functional grafts and rescue lethal hepatic failure after transplantation in vivo. In summary, the cryo-chemical method used in this study is suitable for decellularization of liver and create acellular scaffolds that can support hepatic differentiation of MSCs and be used to fabricate functional tissue-engineered liver constructs. PMID:24462361

  12. Degradable hydrogels derived from PEG‐diacrylamide for hepatic tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kelly R.; Miller, Jordan S.; Blakely, Brandon L.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Engineered tissue constructs have the potential to augment or replace whole organ transplantation for the treatment of liver failure. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)‐based systems are particularly promising for the construction of engineered liver tissue due to their biocompatibility and amenability to modular addition of bioactive factors. To date, primary hepatocytes have been successfully encapsulated in non‐degradable hydrogels based on PEG‐diacrylate (PEGDA). In this study, we describe a hydrogel system based on PEG‐diacrylamide (PEGDAAm) containing matrix‐metalloproteinase sensitive (MMP‐sensitive) peptide in the hydrogel backbone that is suitable for hepatocyte culture both in vitro and after implantation. By replacing hydrolytically unstable esters in PEGDA with amides in PEGDAAm, resultant hydrogels resisted non‐specific hydrolysis, while still allowing for MMP‐mediated hydrogel degradation. Optimization of polymerization conditions, hepatocellular density, and multicellular tissue composition modulated both the magnitude and longevity of hepatic function in vitro. Importantly, hepatic PEGDAAm‐based tissues survived and functioned for over 3 weeks after implantation ectopically in the intraperitoneal (IP) space of nude mice. Together, these studies suggest that MMP‐sensitive PEGDAAm‐based hydrogels may be a useful material system for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3331–3338, 2015. PMID:25851120

  13. Naturally derived anti-hepatitis B virus agents and their mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Despite that some approved drugs and genetically engineered vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV) are available for HBV patients, HBV infection is still a severe public health problem in the world. All the approved therapeutic drugs (including interferon-alpha and nucleoside analogues) have their limitations. No drugs or therapeutic methods can cure hepatitis B so far. Therefore, it is urgently needed to discover and develop new anti-HBV drugs, especially non-nucleoside agents. Naturally originated compounds with enormous molecular complexity and diversity offer a great opportunity to find novel anti-HBV lead compounds with specific antiviral mechanisms. In this review, the natural products against HBV are discussed according to their chemical classes such as terpenes, lignans, phenolic acids, polyphenols, lactones, alkaloids and flavonoids. Furthermore, novel mode of action or new targets of some representative anti-HBV natural products are also discussed. The aim of this review is to report new discoveries and updates pertaining to anti-HBV natural products in the last 20 years, especially novel skeletons and mode of action. Although many natural products with various skeletons have been reported to exhibit potent anti-HBV effects to date, scarcely any of them are found in the list of conventional anti-HBV drugs worldwide. Additionly, in anti-HBV mechanism of action, only a few references reported new targets or novel mode of action of anti-HBV natural products. PMID:26755870

  14. Degradable hydrogels derived from PEG-diacrylamide for hepatic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kelly R; Miller, Jordan S; Blakely, Brandon L; Chen, Christopher S; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-10-01

    Engineered tissue constructs have the potential to augment or replace whole organ transplantation for the treatment of liver failure. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based systems are particularly promising for the construction of engineered liver tissue due to their biocompatibility and amenability to modular addition of bioactive factors. To date, primary hepatocytes have been successfully encapsulated in non-degradable hydrogels based on PEG-diacrylate (PEGDA). In this study, we describe a hydrogel system based on PEG-diacrylamide (PEGDAAm) containing matrix-metalloproteinase sensitive (MMP-sensitive) peptide in the hydrogel backbone that is suitable for hepatocyte culture both in vitro and after implantation. By replacing hydrolytically unstable esters in PEGDA with amides in PEGDAAm, resultant hydrogels resisted non-specific hydrolysis, while still allowing for MMP-mediated hydrogel degradation. Optimization of polymerization conditions, hepatocellular density, and multicellular tissue composition modulated both the magnitude and longevity of hepatic function in vitro. Importantly, hepatic PEGDAAm-based tissues survived and functioned for over 3 weeks after implantation ectopically in the intraperitoneal (IP) space of nude mice. Together, these studies suggest that MMP-sensitive PEGDAAm-based hydrogels may be a useful material system for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3331-3338, 2015.

  15. Degradable hydrogels derived from PEG-diacrylamide for hepatic tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Kelly R.; Miller, Jordan S.; Blakely, Brandon L.; Chen, Christopher S.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tissue constructs have the potential to augment or replace whole organ transplantation for the treatment of liver failure. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based systems are particularly promising for the construction of engineered liver tissue due to their biocompatibility and amenability to modular addition of bioactive factors. To date, primary hepatocytes have been successfully encapsulated in non-degradable hydrogels based on PEG-diacrylate (PEGDA). In this study, we describe a hydrogel system based on PEG-diacrylamide (PEGDAAm) containing matrix-metalloproteinase sensitive (MMP-sensitive) peptide in the hydrogel backbone that is suitable for hepatocyte culture both in vitro and after implantation. By replacing hydrolytically unstable esters in PEGDA with amides in PEGDAAm, resultant hydrogels resisted non-specific hydrolysis, while still allowing for MMP-mediated hydrogel degradation. Optimization of polymerization conditions, hepatocellular density, and multicellular tissue composition modulated both the magnitude and longevity of hepatic function in vitro. Importantly, hepatic PEGDAAm-based tissues survived and functioned for over three weeks after implantation ectopically in the intraperitoneal (IP) space of nude mice. Together, these studies suggest that MMP-sensitive PEGDAAm-based hydrogels may be a useful material system for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25851120

  16. Kupffer cell inactivation by carbon monoxide bound to red blood cells preserves hepatic cytochrome P450 via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects exerted through the HMGB1/TLR-4 pathway during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ogaki, Shigeru; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Maeda, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ishima, Yu; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2015-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions for controlling hemorrhaging induce systemic ischemia reperfusion, resulting in a decrease in hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels. Carbon monoxide (CO), when bound to red blood cells (CO-RBC) has the potential to protect the hepatic CYP protein to produce a resuscitative effect in a hemorrhagic shock rat model. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which CO-RBC resuscitation from a massive hemorrhage protects against a decrease in hepatic CYP. In the early phase (∼1h) after a hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, hepatic CYP protein levels were significantly decreased with increasing hepatic free heme levels, but were maintained by a pre-treatment of gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cell inhibitor, and Trolox, an anti-oxidant agent, as well as CO-RBC resuscitation. Under these conditions, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from activated Kupffer cells was increased, but this increase was suppressed by CO-RBC resuscitation. At a late phase (6∼24h), CYP mRNA levels decreased after hemorrhage and RBC resuscitation, but not in the case of CO-RBC resuscitation. The increases in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels were decreased by CO-RBC resuscitation via the suppression of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and the expression of the high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1). Hepatic CYP protection after a hemorrhage and CO-RBC resuscitation can be attributed to the inactivation of Kupffer cells, resulting in the suppression of ROS production in the early phase and the suppression of inflammatory cytokine production via the TLR-4/HMGB-1signal pathway in the late phase.

  17. Adipose-derived stem cells: current findings and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Morikuni; Orbay, Hakan; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2011-02-01

    Adipose tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown promise in the field of regenerative medicine. Furthermore, these cells can be readily harvested in large numbers with low donor-site morbidity. During the past decade, numerous studies have provided preclinical data on the safety and efficacy of adipose-derived stem cells, supporting the use of these cells in future clinical applications. Various clinical trials have shown the regenerative capability of adipose-derived stem cells in subspecialties of medical fields such as plastic surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, and cardiac surgery. In addition, a great deal of knowledge concerning the harvesting, characterization, and culture of adipose-derived stem cells has been reported. This review will summarize data from in vitro studies, pre-clinical animal models, and recent clinical trials concerning the use of adipose-derived stem cells in regenerative medicine.

  18. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  19. Characterization of two distinct liver progenitor cell subpopulations of hematopoietic and hepatic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Corcelle, V.; Stieger, B.; Gjinovci, A.; Wollheim, C.B.; Gauthier, B.R. . E-mail: Benoit.Gauthier@medecine.unige.ch

    2006-09-10

    Despite extensive studies, the hematopoietic versus hepatic origin of liver progenitor oval cells remains controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the origin of such cells after liver injury and to establish an oval cell line. Rat liver injury was induced by subcutaneous insertion of 2-AAF pellets for 7 days with subsequent injection of CCl{sub 4}. Livers were removed 9 to 13 days post-CCl{sub 4} treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-c-kit, OV6, Thy1, CK19, AFP, vWF and Rab3b. Isolated non-parenchymal cells were grown on mouse embryonic fibroblast, and their gene expression profile was characterized by RT-PCR. We identified a subpopulation of OV6/CK19/Rab3b-expressing cells that was activated in the periportal region of traumatized livers. We also characterized a second subpopulation that expressed the HSCs marker c-kit but not Thy1. Although we successfully isolated both cell types, OV6/CK19/Rab3b{sup +} cells fail to propagate while c-kit {sup +}-HSCs appeared to proliferate for up to 7 weeks. Cells formed clusters which expressed c-kit, Thy1 and albumin. Our results indicate that a bona fide oval progenitor cell population resides within the liver and is distinct from c-kit {sup +}-HSCs. Oval cells require the hepatic niche to proliferate, while cells mobilized from the circulation proliferate and transdifferentiate into hepatocytes without evidence of cell fusion.

  20. Differential effects of arsenic trioxide on chemosensitization in human hepatic tumor and stellate cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between malignant hepatocytes and the surrounding peritumoral stroma is a key modulator of hepatocarcinogenesis and therapeutic resistance. To examine the chemotherapy resistance of these two cellular compartments in vitro, we evaluated a well-established hepatic tumor cell line, HepG2, and an adult hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. The aim was to compare the chemosensitization potential of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in combination with sorafenib or fluorouracil (5-FU), in both hepatic tumor cells and stromal cells. Methods Cytotoxicity of ATO, 5-FU, and sorafenib, alone and in combination against HepG2 cells and LX2 cells was measured by an automated high throughput cell-based proliferation assay. Changes in survival and apoptotic signaling pathways were analyzed by flow cytometry and western blot. Gene expression of the 5-FU metabolic enzyme, thymidylate synthase, was analyzed by real time PCR. Results Both HepG2 and LX2 cell lines were susceptible to single agent sorafenib and ATO at 24 hr (ATO IC50: 5.3 μM in LX2; 32.7 μM in HepG2; Sorafenib IC50: 11.8 μM in LX2; 9.9 μM in HepG2). In contrast, 5-FU cytotoxicity required higher concentrations and prolonged (48–72 hr) drug exposure. Concurrent ATO and 5-FU treatment of HepG2 cells was synergistic, leading to increased cytotoxicity due in part to modulation of thymidylate synthase levels by ATO. Concurrent ATO and sorafenib treatment showed a trend towards increased HepG2 cytotoxicity, possibly due to a significant decrease in MAPK activation in comparison to treatment with ATO alone. Conclusions ATO differentially sensitizes hepatic tumor cells and adult hepatic stellate cells to 5-FU and sorafenib. Given the importance of both of these cell types in hepatocarcinogenesis, these data have implications for the rational development of anti-cancer therapy combinations for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:22963400

  1. Hepatic stem cells: A viable approach for the treatment of liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Habeeb, Md Aejaz; Vishwakarma, Sandeep Kumar; Bardia, Avinash; Khan, Aleem Ahmed

    2015-06-26

    Liver cirrhosis is characterized by distortion of liver architecture, necrosis of hepatocytes and regenerative nodules formation leading to cirrhosis. Various types of cell sources have been used for the management and treatment of decompensated liver cirrhosis. Knowledge of stem cells has offered a new dimension for regenerative therapy and has been considered as one of the potential adjuvant treatment modality in patients with end stage liver diseases (ESLD). Human fetal hepatic progenitor cells are less immunogenic than adult ones. They are highly propagative and challenging to cryopreservation. In our earlier studies we have demonstrated that fetuses at 10-18 wk of gestation age contain a large number of actively dividing hepatic stem and progenitor cells which possess bi-potent nature having potential to differentiate into bile duct cells and mature hepatocytes. Hepatic stem cell therapy for the treatment of ESLD is in their early stage of the translation. The emerging technology of decellularization and recellularization might offer a significant platform for developing bioengineered personalized livers to come over the scarcity of desired number of donor organs for the treatment of ESLD. Despite these significant advancements long-term tracking of stem cells in human is the most important subject nowadays in order to answer several unsettles issues regarding the route of delivery, the choice of stem cell type(s), the cell number and the time-point of cell delivery for the treatment in a chronic setting. Answering to these questions will further contribute to the development of safer, noninvasive, and repeatable imaging modalities that could discover better cell therapeutic approaches from bench to bed-side. Combinatorial approach of decellularization and nanotechnology could pave a way towards the better understanding in determination of cell fate post-transplantation. PMID:26131316

  2. Molecular Mimicry of Human Cytochrome P450 by Hepatitis C Virus at the Level of Cytotoxic T Cell Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, Andreas R.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Grabscheid, Benno; Hunziker, Isabelle P.; Kwappenberg, Kitty M.C.; Reichen, Jürg; Melief, Cornelis J.M.; Cerny, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 2, which is defined by the presence of type I antiliver kidney microsome autoantibodies directed mainly against cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 and by autoreactive liver infiltrating T cells. Virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) that recognize infected cells and contribute to viral clearance and tissue injury during HCV infection could be involved in the induction of AIH. To explore whether the antiviral cellular immunity may turn against self-antigens, we characterized the primary CTL response against an HLA-A*0201–restricted HCV-derived epitope, i.e., HCV core 178–187, which shows sequence homology with human CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 8–17. To determine the relevance of these homologies for the pathogenesis of HCV-associated AIH, we used synthetic peptides to induce primary CTL responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy blood donors and patients with chronic HCV infection. We found that the naive CTL repertoire of both groups contains cross-reactive CTLs inducible by the HCV peptide recognizing both CYP2A6 and CYP2A7 peptides as well as endogenously processed CYP2A6 protein. Importantly, we failed to induce CTLs with the CYP-derived peptides that showed a lower capacity to form stable complexes with the HLA-A2 molecule. These findings demonstrate the potential of HCV to induce autoreactive CD8+ CTLs by molecular mimicry, possibly contributing to virus-associated autoimmunity. PMID:10432280

  3. Intracellular calcium signals regulate growth of hepatic stellate cells via specific effects on cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Elwy M.; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Gomes, Dawidson Assis; Sheung, Nina; Yu, Jin; Amaya, Maria Jimina; Nathanson, Michael H.; Dranoff, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are important mediators of liver fibrosis. Hormones linked to downstream intracellular Ca2+ signals upregulate HSC proliferation, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. Nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ signals may have distinct effects on cell proliferation, so we expressed plasmid and adenoviral constructs containing the Ca2+ chelator parvalbumin (PV) linked to either a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES) to block Ca2+ signals in distinct compartments within LX-2 immortalized human HSC and primary rat HSC. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs each targeted to the appropriate intracellular compartment and blocked Ca2+ signals only within that compartment. PV-NLS and PV-NES constructs inhibited HSC growth. Furthermore, blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca2+ signals arrested growth at the G2/mitosis (G2/M) cell-cycle interface and prevented the onset of mitosis. Blockade of nuclear or cytosolic Ca2+ signals downregulated phosphorylation of the G2/M checkpoint phosphatase Cdc25C. Inhibition of calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) had identical effects on LX-2 growth and Cdc25C phosphorylation. We propose that nuclear and cytosolic Ca2+ are critical signals that regulate HSC growth at the G2/M checkpoint via CaMK II-mediated regulation of Cdc25C phosphorylation. These data provide a new logical target for pharmacological therapy directed against progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:19131107

  4. Hepatic carcinoma-associated fibroblasts induce IDO-producing regulatory dendritic cells through IL-6-mediated STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J-T; Deng, Y-N; Yi, H-M; Wang, G-Y; Fu, B-S; Chen, W-J; Liu, W; Tai, Y; Peng, Y-W; Zhang, Q

    2016-02-22

    Although carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironments have a critical role in immune cell modulation, their effects on the generation of regulatory dendritic cells (DCs) are still unclear. In this study, we initially show that CAFs derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors facilitate the generation of regulatory DCs, which are characterized by low expression of costimulatory molecules, high suppressive cytokines production and enhanced regulation of immune responses, including T-cell proliferation impairment and promotion of regulatory T-cell (Treg) expansion via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) upregulation. Our findings also indicate that STAT3 activation in DCs, as mediated by CAF-derived interleukin (IL)-6, is essential to IDO production. Moreover, IDO inhibitor, STAT3 and IL-6 blocking antibodies can reverse this hepatic CAF-DC regulatory function. Therefore, our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which CAFs induce tumor immune escape as well as a novel cancer immunotherapeutic approach (for example, targeting CAFs, IDO or IL-6).

  5. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS3 transforms NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuro, D; Furukawa, T; Takegami, T

    1995-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that hepatitis C virus (HCV) is etiologically involved in hepatic cancer and liver cirrhosis. To investigate whether the HCV nonstructural protein NS3 has oncogenic activity, NIH 3T3 cells were transfected with an expression vector containing cDNA for the 5'- or 3'-half sequence of the HCV genome segment encoding NS3. Only cells transfected with the 5'-half cDNA rapidly proliferated, lost contact inhibition, grew anchorage independently in soft agar, and formed tumors in nude mice. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of the 5'-half DNA in the transfectants. These results suggest that the 5' region of the HCV genome segment encoding NS3 is involved in cell transformation. PMID:7745741

  6. Discovery of cytoglobin and its roles in physiology and pathology of hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIZATO, Katsutoshi; THUY, Le Thi Thanh; SHIOTA, Goshi; KAWADA, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Cytoglobin (CYGB), a new member of the globin family, was discovered in 2001 as a protein associated with stellate cell activation (stellate cell activation-associated protein [STAP]). Knowledge of CYGB, including its crystal, gene, and protein structures as well as its physiological and pathological importance, has increased progressively. We investigated the roles of oxygen (O2)-binding CYGB as STAP in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to understand the part played by this protein in their pathophysiological activities. Studies involving CYGB-gene-deleted mice have led us to suppose that CYGB functions as a regulator of O2 homeostasis; when O2 homeostasis is disrupted, HSCs are activated and play a key role(s) in hepatic fibrogenesis. In this review, we discuss the rationale for this hypothesis. PMID:26972599

  7. NK Cells: A Double-Edged Sword in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maini, Mala K.; Peppa, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    There is natural enrichment of NK cells in the human liver and this intrahepatic predominance underscores their potential importance in the control of infections with hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis B virus (HBV). The contribution of innate components during chronic HBV infection has been a relatively under-investigated area. However, recent data have highlighted that NK cells are capable of exerting antiviral and immunoregulatory functions whilst also contributing to the pathogenesis of liver injury via death receptor pathways. We will present an overview of current knowledge regarding the complex biology of NK cells in the context of their antiviral versus pathogenic role in chronic hepatitis B as a clinically relevant avenue for further investigation. PMID:23459859

  8. Design, synthesis and evaluation of pyrazole derivatives as non-nucleoside hepatitis B virus inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haiyong; Bai, Fuxiang; Liu, Na; Liang, Xiaohong; Zhan, Peng; Ma, Chunhong; Jiang, Xuemei; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-11-10

    In continuation of our efforts toward the discovery of potent non-nucleoside hepatitis B virus (HBV) inhibitors with novel structures, we have employed bioisosterism and hybrid pharmacophore-based strategy to explore the chemically diverse space of bioactive compounds. In this article, the original thiazole platform was replaced with pyrazole scaffold to yield the optimal pharmacophore moieties in order to generate novel non-nucleoside HBV inhibitors with desirable potency. Some of the new compounds were able to inhibit HBV activity in the low micromolar range. In particular, compound 6a3 displayed the most potent activity against the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg with IC50 of 24.33 μM and 2.22 μM, respectively. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this new series of compounds was investigated, which may help designing more potent molecules.

  9. Calcium sensing receptor effects in adipocytes and liver cells: Implications for an adipose-hepatic crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Pia; Mattar, Pamela; D'Espessailles, Amanda; Arrese, Marco; Arreguin, Andrea; Fuentes, Cecilia; Reyes, Marcela; Cifuentes, Mariana

    2016-10-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in human adipose cells, and its activation may associate with adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction. We evaluated whether CaSR stimulation influences adipocyte triglyceride (TG) and fatty acid binding protein 4 (aP2) content, and hepatocyte TGs and proinflammatory cytokine expression. The effect of the calcimimetic cinacalcet on TGs (fluorimetry), lipogenic genes (qPCR) and aP2 (immunoblot) was evaluated in LS14 adipocytes or AT. In the human HepG2 hepatic cell line, we assessed CaSR expression and cinacalcet effect on TGs and lipogenic and proinflammatory genes. CaSR activation decreased adipocyte TG content by 20% and the expression of GPD and LPL by 34% and 20%, respectively. Cinacalcet increased aP2 protein expression by 60%. CaSR expression was shown in HepG2 cells and human liver samples. Cinacalcet-treated HepG2 cells in the presence of oleic acid exhibited a19% increased TG content. No changes were observed in the expression of lipogenic genes in HepG2 cells, however there was a 50%-300% elevation in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. CaSR activation in adipocytes may associate with decreased TG storage ability and increased aP2. Hepatic CaSR stimulation may elevate steatosis and proinflammatory factors. We propose that CaSR may contribute to obesity-associated hepatic metabolic consequences. PMID:27565442

  10. Equine peripheral blood-derived progenitors in comparison to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Jens; Nesic, Dobrila; Romero, Jose Diaz; Brehm, Walter; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Grogan, Shawn Patrick

    2006-06-01

    Fibroblast-like cells isolated from peripheral blood of human, canine, guinea pig, and rat have been demonstrated to possess the capacity to differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages. The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of isolating pluripotent precursor cells from equine peripheral blood and compare them with equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were used as a control for cell multipotency assessment. Venous blood (n = 33) and bone marrow (n = 5) were obtained from adult horses. Mononuclear cells were obtained by Ficoll gradient centrifugation and cultured in monolayer, and adherent fibroblast-like cells were tested for their differentiation potential. Chondrogenic differentiation was performed in serum-free medium in pellet cultures as a three-dimensional model, whereas osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation were induced in monolayer culture. Evidence for differentiation was made via biochemical, histological, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction evaluations. Fibroblast-like cells were observed on day 10 in 12 out of 33 samples and were allowed to proliferate until confluence. Equine peripheral blood-derived cells had osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation capacities comparable to cells derived from bone marrow. Both cell types showed a limited capacity to produce lipid droplets compared to human MSCs. This result may be due to the assay conditions, which are established for human MSCs from bone marrow and may not be optimal for equine progenitor cells. Bone marrow-derived equine and human MSCs could be induced to develop cartilage, whereas equine peripheral blood progenitors did not show any capacity to produce cartilage at the histological level. In conclusion, equine peripheral blood-derived fibroblast-like cells can differentiate into distinct mesenchymal lineages but have less multipotency than bone marrow-derived MSCs under the conditions used in this study.

  11. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  12. HNF4A is essential for specification of hepatic progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    DeLaForest, Ann; Nagaoka, Masato; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Noto, Fallon K.; Konopka, Genevieve; Battle, Michele A.; Duncan, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of pluripotent stem cells offers the possibility of using such cells to model hepatic disease and development. With this in mind, we previously established a protocol that facilitates the differentiation of both human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into cells that share many characteristics with hepatocytes. The use of highly defined culture conditions and the avoidance of feeder cells or embryoid bodies allowed synchronous and reproducible differentiation to occur. The differentiation towards a hepatocyte-like fate appeared to recapitulate many of the developmental stages normally associated with the formation of hepatocytes in vivo. In the current study, we addressed the feasibility of using human pluripotent stem cells to probe the molecular mechanisms underlying human hepatocyte differentiation. We demonstrate (1) that human embryonic stem cells express a number of mRNAs that characterize each stage in the differentiation process, (2) that gene expression can be efficiently depleted throughout the differentiation time course using shRNAs expressed from lentiviruses and (3) that the nuclear hormone receptor HNF4A is essential for specification of human hepatic progenitor cells by establishing the expression of the network of transcription factors that controls the onset of hepatocyte cell fate. PMID:21852396

  13. The hepatic sinusoid 'classic and contemporary’: a report on the 17th international symposium on cells of the hepatic sinusoid (ISCHS)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 17th ISCHS took place in Osaka, Japan, on 23 to 25 September 2013. This symposium focuses on an exchange of views on the structure and function of hepatic sinusoidal cells in addition to their roles in clinical pathophysiology. PMID:24484528

  14. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell lines, towards clinical quality.

    PubMed

    Hovatta, Outi

    2006-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells offer an excellent source of cells for transplantation in the treatment of severe diseases. To be clinically safe, the lines have to be derived using strict quality criteria and good manufacturing practice. Animal proteins are immunogenic and may contain microbes, and they should not be used in establishing or propagating hES cells. Derivation systems have been improved towards clinical quality by establishing all 25 hES cell lines using human skin fibroblasts as feeder cells instead of mouse fibroblasts. A further 21 cell lines have been established using synthetic serum instead of fetal calf serum in the medium. In the five latest derivations, the inner cell mass was isolated mechanically instead of by immunosurgery (animal antibodies). Feeder-free derivation would be optimal, but it is not yet considered safe. Clinical-quality lines can be derived by establishing the skin fibroblast feeders in the good manufacturing practice laboratory with human serum in the medium, and by establishing the hES cells on such feeders. In this process, a serum replacement that contains only human protein can be used, the inner cell mass has to be isolated mechanically, and the colonies have to be split mechanically for passaging. Somatic cell nuclear transfer would help to overcome rejection of transplanted cells. PMID:17147930

  15. Apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat hepatocyte cell lines expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S.; Miller, T.; Cornman, G.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Three well differentiated SV40-immortalized rat hepatocyte cell lines, CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14, and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-producing cell lines derived from them were examined for sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14 cells were co-transfected with a DNA construct containing a dimer of the HBV genome and the neo gene and selected in G418 to generate stable cell lines. Characterization of these cell lines indicated that they contain integrated HBV DNA, contain low molecular weight HBV DNA compatible with the presence of HBV replication intermediates, express HBV transcripts, and produce HBV proteins. The viability of CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV2 cells was not significantly altered when they were treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations as high as 20,000 U/ml. The HBV-expressing CWSV1 cell line, SV1di36, and the HBV-expressing CWSV14 cell line, SV14di208, were also not killed when treated with TNF-alpha. However, the HBV-expressing CWSV2 cell line, SV2di366, was extensively killed when treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations ranging from 200 to 20,000 U/ml. Analysis of several different HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines indicated that TNF-alpha killing depended upon the level of HBV expression. The TNF-alpha-induced cell killing in high HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines was accompanied by the presence of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8774135

  16. Technical Challenges in the Derivation of Human Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noisa, Parinya; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2011-01-01

    It has long been discovered that human pluripotent cells could be isolated from the blastocyst state of embryos and called human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). These cells can be adapted and propagated indefinitely in culture in an undifferentiated manner as well as differentiated into cell representing the three major germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. However, the derivation of human pluripotent cells from donated embryos is limited and restricted by ethical concerns. Therefore, various approaches have been explored and proved their success. Human pluripotent cells can also be derived experimentally by the nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), cell fusion and overexpression of pluripotent genes. In this paper, we discuss the technical challenges of these approaches for nuclear reprogramming, involving their advantages and limitations. We will also highlight the possible applications of these techniques in the study of stem cell biology. PMID:21776284

  17. Derivation of three new human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Cara K; Chami, Omar; Peura, Teija T; Bosman, Alexis; Dumevska, Biljana; Schmidt, Uli; Stojanov, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells capable of extensive self-renewal and differentiation to all cells of the embryo proper. Here, we describe the derivation and characterization of three Sydney IVF human embryonic stem cell lines not already reported elsewhere, designated SIVF001, SIVF002, and SIVF014. The cell lines display typical compact colony morphology of embryonic stem cells, have stable growth rates over more than 40 passages and are cytogenetically normal. Furthermore, the cell lines express pluripotency markers including Nanog, Oct4, SSEA3 and Tra-1-81, and are capable of generating teratoma cells derived from each of the three germ layers in immunodeficient mice. These experiments show that the cell lines constitute pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20198447

  18. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Lee, Won Hee; Snyder, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC–derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC–ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31+ population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC–ECs maintained a higher CD31+ population than FB-iPSC–ECs and CPC-iPSC–ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation. PMID:27398408

  19. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by quercetin in human hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhikui; Sun, Ge; Guo, Wei; Huang, Yayun; Sun, Weihua; Zhao, Fei; Hu, Kanghong

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most serious and prevalent viral diseases in the world. Although several anti-HBV drugs have been used clinically, their side and adverse effects limit treatment efficacy. Therefore, it is necessary to identify novel potential anti-HBV agents. The flavonol quercetin has shown activity against some retroviruses, but its effect on HBV remains unclear. In the present study, quercetin was incubated with HepG2.2.15 cells, as well as HuH-7 cells transfected with an HBV plasmid. Quercetin was shown to significantly reduce Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), secretion and HBV genomic DNA levels in both cell lines. In addition, co-incubation with lamivudine (3TC), entecavir (ETV), or adefovir (Ade) further enhanced the quercetin-induced inhibition of HBV replication. This inhibition was partially associated with decreased heat shock proteins and HBV transcription levels. The results indicate that quercetin inhibited HBV antigen secretion and genome replication in human hepatoma cell lines, which suggests that quercetin may be a potentially effective anti-HBV agent.

  20. Metadoxine prevents damage produced by ethanol and acetaldehyde in hepatocyte and hepatic stellate cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Ruiz, M C; Bucio, L; Correa, A; Souza, V; Hernández, E; Gómez-Quiroz, L E; Kershenobich, D

    2001-11-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to improve liver function tests in alcoholic patients. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on some parameters of cellular damage in hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells in culture treated with ethanol and acetaldehyde. HepG2 and CFSC-2G cells were treated with 50 mM ethanol or 175 microM acetaldehyde as initial concentration in the presence or absence of 10 microg ml(-1) of metadoxine. Twenty-four hours later reduced and oxidized glutathione content, lipid peroxidation damage, collagen secretion and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF- alpha secretion were determined. Our results suggest that metadoxine prevents glutathione depletion and the increase in lipid peroxidation damage caused by ethanol and acetaldehyde in HepG2 cells. In hepatic stellate cells, metadoxine prevents the increase in collagen and attenuated TNF- alpha secretion caused by acetaldehyde. Thus, metadoxine could be useful in preventing the damage produced in early stages of alcoholic liver disease as it prevents the redox imbalance of the hepatocytes and prevents TNF- alpha induction, one of the earliest events in hepatic damage. PMID:11712874

  1. Novel fullerene derivatives as dual inhibitors of Hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase and NS3/4A protease.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroki; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nakamura, Shigeo; Mashino, Tadahiko

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase and HCV NS3/4A protease inhibition activities of a new set of proline-type fullerene derivatives. All of the compounds had the potential to inhibit both the enzymes, indicating that the fullerene derivatives may be dual inhibitors against NS5B and NS3/4A and could be novel lead compounds for the treatment of HCV infections. PMID:27597249

  2. Biology of the Adult Hepatic Progenitor Cell: “Ghosts in the Machine”

    PubMed Central

    Darwiche, Houda; Petersen, Bryon E.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews some of the basic biological principles governing adult progenitor cells of the liver and the mechanisms by which they operate. If scientists were better able to understand the conditions that govern stem cell mechanics in the liver, it may be possible to apply that understanding in a clinical setting for use in the treatment or cure of human pathologies. This chapter gives a basic introduction to hepatic progenitor cell biology and explores what is known about progenitor cell-mediated liver regeneration. We also discuss the putative stem cell niche in the liver, as well as the signaling pathways involved in stem cell regulation. Finally, the isolation and clinical application of stem cells to human diseases is reviewed, along with the current thoughts on the relationship between stem cells and cancer. PMID:21074735

  3. Regulation of TREM expression in hepatic macrophages and endothelial cells during acute endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li C; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Gordon, Marion K; Laskin, Debra L

    2008-04-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) regulates inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In these studies, we analyzed the expression of TREM in hepatic macrophages and endothelial cells which play a central role in LPS clearance. LPS administration to C3H/HeOuJ mice resulted in a rapid induction of TREM-1 and TREM-3, but a decrease in TREM-2 in liver macrophages and endothelial cells. The observation that TREM family members are detectable in endothelial cells is novel and demonstrates that their expression is not limited to myeloid cells. LPS-induced alterations in TREM expression were not evident in cells from C3H/HeJ TLR-4 mutant mice, indicating that the response is dependent on TLR-4. IL-1beta and TNFalpha upregulated TREM-1 and TREM-3 expression and suppressed TREM-2 expression in macrophages and endothelial cells. This activity involved PI3-kinase and p38 MAP kinase signaling. Interestingly, no significant differences were noted in TREM expression between wild-type and TNFR1-/- mice treated with LPS. Treatment of macrophages and endothelial cells with LPS upregulated expression of nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). This was blocked by TREM-1 Fc/fusion protein, indicating that TREM-1 mediates LPS-induced NOS-2 expression. These results suggest that TREM proteins are important in the inflammatory response of hepatic macrophages and endothelial cells to acute endotoxemia. PMID:18222421

  4. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  5. Adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 attenuates cell viability but does not preserve the stem cell like phenotype of hepatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Genz, Berit; Thomas, Maria; Pützer, Brigitte M.; Siatkowski, Marcin; Fuellen, Georg; Vollmar, Brigitte; Abshagen, Kerstin

    2014-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are well known initiators of hepatic fibrosis. After liver cell damage, HSC transdifferentiate into proliferative myofibroblasts, representing the major source of extracellular matrix in the fibrotic organ. Recent studies also demonstrate a role of HSC as progenitor or stem cell like cells in liver regeneration. Lhx2 is described as stem cell maintaining factor in different organs and as an inhibitory transcription factor in HSC activation. Here we examined whether a continuous expression of Lhx2 in HSC could attenuate their activation and whether Lhx2 could serve as a potential target for antifibrotic gene therapy. Therefore, we evaluated an adenoviral mediated overexpression of Lhx2 in primary HSC and investigated mRNA expression patterns by qRT-PCR as well as the activation status by different in vitro assays. HSC revealed a marked increase in activation markers like smooth muscle actin alpha (αSMA) and collagen 1α independent from adenoviral transduction. Lhx2 overexpression resulted in attenuated cell viability as shown by a slightly hampered migratory and contractile phenotype of HSC. Expression of stem cell factors or signaling components was also unaffected by Lhx2. Summarizing these results, we found no antifibrotic or stem cell maintaining effect of Lhx2 overexpression in primary HSC. - Highlights: • We performed adenoviral overexpression of Lhx2 in primary hepatic stellate cells. • Hepatic stellate cells expressed stem cell markers during cultivation. • Cell migration and contractility was slightly hampered upon Lhx2 overexpression. • Lhx2 overexpression did not affect stem cell character of hepatic stellate cells.

  6. Novel Management of Acute or Secondary Biliary Liver Conditions Using Hepatically Differentiated Human Dental Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Imai, Toshio; Tanaka, Tomoko; Fushimi, Naho; Mitev, Vanyo; Okada, Mio; Tominaga, Noriko; Ono, Sachie; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The current definitive treatment for acute or chronic liver condition, that is, cirrhosis, is liver transplantation from a limited number of donors, which might cause complications after donation. Hence, bone marrow stem cell transplantation has been developed, but the risk of carcinogenesis remains. We have recently developed a protocol for hepatic differentiation of CD117+ stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED). In the present study, we examine whether SHED hepatically differentiated (hd) in vitro could be used to treat acute liver injury (ALI) and secondary biliary cirrhosis. The CD117+ cell fraction was magnetically separated from SHED and then differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. The cells were transplanted into rats with either ALI or induced secondary biliary cirrhosis. Engraftment of human liver cells was determined immunohistochemically and by in situ hybridization. Recovery of liver function was examined by means of histochemical and serological tests. Livers of transplanted animals were strongly positive for human immunohistochemical factors, and in situ hybridization confirmed engraftment of human hepatocytes. The tests for recovery of liver function confirmed the presence of human hepatic markers in the animals' blood serum and lack of fibrosis and functional integration of transplanted human cells into livers. No evidence of malignancy was found. We show that in vitro hdSHED engraft morphologically and functionally into the livers of rats having acute injury or secondary biliary cirrhosis. SHED are readily accessible adult stem cells, capable of proliferating in large numbers before differentiating in vitro. This makes SHED an appropriate and safe stem cell source for regenerative medicine. PMID:25234861

  7. Design, synthesis, assessment, and molecular docking of novel pyrrolopyrimidine (7-deazapurine) derivatives as non-nucleoside hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mosaad S; Sayed, Amira I; Khedr, Mohammed A; Soror, Sameh H

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly persistent and presents an unmet medical need requiring more effective treatment options. This has spurred intensive efforts to discover novel anti-HCV agents. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), NS5B of HCV, constitutes a selective target for drug discovery due to its absence in human cells; also, it is the centerpiece for viral replication. Here, we synthesized novel pyrrole, pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine and pyrrolo[3,2-e][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]pyrimidine derivatives. The non-toxic doses of these compounds on Huh 7.5 cell line were determined and their antiviral activity against HCVcc genotype 4a was examined. Compounds 7j, 7f, 5c, 12i and 12f showed significant anti HCV activity. The percent of reduction for the non-toxic doses of 7j, 7f, 5c, 12i and 12f were 90%, 76.7±5.8%, 73.3±5.8%, 70% and 63.3±5.8%, respectively. The activity of these compounds was interpreted by molecular docking against HCV NS5B polymerase enzyme. PMID:27052365

  8. Advances in hepatic stem/progenitor cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Stefaan; Best, Jan; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Dollé, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The liver is famous for its strong regenerative capacity, employing different modes of regeneration according to type and extent of injury. Mature liver cells are able to proliferate in order to replace the damaged tissue allowing the recovery of the parenchymal function. In more severe scenarios hepatocytes are believed to arise also from a facultative liver progenitor cell compartment. In human, severe acute liver failure and liver cirrhosis are also both important clinical targets in which regeneration is impaired, where the role of this stem cell compartment seems more convincing. In animal models, the current state of ambiguity regarding the identity and role of liver progenitor cells in liver physiology dampens the enthusiasm for the potential use of these cells in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to give the basics of liver progenitor cell biology and discuss recent results vis-à-vis their identity and contribution to liver regeneration. PMID:26600740

  9. Endogenous hepatitis C virus homolog fragments in European rabbit and hare genomes replicate in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Silva, Eliane; Marques, Sara; Osório, Hugo; Carvalheira, Júlio; Thompson, Gertrude

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS) proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and hare (Lepus europaeus) genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM) using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity.

  10. Endogenous Hepatitis C Virus Homolog Fragments in European Rabbit and Hare Genomes Replicate in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Eliane; Marques, Sara; Osório, Hugo; Carvalheira, Júlio; Thompson, Gertrude

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS) proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and hare (Lepus europaeus) genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM) using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity. PMID:23185448

  11. Influence of 4-hydroxynonenal and spleen cells on primary hepatocyte culture and a novel liver-derived cell line resembling hepatocyte stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cipak, Ana; Borovic, Suzana; Jaganjac, Morana; Bresgen, Nikolaus; Kirac, Iva; Grbesa, Ivana; Mrakovcic, Lidija; Cindric, Marina; Scukanec-Spoljar, Mira; Gall-Troselj, Koraljka; Coric, Marijana; Eckl, Peter; Zarkovic, Neven

    2010-01-01

    Liver is a unique mammalian organ with a great capacity of regeneration related to its function. After surgical resection or injury, hepatic cells, especially hepatocytes, can proliferate rapidly to repair the damage and to regenerate the structure without affecting the function of the liver. Loss of catalase activity during regeneration indicates that oxidative stress is present in the liver not only in pathological conditions but also as a 'physiological' factor during regeneration. As we have shown in our previous work, liver stem cell-like cells treated with 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a cytotoxic and growth regulating lipid peroxidation product, recover in the presence of spleen cells. In the current study we characterized this novel cell line as liver-derived progenitor/oval-like cells, (LDP/OCs), i.e. functional liver stem-like cells. We showed that LDP/OC were OV6 positive, with abundant glycogen content in the cytoplasm and expressed alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, biliverdin reductase and gamma-glutamyl transferase. Also, we compared their growth in vitro with the growth of cultured primary hepatocytes stressed with HNE and co-cultured with autologous spleen cells. The influence of spleen cells on HNE-treated primary hepatocytes and on LDP/OCs showed that spleen cells support in a similar manner the recovery of both types of liver cells indicating their important role in regeneration. Hence, LDP/OC cells may provide a valuable tool to study cell interactions and the role on HNE in liver regeneration.

  12. Kupffer cells modulate hepatic fatty acid oxidation during infection with PR8 influenza.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N; Singh, Larry N; Chatterji-Len, Milani; Zerfas, Patricia M; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; McGuire, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    In response to infection, patients with inborn errors of metabolism may develop a functional deterioration termed metabolic decompensation. The biochemical hallmarks of this disruption of metabolic homeostasis are disease specific and may include acidosis, hyperammonemia or hypoglycemia. In a model system previously published by our group, we noted that during influenza infection, mice displayed a depression in hepatic mitochondrial enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that this normal adaptation may extend to other metabolic pathways, and as such, may impact various inborn errors of metabolism. Since the liver is a critical organ in inborn errors of metabolism, we carried out untargeted metabolomic profiling of livers using mass spectrometry in C57Bl/6 mice infected with influenza to characterize metabolic adaptation. Pathway analysis of metabolomic data revealed reductions in CoA synthesis, and long chain fatty acyl CoA and carnitine species. These metabolic adaptations coincided with a depression in hepatic long chain β-oxidation mRNA and protein. To our surprise, the metabolic changes observed occurred in conjunction with a hepatic innate immune response, as demonstrated by transcriptional profiling and flow cytometry. By employing an immunomodulation strategy to deplete Kupffer cells, we were able to improve the expression of multiple genes involved in β-oxidation. Based on these findings, we are the first to suggest that the role of the liver as an immunologic organ is central in the pathophysiology of hepatic metabolic decompensation in inborn errors of metabolism due to respiratory viral infection.

  13. Corona-directed nucleic acid delivery into hepatic stellate cells for liver fibrosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengping; Wang, Chunming; Zha, Yinhe; Hu, Wei; Gao, Zhongfei; Zang, Yuhui; Chen, Jiangning; Zhang, Junfeng; Dong, Lei

    2015-03-24

    Strategies to modify nanoparticles with biological ligands for targeted drug delivery in vivo have been widely studied but met with limited clinical success. A possible reason is that, in the blood circulation, serum proteins could rapidly form a layer of protein "corona" on the vehicle surface, which might block the modified ligands and hamper their targeting functions. We speculate that strategies for drug delivery can be designed based upon elegant control of the corona formation on the vehicle surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate a retinol-conjugated polyetherimine (RcP) nanoparticle system that selectively recruited the retinol binding protein 4 (RBP) in its corona components. RBP was found to bind retinol, and direct the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)-laden RcP carrier to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which play essential roles in the progression of hepatic fibrosis. In both mouse fibrosis models, induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and bile duct ligation (BDL), respectively, the ASO-laden RcP particles effectively suppressed the expression of type I collagen (collagen I), and consequently ameliorated hepatic fibrosis. Such findings suggest that this delivery system, designed to exploit the power of corona proteins, can serve as a promising tool for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  14. Geniposide Suppresses Hepatic Glucose Production via AMPK in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Zheng, Xuxu; Liu, Jianhui; Yin, Zhongyi

    2016-01-01

    Geniposide is one of the main compounds in Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS and has many pharmacological activities, but its anti-hyperglycemic activity has not yet been fully explored. This study was designed to determine, for the first time, how geniposide from G. jasminoides regulates hepatic glucose production, and the underlying mechanisms. During in vitro study, we found the inhibitory effect of geniposide on the hepatic glucose production is partly through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HepG2 cells. Geniposide significantly inhibited hepatic glucose production in a dose-dependent manner. AMPK, acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACC) and forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1) phosphorylation were stimulated by different concentrations of geniposide. In addition, the enzyme activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) were all significantly suppressed. What is important is that these effects were partly reversed by (1) inhibition of AMPK activity by compound C, a selective AMPK inhibitor, and by (2) suppression of AMPKα expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA). In summary, geniposide potentially ameliorates hyperglycemia through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by modulation of the AMPK-FoxO1 signaling pathway. Geniposide or geniposide-containing medicinal plants could represent a promising therapeutic agent to prevent type 2 diabetes on gluconeogenesis. PMID:26830672

  15. Dynamic metabolic change is indicative of inflammation-induced transformation of hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Liu, Fan; Han, Rong; Luo, George; Cathopoulis, Terry; Lu, Kun; Li, Xiao; Yang, Ling; Liu, Guo-Yan; Cai, Jian-Chun; Shi, Song-Lin

    2015-09-01

    The observation that prolonged inflammation plays a causative role in cancer development has been well documented. However, an incremental process that leads from healthy to malignant phenotypes has not yet been described. Experimentally induced hepatocellular carcinoma is considered one of the representative laboratory models for studying this process. Hepatic exposure to viral infection or toxic reagents leads to chronic inflammation and gradual transformation into hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we present metabolomic profiles of hepatic cells at different stages during inflammation-induced cellular transformation by N-nitrosodiethylamine. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we quantitatively assessed the changes in cellular metabolites during the transformation process in hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Further pathway analysis of the differentially expressed metabolites showed that carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism were greatly altered in hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, respectively. Additionally, the enhanced inflammation in cirrhosis was associated with a shift from carbohydrate metabolism to lipid and amino acid metabolism. Among the differentially expressed metabolites found in diseased mouse livers, d-glucose and d-mannitol showed the most significant changes, highlighting them as potential early-diagnostic biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma development. Taken together, these investigations into the dynamic metabolic changes that occur during the precancerous stages of hepatocellular carcinoma add to and refine understanding of how chronic inflammation ultimately leads to cancer. Furthermore, the findings set the stage for identifying metabolites that may serve as early-diagnostic indicators of these unfolding events.

  16. Oleoylethanolamide, an endogenous PPAR-α ligand, attenuates liver fibrosis targeting hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junde; Li, Lei; Zheng, Zihan; Ren, Jie; Qiu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), an endocannabinoid-like molecule, was revealed to modulate lipid metabolism through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) mediated mechanism. In present study, we further investigated the activities and mechanisms of OEA in ameliorating hepatic fibrosis in Sv/129 mice induced by a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet or thioacetamide (TAA) treatment. Liver fibrosis development was assessed by Hematoxylin-eosin and Sirius red staining. Treatment with OEA (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal injection, i.p.) significantly attenuated the progress of liver fibrosis in both two experimental animal models by blocking the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Gene expression analysis of hepatic tissues indicated that OEA inhibited the expression of α-smooth muscle action (α-SMA) and collagen matrix, fibrosis markers, and genes involved in inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. In vitro studies showed that OEA inhibited transforming growth factor β1-stimulated HSCs activation through suppressing Smad2/3 phosphorylation, α-SMA expression and myofibroblast transformation. These improvements could not be observed in PPAR-α knockout mice models with OEA administration, which suggested all the anti-fibrotic effects of OEA in vivo and in vitro were mediated by PPAR-α activation. Collectively, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on modulating hepatic fibrosis development through the inhibition of HSCs activation in liver and therefore may be a potential therapeutic agent for liver fibrosis. PMID:26729705

  17. Lost in translation: pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mania; Liebhaber, Steffi; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Lachmann, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) such as embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells represent a promising cell type to gain novel insights into human biology. Understanding the differentiation process of PSCs in vitro may allow for the identification of cell extrinsic/intrinsic factors, driving the specification process toward all cell types of the three germ layers, which may be similar to the human in vivo scenario. This would not only lay the ground for an improved understanding of human embryonic development but would also contribute toward the generation of novel cell types used in cell replacement therapies. In this line, especially the developmental process of mesodermal cells toward the hematopoietic lineage is of great interest. Therefore, this review highlights recent progress in the field of hematopoietic specification of pluripotent stem cell sources. In addition, we would like to shed light on emerging factors controlling primitive and definitive hematopoietic development and to highlight recent approaches to improve the differentiation potential of PSC sources toward hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. While the generation of fully defined hematopoietic stem cells from PSCs remains challenging in vitro, we here underline the instructive role of cell extrinsic factors such as cytokines for the generation of PSC-derived mature hematopoietic cells. Thus, we have comprehensively examined the role of cytokines for the derivation of mature hematopoietic cell types such as macrophages, granulocytes, megakaryocytes, erythrocytes, dendritic cells, and cells of the B- and T-cell lineage. PMID:26174486

  18. Advances in Liver Regeneration: Revisiting Hepatic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Their Origin.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Ali-Reza; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    The liver has evolved to become a highly plastic organ with extraordinary regenerative capabilities. What drives liver regeneration is still being debated. Adult liver stem/progenitor cells have been characterized and used to produce functional hepatocytes and biliary cells in vitro. However, in vivo, numerous studies have questioned whether hepatic progenitor cells have a significant role in liver regeneration. Mature hepatocytes have recently been shown to be more plastic than previously believed and give rise to new hepatocytes after acute and chronic injury. In this review, we discuss current knowledge in the field of liver regeneration and the importance of the serotonin pathway as a clinical target for patients with liver dysfunction.

  19. Insulin stimulates the generation from hepatic plasma membranes of modulators derived from an inositol glycolipid.

    PubMed Central

    Saltiel, A R; Cuatrecasas, P

    1986-01-01

    Insulin binding to plasma membrane receptors results in the generation of substances that acutely mimic the actions of the hormone on certain target enzymes. Two such substances, which modulate the activity of the high-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17), have been purified from hepatic plasma membranes. The two have similar properties and activities but can be resolved by ion-exchange chromatography and high-voltage electrophoresis. They exhibit a net negative charge, even at pH 1.9, and an apparent molecular weight of approximately 1400. The generation of these substances from membranes by insulin can be reproduced by addition of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C purified from Staphylococcus aureus. This enzyme is known to selectively hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol and release from membranes several proteins that are covalently linked to phosphatidylinositol by a glycan anchor. Both enzyme-modulating substances appear to be generated by the phosphodiesterase cleavage of a phosphatidylinositol-containing glycolipid precursor that has been characterized by thin-layer chromatography. Some of the chemical properties of these substances have been examined. They appear to be related complex carbohydrate-phosphate substances containing glucosamine and inositol. These findings suggest that insulin may activate a selective phospholipase activity that hydrolyzes a membrane phospholipid, releasing a carbohydrate-containing molecule that regulates cAMP phosphodiesterase and perhaps other insulin-sensitive enzymes. PMID:3016721

  20. Hepatic circadian clock oscillators and nuclear receptors integrate microbiome-derived signals

    PubMed Central

    Montagner, Alexandra; Korecka, Agata; Polizzi, Arnaud; Lippi, Yannick; Blum, Yuna; Canlet, Cécile; Tremblay-Franco, Marie; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Burcelin, Rémy; Yen, Yi-Chun; Je, Hyunsoo Shawn; Maha, Al-Asmakh; Mithieux, Gilles; Arulampalam, Velmurugesan; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Guillou, Hervé; Pettersson, Sven; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a key organ of metabolic homeostasis with functions that oscillate in response to food intake. Although liver and gut microbiome crosstalk has been reported, microbiome-mediated effects on peripheral circadian clocks and their output genes are less well known. Here, we report that germ-free (GF) mice display altered daily oscillation of clock gene expression with a concomitant change in the expression of clock output regulators. Mice exposed to microbes typically exhibit characterized activities of nuclear receptors, some of which (PPARα, LXRβ) regulate specific liver gene expression networks, but these activities are profoundly changed in GF mice. These alterations in microbiome-sensitive gene expression patterns are associated with daily alterations in lipid, glucose, and xenobiotic metabolism, protein turnover, and redox balance, as revealed by hepatic metabolome analyses. Moreover, at the systemic level, daily changes in the abundance of biomarkers such as HDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, FGF21, bilirubin, and lactate depend on the microbiome. Altogether, our results indicate that the microbiome is required for integration of liver clock oscillations that tune output activators and their effectors, thereby regulating metabolic gene expression for optimal liver function. PMID:26879573

  1. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  2. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen.

    PubMed

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  3. Altered effector functions of NK cells in chronic hepatitis C are associated with IFNL3 polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rogalska-Taranta, Magdalena; Markova, Antoaneta A; Taranta, Andrzej; Lunemann, Sebastian; Schlaphoff, Verena; Flisiak, Robert; Manns, Michael P; Cornberg, Markus; Kraft, Anke R M; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    Interferon α-mediated effector functions of NK cells may contribute to the control of HCV replication and the pathogenesis of liver disease. The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs12979860 near IFNL3 (previously known as IL28B) is important in response to IFN-α treatment and in spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C. The role of the IFNL3 polymorphism in NK cell function is unclear. Thus, we investigated the role of IFNL3 polymorphism in type I IFN-dependent regulation of NK cell functions in patients with cHC and healthy control subjects. We demonstrated a marked polarization of NK cells toward cytotoxicity in response to IFN-α stimulation in patients with hepatitis C. That TRAIL up-regulation was present, particularly in patients with the IFNL3-TT allele, was supported by a shift in the pSTAT-1:pSTAT-4 ratios toward pSTAT-1. In patients bearing the IFNL3-TT allele, NK cell effector function correlated with liver disease activity. In contrast, higher cytokine production of NK cells was observed in healthy individuals with the IFNL3-CC genotype, which may support spontaneous HCV clearance in acute infection. Overall, these findings show that the role of NK cells may differ in chronic infection vs. early antiviral defense and that the IFNL3 genotype differentially influences NK cell function. PMID:26034208

  4. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system.

  5. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  6. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system.

  7. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  8. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, Tina L.; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M.; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, i.e. dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. Here, we report that murine liver DCs co-localize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MIP1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared to that of either cell population alone. Co-culture also resulted in enhanced expression of co-stimulatory (CD80, CD86) and co-inhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MIP1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and in part on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent up-regulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity. PMID:22962681

  9. Dietary fatty acids modulate antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong; Webb, Tonya; Potter, James J.; Oelke, Mathias; Li, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids are major contributors to the development and progression of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Dietary fatty acids also alter hepatic NKT cells that are activated by antigens presented by CD1d. In the current study, we examine the mechanism of dietary fatty acid induced hepatic NKT cell deficiency and its causal relationship to insulin resistance and NAFLD. We discover that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), but not polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cause hepatic NKT cell depletion with increased apoptosis. Dietary SFA or MUFA also impair hepatocyte presentation of endogenous, but not exogenous, antigen to NKT cells, indicating alterations of the endogenous antigen processing or presenting pathway. In vitro treatment of normal hepatocytes with fatty acids also demonstrates impaired ability of CD1d to present endogenous antigen by dietary fatty acids. Furthermore, dietary SFA and MUFA activate the NFκB signaling pathway and lead to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, both dietary SFA and MUFA alter endogenous antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells and contribute to NKT cell depletion, leading to further activation of inflammatory signaling, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. PMID:20185414

  10. Upregulation of MiR-122 via Trichostatin A Treatments in Hepatocyte-like Cells Derived from Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Effat; Eslaminejad, MohamadReza Baghaban; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Sadeghi, Zohre; Abasi, Mozghan; Herizchi, Roya; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-02-01

    The miR-122 is a tissue-specific miRNA; its expression is abundant in liver. MiR-122 upregulation is crucial for differentiation, functionality, and maintenance of differentiated phenotype in hepatocytes. The improving effects of trichostatin A (TSA) on hepatic differentiation have been reported previously. The aim of this study was to determine whether TSA can affect the expression of miR-122 in hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) generated from human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSCs). The hepatic differentiation of hAT-MSCs induced by a mixture of growth factors and cytokines either with or without TSA treatments. The functionality of HLCs generated with or without TSA and the expression levels of miR-122 were studied. The expression levels of miR-122 in TSA-treated HLCs was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those generated by growth factors and cytokines, only. The downregulation of a-fetoprotein (AFP) levels but enhanced albumin synthesis (p < 0.05) and upregulation of liver-enriched transcription factors (LETFs) HNF4α (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α) and HNF6 (hepatocyte nuclear factor 6) were observed in TSA-treated HLCs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, administration of TSA in hepatogenic differentiation of hAT-MSCs resulted in higher expression levels of miR-122, facilitation of differentiation, and subsequently attenuation of AFP levels.

  11. LPS-TLR4 Pathway Mediates Ductular Cell Expansion in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Odena, Gemma; Chen, Jiegen; Lozano, Juan Jose; Altamirano, Jose; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affo, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Matsushita, Hiroshi; Zou, Jian; Dumitru, Raluca; Caballeria, Juan; Gines, Pere; Arroyo, Vicente; You, Min; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique; Crews, Fulton; Seki, Ekihiro; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Bataller, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most severe form of alcoholic liver disease for which there are no effective therapies. Patients with AH show impaired hepatocyte proliferation, expansion of inefficient ductular cells and high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels. It is unknown whether LPS mediates ductular cell expansion. We performed transcriptome studies and identified keratin 23 (KRT23) as a new ductular cell marker. KRT23 expression correlated with mortality and LPS serum levels. LPS-TLR4 pathway role in ductular cell expansion was assessed in human and mouse progenitor cells, liver slices and liver injured TLR4 KO mice. In AH patients, ductular cell expansion correlated with portal hypertension and collagen expression. Functional studies in ductular cells showed that KRT23 regulates collagen expression. These results support a role for LPS-TLR4 pathway in promoting ductular reaction in AH. Maneuvers aimed at decreasing LPS serum levels in AH patients could have beneficial effects by preventing ductular reaction development. PMID:27752144

  12. Permissivity of primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines to support hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Garrick K; Farquhar, Michelle J; Meredith, Luke; Dhawan, Anil; Mitry, Ragai; Balfe, Peter; McKeating, Jane A

    2015-06-01

    The major cell type supporting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the hepatocyte; however, most reports studying viral entry and replication utilize transformed hepatoma cell lines. We demonstrate that HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) infect primary hepatocytes with comparable rates to hepatoma cells, demonstrating the limited variability in donor hepatocytes to support HCV receptor-glycoprotein-dependent entry. In contrast, we observed a 2-log range in viral replication between the same donor hepatocytes. We noted that cell proliferation augments pseudoparticle reporter activity and arresting hepatoma cells yields comparable levels of infection to hepatocytes. This study demonstrates comparable rates of HCVpp entry into primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cells, validating the use of transformed cells as a model system to study HCV entry. PMID:25667327

  13. Molecular anatomy of mouse hepatitis virus persistence: coevolution of increased host cell resistance and virus virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Baric, R S

    1996-01-01

    Persistent infection of murine astrocytoma (DBT) cells with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) has been established. From this in vitro virus-host system, persistence is mediated at the level of cellular MHV receptor (MHVR) expression and increased virus virulence. MHV persistence selects for resistant host cell populations which abate virus replication. Reductions in MHVR expression were significantly associated with increased host resistance, and transfection of MHVR into resistant host cells completely restored the capacity of cells to support efficient replication of MHV strain A59. The emergence of resistant host cells coselected for variant viruses that had increased avidity for MHVR and also recognized different receptors for entry into resistant cells. These data illustrate that MHV persistence in vitro provides a model to identify critical sites of virus-host interaction at the cellular level which are altered during the evolution of host cell resistance to viral infection and the coevolution of virus virulence. PMID:8648732

  14. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Driven Alpha Fetoprotein Expression to Promote Malignant Behaviors of Normal Liver Cells and Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingyue; Lu, Yan; Li, Wei; Guo, Junli; Dong, Xu; Lin, Bo; Chen, Yi; Xie, Xieju; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The infection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is closely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC), HBV-X protein(HBx) is able to induce expression of alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) in normal liver cells, and AFP harbors a function to promote malignant transformation of normal liver cells, but the role AFP playing in malignant behaviors of HCC cells is still unclear. Methods: Fifty-six liver tissue samples were collected from the clinical patients through hepatectomy(include normal liver tissues, HBV-related hepatitis liver tissues and HBV-related HCC tissues), and diagnosis of these tissues by pathology section, expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 were evidenced by immunohisochemical staining and Western blotting; The proliferation of human normal liver cells line L-02 cells and human hepatoma cells line, HLE cells(non AFP-producing) were performed by MTT method; Repaired capacity of L-02 and HLE cells were compared by wound healing assay; Migration and invasion of these cells were analyzed by Transwell chamber assay; HBx expressed vectors(pcDNA3.1-HBx) were constructed and transfected into L-02 and HLE cells, effects of pcDNA3.1-HBx on the malignant behaviors were also detected by MTT, Transwell chamber assay and the expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 were evidenced by Western blotting. Results: we found that expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 in HBV-related HCC and lymph nodes metastasis tissues were significantly elevated compared with HBV-related HCC, non metastasis tissues and HBV-related hepatitis tissues; Expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 in HBV-related hepatitis tissues were significantly enhanced compared with normal liver tissues; The growth ratio, migratory and invasive ability, expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 of the cells were outstanding promoted while L-02 and HLE cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1-HBx vectors. The proliferation ratio, migration and invasion ability, and expression of Ras and CXCR4 were significantly inhibited while

  15. Transplanted Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Contribute to Human Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rydén, Mikael; Uzunel, Mehmet; Hård, Joanna L; Borgström, Erik; Mold, Jeff E; Arner, Erik; Mejhert, Niklas; Andersson, Daniel P; Widlund, Yvonne; Hassan, Moustapha; Jones, Christina V; Spalding, Kirsty L; Svahn, Britt-Marie; Ahmadian, Afshin; Frisén, Jonas; Bernard, Samuel; Mattsson, Jonas; Arner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Because human white adipocytes display a high turnover throughout adulthood, a continuous supply of precursor cells is required to maintain adipogenesis. Bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells may contribute to mammalian adipogenesis; however, results in animal models are conflicting. Here we demonstrate in 65 subjects who underwent allogeneic BM or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation that, over the entire lifespan, BM/PBSC-derived progenitor cells contribute ∼10% to the subcutaneous adipocyte population. While this is independent of gender, age, and different transplantation-related parameters, body fat mass exerts a strong influence, with up to 2.5-fold increased donor cell contribution in obese individuals. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of single adipocytes suggests that BM/PBSC-derived progenitors contribute to adipose tissue via both differentiation and cell fusion. Thus, at least in the setting of transplantation, BM serves as a reservoir for adipocyte progenitors, particularly in obese subjects. PMID:26190649

  16. Prosomatostatin-derived antrin is present in gastric D cells and in portal blood.

    PubMed Central

    Ravazzola, M; Benoit, R; Ling, N; Orci, L

    1989-01-01

    The three widely distributed peptides derived from prosomatostatin are the original neurohormone somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, and somatostatin-28(1-12), which are all derived from the COOH terminus of the precursor. Recently a decapeptide derived from the NH2 terminus of the prohormone has been identified in extracts of rat gastric antrum and named antrin. Data now show that in both rats and humans this new molecular form is concentrated in the D cell of the gastrointestinal mucosa together with somatostatin-28(1-12). The highest concentration of antrin immunofluorescent cells is located in the mucosa of the gastric antrum. Ultrastructural studies performed on pyloric D cells using the protein A-gold technique reveals that antrin is present in the same secretory granules as somatostatin-28(1-12) and detectable in one-third of all secretory granules. Acid extracts of rat hepatic portal plasma contain a peptide similar or identical to antrin, indicating that the antral decapeptide circulates in blood. Images PMID:2563263

  17. Development and Characterization of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    De Assuncao, Thiago M.; Sun, Yan; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Drinane, Mary; Huang, Bing Q.; Li, Ying; Davila, Jaime I.; Wang, Ruisi; O’Hara, Steven P.; Lomberk, Gwen A.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Huebert, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Cholangiocytes are the target of a heterogeneous group of liver diseases, known as the cholangiopathies. An evolving understanding of the mechanisms driving biliary development provides the theoretical underpinnings for rational development of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cholangiocytes (iDCs). Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop an approach to generate iDCs and to fully characterize the cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods Human iPSC lines were generated by forced expression of the Yamanaka pluripotency factors. We then pursued a step-wise differentiation strategy toward iDCs using precise temporal exposure to key biliary morphogens and we characterized the cells using a variety of morphologic, molecular, cell biologic, functional, and in vivo approaches. Results Morphology shows a stepwise phenotypic change toward an epithelial monolayer. Molecular analysis during differentiation shows appropriate enrichment in markers of iPSC, definitive endoderm, hepatic specification, hepatic progenitors, and ultimately cholangiocytes. Immunostaining, Western blotting, and flow cytometry demonstrate enrichment of multiple functionally relevant biliary proteins. RNA sequencing reveals that the transcriptome moves progressively toward that of human cholangiocytes. iDCs generate intracellular calcium signaling in response to ATP, form intact primary cilia, and self-assemble into duct-like structures in 3-dimensional culture. In vivo, the cells engraft within mouse liver following retrograde intra-biliary infusion. Conclusions In summary, we have developed a novel approach to generate mature cholangiocytes from iPSCs. In addition to providing a model of biliary differentiation, iDCs represent a platform for in vitro disease modelling, pharmacologic testing, and individualized, cell-based, regenerative therapies for the cholangiopathies. PMID:25867762

  18. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  19. Methods of Liver Stem Cell Therapy in Rodents as Models of Human Liver Regeneration in Hepatic Failure.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Goradel, Nasser; Darabi, Masoud; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Zahedi, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Cell therapy is a promising intervention for treating liver diseases and liver failure. Different animal models of human liver cell therapy have been developed in recent years. Rats and mice are the most commonly used liver failure models. In fact, rodent models of hepatic failure have shown significant improvement in liver function after cell infusion. With the advent of stem-cell technologies, it is now possible to re-programme adult somatic cells such as skin or hair-follicle cells from individual patients to stem-like cells and differentiate them into liver cells. Such regenerative stem cells are highly promising in the personalization of cell therapy. The present review article will summarize current approaches to liver stem cell therapy with rodent models. In addition, we discuss common cell tracking techniques and how tracking data help to direct liver cell therapy research in animal models of hepatic failure.

  20. Monocyte Heterogeneity: Consequences for Monocyte-Derived Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Blood monocytes are precursors of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. They are a heterogeneous cell population with differences in size, phenotype, and function. Although monocytes maintain several tissue-specific populations of immune cells in homeostasis, their contribution to populations of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts is significantly increased in inflammation. Identification of a growing number of functionally different subsets of cells within populations of monocyte-derived immune cells has recently put monocyte heterogeneity into sharp focus. Here, we summarize recent findings in monocyte heterogeneity and their differentiation into dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. We also discuss these advances in the context of the formation of functionally different monocyte-derived subsets of dendritic cells, macrophages, and osteoclasts. PMID:27478854

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Pluripotent Human Spermatogonial Stem Cell-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kossack, Nina; Meneses, Juanito; Shefi, Shai; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Chavez, Shawn; Nicholas, Cory; Gromoll, Joerg; Turek, Paul J; Reijo-Pera, Renee A

    2009-01-01

    Several reports have documented the derivation of pluripotent cells (multipotent germline stem cells) from spermatogonial stem cells obtained from the adult mouse testis. These spermatogonia-derived stem cells express embryonic stem cell markers and differentiate to the three primary germ layers, as well as the germline. Data indicate that derivation may involve reprogramming of endogenous spermatogonia in culture. Here, we report the derivation of human multipotent germline stem cells (hMGSCs) from a testis biopsy. The cells express distinct markers of pluripotency, form embryoid bodies that contain derivatives of all three germ layers, maintain a normal XY karyotype, are hypomethylated at the H19 locus, and express high levels of telomerase. Teratoma assays indicate the presence of human cells 8 weeks post-transplantation but limited teratoma formation. Thus, these data suggest the potential to derive pluripotent cells from human testis biopsies but indicate a need for novel strategies to optimize hMGSC culture conditions and reprogramming. PMID:18927477

  2. Functional aspects of intrahepatic hepatitis B virus-specific T cells induced by therapeutic DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Brass, Anette; Frelin, Lars; Milich, David R; Sällberg, Matti; Ahlén, Gustaf

    2015-03-01

    Current therapies for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a major cause of severe liver disease, suppress viral replication but replication rebounds if therapy is withdrawn. It is widely accepted that immune activation is needed to control replication off-therapy. To specifically activate T cells crossreactive between the hepatitis B core and e antigens (HBcAg/HBeAg) in chronically infected patients, we developed a therapeutic vaccine candidate. The vaccine encompass codon-optimized HBcAg and IL-12 expressing plasmids delivered using targeted high-pressure injection combined with in vivo electroporation. One dose of the vaccine primed a B-cell-independent polyfunctional T-cell response, in wild-type, and in HBeAg-transgenic mice with an impaired ability to respond to HBc/eAg. The response peaked at 2 weeks and contracted at week 6 after vaccination. Coadministration of IL-12 improved antibody levels, and T-cell expansion and functionality. The vaccine primed T cells that, 2 weeks after a single dose, cleared hepatocytes transiently expressing HBcAg in vaccinated wild-type and HBeAg-transgenic mice. However, 4 weeks later, these functional responses were lost. Booster doses after 8-12 weeks effectively restored function and expansion of the rapidly contracting T cells. Thus, this vaccine strategy primes functional HBcAg-specific T cells in a host with dysfunctional response to HBV.

  3. Autoimmune Hepatitis: Progress from Global Immunosuppression to Personalised Regulatory T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nwe Ni; Jeffery, Hannah C.; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune mediated liver injury. The precise aetiology of AIH is still unknown but current evidence suggests both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Breakdown in peripheral self-tolerance, and impaired functions of FOXP3+ regulatory T cell along with effector cell resistance to suppression at the tissue level seem to play an important role in AIH immunopathogenesis. AIH is predominantly a T lymphocytes driven disease but B lymphocytes are also involved in the immunopathology. Innate immune cells are crucial in the initial onset of disease and their response is followed by adaptive T (Th1, Th17, and cytotoxic T cells) and B cell responses evidenced by liver histology and peripheral blood serology. Standard treatment regimens involving steroid and immunosuppressive medications lead to global immune suppression requiring life-long therapy with many side effects. Biologic therapies have been attempted but duration of remission is short-lived. Future direction of diagnosis and treatment for AIH should be guided by “omics” and the immunology profile of the individual patient and clinicians should aim to deliver personalised medicine for their patients. Cell therapy such as infusion of autologous, antigen-specific, and liver-homing regulatory T cells to restore hepatic immune tolerance may soon be a potential future treatment for AIH patients. PMID:27446862

  4. Primary hepatic signet ring cell neuroendocrine tumor: a case report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongfa; Sun, Katherine; Ward, Stephen C; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan N; Qin, Lihui

    2010-11-01

    Primary hepatic signet ring cell neuroendocrine tumor is extremely rare and is characterized by distinct intracytoplasmic hyaline vacuoles that are mucin negative and cytokeratin positive. The unique histological features may cause difficulty in diagnosis and delay patient care. Here the authors report a 49-year-old man with an incidental finding of a 2.7 cm liver mass in the absence of chronic liver disease. The resected tumor was grossly unencapsulated but well demarcated with friable tissue texture. Microscopically, the entire tumor consisted of sheets of monotonous cells separated by delicate microvasculature. The tumor cells had granular chromatin, inconspicuous nucleoli, and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Many of the tumor cells had eccentric, pale intracytoplasmic vacuoles resembling signet ring cells in adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical studies showed that the tumor cells were positive for neuroendocrine markers and that the intracytoplasmic vacuoles were negative for mucin but strongly positive for cytokeratins. Careful systemic search including OctreoScan scintigraphy (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO) and capsule endoscopy failed to reveal any other tumors. A diagnosis of primary hepatic signet ring cell neuroendocrine tumor was established. Ten months after surgery, the patient is well without any other detectable tumor on radiology. Serological neuroendocrine markers are also within normal limits.

  5. p53 signaling is involved in leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Mohan; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, is well known to induce tumor growth. However, underlying molecular mechanisms are not established yet. While p53 has long been well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor gene, accumulating evidence has also indicated its potential role in growth and survival of cancer cells depending on experimental environments. In the present study, we examined if p53 signaling is implicated in leptin-induced growth of cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrated that leptin treatment significantly increased p53 protein expression in both hepatic (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells without significant effect on mRNA expression. Enhanced p53 expression by leptin was mediated via modulation of ubiquitination, in particular ubiquitin specific protease 2 (USP2)-dependent manner. Furthermore, gene silencing of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells, indicating the role of p53 signaling in tumor growth by leptin. In addition, we also showed that knockdown of p53 restored suppression of caspase-3 activity by leptin through modulating Bax expression and prevented leptin-induced cell cycle progression, implying the involvement of p53 signaling in the regulation of both apoptosis and cell cycle progression in cancer cells treated with leptin. Taken together, the results in the present study demonstrated the potential role of p53 signaling in leptin-induced tumor growth.

  6. p53 signaling is involved in leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, is well known to induce tumor growth. However, underlying molecular mechanisms are not established yet. While p53 has long been well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor gene, accumulating evidence has also indicated its potential role in growth and survival of cancer cells depending on experimental environments. In the present study, we examined if p53 signaling is implicated in leptin-induced growth of cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrated that leptin treatment significantly increased p53 protein expression in both hepatic (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells without significant effect on mRNA expression. Enhanced p53 expression by leptin was mediated via modulation of ubiquitination, in particular ubiquitin specific protease 2 (USP2)-dependent manner. Furthermore, gene silencing of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells, indicating the role of p53 signaling in tumor growth by leptin. In addition, we also showed that knockdown of p53 restored suppression of caspase-3 activity by leptin through modulating Bax expression and prevented leptin-induced cell cycle progression, implying the involvement of p53 signaling in the regulation of both apoptosis and cell cycle progression in cancer cells treated with leptin. Taken together, the results in the present study demonstrated the potential role of p53 signaling in leptin-induced tumor growth. PMID:27610035

  7. p53 signaling is involved in leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Mohan; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2016-09-01

    Leptin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, is well known to induce tumor growth. However, underlying molecular mechanisms are not established yet. While p53 has long been well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor gene, accumulating evidence has also indicated its potential role in growth and survival of cancer cells depending on experimental environments. In the present study, we examined if p53 signaling is implicated in leptin-induced growth of cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrated that leptin treatment significantly increased p53 protein expression in both hepatic (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells without significant effect on mRNA expression. Enhanced p53 expression by leptin was mediated via modulation of ubiquitination, in particular ubiquitin specific protease 2 (USP2)-dependent manner. Furthermore, gene silencing of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells, indicating the role of p53 signaling in tumor growth by leptin. In addition, we also showed that knockdown of p53 restored suppression of caspase-3 activity by leptin through modulating Bax expression and prevented leptin-induced cell cycle progression, implying the involvement of p53 signaling in the regulation of both apoptosis and cell cycle progression in cancer cells treated with leptin. Taken together, the results in the present study demonstrated the potential role of p53 signaling in leptin-induced tumor growth. PMID:27610035

  8. Natural killer cell populations in Egyptians infected with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Rafik, M; Sidhom, G; Mamdouh, R; Ellebedy, D; Mohamed, M

    2012-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key players in the immune response to viruses. This study examined the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) on the frequency of NK cells and their subsets in individuals with different clinical outcomes; 20 positive for anti-HCV and HCV-RNA (chronic hepatitis C), 20 positive for anti-HCV but negative for HCV-RNA (spontaneously resolved) and 20 healthy controls free of HCV. There was a significant reduction in the frequency of total NK cells in the chronic group compared to the control (P = 0.001) or resolved (P = 0.01) groups. The percentage of CD56(bright) cells was significantly higher than the control group (P = 0.04). While the percentages of CD56 (dim) cells and their CD16 expression were lower in the chronic group, this was not statistically significant. The frequency of CD3+CD56- T cells was significantly lower in both the chronic and resolved groups compared to the control group (P = 0.04). Our results confirm a potential role of NK cells and the different subsets in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection.

  9. p53 signaling is involved in leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipokine predominantly produced from adipose tissue, is well known to induce tumor growth. However, underlying molecular mechanisms are not established yet. While p53 has long been well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor gene, accumulating evidence has also indicated its potential role in growth and survival of cancer cells depending on experimental environments. In the present study, we examined if p53 signaling is implicated in leptin-induced growth of cancer cells. Herein, we demonstrated that leptin treatment significantly increased p53 protein expression in both hepatic (HepG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells without significant effect on mRNA expression. Enhanced p53 expression by leptin was mediated via modulation of ubiquitination, in particular ubiquitin specific protease 2 (USP2)-dependent manner. Furthermore, gene silencing of p53 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed leptin-induced growth of hepatic and breast cancer cells, indicating the role of p53 signaling in tumor growth by leptin. In addition, we also showed that knockdown of p53 restored suppression of caspase-3 activity by leptin through modulating Bax expression and prevented leptin-induced cell cycle progression, implying the involvement of p53 signaling in the regulation of both apoptosis and cell cycle progression in cancer cells treated with leptin. Taken together, the results in the present study demonstrated the potential role of p53 signaling in leptin-induced tumor growth.

  10. Matrine induces the hepatic differentiation of WB-F344 rat hepatic progenitor cells and inhibits Jagged 1/HES1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyun; Wang, Li; Wang, Xianbo

    2016-10-01

    Matrine is a Chinese medicine, which is widely utilized for the attenuation of liver injuries and promotion of liver regeneration. It was previously observed that the in vivo administration of matrine promoted oval cell‑mediated liver regeneration in a rat model, suggesting that this compound may affect the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells. The present study aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying this observation and to investigate the effect of matrine on the differentiation of the WB‑F344 rat hepatic progenitor cell line. Matrine was administered to rats, and rat serum was collected. WB‑F344 cells were cultured in the presence or absence of the rat serum for 24‑72 h, and the effects on cell viability and proliferation were assessed using acridine orange/propidium iodide staining and a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl) ‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The expression of albumin (ALB, a hepatocyte marker) and the notch signaling pathway ligand, Jagged 1, were assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting, and the mRNA transcription of ALB, Jagged 1 and hairy and enhancer of split‑1 (HES1, another notch signaling ligand) were measured using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction analysis. The results showed that proliferation of the WB‑F344 cells was inhibited by matrine serum in a concentration‑ and time‑dependent manner. Matrine serum downregulated Jagged 1 and HES1, and upregulated ALB, indicating the induction of WB‑F344 cell differentiation. The effects of matrine serum were reversed by supplementing the culture medium with 0.1 mol/l parathyroid hormone, a Notch signaling pathway activator. In conclusion, matrine induced hepatic differentiation of the hepatic progenitor cells, likely by inhibiting the Jagged 1/HES1 signaling pathway.

  11. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human hepatic stellate cells treated with natural taurine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Tang, Yan-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of genes and proteins between natural taurine (NTau)‑treated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and control cells as well as the underlying mechanism of NTau in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. A microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of NTau‑treated HSCs. Flow cytometry was performed to compare the apoptosis rate between NTau-treated and non‑treated HSCs. Proteomic analysis using a combination of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microarray analysis was performed to investigate the differential expression of genes and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to validate the results. The experimental findings obtained demonstrated that NTau decreased HSC proliferation, resulting in an increased number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduced number of cells in the S phase. Flow cytometric analysis showed that NTau-treated HSCs had a significantly increased rate of apoptosis when compared with the non‑treated control group. A total of 15 differentially expressed proteins and 658 differentially expressed genes were identified by 2DE and MS, and microarray analysis, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) functional analysis indicated that these genes and proteins were enriched in the function clusters and pathways related to cell proliferation, cellular apoptosis and oxidation. The transcriptome and proteome analyses of NTau-treated HSCs demonstrated that NTau is able to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis, highlighting its potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23525364

  12. Influence of Kupffer cell inactivation on cycloheximide-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Kiyosawa, Naoki; Ito, Kazumi; Yamoto, Takashi; Teranishi, Munehiro; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Manabe, Sunao

    2007-11-30

    In our previous study, we found that cycloheximide (CHX) induces hepatocellular necrosis as well as hepatocellular apoptosis. This article evaluates the role of Kupffer cells on cycloheximide-induced hepatic injury using gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)) for the inhibition of Kupffer cells. One group of rats was treated with CHX (CHX group), and another was treated with GdCl(3) before being treated with the same dose of CHX (GdCl(3)/CHX group). The necrotic change in the GdCl(3)/CHX group was exacerbated under the induction of hepatocellular apoptosis by the CHX treatment. A substantial diminution of the number of ED1- or ED2-positive cells was demonstrated in the GdCl(3)/CHX group compared to the CHX group. In addition, the degree of decrease in ED2-positive cells was more apparent than that in ED1-positive cells. Increases in the mRNA levels of IL-10 and Stat3 were observed in the CHX group, but not in the GdCl(3)/CHX group. On the other hand, the hepatic mRNA levels of chemokines and adhesion molecules such as Ccl20, LOX-1, and E-selectin were significantly increased only in the GdCl(3)/CHX group. Thus, Kupffer cell inactivation by the GdCl(3) treatment leads to a loss of the capacity to produce IL-10, supposedly resulting in the enhancement of pro-inflammatory cytokine activities such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling. These events are suggested to be a factor of the inflammatory exacerbation in the livers of the GdCl(3)/CHX group. In conclusion, Kupffer cells may play a role in protecting hepatic necroinflammatory changes by releasing anti-inflammatory cytokines following the hepatocellular apoptosis resulting from CHX treatment. PMID:17900782

  13. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of human hepatic stellate cells treated with natural taurine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Wu, Fa-Sheng; Tang, Yan-Fang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differential expression of genes and proteins between natural taurine (NTau)‑treated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and control cells as well as the underlying mechanism of NTau in inhibiting hepatic fibrosis. A microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to analyze the proliferation of NTau‑treated HSCs. Flow cytometry was performed to compare the apoptosis rate between NTau-treated and non‑treated HSCs. Proteomic analysis using a combination of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Microarray analysis was performed to investigate the differential expression of genes and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to validate the results. The experimental findings obtained demonstrated that NTau decreased HSC proliferation, resulting in an increased number of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a reduced number of cells in the S phase. Flow cytometric analysis showed that NTau-treated HSCs had a significantly increased rate of apoptosis when compared with the non‑treated control group. A total of 15 differentially expressed proteins and 658 differentially expressed genes were identified by 2DE and MS, and microarray analysis, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) functional analysis indicated that these genes and proteins were enriched in the function clusters and pathways related to cell proliferation, cellular apoptosis and oxidation. The transcriptome and proteome analyses of NTau-treated HSCs demonstrated that NTau is able to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis, highlighting its potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  14. Structural Phenotyping of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Francesco Silvio; Sheehy, Sean Paul; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-01-01

    Summary Structural phenotyping based on classical image feature detection has been adopted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind genetically or pharmacologically induced changes in cell morphology. Here, we developed a set of 11 metrics to capture the increasing sarcomere organization that occurs intracellularly during striated muscle cell development. To test our metrics, we analyzed the localization of the contractile protein α-actinin in a variety of primary and stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes. Further, we combined these metrics with data mining algorithms to unbiasedly score the phenotypic maturity of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:25733020

  15. Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ameliorates Chemical-Induced Rat Hepatic Fibrosis In Vivo and Inactivates Stellate Cells and Kupffer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li-Jen; Chang, Chia-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Hsueh; Hsieh, Shur-Jong; Wu, Yi-Chin; Lai, Jin-Mei; Tseng, Tzu-Ling; Huang, Chi-Ying F.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Background Graptopetalum paraguayense (GP) is a folk herbal medicine with hepatoprotective effects that is used in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antifibrotic effects of GP on experimental hepatic fibrosis in both dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)- and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury rats. Methods Hepatic fibrosis-induced rats were fed with the methanolic extract of GP (MGP) by oral administration every day. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical assays, and Western blot analysis were performed. The effects of MGP on the expression of fibrotic markers and cytokines in the primary cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and Kupffer cells, respectively, were evaluated. Results Oral administration of MGP significantly alleviated DMN- or CCl4-induced liver inflammation and fibrosis. High levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin, prothrombin activity and mortality rates also decreased in rats treated with MGP. There were significantly decreased hydroxyproline levels in therapeutic rats compared with those of the liver-damaged rats. Collagen I and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression were all reduced by incubation with MGP in primary cultured rat HSCs. Furthermore, MGP induced apoptotic cell death in activated HSCs. MGP also suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat Kupffer cell activation by decreasing nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production, and increasing interleukin-10 expression. Conclusions The results show that the administration of MGP attenuated toxin-induced hepatic damage and fibrosis in vivo and inhibited HSC and Kupffer cell activation in vitro, suggesting that MGP might be a promising complementary or alternative therapeutic agent for liver inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:23335984

  16. Schizophrenia patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived cells do not respond to extracellular reelin

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Reelin expression is reduced in various regions in the post-mortem brain of schizophrenia patients but the exact role of reelin function in the neurobiology of schizophrenia remains elusive. Absence of reelin in knockout mouse causes inverted lamination of the neocortex due to aberrant neuronal migration. The aim of this study was to utilize patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells to investigate whether extracellular reelin alters cell motility in schizophrenia patient-derived cells. ONS cells from nine patients were compared with cells from nine matched healthy controls. Automated high-throughput imaging and analysis were used to track motility of individual living cells on reelin-coated surfaces produced from reelin secreted into the medium by HEK293FT cells transfected with the full-length reelin plasmid pCrl. Automated assays were used to quantify intracellular cytoskeleton composition, cell morphology, and focal adhesions. Expression of reelin and components of the reelin signaling pathway were measured by western blot and flow cytometry. Reelin inhibited the motility of control cells but not patient cells, and increased the number and size of focal adhesions in control cells but not patient cells. Patient and control cells expressed similar levels of the reelin receptors and the reelin signaling protein, Dab1, but patient cells expressed less reelin. Patient cells were smaller than control cells and had less actin and acetylated α-tubulin, components of the cytoskeleton. These findings are the first direct evidence that cellular responses to reelin are impaired in schizophrenia and are consistent with the role of reelin in cytoarchitectural deficits observed in schizophrenia patient brains.

  17. Schizophrenia patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived cells do not respond to extracellular reelin

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Reelin expression is reduced in various regions in the post-mortem brain of schizophrenia patients but the exact role of reelin function in the neurobiology of schizophrenia remains elusive. Absence of reelin in knockout mouse causes inverted lamination of the neocortex due to aberrant neuronal migration. The aim of this study was to utilize patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells to investigate whether extracellular reelin alters cell motility in schizophrenia patient-derived cells. ONS cells from nine patients were compared with cells from nine matched healthy controls. Automated high-throughput imaging and analysis were used to track motility of individual living cells on reelin-coated surfaces produced from reelin secreted into the medium by HEK293FT cells transfected with the full-length reelin plasmid pCrl. Automated assays were used to quantify intracellular cytoskeleton composition, cell morphology, and focal adhesions. Expression of reelin and components of the reelin signaling pathway were measured by western blot and flow cytometry. Reelin inhibited the motility of control cells but not patient cells, and increased the number and size of focal adhesions in control cells but not patient cells. Patient and control cells expressed similar levels of the reelin receptors and the reelin signaling protein, Dab1, but patient cells expressed less reelin. Patient cells were smaller than control cells and had less actin and acetylated α-tubulin, components of the cytoskeleton. These findings are the first direct evidence that cellular responses to reelin are impaired in schizophrenia and are consistent with the role of reelin in cytoarchitectural deficits observed in schizophrenia patient brains. PMID:27602387

  18. Schizophrenia patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived cells do not respond to extracellular reelin.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Reelin expression is reduced in various regions in the post-mortem brain of schizophrenia patients but the exact role of reelin function in the neurobiology of schizophrenia remains elusive. Absence of reelin in knockout mouse causes inverted lamination of the neocortex due to aberrant neuronal migration. The aim of this study was to utilize patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells to investigate whether extracellular reelin alters cell motility in schizophrenia patient-derived cells. ONS cells from nine patients were compared with cells from nine matched healthy controls. Automated high-throughput imaging and analysis were used to track motility of individual living cells on reelin-coated surfaces produced from reelin secreted into the medium by HEK293FT cells transfected with the full-length reelin plasmid pCrl. Automated assays were used to quantify intracellular cytoskeleton composition, cell morphology, and focal adhesions. Expression of reelin and components of the reelin signaling pathway were measured by western blot and flow cytometry. Reelin inhibited the motility of control cells but not patient cells, and increased the number and size of focal adhesions in control cells but not patient cells. Patient and control cells expressed similar levels of the reelin receptors and the reelin signaling protein, Dab1, but patient cells expressed less reelin. Patient cells were smaller than control cells and had less actin and acetylated α-tubulin, components of the cytoskeleton. These findings are the first direct evidence that cellular responses to reelin are impaired in schizophrenia and are consistent with the role of reelin in cytoarchitectural deficits observed in schizophrenia patient brains. PMID:27602387

  19. Characterization of T-cell response to woodchuck hepatitis virus core protein and protection of woodchucks from infection by immunization with peptides containing a T-cell epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Menne, S; Maschke, J; Tolle, T K; Lu, M; Roggendorf, M

    1997-01-01

    Specific activation of T cells appears to be a prerequisite for viral clearance during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The T-cell response to HBV core protein is essential in determining an acute or chronic outcome of HBV infection, but how this immune response contributes to the course of infection remains unclear. This is due to results obtained from humans, which are restricted to phenomenological observations occurring during the clinical onset after HBV infection. Thus, a useful animal model is needed. Characterization of the T-cell response to the core protein (WHcAg) of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) in woodchucks contributes to the understanding of these mechanisms. Therefore, we investigated the response of woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to WHcAg and WHcAg-derived peptides, using our 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assay. We demonstrated WHcAg-specific proliferation of PBMCs and nylon wool-nonadherent cells from acutely WHV-infected woodchucks. Using a cross-reacting anti-human T-cell (CD3) antiserum, we identified nonadherent cells as woodchuck T cells. T-cell epitope mapping with overlapping peptides, covering the entire WHcAg, revealed T-cell responses of acutely WHV-infected woodchucks to peptide1-20, peptide100-119, and peptide112-131. Detailed epitope analysis in the WHcAg region from amino acids 97 to 140 showed that T cells especially recognized peptide97-110. Establishment of polyclonal T-cell lines with WHcAg or peptide97-110 revealed reciprocal stimulation by peptide97-110 or WHcAg, respectively. We vaccinated woodchucks with peptide97-110 or WHcAg to prove the importance of this immunodominant T-cell epitope. All woodchucks immunized with peptide97-110 or WHcAg were protected. Our results show that the cellular immune response to WHcAg or to one T-cell epitope protects woodchucks from WHV infection. PMID:8985324

  20. Variable severity and Ia antigen expression in streptococcal-cell-wall-induced hepatic granulomas in rats.

    PubMed

    Allen, J B; Wilder, R L

    1987-03-01

    We have previously reported that a single intraperitoneal injection of an aqueous suspension of group A streptococcal cell wall (SCW) fragments induces extensive hepatic granulomas in LEW/N female rats, but not in F344/N female rats. To further understand the mechanisms underlying these differences, we compared granuloma development and class II major histocompatibility complex antigen (Ia) expression in histocompatible LEW/N, F344/N, and CAR/N female rats in response to SCW fragments of four different average molecular sizes. In LEW/N female rats, the smallest fragments (less than 5 megadaltons) induced the most severe hepatic inflammatory disease, with development of widespread granulomas composed of macrophages, lymphocytes, and a peripheral rim of fibroblasts. The largest fragments (greater than 500 megadaltons) induced equivocal disease. Fragments of intermediate size induced granulomas of intermediate severity. The extent of granuloma development, the intensity of Ia antigen expression, and the amount of SCW antigen deposited in the liver qualitatively paralleled each other. In contrast, injection of the most granulomagenic SCW fragments into F344/N and CAR/N rats did not induce granulomas. Although these rat strains are histocompatible with the LEW/N (i.e., RTL.1) strain, hepatic Ia antigen expression in these strains was not increased significantly above basal levels. The amount of SCW antigen in the livers of the resistant rat strains appeared similar to the amount in the susceptible LEW/N strain. These data indicate that granuloma development is dependent on the size of the SCW fragment and host genetic background and that Ia expression directly parallels the severity of the hepatic disease. In addition, the data suggest that non-major histocompatibility complex genetic loci play a major role in regulating the development of the hepatic disease.

  1. Foetal hepatic progenitor cells assume a cholangiocytic cell phenotype during two-dimensional pre-culture

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, Kazuya; Chikada, Hiromi; Tsuruya, Kota; Ida, Kinuyo; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Inagaki, Yutaka; Mine, Tesuya; Kamiya, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Liver consists of parenchymal hepatocytes and other cells. Liver progenitor cell (LPC) is the origin of both hepatocytes and cholangiocytic cells. The analyses of mechanism regulating differentiation of LPCs into these functional cells are important for liver regenerative therapy using progenitor cells. LPCs in adult livers were found to form cysts with cholangiocytic characteristics in 3D culture. In contrast, foetal LPCs cannot form these cholangiocytic cysts in the same culture. Thus, the transition of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic progenitor cells might occur during liver development. Primary CD45−Ter119−Dlk1+ LPCs derived from murine foetal livers formed ALBUMIN (ALB)+CYTOKERATIN (CK)19− non-cholangiocytic cysts within 3D culture. In contrast, when foetal LPCs were pre-cultured on gelatine-coated dishes, they formed ALB−CK19+ cholangiocytic cysts. When hepatocyte growth factor or oncostatin M, which are inducers of hepatocytic differentiation, was added to pre-culture, LPCs did not form cholangiocytic cysts. These results suggest that the pre-culture on gelatine-coated dishes changed the characteristics of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic cells. Furthermore, neonatal liver progenitor cells were able to form cholangiocytic cysts in 3D culture without pre-culture. It is therefore possible that the pre-culture of mid-foetal LPCs in vitro functioned as a substitute for the late-foetal maturation step in vivo. PMID:27335264

  2. Anticytoproliferative effect of Vitamin C on rat hepatic stellate cell

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Chao, Guo; Liang, Minqing; Song, Jianhua; Wu, Ka

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the potential therapeutical benefit of Vitamin (VC), a potent antioxidant, on suppressing proliferation of immortalized rat liver stellate cell line (HSC-T6) in vitro, and to discuss the underlying mechanism. HSC-T6 was co-treated with different concentrations of VC (50, 100, 200 μmol/L) on designed time points. Then, cell viability was assessed by using MTT analysis, and the changes of cytomorphology was observed with apoptosis-specific TUNEL and immunohistochemical stains, as well as the intracellular target genes was determined by using RT-PCR, respectively. As the outcomes, VC-treated HSC-T6 showed significantly inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner when compared to the vehicle control. Cytologically, VC increased TUNEL-labeled positive cells in cultured HSC-T6, which the cell count was greater than vehicle control. Meanwhile, VC-treated HSC-T6 showed elevated immunoreactive for TGF-β1-labeled cells. Moreover, VC contributed to down-regulated expressions of intracellular c-myc, cyclin D1, mTOR mRNAs in HSC-T6. Collectively, these preliminary findings have demonstrated that VC-mediated anti-proliferative effect on HSCs is involved in molecular mechanisms of promoting apoptosis and blocking endogenous collagenation. PMID:27398165

  3. Posttranscriptional Inhibition of Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Presentation on Hepatocytes and Lymphoid Cells in Chronic Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, Tomasz I.; Hodgson, Paul D.; Churchill, Norma D.

    2000-01-01

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), similar to human hepatitis B virus, causes acute liver inflammation that can progress to chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. WHV also invades cells of the host lymphatic system, where it persists for life. We report here that acute and chronic hepadnavirus hepatitis is characterized by a profound difference in the expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on the surface of infected hepatocytes and, notably, lymphoid cells. While acute WHV infection is accompanied by the enhanced hepatocyte surface presentation of class I MHC antigen and upregulated transcription of the relevant hepatic genes, inhibition of class I antigen display on liver cells is a uniform hallmark of chronic WHV infection. This inhibition in chronic hepatitis occurs despite augmented (as in acute infection) expression of hepatic genes for class I MHC heavy chain, β2-microglobulin, and transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2). Further, the class I antigen inhibition is not related to the histological severity of hepatocellular injury, the extent of lymphocytic infiltrations, the level of intrahepatic gamma interferon induction, or the hepatic WHV load. Importantly, the antigen expression is also inhibited on organ lymphoid cells of chronically infected hosts. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that the defective presentation of class I MHC molecules on cells supporting persistent WHV replication is due to viral posttranscriptional interference. This event may diminish the susceptibility of infected hepatocytes to virus-specific T-cell-mediated elimination, hinder virus clearance, and deregulate the class I MHC-dependent functions of the host immune system. This multifarious effect could be critical for perpetuation of liver damage and evasion of the antiviral immunological surveillance in chronic infection and therefore could be supportive of hepadnavirus persistence. PMID:10775584

  4. Combined therapy of transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization with intratumoral dendritic cell infusion for hepatocellular carcinoma: clinical safety

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Y; Mizukoshi, E; Tsuji, H; Sakai, Y; Kitahara, M; Arai, K; Yamashita, T; Yokoyama, K; Mukaida, N; Matsushima, K; Matsui, O; Kaneko, S

    2007-01-01

    The curative treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), including surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA), do not prevent tumour recurrence effectively. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapies are believed to contribute to the eradication of the residual and recurrent tumour cells. The current study was designed to assess the safety and bioactivity of DC infusion into tumour tissues following transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization (TAE) for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated into phenotypically confirmed DCs. Ten patients were administered autologous DCs through an arterial catheter during TAE treatment. Shortly thereafter, some HCC nodules were treated additionally to achieve the curative local therapeutic effects. There was no clinical or serological evidence of adverse events, including hepatic failure or autoimmune responses in any patients, in addition to those due to TAE. Following the infusion of 111Indium-labelled DCs, DCs were detectable inside and around the HCC nodules for up to 17 days, and were associated with lymphocyte and monocyte infiltration. Interestingly, T lymphocyte responses were induced against peptides derived from the tumour antigens, Her-2/neu, MRP3, hTERT and AFP, 4 weeks after the infusion in some patients. The cumulative survival rates were not significantly changed by this strategy. These results demonstrate that transcatheter arterial DC infusion into tumour tissues following TAE treatment is feasible and safe for patients with cirrhosis and HCC. Furthermore, the antigen-non-specific, immature DC infusion may induce immune responses to unprimed tumour antigens, providing a plausible strategy to enhance tumour immunity. PMID:17223971

  5. Hospicells (ascites-derived stromal cells) promote tumorigenicity and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pasquet, Marlene; Golzio, Muriel; Mery, Eliane; Rafii, Arash; Benabbou, Nadia; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bourin, Philippe; Allal, Ben; Teissie, Justin; Mirshahi, Massoud; Couderc, Bettina

    2010-05-01

    The microenvironment is known to play a dominant role in cancer progression. Cells closely associated with tumoral cells, named hospicells, have been recently isolated from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients. Whilst these cells present no specific markers from known cell lineages, they do share some homology with bone marrow-derived or adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166, HLA-1). We studied the role of hospicells in ovarian carcinoma progression. In vitro, these cells had no effect on the growth of human ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3, SKOV-1 and IGROV-1. In vivo, their co-injection with adenocarcinoma cells enhanced tumor growth whatever the tumor model used (subcutaneous and intraperitoneally established xenografts in athymic mice). In addition, their injection increased the development of ascites in tumor-bearing mice. Fluorescent macroscopy revealed an association between hospicells and ovarian adenocarcinoma cells within the tumor mass. Tumors obtained by coinjection of hospicells and human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells presented an increased microvascularization indicating that the hospicells could promote tumorigenicity of ovarian tumor cells in vivovia their action on angiogenesis. This effect on angiogenesis could be attributed to the increased HIF1alpha and VEGF expression associated with the presence of the hospicells. Collectively, these data indicate a role for these ascite-derived stromal cells in promoting tumor growth by increasing angiogenesis.

  6. Hepatic progenitor cells, stem cells, and AFP expression in models of liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Wolf D; Peschke, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Adult hepatocytes and liver-cell progenitors play a role in restoring liver tissue after injury. For the study of progenitor cells in liver repair, experimental models included (a) surgical removal of liver tissue by partial hepatectomy; (b) acute injury by carbontetrachloride; (c) acute injury by d-galactosamine (GalN) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM); and (d) chemical hepatocarcinogenesis by feeding NNM in low and high doses. Serological and immunohistological detection of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression served to follow pathways of cellular differentiation. Stem cells were not required in models of surgical removal of parenchyma and in carbon tetrachloride intoxication of adult hepatocytes. In contrast, regeneration of liver occurred through biliary epithelial cells in injuries induced by GalN and NNM. These biliary epithelial cells, collectively called oval cells, are most probably derived from the canals of Hering. Proliferating bile duct cells reached a level of differentiation with reactivation of foetal genes and significant alpha-1-fetoprotein (AFP) synthesis signalling a certain degree of retrodifferentiation with potential stemness. Due to the same embryonic origin of bile ducts and hepatocytes, biliary epithelium and its proliferating progeny (oval cells) have a defined role in liver regeneration as a transit and amplification compartment. In their early proliferation stage, oval cells were heavily engaged in DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine labelling). Pulse-chase experiments during experimental hepatocarcinogenesis exhibited their development into hepatocytes with high risk for transformation and leading to foci of altered hepatocytes. Hepatocellular carcinomas may arise either from proliferating/differentiating oval cells or from adult hepatocytes; both cell types have stem-like properties. AFP-positive and AFP-negative carcinomas occurred in the same liver. They may represent random clonal origin. The heterogeneity of phenotypic marker (AFP) correlated

  7. Generation and characterization of functional cardiomyocytes derived from human T cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohisa; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Saito, Yuki; Tohyama, Shugo; Yae, Kojiro; Kishino, Yoshikazu; Okada, Marina; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Takei, Makoto; Egashira, Toru; Kodaira, Masaki; Kuroda, Yusuke; Tanaka, Atsushi; Okata, Shinichiro; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Murata, Mitsushige; Fujita, Jun; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been proposed as novel cell sources for genetic disease models and revolutionary clinical therapies. Accordingly, human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes are potential cell sources for cardiomyocyte transplantation therapy. We previously developed a novel generation method for human peripheral T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) that uses a minimally invasive approach to obtain patient cells. However, it remained unknown whether TiPSCs with genomic rearrangements in the T cell receptor (TCR) gene could differentiate into functional cardiomyocyte in vitro. To address this issue, we investigated the morphology, gene expression pattern, and electrophysiological properties of TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes differentiated by floating culture. RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that the TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes properly express cardiomyocyte markers and ion channels, and show the typical cardiomyocyte morphology. Multiple electrode arrays with application of ion channel inhibitors also revealed normal electrophysiological responses in the TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of beating rate and the field potential waveform. In this report, we showed that TiPSCs successfully differentiated into cardiomyocytes with morphology, gene expression patterns, and electrophysiological features typical of native cardiomyocytes. TiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes obtained from patients by a minimally invasive technique could therefore become disease models for understanding the mechanisms of cardiac disease and cell sources for revolutionary cardiomyocyte therapies. PMID:24465630

  8. Remodeling of Hepatic Metabolism and Hyperaminoacidemia in Mice Deficient in Proglucagon-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chika; Seino, Yusuke; Miyahira, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Michiyo; Fukami, Ayako; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Sato, Jun; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Oiso, Yutaka; Murata, Yoshiharu; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon is believed to be one of the most important peptides for upregulating blood glucose levels. However, homozygous glucagon–green fluorescent protein (gfp) knock-in mice (Gcggfp/gfp: GCGKO) are normoglycemic despite the absence of proglucagon-derived peptides, including glucagon. To characterize metabolism in the GCGKO mice, we analyzed gene expression and metabolome in the liver. The expression of genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes for gluconeogenesis was only marginally altered. On the other hand, genes encoding enzymes involved in conversion of amino acids to metabolites available for the tricarboxylic acid cycle and/or gluconeogenesis showed lower expression in the GCGKO liver. The expression of genes involved in the metabolism of fatty acids and nicotinamide was also altered. Concentrations of the metabolites in the GCGKO liver were altered in manners concordant with alteration in the gene expression patterns, and the plasma concentrations of amino acids were elevated in the GCGKO mice. The insulin concentration in serum and phosphorylation of Akt protein kinase in liver were reduced in GCGKO mice. These results indicated that proglucagon-derived peptides should play important roles in regulating various metabolic pathways, especially that of amino acids. Serum insulin concentration is lowered to compensate the impacts of absent proglucagon-derived peptide on glucose metabolism. On the other hand, impacts on other metabolic pathways are only partially compensated by reduced insulin action. PMID:22187375

  9. Protein dependent fate of hepatic cells under nicotine induced stress and curcumin ameliorated condition.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Satyam; Chattopadhyay, Krishna; Chhabra, Jasmeet Kaur; Chattopadhyay, Brajadulal

    2012-06-01

    Nicotine is mainly metabolized in liver. Its abuse elicits acute phase response by activating macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, which play critical role in apoptosis or cell proliferation. The protective pharmacological mechanism of curcumin against nicotine-induced toxicity on protein malnourished liver is still remaining unclear. This study investigated the ameliorative mechanism of curcumin against nicotine-induced toxicity and also fate of liver particularly under protein restricted condition. Female Albino-rats maintained under normal/protein-restricted diets, were subcutaneously injected with nicotine tartrate (2.5 mg/kg body weight/day) and orally supplemented with curcumin (80 mg/kg body weight/day) for 21 days. The animals were then sacrificed to dissect out liver and proceed with further experiments. Interactions of nicotine with DNA both in vivo and in vitro were observed by thermal denaturation and DNA laddering assays. Effects of nicotine on hepatic cells were monitored by differential staining, comet assay, cytokine profiling, mRNA and protein expression. Nicotine caused more intense DNA damage, promoted hepatic cell death through up-regulating pro-apoptotic proteins and signaling molecules in protein malnourished individuals. Through up-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins and proliferation promoting molecules, nicotine dysregulated homeostasis in normal protein condition. Curcumin significantly ameliorated the nicotine-induced toxicity in both conditions and regulated the imbalance between cell survival and death induced by nicotine. The protein content present in the nicotine induced hepatic cell decides either cell-survival pathway or cytotoxic pathway. PMID:22381069

  10. Arresting initiation of hepatitis C virus RNA synthesis using heterocyclic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gu, Baohua; Johnston, Victor K; Gutshall, Lester L; Nguyen, Tammy T; Gontarek, Richard R; Darcy, Michael G; Tedesco, Rosanna; Dhanak, Dashyant; Duffy, Kevin J; Kao, C Cheng; Sarisky, Robert T

    2003-05-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B protein encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), the primary catalytic enzyme of the HCV replicase complex. Recently, two benzo-1,2,4-thiadiazine compounds were shown to be potent, highly specific inhibitors of the genotype 1b HCV RdRp containing a carboxyl-terminal 21 residue truncation (delta21 HCV RdRp) (Dhanak, D., Duffy, K., Johnston, V. K., Lin-Goerke, J., Darcy, M., Shaw, A. N. G. B., Silverman, C., Gates, A. T., Earnshaw, D. L., Casper, D. J., Kaura, A., Baker, A., Greenwood, C., Gutshall, L. L., Maley, D., DelVecchio, A., Macarron, R., Hofmann, G. A., Alnoah, Z., Cheng, H.-Y., Chan, G., Khandekar, S., Keenan, R. M., and Sarisky, R. T. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 38322-38327). Compound 4 (C(21)H(21)N(3)O(4)S) reduces viral replication by virtue of its direct interaction with the viral polymerase rather than by nonspecific titration of nucleic acid template. In this study, we present several lines of evidence to demonstrate that this inhibitor interferes with the initiation step of RNA synthesis rather than acting as an elongation inhibitor. Inhibition of initial phosphodiester bond formation occurred regardless of whether replication was initiated by primer-dependent or de novo mechanisms. Filter binding studies using increasing concentrations of compound 4 did not interfere with the ability of delta21 HCV RdRp to interact with nucleic acid. Furthermore, varying the order of reagent addition in the primer extension assay showed no distinct differences in inhibition profile. Finally, surface plasmon resonance analyses provided evidence that a ternary complex is capable of forming between the RNA template, RdRp, and compound 4. Together, these data suggest that this heterocyclic agent interacts with the apoenzyme, as well as with the RNA-bound form of delta21 HCV RdRp, and therefore does not directly interfere with the RdRp-RNA interaction to mediate inhibition.

  11. Novel Potent Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease Inhibitors Derived from Proline-Based Macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin X.; Njoroge, F. George; Arasappan, Ashok; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Yang, Weiying; Parekh, Tejal N.; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Cheng, Kuo-Chi; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Yao, Nanhua; Madison, Vincent; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease is essential for viral replication. It has been a target of choice for intensive drug discovery research. On the basis of an active pentapeptide inhibitor, 1, we envisioned that macrocyclization from the P2 proline to P3 capping could enhance binding to the backbone Ala156 residue and the S4 pocket. Thus, a number of P2 proline-based macrocyclic {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitors were prepared and investigated in an HCV NS3 serine protease continuous assay (K*{sub i}). The biological activity varied substantially depending on factors such as the ring size, number of amino acid residues, number of methyl substituents, type of heteroatom in the linker, P3 residue, and configuration at the proline C-4 center. The pentapeptide inhibitors were very potent, with the C-terminal acids and amides being the most active ones (24, K*{sub i} = 8 nM). The tetrapeptides and tripeptides were less potent. Sixteen- and seventeen-membered macrocyclic compounds were equally potent, while fifteen-membered analogues were slightly less active. gem-Dimethyl substituents at the linker improved the potency of all inhibitors (the best compound was 45, K*{sub i} = 6 nM). The combination of tert-leucine at P3 and dimethyl substituents at the linker in compound 47 realized a selectivity of 307 against human neutrophil elastase. Compound 45 had an IC{sub 50} of 130 nM in a cellular replicon assay, while IC{sub 50} for 24 was 400 nM. Several compounds had excellent subcutaneous AUC and bioavailability in rats. Although tripeptide compound 40 was 97% orally bioavailable, larger pentapeptides generally had low oral bioavailability. The X-ray crystal structure of compounds 24 and 45 bound to the protease demonstrated the close interaction of the macrocycle with the Ala156 methyl group and S4 pocket. The strategy of macrocyclization has been proved to be successful in improving potency (>20-fold greater than that of 1) and in structural depeptization.

  12. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  13. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine Inhibits Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells through Hedgehog Signaling Pathways In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jue; Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a major alkaloid isolated from Ligusticum chuanxiong, has been reported in hepatic fibrosis models. However, the action mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) against hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation as well as the possible mechanisms were evaluated. Methods. Western blot assay was used to detect TMP effects on protein expression of Smo, Patched, Hhip, and Gli and to investigate the effects of TMP on Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase expression with cyclopamine supplementation. Results. Our results showed that TMP significantly inhibits the expression of Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, and Cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2 and changes the HSC cycle by inhibiting the proliferation of HSC. Moreover, TMP has also been shown to decrease the expression of Bcl-2 and increase the expression of Bax in HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, TMP can inhibit the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and the inhibitory effect was intensified after the application of joint treatment with TMP and cyclopamine. Conclusion. TMP may be an effective Hh signaling pathway inhibitor for hepatic fibrosis treatment. PMID:26380286

  15. Diosgenin attenuates hepatic stellate cell activation through transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Lin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) plays a pivotal role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is considered to be the main stimuli factor responsible for the activation of HSC. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species, and it inhibited high glucose-induced renal tubular fibrosis. However, the effects of diosgenin against hepatic fibrosis remain elusive. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diosgenin on TGF-β1-induced HSCs and elucidate the possible mechanism of its anti-fibrotic effect. Our results demonstrated that diosgenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced HSC proliferation, reduced the expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), as well as the expression of TGF-β receptor I (TGF-β RI) and II. Moreover, diosgenin suppressed TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 in HSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that diosgenin inhibited HSC-T6 cell proliferation and activation, at least in part, via the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. These results provide that diosgenin may have potential to treat liver fibrosis. PMID:26884947

  16. Phytomedicinal Role of Pithecellobium dulce against CCl4-mediated Hepatic Oxidative Impairments and Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Sil, Parames C.

    2011-01-01

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of the aqueous extract of the fruits of Pithecellobium dulce (AEPD) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury using a murine model. AEPD has been found to possess free radical (DPPH, hydroxyl and superoxide) scavenging activity in cell-free system. CCl4 exposure increased the activities of various serum maker enzymes and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In line with these findings, we also observed that CCl4 intoxication increased the lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation accompanied by decreased intracellular antioxidant defense, activity of cytochrome P450 and CYP2E1 expression. DNA fragmentation and flow cytometric analyses revealed that CCl4 exposure caused hepatic cell death mainly via the necrotic pathway. Treatment with AEPD both pre- and post-toxin exposure protected the organ from CCl4-induced hepatic damage. Histological findings also support our results. A well-known antioxidant vitamin C was included in this study to compare the antioxidant potency of AEPD. Combining all, results suggest that AEPD protects murine liver against CCl4-induced oxidative impairments probably via its antioxidative property. PMID:21869899

  17. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments. PMID:27026484

  18. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  19. Characterization of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced rat liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Anusha Hemamali; Izawa, Takeshi; Wijesundera, Kavindra Kumara; Golbar, Hossain M; Tanaka, Miyuu; Ichikawa, Chisa; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2013-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which can express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in normal rat livers, play important roles in hepatic fibrogenesis through the conversion into myofibroblasts (MFs). Cellular properties and possible derivation of GFAP-expressing MFs were investigated in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced rat liver injury and subsequent fibrosis. Seven-week-old male F344 rats were injected with TAA (300mg/kg BW, once, intraperitoneally), and were examined on post single injection (PSI) days 1-10 by the single and double immunolabeling with MF and stem cell marker antibodies. After hepatocyte injury in the perivenular areas on PSI days 1 and 2, the fibrotic lesion consisting of MF developed at a peak on PSI day 3, and then recovered gradually by PSI day 10. MFs expressed GFAP, and also showed co-expressions such cytoskeletons (MF markers) as vimentin, desmin and α-SMA in varying degrees. Besides MFs co-expressing vimentin/desmin, desmin/α-SMA or α-SMA/vimentin, some GFAP positive MFs co-expressed with nestin or A3 (both, stem cell markers), and there were also MFs co-expressing nestin/A3. However, there were no GFAP positive MFs co-expressing RECA-1 (endothelial marker) or Thy-1 (immature mesenchymal cell marker). GFAP positive MFs showed the proliferating activity, but they did not undergo apoptosis. However, α-SMA positive MFs underwent apoptosis. These findings indicate that HSCs can proliferate and then convert into MFs with co-expressing various cytoskeletons for MF markers, and that the converted MFs may be derived partly from the stem cell lineage. Additionally, well-differentiated MFs expressing α-SMA may disappear by apoptosis for healing. These findings shed some light on the pathogenesis of chemically induced hepatic fibrosis.

  20. Non cell autonomous upregulation of CDKN2 transcription linked to progression of chronic hepatitis C disease.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark W; McGuinness, Dagmara; Swann, Rachael; Barclay, Stephen; Mills, Peter R; Patel, Arvind H; McLauchlan, John; Shiels, Paul G

    2013-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection (C-HC) is associated with higher mortality arising from hepatic and extrahepatic disease. This may be due to accelerated biological aging; however, studies in C-HC have thus far been based solely on telomere length as a biomarker of aging (BoA). In this study, we have evaluated CDKN2 locus transcripts as alternative BoAs in C-HC. Our results suggest that C-HC induces non-cell-autonomous senescence and accelerates biological aging. The CDKN2 locus may provide a link between C-HC and increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases and provides novel biomarkers for assessing its impact on aging processes in man.

  1. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis. PMID:27699175

  2. Regulation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Fibrogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors critically involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing, and endocrine functions. In the liver, several FGFs are produced basally by hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Upon insult to the liver, expression of FGFs in HSCs is greatly upregulated, stimulating hepatocyte regeneration and growth. Various FGF isoforms have also been shown to directly induce HSC proliferation and activation thereby enabling autocrine and paracrine regulation of HSC function. Regulation of HSCs by the endocrine FGFs, namely, FGF15/19 and FGF21, has also recently been identified. With the ability to modulate HSC proliferation and transdifferentiation, targeting FGF signaling pathways constitutes a promising new therapeutic strategy to treat hepatic fibrosis.

  3. CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Inhibit Natural Killer Cell Hepatocytotoxicity of Hepatitis B Virus Transgenic Mice via Membrane-Bound TGF-β and OX40.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyan; Sun, Rui; Wu, Xunyao; Cheng, Min; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the regulation of physiological and pathological hepatic immune responses, but the roles are not well explored in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated liver diseases. In this study, using the NK cell-mediated oversensitive liver injury model of hepatitis B virus transgenic (HBs-Tg) mice triggered by a low dose of concanavalin A, it was observed that an increased number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs were accumulated in the liver, along with the recovery of liver injury. Adoptive transfer of hepatic Tregs from HBs-Tg mice but not wild B6 mice could significantly attenuate the oversensitive liver injury via inhibiting liver accumulation and decreasing NK cell group 2D-mediated activation of NK cells in the recipient HBs-Tg mice. Furthermore, upregulated expression of membrane-bound TGF-β (mTGF-β) and OX40 on hepatic Tregs were demonstrated to account for inhibiting the NK cell-mediated hepatic injury in HBs-Tg mice through cell-cell contact, confirmed by antibody blockade and cell Transwell experiments in vivo and in vitro. Our findings for the first time indicated that CD4+CD25+ Tregs directly suppressed NK cell-mediated hepatocytotoxicity through mTGF-β and OX40/OX40L interaction in a cell-cell contact manner in HBV-associated liver disease. PMID:26067079

  4. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) Protect Islet Transplants via B7-H1 Mediated Enhancement of T Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Charles, Ronald; Wang, Lianfu; Wagner, Timothy; Fung, John J.; Qian, Shiguang; L, Lina Lu

    2011-01-01

    Background Side effects of lifetime immunosuppression for cell transplants often outweigh the benefits, therefore, induction of transplant tolerance is needed. We have shown that cotransplantation with myeoid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) effectively protect islet allografts from rejection without requirement of immunosuppression. This study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods MDSC were generated by addition of hepatic stellate cells (HpSC) from various stain mice into dendritic cell (DC) culture. The quality of MDSC was monitored by phenotype and function analyses. MDSC mixed with islet allografts were transplanted into diabetic recipients. T cell response was analyzed following transplant by flow and histochemical analyses, and compared to islet alone and islet/DC transplant groups. B7-H1 knockout mice were used to determine the role of B7-H1 on MDSC in regulation of T cell response. Results Cotransplantation with MDSC (not DC) effectively protected islet allografts without requirement of immunosuppression. This is associated with attenuation of CD8 T cells in the grafts and marked expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells, which contributed to MDSC-induced T cell hyporesponsiveness. Antigen-specific Treg cells were prone to accumulate in lymphoid organs close to the grafts. Both in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that B7-H1 was absolutely required for MDSC to exert immune regulatory activity and induction of Treg cells. Conclusion The described approach holds great clinical application potential, and may overcome the limitation of requiring chronic administration of immunosuppression in cell transplants. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will facilitate the development of this novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:22179405

  5. Status and prospects of liver cirrhosis treatment by using bone marrow-derived cells and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Terai, Shuji; Takami, Taro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujisawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Urata, Yohei; Tanimoto, Haruko; Iwamoto, Takuya; Mizunaga, Yuko; Matsuda, Takashi; Oono, Takashi; Marumoto, Miho; Burganova, Guzel; Fernando Quintanilha, Luiz; Hidaka, Isao; Marumoto, Yoshio; Saeki, Issei; Uchida, Koichi; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Tani, Kenji; Taura, Yasuho; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Nishina, Hiroshi; Okita, Kiwamu; Sakaida, Isao

    2014-06-01

    In 2003, we started autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABMi) therapy for treating liver cirrhosis. ABMi therapy uses 400 mL of autologous bone marrow obtained under general anesthesia and infused mononuclear cells from the peripheral vein. The clinical study expanded and we treated liver cirrhosis induced by HCV and HBV infection and alcohol consumption. We found that the ABMi therapy was effective for cirrhosis patients and now we are treating patients with combined HIV and HCV infection and with metabolic syndrome-induced liver cirrhosis. Currently, to substantiate our findings that liver cirrhosis can be successfully treated by the ABMi therapy, we are conducting randomized multicenter clinical studies designated "Advanced medical technology B" for HCV-related liver cirrhosis in Japan. On the basis of our cl