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Sample records for cell differentiation shedding

  1. Mechanical stretch promotes fetal type II epithelial cell differentiation via shedding of HB-EGF and TGF-α

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yulian; Maciejewski, Benjamin S; Soto-Reyes, Dariana; Lee, Hyeon-Soo; Warburton, David; Sanchez-Esteban, Juan

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces promote fetal lung development are not fully understood. Here, we investigated differentiation of fetal type II epithelial cells via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in response to mechanical strain. First, we showed that incubation of embryonic day (E) 19 fetal type II cells with recombinant heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) or transforming growth factor (TGF)-α, but not with amphiregulin (AR), betacellulin (BTC) or epiregulin (EPR), increased fetal type II cell differentiation, as measured by surfactant protein B/C mRNA and protein levels. Next, we demonstrated that 5% cyclic stretch of E19 monolayers transfected with plasmid encoding alkaline phosphatase (AP)-tagged ligands shed mature HB-EGF and TGF-α into the supernatant and promoted type II cell differentiation. Release of these ligands was also observed in E19 cells subjected to higher degrees of cyclic strain, but not in cells exposed to continuous stretch. Interestingly, the addition of fibroblasts to type II cell cultures did not enhance release of HB-EGF. Whereas HB-EGF shedding was also detected in E18 cells exposed to 5% cyclic stretch, release of this ligand after 2.5% sustained stretch was restricted to cells isolated on E18 of gestation. In addition, mechanical stretch released EGF, AR and BTC. We conclude that mechanical stretch promotes fetal type II cell differentiation via ectodomain shedding of HB-EGF and TGF-α. The magnitude of shedding varied depending on gestational age, ligand, and strain protocol. These studies provide novel mechanistic information potentially relevant to fetal lung development and to mechanical ventilation-induced lung injury. PMID:19237431

  2. Physicochemical Control of Adult Stem Cell Differentiation: Shedding Light on Potential Molecular Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    applications, including tissue engineering, requires an understanding of the cell-cell and cell-environment interactions. To this end, recent efforts have been...restricted locations to allow continuation of the cycle of life [1]. These tissue -specific stem cells have been identified in the bone marrow [2], brain [3...relatively easy to isolate and differentiate into neuronal cells, and therefore may be useful for tissue engineering strategies to repair and regenerate

  3. Effects of decellularized matrices derived from periodontal ligament stem cells and SHED on the adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Zhu, Shaoyue; Xu, Jianguang; Yuan, Changyong; Gong, Ting; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-04-01

    A major bottleneck to the therapeutic applications of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are their limited proliferative capacity ex vivo and tendency to undergo senescence. This may be partly due to the sub-optimal in vitro culture milieu, which could be improved by an appropriate extracellular matrix substratum. This study therefore examined decellularized matrix (DECM) from stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC), as potential substrata for DPSC culture. Both SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM promoted rapid adhesion and spreading of newly-seeded DPSC compared to bare polystyrene (TCPS), with vinculin immunocytochemistry showing expression of more focal adhesions by newly-adherent DPSC cultured on DECM versus TCPS. Culture of DPSC on SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM yielded higher proliferation of cell numbers compared to TCPS. The qRT-PCR data showed significantly higher expression of nestin by DPSC cultured on DECM versus the TCPS control. Osteogenic differentiation of DPSC was enhanced by culturing on PDLSC-DECM and SHED-DECM versus TCPS, as demonstrated by alizarin red S staining for mineralized calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase assay and qRT-PCR analysis of key osteogenic marker expression. Hence, both SHED-DECM and PDLSC-DECM could enhance the ex vivo culture of DPSC under both non-inducing and osteogenic-inducing conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acetylsalicylic Acid Treatment Improves Differentiation and Immunomodulation of SHED

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, S.; Liu, D.; Xu, X.; Chen, X.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) possess multipotent differentiation and immunomodulatory properties. They have been used for orofacial bone regeneration and autoimmune disease treatment. In this study, we show that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment is able to significantly improve SHED-mediated osteogenic differentiation and immunomodulation. Mechanistically, ASA treatment upregulates the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)/Wnt/β-catenin cascade, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated bone regeneration, and also upregulates TERT/FASL signaling, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated T-cell apoptosis and ameliorating disease phenotypes in dextran sodium sulfate–induced colitis mice. These data indicate that ASA treatment is a practical approach to improving SHED-based cell therapy. PMID:25394850

  5. ADAM10 mediates N-cadherin ectodomain shedding during retinal ganglion cell differentiation in primary cultured retinal cells from the developing chick retina.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sharada; Kim, Yeoun-Hee; Huh, Man-Il; Kim, Song-Ja; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Young Jeung; Lee, Kyoo Won; Jung, Jae-Chang

    2013-04-01

    Here, we examined the role of ADAM10 during retinal cell differentiation in retinal sections and in vitro cultures of developing chick retinal cells from embryonic day 6 (ED6). Immunohistochemistry showed that ADAM10 is abundantly expressed in the inner zone of neuroblastic layer at ED5, and it becomes more highly expressed in the ganglion cell layer at ED7 and ED9. Western blotting confirmed that ADAM10 was expressed as an inactive pro-form that was processed to a shorter, active form in control cultured cells, but in cultures treated with an ADAM10 inhibitor (GI254023X) and ADAM10-specific siRNA, the level of mature ADAM10 decreased. Phase-contrast microscopy showed that long neurite extensions were present in untreated cultures 24 h after plating, whereas cultures treated with GI254023X showed significant decreases in neurite extension. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that there were far fewer differentiated ganglion cells in ADAM10 siRNA and GI254023X-treated cultures compared to controls, whereas the photoreceptor cells were unaltered. The Pax6 protein was more strongly detected in the differentiated ganglion cells of control cultures compared to ADAM10 siRNA and GI254023X-treated cultures. N-cadherin ectodomain shedding was apparent in control cultures after 24 h, when ganglion cell differentiation was observed, but ADAM10 siRNA and GI254023X treatment inhibited these processes. In contrast, N-cadherin staining was strongly detected in photoreceptor cells regardless of ADAM10 siRNA and GI254023X treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that the inhibition of ADAM10 can inhibit Pax6 expression and N-cadherin ectodomain shedding in retinal cells, possibly affecting neurite outgrowth and ganglion cell differentiation.

  6. Metalloproteinase inhibitors for the disintegrin-like metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 that differentially block constitutive and phorbol ester-inducible shedding of cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Andreas; Hundhausen, Christian; Lambert, Millard H; Broadway, Neil; Andrews, Robert C; Bickett, D Mark; Leesnitzer, M Anthony; Becherer, J David

    2005-03-01

    The transmembrane metzinkin-proteases of the ADAM (a disintegrin and a metalloproteinase)-family ADAM10 and ADAM 17 are both implicated in the ectodomain shedding of various cell surface molecules including the IL6-receptor and the transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1 and CXCL16. These molecules are constitutively released from cultured cells, a process that can be rapidly enhanced by cell stimulation with phorbol esters such as PMA. Recent research supports the view that the constitutive cleavage predominantly involves ADAM10 while the inducible one is mediated to a large extent by ADAM17. We here describe the discovery of hydroxamate compounds with different potency against ADAM10 and ADAM17 and different ability to block constitutive and inducible cleavage of IL6R, CX3CL1 and CXCL16 by the two proteases. By screening a number of hydroxamate inhibitors for the inhibition of recombinant metalloproteinases, a compound was found inhibiting ADAM10 with more than 100-fold higher potency than ADAM17, which may be explained by an improved fit of the compound to the S1' specificity pocket of ADAM10 as compared to that of ADAM17. In cell-based cleavage experiments this compound (GI254023X) potently blocked the constitutive release of IL6R, CX3CL1 and CXCL16, which was in line with the reported involvement of ADAM10 but not ADAM17 in this process. By contrast, the compound did not affect the PMA-induced shedding, which was only blocked by GW280264X, a potent inhibitor of ADAM17. As expected, GI254023X did not further decrease the residual release of CX3CL1 and CXCL16 in ADAM10-deficient cells verifying that the compound's effect on the constitutive shedding of these molecules was exclusively due to the inhibition of ADAM10. Thus, GI254023X may by of use as a preferential inhibitor of constitutive shedding events without effecting the inducible shedding in response to agonists acting similar to PMA.

  7. Inhibition of TGF-β Signaling in SHED Enhances Endothelial Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, J G; Gong, T; Wang, Y Y; Zou, T; Heng, B C; Yang, Y Q; Zhang, C F

    2017-10-01

    Low efficiency of deriving endothelial cells (ECs) from adult stem cells hampers their utilization in tissue engineering studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether suppression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling could enhance the differentiation efficiency of dental pulp-derived stem cells into ECs. We initially used vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) to stimulate 2 dental pulp-derived stem cells (dental pulp stem cells and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth [SHED]) and compared their differentiation capacity into ECs. We further evaluated whether the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor I (VEGF-RI)-specific ligand placental growth factor-1 (PlGF-1) could mediate endothelial differentiation. Finally, we investigated whether the TGF-β signaling inhibitor SB-431542 could enhance the inductive effect of VEGF-A on endothelial differentiation, as well as the underlying mechanisms involved. ECs differentiated from dental pulp-derived stem cells exhibited the typical phenotypes of primary ECs, with SHED possessing a higher endothelial differentiation potential than dental pulp stem cells. VEGFR1-specific ligand-PLGF exerted a negligible effect on SHED-ECs differentiation. Compared with VEGF-A alone, the combination of VEGF-A and SB-431542 significantly enhanced the endothelial differentiation of SHED. The presence of SB-431542 inhibited the phosphorylation of Suppressor of Mothers Against Decapentaplegic 2/3 (SMAD2/3), allowing for VEGF-A-dependent phosphorylation and upregulation of VEGFR2. Our results indicate that the combination of VEGF-A and SB-431542 could enhance the differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells into endothelial cells, and this process is mediated through enhancement of VEGF-A-VEGFR2 signaling and concomitant inhibition of TGF-β-SMAD2/3 signaling.

  8. Shed syndecan-2 enhances tumorigenic activities of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sojoong; Choi, Youngsil; Jun, Eunsung; Kim, In-San; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Because earlier studies showed the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-2, sheds from colon cancer cells in culture, the functional roles of shed syndecan-2 were assessed. A non-cleavable mutant of syndecan-2 in which the Asn148-Leu149 residues were replaced with Asn148-Ile149, had decreased shedding, less cancer-associated activities of syndecan-2 in vitro, and less syndecan-2-mediated metastasis of mouse melanoma cells in vivo, suggesting the importance of shedding on syndecan-2-mediated pro-tumorigenic functions. Indeed, shed syndecan-2 from cancer-conditioned media and recombinant shed syndecan-2 enhanced cancer-associated activities, and depletion of shed syndecan-2 abolished these effects. Similarly, shed syndecan-2 was detected from sera of patients from advanced carcinoma (625.9 ng/ml) and promoted cancer-associated activities. Furthermore, a series of syndecan-2 deletion mutants showed that the tumorigenic activity of shed syndecan-2 resided in the C-terminus of the extracellular domain and a shed syndecan-2 synthetic peptide (16 residues) was sufficient to establish subcutaneous primary growth of HT29 colon cancer cells, pulmonary metastases (B16F10 cells), and primary intrasplenic tumor growth and liver metastases (4T1 cells). Taken together, these results demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 directly enhances colon cancer progression and may be a promising therapeutic target for controlling colon cancer development. PMID:25686828

  9. Zinc Up-Regulates Insulin Secretion from β Cell-Like Cells Derived from Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Tooth (SHED).

    PubMed

    Kim, Gyuyoup; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Pae, Eung-Kwon

    2016-12-13

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous tooth (SHED) offer several advantages over other stem cell sources. Using SHED, we examined the roles of zinc and the zinc uptake transporter ZIP8 (Zrt- and irt-like protein 8) while inducing SHED into insulin secreting β cell-like stem cells (i.e., SHEDcells). We observed that ZIP8 expression increased as SHED differentiated into SHEDcells, and that zinc supplementation at day 10 increased the levels of most pancreatic β cell markers-particularly Insulin and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). We confirmed that SHEDcells produce insulin successfully. In addition, we note that zinc supplementation significantly increases insulin secretion with a significant elevation of ZIP8 transporters in SHEDcells. We conclude that SHED can be converted into insulin-secreting β cell-like cells as zinc concentration in the cytosol is elevated. Insulin production by SHEDcells can be regulated via modulation of zinc concentration in the media as ZIP8 expression in the SHEDcells increases.

  10. Zinc Up-Regulates Insulin Secretion from β Cell-Like Cells Derived from Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Tooth (SHED)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gyuyoup; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Pae, Eung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous tooth (SHED) offer several advantages over other stem cell sources. Using SHED, we examined the roles of zinc and the zinc uptake transporter ZIP8 (Zrt- and irt-like protein 8) while inducing SHED into insulin secreting β cell-like stem cells (i.e., SHEDcells). We observed that ZIP8 expression increased as SHED differentiated into SHEDcells, and that zinc supplementation at day 10 increased the levels of most pancreatic β cell markers—particularly Insulin and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). We confirmed that SHEDcells produce insulin successfully. In addition, we note that zinc supplementation significantly increases insulin secretion with a significant elevation of ZIP8 transporters in SHEDcells. We conclude that SHED can be converted into insulin-secreting β cell-like cells as zinc concentration in the cytosol is elevated. Insulin production by SHEDcells can be regulated via modulation of zinc concentration in the media as ZIP8 expression in the SHEDcells increases. PMID:27983594

  11. Characteristics of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) from intact cryopreserved deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Seol; Jeon, Mijeong; Jeon, Mi Jung; Kim, Seong-Oh; Kim, Seung-Hye; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Jea-Ho; Ahn, Su-Jin; Shin, Yooseok; Song, Je Seon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the characteristics of stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) from cryopreserved intact deciduous teeth with those of fresh SHED. In total, 20 exfoliated deciduous teeth were randomly divided into a fresh group (f-SHED; n = 11) and cryopreserved group (c-SHED; n = 9; stored for 1-8 months). Following thawing and separation of the pulp, the SHED cells were cultured, and the characteristics as mesenchymal stem cells were investigated using proliferation assays, cell-cycle analysis, colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assays, and flow cytometry analyses. Furthermore, differentiation into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages was investigated in vitro as well as in vivo via transplantation in mice. We found no significant differences between the two groups in the proliferation analyses, in the expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers, or in the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in vitro (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the in vivo transplantation results showed no significant differences in the quantity of bone tissue that formed or in histochemistry performance (p < 0.05). In conclusion, cryopreservation of intact exfoliated deciduous teeth appears to be a useful method for preserving SHED.

  12. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging. This

  13. Shedding light on biology of bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Johannes P; Basler, Marek

    2016-11-05

    To understand basic principles of living organisms one has to know many different properties of all cellular components, their mutual interactions but also their amounts and spatial organization. Live-cell imaging is one possible approach to obtain such data. To get multiple snapshots of a cellular process, the imaging approach has to be gentle enough to not disrupt basic functions of the cell but also have high temporal and spatial resolution to detect and describe the changes. Light microscopy has become a method of choice and since its early development over 300 years ago revolutionized our understanding of living organisms. As most cellular components are indistinguishable from the rest of the cellular contents, the second revolution came from a discovery of specific labelling techniques, such as fusions to fluorescent proteins that allowed specific tracking of a component of interest. Currently, several different tags can be tracked independently and this allows us to simultaneously monitor the dynamics of several cellular components and from the correlation of their dynamics to infer their respective functions. It is, therefore, not surprising that live-cell fluorescence microscopy significantly advanced our understanding of basic cellular processes. Current cameras are fast enough to detect changes with millisecond time resolution and are sensitive enough to detect even a few photons per pixel. Together with constant improvement of properties of fluorescent tags, it is now possible to track single molecules in living cells over an extended period of time with a great temporal resolution. The parallel development of new illumination and detection techniques allowed breaking the diffraction barrier and thus further pushed the resolution limit of light microscopy. In this review, we would like to cover recent advances in live-cell imaging technology relevant to bacterial cells and provide a few examples of research that has been possible due to imaging

  14. Membrane Cholesterol Modulates LOX-1 Shedding in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Magda; Vindigni, Giulia; Testa, Barbara; Raniolo, Sofia; Fasciglione, Giovanni Francesco; Coletta, Massimiliano; Biocca, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a scavenger receptor responsible for ox-LDL recognition, binding and internalization, which is up-regulated during atherogenesis. Its activation triggers endothelium dysfunction and induces inflammation. A soluble form of LOX-1 has been identified in the human blood and its presence considered a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. We recently showed that cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit ox-LDL binding and internalization, rescuing the ox-LDL induced apoptotic phenotype in primary endothelial cells. Here we have investigated the molecular bases of human LOX-1 shedding by metalloproteinases and the role of cell membrane cholesterol on the regulation of this event by modulating its level with MβCD and statins. We report that membrane cholesterol affects the release of different forms of LOX-1 in cells transiently and stably expressing human LOX-1 and in a human endothelial cell line (EA.hy926). In particular, our data show that i) cholesterol depletion triggers the release of LOX-1 in exosomes as a full-length transmembrane isoform and as a truncated ectodomain soluble fragment (sLOX-1); ii) endothelial cells secrete a soluble metalloproteinase which induces LOX-1 ectodomain shedding and iii) long term statins treatment enhances sLOX-1 proteolytic shedding.

  15. Awareness of Stem cells & Health Implications of SHED found in Pediatric Dentition among Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Goomer, Pallvi; Sidhu, Arshpreet Kaur; Tuli, Preety; Kansal, Shinam; Bansal, Kanishka; Thakre, Gauri R

    2014-02-01

    Primary teeth may be an ideal source of postnatal stem cells to regenerate tooth structures and bone, and possibly to treat neural tissue injury or degenerative diseases. SHED (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth) were identified to be a population of highly proliferative, clonogenic cells capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types including neural cells, adipocytes, and odontoblasts. The present study was carried out to assess the knowledge, awareness & attitude of parents visiting various dental clinics in tricity area of india regarding stem cells from primary teeth and their potential health benefits. A total of 250 parents of pediatric patients seeking dental treatment at various dental clinics in tricity area were included in the study. Parents were personally interviewed with a questionnaire and their responses were immediately computed. Among 250 parents only 95(62%) had knowledge regarding stem cells. While only 47(18.8) were informed regarding stem cells from baby teeth & their benefits. Maximum subjects were informed through internet 21(44.6%) followed by information through friends(23.4%) and dentist(21.2%). Very few were informed through magazines, newspaper and only one (2.1%) person was informed by television. It is important to create more awareness among the populace of our country about the potential health benefits of stem cells from primary teeth. Dentist should educate parents, caregivers and teachers regarding SHED & its benefits, ensuring good health for every Indian child and hence health of future citizens. How to cite the article: Goomer P, Sidhu AK, Tuli P, Kansal S, Bansal K, Thakre GR. Awareness of Stem cells & Health Implications of SHED found in Pediatric Dentition among Indian Population. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):44-7.

  16. Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Stimulate Ruffling and Shedding of Mammalian Cell Plasma Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Wakefield, Devin L; Han, Yimo; Muller, David A; Holowka, David A; Baird, Barbara A; Dichtel, William R

    2016-08-11

    Graphene oxide (GO) has attracted intense interest for use in living systems and environmental applications. GO's compatibility with mammalian cells is sometimes inferred from its low cytotoxicity, but such conclusions ignore non-lethal effects that will influence GO's utility. Here we demonstrate, with rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells, profound plasma membrane (PM) ruffling and shedding induced by GO using confocal and live cell fluorescence microscopy, as well as scanning electron microscopy. These membrane structures contain immunoglobulin E receptors, are resistant to detergents, and lack detectable fluorescence labeling of F-actin and fibronectin. The formation of these membrane structures correlates with a loss of contact inhibition between RBL cells. We observe similar cellular responses towards GO for NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. These findings reveal a previously unreported cellular response towards foreign nanomaterials. Membrane ruffling and shedding raise fundamental questions about how GO interacts with the PM, as well as its potential to modulate cellular mechanosensing for tissue engineering, stem cell differentiation, and other biomedical applications.

  17. Inhibitor of Aurora Kinase B Induces Differentially Cell Death and Polyploidy via DNA Damage Response Pathways in Neurological Malignancy: Shedding New Light on the Challenge of Resistance to AZD1152-HQPA.

    PubMed

    Zekri, Ali; Ghaffari, Seyed H; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Estiar, Mehrdad Asghari; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2016-04-01

    Aurora kinase B (AURKB), a crucial regulator of malignant mitosis, is involved in chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. AZD1152-HQPA is a selective inhibitor for AURKB activity and currently bears clinical assessment for several malignancies. However, the effect of this drug still needs to be elucidated in neurological malignancies. In this study, we investigated the restrictive potentials of AZD1152-HQPA in U87MG and SK-N-MC. AZD1152-HQPA treatment resulted in growth arrest, modification of cell cycle, and inhibition of colony formation in both cell lines. Furthermore, lower concentrations of AZD1152-HQPA profoundly induced apoptosis in U87GM (p53/p73 wild type) cells in parallel with an upregulation of p53 and its target genes BAX, BAD, APAF1, and PUMA. But remarkably, SK-N-MC (p53/p73 double null) responded to AZD1152-HQPA at much higher concentrations with an upregulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression, induction of excessive endoreduplication, and polyploidy rather than apoptosis. Although SK-N-MC was resistant to AZD1152-HQPA, we did not find a mutation in the coding sequence of Aurora B gene or overexpressions of ABCG2 and ABCB1 as reported previously to be resistance mechanisms. However, our results suggest that p53/p73 status could be an important mechanism for the type of response and resistance of the tumor cells to AZD1152-HQPA. Collectively, inhibition of Aurora kinase B differentially induced cell death and polyploidy via DNA damage response pathways, depending on the status of p53/p73. We suggest p53/p73 could be a key regulator of sensitivity to AZD1152-HQPA and their status should be explored in clinical response to this ongoing drug in clinical trials.

  18. Human Deciduous Teeth Stem Cells (SHED) Display Neural Crest Signature Characters

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-García, Luis R.

    2017-01-01

    Human dental tissues are sources of neural crest origin multipotent stem cells whose regenerative potential is a focus of extensive studies. Rational programming of clinical applications requires a more detailed knowledge of the characters inherited from neural crest. Investigation of neural crest cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells provided opportunity for their comparison with the postnatal dental cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the culture conditions in the expression by dental cells of neural crest characters. The results of the study demonstrate that specific neural crest cells requirements, serum-free, active WNT signaling and inactive SMAD 2/3, are needed for the activity of the neural crest characters in dental cells. Specifically, the decreasing concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) from regularly used for dental cells 10% to 2% and below, or using serum-free medium, led to emergence of a subset of epithelial-like cells expressing the two key neural crest markers, p75 and HNK-1. Further, the serum-free medium supplemented with neural crest signaling requirements (WNT inducer BIO and TGF-β inhibitor REPSOX), induced epithelial-like phenotype, upregulated the p75, Sox10 and E-Cadherin and downregulated the mesenchymal genes (SNAIL1, ZEB1, TWIST). An expansion medium containing 2% FBS allowed to obtain an epithelial/mesenchymal SHED population showing high proliferation, clonogenic, multi-lineage differentiation capacities. Future experiments will be required to determine the effects of these features on regenerative potential of this novel SHED population. PMID:28125654

  19. Shedding of mitotic cells from the surface of multicell spheroids during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, J.; Freyer, J.P.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    During the growth of EMT6/Ro mammary tumor multicell spheroids, a large number of cells are shed into the suspension medium. The rate of cell shedding was 218 cells per square millimeter of spheroid surface per hour, or up to 1.5% of the total spheroid cell content per hour. Shed cells had a clonogenic capacity equal to that of exponential monolayer cultures and were further characterized by volume distribution, mitotic index, flow cytofluorometry, and autoradiography. The results indicated that cells are released from the spheroid surface at mitosis, presumably due to a loosening of the cell-to-cell attachment during this cycle phase. These mitotic cells, when placed in monolayer culture, attached and grew synchronously with a cell cycle time of about 13 hours. Shed cells kept in suspension culture had a similar cell cycle time, but these cells reaggregated immediately after mitosis. The results indicated that cell shedding and reaggregation both occur near the time of mitosis and are intrinsic factors regulating the initiation and subsequent growth of multicell spheroids. Although these studies were done with spheroids cultured in vitro, shedding of mitotic cells may play an important role in the in vivo process of metastasis.

  20. Cells shed from tumours show reduced clonogenicity, resistance to apoptosis, and in vivo tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, M A; Kristensen, C A; Melder, R J; Roberge, S; Calautti, E; Fukumura, D; Jain, R K

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare growth characteristics of cells shed from a tumour with the native tumour cells. The human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T and its highly metastatic subline LS LiM 6 were grown as tissue-isolated tumours in nude mice and perfused to collect shed cells. The tumours were then excised and prepared into single-cell suspensions. Clonogenicity in 0.3–0.9% agarose, apoptotic fraction, and in vivo tumorigenicity were determined for each population. In both tumour lines, shed cells were less clonogenic, more apoptotic and less tumorigenic than cells isolated directly from their native tissue. These findings suggest that shed cells have a low metastatic potential compared to native tumour cells, most likely because they represent an apoptotic population. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555742

  1. Acceleration of epithelial cell syndecan-1 shedding by anthrax hemolytic virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Taissia G; Millis, Bryan; Bradburne, Chris; Nazarenko, Svetlana; Bailey, Charles; Chandhoke, Vikas; Popov, Serguei G

    2006-01-01

    Background It has been recently reported that major pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accelerate a normal process of cell surface syndecan-1 (Synd1) ectodomain shedding as a mechanism of host damage due to the production of shedding-inducing virulence factors. We tested if acceleration of Synd1 shedding takes place in vitro upon treatment of epithelial cells with B. anthracis hemolysins, as well as in vivo during anthrax infection in mice. Results The isolated anthrax hemolytic proteins AnlB (sphingomyelinase) and AnlO (cholesterol-binding pore-forming factor), as well as ClnA (B. cereus homolog of B. anthracis phosphatidyl choline-preferring phospholipase C) cause accelerated shedding of Synd1 and E-cadherin from epithelial cells and compromise epithelial barrier integrity within a few hours. In comparison with hemolysins in a similar range of concentrations, anthrax lethal toxin (LT) also accelerates shedding albeit at slower rate. Individual components of LT, lethal factor and protective antigen are inactive with regard to shedding. Inhibition experiments favor a hypothesis that activities of tested bacterial shedding inducers converge on the stimulation of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases of the Syk family, ultimately leading to activation of cellular sheddase. Both LT and AnlO modulate ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways, while JNK pathway seems to be irrelevant to accelerated shedding. Accelerated shedding of Synd1 also takes place in DBA/2 mice challenged with Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) spores. Elevated levels of shed ectodomain are readily detectable in circulation after 24 h. Conclusion The concerted acceleration of shedding by several virulence factors could represent a new pathogenic mechanism contributing to disruption of epithelial or endothelial integrity, hemorrhage, edema and abnormal cell signaling during anthrax infection. PMID:16464252

  2. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  3. Chromosomal differentiation of cells

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 16, discusses the chromosomal differentiation of cells. The chromosomes of differentiated cells have been much less studies than those of meristematic or germline cells, probably because such cells do not usually divide spontaneously. However, in many cases they can be induced to undergo mitosis. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Deciphering the Complex Signaling Systems That Regulate Intestinal Epithelial Cell Death Processes and Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Angela M.; Watson, Alastair J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells play a fundamental role in maintaining homeostasis. Shedding of intestinal cells in a controlled manner is critical to maintenance of barrier function. Barrier function is maintained during this shedding process by a redistribution of tight junctional proteins to facilitate closure of the gap left by the shedding cell. However, despite the obvious importance of epithelial cell shedding to gut health, a central question is how the extrusion of epithelial cells is achieved, enabling barrier integrity to be maintained in the healthy gut and restored during inflammation remains largely unanswered. Recent studies have provided evidence that excessive epithelial cell shedding and loss of epithelial barrier integrity is triggered by exposure to lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha. Subsequent studies have provided evidence of the involvement of specific cellular components and signaling mechanisms as well as the functionality of microbiota that can be either detrimental or beneficial for intestinal barrier integrity. This review will focus on the evidence and decipher how the signaling systems through which the mucosal immune system and microbiota can regulate epithelial cell shedding and how these mechanisms interact to preserve the viability of the epithelium. PMID:28769935

  5. Prolonged Shedding of Human Coronavirus in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients: Risk Factors and Viral Genome Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ogimi, Chikara; Greninger, Alexander L; Waghmare, Alpana A; Kuypers, Jane M; Shean, Ryan C; Xie, Hu; Leisenring, Wendy M; Stevens-Ayers, Terry L; Jerome, Keith R; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2017-07-15

    Recent data suggest that human coronavirus (HCoV) pneumonia is associated with significant mortality in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Investigation of risk factors for prolonged shedding and intrahost genome evolution may provide critical information for development of novel therapeutics. We retrospectively reviewed HCT recipients with HCoV detected in nasal samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HCoV strains were identified using strain-specific PCR. Shedding duration was defined as time between first positive and first negative sample. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors for prolonged shedding (≥21 days). Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) was conducted when ≥4 samples with cycle threshold values of <28 were available. Seventeen of 44 patients had prolonged shedding. Among 31 available samples, 35% were OC43, 32% were NL63, 19% were HKU1, and 13% were 229E; median shedding duration was similar between strains (P = .79). Bivariable logistic regression analyses suggested that high viral load, receipt of high-dose steroids, and myeloablative conditioning were associated with prolonged shedding. mNGS among 5 subjects showed single-nucleotide polymorphisms from OC43 and NL63 starting 1 month following onset of shedding. High viral load, high-dose steroids, and myeloablative conditioning were associated with prolonged shedding of HCoV in HCT recipients. Genome changes were consistent with the expected molecular clock of HCoV.

  6. The shed ectodomain of Nr-CAM stimulates cell proliferation and motility, and confers cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Kaplan, Anna; Raveh, Shani; Gavert, Nancy; Sakurai, Takeshi; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2005-12-15

    Nr-CAM, a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule family, known for its function in neuronal outgrowth and guidance, was recently identified as a target gene of beta-catenin signaling in human melanoma and colon carcinoma cells and tissue. Retrovirally mediated transduction of Nr-CAM into fibroblasts induces cell motility and tumorigenesis. We investigated the mechanisms by which Nr-CAM can confer properties related to tumor cell behavior and found that Nr-CAM expression in NIH3T3 cells protects cells from apoptosis in the absence of serum by constitutively activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT signaling pathways. We detected a metalloprotease-mediated shedding of Nr-CAM into the culture medium of cells transfected with Nr-CAM, and of endogenous Nr-CAM in B16 melanoma cells. Conditioned medium and purified Nr-CAM-Fc fusion protein both enhanced cell motility, proliferation, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT activation. Moreover, Nr-CAM was found in complex with alpha4beta1 integrins in melanoma cells, indicating that it can mediate, in addition to homophilic cell-cell adhesion, heterophilic adhesion with extracellular matrix receptors. Suppression of Nr-CAM levels by small interfering RNA in B16 melanoma inhibited the adhesive and tumorigenic capacities of these cells. Stable expression of the Nr-CAM ectodomain in NIH3T3 cells conferred cell transformation and tumorigenesis in mice, suggesting that the metalloprotease-mediated shedding of Nr-CAM is a principal route for promoting oncogenesis by Nr-CAM.

  7. Tumor cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aarbakke, J.; Chiang, P.K.; Koeffler, H.P

    1987-01-01

    This book contains four sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: Studies of Gene Expression During Granulocyte Maturation; Proliferation and Differentiation of Human Leukemic Cells in Culture; Sequence-Specific DNA Methylation: Promoter Inactivation and Release of the Expression Block; Retinoic Acid-Induced Differentiation of HL-60: Studies In Vitro and In Vivo; and Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells by Nucleoside Analogues.

  8. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L.; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, shedding of MULT1, a high affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are inhibitory, and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25745066

  9. Shed Syndecan-1 Translocates to the Nucleus of Cells Delivering Growth Factors and Inhibiting Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Mark D.; Ramani, Vishnu C.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2015-01-01

    The heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 is proteolytically shed from the surface of multiple myeloma cells and is abundant in the bone marrow microenvironment where it promotes tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that shed syndecan-1 present in the medium conditioned by tumor cells is taken up by bone marrow-derived stromal cells and transported to the nucleus. Translocation of shed syndecan-1 (sSDC1) to the nucleus was blocked by addition of exogenous heparin or heparan sulfate, pretreatment of conditioned medium with heparinase III, or growth of cells in sodium chlorate, indicating that sulfated heparan sulfate chains are required for nuclear translocation. Interestingly, cargo bound to sSDC1 heparan sulfate chains (i.e. hepatocyte growth factor) was transported to the nucleus along with sSDC1, and removal of heparan sulfate-bound cargo from sSDC1 abolished its translocation to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, sSDC1 binds to the histone acetyltransferase enzyme p300, and histone acetyltransferase activity and histone acetylation are diminished. These findings reveal a novel function for shed syndecan-1 in mediating tumor-host cross-talk by shuttling growth factors to the nucleus and by altering histone acetylation in host cells. In addition, this work has broad implications beyond myeloma because shed syndecan-1 is present in high levels in many tumor types as well as in other disease states. PMID:25404732

  10. Coxsackievirus B Exits the Host Cell in Shed Microvesicles Displaying Autophagosomal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Mangale, Vrushali; Rahawi, Shahad; McIntyre, Laura L.; Williams, Wesley; Kha, Nelson; Cruz, Casey; Hancock, Bryan M.; Nguyen, David P.; Sayen, M. Richard; Hilton, Brett J.; Doran, Kelly S.; Segall, Anca M.; Wolkowicz, Roland; Cornell, Christopher T.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Feuer, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a member of the picornavirus family and enterovirus genus, causes viral myocarditis, aseptic meningitis, and pancreatitis in humans. We genetically engineered a unique molecular marker, “fluorescent timer” protein, within our infectious CVB3 clone and isolated a high-titer recombinant viral stock (Timer-CVB3) following transfection in HeLa cells. “Fluorescent timer” protein undergoes slow conversion of fluorescence from green to red over time, and Timer-CVB3 can be utilized to track virus infection and dissemination in real time. Upon infection with Timer-CVB3, HeLa cells, neural progenitor and stem cells (NPSCs), and C2C12 myoblast cells slowly changed fluorescence from green to red over 72 hours as determined by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometric analysis. The conversion of “fluorescent timer” protein in HeLa cells infected with Timer-CVB3 could be interrupted by fixation, suggesting that the fluorophore was stabilized by formaldehyde cross-linking reactions. Induction of a type I interferon response or ribavirin treatment reduced the progression of cell-to-cell virus spread in HeLa cells or NPSCs infected with Timer-CVB3. Time lapse photography of partially differentiated NPSCs infected with Timer-CVB3 revealed substantial intracellular membrane remodeling and the assembly of discrete virus replication organelles which changed fluorescence color in an asynchronous fashion within the cell. “Fluorescent timer” protein colocalized closely with viral 3A protein within virus replication organelles. Intriguingly, infection of partially differentiated NPSCs or C2C12 myoblast cells induced the release of abundant extracellular microvesicles (EMVs) containing matured “fluorescent timer” protein and infectious virus representing a novel route of virus dissemination. CVB3 virions were readily observed within purified EMVs by transmission electron microscopy, and infectious virus was identified within low

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  12. Shedding Light on the Nature of Seminal Round Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Gianpiero D.; Neri, Queenie V.; Cozzubbo, Tyler; Cheung, Stephanie; Pereira, Nigel; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this investigation we assess the incidence of round cells (RCs) in semen samples in our infertile patient population and their significance on intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycle outcomes. We also evaluate the usefulness of RCs as indicators of bacterial infection and highlight the origin of this cell-type, as well as its role in the human ejaculate. Patients and Methods In a prospective fashion, a total of 4,810 ejaculated samples were included in the study during a period of 24 months. RCs were characterized for white blood cell (WBC) components versus exfoliated germ cells by testing for multiple markers of ploidy as well as protamine assays. Cases displaying ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs were screened for bacteria. Raw specimens containing RC were processed by peroxidase and other leukocyte assays, specific stains for protamines were used to identify spermiogenic stage, aneuploidy (FISH) assessment was carried out, and the presence of various Sertoli-cell cytoplasmic remnants was analyzed to identify and characterize immature germ cells. The effect of RC on clinical outcome was assessed in specimens used for ICSI. Results The average age of the men involved was 39.2 ± 7 years. Semen samples had a mean concentration of 40.7 ± 31 x 106/ml, motility of 42.6 ± 35%, and morphology of 2.3 ± 2%. RCs were identified in 261 specimens, representing a proportion of 5.4%. Men with RCs had comparable age but lower sperm concentration and morphology than the control group (P<0.001). The aneuploidy rate of 4.3% in RCs group was remarkably higher than the control group (2.3%; P<0.001). Sperm aneuploidy rate positively correlated with the number of RCs (P<0.001). Of 44 men, 17 of them in 18 cycles had up to 1.9 x 106/ml RCs without affecting fertilization and clinical pregnancy rates when compared to controls (n = 365 cycles). In 27 men undergoing 33 ICSI cycles with ≥ 2 x 106/ml RCs, the fertilization rate trended lower and the miscarriage rate was

  13. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  14. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  15. RSV-encoded NS2 promotes epithelial cell shedding and distal airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liesman, Rachael M.; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Luongo, Cindy L.; Yang, Lijuan; Proia, Alan D.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Collins, Peter L.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the major cause of bronchiolitis in young children. The factors that contribute to the increased propensity of RSV-induced distal airway disease compared with other commonly encountered respiratory viruses remain unclear. Here, we identified the RSV-encoded nonstructural 2 (NS2) protein as a viral genetic determinant for initiating RSV-induced distal airway obstruction. Infection of human cartilaginous airway epithelium (HAE) and a hamster model of disease with recombinant respiratory viruses revealed that NS2 promotes shedding of infected epithelial cells, resulting in two consequences of virus infection. First, epithelial cell shedding accelerated the reduction of virus titers, presumably by clearing virus-infected cells from airway mucosa. Second, epithelial cells shedding into the narrow-diameter bronchiolar airway lumens resulted in rapid accumulation of detached, pleomorphic epithelial cells, leading to acute distal airway obstruction. Together, these data indicate that RSV infection of the airway epithelium, via the action of NS2, promotes epithelial cell shedding, which not only accelerates viral clearance but also contributes to acute obstruction of the distal airways. Our results identify RSV NS2 as a contributing factor for the enhanced propensity of RSV to cause severe airway disease in young children and suggest NS2 as a potential therapeutic target for reducing the severity of distal airway disease. PMID:24713657

  16. Regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by cytokines is mediated through differential activation of MAP kinase signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2009-09-10

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a pivotal role in coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, and cancer, but its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). In this study we examined the mechanisms involved in the regulation of EPCR shedding in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), but not interferon-{gamma} and interleukin-6, suppressed EPCR mRNA transcription and cell-associated EPCR expression in HUVEC. The release of sEPCR induced by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} correlated with activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). EPCR shedding was also induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, ionomycin, anisomycin, thiol oxidants or alkylators, thrombin, and disruptors of lipid rafts. Both basal and induced shedding of EPCR was blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitors, TAPI-0 and GM6001, and by the reduced non-protein thiols, glutathione, dihydrolipoic acid, dithiothreitol, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Because other antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to block the cleavage of EPCR, a direct suppression of metalloproteinase activity seems responsible for the observed effects of reduced thiols. In summary, the shedding of EPCR in HUVEC is effectively regulated by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}, and downstream by MAP kinase signaling pathways and metalloproteinases.

  17. Mitochondria Regulate the Differentiation of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroki; Thi Mai Pham, Thanh; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Masuda, Keiji; Hirofuji, Yuta; Han, Xu; Sato, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Nonaka, Kazuaki

    2017-08-19

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are isolated from the dental pulp tissue of primary teeth and can differentiate into neuronal cells. Although SHED are a desirable type of stem cells for transplantation therapy and for the study of neurological diseases, a large part of the neuronal differentiation machinery of SHED remains unclear. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial activity is involved in the differentiation of stem cells. In the present work, we investigated the neuronal differentiation machinery of SHED by focusing on mitochondrial activity. During neuronal differentiation of SHED, we observed increased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased mitochondrial DNA, and elongated mitochondria. Furthermore, to examine the demand for mitochondrial activity in neuronal differentiation, we then differentiated SHED into neuronal cells in the presence of rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I, and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), a mitochondrial uncoupler, and found that neuronal differentiation was inhibited by treatment with rotenone and CCCP. These results indicated that increased mitochondrial activity was crucial for the neuronal differentiation of SHED.Key words: mitochondria, differentiation, stem cells, dental pulp, exfoliated deciduous teeth.

  18. Characterization of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Ectodomain Shedding from Mouse Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Agaybi, Samih; Gurley, Susan B.; Puente, Lawrence; Burns, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is highly expressed in the kidney proximal tubule, where it cleaves angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1-7). Urinary ACE2 levels increase in diabetes, suggesting that ACE2 may be shed from tubular cells. The aim of this study was to determine if ACE2 is shed from proximal tubular cells, to characterize ACE2 fragments, and to study pathways for shedding. Studies involved primary cultures of mouse proximal tubular cells, with ACE2 activity measured using a synthetic substrate, and analysis of ACE2 fragments by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. The culture media from mouse proximal tubular cells demonstrated a time-dependent increase in ACE2 activity, suggesting constitutive ACE2 shedding. ACE2 was detected in media as two bands at ∼90 kDa and ∼70 kDa on immunoblots. By contrast, full-length ACE2 appeared at ∼100 kDa in cell lysates or mouse kidney cortex. Mass spectrometry of the two deglycosylated fragments identified peptides matching mouse ACE2 at positions 18-706 and 18-577, respectively. The C-terminus of the 18-706 peptide fragment contained a non-tryptic site, suggesting that Met706 is a candidate ACE2 cleavage site. Incubation of cells in high D-glucose (25 mM) (and to a lesser extent Ang II) for 48–72 h increased ACE2 activity in the media (p<0.001), an effect blocked by inhibition of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)17. High D-glucose increased ADAM17 activity in cell lysates (p<0.05). These data indicate that two glycosylated ACE2 fragments are constitutively shed from mouse proximal tubular cells. ACE2 shedding is stimulated by high D-glucose, at least partly via an ADAM17-mediated pathway. The results suggest that proximal tubular shedding of ACE2 may increase in diabetes, which could enhance degradation of Ang II in the tubular lumen, and increase levels of Ang-(1-7). PMID:24454948

  19. Measles virus blind to its epithelial cell receptor remains virulent in rhesus monkeys but cannot cross the airway epithelium and is not shed

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Vincent H.J.; Sinn, Patrick L.; Hodge, Gregory; Miest, Tanner; Devaux, Patricia; Oezguen, Numan; Braun, Werner; McCray, Paul B.; McChesney, Michael B.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The current model of measles virus (MV) pathogenesis implies that apical infection of airway epithelial cells precedes systemic spread. An alternative model suggests that primarily infected lymphatic cells carry MV to the basolateral surface of epithelial cells, supporting MV shedding into the airway lumen and contagion. This model predicts that a mutant MV, unable to enter cells through the unidentified epithelial cell receptor (EpR), would remain virulent but not be shed. To test this model, we identified residues of the MV attachment protein sustaining EpR-mediated cell fusion. These nonpolar or uncharged polar residues defined an area located near the binding site of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM), the receptor for MV on lymphatic cells. We then generated an EpR-blind virus maintaining SLAM-dependent cell entry and inoculated rhesus monkeys intranasally. Hosts infected with the selectively EpR-blind MV developed rash and anorexia while averaging slightly lower viremia than hosts infected with wild-type MV but did not shed virus in the airways. The mechanism restricting shedding was characterized using primary well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Wild-type MV infected columnar epithelial cells bearing tight junctions only when applied basolaterally, while the EpR-blind virus did not infect these cells. Thus, EpR is probably a basolateral protein, and infection of the airway epithelium is not essential for systemic spread and virulence of MV. PMID:18568079

  20. Distinct Cytokine Patterns in Semen Influence Local HIV Shedding and HIV Target Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Abraham J.; Masson, Lindi; Ronacher, Katharina; Walzl, Gerhard; Coetzee, David; Lewis, David A.; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Burgers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Semen is the main vector for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from men to women. We investigated the influence of cytokines in semen on local HIV burden and activated T cells. Methods. Blood and semen were collected from 42 HIV-negative and 38 HIV-positive men. Concentrations of 20 cytokines were measured by Luminex, and frequencies of activated T cells were measured by flow cytometry. Results. Semen contained higher concentrations of proinflammatory (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin [IL]-8, IL-6, Fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and adaptive cytokines (IL-7 and IL-15) and higher frequencies of activated T cells compared to blood. Plasma IL-2, eotaxin, MIP-1β, and IL-15 and semen eotaxin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were associated with T-cell activation. Cytokines in semen were highly coregulated in HIV-negative men; however, this network was disrupted during HIV infection. Several cytokines in semen correlated with HIV shedding (G-CSF, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], IL-10). Conclusion. Higher levels of inflammation and T-cell activation were observed in semen compared with blood. Seminal G-CSF, which influences neutrophil survival, T-cell function, and dendritic cell activation, was associated with T-cell activation and HIV shedding and may be an important target for reducing HIV shedding or risk. PMID:24273175

  1. An investigation of the shedding of macromolecules from the Ehrlich mouse ascites tumor cell

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    The spontaneous release, or shedding, of cell surface components into the extracellular medium may be important in the determination of several features of the cancer cell phenotype. The release of macromolecules from the Erhlich mouse ascites tumor cell was studied under a variety of experimental conditions to elucidate the origin and the underlying mechanisms of release. The extrinsic macromolecules are a diverse group with apparent molecular weights ranging from 13,500 to 400,000 daltons. External labeling of the cell surface with tritiated 4,4{prime}-diisothiocyano-1,2-diphenylethane-2,2-disulfonic acid (({sup 3}H)H{sub 2}DIDS) reveals a slow loss of labeled components at 4{degrees}C, while at 21{degrees}C and 37{degrees}C an initial rapid loss is followed by a slower release. In vitro metabolic labeling with (1-{sup 14}C)-D-glucosamine hydrochloride, D-(2-{sup 3}H)-mannose and various ({sup 3}H)-L-amino acids results in the appearance of labeled macromolecules in the medium suggesting tumor, not mouse, origin. These data suggest that the extrinsic macromolecules originate from the cell surface. Macromolecules are shed by a temperature and pH sensitive process. These results suggest that a limited proteolytic digestion, or sublethal autolysis, of the cell surface may occur in this system. The macromolecules shed by the Ehrlich cell originate from the surface and are probably released by sublethal autolysis, direct secretion and a passive process.

  2. Banking stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED): saving for the future.

    PubMed

    Arora, Vipin; Arora, Pooja; Munshi, A K

    2009-01-01

    Tooth derived cells are readily accessible and provide an easy and minimally invasive way to obtain and store stem cells for future use. Banking ones own tooth-derived stem cells is a reasonable and simple alternative to harvesting stem cells from other tissues. Obtaining stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) is simple and convenient, with little or no trauma. Every child loses primary teeth, which creates the perfect opportunity to recover and store this convenient source of stem cells--should they be needed to treat future injuries or ailments and presents a far better alternative to simply discarding the teeth or storing them as mementos from the past. Furthermore, using ones own stem cells poses few, if any, risks for developing immune reactions or rejection following transplantation and also eliminates the potential of contracting disease from donor cells. Stem cells can also be recovered from developing wisdom teeth and permanent teeth. Individuals have different opportunities at different stages of their life to bank these valuable cells. It is best to recover stem cells when a child is young and healthy and the cells are strong and proliferative. The purpose of this review is to discuss the present scenario as well as the technical details of tooth banking as related to SHED cells.

  3. Shedding of APP limits its synaptogenic activity and cell adhesion properties

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Ronny; Schilling, Sandra; Soba, Peter; Rupp, Carsten; Hartmann, Tobias; Wagner, Katja; Merdes, Gunter; Eggert, Simone; Kins, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and has essential synapse promoting functions. Synaptogenic activity as well as cell adhesion properties of APP presumably depend on trans-cellular dimerization via its extracellular domain. Since neuronal APP is extensively processed by secretases, it raises the question if APP shedding affects its cell adhesion and synaptogenic properties. We show that inhibition of APP shedding using cleavage deficient forms of APP or a dominant negative α-secretase strongly enhanced its cell adhesion and synaptogenic activity suggesting that synapse promoting function of APP is tightly regulated by α-secretase mediated processing, similar to other trans-cellular synaptic adhesion molecules. PMID:25520622

  4. Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule Expression and Shedding in Thyroid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miccichè, Francesca; Da Riva, Luca; Fabbi, Marina; Pilotti, Silvana; Mondellini, Piera; Ferrini, Silvano; Canevari, Silvana; Pierotti, Marco A.; Bongarzone, Italia

    2011-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM, CD166) is expressed in various tissues, cancers, and cancer-initiating cells. Alterations in expression of ALCAM have been reported in several human tumors, and cell adhesion functions have been proposed to explain its association with cancer. Here we documented high levels of ALCAM expression in human thyroid tumors and cell lines. Through proteomic characterization of ALCAM expression in the human papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line TPC-1, we identified the presence of a full-length membrane-associated isoform in cell lysate and of soluble ALCAM isoforms in conditioned medium. This finding is consistent with proteolytically shed ALCAM ectodomains. Nonspecific agents, such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or ionomycin, provoked increased ectodomain shedding. Epidermal growth factor receptor stimulation also enhanced ALCAM secretion through an ADAM17/TACE-dependent pathway. ADAM17/TACE was expressed in the TPC-1 cell line, and ADAM17/TACE silencing by specific small interfering RNAs reduced ALCAM shedding. In addition, the CGS27023A inhibitor of ADAM17/TACE function reduced ALCAM release in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited cell migration in a wound-healing assay. We also provide evidence for the existence of novel O-glycosylated forms and of a novel 60-kDa soluble form of ALCAM, which is particularly abundant following cell stimulation by PMA. ALCAM expression in papillary and medullary thyroid cancer specimens and in the surrounding non-tumoral component was studied by western blot and immunohistochemistry, with results demonstrating that tumor cells overexpress ALCAM. These findings strongly suggest the possibility that ALCAM may have an important role in thyroid tumor biology. PMID:21364949

  5. Advanced Glycation Endproducts Impair Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration and Homing via Syndecan 4 Shedding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Li, Ran; Wu, Han; Chen, Jianzhou; Li, Guannan; Chen, Qinhua; Wei, Zhonghai; He, Guixin; Wang, Lian; Ferro, Albert; Xu, Biao

    2017-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a subtype of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)-mediated EPC mobilization from bone marrow to areas of ischemia plays an important role in angiogenesis. Previous studies have reported that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which are important mediators of diabetes-related vascular pathology, may impair EPC migration and homing, but the mechanism is unclear. Syndecan-4 (synd4) is a ubiquitous heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor on the cell surface, involved in SDF-1-dependent cell migration. The extracellular domain of synd4 (ext-synd4) is shed in the context of acute inflammation, but the shedding of ext-synd4 in response to AGEs is undefined. Here we investigated changes in ext-synd4 on EPCs in response to AGEs, focusing on the influence of impaired synd4 signaling on EPC migration and homing. We found decreased full length and increased residue of synd4 in cells incubated with AGEs, with concomitant increase in the soluble fragment of ext-synd4 in the cell medium. EPCs from patients with type 2 diabetes expressed less ext-synd4 as assessed by Western blotting. Flow cytometry analysis showed less ext-synd4 on circulating CD34(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells, of which EPCs form a subgroup. We then explored the role of synd4 in EPC migration and homing. Impaired migration of synd4-deficient EPCs was observed by a 2D-chemotaxis slide. Furthermore, poor homing of synd4-/- EPCs was observed in a mouse model of lower limb ischemia. This study demonstrates that the shedding of synd4 from EPCs plays a key role in AGE-mediated dysfunction of EPC migration and homing. Stem Cells 2017;35:522-531.

  6. Ceramide mediates nanovesicle shedding and cell death in response to phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogs and perifosine

    PubMed Central

    Gills, J J; Zhang, C; Abu-Asab, M S; Castillo, S S; Marceau, C; LoPiccolo, J; Kozikowski, A P; Tsokos, M; Goldkorn, T; Dennis, P A

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer phospholipids that inhibit Akt such as the alkylphospholipid perifosine (Per) and phosphatidylinositol ether lipid analogs (PIAs) promote cellular detachment and apoptosis and have a similar cytotoxicity profile against cancer cell lines in the NCI60 panel. While investigating the mechanism of Akt inhibition, we found that short-term incubation with these compounds induced rapid shedding of cellular nanovesicles containing EGFR, IGFR and p-Akt that occurred in vitro and in vivo, while prolonged incubation led to cell detachment and death that depended on sphingomyelinase-mediated generation of ceramide. Pretreatment with sphingomyelinase inhibitors blocked ceramide generation, decreases in phospho-Akt, nanovesicle release and cell detachment in response to alkylphospholipids and PIAs in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Similarly, exogenous ceramide also decreased active Akt and induced nanovesicle release. Knockdown of neutral sphingomyelinase decreased, whereas overexpression of neutral or acid sphingomyelinase increased cell detachment and death in response to the compounds. When transferred in vitro, PIA or Per-induced nanovesicles increased ceramide levels and death in recipient cells. These results indicate ceramide generation underlies the Akt inhibition and cytotoxicity of this group of agents, and suggests nanovesicle shedding and uptake might potentially propagate their cytotoxicity in vivo. PMID:22764099

  7. Proteomic Identification of Cysteine Cathepsin Substrates Shed from the Surface of Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sobotič, Barbara; Vizovišek, Matej; Vidmar, Robert; Van Damme, Petra; Gocheva, Vasilena; Joyce, Johanna A.; Gevaert, Kris; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Fonović, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular cysteine cathepsins are known to drive cancer progression, but besides degradation of extracellular matrix proteins little is known about their physiological substrates and thus the molecular mechanisms they deploy. One of the major mechanisms used by other extracellular proteases to facilitate cancer progression is proteolytic release of the extracellular domains of transmembrane proteins or ectodomain shedding. Here we show using a mass spectrometry-based approach that cathepsins L and S act as sheddases and cleave extracellular domains of CAM adhesion proteins and transmembrane receptors from the surface of cancer cells. In cathepsin S-deficient mouse pancreatic cancers, processing of these cathepsin substrates is highly reduced, pointing to an essential role of cathepsins in extracellular shedding. In addition to influencing cell migration and invasion, shedding of surface proteins by extracellular cathepsins impacts intracellular signaling as demonstrated for regulation of Ras GTPase activity, thereby providing a putative mechanistic link between extracellular cathepsin activity and cancer progression. The MS data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002192. PMID:26081835

  8. Cervical Shedding of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type I Is Associated with Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Zunt, Joseph R.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Montano, Silvia M.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Alarcón, Jorge O. V.; Quijano, Eberth; Courtois, Barry N.; Sánchez, Jorge L.; Campos, Pablo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Guenthner, Patricia C.; Lal, Renu B.; Holmes, King K.

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is sexually transmitted. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for cervical shedding of HTLV-I DNA among Peruvian sex workers. HTLV tax DNA was detected in cervical specimens from 43 (68%) of 63 HTLV-I–infected sex workers and in samples obtained during 113 (52%) of 216 clinic visits between 1993 and 1997. Detection of HTLV DNA was associated with the presence of ≥30 polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) within cervical mucus per 100×microscopic field (odds ratio [OR], 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8–10.1) and with the presence of cervical secretions (OR, 2.0; 95% CI 1.2–3.4). Hormonal contraceptive use (OR 1.7; 95% CI, 0.8–3.6) and concomitant cervical infection by Chlamydia trachomatis (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.3–4.3) or Neisseria gonorrhoeae (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.6–3.7) were not significantly associated with HTLV-I shedding. Our results suggest that cervicitis may increase cervical HTLV-I shedding and the sexual transmission of this virus. PMID:12447745

  9. Cervical shedding of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I is associated with cervicitis.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Joseph R; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Montano, Silvia M; Thomas, Katherine K; Alarcón, Jorge O V; Quijano, Eberth; Courtois, Barry N; Sánchez, Jorge L; Campos, Pablo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Guenthner, Patricia C; Lal, Renu B; Holmes, King K

    2002-12-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is sexually transmitted. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for cervical shedding of HTLV-I DNA among Peruvian sex workers. HTLV tax DNA was detected in cervical specimens from 43 (68%) of 63 HTLV-I-infected sex workers and in samples obtained during 113 (52%) of 216 clinic visits between 1993 and 1997. Detection of HTLV DNA was associated with the presence of > or =30 polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) within cervical mucus per 100x microscopic field (odds ratio [OR], 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-10.1) and with the presence of cervical secretions (OR, 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.4). Hormonal contraceptive use (OR 1.7; 95% CI, 0.8-3.6) and concomitant cervical infection by Chlamydia trachomatis (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.3-4.3) or Neisseria gonorrhoeae (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.6-3.7) were not significantly associated with HTLV-I shedding. Our results suggest that cervicitis may increase cervical HTLV-I shedding and the sexual transmission of this virus.

  10. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth differentiate toward neural cells in a medium dynamically cultured with Schwann cells in a series of polydimethylsiloxanes scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wen-Ta; Pan, Yu-Jing

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Schwann cells (SCs) are primary structural and functional cells in the peripheral nervous system. These cells play a crucial role in peripheral nerve regeneration by releasing neurotrophic factors. This study evaluated the neural differentiation potential effects of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in a rat Schwann cell (RSC) culture medium. Approach. SHEDs and RSCs were individually cultured on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffold, and the effects of the RSC medium on the SHEDs differentiation between static and dynamic cultures were compared. Main results. Results demonstrated that the SHED cells differentiated by the RSC cultured medium in the static culture formed neurospheres after 7 days at the earliest, and SHED cells formed neurospheres within 3 days in the dynamic culture. These results confirm that the RSC culture medium can induce neurospheres formation, the speed of formation and the number of neurospheres (19.16 folds high) in a dynamic culture was superior to the static culture for 3 days culture. The SHED-derived spheres were further incubated in the RSCs culture medium, these neurospheres continuously differentiated into neurons and neuroglial cells. Immunofluorescent staining and RT-PCR revealed nestin, β-III tubulin, GFAP, and γ-enolase of neural markers on the differentiated cells. Significance. These results indicated that the RSC culture medium can induce the neural differentiation of SHED cells, and can be used as a new therapeutic tool to repair nerve damage.

  11. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity.

  12. Role of Protein Kinase C in Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 trafficking and shedding from endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Tochon-Danguy, Natalie; Ian Smith, A.

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} PKC activation increases the trafficking of ECE-1 to the cell surface. {yields} This in turn leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 shed. {yields} Only the catalytically active C-terminal region is shed from the cell surface. -- Abstract: This study aimed to determine the consequences of Protein Kinase C (PKC) mediated Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 (ECE-1) phosphorylation and its relationship to ECE-1 expression and shedding. The proteins on the surface of EA.hy926 cells were labelled with EZ-Link NHS-SS-Biotin both prior to (control) and following stimulation by 2 {mu}M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) which activates PKC. The biotinylated proteins were isolated using neutravidin beads, resolved by gel electrophoresis and analysed by western blotting using anti-ECE-1 antibodies. Significant increase in ECE-1 expression at the cell surface was observed following stimulation by PMA, compared to unstimulated control cells (170 {+-} 32.3% of control, n = 5). The ECE-1 activity (expressed as {mu}M substrate cleaved/min) was determined by monitoring the cleavage of a quenched fluorescent substrate. The specificity of cleavage was confirmed using the ECE-1 inhibitor (CGS35066). The stimulation of cells by PMA (1 {mu}M, 6 h) significantly increased the ECE-1 activity (0.28 {+-} 0.02; n = 3) compared to the control (0.07 {+-} 0.02; n = 3). This increase was prevented by prior incubation with the PKC inhibitor bisindolymaleimide (BIM; 2 {mu}M for 1 h; 0.10 {+-} 0.01; n = 3). Treatment with PMA also increased the activity of ECE-1 in the media (0.18 {+-} 0.01; n = 3) compared to control (0.08 {+-} 0.01; n = 3). In addition, this study confirmed by western immunoblotting that only the extracellular region of ECE-1 is released from the cell surface. These data indicate for the first time that PKC activation induces the trafficking and shedding of ECE to and from the cell surface, respectively.

  13. γ-secretase directly sheds the survival receptor BCMA from plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Sarah A.; Hoffmann, Franziska S.; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Cheng, Qingyu; Chu, Yuanyuan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Schuh, Elisabeth; Krumbholz, Markus; Rübsamen, Heike; Wanngren, Johanna; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Alexander, Tobias; Hiepe, Falk; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Weber, Frank; Jenne, Dieter; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Meinl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Survival of plasma cells is regulated by B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), a membrane-bound receptor activated by its agonist ligands BAFF and APRIL. Here we report that γ-secretase directly cleaves BCMA, without prior truncation by another protease. This direct shedding is facilitated by the short length of BCMA's extracellular domain. In vitro, γ-secretase reduces BCMA-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, γ-secretase releases soluble BCMA (sBCMA) that acts as a decoy neutralizing APRIL. In vivo, inhibition of γ-secretase enhances BCMA surface expression in plasma cells and increases their number in the bone marrow. Furthermore, in multiple sclerosis, sBCMA levels in spinal fluid are elevated and associated with intracerebral IgG production; in systemic lupus erythematosus, sBCMA levels in serum are elevated and correlate with disease activity. Together, shedding of BCMA by γ-secretase controls plasma cells in the bone marrow and yields a potential biomarker for B-cell involvement in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:26065893

  14. Bifidobacterium breve reduces apoptotic epithelial cell shedding in an exopolysaccharide and MyD88-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K R; Harnisch, L C; Alcon-Giner, C; Mitra, S; Wright, C J; Ketskemety, J; van Sinderen, D; Watson, A J M; Hall, L J

    2017-01-01

    Certain members of the microbiota genus Bifidobacterium are known to positively influence host well-being. Importantly, reduced bifidobacterial levels are associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, who also have impaired epithelial barrier function, including elevated rates of apoptotic extrusion of small intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from villi-a process termed 'cell shedding'. Using a mouse model of pathological cell shedding, we show that mice receiving Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 exhibit significantly reduced rates of small IEC shedding. Bifidobacterial-induced protection appears to be mediated by a specific bifidobacterial surface exopolysaccharide and interactions with host MyD88 resulting in downregulation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic responses to protect epithelial cells under highly inflammatory conditions. Our results reveal an important and previously undescribed role for B. breve, in positively modulating epithelial cell shedding outcomes via bacterial- and host-dependent factors, supporting the notion that manipulation of the microbiota affects intestinal disease outcomes.

  15. Neural stem cells: balancing self-renewal with differentiation.

    PubMed

    Doe, Chris Q

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells are captivating because they have the potential to make multiple cell types yet maintain their undifferentiated state. Recent studies of Drosophila and mammalian neural stem cells have shed light on how stem cells regulate self-renewal versus differentiation and have revealed the proteins, processes and pathways that all converge to regulate neural progenitor self-renewal. If we can better understand how stem cells balance self-renewal versus differentiation, we will significantly advance our knowledge of embryogenesis, cancer biology and brain evolution, as well as the use of stem cells for therapeutic purposes.

  16. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells by herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Ta; Chen, Xiao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the exfoliated human deciduous incisor that can differentiate into a many cell types. In this study, we evaluated the effect of liquorice or angelica extracts on the hepatic differentiation potential of SHEDs cells. SHEDs cells cultured in medium containing liquorice extracts were analyzed for 1) changes in cellular morphology, 2) changes in hepatic gene expression, AFP (Alpha-fetoprotein) and ALB (Albumin), and 3) albumin secretion and urea synthesis activity. Our data show that the hepatic differentiation potential of SHEDs cells is enhanced by the presence of liquorice or angelica extracts in the culture medium. Our findings present new therapeutic possibilities for liver damage repair.

  17. Protein Kinase C-δ Mediates Shedding of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 from Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fengxia; Zimpelmann, Joseph; Burger, Dylan; Kennedy, Christopher; Hébert, Richard L.; Burns, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) degrades angiotensin (Ang) II to Ang-(1–7), and protects against diabetic renal injury. Soluble ACE2 fragments are shed from the proximal tubule, and appear at high levels in the urine with diabetes. High glucose-induced shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by the enzyme “a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17″ (ADAM17). Here, we investigated the mechanism for constitutive shedding of ACE2. Mouse proximal tubular cells were cultured and ACE2 shedding into the media was assessed by enzyme activity assay and immunoblot analysis. Cells were incubated with pharmacologic inhibitors, or transfected with silencing (si) RNA. Incubation of proximal tubular cells with increasing concentrations of D-glucose stimulated ACE2 shedding, which peaked at 16 mM, while L-glucose (osmotic control) had no effect on shedding. In cells maintained in 7.8 mM D-glucose, ACE2 shedding was significantly inhibited by the pan-protein kinase C (PKC) competitive inhibitor sotrastaurin, but not by an inhibitor of ADAM17. Incubation of cells with the PKC-α and -β1-specific inhibitor Go6976, the PKC β1 and β2-specific inhibitor ruboxistaurin, inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases-2,-8, and -9, or an inhibitor of ADAM10 (GI250423X) had no effect on basal ACE2 shedding. By contrast, the PKC-δ inhibitor rottlerin significantly inhibited both constitutive and high glucose-induced ACE2 shedding. Transfection of cells with siRNA directed against PKC-δ reduced ACE2 shedding by 20%, while knockdown of PKC-ε was without effect. These results indicate that constitutive shedding of ACE2 from proximal tubular cells is mediated by PKC-δ, which is also linked to high glucose-induced shedding. Targeting PKC-δ may preserve membrane-bound ACE2 in proximal tubule in disease states and diminish Ang II-stimulated adverse signaling. PMID:27313531

  18. Touch DNA of shed skin cells from the deployed airbag to address drunken driving crimes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Sun, Hong-bin; Luo, Ji-huai; Wei, Shu-guang; Li, Sheng-bin

    2014-08-01

    In the criminal cases of driving under the influence (DUI), DNA evidence can be collected from the deployed airbag of the motor vehicle and submitted to the crime lab for touch DNA analysis. The evidence can be acquired when the skin cells are observed on the surface of the airbag in a traffic accident. However, the low quantity or quality of the evidence collected from a crime scene prevents further identification analysis in many cases. In the current study, we reported a case of identifying touch DNA extraction from the shed skin cells from the deployed airbag of a motor vehicle. We managed to collect DNA evidence from the shed skin cells in an airbag using a proper approach of collection and extraction. The 5.87 ng of extracted DNA was sufficient for genotyping and forensic identification, which helped to identify the driver of the car in collision with a pier in the street. In DUI cases and other traffic accidents, therefore, the amount of touch DNA extracted from the deployed airbag can be sufficient for DNA marker genotyping and further analysis.

  19. Microparticles shed from multidrug resistant breast cancer cells provide a parallel survival pathway through immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Ritu; Johnson, Michael S; Pokharel, Deep; Krishnan, S Rajeev; Bebawy, Mary

    2017-02-06

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. Resident macrophages at distant sites provide a highly responsive and immunologically dynamic innate immune response against foreign infiltrates. Despite extensive characterization of the role of macrophages and other immune cells in malignant tissues, there is very little known about the mechanisms which facilitate metastatic breast cancer spread to distant sites of immunological integrity. The mechanisms by which a key healthy defense mechanism fails to protect distant sites from infiltration by metastatic cells in cancer patients remain undefined. Breast tumors, typical of many tumor types, shed membrane vesicles called microparticles (MPs), ranging in size from 0.1-1 μm in diameter. MPs serve as vectors in the intercellular transfer of functional proteins and nucleic acids and in drug sequestration. In addition, MPs are also emerging to be important players in the evasion of cancer cell immune surveillance. A comparative analysis of effects of MPs isolated from human breast cancer cells and non-malignant human brain endothelial cells were examined on THP-1 derived macrophages in vitro. MP-mediated effects on cell phenotype and functionality was assessed by cytokine analysis, cell chemotaxis and phagocytosis, immunolabelling, flow cytometry and confocal imaging. Student's t-test or a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for comparison and statistical analysis. In this paper we report on the discovery of a new cellular basis for immune evasion, which is mediated by breast cancer derived MPs. MPs shed from multidrug resistant (MDR) cells were shown to selectively polarize macrophage cells to a functionally incapacitated state and facilitate their engulfment by foreign cells. We propose this mechanism may serve to physically disrupt the inherent immune response prior to cancer cell colonization whilst releasing mediators required for the recruitment of distant immune cells. These findings

  20. Isolation and morphology of Stem Cells from Deciduous Tooth (SHED) and Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hDPSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal; Manogaran, Thanaletchumi; Abidin, Intan Zarina Zainol; Senafi, Sahidan; Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul

    2016-11-01

    Dental pulp is a tissue obtained from pulp chamber of deciduous and permanent tooth which contain stem cells. Stem cell isolation procedure is performed to obtain cells from tissue using enzymatic digestion. The aim of this study is to isolate and observe the morphology of stem cells during passage 0 and passage 3. Dental pulp from deciduous and permanent tooth was enzymatically digested using collagenase Type I and cells obtained were cultured in DMEM-KO that contains 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% antibiotic-antimycotic solution and 0.001× GlutaMax®. During culture, cell morphology was observed under the microscope on day 3, 16 and 33 and captured using cellB software. Giemsa staining was conducted on cells at passage 3. Cells attached at the bottom of the flask on day 3 and started forming small colonies. Cells became confluent after approximately 4 weeks. Both Stem Cells from Deciduous Tooth (SHED) and Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hDPSC) exhibited fibroblast-like morphology during passage 0 and passage 3. Meanwhile, Giemsa staining at passage 3 revealed single intact nucleus surrounded by fibroblastic cytoplasm structure. It can be concluded that SHED and hDPSC showed consistent fibroblast-like morphology throughout culture period.

  1. Bifidobacterium breve reduces apoptotic epithelial cell shedding in an exopolysaccharide and MyD88-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, K. R.; Harnisch, L. C.; Alcon-Giner, C.; Mitra, S.; Wright, C. J.; Ketskemety, J.

    2017-01-01

    Certain members of the microbiota genus Bifidobacterium are known to positively influence host well-being. Importantly, reduced bifidobacterial levels are associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, who also have impaired epithelial barrier function, including elevated rates of apoptotic extrusion of small intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from villi—a process termed ‘cell shedding’. Using a mouse model of pathological cell shedding, we show that mice receiving Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 exhibit significantly reduced rates of small IEC shedding. Bifidobacterial-induced protection appears to be mediated by a specific bifidobacterial surface exopolysaccharide and interactions with host MyD88 resulting in downregulation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic responses to protect epithelial cells under highly inflammatory conditions. Our results reveal an important and previously undescribed role for B. breve, in positively modulating epithelial cell shedding outcomes via bacterial- and host-dependent factors, supporting the notion that manipulation of the microbiota affects intestinal disease outcomes. PMID:28123052

  2. In Vivo Imaging Sheds Light on Immune Cell Migration and Function in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Stolp, Jessica; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence for both beneficial and harmful involvement of the immune system in tumor development and spread. Immune cell recruitment to tumors is essential not only for the success of anticancer immune therapies but also for tumor-induced immune suppression. Now that immune-based therapies are playing an increasingly important role in treatment of solid tumors such as metastatic melanomas, precise analysis of the in vivo contributions of different leukocyte subsets in tumor immunity has become an even greater priority. Recently, this goal has been markedly facilitated by the use of intravital microscopy, which has enabled us to visualize the dynamic interactions between cells of the immune system and tumor targets in the context of the tumor microenvironment. For example, intravital imaging techniques have shed new light on T cell infiltration of tumors, the mechanisms of cancer cell killing, and how myeloid cells contribute to tumor tolerance and spread. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances made to our understanding of the roles of innate and adaptive immune cells in cancer based on the use of these in vivo imaging approaches. PMID:28382036

  3. In Vivo Imaging Sheds Light on Immune Cell Migration and Function in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Stolp, Jessica; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence for both beneficial and harmful involvement of the immune system in tumor development and spread. Immune cell recruitment to tumors is essential not only for the success of anticancer immune therapies but also for tumor-induced immune suppression. Now that immune-based therapies are playing an increasingly important role in treatment of solid tumors such as metastatic melanomas, precise analysis of the in vivo contributions of different leukocyte subsets in tumor immunity has become an even greater priority. Recently, this goal has been markedly facilitated by the use of intravital microscopy, which has enabled us to visualize the dynamic interactions between cells of the immune system and tumor targets in the context of the tumor microenvironment. For example, intravital imaging techniques have shed new light on T cell infiltration of tumors, the mechanisms of cancer cell killing, and how myeloid cells contribute to tumor tolerance and spread. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances made to our understanding of the roles of innate and adaptive immune cells in cancer based on the use of these in vivo imaging approaches.

  4. Matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2) mediates MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) shedding in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, F Q; Liu, M; Yang, F P; Zhang, X L; Yang, B; Guo, C C; Huang, J H; Che, J P; Yan, Y; Zheng, J H

    2014-04-01

    The MHC class i chain-related molecule A (MICA) is a ligand for the natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D) immunoreceptor activation. The engagement of tumor cell surface MICA to NKG2D stimulates the NK and T cell antitumor immunity. Shedding of MICA by tumor cells facilitates tumor immune evasion, which might partially contribute to tumor progression. Inmunohistochemistry was performed on both normal and neoplastic renal tissue. Human renal carcinoma cell lines 786-0 and ACHIN were transfected and target sequences to silence human MMP2 by shRNA expression were established. The degree of MICA shedding was measured and quantitative real-time PCR and Western-blot analysis were performed. The membrane type matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) mediated the MICA shedding, which was blocked by suppression of MMP2 expression. Concomitantly, MMP2 over-expression enhanced the MICA shedding, indicating that MMP2 was involved in the renal cell carcinoma-associated proteolytic release of soluble MICA (sMICA), which facilitated the tumor immune escape. These findings suggested that MMP2 might be a new potential target for tumor immune therapy. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which tumors shed MICA could be of a great importance for cancer treatment in order to reinforce the NK and T cell antitumor immunity. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Biological effects of silk fibroin 3D scaffolds on stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs).

    PubMed

    Collado-González, M; Pecci-Lloret, M P; García-Bernal, D; Aznar-Cervantes, S; Oñate-Sánchez, R E; Moraleda, J M; Cenis, J L; Rodríguez-Lozano, F J

    2017-06-14

    The aim is to investigate in vitro biological effects of silk fibroin 3D scaffolds on stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in terms of proliferation, morphological appearance, cell viability, and expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers. Silk fibroin 3D scaffolding materials may represent promising suitable scaffolds for their application in regenerative endodontic therapy approaches. SHEDs were cultured in silk fibroin 3D scaffolds. Then, cell numbers were counted and the Alamar blue colorimetric assay was used to analyse cell proliferation after 24, 48, 72, and 168 h of culture. The morphological features of SHEDs cultured on silk fibroin scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, cell viability and the expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers were analysed by flow cytometry. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Bonferroni post-test was performed (P < 0.05). At 24 and 48 h of culture, SHED proliferation on scaffolds was modest compared to the control although still significant (p < 0.05). However, cell proliferation progressively increased from 72 to 168 h compared with the control (p < 0.001; p < 0.01). In addition, flow cytometry analysis showed that the culture of SHEDs on silk fibroin scaffolds did not significantly alter the level of expression of the mesenchymal markers CD73, CD90, or CD105 up to 168 h; in addition, cell viability in silk fibroin was similar to than obtained in plastic. Moreover, SEM studies revealed a suitable degree of proliferation, cell spreading, and attachment, especially after 168 h of culture. The findings from the current study suggest that silk fibroin 3D scaffolds had a favourable effect on the biological responses of SHEDs. Further in vivo investigations are required to confirm these results.

  6. IgLON Cell Adhesion Molecules Are Shed from the Cell Surface of Cortical Neurons to Promote Neuronal Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B.; Fournier, Alyson E.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons. PMID:25538237

  7. IgLON cell adhesion molecules are shed from the cell surface of cortical neurons to promote neuronal growth.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-02-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons.

  8. Antitumor immunity. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H

    2015-04-03

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D-activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, a shed form of MULT1, a high-affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are always inhibitory and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Diffusion of Immunoglobulin G in Shed Vaginal Epithelial Cells and in Cell-Free Regions of Human Cervicovaginal Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Schroeder, Holly A.; Nunn, Kenetta L.; Woods, Karen; Anderson, Deborah J.; Cone, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) is a viscoelastic gel containing a complex mixture of mucins, shed epithelial cells, microbes and macromolecules, such as antibodies, that together serve as the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Here, to investigate the affinity between IgG and different mucus constituents, we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to measure the diffusion of IgG in fresh, minimally modified CVM. We found that CVM exhibits substantial spatial variations that necessitate careful selection of the regions in which to perform FRAP. In portions of CVM devoid of cells, FRAP measurements using different IgG antibodies and labeling methods consistently demonstrate that both exogenous and endogenous IgG undergo rapid diffusion, almost as fast as in saline, in good agreement with the rapid diffusion of IgG in mid-cycle endocervical mucus that is largely devoid of cells. This rapid diffusion indicates the interactions between secreted mucins and IgG must be very weak and transient. IgG also accumulated in cellular debris and shed epithelial cells that had become permeable to IgG, which may allow shed epithelial cells to serve as reservoirs of secreted IgG. Interestingly, in contrast to cell-free regions of CVM, the diffusion of cell-associated IgG was markedly slowed, suggesting greater affinity between IgG and cellular constituents. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the role of IgG in mucosal protection against infectious diseases, and may also provide a framework for using FRAP to study molecular interactions in mucus and other complex biological environments. PMID:27362256

  10. Host cell invasion by Staphylococcus aureus stimulates the shedding of microvesicles.

    PubMed

    DeWalt, Robin I; Petkovich, Daniel A; Zahrt, Ashley N; Bruns, Heather A; McDowell, Susan A

    2013-03-22

    During severe sepsis, microvesicles that are positive for tissue factor (TF) are at increased levels within blood and in pulmonary lavage. These microvesicles potentially disperse TF, the major initiator of the coagulation cascade, throughout multiple organ systems, initiating fibrin deposition and resultant ischemia. The source of these microvesicles has remained incompletely defined. Although TF(+) microvesicles are shed from cells that express nascent TF transcript in response to injury, recent findings revealed that circulating, full-length TF protein is detectable prior to these nascent transcripts. This finding suggested that the protein is released from constitutive sources as an acute response. We examined whether Staphylococcus aureus, the Gram-positive bacteria that is emerging as one of the most common etiologic agents in sepsis, is capable of stimulating the release of TF(+) microvesicles from a pulmonary cell line that constitutively expresses TF protein. We found that host cell invasion stimulated an acute release of TF(+) microvesicles and that these microvesicles mediated the transfer of the protein to TF-negative endothelial cells. We also found that transfer was inhibited by cholesterol-lowering simvastatin. Taken together, our findings reveal that S. aureus pathogenesis extends to the acute release of TF(+) microvesicles and that inhibiting dispersal by this mechanism may provide a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In silico CDM model sheds light on force transmission in cell from focal adhesions to nucleus.

    PubMed

    Milan, Jean-Louis; Manifacier, Ian; Beussman, Kevin M; Han, Sangyoon J; Sniadecki, Nathan J; About, Imad; Chabrand, Patrick

    2016-09-06

    Cell adhesion is crucial for many types of cell, conditioning differentiation, proliferation, and protein synthesis. As a mechanical process, cell adhesion involves forces exerted by the cytoskeleton and transmitted by focal adhesions to extracellular matrix. These forces constitute signals that infer specific biological responses. Therefore, analyzing mechanotransduction during cell adhesion could lead to a better understanding of the mechanobiology of adherent cells. For instance this may explain how, the shape of adherent stem cells influences their differentiation or how the stiffness of the extracellular matrix affects adhesion strength. To assess the mechanical signals involved in cell adhesion, we computed intracellular forces using the Cytoskeleton Divided Medium model in endothelial cells adherent on micropost arrays of different stiffnesses. For each cell, focal adhesion location and forces measured by micropost deflection were used as an input for the model. The cytoskeleton and the nucleoskeleton were computed as systems of multiple tensile and compressive interactions. At the end of computation, the systems respected mechanical equilibrium while exerting the exact same traction force intensities on focal adhesions as the observed cell. The results indicate that not only the level of adhesion forces, but also the shape of the cell has an influence on intracellular tension and on nucleus strain. The combination of experimental micropost technology with the present CDM model constitutes a tool able to estimate the intracellular forces. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I

    2016-06-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Regulation of Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) Ectodomain Shedding and Its Role in Cell Function*

    PubMed Central

    Braley, Alex; Kwak, Taekyoung; Jules, Joel; Harja, Evis; Landgraf, Ralf; Hudson, Barry I.

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand transmembrane receptor that can undergo proteolysis at the cell surface to release a soluble ectodomain. Here we observed that ectodomain shedding of RAGE is critical for its role in regulating signaling and cellular function. Ectodomain shedding of both human and mouse RAGE was dependent on ADAM10 activity and induced with chemical activators of shedding (ionomycin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate) and endogenous stimuli (serum and RAGE ligands). Ectopic expression of the splice variant of RAGE (RAGE splice variant 4), which is resistant to ectodomain shedding, inhibited RAGE ligand dependent cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, cell spreading, and cell migration. We found that blockade of RAGE ligand signaling with soluble RAGE or inhibitors of MAPK or PI3K blocked RAGE-dependent cell migration but did not affect RAGE splice variant 4 cell migration. We finally demonstrated that RAGE function is dependent on secretase activity as ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors blocked RAGE ligand-mediated cell migration. Together, our data suggest that proteolysis of RAGE is critical to mediate signaling and cell function and may therefore emerge as a novel therapeutic target for RAGE-dependent disease states. PMID:27022018

  14. Modeling Stem Cell Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Rajiv S.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The process of stem cell myogenesis (transformation into skeletal muscle cells) includes several stages characterized by the expression of certain combinations of myogenic factors. The first part of this process is accompanied by cell division, while the second part is mainly associated with direct differentiation. The mechanical cues are known to enhance stem cell myogenesis, and the paper focuses on the stem cell differentiation under the condition of externally applied strain. The process of stem cell myogenic differentiation is interpreted as the interplay among transcription factors, targeted proteins and strain-generated signaling molecule, and it is described by a kinetic multi-stage model. The model parameters are optimally adjusted by using the available data from the experiment with adipose-derived stem cells subjected to the application of cyclic uniaxial strains of the magnitude of 10%. The modeling results predict the kinetics of the process of myogenic differentiation, including the number of cells in each stage of differentiation and the rates of differentiation from one stage to another for different strains from 4% to 16%. The developed model can help better understand the process of myogenic differentiation and the effects of mechanical cues on stem cell use in muscle therapies. PMID:28106095

  15. Photodynamic diagnosis of shed prostate cancer cells in voided urine treated with 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yasushi; Anai, Satoshi; Kuwada, Masaomi; Miyake, Makito; Chihara, Yoshitomo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Hirayama, Akihide; Yoshida, Katsunori; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-08-03

    Past attempts at detecting prostate cancer (PCa) cells in voided urine by traditional cytology have been impeded by undesirably low sensitivities but high specificities. To improve the sensitivities, we evaluate the feasibility and clinical utility of photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of prostate cancer by using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) to examine shed prostate cancer cells in voided urine samples. One hundred thirty-eight patients with an abnormal digital rectal exam (DRE) and/or abnormal prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were recruited between April 2009 and December 2010. Voided urine specimens were collected before prostate biopsy. Urine specimens were treated with 5-ALA and imaged by fluorescence microscopy and reported as protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) positive (presence of cells demonstrating simultaneous PPIX fluorescence) or PPIX negative (lack of cells demonstrating fluorescence). Of the 138 patients, PCa was detected on needle biopsy in 81 patients (58.7%); of these 81 patients with PCa, 60 were PPIX-positive (sensitivity: 74.1%). Although 57 patients did not harbor PCa by conventional diagnostic procedures, 17 of these at-risk patients were found to be PPIX-positive (specificity: 70.2%). PPIX-PDD was more sensitive compared with DRE and transrectal ultrasound and more specific compared with PSA and PSA density. The incidence of PPIX-PDD positivity did not increase with increasing total PSA levels, tumor stage or Gleason score. To our knowledge, this is the first successful demonstration of PPIX in urine sediments treated with 5-ALA used to detect PCa in a noninvasive yet highly sensitive manner. However, further studies are warranted to determine the role of PPIX-PPD for PCa detection.

  16. Identification of shed proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells: Application of statistical confidence using human and mouse protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Hunter, Joel C.; Miller, John H.; Springer, David L.

    2005-05-01

    The shedding process releases ligands, receptors, and other proteins from the surface of the cell and is a mechanism whereby cells communicate. Even though altered regulation of this process has been implicated in several diseases, global approaches to evaluate shed proteins have not been developed. A goal of this study was to identify global changes in shed proteins in media taken from cells exposed to low-doses of radiation in an effort to develop a fundamental understanding of the bystander response. CHO cells were chosen for this study because they have been widely used for radiation studies and since they have been reported to respond to radiation by releasing factors into the media that cause genomic instability and cytotoxicity in unexposed cells, i.e., a bystander effect. Media samples taken for irradiated cells were evaluated using a combination of tandem- and FTICR-mass spectrometry analysis. Since the hamster genome has not been sequenced, mass spectrometry data was searched against the mouse and human proteins databases. Nearly 150 proteins that were identified by tandem mass spectrometry were confirmed by FTICR. When both types of mass spectrometry data were evaluated with a new confidence scoring tool, which is based on discriminant analyses, about 500 protein were identified. Approximately 20% of these identifications were either integral membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins, suggesting that they were derived from the cell surface, hence were likely shed. However, estimates of quantitative changes, based on two independent mass spectrometry approaches, did not identify any protein abundance changes attributable to the bystander effect. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of global evaluation of shed proteins using mass spectrometry in conjunction with cross-species protein databases and that significant improvement in peptide/protein identifications is provided by the confidence scoring tool.

  17. Subclinical mastitis, cell-associated HIV-1 shedding in breast milk, and breast-feeding transmission of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Serpil; Koulinska, Irene N; Aboud, Said; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Villamor, Eduardo

    2007-12-15

    Mastitis has been identified as a risk factor for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV-1 through breast-feeding. It is unclear whether this association is mediated by increased cell-free virus (CFV) versus cell-associated virus (CAV) HIV shedding in breast milk. We examined the risk of MTCT associated with subclinical mastitis and the relation between mastitis and CFV or CAV shedding in breast milk. Fifty-nine women who transmitted HIV through breast-feeding (cases) were individually matched to 59 nontransmitting controls nested in a cohort from Tanzania. For each case, we selected a milk specimen obtained before the infant's first positive test to quantify sodium (Na) and potassium (K) and measure CFV and CAV concentrations. Controls were matched on the child's age at the time of sample collection. Women with a breast milk Na/K ratio suggestive of mastitis (>1.0) had an 11-fold greater odds of transmission (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2 to 98.1), compared to women with a Na/K cell count and vitamin A supplementation. Although mastitis was positively related to both CFV and CAV shedding in breast milk, only the association with the latter was strong and statistically significant. Increased cell-associated HIV-1 shedding in breast milk could mediate the association between mastitis and MTCT.

  18. Angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas Signaling Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced ADAM17 Shedding Activity and Apoptosis in Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinhua; Xu, Daomiao; Ai, Yuhang; Zhao, Shuangping; Zhang, Lina; Ming, Guangfeng; Liu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17, constitutively expressed in alveolar epithelium, is the pivotal shedding enzyme mediating acute lung inflammation. On the other hand, angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas signaling has been shown to improve acute respiratory distress syndrome and protect alveolar epithelial cells from apoptosis. In this study, we explored the effect of Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling on the expression and activity of ADAM17 and assessed its impact on apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated human alveolar epithelial cells. LPS markedly induced the shedding activity of ADAM17 in alveolar epithelial cells, which was blocked by selective c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. Ang-(1-7) concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced ADAM17 shedding activity, which was abolished by selective Mas blocker A779 and Mas shRNA. LPS and Ang-(1-7) showed no significant effect on the expression of ADAM17. Overexpression of ADAM17 synergized with LPS on increasing the shedding activity of ADAM17 and apoptosis in alveolar epithelial cells, counteracting the inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7). In addition, LPS significantly increased the JNK activity in alveolar epithelial cells; Ang-(1-7) concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced JNK activity, which was abolished by A779 and Mas shRNA. In conclusion, this study suggests that Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling inhibits LPS-induced alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis by inhibiting LPS-induced shedding activity of ADAM17, likely by a JNK-dependent mechanism. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells from human deciduous teeth and their therapeutic benefits for Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiromi; Matsubara, Kohki; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Ito, Mikako; Ohno, Kinji; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and the depletion of striatal dopamine. Here we show that DAergic-neuron-like cells could be efficiently induced from stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), and that these induced cells had therapeutic benefits in a 6-OHDA-induced Parkinsonian rat model. In our protocol, EGF and bFGF signaling activated the SHED's expression of proneural genes, Ngn2 and Mash1, and subsequent treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoted their maturation into DAergic neuron-like SHEDs (dSHEDs). A hypoxic DAergic differentiation protocol improved cell viability and enhanced the expression of multiple neurotrophic factors, including BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and HGF. Engrafted dSHEDs survived in the striatum of Parkinsonian rats, improved the DA level more efficiently than engrafted undifferentiated SHEDs, and promoted the recovery from neurological deficits. Our findings further suggested that paracrine effects of dSHEDs contributed to neuroprotection against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration and to nigrostriatal tract restoration. In addition, we found that the conditioned medium derived from dSHEDs protected primary neurons against 6-OHDA toxicity and accelerated neurite outgrowth in vitro. Thus, our data suggest that stem cells derived from dental pulp may have therapeutic benefits for PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  1. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Display and Shed B Cell Maturation Antigen upon TLR Engagement.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Elisabeth; Musumeci, Andrea; Thaler, Franziska S; Laurent, Sarah; Ellwart, Joachim W; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Krug, Anne; Meinl, Edgar

    2017-04-15

    The BAFF-APRIL system is best known for its control of B cell homeostasis, and it is a target of therapeutic intervention in autoimmune diseases and lymphoma. By analyzing the expression of the three receptors of this system, B cell maturation Ag (BCMA), transmembrane activator and CAML interactor, and BAFF receptor, in sorted human immune cell subsets, we found that BCMA was transcribed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in both blood and lymphoid tissue. Circulating human pDCs contained BCMA protein without displaying it on the cell surface. After engagement of TLR7/8 or TLR9, BCMA was detected also on the cell surface of pDCs. The display of BCMA on the surface of human pDCs was accompanied by release of soluble BCMA (sBCMA); inhibition of γ-secretase enhanced surface expression of BCMA and reduced the release of sBCMA by pDCs. In contrast with human pDCs, murine pDCs did not express BCMA, not even after TLR9 activation. In this study, we extend the spectrum of BCMA expression to human pDCs. sBCMA derived from pDCs might determine local availability of its high-affinity ligand APRIL, because sBCMA has been shown to function as an APRIL-specific decoy. Further, therapeutic trials targeting BCMA in patients with multiple myeloma should consider possible effects on pDCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Synthesis and shedding of hyaluronan from plasma membranes of human fibroblasts and metastatic and non-metastatic melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüke, H J; Prehm, P

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of hyaluronan synthesis and shedding was analysed in human fibroblasts and in two melanoma cells that differed in the metastatic potential and proteolysis of the hyaluronan receptor CD44. Dissociation of nascent hyaluronan from plasma membranes isolated from fibroblasts by high salt concentrations led to activation of hyaluronan synthase. Hyaluronan synthesis was also enhanced in plasma membranes from fibroblasts that had been treated with hyaluronidase or trypsin. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides stimulated hyaluronan production in fibroblast cultures. These results indicated that nascent high-molecular-mass hyaluronan inhibited its own chain elongation, if it was retained in the vicinity of the synthase by cell-surface receptors. The results also indicated that increased hyaluronan synthesis and shedding correlated with proteolysis of CD44 on the melanoma cell lines, which has been observed by others. PMID:10493913

  3. The Vast Universe of T Cell Diversity: Subsets of Memory Cells and Their Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jandus, Camilla; Usatorre, Amaia Martínez; Viganò, Selena; Zhang, Lianjun; Romero, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor confers specificity for antigen recognition to T cells. By the first encounter with the cognate antigen, reactive T cells initiate a program of expansion and differentiation that will define not only the ultimate quantity of specific cells that will be generated, but more importantly their quality and functional heterogeneity. Recent achievements using mouse model infection systems have helped to shed light into the complex network of factors that dictate and sustain memory T cell differentiation, ranging from antigen load, TCR signal strength, metabolic fitness, transcriptional programs, and proliferative potential. The different models of memory T cell differentiation are discussed in this chapter, and key phenotypic and functional attributes of memory T cell subsets are presented, both for mouse and human cells. Therapeutic manipulation of memory T cell generation is expected to provide novel unique ways to optimize current immunotherapies, both in infection and cancer.

  4. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhichong; Ge, Jian; Huang, Bing; Gao, Qianying; Liu, Bingqian; Wang, Linghua; Yu, Ling; Fan, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoming; Liu, Jingbo

    2005-10-01

    Our project was to determine whether embryonic stem (ES) cells could be induced to differentiate into corneal epithelia by superficial corneoscleral limbal stroma. To achieve this goal, ES-GFP cell line D3 was pre-induced by retinoic acid (RA). The pre-induced cells were seeded on deepithelialized superficial corneoscleral slices (SCSS) to form a monolayer, and divided into three groups. Group 1 was cultured and passaged in vitro for direct detection. Group 2 was exposed to air-liquid interfaces for 10 days and implanted into the subcutaneous layer of nude mice for 2 weeks for further induction in vivo. Group 3 was cultured in vitro without any inducing factors for control. There were no teratomas found in nude mice which were implanted with differentiated ES cells after two weeks. The differentiated cells showed an appearance of epithelia both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of CK3, P63 and PCNA was detected by immunohistochemical staining in the differentiated cells in group 1 and 2. Microvillis and zonula occludens were observed on the surface of the differentiated cells under an electron microscope. In the control group, ES cells differentiated freely without any inducing factors. Most cells were shed and formed a neuronal dendrite-like structure, and a minority of cells appeared polymorphic. These results demonstrate that ES cells can differentiate into corneal epithelia on the surface of SCSS under the controlled condition. Differentiated ES cells could be used as epithelial seeding cells for the reconstruction of ocular surface and corneal tissue engineering in the future.

  5. Metalloprotease-mediated tumor cell shedding of B7-H6, the ligand of the natural killer cell-activating receptor NKp30.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Eva; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Altevogt, Peter; Rose-John, Stefan; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Sucker, Antje; Paschen, Annette; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Textor, Sonja; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2014-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent immune effector cells capable of mediating antitumor responses. Thus, during immunoediting, tumor cell populations evolve strategies to escape NK-cell-mediated recognition. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of immune escape involving tumor cell shedding of B7-H6, a ligand for the activating receptor NKp30 that mediates NK-cell binding and NK-cell-mediated killing. Tumor cells from different cancer entities released B7-H6 by ectodomain shedding mediated by the cell surface proteases "a disintegrin and metalloproteases" (ADAM)-10 and ADAM-17, as demonstrated through the use of pharmacologic inhibitors or siRNA-mediated gene attenuation. Inhibiting this proteolytic shedding process increased the levels of B7-H6 expressed on the surface of tumor cells, enhancing NKp30-mediated activation of NK cells. Notably, we documented elevated levels of soluble B7-H6 levels in blood sera obtained from a subset of patients with malignant melanoma, compared with healthy control individuals, along with evidence of elevated B7-H6 expression in melanoma specimens in situ. Taken together, our results illustrated a novel mechanism of immune escape in which tumor cells impede NK-mediated recognition by metalloprotease-mediated shedding of B7-H6. One implication of our findings is that therapeutic inhibition of specific metalloproteases may help support NK-cell-based cancer therapy.

  6. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ebi, Masahide; Kataoka, Hiromi; Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  7. Comparative analysis of proliferation and differentiation potentials of stem cells from inflamed pulp of deciduous teeth and stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi; Diao, Shu; Wang, Jinsong; Ding, Gang; Yang, Dongmei; Fan, Zhipeng

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells isolated from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are highly capable of proliferation and differentiation, and they represent good cell sources for mesenchymal stem cell- (MSC-) mediated dental tissue regeneration, but the supply of SHEDs is limited. A previous study found that stem cells could be isolated from inflamed tissues, but it is unknown whether primary dental pulp diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis might contain stem cells with appropriate tissue regeneration capacity. In this study, we aimed to isolate stem cells from both inflamed pulps of deciduous teeth (SCIDs) and SHEDs from Chinese children and to compare their proliferation and differentiation potentials. Our results showed that SCIDs were positive for cell surface markers, including CD105, CD90, and CD146, and they had high proliferation ability and osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation potentials. There was no significant difference in proliferation and differentiation potentials between SCIDs and SHEDs. The mRNA of inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, was expressed at similar levels in SCIDs and SHEDs, but SCIDs secreted more TNF-α protein. In conclusion, our in vitro results showed that SCIDs have proliferation and differentiation potentials similar to those of SHEDs. Thus, SCIDs represent a new potentially applicable source for MSC mediated tissue regeneration.

  8. Th1 cytokine-induced syndecan-4 shedding by airway smooth muscle cells is dependent on mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiahui; Khalil, Najwa; Tesarik, Candice; Vanapalli, Karunasri; Yaputra, Viki; Alkhouri, Hatem; Oliver, Brian G G; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret

    2012-04-01

    In asthma, airway smooth muscle (ASM) chemokine secretion can induce mast cell recruitment into the airways. The functions of the mast cell chemoattractant CXCL10, and other chemokines, are regulated by binding to heparan sulphates such as syndecan-4. This study is the first demonstration that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) from people with and without asthma express and shed syndecan-4 under basal conditions. Syndecan-4 shedding was enhanced by stimulation for 24 h with the Th1 cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), but not interferon-γ (IFNγ), nor the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. ASMC stimulation with IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFNγ (cytomix) induced the highest level of syndecan-4 shedding. Nonasthmatic and asthmatic ASM cell-associated syndecan-4 protein expression was also increased by TNF-α or cytomix at 4-8 h, with the highest levels detected in cytomix-stimulated asthmatic cells. Cell-associated syndecan-4 levels were decreased by 24 h, whereas shedding remained elevated at 24 h, consistent with newly synthesized syndecan-4 being shed. Inhibition of ASMC matrix metalloproteinase-2 did not prevent syndecan-4 shedding, whereas inhibition of ERK MAPK activation reduced shedding from cytomix-stimulated ASMC. Although ERK inhibition had no effect on syndecan-4 mRNA levels stimulated by cytomix, it did cause an increase in cell-associated syndecan-4 levels, consistent with the shedding being inhibited. In conclusion, ASMC produce and shed syndecan-4 and although this is increased by the Th1 cytokines, the MAPK ERK only regulates shedding. ASMC syndecan-4 production during Th1 inflammatory conditions may regulate chemokine activity and mast cell recruitment to the ASM in asthma.

  9. Inhibiting avian influenza virus shedding using a novel RNAi antiviral vector technology: proof of concept in an avian cell model.

    PubMed

    Linke, Lyndsey M; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Pabilonia, Kristy L; Fruehauf, Johannes; Magnuson, Roberta; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Triantis, Joni; Landolt, Gabriele; Salman, Mo

    2016-03-01

    Influenza A viruses pose significant health and economic threats to humans and animals. Outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) are a liability to the poultry industry and increase the risk for transmission to humans. There are limitations to using the AIV vaccine in poultry, creating barriers to controlling outbreaks and a need for alternative effective control measures. Application of RNA interference (RNAi) techniques hold potential; however, the delivery of RNAi-mediating agents is a well-known obstacle to harnessing its clinical application. We introduce a novel antiviral approach using bacterial vectors that target avian mucosal epithelial cells and deliver (small interfering RNA) siRNAs against two AIV genes, nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase acidic protein (PA). Using a red fluorescent reporter, we first demonstrated vector delivery and intracellular expression in avian epithelial cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated significant reductions in AIV shedding when applying these anti-AIV vectors prophylactically. These antiviral vectors provided up to a 10,000-fold reduction in viral titers shed, demonstrating in vitro proof-of-concept for using these novel anti-AIV vectors to inhibit AIV shedding. Our results indicate this siRNA vector technology could represent a scalable and clinically applicable antiviral technology for avian and human influenza and a prototype for RNAi-based vectors against other viruses.

  10. Activation of the P2X7 receptor induces the rapid shedding of CD23 from human and murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Aleta; Geraghty, Nicholas J; Watson, Debbie; Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the P2X7 receptor by the extracellular damage-associated molecular pattern, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), induces the shedding of cell surface molecules including the low-affinity IgE receptor, CD23, from human leukocytes. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 mediates P2X7-induced shedding of CD23 from multiple myeloma RPMI 8226 B cells; however, whether this process occurs in primary B cells is unknown. The aim of the current study was to determine whether P2X7 activation induces the rapid shedding of CD23 from primary human and murine B cells. Flow cytometric and ELISA measurements showed that ATP treatment of human and murine B cells induced the rapid shedding of CD23. Treatment of cells with the specific P2X7 antagonist, AZ10606120, near-completely impaired ATP-induced CD23 shedding from both human and murine B cells. ATP-induced CD23 shedding was also impaired in B cells from P2X7 knockout mice. The absence of full-length, functional P2X7 in the P2X7 knockout mice was confirmed by immunoblotting of splenic cells, and by flow cytometric measurements of ATP-induced YO-PRO-1(2+) uptake into splenic B and T cells. The broad-spectrum metalloprotease antagonist, BB-94, and the ADAM10 antagonist, GI254023X, impaired P2X7-induced CD23 shedding from both human and murine B cells. These data indicate that P2X7 activation induces the rapid shedding of CD23 from primary human and murine B cells and that this process may be mediated by ADAM10.

  11. Distinct roles of N-glycosylation at different sites of corin in cell membrane targeting and ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhou, Tiantian; Peng, Jianhao; Xu, Ping; Dong, Ningzheng; Chen, Shenghan; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-16

    Corin is a membrane-bound protease essential for activating natriuretic peptides and regulating blood pressure. Human corin has 19 predicted N-glycosylation sites in its extracellular domains. It has been shown that N-glycans are required for corin cell surface expression and zymogen activation. It remains unknown, however, how N-glycans at different sites may regulate corin biosynthesis and processing. In this study, we examined corin mutants, in which each of the 19 predicted N-glycosylation sites was mutated individually. By Western analysis of corin proteins in cell lysate and conditioned medium from transfected HEK293 cells and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, we found that N-glycosylation at Asn-80 inhibited corin shedding in the juxtamembrane domain. Similarly, N-glycosylation at Asn-231 protected corin from autocleavage in the frizzled-1 domain. Moreover, N-glycosylation at Asn-697 in the scavenger receptor domain and at Asn-1022 in the protease domain is important for corin cell surface targeting and zymogen activation. We also found that the location of the N-glycosylation site in the protease domain was not critical. N-Glycosylation at Asn-1022 may be switched to different sites to promote corin zymogen activation. Together, our results show that N-glycans at different sites may play distinct roles in regulating the cell membrane targeting, zymogen activation, and ectodomain shedding of corin.

  12. Inflammatory mediators promote production of shed LRP1/CD91, which regulates cell signaling and cytokine expression by macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gorovoy, Matvey; Gaultier, Alban; Campana, W. Marie; Firestein, Gary S.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    LRP1 is a type-1 transmembrane receptor that mediates the endocytosis of diverse ligands. LRP1 β-chain proteolysis results in release of sLRP1 that is present in human plasma. In this study, we show that LPS and IFN-γ induce shedding of LRP1 from RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs in vitro. ADAM17 was principally responsible for the increase in LRP1 shedding. sLRP1 was also increased in vivo in mouse plasma following injection of LPS and in plasma from human patients with RA or SLE. sLRP1, which was purified from human plasma, and full-length LRP1, purified from mouse liver, activated cell signaling when added to cultures of RAW 264.7 cells and BMMs. Robust activation of p38 MAPK and JNK was observed. The IKK-NF-κB pathway was transiently activated. Proteins that bind to the ligand-binding clusters in LRP1 failed to inhibit sLRP1-initiated cell signaling, however an antibody that targets the sLRP1 N terminus was effective. sLRP1 induced expression of regulatory cytokines by RAW 264.7 cells, including TNF-α, MCP-1/CCL2, and IL-10. These results demonstrate that sLRP1 is generated in inflammation and may regulate inflammation by its effects on macrophage physiology. PMID:20610799

  13. Microwaves and the cell membrane. III. Protein shedding is oxygen and temperature dependent: evidence for cation bridge involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Liburdy, R.P.; Vanek, P.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    Microwaves (2450 MHz, 60 mW/g) are shown to result in the release or shedding of at least 11 low-molecular-weight proteins (less than or equal to 31,000 Da) from rabbit erythrocytes maintained in physiological buffer. Protein release was detected by gel electrophoresis of cell-free supernatants using sensitive silver staining. This release is oxygen dependent and occurs in 30 min for exposures conducted within the special temperature region of 17-21 degrees C, which is linked to a structural or conformational transition in the cell membrane. Shedding of 26,000 and 24,000 Da proteins is unique to microwave treatment, with enhanced release of 28,000 and less than or equal to 15,000 Da species during microwave compared to sham exposures. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing further reveals that proteins of less than or equal to 14,000 Da shed during microwave treatment exhibit a pI of 6.8-7.3 not seen in sham-treated cells. Treatment of erythrocytes with a serine-directed protease inhibitor does not prevent release of proteins. However, when erythrocytes are maintained at 17-21 degrees C by conventional heating in the absence of divalent cations, release of 28,000-31,000 and less than or equal to 14,000 Da components is detected. This indicates that cation-bridge stability may be important for release of these proteins. The above results provide evidence that microwaves alter erythrocyte protein composition at temperatures linked to a transition in the cell membrane and that destabilization of salt bridges may play a role in an interaction mechanism for protein release.

  14. Ectodomain shedding of the cell adhesion molecule Nectin-4 in ovarian cancer is mediated by ADAM10 and ADAM17.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Petra C; Boylan, Kristin L M; Walcheck, Bruce; Heinze, Rachel; Geller, Melissa A; Argenta, Peter A; Skubitz, Amy P N

    2017-04-14

    We previously showed that the cell adhesion molecule Nectin-4 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer tumors, and its cleaved extracellular domain can be detected in the serum of ovarian cancer patients. The ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloproteinase) proteases are involved in ectodomain cleavage of transmembrane proteins, and ADAM17 is known to cleave Nectin-4 in breast cancer. However, the mechanism of Nectin-4 cleavage in ovarian cancer has not yet been determined. Analysis of ovarian cancer gene microarray data showed that higher expression of Nectin-4, ADAM10, and ADAM17 is associated with significantly decreased progression-free survival. We quantified Nectin-4 shedding from the surface of ovarian cancer cells after stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. We report that ADAM17 and ADAM10 cleave Nectin-4 and release soluble Nectin-4 (sN4). Small molecule inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of both ADAM proteases confirmed these results. In matched samples from 11 high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients, we detected 2-20-fold more sN4 in ascites fluid than serum. Co-incubation of ovarian cancer cells with ascites fluid significantly increased sN4 shedding, which could be blocked using a dual inhibitor of ADAM10 and ADAM17. Furthermore, we detected RNA for Nectin-4, ADAM10, and ADAM17 in primary ovarian carcinoma tumors, secondary omental metastases, and ascites cells isolated from serous ovarian cancer patients. In a signaling pathway screen, lysophosphatidic acid increased phosphorylation of AKT, EGF receptor, ERK1/2, JNK1/2/3, and c-Jun. Understanding the function of Nectin-4 shedding in ovarian cancer progression is critical to facilitate its development as both a serum biomarker and a therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Involvement of superoxide generated by NADPH oxidase in the shedding of procoagulant vesicles from human monocytic cells exposed to bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Azma, Toshiharu; Ogawa, Saori; Nishioka, Akira; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Kawahito, Shinji; Nagasaka, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki

    2017-08-17

    It is known that a variety of sized procoagulant vesicles that express tissue factor are released from several types of cells including monocytes by mechanisms related to the induction of apoptosis, while it has not yet been evaluated whether superoxide is involved in the production of such vesicles. Here, we report that a local anesthetic bupivacaine induces apoptosis in human monocytic cells THP-1 within a short observation period, where the shedding of procoagulant vesicles is associated. The property as procoagulant vesicles was evaluated using flow cytometry by the binding of FITC-conjugated fibrinogen to vesicles in the presence of fresh frozen plasma and the suppression of this binding by heparin. Bupivacaine (1 mg/ml) increased the apoptotic cells and procoagulant vesicles. LY294002 (100 µM), that inhibits the recruiting of intracellular component of NADPH oxidase to construct the activated form of this enzyme complex, or superoxide dismutase (1500 unit/ml) suppressed bupivacaine-provoked induction of apoptosis and the increase of procoagulant vesicles. We suggest that this simple experimental system is useful to explore the molecular mechanisms of action of superoxide in the shedding of procoagulant vesicles from human monocytic cells.

  16. Resveratrol promotes differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells to cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Xu, Xin; Qin, Xian; Yang, Chengjian; Feng, Qiuting

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are capable to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, with the potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, directed differentiation is still a challenge faced by scientists. As a natural substance in grapes, resveratrol (RV) is important for cardiovascular protection. The studies of RV and its effects on ESC differentiation have potential clinical applications. Using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), we investigated the effects of different concentrations of RV (5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μmol/L) exposure on mESCs viability, expression levels of cardiac marker genes in embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from mESCs, expression levels of maturity indicative cardiac markers in cardiomyocytes derived from mESCs, and the beating properties of EBs. About 10 μmol/L of RV showed no toxicity on cell viability and was the optimal concentration to promote mESC differentiation, induce mESC differentiation to cardiomyocytes, and gain the beating properties of EBs. RV can successfully direct the differentiation of mESCs into cardiomyocytes, shedding light on its future applications to treat cardiovascular diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Germ Cell Differentiation from Pluripotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Jose V.; Pera, Renee A. Reijo; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a medical condition with an increasing impact in Western societies with causes linked to toxins, genetics, and aging (primarily delay of motherhood). Within the different pathologies that can lead to infertility, poor quality or reduced quantity of gametes plays an important role. Gamete donation and therefore demand on donated sperm and eggs in fertility clinics is increasing. It is hoped that a better understanding of the conditions related to poor gamete quality may allow scientists to design rational treatments. However, to date, relatively little is known about human germ cell development in large part due to the inaccessibility of human development to molecular genetic analysis. It is hoped that pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells may provide an accessible in vitro model to study germline development; these cells are able to differentiate to cells of all three primary embryonic germ layers, as well as to germ cells in vitro. We review the state of the art in germline differentiation from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23329632

  18. Metabolism of Tac (IL2Ralpha): physiology of cell surface shedding and renal catabolism, and suppression of catabolism by antibody binding

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The interleukin 2 receptor alpha (IL2Ralpha; CD25; Tac) is the prototypic model for soluble receptor studies. It exists in vivo as a transmembrane complete molecule (TM-Tac) on cell surfaces and as a truncated soluble form (sTac; sIL2R alpha). sTac has been used as a serum marker of T cell activation in immune disorders and of tumor burden in Tac-expressing malignancies. In vivo, serum levels of all soluble proteins depend on the balance between production and catabolism, but little is known about the metabolic features of this class of molecules. We have developed a model for Tac metabolism that incorporates new insights in its production and catabolism. Tac was shed from the surface of malignant and activated human T cells with a model half-life (t1/2) of 2-6h, but which was prolonged under certain circumstances. The rate of shedding is first order overall and nonsaturable over a two order of magnitude range of substrate (TM-Tac) expression. Once shed from cells Tac is subject to catabolic activities in the host. In vivo studies in mice showed that 90% of Tac was catabolized by the kidney with a t1/2 of 1 h and a filtration fraction of 0.11 relative to creatinine. The remaining 10% of catabolism was mediated by other tissues with a t1/2 of 10 h. Approximately 1-3% of sTac is excreted intact as proteinuria with the remaining 97-99% catabolized to amino acids. Antibody to the receptor induced a marked delay in sTac catabolism by preventing filtration of the smaller protein through the renal glomerulus and additionally suppressing other nonrenal catabolic mechanisms. A discrepancy between the catabolic rats for Tac and anti-Tac in the same complex was interpreted as a previously unrecognized differential catabolic mechanism, suggesting features of the Brambell hypothesis and immunoglobulin G transport and catabolism, in which the antigen-in-complex in intracellular vesicles is relatively less protected from catabolism than the associated antibody. In light of the

  19. Decellularized extracellular matrix of human umbilical vein endothelial cells promotes endothelial differentiation of stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Xu, Jianguang; Zhu, Shaoyue; Yuan, Changyong; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2017-04-01

    Dental stem cells can serve as a potential source of functional endothelial cells for tissue engineering applications, but the endothelial-lineage differentiation efficiency is rather low even with growth factors and mechanical stimuli, which greatly limits their clinical applications. This is partly due to the deficiency of standard two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems, which is unable to recapitulate the three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo milieu that is rich in extracellular matrix. Hence, we extracted decellularized extracellular matrix from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs-DECM) to provide a bioactive substratum conducive to the endothelial differentiation of dental stem cells. Compared to cells plated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) cultured on the HUVECs-DECM demonstrated more regular arrangement and elongated morphology. HUVECs-DECM significantly enhanced the rapid adhesion and proliferation rates of SHED, as demonstrated by WST-8 assay and immunocytochemistry indicating higher expression levels of vinculin by newly adherent SHED on HUVECs-DECM versus TCP. In addition, there was twofold to fivefold higher mRNA expression levels of endothelial-specific markers CD31 and VEGFR-2 in SHED after seven days of culture on DECM versus TCP. Functional testing with in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay identified more capillary-like structure formation with significantly higher tubule length in SHED induced by DECM versus TCP. Hence, the results of this study provide a better understanding of the unique characteristics of cell-specific ECM and demonstrated the potential use of HUVECs-DECM as a culture substratum conducive for stimulating the endothelial differentiation of SHED for therapeutic angiogenic applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1083-1093, 2017.

  20. Characterization of antibody-containing vesicles shed from B-lymphoma cell lines: exposure of annexin V binding sites.

    PubMed

    Michel, Rosana B; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Mattes, M Jules

    2006-11-01

    Antibodies (Abs) to CD20 or HLA-DR, after binding to the B-lymphoma cell line RL following an overnight incubation at 37 degrees C, accumulate in the form of shed vesicles, which develop in the center of the cell clusters that are spontaneously formed by this cell line. These vesicles coalesce into fairly stable large structures, which we refer to as conglomerates of shed vesicles (CSVs). In the present study, we have extended our previous investigations into the nature of this material. Electron microscopy revealed a conglomerate of heterogeneous vesicles, which looked like pinched-off cytoplasmic projections. CSVs developed similarly either with or without Ab, demonstrating that CSV production is a spontaneous process that incorporates bound Abs if they are present. Before delivery to CSVs, the Abs capped on the cell surface. CSVs had high expression of annexin V binding sites, which are phagocytic signals that are exposed on damaged cells. For CSVs that were cell bound, which are frequently observed, the annexin V binding sites were only in the CSVs, and not on the surface of the intact cell. Although all CSVs contained both Abs and annexin V binding sites, the precise distribution of these two ligands was generally different. Annexin V binding sites were present on caps as well as on CSVs, and appear as soon as caps are formed. In cells incubated with anti-HLA-DR, CD20 was delivered to the CSVs together with HLA-DR, suggesting an association between these two molecules. CSVs prepared with anti-HLA-DR, but not CSVs prepared with anti-CD20, contained considerable numbers of nuclear fragments, identified by propidium iodide staining.

  1. Regulators of Tfh Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jogdand, Gajendra M.; Mohanty, Suchitra; Devadas, Satish

    2016-01-01

    The follicular helper T (Tfh) cells help is critical for activation of B cells, antibody class switching, and germinal center (GC) formation. The Tfh cells are characterized by the expression of CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), ICOS, programed death 1 (PD-1), B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL-6), and IL-21. They are involved in clearing infections and are adversely linked with autoimmune diseases and also have a role in viral replication as well as clearance. On the one hand, Tfh cells are generated from naive CD4+ T cells with sequential steps involving cytokine signaling (IL-21, IL-6, IL-12, activin A), migration, and positioning in the GC by CXCR5, surface receptors (ICOS/ICOSL, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein/signaling lymphocyte activation molecule) as well as transcription factor (BCL-6, c-Maf, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) signaling and repressor miR155. On the other hand, Tfh generation is negatively regulated at specific steps of Tfh generation by specific cytokine (IL-2, IL-7), surface receptor (PD-1, CTLA-4), transcription factors B lymphocyte maturation protein 1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, T-bet, KLF-2 signaling, and repressor miR 146a. Interestingly, miR-17–92 and FOXO1 act as a positive as well as a negative regulator of Tfh differentiation depending on the time of expression and disease specificity. Tfh cells are also generated from the conversion of other effector T cells as exemplified by Th1 cells converting into Tfh during viral infection. The mechanistic details of effector T cells conversion into Tfh are yet to be clear. To manipulate Tfh cells for therapeutic implication and or for effective vaccination strategies, it is important to know positive and negative regulators of Tfh generation. Hence, in this review, we have highlighted and interlinked molecular signaling from cytokines, surface receptors, transcription factors, ubiquitin ligase, and microRNA as positive and

  2. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, M T; de Jong, B G; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, J A; van Zelm, M C; Van Dongen, J J M; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, J I; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, N C; Hernandez, M T; Oriol, A; Echeveste, M A; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, S K; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, G J; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, M V; Lahuerta, J J; San-Miguel, J F

    2017-02-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n=20) that the CD19-CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19-CD81+ and CD19-CD81- BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19-CD81-) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19-CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P=0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P=0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n=40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles.

  3. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, MT; de Jong, BG; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, JA; van Zelm, MC; Van Dongen, JJM; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, JI; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, NC; Hernandez, MT; Oriol, A; Echeveste, MA; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, SK; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, GJ; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, MV; Lahuerta, JJ; San-Miguel, JF

    2017-01-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n = 20) that the CD19 − CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19 − CD81+ and CD19 − CD81 − BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19 − CD81 −) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19 − CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P = 0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P = 0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n = 40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles. PMID:27479184

  4. Identification with monoclonal antibody 140.240 of a structural variant of melanotransferrin shed by human melanoma cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liao, S K

    1996-01-01

    Shedding by cultured human melanoma cells of a well-characterised cell- surface glycoprotein antigen known as "melanotransferrin" was studied with two monoclonal antibodies, 140.240 and 96.5. By means of [35S]-cysteine metabolically-labelled melanoma cells and immunoprecipitation studies, identification was made, by 140.240 in the spent media of two of six melanoma cell lines, of a new molecule of 100-kDa, aside from the 88-kDa molecule. Only the 88-kDa shed molecule was detected in the remaining four melanoma cell lines with both antibodies. None of nine clonal sublines derived from the two melanoma cell lines were found to shed the 100-kDa or 88-kDa molecule exclusively. Both shed antigens were released spontaneously to the medium from the live melanoma cells rather than as a result of cell death and lysis, since there was no obvious cell death or debris in the spent medium nor in the monolayer cells detected at the time of spent medium collection. Digestion of the isolated 100-kDa and 88-kDa shed molecules with N-glycanase followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resulted in the appearance of a single band of the 77-kDa molecule, which is deduced to be the polypeptide precursor of the cell-associated 87-kDa antigen. It is concluded that some melanoma lines shed the variant 100-kDa molecule, in addition to the 88-kDa molecule, and that both shed molecules and their cellular counterpart 87-kDa differ in their degrees of glycosylation.

  5. Soluble T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domain 3 Is Shed from CD8+ T Cells by the Sheddase ADAM10, Is Increased in Plasma during Untreated HIV Infection, and Correlates with HIV Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Douglas-Vail, Matthew B.; Rahman, A. K. M. Nur-ur; Medcalf, Karyn E.; Xie, Irene Y.; Chew, Glen M.; Tandon, Ravi; Lanteri, Marion C.; Norris, Philip J.; Deeks, Steven G.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic HIV infection results in a loss of HIV-specific CD8+ T cell effector function, termed “exhaustion,” which is mediated, in part, by the membrane coinhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (Tim-3). Like many other receptors, a soluble form of this protein has been described in human blood plasma. However, soluble Tim-3 (sTim-3) is poorly characterized, and its role in HIV disease is unknown. Here, we show that Tim-3 is shed from the surface of responding CD8+ T cells by the matrix metalloproteinase ADAM10, producing a soluble form of the coinhibitory receptor. Despite previous reports in the mouse model, no alternatively spliced, soluble form of Tim-3 was observed in humans. Shed sTim-3 was found in human plasma and was significantly elevated during early and chronic untreated HIV infection, but it was not found differentially modulated in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-treated HIV-infected subjects or in elite controllers compared to HIV-uninfected subjects. Plasma sTim-3 levels were positively correlated with HIV load and negatively correlated with CD4 counts. Thus, plasma sTim-3 shedding correlated with HIV disease progression. Despite these correlations, we found that shedding Tim-3 did not improve the function of CD8+ T cells in terms of gamma interferon production or prevent their apoptosis through galectin-9. Further characterization studies of sTim-3 function are needed to understand the contribution of sTim-3 in HIV disease pathogenesis, with implications for novel therapeutic interventions. IMPORTANCE Despite the overall success of HAART in slowing the progression to AIDS in HIV-infected subjects, chronic immune activation and T cell exhaustion contribute to the eventual deterioration of the immune system. Understanding these processes will aid in the development of interventions and therapeutics to be used in combination with HAART to slow or reverse this deterioration. Here, we show that a soluble form of

  6. Screening Test for Shed Skin Cells by Measuring the Ratio of Human DNA to Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Takahashi, Shirushi; Kurosu, Akira; Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A novel screening method for shed skin cells by detecting Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), which is a resident bacterium on skin, was developed. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected using real-time PCR. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in all 20 human skin surface samples. Although not present in blood and urine samples, S. epidermidis was detected in 6 of 20 saliva samples, and 5 of 18 semen samples. The ratio of human DNA to S. epidermidisDNA was significantly smaller in human skin surface samples than in saliva and semen samples in which S. epidermidis was detected. Therefore, although skin cells could not be identified by detecting only S. epidermidis, they could be distinguished by measuring the S. epidermidis to human DNA ratio. This method could be applied to casework touch samples, which suggests that it is useful for screening whether skin cells and human DNA are present on potential evidentiary touch samples.

  7. Pancreatic Differentiation from Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are considered as a cell source for replacement therapies for pancreatic beta cells and other organs.We identified tetrabenazine (TBZ), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor as a promoter of late-stage differentiation of Pdx1-positive pancreatic progenitor cells into Ngn3-positive endocrine progenitor cells. A cell-permeable cAMP analog, dBu-cAMP promotes beta cell maturation in late stage of differentiation. The induced beta cells can secrete insulin in a glucose-dependent manner.Our protocol consists of a three -step differentiation process. ES cell recapitulate embryonic developmental processes in vitro. Therefore, the ES cell differentiation system is a useful model for the understanding of molecular mechanism of beta-cell differentiation and are useful for application for future regenerative medicine.

  8. Microparticle Shedding by Erythrocytes, Monocytes and Vascular Smooth Muscular Cells Is Reduced by Aspirin in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Suades, Rosa; Padró, Teresa; Vilahur, Gemma; Peña, Esther; Ybarra, Juan; Pou, Jose M; Badimon, Lina

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an enhanced risk for cardiovascular disease and its prevalence is increasing. Diabetes induces metabolic stress on blood and vascular cells, promoting platelet activation and vascular dysfunction. The level of vascular cell activation can be measured by the number and phenotype of microparticles found in the circulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a platelet-inhibitory dose of aspirin on the number and type of microparticles shed to the circulation. Forty-three diabetic patients were enrolled in the study and received a daily dose of 100mg of aspirin for 10 days to cover the average platelet life-span in the circulation. Before and after the intervention period, circulating microparticles were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry. Type 1 diabetic patients had about twice the number of tissue factor-positive circulating microparticles (derived both from platelets and monocytes) and endothelial-derived E-selectin positive microparticles than type 2 diabetic patients. Aspirin therapy significantly inhibited platelets since cyclooxygenase 1 derived thromboxane generation levels were reduced by 99%. Microparticles derived from erythrocytes, activated monocytes, and smooth muscle cells were significantly reduced after 10 days of aspirin administration. These results indicate that: a) vascular and blood cells in type 1 diabetic patients are exposed to more sustained stress shown by their specific microparticle origin and levels; b) aspirin therapy inhibits vascular wall cell activation and microparticle shedding, and c) the effects of aspirin are similar in type 1 and 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of modified platelet-rich plasma (mPRP) in promoting the proliferation and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells from deciduous teeth

    PubMed Central

    Wen, J.; Li, H.T.; Li, S.H.; Li, X.; Duan, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) have great potential to treat various dental-related diseases in regenerative medicine. They are usually maintained with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in vitro. Modified platelet-rich plasma (mPRP) would be a safe alternative to 10% FBS during SHEDs culture. Therefore, our study aimed to compare the proliferation and differentiation of SHEDs cultured in mPRP and FBS medium to explore an optimal concentration of mPRP for SHEDs maintenance. Platelets were harvested by automatic blood cell analyzer and activated by repeated liquid nitrogen freezing and thawing. The platelet-related cytokines were examined and analyzed by ELISA. SHEDs were extracted and cultured with different concentrations of mPRP or 10% FBS medium. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was measured. Mineralization factors, RUNX2 and OCN, were measured by real-time PCR. SHEDs were characterized with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) markers including vimentin, CD44, and CD105. mPRP at different concentrations (2, 5, 10, and 20%) enhanced the growth of SHEDs. Moreover, mPRP significantly stimulated ALP activity and promoted expression of RUNX2 and OCN compared with 10% FBS. mPRP could efficiently facilitate proliferation and differentiation of SHEDs, and 2% mPRP would be an optimal substitute for 10% FBS during SHEDs expansion and differentiation in clinical scale manufacturing. PMID:27599200

  10. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  11. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell-cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells.

  12. Poor microcirculatory flow dynamics are associated with endothelial cell damage and glycocalyx shedding following traumatic hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Naumann, David N; Hazeldine, Jon; Midwinter, Mark J; Hutchings, Sam D; Harrison, Paul

    2017-09-05

    Endothelial cell damage and glycocalyx shedding following trauma can increase the risk of inflammation, coagulopathy, vascular permeability and death. Bedside sublingual video-microscopy may detect worse flow and perfusion associated with this endotheliopathy. We compared markers of endotheliopathy with physical flow dynamics following traumatic hemorrhagic shock (THS). Sublingual incident dark field video-microscopy was performed at three time-points following injury (<10h; 10-30h; and 30-50h). Values for microcirculatory flow index (MFI), Point Of carE Microcirculation assessment (POEM) score, proportion of perfused vessels (PPV), microcirculatory heterogeneity index (MHI), perfused vessel density (PVD), and total vessel density (TVD) were obtained. ELISAs were performed to measure concentrations of thrombomodulin and syndecan-1 as biomarkers of endothelial cell damage and glycocalyx shedding respectively. Flow parameters were dichotomised to above and below average, and biomarkers compared between groups; below average MFI, POEM, PPV, PVD, and TVD, and above average MHI were considered poor microcirculatory flow dynamics. 155 sublingual video-microscopy clips corresponding to 39 time-points from 17 trauma patients were analysed. Median age was 35 (IQR 25-52); 16/17 were male.Within 10h of injury, syndecan-1 concentrations were significantly higher compared to 17 age and sex-matched healthy controls (30 (IQR 20-44) ng/ml) for worse TVD (78 (IQR 63-417) ng/ml); PVD (156 (IQR 63-590) ng/ml); PPV (249 (IQR 64-578) ng/ml); MFI (249 (IQR 64-578) ng/ml); MHI (45 (IQR 38-68) ng/ml); and POEM scores (108 (IQR 44-462) ng/ml) (all p<0.01). Thrombomodulin was also raised within 10 hours of injury when compared to healthy controls (2.9 (IQR 2.2-3.4) ng/ml) for worse PPV (4.1 (IQR 3.4-6.2) ng/ml) and MFI (4.1 (IQR 3.4-6.2) ng/ml) (both p<0.05). Endothelial cell damage and glycocalyx shedding are associated with worse flow, density, and heterogeneity within micro

  13. The FGFRL1 receptor is shed from cell membranes, binds fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), and antagonizes FGF signaling in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Florian; Zhuang, Lei; Beyeler, Michael; Kälin, Roland E; Mullis, Primus E; Brändli, André W; Trueb, Beat

    2010-01-15

    FGFRL1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor like 1) is the fifth and most recently discovered member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family. With up to 50% amino acid similarity, its extracellular domain closely resembles that of the four conventional FGFRs. Its intracellular domain, however, lacks the split tyrosine kinase domain needed for FGF-mediated signal transduction. During embryogenesis of the mouse, FGFRL1 is essential for the development of parts of the skeleton, the diaphragm muscle, the heart, and the metanephric kidney. Since its discovery, it has been hypothesized that FGFRL1 might act as a decoy receptor for FGF ligands. Here we present several lines of evidence that support this notion. We demonstrate that the FGFRL1 ectodomain is shed from the cell membrane of differentiating C2C12 myoblasts and from HEK293 cells by an as yet unidentified protease, which cuts the receptor in the membrane-proximal region. As determined by ligand dot blot analysis, cell-based binding assays, and surface plasmon resonance analysis, the soluble FGFRL1 ectodomain as well as the membrane-bound receptor are capable of binding to some FGF ligands with high affinity, including FGF2, FGF3, FGF4, FGF8, FGF10, and FGF22. We furthermore show that ectopic expression of FGFRL1 in Xenopus embryos antagonizes FGFR signaling during early development. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that FGFRL1 is indeed a decoy receptor for FGFs.

  14. Characterization of Membrane-shed Microvesicles from Cytokine-stimulated β-Cells Using Proteomics Strategies*

    PubMed Central

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Søren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Lainé, Jeanne; McGuire, James N.; Pociot, Flemming; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2012-01-01

    Microparticles and exosomes are two of the most well characterized membrane-derived microvesicles released either directly from the plasma membrane or released through the fusion of intracellular multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, respectively. They are thought to be involved in many significant biological processes such as cell to cell communication, rescue from apoptosis, and immunological responses. Here we report for the first time a quantitative study of proteins from β-cell-derived microvesicles generated after cytokine induced apoptosis using stable isotope labeled amino acids in cell culture combined with mass spectrometry. We identified and quantified a large number of β-cell-specific proteins and proteins previously described in microvesicles from other cell types in addition to new proteins located to these vesicles. In addition, we quantified specific sites of protein phosphorylation and N-linked sialylation in proteins associated with microvesicles from β-cells. Using pathway analysis software, we were able to map the most distinctive changes between microvesicles generated during growth and after cytokine stimulation to several cell death and cell signaling molecules including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 3, tumor necrosis factor-interacting kinase receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. PMID:22345510

  15. Characterization of membrane-shed microvesicles from cytokine-stimulated β-cells using proteomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Jensen, Søren Skov; Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Lainé, Jeanne; McGuire, James N; Pociot, Flemming; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2012-08-01

    Microparticles and exosomes are two of the most well characterized membrane-derived microvesicles released either directly from the plasma membrane or released through the fusion of intracellular multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane, respectively. They are thought to be involved in many significant biological processes such as cell to cell communication, rescue from apoptosis, and immunological responses. Here we report for the first time a quantitative study of proteins from β-cell-derived microvesicles generated after cytokine induced apoptosis using stable isotope labeled amino acids in cell culture combined with mass spectrometry. We identified and quantified a large number of β-cell-specific proteins and proteins previously described in microvesicles from other cell types in addition to new proteins located to these vesicles. In addition, we quantified specific sites of protein phosphorylation and N-linked sialylation in proteins associated with microvesicles from β-cells. Using pathway analysis software, we were able to map the most distinctive changes between microvesicles generated during growth and after cytokine stimulation to several cell death and cell signaling molecules including tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 3, tumor necrosis factor-interacting kinase receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 1, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1.

  16. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-04-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4(+) T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. © 2014 Bose Institute.

  17. Myb permits multilineage airway epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie-hong; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L.; Patel, Anand C.; Huang, Tao; Yozamp, Nicholas S.; Xu, Jian; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Byers, Derek E.; Pierce, Richard A.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the pulmonary airway is specially differentiated to provide defense against environmental insults, but also subject to dysregulated differentiation that results in lung disease. The current paradigm for airway epithelial differentiation is a one-step program whereby a p63+ basal epithelial progenitor cell generates a ciliated or secretory cell lineage, but the cue for this transition and whether there are intermediate steps is poorly defined. Here we identify transcription factor Myb as a key regulator that permits early multilineage differentiation of airway epithelial cells. Myb+ cells were identified as p63− and therefore distinct from basal progenitor cells, but were still negative for markers of differentiation. Myb RNAi treatment of primary-culture airway epithelial cells and Myb gene deletion in mice resulted in a p63− population with failed maturation of Foxj1+ ciliated cells, as well as Scbg1a1+ and Muc5ac+ secretory cells. Consistent with these findings, analysis of whole genome expression of Myb-deficient cells identified Myb-dependent programs for ciliated and secretory cell differentiation. Myb+ cells were rare in human airways but were increased in regions of ciliated cells and mucous cell hyperplasia in samples from subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Together, the results show that a p63− Myb+ population of airway epithelial cells represents a distinct intermediate stage of differentiation that is required under normal conditions and may be heightened in airway disease. PMID:25103188

  18. Osteoblastic differentiation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth induced by thermosensitive hydrogels with strontium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Ta; Chou, Wei-Ling; Chou, Chih-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are a novel source of multi-potential stem cells for tissue engineering because of their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Strontium exhibits an important function in bone remodeling because it can simulate bone formation and decrease bone resorption. Hydrogels can mimic the natural cellular environment. The association of hydrogels with cell viability is determined using biological tests, including rheological experiments. In this study, osteogenic differentiation was investigated through SHED encapsulation in hydrogels containing strontium phosphate. Results of 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence staining indicated that the cells grew well and SHEDs proliferated in the hydrogels. Strontium-loaded chitosan-based hydrogels induced the biomineralization and high expression of alkaline phosphatase. Moreover, the expression levels of bone-related genes, including type-I collagen, Runx2, osteopontin (OP), and osteonectin (ON), were up-regulated during the osteogenic differentiation of SHEDs. This study demonstrated that strontium can be an effective inducer of osteogenesis for SHEDs. Elucidating the function of bioceramics (such as strontium) is useful in designing and developing strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Biochemical measurements on single erythroid progenitor cells shed light on the combinatorial regulation of red blood cell production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijia; Akbarian, Vahe; Audet, Julie

    2013-02-02

    Adult bone marrow (BM) erythrocyte colony-forming units (CFU-Es) are important cellular targets for the treatment of anemia and also for the manufacture of red blood cells (RBCs) ex vivo. We obtained quantitative biochemical measurements from single and small numbers of CFU-Es by isolating and analyzing c-Kit(+)CD71(high)Ter119(-) cells from adult mouse BM and this allowed us to identify two mechanisms that can be manipulated to increase RBC production. As expected, maximum RBC output was obtained when CFU-Es were stimulated with a combination of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) and Erythropoietin (EPO) mainly because SCF supports a transient CFU-E expansion and EPO promotes the survival and terminal differentiation of erythroid progenitors. However, we found that one of the main factors limiting the output in RBCs was that EPO induces a downregulation of c-Kit expression which limits the transient expansion of CFU-Es. In the presence of SCF, the EPO-mediated downregulation of c-Kit on CFU-Es is delayed but still significant. Moreover, treatment of CFU-Es with 1-Naphthyl PP1 could partially inhibit the downregulation of c-Kit induced by EPO, suggesting that this process is dependent on a Src family kinase, v-Src and/or c-Fyn. We also found that CFU-E survival and proliferation was dependent on the level of time-integrated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in these cells, all of which could be significantly increased when SCF and EPO were combined with mouse fetal liver-derived factors. Taken together, these results suggest two novel molecular strategies to increase RBC production and regeneration.

  20. Cell cholesterol modulates metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) and clearance function

    PubMed Central

    Selvais, Charlotte; D'Auria, Ludovic; Tyteca, Donatienne; Perrot, Gwenn; Lemoine, Pascale; Troeberg, Linda; Dedieu, Stéphane; Noël, Agnès; Nagase, Hideaki; Henriet, Patrick; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Marbaix, Etienne; Emonard, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) is a plasma membrane scavenger and signaling receptor, composed of a large ligand-binding subunit (515-kDa α-chain) linked to a shorter transmembrane subunit (85-kDa β-chain). LRP-1 cell-surface level and function are controlled by proteolytic shedding of its ectodomain. Here, we identified ectodomain sheddases in human HT1080 cells and demonstrated regulation of the cleavage by cholesterol by comparing the classical fibroblastoid type with a spontaneous epithelioid variant, enriched ∼2-fold in cholesterol. Two membrane-associated metalloproteinases were involved in LRP-1 shedding: a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-12 (ADAM-12) and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). Although both variants expressed similar levels of LRP-1, ADAM-12, MT1-MMP, and specific tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2), LRP-1 shedding from epithelioid cells was ∼4-fold lower than from fibroblastoid cells. Release of the ectodomain was triggered by cholesterol depletion in epithelioid cells and impaired by cholesterol overload in fibroblastoid cells. Modulation of LRP-1 shedding on clearance was reflected by accumulation of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in the medium. We conclude that cholesterol exerts an important control on LRP-1 levels and function at the plasma membrane by modulating shedding of its ectodomain, and therefore represents a novel regulator of extracellular proteolytic activities.—Selvais, C., D'Auria, L., Tyteca, D., Perrot, G, Lemoine, P., Troeberg, L., Dedieu, S., Noël, A., Nagase, H., Henriet, P., Courtoy, P. J., Marbaix, E., Emonard, H. Cell cholesterol modulates metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1) and clearance function. PMID:21518850

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis toxins trigger receptor shedding from gypsy moth midgut cells

    Treesearch

    Algimantas P. Valaitis

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the Cry1 insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) begins with the processing of these proteins in the larval gut. After proteolytic activation, the Bt toxins bind to specific midgut receptors and insert into the membrane of the gut epithelial cells, causing insect death.

  2. Raman microscopy of phagocytosis: shedding light on macrophage foam cell formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2006-02-01

    The phagocyte NADPH oxidase is a crucial enzyme in the innate immune response of leukocytes against invading microorganisms. The superoxide (O II -) that is generated by this enzyme upon infection is directly and indirectly used in bacterial killing. The catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase, the membrane-bound protein heterodimer flavocytochrome b 558, contains two heme moieties. Here, we first briefly discuss our recent confocal resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy and microscopy experiments on flavocytochrome b 558 in both resting and phagocytosing neutrophilic granulocytes. Such experiments allow the determination of the redox state of flavocytochrome b 558 inside the cell, which directly reflects the electron transporting activity of NADPH oxidase. Subsequently, we report that incubation of murine RAW 264.7 macrophages with PolyActive microspheres for 1 week in culture medium leads to morphological and biochemical changes in the macrophages that are characteristic for the generation of macrophage-derived foam cells. Lipid-laden foam cells are the hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. Using nonresonant Raman spectroscopy and microscopy, we demonstrate that the numerous intracellular droplets in macrophages exposed to microspheres are rich in cholesteryl esters. The finding that phagocytic processes may trigger foam cell formation reinforces the current belief that (chronic) infection and inflammation are linked to the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. The study of such a connection may reveal new therapeutic targets for atherosclerosis treatment or prevention.

  3. Transcriptomic signatures shaped by cell proportions shed light on comparative developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Pantalacci, Sophie; Guéguen, Laurent; Petit, Coraline; Lambert, Anne; Peterkovà, Renata; Sémon, Marie

    2017-02-15

    Comparative transcriptomics can answer many questions in developmental and evolutionary developmental biology. Most transcriptomic studies start by showing global patterns of variation in transcriptomes that differ between species or organs through developmental time. However, little is known about the kinds of expression differences that shape these patterns. We compared transcriptomes during the development of two morphologically distinct serial organs, the upper and lower first molars of the mouse. We found that these two types of teeth largely share the same gene expression dynamics but that three major transcriptomic signatures distinguish them, all of which are shaped by differences in the relative abundance of different cell types. First, lower/upper molar differences are maintained throughout morphogenesis and stem from differences in the relative abundance of mesenchyme and from constant differences in gene expression within tissues. Second, there are clear time-shift differences in the transcriptomes of the two molars related to cusp tissue abundance. Third, the transcriptomes differ most during early-mid crown morphogenesis, corresponding to exaggerated morphogenetic processes in the upper molar involving fewer mitotic cells but more migrating cells. From these findings, we formulate hypotheses about the mechanisms enabling the two molars to reach different phenotypes. We also successfully applied our approach to forelimb and hindlimb development. Gene expression in a complex tissue reflects not only transcriptional regulation but also abundance of different cell types. This knowledge provides valuable insights into the cellular processes underpinning differences in organ development. Our approach should be applicable to most comparative developmental contexts.

  4. Endocytosis and shedding of the decay accelerating factor on human polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tausk, F; Fey, M; Gigli, I

    1989-11-15

    The decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a cell membrane glycoprotein that functions in the control of C activation. We studied the modulation of membrane DAF on polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) by using anti-DAF antibodies. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis showed that DAF expression was reduced by 43 +/- 7% on resting or stimulated cells that were held at 37 degrees C for 30 min when compared with those kept on ice. Most of this reduction occurred within the first 15 min, and was followed by a gradual further decrease in surface DAF. PMN that were held at 37 degrees C for varying periods of time before DAF measurement had a gradual decrease suggestive of release of DAF from the PMN membrane or endocytosis. To examine the latter, PMN were reacted with anti-DAF at 0 degree C, followed by 125I-Fab'2 secondary antibodies at either 0 degree C or 37 degrees C, and subsequently treated with pronase. Thirty +/- 11% of the 125I remained bound to cells kept at 37 degrees C compared to 2% in those held at 0 degrees C. Internalization was further confirmed by electron microscopy. In PMN that were not exposed to pronase, 26 +/- 2% of the surface-associated 125I was released at 37 degrees C compared with 7% at 0 degrees C. Immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE of surface-labeled PMN showed that the temperature-dependent released DAF had a lower m.w. than membrane DAF. Immunofluorescent studies revealed that 37 degrees C mediated the redistribution of DAF from a homogeneous pattern into caps. These results show that under the conditions studied DAF is partially internalized and partially released from the PMN membrane to the fluid phase; the latter may contribute to the presence of DAF in body fluids.

  5. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  6. Probing the infiltrating character of brain tumors: inhibition of RhoA/ROK-mediated CD44 cell surface shedding from glioma cells by the green tea catechin EGCg.

    PubMed

    Annabi, Borhane; Bouzeghrane, Mounia; Moumdjian, Robert; Moghrabi, Albert; Béliveau, Richard

    2005-08-01

    Glioma cell-surface binding to hyaluronan (HA), a major constituent of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) environment, is regulated through a complex membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)/CD44/caveolin interaction that takes place at the leading edges of invading cells. In the present study, intracellular transduction pathways required for the HA-mediated recognition by infiltrating glioma cells in brain was investigated. We show that the overexpression of the GTPase RhoA up-regulated MT1-MMP expression and triggered CD44 shedding from the U-87 glioma cell surface. This potential implication in cerebral metastatic processes was also observed in cells overexpressing the full-length recombinant MT1-MMP, while the overexpression of a cytoplasmic domain truncated from of MT1-MMP failed to do so. This suggests that the cytoplasmic domain of MT1-MMP transduces intracellular signaling leading to RhoA-mediated CD44 shedding. Treatment of glioma cells with the Rho-kinase (ROK) inhibitor Y27632, or with EGCg, a green tea catechin with anti-MMP and anti-angiogenesis activities, antagonized both RhoA- and MT1-MMP-induced CD44 shedding. Conversely, overexpression of recombinant ROK stimulated CD44 release. Taken together, our results suggest that RhoA/ROK intracellular signaling regulates MT1-MMP-mediated CD44 recognition of HA. These molecular processes may partly explain the diffuse brain-infiltrating character of glioma cells within the surrounding parenchyma and thus be a target for new approaches to anti-tumor therapy.

  7. An Experimental System to Study Cell Differentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1994-01-01

    Uses Dictyostelium discoideum to aid in introducing cell differentiation to students. Students engage in a laboratory exercise that allows them to investigate the means by which embryonic cells choose developmental pathways. (ZWH)

  8. An Experimental System to Study Cell Differentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1994-01-01

    Uses Dictyostelium discoideum to aid in introducing cell differentiation to students. Students engage in a laboratory exercise that allows them to investigate the means by which embryonic cells choose developmental pathways. (ZWH)

  9. Surface Glycoproteins of Exosomes Shed by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Contribute to Function.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sitara; Danielson, Steven; Clements, Virginia; Edwards, Nathan; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2017-01-06

    In this report, we use a proteomic strategy to identify glycoproteins on the surface of exosomes derived from myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and then test if selected glycoproteins contribute to exosome-mediated chemotaxis and migration of MDSCs. We report successful modification of a surface chemistry method for use with exosomes and identify 21 surface N-glycoproteins on exosomes released by mouse mammary carcinoma-induced MDSCs. These glycoprotein identities and functionalities are compared with 93 N-linked glycoproteins identified on the surface of the parental cells. As with the lysate proteomes examined previously, the exosome surface N-glycoproteins are primarily a subset of the glycoproteins on the surface of the suppressor cells that released them, with related functions and related potential as therapeutic targets. The "don't eat me" molecule CD47 and its binding partners thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) were among the surface N-glycoproteins detected. Functional bioassays using antibodies to these three molecules demonstrated that CD47, TSP1, and to a lesser extent SIRPα facilitate exosome-mediated MDSC chemotaxis and migration.

  10. Sumoylation differentially regulates Sp1 to control cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lili; Ji, Wei-Ke; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Wen-Feng; Tang, Xiang-Cheng; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Li, Ling; Liu, Mugen; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Wu, Erxi; Woodward, Zachary; Liu, Yi-Zhi; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Li, David Wan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) are actively involved in regulating differentiation of different cell types. However, the functional differences between SUMO isoforms and their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Using the ocular lens as a model system, we demonstrate that different SUMOs display distinct functions in regulating differentiation of epithelial cells into fiber cells. During lens differentiation, SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 displayed different expression, localization, and targets, suggesting differential functions. Indeed, overexpression of SUMO2/3, but not SUMO1, inhibited basic (b) FGF-induced cell differentiation. In contrast, knockdown of SUMO1, but not SUMO2/3, also inhibited bFGF action. Mechanistically, specificity protein 1 (Sp1), a major transcription factor that controls expression of lens-specific genes such as β-crystallins, was positively regulated by SUMO1 but negatively regulated by SUMO2. SUMO2 was found to inhibit Sp1 functions through several mechanisms: sumoylating it at K683 to attenuate DNA binding, and at K16 to increase its turnover. SUMO2 also interfered with the interaction between Sp1 and the coactivator, p300, and recruited a repressor, Sp3 to β-crystallin gene promoters, to negatively regulate their expression. Thus, stable SUMO1, but diminishing SUMO2/3, during lens development is necessary for normal lens differentiation. In support of this conclusion, SUMO1 and Sp1 formed complexes during early and later stages of lens development. In contrast, an interaction between SUMO2/3 and Sp1 was detected only during the initial lens vesicle stage. Together, our results establish distinct roles of different SUMO isoforms and demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that Sp1 acts as a major transcription factor target for SUMO control of cell differentiation. PMID:24706897

  11. [Basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation].

    PubMed

    Goldman-Lévy, Gabrielle; Frouin, Eric; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Maury, Géraldine; Guillot, Bernard; Costes, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma with matrical differentiation is a very rare variant of basal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, less than 30 cases have been reported. This tumor is composed of basaloid lobules showing a differentiation toward the pilar matrix cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that beta-catenin would interfer with physiopathogenesis of matrical tumors, in particular pilomatricomas, but also basal cell carcinomas with matrical differentiation. This is a new case, with immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of beta-catenin, in order to explain its histogenesis.

  12. Effects of novel hydroxyapatite-based 3D biomaterials on proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Karadzic, Ivana; Vucic, Vesna; Jokanovic, Vukoman; Debeljak-Martacic, Jasmina; Markovic, Dejan; Petrovic, Snjezana; Glibetic, Marija

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the differential capacity of isolated dental pulp stem cells (SHED) cultured onto four different scaffold materials. The differential potential of isolated SHED was examined on the following scaffolds: porous hydroxyapatite (pHAP) alone or combined with three polymers [polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), alginate, and ethylene vinylacetate / ethylene vinylversatate (EVA/EVV)]. SHED were isolated by "outgrowth" method and characterized by the flow cytometry. Viability of cells grown with scaffolds was assessed by MTT and LDH assays. No significant cytotoxic effect of any of the tested materials was shown. Staining with alizarin red and estimated alkaline phosphatase activity to identify differentiation, demonstrated osteoblastic phenotype of SHED and newly deposited and mineralized extra cellular matrix (ECM) in presence of all tested scaffolds. The developed ECM seen at scanning electronic micrographs additionally confirmed the osteogenic differentiation and biocompatibility between cells and materials. In summary, all studied biomaterials are suitable carriers for proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

  13. Cell division, differentiation and dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Yomo, Tetsuya

    1994-08-01

    A novel mechanism for cell differentiation is proposed, based on the dynamic clustering in a globally coupled nonlinear system. A simple model with metabolic reaction, active transport of chemicals from media, and cell division is found to show three successive stages with the growth of the number of cells; coherent growth, dynamic clustering, and fixed cell differentiation. At the last stage, disparity in activities, germ line segregation, somatic cell differentiation, and homeochaotic stability against external perturbation are found. Our results, providing a simple interpretation of the experiments of the preceding paper, imply that cell differentiation can occur without a spatial pattern. From dynamical systems viewpoint, the new concept of “open chaos” is proposed, as a novel and general scenario for systems with growing numbers of elements, also seen in economics and sociology.

  14. The Mechanisms of M-cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    KANAYA, Takashi; OHNO, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal M (microfold or membranous) cells are an enigmatic lineage of intestinal epithelial cells that initiate mucosal immune responses through the uptake and transcytosis of luminal antigens. Due to their rarity, the mechanisms of M-cell function and differentiation are poorly understood. To overcome this problem, experimental strategies to enrich for M-cells have been established. Transcriptome analyses have provided valuable insight, especially on the receptors for antigen uptake, and such studies have broadened our knowledge of M-cell function. In another line of investigation, we and others have begun to dissect the molecular pathways of M-cell differentiation. Among them, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) has been identified as an essential factor for M-cell differentiation. We have focused on the M-cell inducible activity of RANKL and have been able to observe temporal transitions during M-cell differentiation by using in vivo ectopic M-cell differentiation induced by exogenous RANKL treatment. We have found that the ets-family transcription factor Spi-B is essential for functional maturation of M cells. In the absence of Spi-B, the immune response to Salmonella Typhimurium is severely impaired, suggesting that M cells are important for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. PMID:25032083

  15. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  16. Hydrogen sulphide increases hepatic differentiation of human tooth pulp stem cells compared with human bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, M; Ishkitiev, N; Yaegaki, K; Imai, T; Tanaka, T; Fukuda, M; Ono, S; Haapasalo, M

    2014-12-01

    To determine the differences in stem cell properties, in hepatic differentiation and in the effects of hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) on hepatic differentiation between human bone marrow stem cells (hBMC) and stem cells from human exfoliated primary tooth pulp (SHED). CD117(+) cells were magnetically separated and subjected to hepatic differentiation. CD117(+) cell lineages were characterized for transcription factors indicative of stem cells by qRT-PCR. For the last 9 days of the differentiation, the test cells were exposed to 0.1 ng mL(-1) H2 S. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry of albumin, alpha-fetoprotein and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase were carried out after differentiation. Urea concentration and glycogen synthesis were also determined. Genes expressed in SHED were also expressed in BMC. No difference in expression level of hepatic markers was shown by immunofluorescence. SHED showed more positive cells than hBMC (P < 0.01). H2 S increased the number of positive cells in both cultures (P < 0.01). Urea concentration and glycogen synthesis increased significantly after H2 S exposure (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Real-time PCR data were analysed by RT(2) profiler RT-PCR Array Data Analysis version 3.5 (Qiagen), and ELISA data were analysed by Bonferroni's multiple comparison using Windows spss version 16 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). Bonferroni's multiple comparison test was also carried out after angle transformation for the percentage data of flow cytometer using Windows spss(®) version 16 (SPSS Inc). Statistical significance was accepted at P < 0.05. Stem cells from human exfoliated primary tooth pulp and BMC have similar properties. The level of hepatic differentiation in SHED compared with BMC was the same or higher. H2 S increased the level of hepatic differentiation. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  18. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  19. Differential gene expression profiling of human adipose stem cells differentiating into smooth muscle-like cells by TGFβ1/BMP4.

    PubMed

    Elçin, Ayşe Eser; Parmaksiz, Mahmut; Dogan, Arin; Seker, Sukran; Durkut, Serap; Dalva, Klara; Elçin, Yaşar Murat

    2017-03-15

    Regenerative repair of the vascular system is challenging from the perspectives of translational medicine and tissue engineering. There are fundamental hurdles in front of creating bioartificial arteries, which involve recaputilation of the three-layered structure under laboratory settings. Obtaining and maintaining smooth muscle characteristics is an important limitation, as the transdifferentiated cells fail to display mature phenotype. This study aims to shed light on the smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose stem cells (hASCs). To this end, we first acquired hASCs from lipoaspirate samples. Upon characterization, the cells were induced to differentiate into smooth muscle (SM)-like cells using a variety of inducer combinations. Among all, TGFβ1/BMP4 combination had the highest differentiation efficiency, based on immunohistochemical analyses. hSM-like cell samples were compared to hASCs and to the positive control, human coronary artery-smooth muscle cells (hCA-SMCs) through gene transcription profiling. Microarray findings revealed the activation of gene groups that function in smooth muscle differentiation, signaling pathways, extracellular modeling and cell proliferation. Our results underline the effectiveness of the growth factors and suggest some potential variables for detecting the SM-like cell characteristics. Evidence in transcriptome level was used to evaluate the TGFβ1/BMP4 combination as a previously unexplored effector for the smooth muscle differentiation of adipose stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Activin A programs human TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Locci, Michela; Wu, Jennifer; Arumemi, Fortuna; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Dahlberg, Carol; Miller, Andrew T.; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Follicular helper T (TFH) cells are CD4+ T cells specialized in helping B cells and are associated both with protective antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. The promise of targeting TFH cells therapeutically has been limited by fragmentary understanding of extrinsic signals regulating human TFH cell differentiation. A screen of a human protein library identified activin A as new regulator of TFH cell differentiation. Activin A orchestrated expression of multiple TFH-associated genes, independently or in concert with additional signals. TFH programming by activin A was antagonized by the cytokine IL-2. Activin A’s capacity to drive TFH cell differentiation in vitro was conserved for non-human primates but not mice. Finally, activin A-induced TFH programming was dependent on SMAD2 and SMAD3 signaling and blocked by pharmacological inhibitors. PMID:27376469

  1. Factors involved in CLL pathogenesis and cell survival are disrupted by differentiation of CLL B-cells into antibody-secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghamlouch, Hussein; Darwiche, Walaa; Hodroge, Ahmed; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Dupont, Sébastien; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Guignant, Caroline; Trudel, Stéphanie; Royer, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown that chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells display a strong tendency to differentiate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and thus may be amenable to differentiation therapy. However, the effect of this differentiation on factors associated with CLL pathogenesis has not been reported. In the present study, purified CLL B-cells were stimulated to differentiate into ASCs by phorbol myristate acetate or CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, in combination with CD40 ligand and cytokines in a two-step, seven-day culture system. We investigated (i) changes in the immunophenotypic, molecular, functional, morphological features associated with terminal differentiation into ASCs, (ii) the expression of factors involved in CLL pathogenesis, and (iii) the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the differentiated cells. Our results show that differentiated CLL B-cells are able to display the transcriptional program of ASCs. Differentiation leads to depletion of the malignant program and deregulation of the apoptosis/survival balance. Analysis of apoptosis and the cell cycle showed that differentiation is associated with low cell viability and a low rate of cell cycle entry. Our findings shed new light on the potential for differentiation therapy as a part of treatment strategies for CLL. PMID:26050196

  2. Cell proliferation and differentiation in chemical leukemogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tissues such as bone marrow with normally high rates of cell division, proliferation is tightly coordinated with cell differentiation. Survival, proliferation and differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells depend on the growth factors, interleukin 3 (IL-3) and/or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and their synergism with other cytokines. We provide evidence that a characteristic shared by a diverse group of compounds with demonstrated leukemogenic potential is the ability to act synergistically with GM-CSF. This results in an increase in recruitment of a resting population of hematopoietic progenitor cells normally unresponsive to the cytokine and a twofold increase in the size of the proliferating cell population normally regarded to be at risk of transformation in leukemogenesis. These findings support the possibility that transient alterations in hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation may be an important factor in the early stages of development of leukemia secondary to chemical or drug exposure.

  3. Cell proliferation and differentiation in chemical leukemogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irons, R. D.; Stillman, W. S.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    In tissues such as bone marrow with normally high rates of cell division, proliferation is tightly coordinated with cell differentiation. Survival, proliferation and differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells depend on the growth factors, interleukin 3 (IL-3) and/or granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and their synergism with other cytokines. We provide evidence that a characteristic shared by a diverse group of compounds with demonstrated leukemogenic potential is the ability to act synergistically with GM-CSF. This results in an increase in recruitment of a resting population of hematopoietic progenitor cells normally unresponsive to the cytokine and a twofold increase in the size of the proliferating cell population normally regarded to be at risk of transformation in leukemogenesis. These findings support the possibility that transient alterations in hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation may be an important factor in the early stages of development of leukemia secondary to chemical or drug exposure.

  4. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies.

  5. Differentiation of programmed Arabidopsis cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, De-Yu; Shi, Ming-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Plants express genes that encode enzymes that catalyse reactions to form plant secondary metabolites in specific cell types. However, the mechanisms of how plants decide their cellular metabolic fate and how cells diversify and specialise their specific secondary metabolites remains largely unknown. Additionally, whether and how an established metabolic program impacts genome-wide reprogramming of plant gene expression is unclear. We recently isolated PAP1-programmed anthocyanin-producing (red) and -free (white) cells from Arabidopsis thaliana; our previous studies have indicated that the PAP1 expression level is similar between these two different cell types. Transcriptional analysis showed that the red cells contain the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 regulatory complex, which controls anthocyanin biosynthesis; in contrast, the white cells and the wild-type cells lack this entire complex. These data indicate that different regulatory programming underlies the different metabolic states of these cells. In addition, our previous transcriptomic comparison indicated that there is a clear difference in the gene expression profiles of the red and wild-type cells, which is probably a consequence of cell-specific reprogramming. Based on these observations, in this report we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie the programming and reprogramming of gene expression involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:22126737

  6. Exposure to a metabolite of the environmental toxicant, trichloroethylene, attenuates CD4+ T cell activation-induced cell death by metalloproteinase-dependent FasL shedding.

    PubMed

    Blossom, Sarah J; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2006-07-01

    Long-term exposure to the environmental contaminant trichloroethylene (TCE) in drinking water has been shown to promote autoimmune disease in association with the expansion of activated CD4+ T cells. The effects of TCE on CD4+ T cells were linked in the present study to the ability of TCE metabolite, trichloroacetaldehyde hydrate (TCAH), to inhibit activation-induced cell death (AICD) in CD4+ T cells. TCAH attenuated AICD in CD4+ T cells by decreasing FasL (CD178) expression but not by altering Fas (CD95) expression or by interfering with Fas-signaling events following direct engagement of the Fas receptor. The TCAH-induced decrease in FasL expression did not appear to be mediated at the transcriptional level but was instead due to increased shedding of FasL from the surface of the CD4+ T cells. The ability of TCAH to cleave FasL and thereby decrease AICD appeared to be mediated by metalloproteinases and correlated with a TCAH-induced increase in matrix metalloproteinase-7. Thus, this study presents the novel finding that the environmental contaminant TCE works via its metabolite TCAH to attenuate AICD by increasing metalloproteinase activity that cleaves FasL from CD4+ T cells. This represents a mechanism by which an environmental trigger inhibits AICD in CD4+ T cells and may thereby promote CD4+ T cell-mediated autoimmune disease.

  7. Cancer stem cells and differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart

    2006-01-01

    Cancers arise from stem cells in adult tissues and the cells that make up a cancer reflect the same stem cell --> progeny --> differentiation progression observed in normal tissues. All adult tissues are made up of lineages of cells consisting of tissue stem cells and their progeny (transit-amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells); the number of new cells produced in normal tissue lineages roughly equals the number of old cells that die. Cancers result from maturation arrest of this process, resulting in continued proliferation of cells and a failure to differentiate and die. The biological behavior, morphological appearance, and clinical course of a cancer depend on the stage of maturation at which the genetic lesion is activated. This review makes a comparison of cancer cells to embryonic stem cells and to adult tis sue stem cells while addressing two basic questions: (1) Where do cancers come from?, and (2) How do cancers grow? The answers to these questions are critical to the development of approaches to the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

  8. A Soluble Form of the Giant Cadherin Fat1 Is Released from Pancreatic Cancer Cells by ADAM10 Mediated Ectodomain Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Wojtalewicz, Nathalie; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Hahn, Stephan; Schmiegel, Wolff; Warnken, Uwe; Schnölzer, Martina; de Bock, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    In pancreatic cancer, there is a clear unmet need to identify new serum markers for either early diagnosis, therapeutic stratification or patient monitoring. Proteomic analysis of tumor cell secretomes is a promising approach to indicate proteins released from tumor cells in vitro. Ectodomain shedding of transmembrane proteins has previously been shown to contribute significant fractions the tumor cell secretomes and to generate valuable serum biomarkers. Here we introduce a soluble form of the giant cadherin Fat1 as a novel biomarker candidate. Fat1 expression and proteolytic processing was analyzed by mass spectrometry and Western blotting using pancreatic cancer cell lines as compared to human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. RNA expression in cancer tissues was assessed by in silico analysis of publically available microarray data. Involvement of ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10) in Fat1 ectodomain shedding was analyzed by chemical inhibition and knockdown experiments. A sandwich ELISA was developed to determine levels of soluble Fat1 in serum samples. In the present report we describe the release of high levels of the ectodomain of Fat1 cadherin into the secretomes of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, a process that is mediated by ADAM10. We confirm the full-length and processed heterodimeric form of Fat1 expressed on the plasma membrane and also show the p60 C-terminal transmembrane remnant fragment corresponding to the shed ectodomain. Fat1 and its sheddase ADAM10 are overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas and ectodomain shedding is also recapitulated in vivo leading to increased Fat1 serum levels in some pancreatic cancer patients. We suggest that soluble Fat1 may find an application as a marker for patient monitoring complementing carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). In addition, detailed analysis of the diverse processed protein isoforms of the candidate tumor suppressor Fat1 can also contribute to our

  9. Differential Neuronal Plasticity of Dental Pulp Stem Cells From Exfoliated Deciduous and Permanent Teeth Towards Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Debanjana; Kanafi, Mohammad; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan; Datta, Indrani

    2016-09-01

    Based on early occurrence in chronological age, stem-cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) has been reported to possess better differentiation-potential toward certain cell-lineage in comparison to stem-cells from adult teeth (DPSCs). Whether this same property between them extends for the yield of functional central nervous system neurons is still not evaluated. Hence, we aim to assess the neuronal plasticity of SHED in comparison to DPSCs toward dopaminergic-neurons and further, if the difference is reflected in a differential expression of sonic-hedgehog (SHH)-receptors and basal-expressions of tyrosine-hydroxylase [TH; through cAMP levels]. Human SHED and DPSCs were exposed to midbrain-cues [SHH, fibroblast growth-factor8, and basic fibroblast growth-factor], and their molecular, immunophenotypical, and functional characterization was performed at different time-points of induction. Though SHED and DPSCs spontaneously expressed early-neuronal and neural-crest marker in their naïve state, only SHED expressed a high basal-expression of TH. The upregulation of dopaminergic transcription-factors Nurr1, Engrailed1, and Pitx3 was more pronounced in DPSCs. The yield of TH-expressing cells decreased from 49.8% to 32.16% in SHED while it increased from 8.09% to 77.47% in DPSCs. Dopamine release and intracellular-Ca(2+) influx upon stimulation (KCl and ATP) was higher in induced DPSCs. Significantly lower-expression of SHH-receptors was noted in naïve SHED than DPSCs, which may explain the differential neuronal plasticity. In addition, unlike DPSCs, SHED showed a down-regulation of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) upon exposure to SHH; possibly another contributor to the lesser differentiation-potential. Our data clearly demonstrates for the first time that DPSCs possess superior neuronal plasticity toward dopaminergic-neurons than SHED; influenced by higher SHH-receptor and lower basal TH expression. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2048-2063, 2016. © 2016

  10. EXPOSURE MODELING - SHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a general overview of SHEDS model features, describes algorithms in the SHEDS-Air Toxics model that focus on mobile source exposures and multipathway exposures, and presents examples of results from application of the SHEDS-Air Toxics model to benzene i...

  11. Involvement of gene methylation changes in the differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into islet-like cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lin; Wang, Jian; Lu, Guangxiu

    2014-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes results from destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas. Islet cell transplantation is a promising cure for diabetes. Here, we induced human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) to differentiate into islet-like cell clusters by nicotinamide plus betacellulin in vitro, and further investigated the DNA methylation status by a Nimble MeDIP microarray before and after cell differentiation to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of this differentiation. In addition, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to investigate whether the differentiation of hAECs into islet-like cells occurred through demethylation. Purified hAECs (CK18(+)/E-cadherin(+)/CD29(+)/CD90(-)/CD34(-)/CD45(-)) were isolated from human amnia. After induction, hAECs were found to be insulin positive and sensitive to glucose, indicating successful induction to islet-like cells. The methylation status of cell cytoskeleton-related genes was down-regulated and that of negative regulation of cell adhesion-related genes was up-regulated. The methylation status of pancreas development-related genes such as HNF1α and DGAT1 was decreased in hAECs after induction. After brief demethylation, INS gene expression was up-regulated in islet-like cell clusters, suggesting that DNA methylation changes were associated with the differentiation of hAECs into islet-like cell clusters.

  12. Pathogen induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Obar, Joshua J.; Jellison, Evan R.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Blair, David A.; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-01-01

    In response to infection CD8+ T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived (SLEC; CD127lowKLRG1high) and memory-precursor (MPEC; CD127highKLRG1low) effector cells from an early-effector cell (EEC) that is CD127lowKLRG1low in phenotype. CD8+ T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in EEC differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generationwas dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during VSV infection wasenhanced by administration ofCpG-DNA, through an IL-12 dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNAtreatment enhanced effector CD8+ T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12 independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8+ T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127highKLRG1highmemory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8+ T cell. These subsets persisted for several months, but were less effective in recall than MPECs. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  13. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  14. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide.

  15. IAA8 expression during vascular cell differentiation

    Treesearch

    Andrew T. Groover; Amy Pattishall; Alan M. Jones

    2003-01-01

    We report the characterization of a member of the auxin-induced IAA gene family from zinnia, designated zIAA8, which is expressed by mesophyll cells differentiating as tracheary elements in vitro. Transcription of zIAA8 is upregulated within 3 h after cell isolation in inductive medium,...

  16. Rethinking differentiation: Stem cells, regeneration, and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is an essential process for the development, growth, reproduction and longevity of all multicellular organisms, and its regulation has been the focus of intense investigation for the past 4 decades. The study of natural and induced stem cells has ushered an age of re-examination of what it means to be a stem or a differentiated cell. Past and recent discoveries in plants and animals, as well as novel experimental manipulations are beginning to erode many of these established concepts, and are forcing a re-evaluation of the experimental systems and paradigms presently being used to explore these and other biological process. PMID:24679530

  17. Imaging stem cell differentiation for cell-based tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Zhenghong; Dennis, James; Alsberg, Eben; Krebs, Melissa D; Welter, Jean; Caplan, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into a number of tissue lineages and possess great potential in tissue regeneration and cell-based therapy. For bone fracture or cartilage wear and tear, stem cells need to be delivered to the injury site for repair. Assessing engraftment of the delivered cells and their differentiation status is crucial for the optimization of novel cell-based therapy. A longitudinal and quantitative method is needed to track stem cells transplanted/implanted to advance our understanding of their therapeutic effects and facilitate improvements in cell-based therapy. Currently, there are very few effective noninvasive ways to track the differentiation of infused stem cells. A brief review of a few existing approaches, mostly using transgenic animals, is given first, followed by newly developed in vivo imaging strategies that are intended to track implanted MSCs using a reporter gene system. Specifically, marker genes are selected to track whether MSCs differentiate along the osteogenic lineage for bone regeneration or the chondrogenic lineage for cartilage repair. The general strategy is to use the promoter of a differentiation-specific marker gene to drive the expression of an established reporter gene for noninvasive and repeated imaging of stem cell differentiation. The reporter gene system is introduced into MSCs by way of a lenti-viral vector, which allows the use of human cells and thus offers more flexibility than the transgenic animal approach. Imaging osteogenic differentiation of implanted MSCs is used as a demonstration of the proof-of-principle of this differentiation-specific reporter gene approach. This framework can be easily extended to other cell types and for differentiation into any other cell lineage for which a specific marker gene (promoter) can be identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differentiation of germ cells and gametes from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marques-Mari, A I; Lacham-Kaplan, O; Medrano, J V; Pellicer, A; Simón, C

    2009-01-01

    Advances in stem cell research have opened new perspectives for regenerative and reproductive medicine. Stem cells (SC) can differentiate under appropriate in vitro and in vivo conditions into different cell types. Several groups have reported their ability to differentiate SCs into germline cells, and some of them have been successful in obtaining male and female gamete-like cells by using different methodologies. This review summarizes the current knowledge in this field and emphasizes significant embryological, genetic and epigenetic aspects of germ cells and gametes in vitro differentiation in humans and other species, highlighting major obstacles that need to be overcome for successful gametogenesis in culture: studies reporting development of germ cell-like cells from murine and human embryonic (ESC) and somatic SCs are critically reviewed. Published studies indicate that germ cells can be consistently differentiated from mouse and human ESC. However, further differentiation of germ cells through gametogenesis still has important genetic and epigenetic obstacles to be efficient. Differentiation of germ cells from SCs has the potential of becoming a future source of gametes for research use, although further investigation is needed to understand and develop the appropriate niches and culture conditions. Additionally, if genetic and epigenetic methodological limitations could be solved, therapeutic opportunities could be also considered.

  19. An Active Form of Sphingosine Kinase-1 Is Released in the Extracellular Medium as Component of Membrane Vesicles Shed by Two Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Donati, Chiara; Cassarà, Donata; Taverna, Simona; Salamone, Monica; Bruni, Paola; Vittorelli, Maria Letizia

    2010-01-01

    Expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK-1) correlates with a poor survival rate of tumor patients. This effect is probably due to the ability of SphK-1 to be released into the extracellular medium where it catalyzes the biosynthesis of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a signaling molecule endowed with profound proangiogenic effects. SphK-1 is a leaderless protein which is secreted by an unconventional mechanism. In this paper, we will show that in human hepatocarcinoma Sk-Hep1 cells, extracellular signaling is followed by targeting the enzyme to the cell surface and parallels targeting of FGF-2 to the budding vesicles. We will also show that SphK-1 is present in a catalitycally active form in vesicles shed by SK-Hep1 and human breast carcinoma 8701-BC cells. The enzyme substrate sphingosine is present in shed vesicles where it is produced by neutral ceramidase. Shed vesicles are therefore a site for S1P production in the extracellular medium and conceivably also within host cell following vesicle endocytosis. PMID:20508814

  20. Osteogenic differentiation of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth on poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibers containing strontium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Ta; Wu, Pai-Shuen; Huang, Te-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking the architecture of the extracellular matrix is an effective strategy for tissue engineering. Composite nanofibers similar to natural bone structure can be prepared via an electrospinning technique and used in biomedical applications. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, such as cells that are alternative sources of stem cells for tissue engineering. Strontium has important functions in bone remodeling; for example, this element can simulate bone formation and decrease bone resorption. Incorporating strontium phosphate into nanofibers provides a potential material for bone tissue engineering. This study investigated the potential of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers coated or blended with strontium phosphate for the osteogenic differentiation of SHEDs. Cellular morphology and MTT assay revealed that nanofibers effectively support cellular attachment, spreading, and proliferation. Strontium-loaded PCL nanofibers exhibited higher expressions of collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, biomineralization, and bone-related genes than pure PCL nanofibers during the osteogenic differentiation of SHEDs. This study demonstrated that strontium can be an effective inducer of osteogenesis for SHEDs. Understanding the function of bioceramics (such as strontium) is useful in designing and developing strategies for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction of differentiation in neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R I

    1985-01-01

    There is now clear evidence that cells cultured from human and animal tumours can be induced to differentiate in vitro by recognised hormones, regulatory peptides, polar solvents and cytotoxic drugs. Examples can be found from several different types of tumour with the bulk of the data deriving from neuroblastoma and myeloid leukaemia. There is no clear correlation of inducer with cell type, other than some specific peptides like MSH, and agents such as dimethyl sulphoxide and dexamethasone have wide ranging activity. Steroid hormone action may require interaction between different cell types, and the inability of tumours to differentiate in situ may implicate reduced cell-cell interaction, possibly due to degradation of extracellular matrix, or to alteration of the stromal phenotype by tumour-derived factors such as peptides or prostaglandins. When differentiation has been demonstrated, it has been possible, in some cases, to correlate increased differentiation with reduced malignancy by in vitro characterisation or tumorigenicity. Conditions which induce differentiation in rat mammary carcinoma and mouse myeloma also reduce tumour growth in vivo. Clinical trials have not provided any conclusive evidence for a therapeutic benefit so far, but relatively few trials have been carried out. There is clearly a need for further investigation both in vitro and in vivo to select optimal conditions and combinations of agents for clinical evaluation.

  2. Modeling to optimize terminal stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gallicano, G Ian

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC), iPCs, and adult stem cells (ASCs) all are among the most promising potential treatments for heart failure, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. However, considerable uncertainty in the production of ESC-derived terminally differentiated cell types has limited the efficiency of their development. To address this uncertainty, we and other investigators have begun to employ a comprehensive statistical model of ESC differentiation for determining the role of intracellular pathways (e.g., STAT3) in ESC differentiation and determination of germ layer fate. The approach discussed here applies the Baysian statistical model to cell/developmental biology combining traditional flow cytometry methodology and specific morphological observations with advanced statistical and probabilistic modeling and experimental design. The final result of this study is a unique tool and model that enhances the understanding of how and when specific cell fates are determined during differentiation. This model provides a guideline for increasing the production efficiency of therapeutically viable ESCs/iPSCs/ASC derived neurons or any other cell type and will eventually lead to advances in stem cell therapy.

  3. Modeling to Optimize Terminal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gallicano, G. Ian

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC), iPCs, and adult stem cells (ASCs) all are among the most promising potential treatments for heart failure, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. However, considerable uncertainty in the production of ESC-derived terminally differentiated cell types has limited the efficiency of their development. To address this uncertainty, we and other investigators have begun to employ a comprehensive statistical model of ESC differentiation for determining the role of intracellular pathways (e.g., STAT3) in ESC differentiation and determination of germ layer fate. The approach discussed here applies the Baysian statistical model to cell/developmental biology combining traditional flow cytometry methodology and specific morphological observations with advanced statistical and probabilistic modeling and experimental design. The final result of this study is a unique tool and model that enhances the understanding of how and when specific cell fates are determined during differentiation. This model provides a guideline for increasing the production efficiency of therapeutically viable ESCs/iPSCs/ASC derived neurons or any other cell type and will eventually lead to advances in stem cell therapy. PMID:24278782

  4. Endothelial Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Janeczek Portalska, Karolina; Leferink, Anne; Groen, Nathalie; Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are increasingly used in regenerative medicine for restoring worn-out or damaged tissue. Newly engineered tissues need to be properly vascularized and current candidates for in vitro tissue pre-vascularization are endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. However, their use in therapy is hampered by their limited expansion capacity and lack of autologous sources. Our approach to engineering large grafts is to use hMSCs both as a source of cells for regeneration of targeted tissue and at the same time as the source of endothelial cells. Here we investigate how different stimuli influence endothelial differentiation of hMSCs. Although growth supplements together with shear force were not sufficient to differentiate hMSCs with respect to expression of endothelial markers such as CD31 and KDR, these conditions did prime the cells to differentiate into cells with an endothelial gene expression profile and morphology when seeded on Matrigel. In addition, we show that endothelial-like hMSCs are able to create a capillary network in 3D culture both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The expansion phase in the presence of growth supplements was crucial for the stability of the capillaries formed in vitro. To conclude, we established a robust protocol for endothelial differentiation of hMSCs, including an immortalized MSC line (iMSCs) which allows for reproducible in vitro analysis in further studies. PMID:23056481

  5. Transdifferentiation of adipogenically differentiated cells into osteogenically or chondrogenically differentiated cells: phenotype switching via dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mujib; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming is a new wave in cellular therapies to achieve the vital goals of regenerative medicine. Transdifferentiation, whereas the differentiated state of cells could be reprogrammed into other cell types, meaning cells are no more locked in their differentiated circle. Hence, cells of choice from abundant and easily available sources such as fibroblast and adipose tissue could be converted into cells of demand, to restore the diseased tissues. Before diverting this new approach into effective clinical use, transdifferentiation could not be simply overlooked, as it challenges the normal paradigms of biological laws, where mature cells transdifferentiate not only within same germ layers, but even across the lineage boundaries. How unipotent differentiated cells reprogram into another, and whether transdifferentiation proceeds via a direct cell-to-cell conversion or needs dedifferentiation. To address such questions, MSC were adipogenically differentiated followed by direct transdifferentiation, and subsequently examined by histology, immunohistochemistry, qPCR and single cell analysis. Direct cellular conversion of adipogenic lineage cells into osteogenic or chondrogenic resulted in mixed culture of both lineage cells (adipogenic and new acquiring osteogenic/chondrogenic phenotypes). On molecular level, such conversion was confirmed by significantly upregulated expression of PPARG, FABP4, SPP1 and RUNX2. Chondrogenic transdifferentiation was verified by significantly upregulated expression of PPARG, FABP4, SOX9 and COL2A1. Single cell analysis did not support the direct cell-to-cell conversion, rather described the involvement of dedifferentiation. Moreover, some differentiated single cells did not change their phenotype and were resistant to transdifferentiation, suggesting that differentiated cells behave differently during cellular conversion. An obvious characterization of differentiated cells could be helpful to understand the process of

  6. Signal transduction and Th17 cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, John J.; Steward-Tharp, Scott M.; Laurence, Arian; Watford, Wendy T.; Wei, Lai; Adamson, Adewole S.; Fan, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The paradigm of effector T helper cell differentiation into either Th1 or Th2 lineages has been notably shaken by the discovery of a third lineage of cells that selectively produce interleukin (IL)-17. Characterization of this new subset, referred to as Th17, has provided exciting new insights into immunoregulation, host defense and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, the discovery of this T cell subset has offered a fresh look at such concepts as lineage commitment and terminal differentiation. The transcriptional regulatory events and epigenetic modifications that control these processes are diverse and complex, and despite the rapid pace at which data continues to accumulate, many questions remain to be answered. Here we review our current understanding of the signaling pathways, molecular interactions and transcriptional events that lead to Th17 differentiation and effector function, as well as the epigenetic modifications that accompany them. PMID:19379825

  7. Differentiation of ICM cells into trophectoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, G. B.; Arechaga, J.; Muro, C.; Wells, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    It has been established previously that when inserted in the blastocyst E Ca 247 preferentially differentiates into trophectoderm in vitro. If the concept that tumors are caricatures of the process of tissue renewal is correct, then some cells from the inner cell mass (ICM), the normal counterpart of embryonal carcinoma, should be able to differentiate into trophectoderm. This has been a controversial issue. Four experiments are now reported that support the idea that ICM can differentiate into trophectoderm: 1) ICM from early blastocysts after classical immunosurgery made blastocysts in vitro; 2) ICM obtained from early blastocysts by immunosurgery using antigens other than histocompatibility ones made blastocysts in vitro; 3) ICM from early blastocysts, in which the trophectodermal cells had been labeled, contained no labeled cells following immunosurgery; and 4) In reconstruction experiments, polar and mural trophectodermal cells attached to ICM from late blastocysts failed to multiply and make blastocysts when cultured. It is concluded that like the embryonal carcinoma some ICM cells of early blastocysts have the potential to make trophectoderm. This fact is consistent with the concept that tumors are caricatures of the process of tissue renewal; and establishes E Ca 247 as a good model for study of trophectodermal differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3400778

  8. Alternative splicing modulates stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ru-Huei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Ou, Chen-Wei; Yu, Hsiu-Hui; Li, Kuo-Wei; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the surprising potential to develop into many different cell types. Therefore, major research efforts have focused on transplantation of stem cells and/or derived progenitors for restoring depleted diseased cells in degenerative disorders. Understanding the molecular controls, including alternative splicing, that arise during lineage differentiation of stem cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapeutic approaches in regeneration medicine. Alternative splicing to allow a single gene to encode multiple transcripts with different protein coding sequences and RNA regulatory elements increases genomic complexities. Utilizing differences in alternative splicing as a molecular marker may be more sensitive than simply gene expression in various degrees of stem cell differentiation. Moreover, alternative splicing maybe provide a new concept to acquire induced pluripotent stem cells or promote cell-cell transdifferentiation for restorative therapies and basic medicine researches. In this review, we highlight the recent advances of alternative splicing regulation in stem cells and their progenitors. It will hopefully provide much needed knowledge into realizing stem cell biology and related applications.

  9. Annexin A2 Promotes the Migration and Invasion of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro by Regulating the Shedding of CD147-Harboring Microvesicles from Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lei; Song, Zhen-Shun; Cao, Da-Yong; Tao, Kai-Shan; Zhou, Wen-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Dou, Ke-Feng

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that Annexin A2 (ANXA2) is up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the roles of ANXA2 in the migration and invasion of HCC cells have not been determined. In this study, we found that ANXA2-specific siRNA (si-ANXA2) significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of HCC cells co-cultured with fibroblasts in vitro. In addition, the production of MMP-2 by fibroblasts cultured in supernatant collected from si-ANXA2-transfected HCC cells was notably down-regulated. ANXA2 was also found to be co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with CD147. Further investigation revealed that the expression of ANXA2 in HCC cells affected the shedding of CD147-harboring membrane microvesicles, acting as a vehicle for CD147 in tumor-stromal interactions and thereby regulating the production of MMP-2 by fibroblasts. Together, these results suggest that ANXA2 enhances the migration and invasion potential of HCC cells in vitro by regulating the trafficking of CD147-harboring membrane microvesicles. PMID:23950866

  10. Th9 cells: differentiation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T-helper cells regulate immunity and inflammation through the acquisition of potential to secrete specific cytokines. The acquisition of cytokine-secreting potential, in a process termed T-helper cell differentiation, is a response to multiple environmental signals including the cytokine milieu. The most recently defined subset of T-helper cells are termed Th9 and are identified by the potent production of interleukin-9 (IL-9). Given the pleiotropic functions of IL-9, Th9 cells might be involved in pathogen immunity and immune-mediated disease. In this review, I focus on recent developments in understanding the signals that promote Th9 differentiation, the transcription factors that regulate IL-9 expression, and finally the potential roles for Th9 cells in immunity in vivo. PMID:23405898

  11. Differentiation of Neural Lineage Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Philip H.; Brick, David J.; Stover, Alexander E.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Müller, Franz Josef

    2008-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells have the unique properties of being able to proliferate indefinitely in their undifferentiated state and to differentiate into any somatic cell type. These cells are thus posited to be extremely useful for furthering our understanding of both normal and abnormal human development, providing a human cell preparation that can be used to screen for new reagents or therapeutic agents, and generating large numbers of differentiated cells that can be used for transplantation purposes. Critical among the applications for the latter are diseases and injuries of the nervous system, medical approaches to which have been, to date, primarily palliative in nature. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into cells of the neural lineage, therefore, has become a central focus of a number of laboratories. This has resulted in the description in the literature of several dozen methods for neural cell differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells. Among these are methods for the generation of such divergent neural cells as dopaminergic neurons, retinal neurons, ventral motoneurons, and oligodendroglial progenitors. In this review, we attempt to fully describe most of these methods, breaking them down into five basic subdivisions: 1) starting material, 2) induction of loss of pluripotency, 3) neural induction, 4) neural maintenance and expansion, and 5) neuronal/glial differentiation. We also show data supporting the concept that undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells appear to have an innate neural differentiation potential. In addition, we evaluate data comparing and contrasting neural stem cells differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells with those derived directly from the human brain. PMID:18593611

  12. The manipulation of auxin in the abscission zone cells of Arabidopsis flowers reveals that indoleacetic acid signaling is a prerequisite for organ shedding.

    PubMed

    Basu, Manojit M; González-Carranza, Zinnia H; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A

    2013-05-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place.

  13. The Manipulation of Auxin in the Abscission Zone Cells of Arabidopsis Flowers Reveals That Indoleacetic Acid Signaling Is a Prerequisite for Organ Shedding1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Manojit M.; González-Carranza, Zinnia H.; Azam-Ali, Sayed; Tang, Shouya; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Roberts, Jeremy A.

    2013-01-01

    A number of novel strategies were employed to examine the role of indoleacetic acid (IAA) in regulating floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of auxin influx facilitator expression in β-glucuronidase reporter plants revealed that AUXIN RESISTANT1, LIKE AUX1, and LAX3 were specifically up-regulated at the site of floral organ shedding. Flowers from mutants where individual family members were down-regulated exhibited a reduction in the force necessary to bring about petal separation; however, the effect was not additive in double or quadruple mutants. Using the promoter of a polygalacturonase (At2g41850), active primarily in cells undergoing separation, to drive expression of the bacterial genes iaaL and iaaM, we have shown that it is possible to manipulate auxin activity specifically within the floral organ abscission zone (AZ). Analysis of petal breakstrength reveals that if IAA AZ levels are reduced, shedding takes place prematurely, while if they are enhanced, organ loss is delayed. The At2g41850 promoter was also used to transactivate the gain-of-function AXR3-1 gene in order to disrupt auxin signaling specifically within the floral organ AZ cells. Flowers from transactivated lines failed to shed their sepals, petals, and anthers during pod expansion and maturity, and these organs frequently remained attached to the plant even after silique desiccation and dehiscence had taken place. These observations support a key role for IAA in the regulation of abscission in planta and reveal, to our knowledge for the first time, a requirement for a functional IAA signaling pathway in AZ cells for organ shedding to take place. PMID:23509178

  14. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L.; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus. PMID

  15. Sonic Hedgehog regulates thymic epithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Solanki, Anisha; Lau, Ching-In; Sahni, Hemant; Ross, Susan; Furmanski, Anna L; Ono, Masahiro; Holländer, Georg; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the thymus, where it regulates T cell development. Here we investigated the influence of Shh on thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development. Components of the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway were expressed by TEC, and use of a Gli Binding Site-green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic reporter mouse demonstrated active Hh-dependent transcription in TEC in the foetal and adult thymus. Analysis of Shh-deficient foetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC) showed that Shh is required for normal TEC differentiation. Shh-deficient foetal thymus contained fewer TEC than wild type (WT), the proportion of medullary TEC was reduced relative to cortical TEC, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules was increased on both cortical and medullary TEC populations. In contrast, the Gli3-deficient thymus, which shows increased Hh-dependent transcription in thymic stroma, had increased numbers of TEC, but decreased cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on both cortical and medullary TEC. Neutralisation of endogenous Hh proteins in WT FTOC led to a reduction in TEC numbers, and in the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC, but an increase in cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC. Likewise, conditional deletion of Shh from TEC in the adult thymus resulted in alterations in TEC differentiation and consequent changes in T cell development. TEC numbers, and the proportion of mature Aire-expressing medullary TEC were reduced, and cell surface expression of MHC Class II molecules on medullary TEC was increased. Differentiation of mature CD4 and CD8 single positive thymocytes was increased, demonstrating the regulatory role of Shh production by TEC on T cell development. Treatment of human thymus explants with recombinant Shh or neutralising anti-Shh antibody indicated that the Hedgehog pathway is also involved in regulation of differentiation from DP to mature SP T cells in the human thymus.

  16. Stem cell regulation: Implications when differentiated cells regulate symmetric stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Høyem, Marte Rørvik; Måløy, Frode; Jakobsen, Per; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-09-07

    We use a mathematical model to show that if symmetric stem cell division is regulated by differentiated cells, then changes in the population dynamics of the differentiated cells can lead to changes in the population dynamics of the stem cells. More precisely, the relative fitness of the stem cells can be affected by modifying the death rate of the differentiated cells. This result is interesting because stem cells are less sensitive than differentiated cells to environmental factors, such as medical therapy. Our result implies that stem cells can be manipulated indirectly by medical treatments that target the differentiated cells.

  17. 2. SOUTH FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) SHOWING SIGN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTH FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) SHOWING SIGN HOLDER ON LEFT AND ENTRANCE TO TEST CELL. METEOROLOGICAL TOWER AND METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) IN BACKGROUND ON LEFT; SOUTHEAST CORNER OF GPS AZIMUTH STATION (BLDG. 775) IN BACKGROUND BEHIND AND RIGHT OF PYROTECHNIC SHED. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. Asymptotic phases in a cell differentiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Avner; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Shih, Chih-Wen

    T cells of the immune system, upon maturation, differentiate into either Th1 or Th2 cells that have different functions. The decision to which cell type to differentiate depends on the concentrations of transcription factors T-bet ( x) and GATA-3 ( x). The population density of the T cells, ϕ(t,x,x), satisfies a conservation law ∂ϕ/∂t+(∂/∂x)(fϕ)+(∂/∂x)(fϕ)=gϕ where f depends on (t,x,x) and, in a nonlinear nonlocal way, on ϕ. It is proved that, as t→∞, ϕ(t,x,x) converges to a linear combination of 1, 2, or 4 Dirac measures. Numerical simulations and their biological implications are discussed.

  19. Functional and molecular evidence for expression of the renin angiotensin system and ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding in COS7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Kashkari, Nada; Chodavarapu, Harshita; Somineni, Hari K.; Singh, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) plays a vital role in the regulation of the cardiovascular and renal functions. COS7 is a robust and easily transfectable cell line derived from the kidney of the African green monkey, Cercopithecus aethiops. The aims of this study were to 1) demonstrate the presence of an endogenous and functional RAS in COS7, and 2) investigate the role of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17 (ADAM17) in the ectodomain shedding of angiotensin converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). Reverse transcription coupled to gene-specific polymerase chain reaction demonstrated expression of ACE, ACE2, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), and renin at the transcript levels in total RNA cell extracts. Western blot and immunohistochemistry identified ACE (60 kDa), ACE2 (75 kDa), AT1R (43 kDa), renin (41 kDa), and ADAM17 (130 kDa) in COS7. At the functional level, a sensitive and selective mass spectrometric approach detected endogenous renin, ACE, and ACE2 activities. ANG-(1–7) formation (m/z 899) from the natural substrate ANG II (m/z 1,046) was detected in lysates and media. COS7 cells stably expressing shRNA constructs directed against endogenous ADAM17 showed reduced ACE2 shedding into the media. This is the first study demonstrating endogenous expression of the RAS and ADAM17 in the widely used COS7 cell line and its utility to study ectodomain shedding of ACE2 mediated by ADAM17 in vitro. The transfectable nature of this cell line makes it an attractive cell model for studying the molecular, functional, and pharmacological properties of the renal RAS. PMID:25740155

  20. Tcf15 Primes Pluripotent Cells for Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Owen R.; Lin, Chia-Yi; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Zhou, Xinzhi; Taube, Jessica; Blin, Guillaume; Waterhouse, Anna; Smith, Andrew J.H.; Lowell, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Summary The events that prime pluripotent cells for differentiation are not well understood. Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation (Id) proteins, which are inhibitors of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor activity, contribute to pluripotency by blocking sequential transitions toward differentiation. Using yeast-two-hybrid screens, we have identified Id-regulated transcription factors that are expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). One of these, Tcf15, is also expressed in the embryonic day 4.5 embryo and is specifically associated with a novel subpopulation of primed ESCs. An Id-resistant form of Tcf15 rapidly downregulates Nanog and accelerates somatic lineage commitment. We propose that because Tcf15 can be held in an inactive state through Id activity, it may prime pluripotent cells for entry to somatic lineages upon downregulation of Id. We also find that Tcf15 expression is dependent on fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, providing an explanation for how FGF can prime for differentiation without driving cells out of the pluripotent state. PMID:23395635

  1. Differentiated human stem cells resemble fetal, not adult, β cells.

    PubMed

    Hrvatin, Sinisa; O'Donnell, Charles W; Deng, Francis; Millman, Jeffrey R; Pagliuca, Felicia Walton; DiIorio, Philip; Rezania, Alireza; Gifford, David K; Melton, Douglas A

    2014-02-25

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to generate any human cell type, and one widely recognized goal is to make pancreatic β cells. To this end, comparisons between differentiated cell types produced in vitro and their in vivo counterparts are essential to validate hPSC-derived cells. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of sorted insulin-expressing (INS(+)) cells derived from three independent hPSC lines, human fetal pancreata, and adult human islets points to two major conclusions: (i) Different hPSC lines produce highly similar INS(+) cells and (ii) hPSC-derived INS(+) (hPSC-INS(+)) cells more closely resemble human fetal β cells than adult β cells. This study provides a direct comparison of transcriptional programs between pure hPSC-INS(+) cells and true β cells and provides a catalog of genes whose manipulation may convert hPSC-INS(+) cells into functional β cells.

  2. Syndecan-1 in Cancer: Implications for Cell Signaling, Differentiation, and Prognostication

    PubMed Central

    Szatmári, Tünde; Ötvös, Rita; Hjerpe, Anders; Dobra, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Syndecan-1, a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is critically involved in the differentiation and prognosis of various tumors. In this review, we highlight the synthesis, cellular interactions, and the signalling pathways regulated by syndecan-1. The basal syndecan-1 level is also crucial for understanding the sequential changes involving malignant transformation, tumor progression, and advanced or disseminated cancer stages. Moreover, we focus on the cellular localization of this proteoglycan as cell membrane anchored and/or shed, soluble syndecan-1 with stromal or nuclear accumulation and how this may carry different, highly tissue specific prognostic information for individual tumor types. PMID:26420915

  3. Incidentally detected clear cell renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh; Gowda, Kiran Krishne; Rao, Raman Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma with rhabdoid differentiation (RCC-R) has an aggressive biologic behavior and poor prognosis. A recent consensus statement of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) proposed a nucleolar grading system (ISUP grade) for RCC to replace Fuhrman system and recommended reporting the presence of rhabdoid differentiation and considering tumors with rhabdoid differentiation to be ISUP Grade 4. We report a case of incidentally detected clear cell RCC-R in a 52-year-old man. This is one of the earliest cases of RCC-R (pT1b) detected and first such case from Indian subcontinent.

  4. BCOR regulates myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Gearhart, Micah D.; Gery, Sigal; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Yang, Henry; Sun, Haibo; Lin, De-chen; Bai, Jing-wen; Mead, Monica; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Qi; Chien, Wen-wen; Alkan, Serhan; Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Torsten; Müschen, Markus; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2016-01-01

    BCOR is a component of a variant Polycomb group repressive complex 1 (PRC1). Recently, we and others reported recurrent somatic BCOR loss-of-function mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML). However, the role of BCOR in normal hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we explored the function of BCOR in myeloid cells using myeloid murine models with Bcor conditional loss-of-function or overexpression alleles. Bcor mutant bone marrow cells showed significantly higher proliferation and differentiation rates with upregulated expression of Hox genes. Mutation of Bcor reduced protein levels of RING1B, an H2A ubiquitin ligase subunit of PRC1 family complexes and reduced H2AK119ub upstream of upregulated HoxA genes. Global RNA expression profiling in murine cells and AML patient samples with BCOR loss-of-function mutation suggested that loss of BCOR expression is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation. Our results strongly suggest that BCOR plays an indispensable role in hematopoiesis by inhibiting myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation and offer a mechanistic explanation for how BCOR regulates gene expression such as Hox genes. PMID:26847029

  5. Rethinking differentiation: stem cells, regeneration, and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2014-03-27

    Cell differentiation is an essential process for the development, growth, reproduction, and longevity of all multicellular organisms, and its regulation has been the focus of intense investigation for the past four decades. The study of natural and induced stem cells has ushered an age of re-examination of what it means to be a stem or a differentiated cell. Past and recent discoveries in plants and animals, as well as novel experimental manipulations, are beginning to erode many of these established concepts and are forcing a re-evaluation of the experimental systems and paradigms presently being used to explore these and other biological process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of symplasmic communication in cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Marek; Kurczynska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Symplasmic communication via plasmodesmata (PD) is part of the system of information exchange between plant cells. Molecules that pass through the PD include ions, some hormones, minerals, amino acids, and sugars but also proteins, transcription factors, and different classes of RNA, and as such PD can participate in the coordination of plant growth and development. This review summarizes the current literature on this subject and the role of PD in signal exchange, the importance of symplasmic communication and symplasmic domains in plant cell differentiation, and highlights the future prospective in the exploration of PD functions in plants. Moreover, this review also describes the potential use of barley root epidermis and non-zygotic embryogenesis in study of symplasmic communication during cell differentiation.

  7. Importance of symplasmic communication in cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek; Kurczynska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Symplasmic communication via plasmodesmata (PD) is part of the system of information exchange between plant cells. Molecules that pass through the PD include ions, some hormones, minerals, amino acids, and sugars but also proteins, transcription factors, and different classes of RNA, and as such PD can participate in the coordination of plant growth and development. This review summarizes the current literature on this subject and the role of PD in signal exchange, the importance of symplasmic communication and symplasmic domains in plant cell differentiation, and highlights the future prospective in the exploration of PD functions in plants. Moreover, this review also describes the potential use of barley root epidermis and non-zygotic embryogenesis in study of symplasmic communication during cell differentiation. PMID:24476959

  8. Differentiation of Club Cells to Alveolar Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dahai; Soh, Boon-Seng; Yin, Lu; Hu, Guangan; Chen, Qingfeng; Choi, Hyungwon; Han, Jongyoon; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2017-01-01

    Club cells are known to function as regional progenitor cells to repair the bronchiolar epithelium in response to lung damage. By lineage tracing in mice, we have shown recently that club cells also give rise to alveolar type 2 cells (AT2s) and alveolar type 1 cells (AT1s) during the repair of the damaged alveolar epithelium. Here, we show that when highly purified, anatomically and phenotypically confirmed club cells are seeded in 3-dimensional culture either in bulk or individually, they proliferate and differentiate into both AT2- and AT1-like cells and form alveolar-like structures. This differentiation was further confirmed by transcriptomic analysis of freshly isolated club cells and their cultured progeny. Freshly isolated club cells express Sca-1 and integrin α6, markers commonly used to characterize lung stem/progenitor cells. Together, current study for the first time isolated highly purified club cells for in vitro study and demonstrated club cells’ capacity to differentiate into alveolar epithelial cells at the single-cell level. PMID:28128362

  9. A simple theoretical framework for understanding heterogeneous differentiation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cells have several subsets of functional phenotypes, which play critical yet diverse roles in the immune system. Pathogen-driven differentiation of these subsets of cells is often heterogeneous in terms of the induced phenotypic diversity. In vitro recapitulation of heterogeneous differentiation under homogeneous experimental conditions indicates some highly regulated mechanisms by which multiple phenotypes of CD4+ T cells can be generated from a single population of naïve CD4+ T cells. Therefore, conceptual understanding of induced heterogeneous differentiation will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the response of populations of CD4+ T cells under physiological conditions. Results We present a simple theoretical framework to show how heterogeneous differentiation in a two-master-regulator paradigm can be governed by a signaling network motif common to all subsets of CD4+ T cells. With this motif, a population of naïve CD4+ T cells can integrate the signals from their environment to generate a functionally diverse population with robust commitment of individual cells. Notably, two positive feedback loops in this network motif govern three bistable switches, which in turn, give rise to three types of heterogeneous differentiated states, depending upon particular combinations of input signals. We provide three prototype models illustrating how to use this framework to explain experimental observations and make specific testable predictions. Conclusions The process in which several types of T helper cells are generated simultaneously to mount complex immune responses upon pathogenic challenges can be highly regulated, and a simple signaling network motif can be responsible for generating all possible types of heterogeneous populations with respect to a pair of master regulators controlling CD4+ T cell differentiation. The framework provides a mathematical basis for understanding the decision-making mechanisms of CD4+ T cells, and it can be

  10. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  11. Differential transformation of mammary epithelial cells by Wnt genes.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G T; Gavin, B J; McMahon, A P

    1994-01-01

    The mouse Wnt family includes at least 10 genes that encode structurally related secreted glycoproteins. Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 were originally identified as oncogenes activated by the insertion of mouse mammary tumor virus in virus-induced mammary adenocarcinomas, although they are not expressed in the normal mammary gland. However, five other Wnt genes are differentially expressed during development of adult mammary tissue, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in various phases of mammary gland growth and development. Induction of transformation by Wnt-1 and Wnt-3 may be due to interference with these normal regulatory events; however, there is no direct evidence for this hypothesis. We have tested Wnt family members for the ability to induce transformation of cultured mammary cells. The results demonstrate that the Wnt gene family can be divided into three groups depending on their ability to induce morphological transformation and altered growth characteristics of the C57MG mammary epithelial cell line. Wnt-1, Wnt-3A, and Wnt-7A were highly transforming and induced colonies which formed and shed balls of cells. Wnt-2, Wnt-5B, and Wnt-7B also induced transformation but with a lower frequency and an apparent decrease in saturation density. In contrast, Wnt-6 and two other family members which are normally expressed in C57MG cells, Wnt-4 and Wnt-5A, failed to induce transformation. These data demonstrate that the Wnt genes have distinct effects on cell growth and should not be regarded as functionally equivalent. Images PMID:8065359

  12. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  13. Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulating Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Campo, Flor M.; Riancho, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) have emerged in the last few years as one of the most promising therapeutic cell sources and, in particular, as an important tool for regenerative medicine of skeletal tissues. Although they present a more restricted potency than Embryonic Stem (ES) cells, the use of hMCS in regenerative medicine avoids many of the drawbacks characteristic of ES cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenge in using these cells lies into developing precise protocols for directing cellular differentiation to generate a specific cell lineage. In order to achieve this goal, it is of the upmost importance to be able to control de process of fate decision and lineage commitment. This process requires the coordinate regulation of different molecular layers at transcriptional, posttranscriptional and translational levels. At the transcriptional level, switching on and off different sets of genes is achieved not only through transcriptional regulators, but also through their interplay with epigenetic modifiers. It is now well known that epigenetic changes take place in an orderly way through development and are critical in the determination of lineage-specific differentiation. More importantly, alteration of these epigenetic changes would, in many cases, lead to disease generation and even tumour formation. Therefore, it is crucial to elucidate how epigenetic factors, through their interplay with transcriptional regulators, control lineage commitment in hMSCs. PMID:27019612

  14. Neuroendocrine differentiation in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Houcine, Yoldez; Chelly, Ines; Zehani, Alia; Belhaj Kacem, Linda; Azzouz, Haifa; Rekik, Wafa; C, Hend; Haouet, Slim; Kchir, Nidhameddine

    2017-05-26

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the prototypical basaloid tumor of the skin. It may show various patterns simulating other cutaneous tumors due to its pleomorphism. It may have an unusal pattern of differentiation such as squamous, sebaceous, apocrine, eccrine, pilar, and endocrine differentiation. In order to establish the relative frequency of neuroendocrine differentiation in BCC, we performed a retrospective study of 33 consecutive BCCs using conventional immunohistochemistry with two neuroendocrine antibodies: Chromogranine A and synaptophysine. The age of the patients ranged from 17-83 years with mean of 65 years. The male to female ratio was 16:17. In immunohistochimestry, Chromogranine A was seen in 72.2% (24/33) while Synaptophysine was positive in 9.09% (3/33). Their expression was cytoplasmic and membranous and was seen in the periphery of these tumors in the overlying cells. Positive staining of chromogranine A was high (75-100% of tumors cells) in 9%, intermediate (25-75% of tumors cells) in 33% of cases and relatively low (<25%) in 30.3% of cases.

  15. Metabolism in T cell activation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Erika L

    2015-01-01

    When naïve or memory T cells encounter foreign antigen along with proper co-stimulation they undergo rapid and extensive clonal expansion. In mammals, this type of proliferation is fair1y unique to cells of the adaptive immune system and requires a considerable expenditure of energy and cellular resources. While research has often focused on the roles of cytokines, antigenic signals, and co-stimulation in guiding T cell responses, data indicate that, at a fundamental level, it is cellular metabolism that regulates T cell function and differentiation and therefore influences the final outcome of the adaptive immune response. This review will focus on some earlier fundamental observations regarding T cell bioenergetics and its role in regulating cellular function, as well as recent work that suggests that manipulating the immune response by targeting lymphocyte metabolism could prove useful in treatments against infection and cancer. PMID:20189791

  16. Differential Light Scattering from Spherical Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunsting, Albert; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    The differential scattered light intensity patterns of spherical mammalian cells were measured with a new photometer which uses high-speed film as the light detector. The scattering objects, interphase and mitotic Chinese hamster ovary cells and HeLa cells, were modeled as (a) a coated sphere, accounting for nucleus and cytoplasm, and (b) a homogeneous sphere when no cellular nucleus was present. The refractive indices and size distribution of the cells were measured for an accurate comparison of the theoretical model with the light-scattering measurements. The light scattered beyond the forward direction is found to contain information about internal cellular morphology, provided the size distribution of the cells is not too broad. ImagesFIGURE 1 PMID:4134589

  17. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  18. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  19. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  20. 21 CFR 864.5220 - Automated differential cell counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated differential cell counter. 864.5220... § 864.5220 Automated differential cell counter. (a) Identification. An automated differential cell... have the capability to flag, count, or classify immature or abnormal hematopoietic cells of the blood...

  1. Transcriptomic Analyses of Adipocyte Differentiation From Human Mesenchymal Stromal-Cells (MSC).

    PubMed

    Casado-Díaz, Antonio; Anter, Jaouad; Müller, Sören; Winter, Peter; Quesada-Gómez, José Manuel; Dorado, Gabriel

    2017-04-01

    Adipogenesis is a physiological process required for fat-tissue development, mainly involved in regulating the organism energetic-state. Abnormal distribution-changes and dysfunctions in such tissue are associated to different pathologies. Adipocytes are generated from progenitor cells, via a complex differentiating process not yet well understood. Therefore, we investigated differential mRNA and miRNA expression patterns of human mesenchymal stromal-cells (MSC) induced and not induced to differentiate into adipocytes by next (second)-generation sequencing. A total of 2,866 differentially expressed genes (101 encoding miRNA) were identified, with 705 (46 encoding miRNA) being upregulated in adipogenesis. They were related to different pathways, including PPARG, lipid, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, redox, membrane-organelle biosynthesis, and endocrine system. Downregulated genes were related to extracellular matrix and cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Analyses of mRNA-miRNA interaction showed that repressed miRNA-encoding genes can act downregulating PPARG-related genes; mostly the PPARG activator (PPARGC1A). Induced miRNA-encoding genes regulate downregulated genes related to TGFB1. These results shed new light to understand adipose-tissue differentiation and physiology, increasing our knowledge about pathologies like obesity, type-2 diabetes and osteoporosis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 771-784, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.; Lussier, A.M.; Lee, S.K.; Appel, M.C.; Woodland, R.T.

    1988-09-15

    We have previously shown that low doses of ionizing radiation selectively impair a functionally defined B cell subpopulation. Normal mice, after exposure to 200 rad of ionizing radiation, have normal or near normal splenic plaque-forming cell responses to thymus-independent type 1 Ag, but reduced responses to thymus-independent type 2 Ag. Here, we confirm and extend the original findings by using hapten-specific serum RIA to demonstrate this differential radiosensitivity is systemic. We also examined splenocytes stained with a panel of lymphocyte surface Ag by FACS analysis to determine if these functional changes are accompanied by a physical alteration of the B cell pool of irradiated mice. Single-parameter FACS analyses demonstrate a diminution in both B cell number and the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression within the surviving B cell pool after irradiation. In contrast, T cells are relatively radioresistant as the relative percentage of T cells in the irradiated splenocyte pool increases, whereas the heterogeneity of membrane Ag expression remains constant. Multiparameter FACS analyses indicate that B cells with the sIgM much greater than sIgD phenotype are more radiosensitive than B cells of the sIgM much less than sIgD phenotype. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of splenic sections stained with anti-IgM or anti-IgD reveal the enhanced radiosensitivity of marginal zone B cells.

  3. Association of mesenchymal cells and immunoglobulins with differentiating epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Caudle, Michael R; Keenan, Jeffrey A; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B; Van Meter, Stuart E; Wimalasena, Jay; Elder, Robert F

    2001-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions play an important role in the physiology and pathology of epithelial tissues. Mesenchymal cells either associate with epithelium basement membrane [pericytes and perivascular monocyte-derived cells (MDC)] or reside within epithelium (MDC and T cells). Although intraepithelial mesenchymal cells were suggested to contribute to the epithelium physiology, their association with particular steps in differentiation of epithelial cells, interactions among themselves, and their fate remain unclear. We studied epitopes of mesenchymal cells and their products (immunoglobulins) in stratified epithelium of uterine ectocervix, which is one of the prototypes of complete cellular differentiation from stem into the aged cells. Results Perivascular CD14 primitive MDC associated with basal (stem) epithelial cells. Thy-1 pericytes of microvasculature secreted intercellular vesicles, which associated with Ki67 postmitotic epithelial cells expressing MHC class I. Intraepithelial T cells showed an association with veiled type MDC [dendritic cell (DC) precursors] among parabasal cells, and exhibited fragmentation after entering intermediate (mature) epithelial layers. Mature DC secreted CD68 and exhibited fragmentation after reaching mid intermediate layers. Binding of IgM was detected at the top of each layer: in the upper parabasal, upper intermediate, and most surface epithelial cells. IgG was confined to the entire superficial layer. Conclusions These data suggest that the phylogenetically and ontogenetically developed hierarchy of mesenchymal cells (MDC, pericytes, T cells) and immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG) accompanies differentiation of epithelial cells from immature into the mature and aged phenotype. Further studies of an involvement of mesenchymal cells in the regulation of tissue homeostasis may bring novel approaches to the prevention and therapy of tissue dysfunctions characterized by permanent tissue immaturity (muscular dystrophy

  4. Mechanical regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Steward, Andrew J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Biophysical cues play a key role in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent stromal cells (MSCs), but the mechanotransductive mechanisms at play are still not fully understood. This review article first describes the roles of both substrate mechanics (e.g. stiffness and topography) and extrinsic mechanical cues (e.g. fluid flow, compression, hydrostatic pressure, tension) on the differentiation of MSCs. A specific focus is placed on the role of such factors in regulating the osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Next, the article focuses on the cellular components, specifically integrins, ion channels, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton, hypothesized to be involved in MSC mechanotransduction. This review aims to illustrate the strides that have been made in elucidating how MSCs sense and respond to their mechanical environment, and also to identify areas where further research is needed.

  5. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin−Sca-1+Kit+ cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte–related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  6. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation.

  7. The epigenomics of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Daniel C; Zhao, Keji

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) possess an open and highly dynamic chromatin landscape, which underlies their plasticity and ultimately maintains ESC pluripotency. The ESC epigenome must not only maintain the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes but must also, through gene priming, facilitate rapid and cell type-specific activation of developmental genes upon lineage commitment. Trans-generational inheritance ensures that the ESC chromatin state is stably transmitted from one generation to the next; yet at the same time, epigenetic marks are highly dynamic, reversible and responsive to extracellular cues. Once committed to differentiation, the ESC epigenome is remodeled and resolves into a more compact chromatin state. A thorough understanding of the role of chromatin modifiers in ESC fate and differentiation will be important if they are to be used for therapeutic purposes. Recent technical advances, particularly in next-generation sequencing technologies, have provided a genome-scale view of epigenetic marks and chromatin modifiers. More affordable and faster sequencing platforms have led to a comprehensive characterization of the ESC epigenome and epigenomes of differentiated cell types. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress that has highlighted the central role of histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin modifiers in ESC pluripotency and ESC fate. We provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of genome-wide studies that are pertinent to our understanding of mammalian development.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of male germ cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hecht, N B

    1998-07-01

    During spermatogenesis, diploid stem cells differentiate, undergo meiosis, and transform into haploid spermatozoa. As this precisely timed series of events proceeds, chromosomal ploidy is reduced and the nucleosomes of the chromatin are replaced by a transcriptionally quiescent protamine-containing nucleus. The premature termination of transcription during the haploid phase of spermatogenesis necessitates an especially prominent role for posttranscriptional regulation in the temporal and spatial expression of many testis-specific proteins and isozymes. In this review article, discussion will focus on novel mechanisms regulating gene expression in mammalian male germ cells from genome to protein.

  9. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  10. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  11. EphrinA/EphA-induced ectodomain shedding of neural cell adhesion molecule regulates growth cone repulsion through ADAM10 metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Brennaman, Leann H; Moss, Marcia L; Maness, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    EphrinA/EphA-dependent axon repulsion is crucial for synaptic targeting in developing neurons but downstream molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, it is shown that ephrinA5/EphA3 triggers proteolysis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) by the metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 to promote growth cone collapse in neurons from mouse neocortex. EphrinA5 induced ADAM10 activity to promote ectodomain shedding of polysialic acid-NCAM in cortical neuron cultures, releasing a ~ 250 kDa soluble fragment consisting of most of its extracellular region. NCAM shedding was dependent on ADAM10 and EphA3 kinase activity as shown in HEK293T cells transfected with dominant negative ADAM10 and kinase-inactive EphA3 (K653R) mutants. Purified ADAM10 cleaved NCAM at a sequence within the E-F loop of the second fibronectin type III domain (Leu(671) -Lys(672) /Ser(673) -Leu(674) ) identified by mass spectrometry. Mutations of NCAM within the ADAM10 cleavage sequence prevented EphA3-induced shedding of NCAM in HEK293T cells. EphrinA5-induced growth cone collapse was dependent on ADAM10 activity, was inhibited in cortical cultures from NCAM null mice, and was rescued by WT but not ADAM10 cleavage site mutants of NCAM. Regulated proteolysis of NCAM through the ephrin5/EphA3/ADAM10 mechanism likely impacts synapse development, and may lead to excess NCAM shedding when disrupted, as implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PSA-NCAM and ephrinA/EphA3 coordinately regulate inhibitory synapse development. Here, we have found that ephrinA5 stimulates EphA3 kinase and ADAM10 activity to promote PSA-NCAM cleavage at a site in its second FNIII repeat, which regulates ephrinA5-induced growth cone collapse in GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons. These findings identify a new regulatory mechanism which may contribute to inhibitory connectivity.

  12. Continuous differential impedance spectroscopy of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, J. Tanner; Lee, Luke P.; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    A device for continuous differential impedance analysis of single cells held by a hydrodynamic cell trapping is presented. Measurements are accomplished by recording the current from two closely-situated electrode pairs, one empty (reference) and one containing a cell. We demonstrate time-dependent measurement of single cell impedance produced in response to dynamic chemical perturbations. First, the system is used to assay the response of HeLa cells to the effects of the surfactant Tween, which reduces the impedance of the trapped cells in a concentration dependent way and is interpreted as gradual lysis of the cell membrane. Second, the effects of the bacterial pore-forming toxin, Streptolysin-O are measured: a transient exponential decay in the impedance is recorded as the cell membrane becomes increasingly permeable. The decay time constant is inversely proportional to toxin concentration (482, 150, and 30 s for 0.1, 1, and 10 kU/ml, respectively). Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10404-009-0534-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20927185

  13. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  14. View from underneath umbrella shed at rear of Train Shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from underneath umbrella shed at rear of Train Shed looking W. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  15. ADAMs 10 and 17 Represent Differentially Regulated Components of a General Shedding Machinery for Membrane Proteins Such as Transforming Growth Factor α, L-Selectin, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Sylvain M.; Bobé, Pierre; Reiss, Karina; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Niu, Xiao-Da; Lundell, Daniel; Gibb, David R.; Conrad, Daniel; Saftig, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Protein ectodomain shedding is a critical regulator of many membrane proteins, including epidermal growth factor receptor-ligands and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, providing a strong incentive to define the responsible sheddases. Previous studies identified ADAM17 as principal sheddase for transforming growth factor (TGF)-α and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, but Ca++ influx activated an additional sheddase for these epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in Adam17−/− cells. Here, we show that Ca++ influx and stimulation of the P2X7R signaling pathway activate ADAM10 as sheddase of many ADAM17 substrates in Adam17−/− fibroblasts and primary B cells. Importantly, although ADAM10 can shed all substrates of ADAM17 tested here in Adam17−/− cells, acute treatment of wild-type cells with a highly selective ADAM17 inhibitor (SP26) showed that ADAM17 is nevertheless the principal sheddase when both ADAMs 10 and 17 are present. However, chronic treatment of wild-type cells with SP26 promoted processing of ADAM17 substrates by ADAM10, thus generating conditions such as in Adam17−/− cells. These results have general implications for understanding the substrate selectivity of two major cellular sheddases, ADAMs 10 and 17. PMID:19158376

  16. Local load shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Thorne, D.K. )

    1988-08-01

    Equipment overloads in an underground transmission network are caused by unscheduled outages. Repairs or replacements of damaged cables and/or transformers in urban areas are inherently difficult and time-consuming. Therefore, for overloads greatly in excess of short-time ratings, speed of load shedding is of paramount importance. Under such conditions, the system operator is faced with: recognizing the problem, determining the course of action and shedding the correct amount of load at the right locations. These tasks are difficult to perform, particularly under pressure of time. Reliance on pre-specified load shedding lists is not satisfactory since the load shedding lists do not necessarily match the amounts and locations of the required loads to be shed. Clearly, there has been a need for a local load shedding scheme, which in the first order of importance, would relieve the overloaded equipment within the time limits imposed by the equipment short-time ratings and in the second order of importance, would ''minimize'' the amount of load to be curtailed. This paper describes an approach which meets the dual objective, providing a practical solution to a difficult engineering/operating problem.

  17. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epigenetic inheritance of cell differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray K; Gurdon, John B

    2008-05-01

    Epigenetic modifications influence gene expression pattern and provide a unique signature of a cell differentiation status. Without external stimuli or signalling events, this cell identity remains stable and unlikely to change over many cell divisions. The epigenetic signature of a particular cell fate therefore needs to be replicated faithfully in daughter cells; otherwise a cell lineage cannot be maintained. However, the mechanism of transmission of cellular memory from mother to daughter cells remains unclear. It has been suggested that the inheritance of an active or silent gene state involves different kinds of epigenetic mechanisms, e.g. DNA methylation, histone modifications, replacement of histone variants, Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins. Emerging evidence supports the role of histone variant H3.3 in maintaining an active gene status and in remodelling nucleosomal composition. Here we discuss some recent findings on the propagation of epigenetic memory and propose a model for the inheritance of an active gene state through the interaction of H3.3 with other epigenetic components.

  19. Shed syndecan-2 inhibits angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Giulia; Evans, Alun R.; Kay, Emma; Woodfin, Abigail; McKay, Tristan R.; Nourshargh, Sussan; Whiteford, James R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Angiogenesis is essential for the development of a normal vasculature, tissue repair and reproduction, and also has roles in the progression of diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-2 is expressed on mesenchymal cells in the vasculature and, like the other members of its family, can be shed from the cell surface resulting in the release of its extracellular core protein. The purpose of this study was to establish whether shed syndecan-2 affects angiogenesis. We demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 regulates angiogenesis by inhibiting endothelial cell migration in human and rodent models and, as a result, reduces tumour growth. Furthermore, our findings show that these effects are mediated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor CD148 (also known as PTPRJ) and this interaction corresponds with a decrease in active β1 integrin. Collectively, these data demonstrate an unexplored pathway for the regulation of new blood vessel formation and identify syndecan-2 as a therapeutic target in pathologies characterised by angiogenesis. PMID:25179601

  20. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  1. Hepatitis A virus cellular receptor 1/kidney injury molecule-1 is a susceptibility gene for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and hepatitis A virus cellular receptor/kidney injury molecule-1 ectodomain shedding a predictive biomarker of tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Cuadros, Thaïs; Trilla, Enric; Vilà, Maria Rosa; de Torres, Inés; Vilardell, Jordi; Messaoud, Nabil Ben; Salcedo, Mayte; Sarró, Eduard; López-Hellin, Joan; Blanco, Albert; Mir, Carmen; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Itarte, Emilio; Morote, Juan; Meseguer, Anna

    2013-05-01

    To correlate hepatitis A virus cellular receptor (HAVCR)/kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tumours with patient outcome and study the consequences of HAVCR/KIM-1 ectodomain shedding. HAVCR/KIM-1 expression in ccRCC, oncocytomes, papillary carcinomas and unaffected tissue counterparts was evaluated. Minimal change disease and pre-clamping normal and ccRCC tissue biopsies were included. Tissue microarrays from 98 ccRCC tumours were analysed. Tumour registry data and patient outcome were retrospectivelly collected. Deletions in HAVCR/KIM-1 ectodomain and lentiviral infection of 786-O cells with HAVCR/KIM-1 mutated constructs to determine their subcellular distribution and invasive capacity were performed. HAVCR/KIM-1 was expressed in ccRCC, papillary tumours and in tubule cells of adjacent and distal unaffected counterparts of ccRCC tumours. The latest was not related to ischemic or tumour-related paracrine effects since pre-clamping normal biopsies were positive for HAVCR/KIM-1 and unaffected counterparts of papillary tumours were negative. HAVCR/KIM-1 analyses in patients and the invasive capacity of HAVCR/KIM-1 shedding mutants in cell lines demonstrated that: (i) relative low HAVCR/KIM-1 membrane levels correlate with activated shedding in ccRCC patients and mutant cell lines; (ii) augmented shedding directly correlates with higher invasiveness and tumour malignancy. CONCLUDING STATEMENTS: Constitutive expression of HAVCR/KIM-1 in kidney might constitute a susceptibility trait for ccRCC tumour development. Enhanced HAVCR/KIM-1 ectodomain shedding promotes invasive phenotype in vitro and more aggressive tumours in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Application of small molecule compounds inducing differentiation of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Shan, Lei; Li, Wen-lin; Zhang, Shou-de; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2011-02-01

    With the development of stem cells and regenerative medicine (treatment of various diseases using stem cells) research, the induction of differentiation of human stem cell technology has also made significant progress. The development of chemical biology offers a variety of small biological molecules for stem cell biology. This review focuses on how small molecule compounds (natural and synthetic) induce differentiation of stem cells.

  3. Taurine transport in human placental trophoblast is important for regulation of cell differentiation and survival.

    PubMed

    Desforges, M; Parsons, L; Westwood, M; Sibley, C P; Greenwood, S L

    2013-03-21

    The outer epithelial cell layer of human placenta, the syncytiotrophoblast, is a specialised terminally differentiated multinucleate tissue. It is generated and renewed from underlying cytotrophoblast cells that undergo proliferation, differentiation and fusion with syncytiotrophoblast. Acquisition of fresh cellular components is thought to be balanced by apoptosis and shedding of aged nuclei. This process of trophoblast cell turnover maintains a functional syncytiotrophoblast, capable of sufficient nutrient transfer from mother to foetus. Foetal growth restriction (FGR) is a pregnancy complication associated with aberrant trophoblast turnover and reduced activity of certain amino acid transporters, including the taurine transporter (TauT). Taurine is the most abundant amino acid in human placenta implying an important physiological role within this tissue. Unlike other amino acids, taurine is not incorporated into proteins and in non-placental cell types represents an important osmolyte involved in cell volume regulation, and is also cytoprotective. Here, we investigated the role of taurine in trophoblast turnover using RNA interference to deplete primary human trophoblast cells of TauT and reduce intracellular taurine content. Trophoblast differentiation was compromised in TauT-deficient cells, and susceptibility of these cells to an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in FGR was increased, evidenced by elevated levels of apoptosis. These data suggest an important role for taurine in trophoblast turnover and cytoprotection.

  4. Taurine transport in human placental trophoblast is important for regulation of cell differentiation and survival

    PubMed Central

    Desforges, M; Parsons, L; Westwood, M; Sibley, C P; Greenwood, S L

    2013-01-01

    The outer epithelial cell layer of human placenta, the syncytiotrophoblast, is a specialised terminally differentiated multinucleate tissue. It is generated and renewed from underlying cytotrophoblast cells that undergo proliferation, differentiation and fusion with syncytiotrophoblast. Acquisition of fresh cellular components is thought to be balanced by apoptosis and shedding of aged nuclei. This process of trophoblast cell turnover maintains a functional syncytiotrophoblast, capable of sufficient nutrient transfer from mother to foetus. Foetal growth restriction (FGR) is a pregnancy complication associated with aberrant trophoblast turnover and reduced activity of certain amino acid transporters, including the taurine transporter (TauT). Taurine is the most abundant amino acid in human placenta implying an important physiological role within this tissue. Unlike other amino acids, taurine is not incorporated into proteins and in non-placental cell types represents an important osmolyte involved in cell volume regulation, and is also cytoprotective. Here, we investigated the role of taurine in trophoblast turnover using RNA interference to deplete primary human trophoblast cells of TauT and reduce intracellular taurine content. Trophoblast differentiation was compromised in TauT-deficient cells, and susceptibility of these cells to an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in FGR was increased, evidenced by elevated levels of apoptosis. These data suggest an important role for taurine in trophoblast turnover and cytoprotection. PMID:23519128

  5. Differentiation-stimulating potency of differentiated HL60 cells after drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Qun; Gou, Bao-Di; Zhang, Tian-Lan; Wang, Kui

    2014-06-01

    Differentiation therapy in the treatment of leukemia is often hampered by limitations on using certain pharmaceutical regents or on the required doses due to various reasons, such as drug-resistance and retinoic acid syndrome. To circumvent these problems, a strategy might be developed on the basis of the ability of drug-differentiated cells to stimulate differentiation in leukemia cells. Using the promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 as a cell model, we assessed the differentiation-stimulating potency of differentiated granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages after treatments with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), respectively. ATRA- and TPA-differentiated cells were able to stimulate differentiation in fresh HL60 cells, accompanied by inhibition on cell growth to various extents. The differentiated cells of the second generation, especially those originated from TPA treatment, were as potent as the drugs themselves in stimulating differentiation in fresh HL60 cells. On the basis of "differentiation induced by differentiated cells", we explored the feasibility of ex vivo therapy.

  6. Urothelial cell detachment and differentiation in urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Jezernik, K; Romih, R; Veranic, P

    2000-01-01

    In developing and in repairing bladder, proliferation of the transitional urothelium is followed by cell detachment--desquamation or apoptosis. Proliferation results in formation of terminally differentiated superficial cells and this process may be followed by checking the cells on the presence of differentiation markers. The formation of an asymmetric unit membrane (AUM) structure (plaque) on the cell surface is in correlation with urothelial differentiation. Thus, the microstructure of the luminal surface of the urinary bladder provides a very convenient differentiation biomarker. The surface of immature cells showed a pattern of microvilli. The progress of differentiation was associated with microvili arranged in rows finally forming the characteristic pattern of ridges in terminally differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that the characteristic surface pattern and the AUM plaque formation in the apical plasma membrane of superficial urothelial cells are associated with specific morphology, and patterns and thus help detect differentiation level of cell.

  7. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  8. Smooth muscle differentiation in scleroderma fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sappino, A. P.; Masouyé, I.; Saurat, J. H.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    Using antibodies to alpha-smooth muscle actin and desmin on paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections, the authors demonstrate that fibroblastic cells of localized and systemic scleroderma lesions express features of smooth muscle differentiation. Eleven of eleven skin specimens of systemic sclerosis patients and two of four skin specimens of localized scleroderma displayed the presence of fibroblasts expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin, a cell population that predominated in areas of prominent collagen deposition. A similar fibroblastic phenotype was found in the esophagus, the liver, and the lung specimens obtained from four patients who died of progressive systemic sclerosis. Immunostaining for desmin, performed on adjacent tissue sections, demonstrated that a minority of these fibroblastic cells present in skin and visceral lesions contained this protein. The authors' observations indicate that scleroderma fibroblasts are phenotypically related to the stromal cells previously identified in hypertrophic scars, fibromatoses, and desmoplasia; they might provide novel criteria for the characterization of scleroderma lesions and help to identify the factors responsible for phenotypic modulations in fibroblastic cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698026

  9. Neuronal Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Exosomes Derived from Differentiating Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yuji S.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes deliver functional proteins and genetic materials to neighboring cells, and have potential applications for tissue regeneration. One possible mechanism of exosome-promoted tissue regeneration is through the delivery of microRNA (miRNA). In this study, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from neuronal progenitor cells contain miRNAs that promote neuronal differentiation. We treated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) daily with exosomes derived from PC12 cells, a neuronal cell line, for 1 week. After the treatment with PC12-derived exosomes, MSCs developed neuron-like morphology, and gene and protein expressions of neuronal markers were upregulated. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of miR-125b, which is known to play a role in neuronal differentiation of stem cells, was much higher in PC12-derived exosomes than in exosomes from B16-F10 melanoma cells. These results suggest that the delivery of miRNAs contained in PC12-derived exosomes is a possible mechanism explaining the neuronal differentiation of MSC. PMID:26248331

  10. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine affords a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease. Nephron progenitor cell populations exist only during embryonic kidney development. Understanding the mechanisms by which these populations arise and differentiate is integral to the challenge of generating new nephrons for therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adults, have the potential to generate functional kidney cells and tissue. Studies in mouse and human PSCs have identified specific approaches to the addition of growth factors, including Wnt and fibroblast growth factor, that can induce PSC differentiation into cells with phenotypic characteristics of nephron progenitor populations with the capacity to form kidney-like structures. Although significant progress has been made, further studies are necessary to confirm the production of functional kidney cells and to promote their three-dimensional organization into bona fide kidney tissue. Human PSCs have been generated from patients with kidney diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Wilms tumor, and may be used to better understand phenotypic consequences of naturally occurring genetic mutations and to conduct "clinical trials in a dish". The capability to generate human kidney cells from PSCs has significant translational applications, including the bioengineering of functional kidney tissue, use in drug development to test compounds for efficacy and toxicity, and in vitro disease modeling.

  11. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  12. Soft matrix supports osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Voellner, Florian; Moehl, Christoph; Kuepper, Kevin; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E.; Schmalz, Gottfried; Morsczeck, Christian

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Rigid stiffness supports osteogenic differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). {yields} Our study examined stiffness and differentiation of dental follicle cells (DFCs). {yields} Soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs. {yields} DFCs and MSCs react contrarily to soft and rigid surface stiffness. -- Abstract: The differentiation of stem cells can be directed by the grade of stiffness of the developed tissue cells. For example a rigid extracellular matrix supports the osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, less is known about the relation of extracellular matrix stiffness and cell differentiation of ectomesenchymal dental precursor cells. Our study examined for the first time the influence of the surface stiffness on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental follicle cells (DFCs). Cell proliferation of DFCs was only slightly decreased on cell culture surfaces with a bone-like stiffness. The osteogenic differentiation in DFCs could only be initiated with a dexamethasone based differentiation medium after using varying stiffness. Here, the softest surface improved the induction of osteogenic differentiation in comparison to that with the highest stiffness. In conclusion, different to bone marrow derived MSCs, soft ECMs have a superior capacity to support the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs.

  13. Differential expression of living mammary epithelial cell subpopulations in milk during lactation in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Baratta, M; Volpe, M G; Nucera, D; Gabai, G; Guzzo, N; Fustini, M; Faustini, M; Martignani, E

    2015-10-01

    Epithelial cells are shed into milk during lactation, and although they generally reflect the cellular characteristics of terminally differentiated luminal cells, previously the detection of more primitive cells was described in human milk where a cell population of epithelial lineage was detected expressing markers typical of progenitor cells. In this investigation, we report the development of flow cytometry analysis to allow multiparametric assessment of mammary epithelial cells observed in milk. Cells collected from milk samples of 10 healthy dairy cows were directly analyzed for 6 different markers: CD45, CD49f, cytokeratin 14, cytokeratin 18, presence of nucleus, and cell viability. Milk samples were collected in 3 different periods of lactation: early lactation (EL=d 0-30), mid-lactation (ML=d 90-120), and late lactation (LL=210-250). Here we identify the differential expression of precursor or differentiated cell markers (or both) in mammary epithelial cells present in bovine milk. Myoepithelial cells, as indicated by cells staining positively for cytokeratin 14(+)/cytokeratin 18(-), were observed to increase from EL to LL with a high correlation with nuclear staining inferring potential proliferative activity. Furthermore, a significant increase in CD49f(+) and cytokeratin 14(+)/cytokeratin 18(+) positive cells was observed in LL. This assay is a sensitive approach for evaluating the variations in the frequency and features of living epithelial cells, whose reciprocal balance may be significant in understanding mammary gland cellular function throughout lactation. These observations suggest that mammary epithelial cell immunophenotypes could be investigated as biomarkers for mammary gland function in dairy cows.

  14. Ependymal cell differentiation, from monociliated to multiciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Delgehyr, Nathalie; Meunier, Alice; Faucourt, Marion; Bosch Grau, Montserrat; Strehl, Laetitia; Janke, Carsten; Spassky, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Primary and motile cilia differ in their structure, composition, and function. In the brain, primary cilia are immotile signalling organelles present on neural stem cells and neurons. Multiple motile cilia are found on the surface of ependymal cells in all brain ventricles, where they contribute to the flow of cerebrospinal fluid. During development, monociliated ependymal progenitor cells differentiate into multiciliated ependymal cells, thus providing a simple system for studying the transition between these two stages. In this chapter, we provide protocols for immunofluorescence staining of developing ependymal cells in vivo, on whole mounts of lateral ventricle walls, and in vitro, on cultured ependymal cells. We also provide a list of markers we currently use to stain both types of cilia, including proteins at the ciliary membrane and tubulin posttranslational modifications of the axoneme.

  15. Bam and Bgcn in Drosophila germline stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Perinthottathil, Sreejith; Kim, Changsoo

    2011-01-01

    The female Drosophila reproductive organ, the ovary, has provided researchers with an incisive genetic system with which principle regulation of stem cell maintenance and differentiation has been delineated. An environmental niche regulates a stem cell's asymmetric self-renewal division that produces a daughter stem cell and a differentiated daughter cell, which further differentiate into eggs. A number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors have been identified that are required either for stem cell maintenance or differentiation. Bam/Bgcn complex plays a pivotal role in promoting stem cell differentiation. Recent papers suggest that Bam/Bgcn complex regulates translation of important maintenance factors and is also involved in the regulation of microRNA-dependent translational repression. Here, we focus on Bam and Bgcn repression of stem cell maintenance factors in the differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs).

  16. Balance between cell division and differentiation during plant development.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2005-01-01

    The processes which make possible that a cell gives rise to two daughter cells define the cell division cycle. In individual cells, this is strictly controlled both in time and space. In multicellular organisms extra layers of regulation impinge on the balance between cell proliferation and cell differentiation within particular ontogenic programs. In contrast to animals, organogenesis in plants is a post-embryonic process that requires developmentally programmed reversion of sets of cells from different differentiated states to a pluripotent state followed by regulated proliferation and progression through distinct differentiation patterns. This implies a fine coupling of cell division control, cell cycle arrest and reactivation, endoreplication and differentiation. The emerging view is that cell cycle regulators, in addition to controlling cell division, also function as targets for maintaining cell homeostasis during development. The mechanisms and cross talk among different cell cycle regulatory pathways are discussed here in the context of a developing plant.

  17. Stochasticity and Spatial Interaction Govern Stem Cell Differentiation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Quinton; Stukalin, Evgeny; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon; Sun, Sean X

    2015-07-31

    Stem cell differentiation underlies many fundamental processes such as development, tissue growth and regeneration, as well as disease progression. Understanding how stem cell differentiation is controlled in mixed cell populations is an important step in developing quantitative models of cell population dynamics. Here we focus on quantifying the role of cell-cell interactions in determining stem cell fate. Toward this, we monitor stem cell differentiation in adherent cultures on micropatterns and collect statistical cell fate data. Results show high cell fate variability and a bimodal probability distribution of stem cell fraction on small (80-140 μm diameter) micropatterns. On larger (225-500 μm diameter) micropatterns, the variability is also high but the distribution of the stem cell fraction becomes unimodal. Using a stochastic model, we analyze the differentiation dynamics and quantitatively determine the differentiation probability as a function of stem cell fraction. Results indicate that stem cells can interact and sense cellular composition in their immediate neighborhood and adjust their differentiation probability accordingly. Blocking epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) can diminish this cell-cell contact mediated sensing. For larger micropatterns, cell motility adds a spatial dimension to the picture. Taken together, we find stochasticity and cell-cell interactions are important factors in determining cell fate in mixed cell populations.

  18. Stochasticity and Spatial Interaction Govern Stem Cell Differentiation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Quinton; Stukalin, Evgeny; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell differentiation underlies many fundamental processes such as development, tissue growth and regeneration, as well as disease progression. Understanding how stem cell differentiation is controlled in mixed cell populations is an important step in developing quantitative models of cell population dynamics. Here we focus on quantifying the role of cell-cell interactions in determining stem cell fate. Toward this, we monitor stem cell differentiation in adherent cultures on micropatterns and collect statistical cell fate data. Results show high cell fate variability and a bimodal probability distribution of stem cell fraction on small (80-140 μm diameter) micropatterns. On larger (225-500 μm diameter) micropatterns, the variability is also high but the distribution of the stem cell fraction becomes unimodal. Using a stochastic model, we analyze the differentiation dynamics and quantitatively determine the differentiation probability as a function of stem cell fraction. Results indicate that stem cells can interact and sense cellular composition in their immediate neighborhood and adjust their differentiation probability accordingly. Blocking epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) can diminish this cell-cell contact mediated sensing. For larger micropatterns, cell motility adds a spatial dimension to the picture. Taken together, we find stochasticity and cell-cell interactions are important factors in determining cell fate in mixed cell populations.

  19. Stochasticity and Spatial Interaction Govern Stem Cell Differentiation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Quinton; Stukalin, Evgeny; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation underlies many fundamental processes such as development, tissue growth and regeneration, as well as disease progression. Understanding how stem cell differentiation is controlled in mixed cell populations is an important step in developing quantitative models of cell population dynamics. Here we focus on quantifying the role of cell-cell interactions in determining stem cell fate. Toward this, we monitor stem cell differentiation in adherent cultures on micropatterns and collect statistical cell fate data. Results show high cell fate variability and a bimodal probability distribution of stem cell fraction on small (80–140 μm diameter) micropatterns. On larger (225–500 μm diameter) micropatterns, the variability is also high but the distribution of the stem cell fraction becomes unimodal. Using a stochastic model, we analyze the differentiation dynamics and quantitatively determine the differentiation probability as a function of stem cell fraction. Results indicate that stem cells can interact and sense cellular composition in their immediate neighborhood and adjust their differentiation probability accordingly. Blocking epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) can diminish this cell-cell contact mediated sensing. For larger micropatterns, cell motility adds a spatial dimension to the picture. Taken together, we find stochasticity and cell-cell interactions are important factors in determining cell fate in mixed cell populations. PMID:26227093

  20. Nuclear receptor regulation of stemness and stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yangsik

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells include a diverse number of toti-, pluri-, and multi-potent cells that play important roles in cellular genesis and differentiation, tissue development, and organogenesis. Genetic regulation involving various transcription factors results in the self-renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells. The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily is composed of 48 ligand-activated transcription factors involved in diverse physiological functions such as metabolism, development, and reproduction. Increasing evidence shows that certain NRs function in regulating stemness or differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and tissue-specific adult stem cells. Here, we review the role of the NR superfamily in various aspects of stem cell biology, including their regulation of stemness, forward- and trans-differentiation events; reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells; and interspecies differences. These studies provide insights into the therapeutic potential of the NR superfamily in stem cell therapy and in treating stem cell-associated diseases (e.g., cancer stem cell). PMID:19696553

  1. A differential model of the complex cell.

    PubMed

    Hansard, Miles; Horaud, Radu

    2011-09-01

    The receptive fields of simple cells in the visual cortex can be understood as linear filters. These filters can be modeled by Gabor functions or gaussian derivatives. Gabor functions can also be combined in an energy model of the complex cell response. This letter proposes an alternative model of the complex cell, based on gaussian derivatives. It is most important to account for the insensitivity of the complex response to small shifts of the image. The new model uses a linear combination of the first few derivative filters, at a single position, to approximate the first derivative filter, at a series of adjacent positions. The maximum response, over all positions, gives a signal that is insensitive to small shifts of the image. This model, unlike previous approaches, is based on the scale space theory of visual processing. In particular, the complex cell is built from filters that respond to the 2D differential structure of the image. The computational aspects of the new model are studied in one and two dimensions, using the steerability of the gaussian derivatives. The response of the model to basic images, such as edges and gratings, is derived formally. The response to natural images is also evaluated, using statistical measures of shift insensitivity. The neural implementation and predictions of the model are discussed.

  2. Bestatin inhibits cell growth, cell division, and spore cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Poloz, Yekaterina; Catalano, Andrew; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-04-01

    Bestatin methyl ester (BME) is an inhibitor of Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. We have used Dictyostelium as a model organism to study the effects of BME. Only two Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases have been identified in Dictyostelium to date, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A and B (PsaA and PsaB). PSA from other organisms is known to regulate cell division and differentiation. Here we show that PsaA is differentially expressed throughout growth and development of Dictyostelium, and its expression is regulated by developmental morphogens. We present evidence that BME specifically interacts with PsaA and inhibits its aminopeptidase activity. Treatment of cells with BME inhibited the rate of cell growth and the frequency of cell division in growing cells and inhibited spore cell differentiation during late development. Overexpression of PsaA-GFP (where GFP is green fluorescent protein) also inhibited spore cell differentiation but did not affect growth. Using chimeras, we have identified that nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of PsaA affects the choice between stalk or spore cell differentiation pathway. Cells that overexpressed PsaA-GFP (primarily nuclear) differentiated into stalk cells, while cells that overexpressed PsaAΔNLS2-GFP (cytoplasmic) differentiated into spores. In conclusion, we have identified that BME inhibits cell growth, division, and differentiation in Dictyostelium likely through inhibition of PsaA.

  3. Single-cell analyses of X Chromosome inactivation dynamics and pluripotency during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Geng; Schell, John Paul; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Petropoulos, Sophie; Yilmaz, Marlene; Reinius, Björn; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Shi, Leming; Hedlund, Eva; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard; Deng, Qiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency, differentiation, and X Chromosome inactivation (XCI) are key aspects of embryonic development. However, the underlying relationship and mechanisms among these processes remain unclear. Here, we systematically dissected these features along developmental progression using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and single-cell RNA sequencing with allelic resolution. We found that mESCs grown in a ground state 2i condition displayed transcriptomic profiles diffused from preimplantation mouse embryonic cells, whereas EpiStem cells closely resembled the post-implantation epiblast. Sex-related gene expression varied greatly across distinct developmental states. We also identified novel markers that were highly enriched in each developmental state. Moreover, we revealed that several novel pathways, including PluriNetWork and Focal Adhesion, were responsible for the delayed progression of female EpiStem cells. Importantly, we “digitalized” XCI progression using allelic expression of active and inactive X Chromosomes and surprisingly found that XCI states exhibited profound variability in each developmental state, including the 2i condition. XCI progression was not tightly synchronized with loss of pluripotency and increase of differentiation at the single-cell level, although these processes were globally correlated. In addition, highly expressed genes, including core pluripotency factors, were in general biallelically expressed. Taken together, our study sheds light on the dynamics of XCI progression and the asynchronicity between pluripotency, differentiation, and XCI. PMID:27486082

  4. Identifying microRNAs that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0241 TITLE: Identifying that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Liqin Du...inducing miRNA, miR- 449a. We examined the differentiation-inducing function of miR-449a in multiple neuroblastoma cell lines. We have demonstrated that...miR-449a functions as an inducer of cell differentiation in neuroblastoma cell lines with distinct genetic backgrounds, including the MYCN

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Goff, Loyal A; Davila, Jonathan; Jörnsten, Rebecka; Keles, Sunduz; Hart, Ronald P

    2007-09-01

    Regulated mRnAs during differentiation of rat neural stem cells were analyzed using the ABi1700 microarray platform. This microarray, while technically advanced, suffers from the difficulty of integrating hybridization results into public databases for systems-level analysis. This is particularly true for the rat array, since many of the probes were designed for transcripts based on predicted human and mouse homologs. using several strategies, we increased the public annotation of the 27,531 probes from 43% to over 65%. To increase the dynamic range of annotation, probes were mapped to numerous public keys from several data sources. consensus annotation from multiple sources was determined for well-scoring alignments, and a confidence-based ranking system established for probes with less agreement across multiple data sources. previous attempts at genomic interpretation using the celera annotation model resulted in poor overlap with expected genomic sequences. since the public keys are more precisely mapped to the genome, we could now analyze the relationships between predicted transcription-factor binding sites and expression clusters. Results collected from a differentiation time course of two neural stem cell clones were clustered using a model-based algorithm. Transcription-factor binding sites were predicted from upstream regions of mapped transcripts using position weight matrices from either JAspAR or TRAnsFAc, and the resulting scores were used to discriminate between observed expression clusters. A classification and regression tree analysis was conducted using cluster numbers as gene identifiers and TFBs scores as predictors, pruning back to obtain a tree with the lowest gene class prediction error rate. Results identify several transcription factors, the presence or absence of which are sufficient to describe clusters of mRnAs changing over time-those that are static, as well as clusters describing cell line differences. public annotation of the AB1700

  6. Curtailed T-cell activation curbs effector differentiation and generates CD8(+) T cells with a naturally-occurring memory stem cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zanon, Veronica; Pilipow, Karolina; Scamardella, Eloise; De Paoli, Federica; De Simone, Gabriele; Price, David A; Martinez Usatorre, Amaia; Romero, Pedro; Mavilio, Domenico; Roberto, Alessandra; Lugli, Enrico

    2017-09-01

    Human T memory stem (TSCM ) cells with superior persistence capacity and effector functions are emerging as important players in the maintenance of long-lived T-cell memory and are thus considered an attractive population to be used in adoptive transfer-based immunotherapy of cancer. However, the molecular signals regulating their generation remain poorly defined. Here we show that curtailed T-cell receptor stimulation curbs human effector CD8(+) T-cell differentiation and allows the generation of CD45RO(-) CD45RA(+) CCR7(+) CD27(+) CD95(+) -phenotype cells from highly purified naïve T-cell precursors, resembling naturally-occurring human TSCM . These cells proliferate extensively in vitro and in vivo, express low amounts of effector-associated genes and transcription factors and undergo considerable self-renewal in response to IL-15 while retaining effector differentiation potential. Such a phenotype is associated with a lower number of mitochondria compared to highly-activated effector T cells committed to terminal differentiation. These results shed light on the molecular signals that are required to generate long-lived memory T cells with potential application in adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  8. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  9. Epigenetic heterochromatin markers distinguish terminally differentiated leukocytes from incompletely differentiated leukemia cells in human blood.

    PubMed

    Popova, Evgenya Y; Claxton, David F; Lukasova, Emilie; Bird, Phillip I; Grigoryev, Sergei A

    2006-04-01

    During terminal cell differentiation, nuclear chromatin becomes condensed and the repertoire of epigentic heterochromatin proteins responsible for chromatin condensation is dramatically changed. In order to identify the chromatin regulatory factors associated with incomplete cell differentiation and impaired chromatin condensation in hematological malignancies, we examined expression levels of major heterochromatin proteins in normal blood cells and cells derived from a number of chronic and acute myeloid leukemia patients exhibiting different degrees of differentiation. We used immunoblotting and immunofluorescence to examine the levels and localization of epigenetic heterochromatin factors in isolated cell nuclei and fractionated peripheral blood cells. While the major epigenetic heterochromatin factor, histone H3 methylated at lysine 9, is present in all cell types, its main counterparts, nonhistone proteins, heterochromatin proteins 1 (HP1) alpha, beta, and gamma, are dramatically reduced in peripheral blood leukocytes of normal donors and chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but are substantially increased in the blood of accelerated phase and blast crisis patients. In the terminally differentiated cells, nuclear chromatin accumulates a nucleocytoplasmic serpin, monocyte and neutrophil elastase inhibitor (MNEI). HP1 and MNEI levels inversely correlate in a number of normal and leukemia myeloid cells and show strikingly opposite coordinated changes during differentiation of U937 cell line induced by retinoic acid. Our results suggest that repression of HP1 and accumulation of MNEI are linked to terminal cell differentiation and that their levels may be monitored in blood cell populations to detect transitions in cell differentiation associated with leukemia progression and treatment.

  10. Multistep process of squamous differentiation in tracheobronchial epithelial cells in vitro: analogy with epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, A M

    1989-01-01

    The lung, in particular the bronchial epithelium, is a major site for tumor formation in humans. Environmental factors, such as cigarette smoke, in conjunction with genetic factors are important determinants in this disease. Malignant cells exhibit alterations in their control of proliferation and differentiation. It is believed that the acquisition of defects in the regulation of these processes is important in the process of carcinogenesis. A clear insight into the basic mechanisms of the regulation of proliferation and differentiation is required to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in tumor development and in other pathological conditions. Studies using in vitro cell culture systems of tracheobronchial epithelial cells provide useful models in which to study the regulation of differentiation and proliferation. The clonogenic cells derived from the treacheobronchial epithelium are pluripotent: They have self-renewal capacity and can differentiate along either a normal, mucosecretory, or a squamous cell pathway. Squamous differentiation in tracheobronchial epithelial cells has many morphological, biochemical, and regulatory properties in common with epidermal differentiation. This pathway of differentiation is a multistep process consisting of at least three stages. In the initial stage, cells become committed to terminal cell division. This is followed by the expression of the squamous differentiated phenotype and finally cornification. Various factors, such as several growth factors, retinoids, calcium ions, and phorbol esters, regulate the program of differentiation at different stages. Studies have indicated that the controls of proliferation and differentiation are interrelated. Cell lines established from tracheobronchial epithelial cells expressing SV 40 large T-antigen, as well as carcinoma cell lines, exhibit altered responses to growth and differentiation regulatory factors. Alterations in the commitment to terminal cell division must be a

  11. Identification of novel transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage differentiation and activation in U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Young-Sook; Haas, Stefan; Hackstein, Holger; Bein, Gregor; Hernandez-Santana, Maria; Lehrach, Hans; Sauer, Sascha; Seitz, Harald

    2009-04-02

    Monocytes and macrophages play essential role in innate immunity. Understanding the underlying mechanism of macrophage differentiation and the identification of regulatory mechanisms will help to find new strategies to prevent their harmful effects in chronic inflammatory diseases and sepsis. Maturation of blood monocytes into tissue macrophages and subsequent inflammatory response was mimicked in U937 cells of human histocytic lymphoma origin. Whole genome array analysis was employed to evaluate gene expression profile to identify underlying transcriptional networks implicated during the processes of differentiation and inflammation. In addition to already known transcription factors (i.e. MAFB, EGR, IRF, BCL6, NFkB, AP1, Nur77), gene expression analysis further revealed novel genes (i.e. MEF2, BRI, HLX, HDAC5, H2AV, TCF7L2, NFIL3) previously uncharacterized to be involved in the differentiation process. A total of 58 selected genes representing cytokines, chemokines, surface antigens, signaling molecules and transcription factors were validated by real time PCR and compared to primary monocyte-derived macrophages. Beside the verification of several new genes, the comparison reveals individual heterogeneity of blood donors. Up regulation of MEF2 family, HDACs, and H2AV during cell differentiation and inflammation sheds new lights onto regulation events on transcriptional and epigenetic level controlling these processes. Data generated will serve as a source for further investigation of macrophages differentiation pathways and related biological responses.

  12. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  13. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, L S; Yuen, H K; Varner, J E

    1991-01-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9 degrees C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl2 to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8 degrees C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1 degrees C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, we propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium. PMID:11607163

  14. Impact of Enriched Environment on Murine T Cell Differentiation and Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Rattazzi, Lorenza; Piras, Giuseppa; Brod, Samuel; Smith, Koval; Ono, Masahiro; D’Acquisto, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    T cells are known to be plastic and to change their phenotype according to the cellular and biochemical milieu they are embedded in. In this study, we transposed this concept at a macroscopic level assessing whether changes in the environmental housing conditions of C57/BL6 mice would influence the phenotype and function of T cells. Our study shows that exposure to 2 weeks in an enriched environment (EE) does not impact the T cell repertoire in vivo and causes no changes in the early TCR-driven activation events of these cells. Surprisingly, however, T cells from enriched mice showed a unique T helper effector cell phenotype upon differentiation in vitro. This was featured by a significant reduction in their ability to produce IFN-γ and by an increased release of IL-10 and IL-17. Microarray analysis of these cells also revealed a unique gene fingerprint with key signaling pathways involved in autoimmunity being modulated. Together, our results provide first evidence for a specific effect of EE on T cell differentiation and its associated changes in gene expression profile. In addition, our study sheds new light on the possible mechanisms by which changes in environmental factors can significantly influence the immune response of the host and favor the resolution of the inflammatory response. PMID:27746779

  15. Side Effects of Culture Media Antibiotics on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Montoya, Julio; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Besides the advance in scientific knowledge and the production of different compounds, cell culture can now be used to obtain cells for regenerative medicine. To avoid microbial contamination, antibiotics were usually incorporated into culture media. However, these compounds affect cell biochemistry and may modify the differentiation potential of cultured cells. To check this possibility, we grew human adipose tissue-derived stem cells and differentiated them to adipocyte with or without antibiotics commonly used in these culture protocols, such as a penicillin-streptomycin-amphotericin mix or gentamicin. We show that these antibiotics affect cell differentiation. Therefore, antibiotics should not be used in cell culture because aseptic techniques make these compounds unnecessary.

  16. Midgut epithelium in molting silkworm: A fine balance among cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Casartelli, Morena; D'Antona, Paola; Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Caccia, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    The midgut of insects has attracted great attention as a system for studying intestinal stem cells (ISCs) as well as cell death-related processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Among insects, Lepidoptera represent a good model to analyze these cells and processes. In particular, larva-larva molting is an interesting developmental phase since the larva must deal with nutrient starvation and its organs are subjected to rearrangements due to proliferation and differentiation events. Several studies have analyzed ISCs in vitro and characterized key factors involved in their division and differentiation during molt. However, in vivo studies performed during larva-larva transition on these cells, and on the whole midgut epithelium, are fragmentary. In the present study, we analyzed the larval midgut epithelium of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, during larva-larva molting, focusing our attention on ISCs. Moreover, we investigated the metabolic changes that occur in the epithelium and evaluated the intervention of autophagy. Our data on ISCs proliferation and differentiation, autophagy activation, and metabolic and functional activities of the midgut cells shed light on the complexity of this organ during the molting phase.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocyte-Like cells.

    PubMed

    Narakornsak, Suteera; Poovachiranon, Naree; Peerapapong, Lamaiporn; Pothacharoen, Peeraphan; Aungsuchawan, Sirinda

    2016-05-01

    Among the stem cells contained in human amniotic fluid (hAF), the human amniotic fluid derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hAF-MSCs) are derived from fetal membranes and tissues that are produced during fetal development. The aim of this study was to characterize the 'stem-ness' properties of hAF-MSCs and their potency with regard to the chondrogenic differentiations using the scaffold cultivation method. This study revealed that the easily accessed and isolated MSCs were highly cell prolific and there were fewer ethical concerns regarding their usage. The MSCs were studied through the use of the alamar blue technique. In addition, after cell isolation, hAF-MSCs displayed typical MSCs morphologies including MSCs biomarker characteristics and immune privilege properties (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105 and HLA-ABC) through immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Interestingly, this result indicated a negative expression when using the C-Kit (CD117, tyrosine kinase receptor type III ligand for cytokine stem cell factor). This expression can be found at the cell's surface of the amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs). This study found evidence that hAF-MSCs had the ability to differentiate the cells into the chondrogenic lineage by exhibiting chondrogenic related genes and proteins (SOX9, AGC, COL2A1 and COMP) through RT-qPCR, immunoenzymatic assays and immunofluorescence analysis. Furthermore, MSCs presented sGAGs accumulation, which was confirmed by histological analysis and SEM. Therefore, this study showed that the MSCs characteristics are contained in AF and are of significant value for further research. It appears that MSCs possess the potential for use in treatments that would necessitate the use of regenerative cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage.

  19. Downregulation of rRNA transcription triggers cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuki; Kuroda, Takao; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Wang, Changshan; Iwama, Atsushi; Kimura, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Responding to various stimuli is indispensable for the maintenance of homeostasis. The downregulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription is one of the mechanisms involved in the response to stimuli by various cellular processes, such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell differentiation is caused by intra- and extracellular stimuli and is associated with the downregulation of rRNA transcription as well as reduced cell growth. The downregulation of rRNA transcription during differentiation is considered to contribute to reduced cell growth. However, the downregulation of rRNA transcription can induce various cellular processes; therefore, it may positively regulate cell differentiation. To test this possibility, we specifically downregulated rRNA transcription using actinomycin D or a siRNA for Pol I-specific transcription factor IA (TIF-IA) in HL-60 and THP-1 cells, both of which have differentiation potential. The inhibition of rRNA transcription induced cell differentiation in both cell lines, which was demonstrated by the expression of the common differentiation marker CD11b. Furthermore, TIF-IA knockdown in an ex vivo culture of mouse hematopoietic stem cells increased the percentage of myeloid cells and reduced the percentage of immature cells. We also evaluated whether differentiation was induced via the inhibition of cell cycle progression because rRNA transcription is tightly coupled to cell growth. We found that cell cycle arrest without affecting rRNA transcription did not induce differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, our results demonstrate the first time that the downregulation of rRNA levels could be a trigger for the induction of differentiation in mammalian cells. Furthermore, this phenomenon was not simply a reflection of cell cycle arrest. Our results provide a novel insight into the relationship between rRNA transcription and cell differentiation.

  20. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-05-19

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Shedding light on the expansion and diversification of the Cdc48 protein family during the rise of the eukaryotic cell.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Nickias; Kloepper, Tobias H; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2016-10-18

    A defining feature of eukaryotic cells is the presence of various distinct membrane-bound compartments with different metabolic roles. Material exchange between most compartments occurs via a sophisticated vesicle trafficking system. This intricate cellular architecture of eukaryotes appears to have emerged suddenly, about 2 billion years ago, from much less complex ancestors. How the eukaryotic cell acquired its internal complexity is poorly understood, partly because no prokaryotic precursors have been found for many key factors involved in compartmentalization. One exception is the Cdc48 protein family, which consists of several distinct classical ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) proteins with two consecutive AAA domains. Here, we have classified the Cdc48 family through iterative use of hidden Markov models and tree building. We found only one type, Cdc48, in prokaryotes, although a set of eight diverged members that function at distinct subcellular compartments were retrieved from eukaryotes and were probably present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Pronounced changes in sequence and domain structure during the radiation into the LECA set are delineated. Moreover, our analysis brings to light lineage-specific losses and duplications that often reflect important biological changes. Remarkably, we also found evidence for internal duplications within the LECA set that probably occurred during the rise of the eukaryotic cell. Our analysis corroborates the idea that the diversification of the Cdc48 family is closely intertwined with the development of the compartments of the eukaryotic cell.

  2. Oral mucosal progenitor cell clones resist in vitro myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Locke, Matthew; Davies, Lindsay C; Stephens, Phil

    2016-10-01

    Progenitor cells derived from the oral mucosa lamina propria (OMLP-PCs) demonstrate an ability to differentiate into tissue lineages removed from their anatomical origin. This clonally derived population of neural-crest cells have demonstrated potential to differentiate along mesenchymal and neuronal cell lineages.

  3. Regulation of pluripotent cell differentiation by a small molecule, staurosporine.

    PubMed

    Hughes, James Nicholas; Wong, Chong Kum Edwin; Lau, Kevin Xiuwen; Rathjen, Peter David; Rathjen, Joy

    2014-01-01

    Research in the embryo and in culture has resulted in a sophisticated understanding of many regulators of pluripotent cell differentiation. As a consequence, protocols for the differentiation of pluripotent cells generally rely on a combination of exogenous growth factors and endogenous signalling. Little consideration has been given to manipulating other pathways to achieve pluripotent cell differentiation. The integrity of cell:cell contacts has been shown to influence lineage choice during pluripotent cell differentiation, with disruption of cell:cell contacts promoting mesendoderm formation and maintenance of cell:cell contacts resulting in the preferential formation of neurectoderm. Staurosporine is a broad spectrum inhibitor of serine/threonine kinases which has several effects on cell function, including interruption of cell:cell contacts, decreasing focal contact size, inducing epithelial to mesenchyme transition (EMT) and promoting cell differentiation. The possibility that staurosporine could influence lineage choice from pluripotent cells in culture was investigated. The addition of staurosporine to differentiating mouse EPL resulted in preferential formation of mesendoderm and mesoderm populations, and inhibited the formation of neurectoderm. Addition of staurosporine to human ES cells similarly induced primitive streak marker gene expression. These data demonstrate the ability of staurosporine to influence lineage choice during pluripotent cell differentiation and to mimic the effect of disrupting cell:cell contacts. Staurosporine induced mesendoderm in the absence of known inducers of formation, such as serum and BMP4. Staurosporine induced the expression of mesendoderm markers, including markers that were not induced by BMP4, suggesting it acted as a broad spectrum inducer of molecular gastrulation. This approach has identified a small molecule regulator of lineage choice with potential applications in the commercial development of ES cell

  4. Differential expression of Ran GTPase during HMBA-induced differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, N; García-Sacristán, A; López-Fernández, L A; Párraga, M; del Mazo, J; Hernández, P; Schvartzman, J B; Krimer, D B

    2003-07-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro when treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). To identify genes involved in the commitment of MEL cells to differentiate, we screened a cDNA library constructed from HMBA-induced cells by differential hybridization and isolated GTPase Ran as a down-regulated gene. We observed that Ran was expressed in a biphasic mode. Following a decrease in mRNA level during the initial hours of induction, Ran re-expressed at 24-48 h, and gradually declined again. To investigate the role of Ran during MEL differentiation we constructed MEL transfectants capable to express or block Ran mRNA production constitutively. No effects were observed on cell growth and proliferation. Blockage of Ran, however, interfered with MEL cell differentiation resulting in a decrease of cell survival in the committed population.

  5. Shedding lights on the flexible-armed porphyrins: Human telomeric G4 DNA interaction and cell photocytotoxicity research.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-Fang; Liu, Min-Chao; Wang, Xia-Hong; Huang, Yu-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Feng; Yan, Si-Qi; Li, Yan-Yu; Chen, Ya-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Mei

    2017-08-01

    DNA polymorphism exerts a fascination on a large scientific community. Without crystallographic structural data, clarification of the binding modes between G-quadruplex (G4) and ligand (complex) is a challenging job. In the present work, three porphyrin compounds with different flexible carbon chains (arms) were designed, synthesized and characterized. Their binding, folding and stabilizing abilities to human telomeric G4 DNA structures were comparatively researched. Positive charges at the end of the flexible carbon chains seem to be favorable for the DNA-porphyrin interactions, which were evidenced by the spectral results and further confirmed by the molecular docking calculations. Biological function analysis demonstrated that these porphyrins show no substantial inhibition to Hela, A549 and BEL 7402 cancer cell lines under dark while exhibit broad inhibition under visible light. This significantly enhanced photocytotoxicity relative to the dark control is an essential property of photochemotherapeutic agents. The feature of the flexible arms emerges as critical influencing factors in the cell photocytotoxicity. Moreover, an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway was suggested for the cell apoptosis induced by these flexible-armed porphyrins. It is found that the porphyrins with positive charges located at the end of the flexible arms represent an exciting opportunity for photochemotherapeutic anti-cancer drug design. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Self-renewal and differentiation capacity of urine-derived stem cells after urine preservation for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ren; Liu, Guihua; Shi, Yingai; Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Leng, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaobo; Liu, Hong; Atala, Anthony; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite successful approaches to preserve organs, tissues, and isolated cells, the maintenance of stem cell viability and function in body fluids during storage for cell distribution and transportation remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize urine-derived stem cells (USCs) after optimal preservation of urine specimens for up to 24 hours. A total of 415 urine specimens were collected from 12 healthy men (age range 20-54 years old). About 6 × 10(4) cells shed off from the urinary tract system in 24 hours. At least 100 USC clones were obtained from the stored urine specimens after 24 hours and maintained similar biological features to fresh USCs. The stored USCs had a "rice grain" shape in primary culture, and expressed mesenchymal stem cell surface markers, high telomerase activity, and normal karyotypes. Importantly, the preserved cells retained bipotent differentiation capacity. Differentiated USCs expressed myogenic specific proteins and contractile function when exposed to myogenic differentiation medium, and they expressed urothelial cell-specific markers and barrier function when exposed to urothelial differentiation medium. These data demonstrated that up to 75% of fresh USCs can be safely persevered in urine for 24 hours and that these cells stored in urine retain their original stem cell properties, indicating that preserved USCs could be available for potential use in cell-based therapy or clinical diagnosis.

  7. Self-Renewal and Differentiation Capacity of Urine-Derived Stem Cells after Urine Preservation for 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yingai; Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Leng, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaobo; Liu, Hong; Atala, Anthony; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite successful approaches to preserve organs, tissues, and isolated cells, the maintenance of stem cell viability and function in body fluids during storage for cell distribution and transportation remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize urine-derived stem cells (USCs) after optimal preservation of urine specimens for up to 24 hours. A total of 415 urine specimens were collected from 12 healthy men (age range 20–54 years old). About 6×104 cells shed off from the urinary tract system in 24 hours. At least 100 USC clones were obtained from the stored urine specimens after 24 hours and maintained similar biological features to fresh USCs. The stored USCs had a “rice grain” shape in primary culture, and expressed mesenchymal stem cell surface markers, high telomerase activity, and normal karyotypes. Importantly, the preserved cells retained bipotent differentiation capacity. Differentiated USCs expressed myogenic specific proteins and contractile function when exposed to myogenic differentiation medium, and they expressed urothelial cell-specific markers and barrier function when exposed to urothelial differentiation medium. These data demonstrated that up to 75% of fresh USCs can be safely persevered in urine for 24 hours and that these cells stored in urine retain their original stem cell properties, indicating that preserved USCs could be available for potential use in cell-based therapy or clinical diagnosis. PMID:23349776

  8. Toying with fate: Redirecting the differentiation of adrenocortical progenitor cells into gonadal-like tissue.

    PubMed

    Röhrig, Theresa; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Ziegler, Ricarda; Cochran, Rebecca S; Schrade, Anja; Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Mitra, Robi D; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B

    2015-06-15

    Cell fate decisions are integral to zonation and remodeling of the adrenal cortex. Animal models exhibiting ectopic differentiation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal cortex can shed light on the molecular mechanisms regulating steroidogenic cell fate. In one such model, prepubertal gonadectomy (GDX) of mice triggers the formation of adrenocortical neoplasms that resemble luteinized ovarian stroma. Transcriptomic analysis and genome-wide DNA methylation mapping have identified genetic and epigenetic markers of GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasia. Members of the GATA transcription factor family have emerged as key regulators of cell fate in this model. Expression of Gata4 is pivotal for the accumulation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal glands of gonadectomized mice, whereas expression of Gata6 limits the spontaneous and GDX-induced differentiation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal cortex. Additionally, Gata6 is essential for proper development of the adrenal X-zone, a layer analogous to the fetal zone of the human adrenal cortex. The relevance of these observations to developmental signaling pathways in the adrenal cortex, to other animal models of altered adrenocortical cell fate, and to human diseases is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toying with fate: Redirecting the differentiation of adrenocortical progenitor cells into gonadal-like tissue

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Theresa; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Ziegler, Ricarda; Cochran, Rebecca S.; Schrade, Anja; Schillebeeckx, Maximiliaan; Mitra, Robi D.; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate decisions are integral to zonation and remodeling of the adrenal cortex. Animal models exhibiting ectopic differentiation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal cortex can shed light on the molecular mechanisms regulating steroidogenic cell fate. In one such model, prepubertal gonadectomy (GDX) of mice triggers the formation of adrenocortical neoplasms that resemble luteinized ovarian stroma. Transcriptomic analysis and genome-wide DNA methylation mapping have identified genetic and epi-genetic markers of GDX-induced adrenocortical neoplasia. Members of the GATA transcription factor family have emerged as key regulators of cell fate in this model. Expression of Gata4 is pivotal for the accumulation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal glands of gonadectomized mice, whereas expression of Gata6 limits the spontaneous and GDX-induced differentiation of gonadal-like cells in the adrenal cortex. Additionally, Gata6 is essential for proper development of the adrenal X-zone, a layer analogous to the fetal zone of the human adrenal cortex. The relevance of these observations to developmental signaling pathways in the adrenal cortex, to other animal models of altered adrenocortical cell fate, and to human diseases is discussed. PMID:25498963

  10. Cellular form of prion protein inhibits Reelin-mediated shedding of Caspr from the neuronal cell surface to potentiate Caspr-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Vasudharani; Jakovcevski, Igor; Santuccione, Antonella; Li, Shen; Lee, Hyun Joon; Peles, Elior; Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir; Schachner, Melitta

    2010-07-07

    Extension of axonal and dendritic processes in the CNS is tightly regulated by outgrowth-promoting and -inhibitory cues to assure precision of synaptic connections. We identify a novel role for contactin-associated protein (Caspr) as an inhibitory cue that reduces neurite outgrowth from CNS neurons. We show that proteolysis of Caspr at the cell surface is regulated by the cellular form of prion protein (PrP), which directly binds to Caspr. PrP inhibits Reelin-mediated shedding of Caspr from the cell surface, thereby increasing surface levels of Caspr and potentiating the inhibitory effect of Caspr on neurite outgrowth. PrP deficiency results in reduced levels of Caspr at the cell surface, enhanced neurite outgrowth in vitro, and more efficient regeneration of axons in vivo following spinal cord injury. Thus, we reveal a previously unrecognized role for Caspr and PrP in inhibitory modulation of neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons, which is counterbalanced by the proteolytic activity of Reelin.

  11. The Effect of 1α,25(OH)2D3 on Osteogenic Differentiation of Stem Cells from Dental Pulp of Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Mojarad, Farzad; Amiri, Iraj; Rafatjou, Rezvan; Janeshin, Atousa; Farhadian, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are a population of highly proliferative cells, being capable of differentiating into osteogenic, odontogenic, adipocytes, and neural cells. Vitamin D3 metabolites such as 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 are key factors in the regulation of bone metabolism. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on osteogenic differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity and alizarin red staining) of stem cells of exfoliated deciduous teeth. Materials and Method: Dental pulp was removed from freshly extracted primary teeth and immersed in a digestive solution. Then, the dental pulp cells were immersed in α-MEM (minimum essential medium) to which 10% fetal bovine serum was added. After the third passage, the cells were isolated from the culture plate and were used for osteogenic differentiation. As a control group, the cells were cultured in osteogenic cell culture medium. As the case group, the cells were cultured in osteogenic culture medium supplemented with 100 nM 1α,25 (OH)2D3. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and alizarin red staining were analyzed to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation at day 21. The results were analyzed by using t-test. Results: Compared with the control group, significant increase was observed in ALP activity of SHEDs after being treated with 1α,25(OH)2D3 (p= 0.002). Alizarin red staining demonstrated that the cells exposed to 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced higher mineralized nodules (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Osteoblast differentiation in SHEDs was stimulated by 1α,25(OH) 2D3. It can be concluded that 1α,25(OH)2D3 can improve osteoblastic differentiation. PMID:27942551

  12. Neonatal thymectomy reveals differentiation and plasticity within human naive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Theo; Delemarre, Eveline M.; Janssen, Willemijn J.M.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Broen, Jasper C.; Tesselaar, Kiki; Borghans, Jose A.M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.S.; Prakken, Berent J.; Mokry, Michal; Jansen, Nicolaas J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of naive T cells is dependent on thymic output, but in adults, the naive T cell pool is primarily maintained by peripheral proliferation. Naive T cells have long been regarded as relatively quiescent cells; however, it was recently shown that IL-8 production is a signatory effector function of naive T cells, at least in newborns. How this functional signature relates to naive T cell dynamics and aging is unknown. Using a cohort of children and adolescents who underwent neonatal thymectomy, we demonstrate that the naive CD4+ T cell compartment in healthy humans is functionally heterogeneous and that this functional diversity is lost after neonatal thymectomy. Thymic tissue regeneration later in life resulted in functional restoration of the naive T cell compartment, implicating the thymus as having functional regenerative capacity. Together, these data shed further light on functional differentiation within the naive T cell compartment and the importance of the thymus in human naive T cell homeostasis and premature aging. In addition, these results affect and alter our current understanding on the identification of truly naive T cells and recent thymic emigrants. PMID:26901814

  13. Extracellular Matrix and Integrins in Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Luo, Xie; Leighton, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells with great therapeutic potentials. The in vitro differentiation of ESC was designed by recapitulating embryogenesis. Significant progress has been made to improve the in vitro differentiation protocols by toning soluble maintenance factors. However, more robust methods for lineage-specific differentiation and maturation are still under development. Considering the complexity of in vivo embryogenesis environment, extracellular matrix (ECM) cues should be considered besides growth factor cues. ECM proteins bind to cells and act as ligands of integrin receptors on cell surfaces. Here, we summarize the role of the ECM and integrins in the formation of three germ layer progenies. Various ECM–integrin interactions were found, facilitating differentiation toward definitive endoderm, hepatocyte-like cells, pancreatic beta cells, early mesodermal progenitors, cardiomyocytes, neuroectoderm lineages, and epidermal cells, such as keratinocytes and melanocytes. In the future, ECM combinations for the optimal ESC differentiation environment will require substantial study. PMID:26462244

  14. A Change In Nuclear Pore Complex Composition Regulates Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maximiliano A.; Gomez-Cavazos, J. Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ~30 different proteins called nucleoporins. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem (ES) cells but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ES cells into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. PMID:22264802

  15. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  16. SETD7 Regulates the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, Julio; Morera, Cristina; Sesé, Borja; Boue, Stephanie; Bonet-Costa, Carles; Martí, Merce; Roque, Alicia; Jordan, Albert; Barrero, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The successful use of specialized cells in regenerative medicine requires an optimization in the differentiation protocols that are currently used. Understanding the molecular events that take place during the differentiation of human pluripotent cells is essential for the improvement of these protocols and the generation of high quality differentiated cells. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation we identify the methyltransferase SETD7 as highly induced during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and differentially expressed between induced pluripotent cells and somatic cells. Knock-down of SETD7 causes differentiation defects in human embryonic stem cell including delay in both the silencing of pluripotency-related genes and the induction of differentiation genes. We show that SETD7 methylates linker histone H1 in vitro causing conformational changes in H1. These effects correlate with a decrease in the recruitment of H1 to the pluripotency genes OCT4 and NANOG during differentiation in the SETD7 knock down that might affect the proper silencing of these genes during differentiation. PMID:26890252

  17. Calcium phosphate-bearing matrices induce osteogenic differentiation of stem cells through adenosine signaling.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Ru V; Hwang, YongSung; Phadke, Ameya; Kang, Heemin; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Caro, Eduardo J; Nguyen, Steven; Siu, Michael; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Vecchio, Kenneth S; Chien, Shu; Lee, Oscar K; Varghese, Shyni

    2014-01-21

    Synthetic matrices emulating the physicochemical properties of tissue-specific ECMs are being developed at a rapid pace to regulate stem cell fate. Biomaterials containing calcium phosphate (CaP) moieties have been shown to support osteogenic differentiation of stem and progenitor cells and bone tissue formation. By using a mineralized synthetic matrix mimicking a CaP-rich bone microenvironment, we examine a molecular mechanism through which CaP minerals induce osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells with an emphasis on phosphate metabolism. Our studies show that extracellular phosphate uptake through solute carrier family 20 (phosphate transporter), member 1 (SLC20a1) supports osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells via adenosine, an ATP metabolite, which acts as an autocrine/paracrine signaling molecule through A2b adenosine receptor. Perturbation of SLC20a1 abrogates osteogenic differentiation by decreasing intramitochondrial phosphate and ATP synthesis. Collectively, this study offers the demonstration of a previously unknown mechanism for the beneficial role of CaP biomaterials in bone repair and the role of phosphate ions in bone physiology and regeneration. These findings also begin to shed light on the role of ATP metabolism in bone homeostasis, which may be exploited to treat bone metabolic diseases.

  18. 13. Relationship of east tool shed, west tool shed, residence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Relationship of east tool shed, west tool shed, residence, claim house, and privy to each other and immediate surroundings, looking north - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  19. 12. Relationship of est tool shed, west tool shed, residence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Relationship of est tool shed, west tool shed, residence, claim house, and chicken house to each other and immediate surroundings, looking southeast - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  20. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Kong, Yan; Zhang, Mingliang; Xie, Fei; Liu, Peng; Xu, Shaohua

    2016-02-26

    A long-standing goal in regenerative medicine is to obtain scalable functional cells on demand to replenish cells lost in various conditions, including relevant diseases, injuries, and aging. As an unlimited cell source, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are invaluable for regenerative medicine, because they have the potential to give rise to any cell type in an organism. For therapeutic purposes, it is important to develop specific approach to directing PSC differentiation towards desired cell types efficiently. Through directed differentiation, PSCs could give rise to scalable, clinically relevant cells for in vivo transplantation, as well as for studying diseases in vitro and discovering drugs to treat them. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in directing differentiation of PSCs into a variety of cell types. In this review, we discuss recent progress in directed differentiation of PSCs, clinical translation of PSC-based cell replacement therapies, and remaining challenges.

  1. Derivation and spontaneous differentiation of human embryonic stem cells*

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cells are unique cells derived from the inner cell mass of the mammalian blastocyst. These cells are immortal and pluripotent, retain their developmental potential after prolonged culture, and can be continuously cultured in an undifferentiated state. Many in vitro differentiation systems have been developed for mouse ES cells, including reproducible methods for mouse ES cell differentiation into haematopoietic and neural precursors, cardiomyocytes, insulin-secreting cells, endothelial cells and various other cell types. The derivation of new human ES cell lines provides the opportunity to develop unique models for developmental research and for cell therapies. In this review we consider the derivation and spontaneous differentiation of human ES cells. PMID:12033726

  2. Non-genetic heterogeneity, criticality and cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mainak; Ghosh, Sayantari; Bose, Indrani

    2015-02-01

    The different cell types in a living organism acquire their identity through the process of cell differentiation in which multipotent progenitor cells differentiate into distinct cell types. Experimental evidence and analysis of large-scale microarray data establish the key role played by a two-gene motif in cell differentiation in a number of cell systems. The two genes express transcription factors which repress each other's expression and autoactivate their own production. A number of theoretical models have recently been proposed based on the two-gene motif to provide a physical understanding of how cell differentiation occurs. In this paper, we study a simple model of cell differentiation which assumes no cooperativity in the regulation of gene expression by the transcription factors. The latter repress each other's activity directly through DNA binding and indirectly through the formation of heterodimers. We specifically investigate how deterministic processes combined with stochasticity contribute in bringing about cell differentiation. The deterministic dynamics of our model give rise to a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation from an undifferentiated stable steady state to two differentiated stable steady states. The stochastic dynamics of our model are studied using the approaches based on the Langevin equations and the linear noise approximation. The simulation results provide a new physical understanding of recent experimental observations. We further propose experimental measurements of quantities like the variance and the lag-1 autocorrelation function in protein fluctuations as the early signatures of an approaching bifurcation point in the cell differentiation process.

  3. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  4. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Jumpei F; Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of interacting cells with

  5. The plastic liver: differentiated cells, stem cells, every cell?

    PubMed Central

    Hindley, Christopher J.; Mastrogiovanni, Gianmarco; Huch, Meritxell

    2014-01-01

    The liver is capable of full regeneration following several types and rounds of injury, ranging from hepatectomy to toxin-mediated damage. The source of this regenerative capacity has long been a hotly debated topic. The damage response that occurs when hepatocyte proliferation is impaired is thought to be mediated by oval/dedifferentiated progenitor cells, which replenish the hepatocyte and ductal compartments of the liver. Recently, reports have questioned whether these oval/progenitor cells truly serve as the facultative stem cell of the liver following toxin-mediated damage. In this issue of the JCI, Kordes and colleagues use lineage tracing to follow transplanted rat hepatic stellate cells, a resident liver mesenchymal cell population, in hosts that have suffered liver damage. Transplanted stellate cells repopulated the damaged rat liver by contributing to the oval cell response. These data establish yet another cell type of mesenchymal origin as the progenitor for the oval/ductular response in the rat. The lack of uniformity between different damage models, the extent of the injury to the liver parenchyma, and potential species-specific differences might be at the core of the discrepancy between different studies. Taken together, these data imply a considerable degree of plasticity in the liver, whereby several cell types can contribute to regeneration. PMID:25401467

  6. Carvacrol promotes angiogenic paracrine potential and endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Matluobi, Danial; Araghi, Atefeh; Maragheh, Behnaz Faramarzian Azimi; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Soltani, Sina; Khaksar, Majid; Siavashi, Vahid; Feyzi, Adel; Bagheri, Hesam Saghaei; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Montazersaheb, Soheila

    2017-08-19

    Phenolic monoterpene compound, named Carvacrol, has been found to exert different biological outcomes. It has been accepted that the angiogenic activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was crucial in the pursuit of appropriate regeneration. In the current experiment, we investigated the contribution of Carvacrol on the angiogenic behavior of primary human mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to Carvacrol in a dose ranging from 25 to 200μM for 48h. We measured cell survival rate by MTT assay and migration rate by a scratch test. The oxidative status was monitored by measuring SOD, GPx activity. The endothelial differentiation was studied by evaluating the level of VE-cadherin and vWF by real-time PCR and ELISA analyses. The content of VEGF and tubulogenesis behavior was monitored in vitro. We also conducted Matrigel plug in vivo CAM assay to assess the angiogenic potential of conditioned media from human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to Carvacrol. Carvacrol was able to increase mesenchymal stem cell survival and migration rate (p<0.05). An increased activity of SOD was obtained while GPx activity unchanged or reduced. We confirmed the endothelial differentiation of stem cells by detecting vWF and VE-cadherin expression (p<0.05). The VEGF expression was increased and mesenchymal stem cells conditioned media improved angiogenesis tube formation in vitro (p<0.05). Moreover, histological analysis revealed an enhanced microvascular density at the site of Matrigel plug in CAM assay. Our data shed lights on the possibility of a Carvacrol to induce angiogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells by modulating cell differentiation and paracrine angiogenic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced and Differential Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells from Lung Cancer Patients by Microfluidic Assays Using Aptamer Cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Tang, Chuanhao; Xu, Li; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyan; Hu, Haixu; Cheng, Si; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Mengfei; Fong, Anna; Liu, Bing; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Yi; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Collecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from solid tumor through a minimally invasive approach provides an opportunity to solve a long-standing oncology problem, the real-time monitoring of tumor state and analysis of tumor heterogeneity. However, efficient capture and detection of CTCs with diverse phenotypes is still challenging. In this work, a microfluidic assay is developed using the rationally-designed aptamer cocktails with synergistic effect. Enhanced and differential capture of CTCs for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is achieved. It is also demonstrated that the overall consideration of CTC counts obtained by multiple aptamer combinations can provide more comprehensive information in treatment monitoring. PMID:26763166

  8. SCOUP: a probabilistic model based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process to analyze single-cell expression data during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Kiryu, Hisanori

    2016-06-08

    Single-cell technologies make it possible to quantify the comprehensive states of individual cells, and have the power to shed light on cellular differentiation in particular. Although several methods have been developed to fully analyze the single-cell expression data, there is still room for improvement in the analysis of differentiation. In this paper, we propose a novel method SCOUP to elucidate differentiation process. Unlike previous dimension reduction-based approaches, SCOUP describes the dynamics of gene expression throughout differentiation directly, including the degree of differentiation of a cell (in pseudo-time) and cell fate. SCOUP is superior to previous methods with respect to pseudo-time estimation, especially for single-cell RNA-seq. SCOUP also successfully estimates cell lineage more accurately than previous method, especially for cells at an early stage of bifurcation. In addition, SCOUP can be applied to various downstream analyses. As an example, we propose a novel correlation calculation method for elucidating regulatory relationships among genes. We apply this method to a single-cell RNA-seq data and detect a candidate of key regulator for differentiation and clusters in a correlation network which are not detected with conventional correlation analysis. We develop a stochastic process-based method SCOUP to analyze single-cell expression data throughout differentiation. SCOUP can estimate pseudo-time and cell lineage more accurately than previous methods. We also propose a novel correlation calculation method based on SCOUP. SCOUP is a promising approach for further single-cell analysis and available at https://github.com/hmatsu1226/SCOUP.

  9. Graphene Oxide promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to haematopoietic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Iluit, Maria; Stefanska, Monika; Silva, Claudio; Heeg, Sebastian; Kimber, Susan J.; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Batta, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a promising source of differentiated tissue-specific stem and multipotent progenitor cells for regenerative medicine and drug testing. The realisation of this potential relies on the establishment of robust and reproducible protocols of differentiation. Several reports have highlighted the importance of biomaterials in assisting directed differentiation. Graphene oxide (GO) is a novel material that has attracted increasing interest in the field of biomedicine. In this study, we demonstrate that GO coated substrates significantly enhance the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to both primitive and definitive haematopoietic cells. GO does not affect cell proliferation or survival of differentiated cells but rather enhances the transition of haemangioblasts to haemogenic endothelial cells, a key step during haematopoietic specification. Importantly, GO also improves, in addition to murine, human ES cell differentiation to blood cells. Taken together, our study reveals a positive role for GO in haematopoietic differentiation and suggests that further functionalization of GO could represent a valid strategy for the generation of large numbers of functional blood cells. Producing these cells would accelerate haematopoietic drug toxicity testing and treatment of patients with blood disorders or malignancies. PMID:27197878

  10. Graphene Oxide promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to haematopoietic lineage.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Iluit, Maria; Stefanska, Monika; Silva, Claudio; Heeg, Sebastian; Kimber, Susan J; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Batta, Kiran

    2016-05-20

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a promising source of differentiated tissue-specific stem and multipotent progenitor cells for regenerative medicine and drug testing. The realisation of this potential relies on the establishment of robust and reproducible protocols of differentiation. Several reports have highlighted the importance of biomaterials in assisting directed differentiation. Graphene oxide (GO) is a novel material that has attracted increasing interest in the field of biomedicine. In this study, we demonstrate that GO coated substrates significantly enhance the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells to both primitive and definitive haematopoietic cells. GO does not affect cell proliferation or survival of differentiated cells but rather enhances the transition of haemangioblasts to haemogenic endothelial cells, a key step during haematopoietic specification. Importantly, GO also improves, in addition to murine, human ES cell differentiation to blood cells. Taken together, our study reveals a positive role for GO in haematopoietic differentiation and suggests that further functionalization of GO could represent a valid strategy for the generation of large numbers of functional blood cells. Producing these cells would accelerate haematopoietic drug toxicity testing and treatment of patients with blood disorders or malignancies.

  11. Cell differentiation under the influence of rh-BMP-2.

    PubMed

    Wilke, A; Traub, F; Kienapfel, H; Griss, P

    2001-06-29

    Bioactive bone growth factors will likely play an important role in the regeneration of bone. BMP-2 is known to promote osteoblastic cell differentiation and osteogenesis. Whether the BMPs act on human osteoblastic cells by increasing immature cell growth and/or differentiation is unknown. The goal of this study was to analyse possible effects of rhBMP-2 on cell differentiation using a human bone marrow cell culture. rhBMP-2 was added to the culture medium once. Fourteen days after addition of rhBMP-2 the cells were incubated with monoclonal antibodies. The cells were counted and analysed in a fluorescence-activating cell sorter (FACS). Compared to the controls there was an increasing effect on granulocytes, B cells and stem cells. The T-cells and monocytes show no increase or decrease after rhBMP-2 treatment.

  12. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology.

  13. Shedding light on cell compartmentation in the candidate phylum Poribacteria by high resolution visualisation and transcriptional profiling

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Martin T.; Markert, Sebastian M.; Ryu, Taewoo; Ravasi, Timothy; Stigloher, Christian; Hentschel, Ute; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Assigning functions to uncultivated environmental microorganisms continues to be a challenging endeavour. Here, we present a new microscopy protocol for fluorescence in situ hybridisation-correlative light and electron microscopy (FISH-CLEM) that enabled, to our knowledge for the first time, the identification of single cells within their complex microenvironment at electron microscopy resolution. Members of the candidate phylum Poribacteria, common and uncultivated symbionts of marine sponges, were used towards this goal. Cellular 3D reconstructions revealed bipolar, spherical granules of low electron density, which likely represent carbon reserves. Poribacterial activity profiles were retrieved from prokaryotic enriched sponge metatranscriptomes using simulation-based optimised mapping. We observed high transcriptional activity for proteins related to bacterial microcompartments (BMC) and we resolved their subcellular localisation by combining FISH-CLEM with immunohistochemistry (IHC) on ultra-thin sponge tissue sections. In terms of functional relevance, we propose that the BMC-A region may be involved in 1,2-propanediol degradation. The FISH-IHC-CLEM approach was proven an effective toolkit to combine -omics approaches with functional studies and it should be widely applicable in environmental microbiology. PMID:27796326

  14. Initiating Differentiation in Immortalized Multipotent Otic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jadali, Azadeh; Song, Zhichao; Ruiz-Laureano, Alejandra S.; Toro-Ramos, Alana

    2017-01-01

    Use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or embryonic stem cells (ESC) for cell replacement therapies holds great promise. Several limitations including low yields and heterogeneous populations of differentiated cells hinder the progress of stem cell therapies. A fate restricted immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line was generated to facilitate efficient differentiation of large numbers of functional hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) for inner ear cell replacement therapies. Starting from dissociated cultures of single iMOP cells, protocols that promote cell cycle exit and differentiation by growth factor (bFGF) withdrawal were described. A significant decrease in proliferating cells after bFGF withdrawal was confirmed using an EdU cell proliferation assay. Concomitant with a decrease in proliferation, successful differentiation resulted in expression of molecular markers and morphological changes. Immunostaining of Cdkn1b (p27KIP) and Cdh1 (E-cadherin) in iMOP-derived otospheres was used as an indicator for differentiation into inner ear sensory epithelia while immunostaining of Cdkn1b and Tubb3 (neuronal β-tubulin) was used to identify iMOP-derived neurons. Use of iMOP cells provides an important tool for understanding cell fate decisions made by inner ear neurosensory progenitors and will help develop protocols for generating large numbers of iPSC or ESC-derived hair cells and SGNs. These methods will accelerate efforts for generating otic cells for replacement therapies. PMID:26780605

  15. Ratio control in a cascade model of cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2009-05-01

    We propose a kind of reaction-diffusion equations for cell differentiation, which exhibits the Turing instability. If the diffusivity of some variables is set to be infinity, we get coupled competitive reaction-diffusion equations with a global feedback term. The size ratio of each cell type is controlled by a system parameter in the model. Finally, we extend the model to a cascade model of cell differentiation. A hierarchical spatial structure appears as a result of the cell differentiation. The size ratio of each cell type is also controlled by the system parameter.

  16. Ovarian follicle selection and granulosa cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    2015-04-01

    The reproductive strategy for avian species that produce a sequence (or clutch) of eggs is dependent upon the maintenance of a small cohort of viable, undifferentiated (prehierarchal) follicles. It is from this cohort that a single follicle is selected on an approximate daily basis to initiate rapid growth and final differentiation before ovulation. This review describes a working model in which follicles within this prehierarchal cohort are maintained in an undifferentiated state by inhibitory cell signaling until the time of selection. Ultimately, follicle selection represents a process in which a single undifferentiated follicle per day is predicted to escape such inhibitory mechanisms to begin rapid growth and final maturation before ovulation. Several processes initiated within the granulosa cell layer at selection are dependent upon G protein-coupled receptors signaling via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and several critical processes are described herein. Finally, reference is made to several practical outcomes that can result from understanding the process of selection, including applications within the poultry industry. Proximal factors and processes that mediate follicle selection can either extend or decrease the length of the laying sequence, and thus directly influence overall egg production. In particular, any aberration that results in the selection of more than one follicle per day will result in decreased egg production. More generally, in wild birds these processes are modified by prevailing environmental conditions and by social interactions to influence clutch size. The elucidation of cellular processes that regulate follicle selection can assist in the development of assisted reproductive technologies for application in threatened and endangered avian species. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Differential levels of Neurod establish zebrafish endocrine pancreas cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Dalgin, Gökhan; Prince, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    During development a network of transcription factors functions to differentiate foregut cells into pancreatic endocrine cells. Differentiation of appropriate numbers of each hormone-expressing endocrine cell type is essential for the normal development of the pancreas and ultimately for effective maintenance of blood glucose levels. A fuller understanding of the details of endocrine cell differentiation may contribute to development of cell replacement therapies to treat diabetes. In this study, by using morpholino and gRNA/Cas9 mediated knockdown we establish that differential levels of the basic-helix loop helix (bHLH) transcription factor Neurod are required for the differentiation of distinct endocrine cell types in developing zebrafish. While Neurod plays a role in the differentiation of all endocrine cells, we find that differentiation of glucagon-expressing alpha cells is disrupted by a minor reduction in Neurod levels, whereas differentiation of insulin-expressing beta cells is less sensitive to Neurod depletion. The endocrine cells that arise during embryonic stages to produce the primary islet, and those that arise subsequently during larval stages from the intra-pancreatic duct (IPD) to ultimately contribute to the secondary islets, show similar dependence on differential Neurod levels. Intriguingly, Neurod-deficiency triggers premature formation of endocrine precursors from the IPD during early larval stages. However, the Neurod-deficient endocrine precursors fail to differentiate appropriately, and the larvae are unable to maintain normal glucose levels. In summary, differential levels of Neurod are required to generate endocrine pancreas subtypes from precursors during both embryonic and larval stages, and Neurod function is in turn critical to endocrine function. PMID:25797153

  18. Identifying microRNAs that Regulate Neuroblastoma Cell Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0241 TITLE: Identifying that Regulate Neuroblastoma ...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We identified 14 microRNA candidates that induce neuroblastoma cell differentiation based on a high...content screening of neurite outgrowth — the morphological differentiation marker of neuroblastoma cells. We further validated that the identified

  19. Electrical Property Characterization of Neural Stem Cells in Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, He; Chen, Deyong; Li, Zhaohui; Fan, Beiyuan; George, Julian; Xue, Chengcheng; Cui, Zhanfeng; Wang, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Electrical property characterization of stem cells could be utilized as a potential label-free biophysical approach to evaluate the differentiation process. However, there has been a lack of technology or tools that can quantify the intrinsic cellular electrical markers (e.g., specific membrane capacitance (Cspecific membrane) and cytoplasm conductivity (σcytoplasm)) for a large amount of stem cells or differentiated cells. In this paper, a microfluidic platform enabling the high-throughput quantification of Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm from hundreds of single neural stem cells undergoing differentiation was developed to explore the feasibility to characterize the neural stem cell differentiation process without biochemical staining. Experimental quantification using biochemical markers (e.g., Nestin, Tubulin and GFAP) of neural stem cells confirmed the initiation of the differentiation process featured with gradual loss in cellular stemness and increased cell markers for neurons and glial cells. The recorded electrical properties of neural stem cells undergoing differentiation showed distinctive and unique patterns: 1) in the suspension culture before inducing differentiation, a large distribution and difference in σcytoplasm among individual neural stem cells was noticed, which indicated heterogeneity that may result from the nature of suspension culture of neurospheres; and 2) during the differentiation in adhering monolayer culture, significant changes and a large difference in Cspecific membrane were located indicating different expressions of membrane proteins during the differentiation process, and a small distribution difference in σcytoplasm was less significant that indicated the relatively consistent properties of cytoplasm during the culture. In summary, significant differences in Cspecific membrane and σcytoplasm were observed during the neural stem cell differentiation process, which may potentially be used as label-free biophysical markers

  20. Differential phenotypic and functional properties of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ling; Peng, Hui; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-02-01

    Group 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) consist of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells, tissue-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s. Recently identified liver-resident NK cells, which can mount contact hypersensitivity responses, and mucosal ILC1s that are involved in pathogenesis of colitis are distinct from cNK cells in several aspects, but the issue of how they are related to each other has not been clearly clarified. Here, we show that liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s have different phenotypes, as evidenced by distinct expression patterns of homing-associated molecules. Moreover, mucosal ILC1s exhibit tissue residency akin to liver-resident NK cells. Importantly, liver-resident NK cells express relative high levels of cytotoxic effector molecules, which are poorly expressed by mucosal ILC1s, and exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity compared with mucosal ILC1s. These results demonstrate differential phenotypic and functional characteristics of liver-resident NK cells and mucosal ILC1s, shedding new light on the diversity of ILC family.

  1. JAB1 accelerates odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Zhang, Ye; Shen, Qijie; Xing, Jing; Lu, Xiaohui; Huang, Dan; Cao, Peipei; Shen, Shuling; Zheng, Ke; Zhang, Jinlong; Chen, Jie; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Feng, Xingmei

    2016-06-01

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 regulates several key proteins, and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. Some studies have shown that the loss of JAB1 in osteochondral progenitor cells severely impairs embryonic limb development in mice. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in the odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of JAB1, a key player in tooth development, in reparative dentin formation, especially odontogenic differentiation. We found that increased expression of JAB1 promoted odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The role of JAB1 in the odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs was further confirmed by knocking down JAB1. Our findings provide novel insights on odontogenic differentiation of DPSCs.

  2. The topographical regulation of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patricia; Edgar, David

    2004-01-01

    The potential use of pluripotent stem cells for tissue repair or replacement is now well recognized. While the ability of embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate into all cells of the body is undisputed, their use is currently restricted by our limited knowledge of the mechanisms controlling their differentiation. This review discusses recent work by ourselves and others investigating the intercellular signalling events that occur within aggregates of mouse ES cells. The work illustrates that the processes of ES cell differentiation, epithelialization and programmed cell death are dependent upon their location within the aggregates and coordinated by the extracellular matrix. Establishment of the mechanisms involved in these events is not only of use for the manipulation of ES cells themselves, but it also throws light on the ways in which differentiation is coordinated during embryogenesis. PMID:15306413

  3. Nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) pathway mediates important physiological functions associated with various integrative body systems including the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Furthermore, NO regulates cell growth, survival, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation at the cellular level. To understand the significance of the NO-cGMP pathway in development and differentiation, studies have been conducted both in developing embryos and stem cells. Manipulation of the NO-cGMP pathway by employing activators and inhibitors as pharmacological probes and/or genetic manipulation of NO signaling components has implicated the involvement of this pathway in regulation of stem cell differentiation. This review will focus on some of the work pertaining to the role of NO-cGMP in differentiation of stem cells into cells of various lineages particularly into myocardial cells and stem cell based therapy. PMID:22019632

  4. Diclofenac and triamcinolone acetonide impair tenocytic differentiation and promote adipocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tendinopathies are often empirically treated with oral/topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and corticosteroid injections despite their unclear effects on tendon regeneration. Recent studies indicate that tendon progenitors exhibit stem cell-like properties, i.e., differentiation to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, in addition to tenocytes. Our present study aims at understanding the effects of triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac on tenocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods The murine fibroblast C3H10T1/2 cell line was induced to tenocytic differentiation by growth differentiation factor-7. Cell proliferation and differentiation with the exposure of different concentrations of triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac were measured by WST-1 assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. Results Cell proliferation was decreased in a concentration-dependent manner when exposed to triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac. In addition to tenocytic differentiation, adipocyte formation was observed, both at gene expression and microscopic level, when the cells were exposed to triamcinolone acetonide or high concentrations of diclofenac. Conclusions Our results indicate that triamcinolone acetonide and diclofenac might alter mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in a nonfavorable way regarding tendon regeneration; therefore, these medications should be used with more caution clinically. PMID:24004657

  5. Correlation between ECM guidance and actin polymerization on osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Keller, Vivian; Deiwick, Andrea; Pflaum, Michael; Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    The correlation between extracellular matrix (ECM) components, cell shape, and stem cell guidance can shed light in understanding and mimicking the functionality of stem cell niches for various applications. This interplay on osteogenic guidance of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) was focus of this study. Proliferation and osteogenic markers like alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization were slightly increased by the ECM components laminin (LA), collagen I (COL), and fibronectin (FIB); with control medium no differentiation occurred. ECM guided differentiation was rather dependent on osterix than on Runx2 pathway. FIB significantly enhanced cell elongation even in presence of actin polymerization blockers cytochalasin D (CytoD) and ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, which generally caused more rounded cells. Except for the COL surface, both inhibitors increased the extent of osterix, while the Runx2 pathway was more sensitive to the culture condition. Both inhibitors did not affect hASC proliferation. CytoD enabled osteogenic differentiation independently from the ECM, while it was rather blocked via Y-27632 treatment; on FIB the general highest extent of differentiation occurred. Taken together, the ECM effect on hASCs occurs indirectly and selectively via a dominant role of FIB: it sustains osteogenic differentiation in case of a tension-dependent control of actin polymerization.

  6. NOV/CCN3 impairs muscle cell commitment and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Calhabeu, Frederico; Lafont, Jerome; Le Dreau, Gwenvael; Laurent, Maryvonne; Kazazian, Chantal; Schaeffer, Laurent; Dubois, Catherine . E-mail: dubois@st-antoine.inserm.frs

    2006-06-10

    NOV (nephroblastoma overexpressed) is a member of a family of proteins which encodes secreted matrix-associated proteins. NOV is expressed during development in dermomyotome and limb buds, but its functions are still poorly defined. In order to understand the role of NOV in myogenic differentiation, C2C12 cells overexpressing NOV (C2-NOV) were generated. These cells failed to engage into myogenic differentiation, whereas they retained the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts. In differentiating conditions, C2-NOV cells remained proliferative, failed to express differentiation markers and lost their ability to form myotubes. Inhibition of differentiation by NOV was also observed with human primary muscle cells. Further examination of C2-NOV cells revealed a strong downregulation of the myogenic determination genes MyoD and Myf5 and of IGF-II expression. MyoD forced expression in C2-NOV was sufficient to restore differentiation and IGF-II induction whereas 10{sup -6} M insulin treatment had no effects. NOV therefore acts upstream of MyoD and does not affect IGF-II induction and signaling. HES1, a target of Notch, previously proposed to mediate NOV action, was not implicated in the inhibition of differentiation. We propose that NOV is a specific cell fate regulator in the myogenic lineage, acting negatively on key myogenic genes thus controlling the transition from progenitor cells to myoblasts.

  7. Differential cytotoxicity of selenite for tumor cells can be achieved by differential depletion of cellular glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, P.B.; Abdullaev, F.; Frenkel, G.D. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown with HeLa cells that the inhibitory effect of selenite on nucleic acid synthesis and colony formation can be decreased by lowering the level of cellular sulfhydryl (SH) compounds, suggesting that this level can be a determining factor in the sensitivity of a cell to selenite. To investigate whether manipulation of cellular SH levels could be used to achieve a differential effect of selenite on tumor cells vs normal cells, the authors utilized two human cell lines: A549 cells and 210 cells. The level of SH compounds in A549 cells is normally 5 times that of 210 cells. However, since A549 cells are less sensitive than 210 cells to depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), after BSO treatment, A549 cells contain 70 times more SH than 210 cells. The authors have found that under normal conditions the two cell types had the same sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of selenite on colony formation. However, after BSO treatment the A549 cells were significantly more sensitive than the 210 cells to the inhibition of colony formation by selenite. Thus, differential depletion of intracellular glutathione resulted in a differential sensitivity of the tumor cells to selenite cytotoxicity.

  8. Examination of the role of galectins in plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chih-Ming; Lin, Kuo-I

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells are terminally differentiated B cells that develop via the stimulation of mature B cells with various agents such as antigens and mitogens. Recently, we found that plasma cell differentiation can be modulated by galectin-1 and galectin-8; these galectins appear to play additive and redundant roles in promoting the production of antibody. Here, we describe the protocols for how to investigate the roles of galectins in plasma cell differentiation. These methods include the preparation of recombinant galectins from Escherichia coli for exogenously treating primary B cells, generation of galectin_Fc(m) fusion proteins for determining their binding to B cells, introduction of ectopic galectins in primary B cells using retroviral vectors, and inhibition of the binding of galectins to B cells by synthetic disaccharides.

  9. Cancer cell differentiation heterogeneity and aggressive behavior in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Annika; Vaapil, Marica; Johansson, Martin; Påhlman, Sven

    2012-05-01

    The differentiation stage of tumors is a central aspect in the histopathological classification of solid malignancies. The differentiation stage is strongly associated with tumor behavior, and generally an immature tumor is more aggressive than the more differentiated counterpart. While this is common knowledge in surgical pathology, the contribution of differentiation-related gene expression and functions to tumor behavior is often overlooked in the experimental, tumor biological setting. The mechanisms by which tumor cell differentiation stages are perturbed or affected are poorly explored but have recently come into focus with the introduction.of the tumor stem cell concept. While developmental biologists view the differentiation as a unidirectional event, pathologists and tumor biologists have introduced the concept of dedifferentiation to explain phenotypic changes occurring in solid tumors. In this review we discuss the impact of the tumor cell differentiation stage as used in surgical pathology. We further discuss knowledge gained from exploring the molecular basis of the differentiation and dedifferentiation processes in neuroblastoma and breast cancer, two tumor forms where the tumor cell differentiation concept is used in the clinical diagnostic work and where the tumor stem cell theory has been applied.

  10. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kimura, Akinori; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    Stem cells and its differentiations have got a lot of attentions in regenerative medicine. The process of differentiations, the formation of tissues, has become better understood by the study using a lot of cell types progressively. These studies of cells and tissue dynamics at molecular levels are carried out through various approaches like histochemical methods, application of molecular biology and immunology. However, in case of using regenerative sources (cells, tissues and biomaterials etc.) clinically, they are measured and quality-controlled by non-invasive methods from the view point of safety. Recently, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) has been used to monitor biochemical changes in cells, and has gained considerable importance. The objective of this study is to establish the infrared spectroscopy of cell differentiation as a quality control of cell sources for regenerative medicine. In the present study, as a basic study, we examined the adipose differentiation kinetics of preadipocyte (3T3-L1) and the osteoblast differentiation kinetics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (Kusa-A1) to analyze the infrared absorption spectra. As a result, we achieved to analyze the adipose differentiation kinetics using the infrared absorption peak at 1739 cm-1 derived from ester bonds of triglyceride and osteoblast differentiation kinetics using the infrared absorption peak at 1030 cm-1 derived from phosphate groups of calcium phosphate.

  11. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  12. Epigenetic stability increases extensively during Drosophila follicle stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Skora, Andrew D; Spradling, Allan C

    2010-04-20

    Stem and embryonic cells facilitate programming toward multiple daughter cell fates, whereas differentiated cells resist reprogramming and oncogenic transformation. How alterations in the chromatin-based machinery of epigenetic inheritance contribute to these differences remains poorly known. We observed random, heritable changes in GAL4/UAS transgene programming during Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cell differentiation and used them to measure the stage-specific epigenetic stability of gene programming. The frequency of GAL4/UAS reprogramming declines more than 100-fold over the nine divisions comprising this stem cell lineage. Stabilization acts in cis, suggesting that it is chromatin-based, and correlates with increased S phase length. Our results suggest that stem/early progenitor cells cannot accurately transmit nongenetic information to their progeny; full epigenetic competence is acquired only gradually during early differentiation. Modulating epigenetic inheritance may be a critical process controlling transitions between the pleuripotent and differentiated states.

  13. Insulin acts as a myogenic differentiation signal for neural stem cells with multilineage differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud; Kendall, Stephen E; Moore, Daniel P; Bellum, Stephen; Cowling, Rebecca A; Nikopoulos, George N; Kubu, Chris J; Vary, Calvin; Verdi, Joseph M

    2004-09-01

    Reports of non-neural differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) have been challenged by alternative explanations for expanded differentiation potentials. In an attempt to demonstrate the plasticity of NSC, neurospheres were generated from single retrovirally labeled embryonic cortical precursors. In a defined serum-free insulin-containing media, 40% of the neurospheres contained both myogenic and neurogenic differentiated progeny. The number of NSCs displaying multilineage differentiation potential declines through gestation but does exist in the adult animal. In this system, insulin appears to function as a survival and dose-dependent myogenic differentiation signal for multilineage NSCs (MLNSC). MLNSC-derived cardiomyocytes contract synchronously, respond to sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation, and regenerate injured heart tissues. These studies provide support for the hypothesis that MLNSCs exist throughout the lifetime of the animal, and potentially provide a population of stem cells for cell-based regenerative medicine strategies inside and outside of the nervous system.

  14. T follicular helper cell differentiation, function, and roles in disease

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Summary Follicular helper T (Tfh) cells are specialized providers of T cell help to B cells, and are essential for germinal center formation, affinity maturation, and the development of most high affinity antibodies and memory B cells. Tfh cell differentiation is a multi-stage, multi-factorial process involving B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) and other transcription factors. This article reviews understanding of Tfh cell biology, including their differentiation, migration, transcriptional regulation, and B cell help functions. Tfh cells are critical components of many protective immune responses against pathogens. As such, there is strong interest in harnessing Tfh cells to improve vaccination strategies. Tfh cells also have roles in a range of other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Overall, there have been dramatic advances in this young field, but there is much to be learned about Tfh cell biology in the interest of applying that knowledge to biomedical needs. PMID:25367570

  15. Secreted phospholipase A2-IIA-induced a phenotype of activated microglia in BV-2 cells requires epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation and proHB-EGF shedding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of microglia, the primary component of the innate immune response in the brain, is a hallmark of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other pathological conditions such as stroke or CNS infection. In response to a variety of insults, microglial cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines that are often involved in neuronal injury, and play an important role in the recognition, engulfment, and clearance of apoptotic cells and/or invading microbes. Secreted phospholipase A2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA), an enzyme that interacts with cells involved in the systemic immune/inflammatory response, has been found up-regulated in the cerebrospinal fluid and brain of AD patients. However, despite several approaches, its functions in mediating CNS inflammation remain unknown. In the present study, the role of sPLA2-IIA was examined by investigating its direct effects on microglial cells. Methods Primary and immortalized microglial cells were stimulated by sPLA2-IIA in order to characterize the cytokine-like actions of the phospholipase. The hallmarks of activated microglia analyzed include: mitogenic response, phagocytic capabilities and induction of inflammatory mediators. In addition, we studied several of the potential molecular mechanisms involved in those events. Results The direct exposure of microglial cells to sPLA2-IIA stimulated, in a time- and dose-dependent manner, their phagocytic and proliferative capabilities. sPLA2-IIA also triggered the synthesis of the inflammatory proteins COX-2 and TNFα. In addition, EGFR phosphorylation and shedding of the membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (pro-HB-EGF) ectodomain, as well as a rapid activation/phosphorylation of the classical survival proteins ERK, P70S6K and rS6 were induced upon sPLA2-IIA treatment. We further demonstrated that the presence of an EGFR inhibitor (AG1478), a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (GM6001), an ADAM

  16. A molecular switch for initiating cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Maite; Sauer, Michael; Muñoz, Alfonso; Zouhar, Jan; Ordóñez, Angel; van de Ven, Wilhelmina T G; Caro, Elena; de la Paz Sánchez, María; Raikhel, Natasha V; Gutiérrez, Crisanto; Sánchez-Serrano, José J; Rojo, Enrique

    2011-06-21

    The onset of differentiation entails modifying the gene expression state of cells, to allow activation of developmental programs that are maintained repressed in the undifferentiated precursor cells [1, 2]. This requires a mechanism to change gene expression on a genome-scale. Recent evidence suggests that in mammalian stem cells, derepression of developmental regulators during differentiation involves a shift from stalled to productive elongation of their transcripts [3-5], but factors mediating this shift have not been identified and the evidence remains correlative. We report the identification of the MINIYO (IYO) gene, a positive regulator of transcriptional elongation that is essential for cells to initiate differentiation in Arabidopsis. IYO interacts with RNA polymerase II and the Elongator complex and is required to sustain global levels of transcriptional elongation activity, specifically in differentiating tissues. Accordingly, IYO is expressed in embryos, meristems, and organ primordia and not in mature tissues. Moreover, differential subcellular protein distribution further refines the domain of IYO function by directing nuclear accumulation, and thus its transcriptional activity, to cells initiating differentiation. Importantly, IYO overexpression induces premature cell differentiation and leads to meristem termination phenotypes. These findings identify IYO as a necessary and sufficient factor for initiating differentiation in Arabidopsis and suggest that the targeted nuclear accumulation of IYO functions as a transcriptional switch for this fate transition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas with Plasmacytic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Charles M; Smith, Lauren B

    2016-03-01

    B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation are a diverse group of entities with extremely variable morphologic features. Diagnostic challenges can arise in differentiating lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma from marginal zone lymphoma and other low-grade B-cell lymphomas. In addition, plasmablastic lymphomas can be difficult to distinguish from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or other high-grade lymphomas. Judicious use of immunohistochemical studies and molecular testing can assist in appropriate classification.

  18. Directed stem cell differentiation: the role of physical forces.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Liu, Li J; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2010-04-01

    A number of factors contribute to the control of stem cell fate. In particular, the evidence for how physical forces control the stem cell differentiation program is now accruing. In this review, the authors discuss the types of physical forces: mechanical forces, cell shape, extracellular matrix geometry/properties, and cell-cell contacts and morphogenic factors, which evidence suggests play a role in influencing stem cell fate.

  19. The Effect of Spaceflight on Cartilage Cell Cycle and Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Stephen B.; Stiner, Dalina; Telford, William G.

    2000-01-01

    In vivo studies have shown that spaceflight results in loss of bone and muscle. In an effort to understand the mechanisms of these changes, cell cultures of cartilage, bone and muscle have been subjected to spaceflight to study the microgravity effects on differentiated cells. However it now seems possible that the cell differentiation process itself may be the event(s) most affected by spaceflight. For example, osteoblast-like cells have been shown to have reduced cellular activity in microgravity due to an underdifferentiated state (Carmeliet, et al, 1997). And reduced human lymphocyte growth in spaceflight was related to increased apoptosis (Lewis, et al, 1998). Which brings us to the question of whether reduced cellular activity in space is due to an effect on the differentiated cell, an effect on the cell cycle and cell proliferation, or an effect on cell death. This question has not been specifically addressed on previous flights and was the question behind die present study.

  20. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  1. Regulation of cell differentiation by Eph receptor and ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David G

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that in addition to having major roles in morphogenesis, in some tissues Eph receptor and ephrin signaling regulates the differentiation of cells. In one mode of deployment, cell contact dependent Eph-ephrin activation induces a distinct fate of cells at the interface of their expression domains, for example in early ascidian embryos and in the vertebrate hindbrain. In another mode, overlapping Eph receptor and ephrin expression underlies activation within a cell population, which promotes or inhibits cell differentiation in bone remodelling, neural progenitors and keratinocytes. Eph-ephrin activation also contributes to formation of the appropriate number of progenitor cells by increasing or decreasing cell proliferation. These multiple roles of Eph receptor and ephrin signaling may enable a coupling between morphogenesis and the differentiation and proliferation of cells. PMID:25482623

  2. The dynamics of DNA methylation fidelity during mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Sun, Ming-An; Li, Zejuan; Bai, Xue; Yu, Miao; Wang, Min; Liang, Liji; Shao, Xiaojian; Arnovitz, Stephen; Wang, Qianfei; He, Chuan; Lu, Xuemei; Chen, Jianjun; Xie, Hehuang

    2014-08-01

    The faithful transmission of DNA methylation patterns through cell divisions is essential for the daughter cells to retain a proper cell identity. To achieve a comprehensive assessment of methylation fidelity, we implemented a genome-scale hairpin bisulfite sequencing approach to generate methylation data for DNA double strands simultaneously. We show here that methylation fidelity increases globally during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), and is particularly high in the promoter regions of actively expressed genes and positively correlated with active histone modification marks and binding of transcription factors. The majority of intermediately (40%-60%) methylated CpG dinucleotides are hemi-methylated and have low methylation fidelity, particularly in the differentiating mESCs. While 5-hmC and 5-mC tend to coexist, there is no significant correlation between 5-hmC levels and methylation fidelity. Our findings may shed new light on our understanding of the origins of methylation variations and the mechanisms underlying DNA methylation transmission.

  3. Id2 reinforces TH1 cell differentiation and inhibits E2A to repress TFH cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Laura A.; Bélanger, Simon; Omilusik, Kyla D.; Cho, Sunglim; Scott-Browne, James P.; Nance, J. Philip; Goulding, John; Lasorella, Anna; Lu, Li-Fan; Crotty, Shane; Goldrath, Ananda W.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of T helper (TH) effector subsets is critical for host protection. E protein transcription factors and Id proteins are important arbiters of T cell development, but their role in differentiation of TH1 and TFH cells is not well understood. TH1 cells showed robust Id2 expression compared to TFH cells, and RNAi depletion of Id2 increased TFH cell frequencies. Further, TH1 cell differentiation was blocked by Id2 deficiency, leading to E protein-dependent accumulation of effector cells with mixed characteristics during viral infection and severely impaired generation of TH1 cells following Toxoplasma gondii infection. The TFH-defining transcriptional repressor Bcl6 bound the Id2 locus, providing a mechanism for the bimodal Id2 expression and reciprocal development of TH1 and TFH cell fates. PMID:27213691

  4. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Fibronectin and stem cell differentiation – lessons from chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purva; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an intricate network of proteins that surrounds cells and has a central role in establishing an environment that is conducive to tissue-specific cell functions. In the case of stem cells, this environment is the stem cell niche, where ECM signals participate in cell fate decisions. In this Commentary, we describe how changes in ECM composition and mechanical properties can affect cell shape and stem cell differentiation. Using chondrogenic differentiation as a model, we examine the changes in the ECM that occur before and during mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. In particular, we focus on the main ECM protein fibronectin, its temporal expression pattern during chondrogenic differentiation, its potential effects on functions of differentiating chondrocytes, and how its interactions with other ECM components might affect cartilage development. Finally, we discuss data that support the possibility that the fibronectin matrix has an instructive role in directing cells through the condensation, proliferation and/or differentiation stages of cartilage formation. PMID:22976308

  6. Vanadium compounds discriminate hepatoma and normal hepatic cells by differential regulation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Liu, Tong-Tong; Fu, Ying; Wang, Kui; Yang, Xiao-Gai

    2010-09-01

    Our previous study indicated that vanadium compounds can block cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in human hepatoma HepG2 cells via a highly activated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal. To explore their differential action on normal cells, we investigated the response of an immortalized hepatic cell line, L02 cells. The results demonstrated that a higher concentration of vanadium compounds was needed to inhibit L02 proliferation, which was associated with S and G2/M cell cycle arrest. In addition, in contrast to insignificant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HepG2 cells, all of the vanadium compounds resulted significant increases in both O2.- and H2O2 levels in L02 cells. At the same time, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as cell division control protein 2 homolog (Cdc2) were found to be highly phosphorylated, which could be counteracted with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The current study also demonstrated that both the ERK and the JNK pathways contributed to the cell cycle arrest induced by vanadium compounds in L02 cells. More importantly, it was found that although NAC can ameliorate the cytotoxicity of vanadium compounds in L02 cells, it did not decrease their cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. It thus shed light on the potential therapeutic applications of vanadium compounds with antioxidants as synergistic agents to reduce their toxicities in human normal cells without affecting their antitumor activities in cancer cells.

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  8. Cisplatin impaired adipogenic differentiation of adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Wen, Yao-Tseng; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2017-02-03

    Adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) were isolated from the adipose tissue and can be induced in vitro to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, myocytes, neurons and other cell types. Cisplatin is a commonly used chemotherapy drug for cancer patients. However, the effects of cisplatin on ASC remain elusive. This study found that high-concentration cisplatin affects the viability of ASCs. First, IC50 concentration of cisplatin was evaluated. Proliferation of ASCs assessed by XTT method decreased immediately after cisplatin treatment with various concentrations. ASCs maintained mesenchymal stem cells surface markers evaluating by flow cytometry after cisplatin treatment. Upon differentiation by adding specific chemicals, a significant decrease in adipogenic differentiation (by Oil red staining) and osteogenic differentiation (by Alizarin red staining), and significant chondrogenic differentiation (by Alcian blue staining) were found after cisplatin treatment. Simultaneously, qRT-PCR was also used for evaluating the specific gene expressions after various differentiations. Finally, ASCs from one donor who had received cisplatin showed significantly decreased adipogenic differentiation but increased osteogenic differentiation compared with ASCs derived from one healthy donor. In conclusion, cisplatin affects the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs both in vitro and in vivo via certain signaling pathway such as p53 and Fas/FasL. The differentiation abilities of ASCs should be evaluated before their transplantation for repairing cisplatin-induced tissue damage.

  9. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-04-26

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  10. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  11. Optical Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Monitoring of Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Downes, Andrew; Mouras, Rabah; Elfick, Alistair

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement for a noninvasive technique to monitor stem cell differentiation. Several candidates based on optical spectroscopy are discussed in this review: Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These techniques are briefly described, and the ability of each to distinguish undifferentiated from differentiated cells is discussed. FTIR spectroscopy has demonstrated its ability to distinguish between stem cells and their derivatives. Raman spectroscopy shows a clear reduction in DNA and RNA concentrations during embryonic stem cell differentiation (agreeing with the well-known reduction in the nucleus to cytoplasm ratio) and also shows clear increases in mineral content during differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. CARS microscopy can map these DNA, RNA, and mineral concentrations at high speed, and Mutliplex CARS spectroscopy/microscopy is highlighted as the technique with most promise for future applications. PMID:20182537

  12. Roles of microRNAs and myocardial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohide; Nishi, Hitoo; Horie, Takahiro; Ono, Koh; Hasegawa, Koji

    2012-01-01

    As drug therapy is of limited efficacy in the treatment of heart diseases related to loss of cardiomyocytes, which have very poor division potential, regenerative medicine is expected to be a new strategy to address regenerative treatment in cardiac diseases. To achieve myocardial regeneration, elucidation of the mechanism of myocardial differentiation from stem cells is essential. Myocardial differentiation from embryonic pluripotent stem cells has been investigated worldwide, and remarkable developments such as establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells and transformation of somatic cells to cardiomyocytes have recently been made, markedly changing the strategy of regenerative medicine. At the same time, the close involvement of microRNA in the maintenance, proliferation, differentiation, and reprogramming of these stem cells has been revealed. In this report, microRNA is outlined, focusing on its role in myocardial differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks for CD4 T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response by secreting cytokines to activate target cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into at least four subsets, Th1, Th2, Th17, and inducible regulatory T cells, each with unique functions for pathogen elimination. The differentiation of these subsets is induced in response to cytokine stimulation, which is translated into Stat activation, followed by induction of master regulator transcription factors. In addition to these factors, multiple other transcription factors, both subset specific and shared, are also involved in promoting subset differentiation. This review will focus on the network of transcription factors that control CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:24839135

  14. Alpha-adrenergic blocker mediated osteoblastic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Lee, Jue Yeon; Lee, Seung Jin; Chung, Chong-Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin directly up-regulated bone metabolism at a low dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doxazocin induced osteoblastic stem cell differentiation without affecting cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This osteogenic stem cell differentiation is mediated by ERK-signal dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Recent researches have indicated a role for antihypertensive drugs including alpha- or beta-blockers in the prevention of bone loss. Some epidemiological studies reported the protective effects of those agents on fracture risk. However, there is limited information on the association with those agents especially at the mechanism of action. In the present study, we investigated the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-blocker that is clinically used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with antihypertensive medication, on the osteogenic stem cell differentiation. We found that doxazosin increased osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, detected by Alizarin red S staining and calcein. Doxazosin not only induced expression of alkaline phosphatase, type I collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin, it also resulted in increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), a MAP kinase involved in osteoblastic differentiation. Treatment with U0126, a MAP kinase inhibitor, significantly blocked doxazosin-induced osteoblastic differentiation. Unrelated to activation of osteogenic differentiation by doxazosin, we found that there were no significant changes in adipogenic differentiation or in the expression of adipose-specific genes, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, aP2, or LPL. In this report, we suggest that doxazosin has the ability to increase osteogenic cell differentiation via ERK1/2 activation in osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells, which supports the protective effects of antihypertensive drug on fracture risk and

  15. Differentiation of photoreceptor cells and morphogenetic function of biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Y A

    1974-01-01

    Photoreceptor cells of eyes in vertebrate animals have been chosen as an example to illustrate the morphogenetic function of biomembranes in differentiation of the eye outer segments -- rods and cones. Morphogenetic function of biomembranes in photoreceptor cells involves an insertion of the heterogeneous molecule of visual pigment into the original plasma membrane. Depending on some features of visual pigment in one case cones may be produced or rods as more complicated structures may be differentiated in the other one. Some evolution aspects of photoreceptor cell differentiation have also been under discussion.

  16. Chemotactic signals induce cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, M; Brachet, P; Da Silva, L H

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out with the aid of cellophane membranes demonstrate that the morphogenetic block of certain nonaggregating, "aggregateless," mutants may be overcome by diffusible factors excreted by aggregating wild-type cells. The same differentiation process into aggregation-competent cell is observed if mutant amoebae are subjected to external 3':5'-cAMP pulses imposed at 5 min intervals. Wild-type amoebae also respond to cAMP pulses, since the onset of differentiation is more precocious in pulsed than in unpulsed populations. These data suggest that chemotactic signals act as an inducer of cell differentiation. Images PMID:171655

  17. Compartmentalized function through cell differentiation in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2010-01-01

    Within the wide biodiversity that is found in the bacterial world, Cyanobacteria represents a unique phylogenetic group that is responsible for a key metabolic process in the biosphere - oxygenic photosynthesis - and that includes representatives exhibiting complex morphologies. Many cyanobacteria are multicellular, growing as filaments of cells in which some cells can differentiate to carry out specialized functions. These differentiated cells include resistance and dispersal forms as well as a metabolically specialized form that is devoted to N(2) fixation, known as the heterocyst. In this Review we address cyanobacterial intercellular communication, the supracellular structure of the cyanobacterial filament and the basic principles that govern the process of heterocyst differentiation.

  18. Dendritic cell MST1 inhibits Th17 differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunxiao; Bi, Yujing; Li, Yan; Yang, Hui; Yu, Qing; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yu; Su, Huilin; Jia, Anna; Hu, Ying; Han, Linian; Zhang, Jiangyuan; Li, Simin; Tao, Wufan; Liu, Guangwei

    2017-01-01

    Although the differentiation of CD4+T cells is widely studied, the mechanisms of antigen-presenting cell-dependent T-cell modulation are unclear. Here, we investigate the role of dendritic cell (DC)-dependent T-cell differentiation in autoimmune and antifungal inflammation and find that mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) signalling from DCs negatively regulates IL-17 producing-CD4+T helper cell (Th17) differentiation. MST1 deficiency in DCs increases IL-17 production by CD4+T cells, whereas ectopic MST1 expression in DCs inhibits it. Notably, MST1-mediated DC-dependent Th17 differentiation regulates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and antifungal immunity. Mechanistically, MST1-deficient DCs promote IL-6 secretion and regulate the activation of IL-6 receptor α/β and STAT3 in CD4+T cells in the course of inducing Th17 differentiation. Activation of the p38 MAPK signal is responsible for IL-6 production in MST1-deficient DCs. Thus, our results define the DC MST1–p38MAPK signalling pathway in directing Th17 differentiation. PMID:28145433

  19. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  20. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-02-26

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions.

  1. Structural properties of scaffolds: Crucial parameters towards stem cells differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Tian, Lingling; Shamirzaei-Jeshvaghani, Elham; Dehghani, Leila; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life-sciences for regeneration of damaged tissues. Stem cells have attracted much interest in tissue engineering as a cell source due to their ability to proliferate in an undifferentiated state for prolonged time and capability of differentiating to different cell types after induction. Scaffolds play an important role in tissue engineering as a substrate that can mimic the native extracellular matrix and the properties of scaffolds have been shown to affect the cell behavior such as the cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Here, we focus on the recent reports that investigated the various aspects of scaffolds including the materials used for scaffold fabrication, surface modification of scaffolds, topography and mechanical properties of scaffolds towards stem cells differentiation effect. We will present a more detailed overview on the effect of mechanical properties of scaffolds on stem cells fate. PMID:26029344

  2. Muse Cells Derived from Dermal Tissues Can Differentiate into Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ting; Zhang, Ru-Zhi; Yang, Yu-Hua; Liu, Qi; Li, Di; Pan, Xiao-Ru

    2017-02-07

    The objective of the authors has been to obtain multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring cells (Muse cells) from primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts, identify their pluripotency, and detect their ability to differentiate into melanocytes. The distribution of SSEA-3-positive cells in human scalp skin was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the distribution of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA-3-positive cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, hKlf4, and Nanog mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses and Western blots, respectively. These Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes in differentiation medium. The SSEA-3-positive cells were scattered in the basement membrane zone and the dermis, with comparatively more in the sebaceous glands, vascular and sweat glands, as well as the outer root sheath of hair follicles, the dermal papillae, and the hair bulbs. Muse cells, which have the ability to self-renew, were obtained from scalp dermal fibroblasts by flow cytometry sorting with an anti-SSEA-3 antibody. The results of RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Klf4 mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were significantly different from their parental dermal fibroblasts. Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes when cultured in melanocyte differentiation medium, and the Muse cell-derived melanocytes expressed the melanocyte-specific marker HMB45. Muse cells could be obtained by flow cytometry from primary cultures of scalp dermal fibroblasts, which possessed the ability of pluripotency and self-renewal, and could differentiate into melanocytes in vitro.

  3. Serum-Induced Differentiation of Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David A.; Liu, Yang; Kam, Wendy R.; Ding, Juan; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Hatton, Mark P.; Liu, Shaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesize that culturing immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells in serum-containing medium will induce their differentiation. The purpose of this investigation was to begin to test our hypothesis, and explore the impact of serum on gene expression and lipid accumulation in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. Immortalized and primary human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured in the presence or absence of serum. Cells were evaluated for lysosome and lipid accumulation, polar and neutral lipid profiles, and gene expression. Results. Our results support our hypothesis that serum stimulates the differentiation of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. This serum-induced effect is associated with a significant increase in the expression of genes linked to cell differentiation, epithelium development, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and lysosomes, and a significant decrease in gene activity related to the cell cycle, mitochondria, ribosomes, and translation. These cellular responses are accompanied by an accumulation of lipids within lysosomes, as well as alterations in the fatty acid content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Of particular importance, our results show that the molecular and biochemical changes of immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells during differentiation are analogous to those of primary cells. Conclusions. Overall, our findings indicate that immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells may serve as an ideal preclinical model to identify factors that control cellular differentiation in the meibomian gland. PMID:24867579

  4. The integration of T cell migration, differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Masopust, David; Schenkel, Jason M

    2013-05-01

    T cells function locally. Accordingly, T cells' recognition of antigen, their subsequent activation and differentiation, and their role in the processes of infection control, tumour eradication, autoimmunity, allergy and alloreactivity are intrinsically coupled with migration. Recent discoveries revise our understanding of the regulation and patterns of T cell trafficking and reveal limitations in current paradigms. Here, we review classic and emerging concepts, highlight the challenge of integrating new observations with existing T cell classification schemes and summarize the heuristic framework provided by viewing T cell differentiation and function first through the prism of migration.

  5. Regulating myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells using thermosensitive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanyi; Li, Zhenqing; Li, Xiaofei; Fan, Zhaobo; Liu, Zhenguo; Xie, Xiaoyun; Guan, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Stem cell therapy has potential to regenerate skeletal muscle tissue in ischemic limb. However, the delivered stem cells experience low rate of myogenic differentiation. Employing injectable hydrogels as stem cell carriers may enhance the myogenic differentiation as their modulus may be tailored to induce the differentiation. Yet current approaches used to manipulate hydrogel modulus often simultaneously vary other properties that also affect stem cell differentiation, such as chemical structure, composition and water content. Thus it is challenging to demonstrate the decoupled effect of hydrogel modulus on stem cell differentiation. In this report, we decoupled the hydrogel modulus from chemical structure, composition, and water content using injectable and thermosensitive hydrogels. The hydrogels were synthesized from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), acrylic acid (AAc), and degradable macromer 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-oligomer [oligolatide, oligohydroxybutyrate, or oligo(trimethylene carbonate)]. We found that using the same monomer composition and oligomer chemical structure but different oligomer length can independently vary hydrogel modulus. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were encapsulated in the hydrogels with elastic expansion moduli of 11, 20, and 40 kPa, respectively. After 14 days of culture, significant myogenic differentiation was achieved for the hydrogel with elastic expansion modulus of 20 kPa, as judged from both the gene and protein expression. In addition, MSCs exhibited an elastic expansion modulus-dependent proliferation rate. The most significant proliferation was observed in the hydrogel with elastic expansion modulus of 40 kPa. These results demonstrate that the developed injectable and thermosensitive hydrogels with suitable modulus has the potential to deliver stem cells into ischemic limb for enhanced myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration. Stem cell therapy for skeletal muscle regeneration in ischemic limb

  6. Differentiation of dental pulp stem cells into neuron-like cells in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Kermani, Shabnam; Zainol Abidin, Intan Zarina; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya; Yamamoto, Zulham; Senafi, Sahidan; Zainal Ariffin, Zaidah; Abdul Razak, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp tissue contains dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Dental pulp cells (also known as dental pulp-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are capable of differentiating into multilineage cells including neuron-like cells. The aim of this study was to examine the capability of DPSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells without using any reagents or growth factors. DPSCs were isolated from teeth extracted from 6- to 8-week-old mice and maintained in complete medium. The cells from the fourth passage were induced to differentiate by culturing in medium without serum or growth factors. RT-PCR molecular analysis showed characteristics of Cd146(+) , Cd166(+) , and Cd31(-) in DPSCs, indicating that these cells are mesenchymal stem cells rather than hematopoietic stem cells. After 5 days of neuronal differentiation, the cells showed neuron-like morphological changes and expressed MAP2 protein. The activation of Nestin was observed at low level prior to differentiation and increased after 5 days of culture in differentiation medium, whereas Tub3 was activated only after 5 days of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation of the differentiated cells decreased in comparison to that of the control cells. Dental pulp stem cells are induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when cultured in serum- and growth factor-free medium.

  7. [Research status of mechanical stimulation of stem cells differentiation in stem cells microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Cui, Shuangshuang; Zhao, Wenjun; Yu, Shunlu; Xing, Guosheng; Zhao, Fengyi

    2014-01-01

    To review the relative researches about mechanical stimulation of stem cells differentiation in stem cells microenvironment in vitro. The recent related literature about stem cells differentiation in vitro was reviewed and summarized. The mechanical loads (including shear stress, mechanical strain, and stress), substrates stiffness, substrates nanotopography, and cell shape were the 4 important aspects of mechanical factors regulating stem cells differentiation. The mechanical stimulation can simulate the in vivo microenvironment, which can alter the size, shape, alignment, and differentiation state of stem cells, can change the expression of their differentiation markers, and can affect the lineage commitment of stem cells. Mechanical stimulation play an important role in regulating stem cells differentiation and cells morphology in addition to chemical and biological factors.

  8. Reference proteome of highly purified human Th1 cells reveals strong effects on metabolism and protein ubiquitination upon differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Massimiliano; Rockstroh, Maxie; Schuster, Maj; Rossetti, Grazisa; Moro, Monica; Crosti, Mariacristina; Tomm, Janina M

    2015-11-01

    The differentiation of human CD4(+) T cells into T helper cell subtypes and regulatory T cells is crucial to the immune response. Among subtypes, Th1 cells are dominant, representing approximately 50% of all lymphocytes. Thus far, most global proteomic studies have used only partially purified T helper cell subpopulations and/or have employed artificial protocols for inducing specific T helper cell subtypes and/or used gel-based approaches. These studies have shed light on molecular details of certain aspects of the proteome; nevertheless a global analysis of high purity primary naïve and Th1 cells by LC-MS/MS is required to provide a reference dataset for proteome-based T cell subtype characterization. The utilization of highly purified Th1 cells for a global proteome assessment and the bioinformatic comparison to naïve cells reveals changes in cell metabolism and the ubiquitination pathway upon T cell differentiation. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001066 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001066). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Stem cell differentiation: Post-degradation forces kick in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Ludovic G.; Engler, Adam J.

    2013-05-01

    Stem cells alter their morphology and differentiate to particular lineages in response to biophysical cues from the surrounding matrix. When the matrix is degradable, however, cell fate is morphology-independent and is directed by the traction forces that the cells actively apply after they have degraded the matrix.

  10. Osteogenic differentiation capacity of porcine dental follicle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Ohshima, Satoshi; Yamakoshi, Yasuo; Simmer, James P; Honda, Masaki J

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM) on the osteogenic differentiation capacity and osteogenesis of dental follicle cells. Single cell-derived porcine dental follicle cells (DFC-I) obtained at the early stage of crown formation in tooth were subcultured and characterized using periodontal ligament cells (PDLC) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) as comparison cell populations. The effect of ECM constituents including collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type IV on the differentiation of DFC-1 into osteogenic-lineage cells was evaluated in vitro. In addition, the DFC-1, PDLC, and BMSC populations were compared for osteogenic capacity in vitro by Alizarin red staining and in vivo by transplantation. DFC-I showed different features from PDLC and BMSC. Different components of ECM had different effects on the differentiation of DFC-1 into osteogenic-lineage cells in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization as early- and late-stage markers of osteogenesis, respectively, supported the differentiation of DFC-1 into osteogenic-related cells in vitro. All three cell types showed equivalent osteogenic capacity in vivo at 4 weeks postoperatively. There were no statistically significant differences among the cell populations with respect to capacity for bone formation. These results suggest a potential application for dental follicle cells in bone-tissue engineering.

  11. Complex extracellular matrices promote tissue-specific stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Philp, Deborah; Chen, Silvia S; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Orenstein, Jan; Margolis, Leonid; Kleinman, Hynda K

    2005-02-01

    Most cells in tissues contact an extracellular matrix on at least one surface. These complex mixtures of interacting proteins provide structural support and biological signals that regulate cell differentiation and may be important for stem cell differentiation. In this study, we have grown a rhesus monkey embryonic stem cell line in the presence of various extracellular matrix components in monolayer, in a NASA-developed rotating wall vessel bioreactor in vitro, and subcutaneously in vivo. We find that individual components of the extracellular matrix, such as laminin-1 or collagen I, do not influence the growth or morphology of the cells. In contrast, a basement membrane extract, Matrigel, containing multiple extracellular matrix components, induces the cells within 4 days to form immature glandular- and tubular-like structures, many of which contain a lumen with polarized epithelium and microvilli. Such structures were seen in vitro when the cells were grown in the bioreactor and when the cells were injected into mice. These tubular- and glandular-like structures were polarized epithelia based on immunostaining for laminin and cytokeratin. The cell aggregates and tumors also contained additional mixed populations of cells, including mesenchymal cells and neuronal cells, based on immunostaining with vimentin and neuronal markers. An extract of cartilage, containing multiple cartilage matrix components, promoted chondrogenesis in vivo where alcian blue-stained cartilage nodules could be observed. Some of these nodules stained with von Kossa, indicating that they had formed calcified cartilage. We conclude that extracellular matrices can promote the differentiation of embryonic stem cells into differentiated cells and structures that are similar to the tissue from which the matrix is derived. Such preprogramming of cell differentiation with extracellular matrices may be useful in targeting stem cells to repair specific damaged organs.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 both sheds cell surface neuronal glial antigen 2 (NG2) proteoglycan on macrophages and governs the response to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Tasuku; Remacle, Albert G; Angert, Mila; Shubayev, Igor; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Liu, Huaqing; Dolkas, Jennifer; Chernov, Andrei V; Strongin, Alex Y; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-02-06

    Neuronal glial antigen 2 (NG2) is an integral membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed by vascular pericytes, macrophages (NG2-Mφ), and progenitor glia of the nervous system. Herein, we revealed that NG2 shedding and axonal growth, either independently or jointly, depended on the pericellular remodeling events executed by membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14). Using purified NG2 ectodomain constructs, individual MMPs, and primary NG2-Mφ cultures, we demonstrated for the first time that MMP-14 performed as an efficient and unconventional NG2 sheddase and that NG2-Mφ infiltrated into the damaged peripheral nervous system. We then characterized the spatiotemporal relationships among MMP-14, MMP-2, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 in sciatic nerve. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2-free MMP-14 was observed in the primary Schwann cell cultures using the inhibitory hydroxamate warhead-based MP-3653 fluorescent reporter. In teased nerve fibers, MMP-14 translocated postinjury toward the nodes of Ranvier and its substrates, laminin and NG2. Inhibition of MMP-14 activity using the selective, function-blocking DX2400 human monoclonal antibody increased the levels of regeneration-associated factors, including laminin, growth-associated protein 43, and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 3, thereby promoting sensory axon regeneration after nerve crush. Concomitantly, DX2400 therapy attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity associated with nerve crush in rats. Together, our findings describe a new model in which MMP-14 proteolysis regulates the extracellular milieu and presents a novel therapeutic target in the damaged peripheral nervous system and neuropathic pain.

  13. Cross talk with hematopoietic cells regulates the endothelial progenitor cell differentiation of CD34 positive cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sang-Mo; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hun; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kang, Song-Hwa; Yoo, So-Young; Hong, Jong-Kyu; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Sun-Jin; Kim, Hwi-Gon; Asahara, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vascular regeneration, the specific interactions between EPCs and hematopoietic cells remain unclear. In EPC colony forming assays, we first demonstrated that the formation of EPC colonies was drastically increased in the coculture of CD34+ and CD34- cells, and determined the optimal concentrations of CD34+ cells and CD34- cells for spindle-shaped EPC differentiation. Functionally, the coculture of CD34+ and CD34- cells resulted in a significant enhancement of adhesion, tube formation, and migration capacity compared with culture of CD34+ cells alone. Furthermore, blood flow recovery and capillary formation were remarkably increased by the coculture of CD34+ and CD34- cells in a murine hind-limb ischemia model. To elucidate further the role of hematopoietic cells in EPC differentiation, we isolated different populations of hematopoietic cells. T lymphocytes (CD3+) markedly accelerated the early EPC status of CD34+ cells, while macrophages (CD11b+) or megakaryocytes (CD41+) specifically promoted large EPC colonies. Our results suggest that specific populations of hematopoietic cells play a role in the EPC differentiation of CD34+ cells, a finding that may aid in the development of a novel cell therapy strategy to overcome the quantitative and qualitative limitations of EPC therapy.

  14. Cross Talk with Hematopoietic Cells Regulates the Endothelial Progenitor Cell Differentiation of CD34 Positive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kang, Song-Hwa; Yoo, So-Young; Hong, Jong-Kyu; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Sun-Jin; Kim, Hwi-Gon; Asahara, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the crucial role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vascular regeneration, the specific interactions between EPCs and hematopoietic cells remain unclear. Methods In EPC colony forming assays, we first demonstrated that the formation of EPC colonies was drastically increased in the coculture of CD34+ and CD34− cells, and determined the optimal concentrations of CD34+ cells and CD34− cells for spindle-shaped EPC differentiation. Results Functionally, the coculture of CD34+ and CD34− cells resulted in a significant enhancement of adhesion, tube formation, and migration capacity compared with culture of CD34+ cells alone. Furthermore, blood flow recovery and capillary formation were remarkably increased by the coculture of CD34+ and CD34− cells in a murine hind-limb ischemia model. To elucidate further the role of hematopoietic cells in EPC differentiation, we isolated different populations of hematopoietic cells. T lymphocytes (CD3+) markedly accelerated the early EPC status of CD34+ cells, while macrophages (CD11b+) or megakaryocytes (CD41+) specifically promoted large EPC colonies. Conclusion Our results suggest that specific populations of hematopoietic cells play a role in the EPC differentiation of CD34+ cells, a finding that may aid in the development of a novel cell therapy strategy to overcome the quantitative and qualitative limitations of EPC therapy. PMID:25166961

  15. Dedifferentiated fat cells differentiate into osteoblasts in titanium fiber mesh.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Naotaka; Momota, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Ando, Kayoko; Omasa, Takeshi; Kotani, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells rapidly differentiate into osteoblasts under three-dimensional culture conditions. However, it has not been demonstrated that DFAT cells can differentiate into osteoblasts in a rigid scaffold consisting of titanium fiber mesh (TFM). We examined the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation ability of DFAT cells using TFM as a scaffold. DFAT cells derived from rabbit subcutaneous fat were seeded into TFM and cultured in osteogenic medium containing dexamethasone, L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and β-glycerophosphate for 14 days. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, well-spread cells covered the titanium fibers on day 3, and appeared to increase in number from day 3 to 7. Numerous globular accretions were found and almost completely covered the fibers on day 14. Cell proliferation, as measured by DNA content in the TFM, was significantly higher on day 7 compared with that of day 1. Osteocalcin and calcium content in the TFM were significantly higher on day 14 compared to those of days 1, 3, and 7, indicating DFAT cells differentiated into osteoblasts. We theorize that globular accretions observed in SEM analysis may be calcified matrix resulting from osteocalcin secreted by osteoblasts binding calcium contained in fetal bovine serum. In this study, we demonstrated that DFAT cells differentiate into osteoblasts and deposit mineralized matrices in TFM. Therefore, the combination of DFAT cells and TFM may be an attractive option for bone tissue engineering.

  16. The organelle of differentiation in embryos: the cell state splitter.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Natalie K; Gordon, Richard

    2016-03-10

    The cell state splitter is a membraneless organelle at the apical end of each epithelial cell in a developing embryo. It consists of a microfilament ring and an intermediate filament ring subtending a microtubule mat. The microtubules and microfilament ring are in mechanical opposition as in a tensegrity structure. The cell state splitter is bistable, perturbations causing it to contract or expand radially. The intermediate filament ring provides metastability against small perturbations. Once this snap-through organelle is triggered, it initiates signal transduction to the nucleus, which changes gene expression in one of two readied manners, causing its cell to undergo a step of determination and subsequent differentiation. The cell state splitter also triggers the cell state splitters of adjacent cells to respond, resulting in a differentiation wave. Embryogenesis may be represented then as a bifurcating differentiation tree, each edge representing one cell type. In combination with the differentiation waves they propagate, cell state splitters explain the spatiotemporal course of differentiation in the developing embryo. This review is excerpted from and elaborates on "Embryogenesis Explained" (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, 2016).

  17. The Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Lung Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells in Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mokhber Dezfouli, Mohammad Reza; Chaleshtori, Sirous Sadeghian; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Tavanaeimanesh, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Tahamtani, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    Lung diseases cause great morbidity and mortality. The choice of effective medical treatment is limited and the number of lung diseases are difficult to treat with current treatments. The embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to differentiate into cell types of all three germinal layers, including lung epithelial cells. So they can be a potential source for new cell therapies for hereditary or acquired diseases of the airways and lungs. One method for treatment of lung diseases is cell therapy and the use of ESCs that can replace the damaged epithelial and endothelial cells. Progress using ESCs has developed slowly for lung regeneration because differentiation of lung cells from ESCs is more difficult as compared to differentiation of other cells. The review studies the therapeutic effects of differentiated lung cells from embryonic stem cells in lung diseases. There are few studies of differentiation of ESCs into a lineage of respiratory and then investigation of this cell in experimental model of lung diseases.

  18. Differentiation of Spermatogonia Stem Cells into Functional Mature Neurons Characterized with Differential Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Bojnordi, Maryam Nazm; Azizi, Hossein; Skutella, Thomas; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh; Shojaei, Amir; Hamidabadi, Hatef Ghasemi

    2016-09-19

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, ESCs are not usable clinically due to immunological and ethical limitations. The identification of an alternative safe cell source opens novel options via autologous transplantation in neuro-regeneration circumventing these problems. Here, we examined the neurogenic capacity of embryonic stem-like cells (ES-like cells) derived from the testis using neural growth factor inducers and utilized them to generate functional mature neurons. The neuronal differentiation of ES-like cells is induced in three stages. Stage 1 is related to embryoid body (EB) formation. To induce neuroprogenitor cells, EBs were cultured in the presence of retinoic acid, N2 supplement and fibroblast growth factor followed by culturing in a neurobasal medium containing B27, N2 supplements for additional 10 days, to allow the maturation and development of neuronal progenitor cells. The neurogenic differentiation was confirmed by immunostaining for markers of mature neurons. The differentiated neurons were positive for Tuj1 and Tau1. Real-time PCR dates indicated the expression of Nestin and Neuro D (neuroprogenitor markers) in induced cells at the second stage of the differentiation protocol. The differentiated mature neurons exhibited the specific neuron markers Map2 and β-tubulin. The functional maturity of neurons was confirmed by an electrophysiological analysis of passive and active neural membrane properties. These findings indicated a differentiation capacity of ES-like cells derived from the testis to functionally mature neurons, which proposes them as a novel cell source for neuroregenerative medicine.

  19. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The selective radiosensitivity of sIgM >> sIgD marginal zone B cells is associated with the selective loss of B cell function. The simultaneous restoration of impaired function and recovery of these cells with time supports this premise. B cell recovery, delayed one week after irradiation, is in progress at two weeks, and virtually complete by three weeks. XID mice reveal similar recovery kinetics although there are fewer recovering cells and these bear reduced levels of Ia. This observation represents additional evidence that xid B cells are distinct from those of normal mice. The simultaneous loss, and concurrent recovery, of sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness in irradiated mice suggests the existence of a unique B cell subpopulation possessing both phenotypes. Additional support for this hypothesis is provided by demonstrating that splenocytes, depleted of IgD{sup +} cells adoptively reconstitute this response in XID mice. The peritoneal B cell pool, which, compared to the spleen, consist of increased numbers of sIgM >> sIgD B cells, is shown to be a source of radiosensitive B cells that are TI-2 responsive. These observations represent additional evidence for an association between sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness.

  20. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  1. Chemical compound 31002 stimulates cardiomyogenic differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Son, Mi-Young; Kang, Youngkuk; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kim, Hae Rim; Won, Youngsuk; Yoon, Wonkee; Kim, Hyoung-Chin

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are an emerging source for cell-based therapies aimed at repairing damaged organ tissues; however, the efficiency of directed differentiation is low and refinement of differentiation protocols is hampered by incomplete understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. To find new compounds which can improve the efficiency of directed differentiation of ESCs to cardiomyocytes, we screened several thousand chemical compounds and identified a promising group. All of the compounds found have a common structure of 1H-pyrrole,2,2'-(phenylmethylene)bis. Here we report the potential mechanism of action for 31002 which showed the strongest activity among the compounds selected. In the presence of 31002, 15 times more cardiomyocytes differentiated from ESCs, i.e., 3.5% to 52% of total differentiated cells. Moreover, the cardiomyocytes showed functional characteristics including rhythmic beating and marker gene expression. 31002 inhibited the down-regulation of genes related to the three germ layers in the late stage of ESCs differentiation, implying that 31002 supports a continuous fate commitment of undifferentiated ESCs to the cardiac lineage by prolonging the three germ layer stages. Therefore, compounds in this group, including 31002, might be useful as directed cardiomyogenic differentiation-inducers to produce cells for use in cell therapy aimed at restoring damaged heart tissue. PMID:21998609

  2. Differential spheroid formation by oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carlin; Lee, Casey; Atakilit, Amha; Siu, Amanda; Ramos, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) make up 96% of all oral cancers. Most laboratory SCC studies grow cells as a monolayer, which does not accurately represent the disease in vivo. We used a more relevant multicellular spheroid (MCS) model to study this disease. The SCC9β6KDFyn cell line, which expresses full-length β6 and a kinase dead Fyn formed the largest MCS. Cell adhesive properties are dynamic and N-cadherin was increased in the largest MCS. c-Raf mediates the survival of tumor cells and was consistently expressed both in monolayers and in the MCS by SCC9β6D1 cells which lack the β6 cytoplasmic tail and, do not activate Fyn. SCC9β6KDFyn cells also express high levels of c-Raf when grown as spheroids in which Fyn suppression stimulates MCS formation. Tumor microenvironment and growth patterns modulate cell behavior and suppression of Fyn kinase may promote MCS growth.

  3. Differentiation of germinal and somatic cells in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Rüdiger

    2003-12-01

    Volvox carteri is a spherical alga with a complete division of labor between around 2000 biflagellate somatic cells and 16 asexual reproductive cells (gonidia). It provides an attractive system for studying how a molecular genetic program for cell-autonomous differentiation is encoded within the genome. Three types of genes have been identified as key players in germ-soma differentiation: a set of gls genes that act in the embryo to shift cell-division planes, resulting in asymmetric divisions that set apart the large-small sister-cell pairs; a set of lag genes that act in the large gonidial initials to prevent somatic differentiation; and the regA gene, which acts in the small somatic initials to prevent reproductive development. Somatic-cell-specific expression of regA is controlled by intronic enhancer and silencer elements.

  4. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  5. Human embryonic stem cells: isolation, maintenance, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Turksen, Kursad; Troy, Tammy-Claire

    2006-01-01

    The isolation of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES) cells having the capacity to differentiate in vitro to numerous cell types generated much excitement and promise in the field of regenerative medicine. However, along with great enthusiasm came hot controversy for stem cell research and researchers alike because available hES cell lines were isolated from "excess" embryos from in vitro fertilization clinics. Despite ethical and political debates, the methods and protocols to study diverse lineages are developing. Furthermore, strategies using specific growth factor combinations, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix induction systems are being explored for directed differentiation along a desired lineage. However, there is a great need to characterize the mechanisms that control self-renewal and differentiation and a necessity to improve methodologies and develop new purification protocols for the potential future clinical application of hES cells. After the scientific and political obstacles are overcome, it is anticipated that the hES cell field will make a tremendous difference in conditions, such as burn traumas and diabetic foot ulcers, as well a number of degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myocardial infarction. In this introductory chapter, we will summarize and review recent progress in the field of hES cell differentiation protocols and discuss some of the current issues surrounding hES cell research.

  6. Mouse differentiating spermatogonia can generate germinal stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Lassalle, Bruno; Coureuil, Mathieu; Louis, Jean Paul; Le Page, Florence; Testart, Jacques; Allemand, Isabelle; Riou, Lydia; Fouchet, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    In adults, stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of many actively renewing tissues, such as haematopoietic, skin, gut and germinal tissues. These stem cells can self-renew or be committed to becoming progenitors. Stem-cell commitment is thought to be irreversible but in male and female Drosophila melanogaster, it was shown recently that differentiating germ cells can revert to functional stem cells that can restore germinal lineage. Whether progenitors are also able to generate stem cells in mammals remains unknown. Here we show that purified mouse spermatogonial progenitors committed to differentiation can generate functional germinal stem cells that can repopulate germ-cell-depleted testes when transplanted into adult mice. We found that GDNF, a key regulator of the stem-cell niche, and FGF2 are able to reprogram in vitro spermatogonial progenitors for reverse differentiation. This study supports the emerging concept that the stem-cell identity is not restricted in adults to a definite pool of cells that self-renew, but that stemness could be acquired by differentiating progenitors after tissue injury and throughout life.

  7. DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED AT LEFT CENTER, FIRE DISPATCH OFFICES 1 AND 2 AT RIGHT CENTER, UTILITY BUILDING "B" ON RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  8. Functional differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells on a chip.

    PubMed

    Giobbe, Giovanni G; Michielin, Federica; Luni, Camilla; Giulitti, Stefano; Martewicz, Sebastian; Dupont, Sirio; Floreani, Annarosa; Elvassore, Nicola

    2015-07-01

    Microengineering human "organs-on-chips" remains an open challenge. Here, we describe a robust microfluidics-based approach for the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells directly on a chip. Extrinsic signal modulation, achieved through optimal frequency of medium delivery, can be used as a parameter for improved germ layer specification and cell differentiation. Human cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes derived on chips showed functional phenotypes and responses to temporally defined drug treatments.

  9. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    PubMed

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  10. DIRECTED DIFFERENTIATION OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS INTO BLADDER TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Oottamasathien, Siam; Wang, YongQing; Williams, Karin; Franco, Omar E.; Wills, Marcia L.; Thomas, John C.; Saba, Katrina; Sharif-Afshar, Ali-Reza; Makari, John H.; Bhowmick, Neil A; DeMarco, Romano T.; Hipkens, Susan; Magnuson, Mark; Brock, John W.; Hayward, Simon W.; Pope, John C.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Manipulatable models of bladder development which interrogate specific pathways are badly needed. Such models will allow a systematic investigation of the multitude of pathologies which result from developmental defects of the urinary bladder. In the present communication, we describe a model in which mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are directed to differentiate to form bladder tissue by specific interactions with fetal bladder mesenchyme. This model allows us to visualize the various stages in the differentiation of urothelium from ES cells, including the commitment to an endodermal cell lineage, with the temporal profile characterized by examining the induction of specific endodermal transcription factors (Foxa1 and Foxa2). In addition, final functional urothelial differentiation was characterized by examining uroplakin expression. It is well established that ES cells will spontaneously develop teratomas when grown within immunocompromised mouse hosts. We determined the specific mesenchymal to ES cell ratios necessary to dictate organ-specific differentiation while completely suppressing teratomatous growth. Embryonic mesenchyme is well established as an inductive tissue which dictates organ-specific programming of epithelial tissues. The present study demonstrates that embryonic bladder mesenchyme can also steer ES cells towards developing specific endodermal derived urothelium. These approaches allow us to capture specific stages of stem cell differentiation and to better define stem cell hierarchies. PMID:17289017

  11. Sambucus williamsii induced embryonic stem cells differentiated into neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Chien-Yu; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Shyu, Woei-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    The pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into any cell type, thus making them the focus of many clinical application studies. However, the efficiency of ESCs differentiated into neurons needs to improve. In this study, we tried to increase efficiently to a neural fate in the presence of various transitional Chinese medicines through a three-step differentiation strategy. From extracts of 10 transitional Chinese medicine candidates, we determined that Sambucus williamsii (SW) extract triggers the up-regulation of Nestin and Tuj1 (neuron cells markers) gene expression levels. After determining the different concentrations of SW extract, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher than the control, 50, 100, and 400 μg/ml SW extract groups. In addition, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher and higher after each time passage (three times). We also detected the Oct4, Sox2 (stem cells markers), Tuj1, and Nestin genes expression levels by RT-PCR. In the differentiated process, Oct4 and Sox2 genes decreased while the Tuj1 and Nestin genes expression levels increased. In summary, we demonstrated that SW could induce pluripotent stem cells differentiated into neurons. Thus, SW might become a powerful material for neurons-differentiating strategies.

  12. Hematopoietic myeloid cell differentiation diminishes nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuki; Sato, Ayako; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Myeloid cell differentiation is the process by which stem cells develop into mature monocytes or granulocytes. This process is achieved by the sequential activation of variety of genes. Disruption of this process can result in immunodeficiency, bone marrow failure syndrome, or leukemia. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) translocation and can be treated by a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline. This treatment can induce leukemic cell differentiation, leading to extremely high remission rates. XAB2, a molecule involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER), is downregulated during granulocyte differentiation and shows reduced expression in NB4 APL-derived cells in vitro. Differentiation of APL by ATRA treatment reduced XAB2 expression levels in vivo. These observations suggest that cellular differentiation is associated with reduced NER activity and provides new insights into combined differentiation induction. NB4 cells were more susceptible than the immature myeloid leukemic cell lines, Kasumi-3 and Kasumi-1, to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent cisplatin.

  13. Intrinsic differentiation potential of adolescent human tendon tissue: an in-vitro cell differentiation study.

    PubMed

    de Mos, Marieke; Koevoet, Wendy J L M; Jahr, Holger; Verstegen, Monique M A; Heijboer, Marinus P; Kops, Nicole; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M; Weinans, Harrie; Verhaar, Jan A N; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2007-02-23

    Tendinosis lesions show an increase of glycosaminoglycan amount, calcifications, and lipid accumulation. Therefore, altered cellular differentiation might play a role in the etiology of tendinosis. This study investigates whether adolescent human tendon tissue contains a population of cells with intrinsic differentiation potential. Cells derived from adolescent non-degenerative hamstring tendons were characterized by immunohistochemistry and FACS-analysis. Cells were cultured for 21 days in osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic medium and phenotypical evaluation was carried out by immunohistochemical and qPCR analysis. The results were compared with the results of similar experiments on adult bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs). Tendon-derived cells stained D7-FIB (fibroblast-marker) positive, but alpha-SMA (marker for smooth muscle cells and pericytes) negative. Tendon-derived cells were 99% negative for CD34 (endothelial cell marker), and 73% positive for CD105 (mesenchymal progenitor-cell marker). In adipogenic medium, intracellular lipid vacuoles were visible and tendon-derived fibroblasts showed upregulation of adipogenic markers FABP4 (fatty-acid binding protein 4) and PPARG (peroxisome proliferative activated receptor gamma). In chondrogenic medium, some cells stained positive for collagen 2 and tendon-derived fibroblasts showed upregulation of collagen 2 and collagen 10. In osteogenic medium Von Kossa staining showed calcium deposition although osteogenic markers remained unaltered. Tendon-derived cells and BMCSs behaved largely comparable, although some distinct differences were present between the two cell populations. This study suggests that our population of explanted human tendon cells has an intrinsic differentiation potential. These results support the hypothesis that there might be a role for altered tendon-cell differentiation in the pathophysiology of tendinosis.

  14. Epigenetic control of myeloid cell differentiation, identity and function.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Vento-Tormo, Roser; Sieweke, Michael; Ballestar, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells are crucial effectors of the innate immune response and important regulators of adaptive immunity. The differentiation and activation of myeloid cells requires the timely regulation of gene expression; this depends on the interplay of a variety of elements, including transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic control involves histone modifications and DNA methylation, and is coupled to lineage-specifying transcription factors, upstream signalling pathways and external factors released in the bone marrow, blood and tissue environments. In this Review, we highlight key epigenetic events controlling myeloid cell biology, focusing on those related to myeloid cell differentiation, the acquisition of myeloid identity and innate immune memory.

  15. [Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells of adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Salyutin, R V; Zapohlska, K M; Palyanytsya, S S; Sirman, V M; Sokolov, M F

    2015-03-01

    Experimental investigation were conducted with the objective to determine a stem cells, capacity to differentiate in adipogenic direction, if they were obtained from adipose tissue. The investigation results have witnessed, that the cells, obtained from adipose tissue, are capable for a tissue-speciphic differentiation in osteogenic, chondrogenic, and, principally--in adipogenic direction, what confirms a multypotent nature of mesenchymal stem cells of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue constitutes an alternative to the bone marrow, as a source of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells, which may be applied in further investigations, concerning determination of their defense possibility for the transplanted autologous adipose tissue from the tissue resorption, made in a lipophiling way.

  16. Effect of Jagged-1 and Dll-1 on osteogenic differentiation by stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Sukarawan, Waleerat; Peetiakarawach, Karnnapas; Pavasant, Prasit; Osathanon, Thanaphum

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of Notch ligands, Jagged-1 and Dll-1, on osteogenic differentiation by stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Notch ligands were immobilized on tissue culture surface using an indirect affinity immobilization technique. Cells from the remaining of dental pulp tissues from human deciduous teeth were isolated and characterized using flow cytometry and differentiation assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic activity, osteogenic marker gene expression, and mineralization were determined using ALP assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and alizarin red staining, respectively. The isolated cells exhibited CD44, CD90, and CD105 expression but lack of CD45 expression. Further, these cells were able to differentiate toward osteogenic lineage. The upregulation of HES-1 and HEY-1 was observed in those cells on Dll-1 and Jagged-1 coated surface. The significant increase of ALP activity and mineralization was noted in those cells seeded on Jagged-1 surface and these results were attenuated when cells were pretreated with gamma secretase inhibitor. The significant upregulation of ALP and collagen type I gene expression was also observed in those cells seeded on Jagged-1 surface. The inconsistent Dll-1 induced osteogenic differentiation was found and high Dll-1 immobilized dose (50 nM) slightly enhanced alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity. However, the statistical significant difference was not obtained as compared to the hFc control. The surface immobilization of Notch ligands, Jagged-1 and Dll-1, likely to enhance osteogenic differentiation of SHEDs. However, Jagged-1 had more ability in enhancing osteogenic differentiation than Dll-1 in our model. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Uric Acid Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation and Inhibits Adipogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-Zhang; Chen, Zhi; Hou, Cang-Long; Tang, Yi-Xing; Wang, Fei; Fu, Qing-Ge

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effect of uric acid on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). The hBMSCs were isolated from bone marrow of six healthy donors. Cell morphology was observed by microscopy and cell surface markers (CD44 and CD34) of hBMSCs were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Cell morphology and immunofluorescence analysis showed that hBMSCs were successfully isolated from bone marrow. The number of hBMSCs in uric acid groups was higher than that in the control group on day 3, 4, and 5. Alizarin red staining showed that number of calcium nodules in uric acid groups was more than that of the control group. Oil red-O staining showed that the number of red fat vacuoles decreased with the increased concentration of uric acid. In summary, uric acid could promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs while inhibit adipogenic differentiation of hBMSCs.

  18. Retinoblastoma protein regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and endoreduplication in plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-A; Ahn, Joon-Woo; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Kim, Su Jung; Kim, Ju-Kon; Kim, Woo Taek; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2005-04-01

    Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) plays a key role in cell cycle control, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in animals. In this study, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to investigate the cellular functions of Rb in higher plants. VIGS of NbRBR1, which encodes the Nicotiana benthamiana Rb homolog, resulted in growth retardation and abnormal organ development. At the cellular level, Rb suppression caused prolonged cell proliferation in tissues that are normally differentiated, which indicates that Rb is a negative regulator of plant cell division. Furthermore, differentiation of the epidermal pavement cells and trichomes was partially retarded, and stomatal clusters formed in the epidermis, likely due to uncontrolled cell division of stomata precursor cells. Rb suppression also caused extra DNA replication in endoreduplicating leaf cells, suggesting a role of Rb in the endocycle. These Rb phenotypes were accompanied by stimulated transcription of E2F and E2F-regulated S-phase genes. Thus, disruption of Rb function in plants leads to ectopic cell division in major organs that correlates with a delay in cell differentiation as well as increased endoreduplication, which indicates that Rb coordinates these processes in plant organ development.

  19. Hollow fiber culture accelerates differentiation of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xudong; Zhang, Guoliang; Shen, Chong; Yin, Jian; Meng, Qin

    2013-08-01

    Caco-2 cells usually require 21 days of culture for developing sufficient differentiation in traditional two-dimensional Transwell culture, deviating far away from the quick differentiation of enterocytes in vivo. The recently proposed three-dimensional cultures of Caco-2 cells, though imitating the villi/crypt-like microstructure of intestinal epithelium, showed no effect on accelerating the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. In this study, a novel culture of Caco-2 cells on hollow fiber bioreactor was applied to morphologically mimic the human small intestine lumen for accelerating the expression of intestine functions. The porous hollow fibers of polyethersulfone (PES), a suitable membrane material for Caco-2 cell culture, successfully promoted cells to form confluent monolayer on the inner surface. The differentiated functions of Caco-2 cells, represented by alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase, and P-glycoprotein activity, were greatly higher in a 10-day hollow fiber culture than in a 21-day Transwell culture. Moreover, the Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers expressed higher F-actin and zonula occludens-1 protein than those on Transwell culture, indicative of an increased mechanical stress in Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers. The accelerated differentiation of Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers was unassociated with membrane chemical composition and surface roughness, but could be stimulated by hollow fiber configuration, since PES flat membranes with either rough or smooth surface failed to enhance the differentiation of Caco-2. Therefore, the accelerated expression of Caco-2 cell function on hollow fiber culture might show great values in simulation of the tissue microenvironment in vivo and guide the construction of intestinal tissue engineering apparatus.

  20. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Costa, Eunice M; Sousa, Marcos FQ; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line) as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors. PMID:19772662

  1. Control of beta-cell differentiation by the pancreatic mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Attali, Myriam; Stetsyuk, Volodymyr; Basmaciogullari, Annie; Aiello, Virginie; Zanta-Boussif, Maria A; Duvillie, Bertrand; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2007-05-01

    The importance of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions for normal development of the pancreas was recognized in the early 1960s, and mesenchymal signals have been shown to control the proliferation of early pancreatic progenitor cells. The mechanisms by which the mesenchyme coordinates cell proliferation and differentiation to produce the normal number of differentiated pancreatic cells are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the mesenchyme positively controls the final number of beta-cells that develop from early pancreatic progenitor cells. In vitro, the number of beta-cells that developed from rat embryonic pancreatic epithelia was larger in cultures with mesenchyme than without mesenchyme. The effect of mesenchyme was not due to an increase in beta-cell proliferation but was due to increased proliferation of early pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX1)-positive progenitor cells, as confirmed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Consequently, the window during which early PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells differentiated into endocrine progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 was extended. Fibroblast growth factor 10 mimicked mesenchyme effects on proliferation of early PDX1(+) progenitor cells and induction of Ngn3 expression. Taken together, our results indicate that expansion of early PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitor cells represents a way to increase the final number of beta-cells developing from early embryonic pancreas.

  2. Mutagenesis and differentiation induction in mammalian cells by environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    These studies indicate that in agreement with the somatic mutation hypothesis, chemical carcinogens: (1) are mutagenic for mammalian cells as tested in the cell-mediated assay; (2) the degree of mutagenicity is correlated with their degree of carcinogenicity; (3) that at least in cases when analyzed carefully the metabolites responsible for mutagenesis are also responsible for initiating the carcinogenic event; and (4) that a cell organ type specificity can be established using the cell-mediated assay. Studies with HL-60 cells and HO melanoma cells and those of others suggest that tumor-promoting phorbol diesters can alter cell differentiation in various cell types and that the degree of the observed alteration in the differentiation properties may be related to the potency of the phorbol esters. Thus these and similar systems may serve as models for both studies and identification of certain types of tumor promoting agents. (ERB)

  3. Hematopoietic cell regulation of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Monique; Srour, Edward F; Kacena, Melissa A

    2011-06-01

    The last several decades have revealed numerous interactions between cells of the hematopoietic lineage and osteoblasts (OBs) of the mesenchymal lineage. For example, OBs are important players in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche and OBs are known to impact osteoclast (OC) development. Thus, although much is known regarding the impact OBs have on hematopoietic cells, less is known about the impact of hematopoietic cells on OBs. Here we will review this reciprocal relationship: the effects of hematopoietic cells on OBs. Specifically, we will examine the impact of hematopoietic cells such as HSCs, lymphocytes, and megakaryocytes, as well as the hematopoietic cell-derived OCs on OB proliferation, differentiation, and function.

  4. Hepatic differentiation of embryonic stem cells by murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ikai, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, it has been technically difficult to differentiate ESCs into mature hepatocytes because the definitive growth factors and molecular mechanisms governing hepatocyte differentiation have not yet been well defined. The CD45(-)CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+) mesenchymal cells that reside in murine fetal livers induce hepatic progenitor cells to differentiate into mature hepatocytes by direct cell-cell contact. Utilizing these cells, we employ a two-step procedure for hepatic maturation of ESCs: first, ESCs are differentiated into endodermal cells or hepatic progenitor cells, and second, ESC-derived endodermal cells are matured into functional hepatocytes by coculture with murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells. The ESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess hepatic functions, including ammonia removal activity, albumin secretion ability, glycogen synthesis and storage, and cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity.

  5. Communication is key: Reducing DEK1 activity reveals a link between cell-cell contacts and epidermal cell differentiation status.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Roberta; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2015-01-01

    Plant epidermis development requires not only the initial acquisition of tissue identity, but also the ability to differentiate specific cell types over time and to maintain these differentiated states throughout the plant life. To set-up and maintain differentiation, plants activate specific transcriptional programs. Interfering with these programs can prevent differentiation and/or force differentiated cells to lose their identity and re-enter a proliferative state. We have recently shown that the Arabidopsis Defective Kernel 1 (DEK1) protein is required both for the differentiation of epidermal cells and for the maintenance of their fully differentiated state. Defects in DEK1 activity lead to a deregulation of the expression of epidermis-specific differentiation-promoting HD-ZIP IV transcription factors. Here we propose a working model in which DEK1, by maintaining cell-cell contacts, and thus communication between neighboring cells, influences HD-ZIP IV gene expression and epidermis differentiation.

  6. Regulation of RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation by vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Tintut, Yin; Abedin, Moeen; Cho, John; Choe, Andrea; Lim, Jina; Demer, Linda L

    2005-08-01

    Vascular calcification is a regulated process of biomineralization resembling osteogenesis. Many bone-related factors, including resorptive osteoclast-like cells, although in low abundance, have been found in calcified atherosclerotic lesions. The regulatory mechanisms governing them in the vasculature, however, are not clear. Previously, we found that calcifying vascular cells (CVC), a subpopulation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMC), undergo osteoblastic differentiation and form mineralized nodules. Since osteoblasts and marrow stromal preosteoblasts regulate osteoclastic differentiation in bone, we hypothesized that vascular cells also regulate differentiation of osteoclastic precursors in the artery wall. Peripheral blood monocytes, which are osteoclast precursors, were co-cultured with CVC or BASMC. Results showed that monocytes co-cultured with both of the vascular cells yielded fewer resorption pits than monocytes cultured alone. Furthermore, monocytes co-cultured with CVC had fewer resorption pits than those co-cultured with BASMC. Conditioned media from the vascular cells also inhibited resorptive activity of monocytes suggesting that the inhibitory effect was mediated in part by soluble factors. Compared with BASMC, CVC had lower mRNA expression for osteopontin, which promotes osteoclast attachment, but greater mRNA expression for the soluble inhibitory cytokine, IL-18. Increased osteoclastic differentiation was observed when neutralizing antibody to IL-18 receptor was added to the cultures of preosteoclasts with CVC conditioned media. Osteoprotegerin, another osteoclast inhibitory cytokine, was expressed at similar levels in both cultures. These results suggest that vascular cells inhibit osteoclastic differentiation, and that CVC have greater inhibitory effects than BASMC.

  7. Cell shape controls terminal differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, F M; Jordan, P W; O'Neill, C H

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of human epidermal keratinocytes provide a useful experimental model with which to study the factors that regulate cell proliferation and terminal differentiation. One situation that is known to trigger premature terminal differentiation is suspension culture, when keratinocytes are deprived of substratum and intercellular contact. We have now investigated whether area of substratum contact, and hence cell shape, can regulate terminal differentiation. Keratinocytes were grown on circular adhesive islands that prevented cell-cell contact. By varying island area we could vary cell shape from fully spread to almost spherical. We found that when substratum contact was restricted, DNA synthesis was inhibited and expression of involucrin, a marker of terminal differentiation, was stimulated. Inhibition of proliferation was not a sufficient stimulus for involucrin synthesis in fully spread cells. When DNA synthesis and involucrin expression were plotted against contact area, classic dose-response curves were obtained. Thus cell shape acts as a signal for the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes in culture. Images PMID:2456572

  8. The transcriptional landscape of αβ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mingueneau, Michael; Kreslavsky, Taras; Gray, Daniel; Heng, Tracy; Cruse, Richard; Ericson, Jeffrey; Bendall, Sean; Spitzer, Matt; Nolan, Garry; Kobayashi, Koichi; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    αβT cell differentiation from thymic precursors is a complex process, explored here with the breadth of ImmGen expression datasets, analyzing how differentiation of thymic precursors gives rise to transcriptomes. After surprisingly gradual changes though early T commitment, transit through the CD4+CD8+ stage involves a shutdown or rare breadth, and correlating tightly with MYC. MHC-driven selection promotes a large-scale transcriptional reactivation. We identify distinct signatures that mark cells destined for positive selection versus apoptotic deletion. Differential expression of surprisingly few genes accompany CD4 or CD8 commitment, a similarity that carries through to peripheral T cells and their activation, revealed by mass cytometry phosphoproteomics. The novel transcripts identified as candidate mediators of key transitions help define the “known unknown” of thymocyte differentiation. PMID:23644507

  9. Arsenic inhibits hedgehog signaling during P19 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jui Tung; Bain, Lisa J.

    2014-12-15

    Arsenic is a toxicant found in ground water around the world, and human exposure mainly comes from drinking water or from crops grown in areas containing arsenic in soils or water. Epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure during development decreased intellectual function, reduced birth weight, and altered locomotor activity, while in vitro studies have shown that arsenite decreased muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays an important role during the differentiation of both neurons and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether arsenic can disrupt Shh signaling in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells, leading to changes muscle and neuronal cell differentiation. P19 embryonic stem cells were exposed to 0, 0.25, or 0.5 μM of sodium arsenite for up to 9 days during cell differentiation. We found that arsenite exposure significantly reduced transcript levels of genes in the Shh pathway in both a time and dose-dependent manner. This included the Shh ligand, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, the Gli2 transcription factor, which was decreased 2- to 3-fold, and its downstream target gene Ascl1, which was decreased 5-fold. GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity were also reduced. However, arsenic did not alter GLI2 primary cilium accumulation or nuclear translocation. Moreover, additional extracellular SHH rescued the inhibitory effects of arsenic on cellular differentiation due to an increase in GLI binding activity. Taken together, we conclude that arsenic exposure affected Shh signaling, ultimately decreasing the expression of the Gli2 transcription factor. These results suggest a mechanism by which arsenic disrupts cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Arsenic exposure decreases sonic hedgehog pathway-related gene expression. • Arsenic decreases GLI2 protein levels and transcriptional activity in P19 cells. • Arsenic exposure does not alter the levels of SHH

  10. Histone H1 Depletion Impairs Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Kaixiang; Krauth, Beth; Ho, Po-Yi; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Berhe, Dawit T.; Pan, Chenyi; McDevitt, Todd C.; Fan, Yuhong

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are known to possess a relatively open chromatin structure; yet, despite efforts to characterize the chromatin signatures of ESCs, the role of chromatin compaction in stem cell fate and function remains elusive. Linker histone H1 is important for higher-order chromatin folding and is essential for mammalian embryogenesis. To investigate the role of H1 and chromatin compaction in stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, we examine the differentiation of embryonic stem cells that are depleted of multiple H1 subtypes. H1c/H1d/H1e triple null ESCs are more resistant to spontaneous differentiation in adherent monolayer culture upon removal of leukemia inhibitory factor. Similarly, the majority of the triple-H1 null embryoid bodies (EBs) lack morphological structures representing the three germ layers and retain gene expression signatures characteristic of undifferentiated ESCs. Furthermore, upon neural differentiation of EBs, triple-H1 null cell cultures are deficient in neurite outgrowth and lack efficient activation of neural markers. Finally, we discover that triple-H1 null embryos and EBs fail to fully repress the expression of the pluripotency genes in comparison with wild-type controls and that H1 depletion impairs DNA methylation and changes of histone marks at promoter regions necessary for efficiently silencing pluripotency gene Oct4 during stem cell differentiation and embryogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that H1 plays a critical role in pluripotent stem cell differentiation, and our results suggest that H1 and chromatin compaction may mediate pluripotent stem cell differentiation through epigenetic repression of the pluripotency genes. PMID:22589736

  11. Evaluation of an inactivated whole-cell vaccine-adjuvant preparation for reducing fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle are the primary reservoir for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157). O157 can cause from a mild diarrheal illness in healthy adults to hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in young children and elderly patients. O157-colonized cattle remain asymptomatic but shed these bacteria in feces...

  12. Molecular ties between the cell cycle and differentiation in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Victor C.; Kirschner, Marc W.

    2014-01-01

    Attainment of the differentiated state during the final stages of somatic cell differentiation is closely tied to cell cycle progression. Much less is known about the role of the cell cycle at very early stages of embryonic development. Here, we show that molecular pathways involving the cell cycle can be engineered to strongly affect embryonic stem cell differentiation at early stages in vitro. Strategies based on perturbing these pathways can shorten the rate and simplify the lineage path of ES differentiation. These results make it likely that pathways involving cell proliferation intersect at various points with pathways that regulate cell lineages in embryos and demonstrate that this knowledge can be used profitably to guide the path and effectiveness of cell differentiation of pluripotent cells. PMID:24979803

  13. Molecular ties between the cell cycle and differentiation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Victor C; Kirschner, Marc W

    2014-07-01

    Attainment of the differentiated state during the final stages of somatic cell differentiation is closely tied to cell cycle progression. Much less is known about the role of the cell cycle at very early stages of embryonic development. Here, we show that molecular pathways involving the cell cycle can be engineered to strongly affect embryonic stem cell differentiation at early stages in vitro. Strategies based on perturbing these pathways can shorten the rate and simplify the lineage path of ES differentiation. These results make it likely that pathways involving cell proliferation intersect at various points with pathways that regulate cell lineages in embryos and demonstrate that this knowledge can be used profitably to guide the path and effectiveness of cell differentiation of pluripotent cells.

  14. Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to definitive endoderm.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Kevin A; Agulnick, Alan D; Eliazer, Susan; Kelly, Olivia G; Kroon, Evert; Baetge, Emmanuel E

    2005-12-01

    The potential of human embryonic stem (hES) cells to differentiate into cell types of a variety of organs has generated much excitement over the possible use of hES cells in therapeutic applications. Of great interest are organs derived from definitive endoderm, such as the pancreas. We have focused on directing hES cells to the definitive endoderm lineage as this step is a prerequisite for efficient differentiation to mature endoderm derivatives. Differentiation of hES cells in the presence of activin A and low serum produced cultures consisting of up to 80% definitive endoderm cells. This population was further enriched to near homogeneity using the cell-surface receptor CXCR4. The process of definitive endoderm formation in differentiating hES cell cultures includes an apparent epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and a dynamic gene expression profile that are reminiscent of vertebrate gastrulation. These findings may facilitate the use of hES cells for therapeutic purposes and as in vitro models of development.

  15. Cartilage stem cells: regulation of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Solursh, M

    1989-01-01

    The developing limb bud is a useful source of cartilage stem cells for studies on the regulation of chondrogenesis. In high density cultures these cells can progress through all stages of chondrogenesis to produce mineralized hypertrophic cartilage. If the cells are maintained in a spherical shape, single stem cells can progress through a similar sequence. The actin cytoskeleton is implicated in the regulation of chondrogenesis since conditions that favor its disruption promote chondrogenesis and conditions that favor actin assembly inhibit chondrogenesis. Since a number of extracellular matrix receptors mediate effects of the extracellular matrix on cytoskeletal organization and some of these receptors are developmentally regulated, it is proposed that matrix receptor expression plays a central role in the divergence of connective tissue cells during development.

  16. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  17. An Evolutionarily Conserved Plant RKD Factor Controls Germ Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koi, Satoshi; Hisanaga, Tetsuya; Sato, Katsutoshi; Shimamura, Masaki; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Nakajima, Keiji

    2016-07-11

    In contrast to animals, in which the germ cell lineage is established during embryogenesis, plant germ cells are generated in reproductive organs via reprogramming of somatic cells. The factors that control germ cell differentiation and reprogramming in plants are poorly understood. Members of the RKD subfamily of plant-specific RWP-RK transcription factors have been implicated in egg cell formation in Arabidopsis based on their expression patterns and ability to cause an egg-like transcriptome upon ectopic expression [1]; however, genetic evidence of their involvement is lacking, due to possible genetic redundancy, haploid lethality, and the technical difficulty of analyzing egg cell differentiation in angiosperms. Here we analyzed the factors that govern germ cell formation in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. This recently revived model bryophyte has several characteristics that make it ideal for studies of germ cell formation, such as low levels of genetic redundancy, readily accessible germ cells, and the ability to propagate asexually via gemma formation [2, 3]. Our analyses revealed that MpRKD, a single RWP-RK factor closely related to angiosperm RKDs, is preferentially expressed in developing eggs and sperm precursors in M. polymorpha. Targeted disruption of MpRKD had no effect on the gross morphology of the vegetative and reproductive organs but led to striking defects in egg and sperm cell differentiation, demonstrating that MpRKD is an essential regulator of germ cell differentiation. Together with previous findings [1, 4-6], our results suggest that RKD factors are evolutionarily conserved regulators of germ cell differentiation in land plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of cell differentiation by division tracking cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kap-Hyoun; Odell, Ross; Nordon, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    We propose a quantitative method to characterize growth and differentiation dynamics of multipotent cells from time series carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE) division tracking data. The dynamics of cell proliferation and differentiation was measured by combining (CFDA-SE) division tracking with phenotypic analysis. We define division tracking population statistics such as precursor cell frequency, generation time and renewal rate that characterize growth of various phenotypes in a heterogeneous culture system. This method is illustrated by study of the divisional recruitment of cord blood CD34(+) cells by hematopoietic growth factors. The technical issue of assigning the correct generation number to cells was addressed by employing high-resolution division tracking methodology and daily histogram analysis. We also quantified division-tracking artifacts such as CFDA-SE degeneration and cellular auto-fluorescence. Mitotic activation of cord blood CD34(+) cells by cytokines commenced after 2 days of cytokine stimulation. Mean generation number increased linearly thereafter, and it was conclusively shown that CD34(+) cells cycle slower than CD34(-) cells. Generation times for CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells were 24.7 +/- 0.8 h and 15.1 +/- 0.9 h (+/-SD, n = 5), respectively. The 20-fold increase in CD34(+) cell numbers at Day 6 could be attributed to a high CD34(+) cell renewal rate (91% +/- 2% per division). Although cultures were initiated with highly purified CD34(+) cells (approximately 96%), CD34(-) numbers had expanded rapidly by Day 6. This rapid expansion could be explained by their short generation time as well as a small fraction of CD34(+) cells (approximately 5%) that differentiated into CD34(-) cells. Multitype division tracking provides a detailed analysis of multipotent cell differentiation dynamics.

  19. Chronology of Islet Differentiation Revealed By Temporal Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Li, Zhongmei; German, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neurogenin 3 plays a pivotal role in pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Whereas mouse models expressing reporters such as eGFP or LacZ under the control of the Neurog3 gene enable us to label cells in the pancreatic endocrine lineage, the long half-life of most reporter proteins makes it difficult to distinguish cells actively expressing neurogenin 3 from differentiated cells that have stopped transcribing the gene. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In order to separate the transient neurogenin 3 –expressing endocrine progenitor cells from the differentiating endocrine cells, we developed a mouse model (Ngn3-Timer) in which DsRed-E5, a fluorescent protein that shifts its emission spectrum from green to red over time, was expressed transgenically from the NEUROG3 locus. RESULTS In the Ngn3-Timer embryos, green-dominant cells could be readily detected by microscopy or flow cytometry and distinguished from green/red double-positive cells. When fluorescent cells were sorted into three different populations by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter, placed in culture, and then reanalyzed by flow cytometry, green-dominant cells converted to green/red double-positive cells within 6 h. The sorted cell populations were then used to determine the temporal patterns of expression for 145 transcriptional regulators in the developing pancreas. CONCLUSIONS The precise temporal resolution of this model defines the narrow window of neurogenin 3 expression in islet progenitor cells and permits sequential analyses of sorted cells as well as the testing of gene regulatory models for the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells. PMID:19478145

  20. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  1. Shedding of HSV-1, HSV-2, CMV, and EBV in the saliva of hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients at Fundación HOMI - Hospital de la Misericordia, Bogotá, D.C.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Sonia P; Díaz, Juliana; Rincón, Claudia M; Estupiñán, Marcela; Chaparro, Mauricio; Low-Calle, Ana María; Castellanos, Jaime E

    2016-05-19

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in pediatric patients is an alternative treatment for different diseases. The conditioning regimen for transplant predisposes recipients to the development of infections. Viral infections by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), human cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are the most common, and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among these patients. These viruses lie dormant in various cell types and the reactivation of latent infections may lead to asymptomatic viral shedding in saliva. The detection of these viruses in secretions may contribute to understand the behavioral dynamics of these viral infections in transplanted patients, and to the early diagnosis of reactivation.  To assess HSV-1, HSV-2, CMV and EBV viral shedding in the saliva of patients admitted for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at Fundación HOMI - Hospital de la Misericordia between January and November of 2012.  We evaluated stimulated saliva samples of 17 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients weekly. We performed DNA extraction from saliva, and we evaluated the presence of DNA for HSV-1, HSV-2, CMV, and EBV by PCR.  While we detected HSV-2 and CMV DNA in the saliva of four patients, EBV DNA was detected in nine patients with leukopenia. In contrast, we did not detect HSV-1 DNA in saliva. Additionally, four out of the 17 patients showed a simultaneous shedding of CMV and EBV.  By conventional PCR, we demonstrated asymptomatic HSV-2, CMV, and EBV viral shedding in saliva, associated with leukopenia.

  2. Myeloid cell origins, differentiation, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Schnorr, Peter J.; Pang, Wendy W.; Chao, Mark P.; Chhabra, Akanksha; Seita, Jun; Feng, Mingye; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a multipotent stem cell that resides in the bone marrow and has the ability to form all of the cells of the blood and immune system. Since its first purification in 1988, additional studies have refined the phenotype and functionality of HSCs and characterized all of their downstream progeny. The hematopoietic lineage is divided into two main branches: the myeloid and lymphoid arms. The myeloid arm is characterized by the Common Myeloid Progenitor and all of its resulting cell types. The stages of hematopoiesis have been defined in both mice and humans. During embryological development, the earliest hematopoiesis takes place in yolk sac blood islands then migrates to the fetal liver and hematopoietic organs. Some adult myeloid populations develop directly from yolk sac progenitors without apparent bone marrow intermediates, such as tissue resident macrophages. Hematopoiesis also changes over time, with a bias of the dominating HSCs towards myeloid development as animals age. Defects in myelopoiesis contribute to many hematologic disorders, and some of these can be overcome with therapies that target the aberrant stage of development. Furthermore, insights into myeloid development have informed us of mechanisms of programmed cell removal. The CD47/SIRPα axis, a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint, limits macrophage removal of HSCs but can be exploited by hematologic and solid malignancies. Therapeutics targeting CD47 represent a new strategy for treating cancer. Overall, an understanding of hematopoiesis and myeloid cell development has implications for regenerative medicine, hematopoietic cell transplantation, malignancy, and many other diseases. PMID:27763252

  3. Heterogeneous differentiation patterns of individual CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Carmen; Rohr, Jan C; Perié, Leïla; van Rooij, Nienke; van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Velds, Arno; Urbanus, Jos; Naik, Shalin H; Jacobs, Heinz; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2013-05-03

    Upon infection, antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses display a highly reproducible pattern of expansion and contraction that is thought to reflect a uniform behavior of individual cells. We tracked the progeny of individual mouse CD8(+) T cells by in vivo lineage tracing and demonstrated that, even for T cells bearing identical T cell receptors, both clonal expansion and differentiation patterns are heterogeneous. As a consequence, individual naïve T lymphocytes contributed differentially to short- and long-term protection, as revealed by participation of their progeny during primary versus recall infections. The discordance in fate of individual naïve T cells argues against asymmetric division as a singular driver of CD8(+) T cell heterogeneity and demonstrates that reproducibility of CD8(+) T cell responses is achieved through population averaging.

  4. Differentiation of highly metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhenlin; Sun, Zhenzhen; Li, Jingwen; Ye, Qing; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    The primary hypothesis tested in the study was that nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells at different stage of invasion and metastasis can be differentiated using multiphoton microscopy (MPM). CNE1 and CNE2Z cells were cultured and used in this study. The activity of cell migration and invasion was measured using Transwell assays. At the same time, the morphologic features were quantified from the multiphoton images. The measurements of Transwell migration and invasion showed that the invasion and migration of CNE2Z cells were significantly enhanced when compared with that of CNE1 cells. Also, statistically significant differences in the morphologic features were found between two kinds of cancer cells. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to differentiate cancer cells with different stage of invasion and metastasis.

  5. Human embryonic stem cells differentiate into functional renal proximal tubular-like cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Karl M; Tasnim, Farah; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Schumacher, Annegret; Ni, Ming; Gao, Shujun; Gopalan, Began; Zink, Daniele; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-04-01

    Renal cells are used in basic research, disease models, tissue engineering, drug screening, and in vitro toxicology. In order to provide a reliable source of human renal cells, we developed a protocol for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into renal epithelial cells. The differentiated stem cells expressed markers characteristic of renal proximal tubular cells and their precursors, whereas markers of other renal cell types were not expressed or expressed at low levels. Marker expression patterns of these differentiated stem cells and in vitro cultivated primary human renal proximal tubular cells were comparable. The differentiated stem cells showed morphological and functional characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells, and generated tubular structures in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the differentiated stem cells contributed in organ cultures for the formation of simple epithelia in the kidney cortex. Bioreactor experiments showed that these cells retained their functional characteristics under conditions as applied in bioartificial kidneys. Thus, our results show that human embryonic stem cells can differentiate into renal proximal tubular-like cells. Our approach would provide a source for human renal proximal tubular cells that are not affected by problems associated with immortalized cell lines or primary cells.

  6. Chondrogenic differentiation of human embryonic germ cell derived cells in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Shyni; Theprungsirikul, Paranduangji; Ferran, Angela; Hwang, Nathaniel; Canver, Adam; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Human embryonic germ (hEG) cells have the potential to self-renew over long periods of time and differentiate into various lineages. Cells derived from embryoid bodies of hEG cells express a broad spectrum of gene markers and have been induced towards cells of ecto-dermal and recently endo-dermal and mesenchymal lineages. LVEC cells express a number of surface marker proteins characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), indicating the potential of these cells to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues. Here we demonstrate the homogenous differentiation of LVEC cells into hyaline cartilage. Three dimensional tissue formation is achieved by encapsulating cells in synthetic hydrogels followed by incubation in chondrocyte-conditioned culture medium. Homogenous hyaline cartilage was produced, even after 63 population doublings (13 passages). The high proliferative capacity of these cells without teratoma formation, homogenous differentiation, and three-dimensional cartilage tissue formation suggests the significant potential of LVEC cells for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

  7. Neural cells play an inhibitory role in pancreatic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Morooka, Mayu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Sakano, Daisuke; Ogaki, Soichiro; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic endocrine β-cells derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have received attention as screening systems for therapeutic drugs and as the basis for cell-based therapies. Here, we used a 12-day β-cell differentiation protocol for mouse ES cells and obtained several hit compounds that promoted β-cell differentiation. One of these compounds, mycophenolic acid (MPA), effectively promoted ES cell differentiation with a concomitant reduction of neuronal cells. The existence of neural cell-derived inhibitory humoral factors for β-cell differentiation was suggested using a co-culture system. Based on gene array analysis, we focused on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and showed that the Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed MPA-induced β-cell differentiation. Wnt pathway activation promoted β-cell differentiation also in human iPS cells. Our results showed that Wnt signaling activation positively regulates β-cell differentiation, and represent a downstream target of the neural inhibitory factor.

  8. Tinospora cordifolia Induces Differentiation and Senescence Pathways in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rachana; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-08-01

    Children diagnosed with neuroblastomas often suffer from severe side as well as late effects of conventional treatments like chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent advances in understanding of molecular pathways involved in cellular differentiation and apoptosis have helped in the development of new therapeutic approach based on differentiation-based therapy of malignant tumours. Natural medicines with their holistic therapeutic approach are known to selectively eliminate cancer cells thus provide a better substitute for the conventional treatment modes. The current study was aimed to investigate the anti-cancer potential of aqueous ethanolic extract of Tinospora cordifolia (TCE) using IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cell line as a model system. TCE is highly recommended in Ayurveda for its general body and metal health-promoting properties. TCE treatment was seen to arrest the majority of cells in G0/G1 phase and modulated the expression of DNA clamp sliding protein (PCNA) and cyclin D1. Further, TCE-treated cells showed differentiation as revealed by their morphology and the expression of neuronal cell specific differentiation markers NF200, MAP-2 and NeuN in neuroblastoma cells. The differentiated phenotype was associated with induction of senescence and pro-apoptosis pathways by enhancing expression of senescence marker mortalin and Rel A subunit of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFkB) along with decreased expression of anti-apoptotic marker, Bcl-xl. TCE exhibited anti-metastatic activity and significantly reduced cell migration in the scratched area along with downregulation of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) polysialylation and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Our data suggest that crude extract or active phytochemicals from this plant may be a potential candidate for differentiation-based therapy of malignant neuroblastoma cells.

  9. Adrenomedullin Promotes Rat Trophoblast Stem Cell Differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Liebenthal, Daniel A.; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating data suggest that adrenomedullin (ADM) regulates the trophoblast cell growth, migration, and invasion. However, the effect of ADM on trophoblast differentiation is poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that ADM promotes the differentiation of trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) into trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). Using rat TSCs, Rcho-1 cells, we investigated the effect of ADM on TSC differentiation into TGCs in differentiation or stem cell media, respectively, and explored the effect of ADM on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) signaling in trophoblast cell differentiation. The results include: 1) in the presence of differentiation medium, 10−7 M ADM, but not lower doses, elevated (P < 0.05) Prl3b1/Esrrb (i.e., the ratio of mRNA levels) by 1.7-fold compared to that in control; 2) the supplementation of ADM antagonist, regardless of the concentration of ADM, reduced (P < 0.05) Prl3b1/Esrrb by 2-fold, compared to control group, while the supplementation of CGRP antagonist, regardless of the concentration of ADM, did not change Prl3b1/Esrrb; 3) in the presence of stem cell medium, ADM did not alter the expression of TSC and TGC marker genes, however, the ratio of Prl3b1/Esrrb was reduced (P < 0.05) by ADM antagonist compared to that in control; and 4) ADM increased (P < 0.05) phosphorylated MTOR proteins and the ratio of phosphorylated to total MTOR proteins by 2.0- and 1.7-fold, respectively. The results indicate that ADM promotes but does not induce the differentiation of TSCs to TGCs in a dose-dependent manner and MTOR signaling may play a role in this process. PMID:25061099

  10. Glycomics of Proteoglycan Biosynthesis in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, Alison V.; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Xie, Jin; Harris, Kyle; Dalton, Stephen; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J. Michael; Toida, Toshihiko; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play a critical role in binding and activation of growth factors involved in cell signaling critical for developmental biology. The biosynthetic pathways for GAGs have been elucidated over the past decade and now analytical methodology makes it possible to determine GAG composition in as few as 10 million cells. A glycomics approach was used to examine GAG content, composition, and the level of transcripts encoding for GAG biosynthetic enzymes as murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) differentiate to embryoid bodies (EBs) and to extraembryonic endodermal cells (ExE) to better understand the role of GAGs in stem cell differentiation. Hyaluronan synthesis was enhanced by 13- and 24-fold, most likely due to increased expression of hyaluronan synthase-2. Chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) synthesis was enhanced by 4- and 6-fold, and heparan sulfate (HS) synthesis was enhanced by 5- and 8-fold following the transition from mESC to EB and ExE. Transcripts associated with the synthesis of the early precursors were largely unaltered, suggesting other factors account for enhanced GAG synthesis. The composition of both CS/DS and HS also changed upon differentiation. Interestingly, CS type E and highly sulfated HS both increase as mESCs differentiate to EBs and ExE. Differentiation was also accompanied by enhanced 2-sulfation in both CS/DS and HS families. Transcript levels for core proteins generally showed increases or remained constant upon mESC differentiation. Finally, transcripts encoding selected enzymes and isoforms, including GlcNAc-4,6-O-sulfotransferase, C5-epimerases, and 3-O-sulfotransferases involved in late GAG biosynthesis, were also enriched. These biosynthetic enzymes are particularly important in introducing GAG fine structure, essential for intercellular communication, cell adhesion, and outside-in signaling. Knowing the changes in GAG fine structure should improve our understanding the biological properties of

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pumps and Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Arbabian, Atousa; Gélébart, Pascal; Kovács, Tünde; Bobe, Régis; Enouf, Jocelyne; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Apáti, Ágota

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major intracellular calcium storage pool and a multifunctional organelle that accomplishes several calcium-dependent functions involved in many homeostatic and signaling mechanisms. Calcium is accumulated in the ER by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA)-type calcium pumps. SERCA activity can determine ER calcium content available for intra-ER functions and for calcium release into the cytosol, and can shape the spatiotemporal characteristics of calcium signals. SERCA function therefore constitutes an important nodal point in the regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis and signaling, and can exert important effects on cell growth, differentiation and survival. In several cell types such as cells of hematopoietic origin, mammary, gastric and colonic epithelium, SERCA2 and SERCA3-type calcium pumps are simultaneously expressed, and SERCA3 expression levels undergo significant changes during cell differentiation, activation or immortalization. In addition, SERCA3 expression is decreased or lost in several tumor types when compared to the corresponding normal tissue. These observations indicate that ER calcium homeostasis is remodeled during cell differentiation, and may present defects due to decreased SERCA3 expression in tumors. Modulation of the state of differentiation of the ER reflected by SERCA3 expression constitutes an interesting new aspect of cell differentiation and tumor biology. PMID:24970132

  12. A change in nuclear pore complex composition regulates cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Maximiliano A; Gomez-Cavazos, J Sebastian; Mei, Arianna; Lackner, Daniel H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2012-02-14

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are built from ∼30 different proteins called nucleoporins or Nups. Previous studies have shown that several Nups exhibit cell-type-specific expression and that mutations in NPC components result in tissue-specific diseases. Here we show that a specific change in NPC composition is required for both myogenic and neuronal differentiation. The transmembrane nucleoporin Nup210 is absent in proliferating myoblasts and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) but becomes expressed and incorporated into NPCs during cell differentiation. Preventing Nup210 production by RNAi blocks myogenesis and the differentiation of ESCs into neuroprogenitors. We found that the addition of Nup210 to NPCs does not affect nuclear transport but is required for the induction of genes that are essential for cell differentiation. Our results identify a single change in NPC composition as an essential step in cell differentiation and establish a role for Nup210 in gene expression regulation and cell fate determination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins.

  14. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2013-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) is crucial for differentiation of LCs. Monocytes differentiated into LC-like cells in presence of IL-4, GM-CSF, and TGF-β1. However, these LC-like cells expressed not only Langerin but also DC-SIGN. Notably, co-culturing of these LC-like cells with KCs expressing E-cadherin or recombinant E-cadherin strongly decreased expression of DC-SIGN and further induced a phenotype similar to purified epidermal LCs. Moreover, pretreatment of LC-like cells with anti-E-cadherin-specific antibody completely abolished their Langerin expression, indicating the requirement of E-cadherin–E-cadherin interactions for the differentiation into Langerin+ cells. These findings suggest that E-cadherin expressed by KCs provide environmental cues that induce differentiation of LCs in the epidermis. PMID:23135957

  15. Stonewalling Drosophila stem cell differentiation by epigenetic controls.

    PubMed

    Maines, Jean Z; Park, Joseph K; Williams, Meredith; McKearin, Dennis M

    2007-04-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, germline stem cell (GSC) identity is maintained largely by preventing the expression of factors that promote differentiation. This is accomplished via the activity of several genes acting either in the GSC or in its niche. The translational repressors Nanos and Pumilio act in GSCs to prevent differentiation, probably by inhibiting the translation of early differentiation factors, whereas niche signals prevent differentiation by silencing transcription of the differentiation factor Bam. We have found that the DNA-associated protein Stonewall (Stwl) is also required for GSC maintenance. stwl is required cell-autonomously; clones of stwl(-) germ cells were lost by differentiation, and ectopic Stwl caused an expansion of GSCs. stwl mutants acted as Suppressors of variegation, indicating that stwl normally acts in chromatin-dependent gene repression. In contrast to several previously described GSC maintenance factors, Stwl probably functions epigenetically to prevent GSC differentiation. Stwl-dependent transcriptional repression does not target bam, but rather Stwl represses the expression of many genes, including those that may be targeted by Nanos and Pumilio translational inhibition.

  16. The role of purinergic receptors in stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaebisch, Constanze; Schipper, Dorothee; Babczyk, Patrick; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge modern society has to face is the increasing need for tissue regeneration due to degenerative diseases or tumors, but also accidents or warlike conflicts. There is great hope that stem cell-based therapies might improve current treatments of cardiovascular diseases, osteochondral defects or nerve injury due to the unique properties of stem cells such as their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Since embryonic stem cells raise severe ethical concerns and are prone to teratoma formation, adult stem cells are still in the focus of research. Emphasis is placed on cellular signaling within these cells and in between them for a better understanding of the complex processes regulating stem cell fate. One of the oldest signaling systems is based on nucleotides as ligands for purinergic receptors playing an important role in a huge variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, migration and differentiation. Besides their natural ligands, several artificial agonists and antagonists have been identified for P1 and P2 receptors and are already used as drugs. This review outlines purinergic receptor expression and signaling in stem cells metabolism. We will briefly describe current findings in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as in cancer-, hematopoietic-, and neural crest-derived stem cells. The major focus will be placed on recent findings of purinergic signaling in mesenchymal stem cells addressed in in vitro and in vivo studies, since stem cell fate might be manipulated by this system guiding differentiation towards the desired lineage in the future.

  17. Silicon Micropore based Electromechanical Transducer to Differentiate Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Waqas; Raza, Muhammad U.; Khanzada, Raja R.; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-03-01

    Solid-state micropores have been used before to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells using size-based filtering. Tumor cells differ from normal ones not only in size but also in physical properties like elasticity, shape, motility etc. Tumor cells show different physical attributes depending on the stage and type of cancer. We report a micropore based electromechanical transducer that differentiated cancer cells based on their mechanophysical properties. The device was interfaced with a high-speed patch-clamp measurement system that biased the ionic solution across the silicon-based membrane. The bias resulted in the flow of ionic current. Electrical pulses were generated when cells passed through. Different cells depicted characteristic pulses. Translocation profiles of cells that were either small or were more elastic and flexible caused electrical pulses shorter in widths and amplitudes whereas cells with larger size or lesser elasticity/flexibility showed deeper and wider pulses. Three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines NCI-H1155, A549 and NCI-H460 were successfully differentiated. NCI-H1155, due to their comparatively smaller size, were found quickest in translocating through. The solid-sate micropore based electromechanical transducer could process the whole blood sample of cancer patient without any pre-processing requirements and is ideal for point-of-care applications. Support Acknowledged from NSF through ECCS-1201878.

  18. The role of purinergic receptors in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kaebisch, Constanze; Schipper, Dorothee; Babczyk, Patrick; Tobiasch, Edda

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge modern society has to face is the increasing need for tissue regeneration due to degenerative diseases or tumors, but also accidents or warlike conflicts. There is great hope that stem cell-based therapies might improve current treatments of cardiovascular diseases, osteochondral defects or nerve injury due to the unique properties of stem cells such as their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Since embryonic stem cells raise severe ethical concerns and are prone to teratoma formation, adult stem cells are still in the focus of research. Emphasis is placed on cellular signaling within these cells and in between them for a better understanding of the complex processes regulating stem cell fate. One of the oldest signaling systems is based on nucleotides as ligands for purinergic receptors playing an important role in a huge variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, migration and differentiation. Besides their natural ligands, several artificial agonists and antagonists have been identified for P1 and P2 receptors and are already used as drugs. This review outlines purinergic receptor expression and signaling in stem cells metabolism. We will briefly describe current findings in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as in cancer-, hematopoietic-, and neural crest-derived stem cells. The major focus will be placed on recent findings of purinergic signaling in mesenchymal stem cells addressed in in vitro and in vivo studies, since stem cell fate might be manipulated by this system guiding differentiation towards the desired lineage in the future. PMID:26900431

  19. Cell line models for differentiation: preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Sylvia P; Dodson, Michael V; Hausman, Gary J

    2010-10-01

    In vitro models have been invaluable in determining the mechanisms involved in adipocyte proliferation, differentiation, adipokine secretion and gene/protein expression. The cells presently available for research purposes all have unique advantages and disadvantages that one should be aware of when selecting cells. Established cell lines, such as 3T3-L1 cells, are easier and less costly to use than freshly isolated cells, even though freshly isolated cells allow for various comparisons such as the in vitro evaluation of different in vivo conditions that may not be possible using cell lines. Moreover, stem cells, transdifferentiated cells or dedifferentiated cells are relatively new cell models being evaluated for the study of adipocyte regulation and physiology. The focus of this brief review is to highlight similarities and differences in adipocyte models to aid in appropriate model selection and data interpretation for successful advancement of our understanding of adipocyte biology.

  20. [Cell therapy using stem cells: trophic factor, differentiation, and cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Hida, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Our research of stem cell transplantation using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent (iPS) cells was carried out from the aspect of trophic factor, cell differentiation, and better survival of grafted cells. Pleiotrophin, an enhanced trophic factor in the dopamine (DA)-depleted striatum, increased the number of DAergic neurons from ES-derived neural stem cells (ES-NSCs), increased cell survival of cultured DAergic neurons, and affected cell survival of grafted DAergic cells in Parkinson model rats. It was shown that DAergic differentiation from ES-NSCs was mediated by hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha. Our challenges of the transplantation of ES-NSCs and iPS-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (iPS-OPCs) into periventricular leukomalasia (PVL) model rats are also presented. It was found that grafted ES-NSCs survived better in the corpus callosum without immunosuppressant and most of them differentiated into neurons near the grafted site. It was also revealed that only a few of the grafted iPS-OPCs induced by a stepwise culture method with no use of serum could survive in PVL model rats, indicating that trophic factor (s) and improvement of graft techniques will be needed for better survival of grafted iPS-OPCs.

  1. Differential Expression of CXCL12 and CXCR4 During Human Fetal Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Kolb, Ryan; Kennedy, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α, CXCL12) and its receptor CXCR4 play an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) development and adulthood by mediating cell migration, enhancing precursor cell proliferation, assisting in neuronal circuit formation, and possibly regulating migration during repair. The expression pattern of CXCR4 and CXCL12 during neurogenesis has not been thoroughly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the expression of CXCL12 and CXCR4 during neural progenitor cells (NPC) differentiation by microarray analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using human fetal NPC as a model system. The production of CXCL12 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CXCR4 expression was determined by florescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, immunocytochemical staining, and CXCR4-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Our data demonstrated that CXCR4 expression is significantly upregulated when NPC are differentiated into neuronal precursors, whereas CXCL12 is upregulated when differentiated into astrocytes. We also provide evidence that CXCR4 localization changes as neurons mature. In neuronal precursors, CXCR4 is localized in both neuronal processes and the cell body, whereas in mature neurons, it is primarily expressed on axons and dendrites. This differential expression of CXCR4 and CXCL12 may be important for the temporal regulation of neuronal migration and circuit formation during development and possibly in adult neurogenesis and repair. PMID:18040858

  2. A novel system for xylem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Fujita, Takashi; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-04-01

    During vascular development, procambial and cambial cells give rise to xylem and phloem cells. Because the vascular tissue is deeply embedded, it has been difficult to analyze the processes of vascular development in detail. Here, we establish a novel in vitro experimental system in which vascular development is induced in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf-disk cultures using bikinin, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins. Transcriptome analysis reveals that mesophyll cells in leaf disks synchronously turn into procambial cells and then differentiate into tracheary elements. Leaf-disk cultures from plants expressing the procambial cell markers TDR(pro):GUS and TDR(pro):YFP can be used for spatiotemporal visualization of procambial cell formation. Further analysis with the tdr mutant and TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) indicates that the key signaling TDIF-TDR-GSK3s regulates xylem differentiation in leaf-disk cultures. This new culture system can be combined with analysis using the rich material resources for Arabidopsis including cell-marker lines and mutants, thus offering a powerful tool for analyzing xylem cell differentiation.

  3. Stem Cell Differentiation as a Non-Markov Stochastic Process.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Patrick S; Smith, Rosanna C G; Lenz, Michael; Schuppert, Andreas; Müller, Franz-Josef; Babtie, Ann; Chan, Thalia E; Stumpf, Michael P H; Please, Colin P; Howison, Sam D; Arai, Fumio; MacArthur, Ben D

    2017-09-27

    Pluripotent stem cells can self-renew in culture and differentiate along all somatic lineages in vivo. While much is known about the molecular basis of pluripotency, the mechanisms of differentiation remain unclear. Here, we profile individual mouse embryonic stem cells as they progress along the neuronal lineage. We observe that cells pass from the pluripotent state to the neuronal state via an intermediate epiblast-like state. However, analysis of the rate at which cells enter and exit these observed cell states using a hidden Markov model indicates the presence of a chain of unobserved molecular states that each cell transits through stochastically in sequence. This chain of hidden states allows individual cells to record their position on the differentiation trajectory, thereby encoding a simple form of cellular memory. We suggest a statistical mechanics interpretation of these results that distinguishes between functionally distinct cellular "macrostates" and functionally similar molecular "microstates" and propose a model of stem cell differentiation as a non-Markov stochastic process. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Dana A.; Farooque, Mohammad

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  5. Regulation of Endothelial Cell Differentiation and Specification

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Goldie, Lauren C.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2013-01-01

    The circulatory system is the first organ system to develop in the vertebrate embryo and is critical throughout gestation for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to, as well as removal of metabolic waste products from, growing tissues. Endothelial cells, which constitute the luminal layer of all blood and lymphatic vessels, emerge de novo from the mesoderm in a process known as vasculogenesis. The vascular plexus that is initially formed is then remodeled and refined via proliferation, migration and sprouting of endothelial cells to form new vessels from pre-existing ones during angiogenesis. Mural cells are also recruited by endothelial cells to form the surrounding vessel wall. During this vascular remodeling process, primordial endothelial cells are specialized to acquire arterial, venous, and blood-forming hemogenic phenotypes and functions. A subset of venous endothelium is also specialized to become lymphatic endothelium later in development. The specialization of all endothelial cell subtypes requires extrinsic signals and intrinsic regulatory events, which will be discussed in this review. PMID:23620236

  6. Somatic mutation and cell differentiation in neoplastic transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Collart, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    In brief, the authors suggest that tumor formation may result from continuous expression of growth facilitating genes that, as a result of irreversible changes during the initiation step, are placed under the control of genes expressed during normal differentiation. Thus, to understand carcinogenesis, we must decipher the processes that lead to the acquisition of a mature phenotype in both normal and tumor cells and characterize the growth dependency of tumor cells to inducers of cell differentiation. Furthermore, the growth of a variety of tumors may be controlled through the use of inducers of maturation that activate genes located beyond the gene that is altered during tumor initiation. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Hematopoietic Cell Regulation of Osteoblast Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Monique; Srour, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    The last several decades have revealed numerous interactions between cells of the hematopoietic lineage and osteoblasts (OBs) of the mesenchymal lineage. For example, OBs are important players in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche and OBs are known to impact osteoclast (OC) development. Thus, although much is known regarding the impact OBs have on hematopoietic cells, less is known about the impact of hematopoietic cells on OBs. Here we will review this reciprocal relationship: the effects of hematopoietic cells on OBs. Specifically, we will examine the impact of hematopoietic cells such as HSCs, lymphocytes, and megakaryocytes, as well as the hematopoietic cell–derived OCs on OB proliferation, differentiation, and function. PMID:21360286

  8. Substrate Induced Osteoblast-Like Differentiation of Stromal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizar, Jacqueline; Glaser, Reena; Hung, Matthew; Simon, Marcia; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Shih, Alice

    2009-03-01

    We have demonstrated that Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be induced to biomineralize on a polybutadiene (PB) coated Si substrate. The cells began to generate calcium phosphate deposits after a five-day incubation period in the absence of dexamethasone. Control cells plated on tissue culture PS culture dish (TCP) did not biomineralize. In addition, the biomineralizing culture retained proliferative cells In order to determine whether the induction was transient, we transferred the cells exposed to polybutadiene after 14 and 28-day incubation periods to TCP dishes. These cells continued to biominerlize. Genetic testing is underway which will determine whether differentiation is maintained after transfer.

  9. 1. VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH FACES OF PYROTECHNIC SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH FACES OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757). ENTRANCE TO TEST CELL ON SOUTH SIDE; ENTRANCE TO PERSONNEL ROOM ON WEST SIDE. SECURITY FENCE BETWEEN SLC-3E AND SLC-3W IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells from Bone Marrow Differentiate into Chondrocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lele; Weng, Yimin; Shui, Xiaolong; Fang, Wenlai; Zhang, Erge; Pan, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has great potential for treating chondral and osteochondral injuries. Efficient seed cells are the key to cartilage tissue engineering. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have greater differentiation ability than other bone-marrow stem cells, and thus may be candidate seed cells. We attempted to differentiate MAPCs into chondrocyte-like cells to evaluate their suitability as seed cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Toluidine blue and Alcian blue staining suggested that glycosaminoglycan was expressed in differentiated cells. Immunofluorostaining indicated that differentiated human MAPCs (hMAPCs) expressed collagen II. Based on these results, we concluded that bone-marrow-derived hMAPCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells in vitro.

  11. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  12. ULTRASTRUCTURAL LOCALIZATION OF ANTIBODY IN DIFFERENTIATING PLASMA CELLS<