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Sample records for cell epitopes delivered

  1. Identification and characterisation of T-cell epitopes for incorporation into dendritic cell-delivered Listeria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells loaded with antigenic peptides, because of their safety and robust immune stimulation, would be ideal for induction of immunity to protect against listeriosis. However, there is no currently accepted method to predict which peptides derived from the Listeria proteome might confer protection. While elution of peptides from MHC molecules after Listeria infection yields high-affinity immune-dominant epitopes, these individual epitopes did not reliably confer Listeria protection. Instead we applied bioinformatic predictions of MHC class I and II epitopes to generate antigenic peptides that were then formulated with Advax™, a novel polysaccharide particulate adjuvant able to enhance cross-presentation prior to being screened for their ability to induce protective T-cell responses. A combination of at least four intermediate strength MHC-I binding epitopes and one weak MHC-II binding epitope when expressed in a single peptide sequence and formulated with Advax adjuvant induced a potent T-cell response and high TNF-α and IL-12 production by dendritic cells resulting in robust listeriosis protection in susceptible mice. This T-cell vaccine approach might be useful for the design of vaccines to protect against listeriosis or other intracellular infections. PMID:26031451

  2. Identification and characterisation of T-cell epitopes for incorporation into dendritic cell-delivered Listeria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Dendritic cells loaded with antigenic peptides, because of their safety and robust immune stimulation, would be ideal for induction of immunity to protect against listeriosis. However, there is no currently accepted method to predict which peptides derived from the Listeria proteome might confer protection. While elution of peptides from MHC molecules after Listeria infection yields high-affinity immune-dominant epitopes, these individual epitopes did not reliably confer Listeria protection. Instead we applied bioinformatic predictions of MHC class I and II epitopes to generate antigenic peptides that were then formulated with Advax™, a novel polysaccharide particulate adjuvant able to enhance cross-presentation prior to being screened for their ability to induce protective T-cell responses. A combination of at least four intermediate strength MHC-I binding epitopes and one weak MHC-II binding epitope when expressed in a single peptide sequence and formulated with Advax adjuvant induced a potent T-cell response and high TNF-α and IL-12 production by dendritic cells resulting in robust listeriosis protection in susceptible mice. This T-cell vaccine approach might be useful for the design of vaccines to protect against listeriosis or other intracellular infections.

  3. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8+ T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; Robinson, H.; Wang, R.; Kong, W.-P.; Kanekiyo, M.; Akahata, W.; Xu, L.; Matsuo, K.; Natarajan, K.; Asher, T. E.; Price, D. A.; Douek, D. C.; Margulies, D. H.; Nabel, G. J.

    2009-08-15

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  4. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8plus T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    M Honda; R Wang; W Kong; M Kanekiyo; Q Akahata; L Xu; K Matsuo; K Natarajan; H Robinson; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  5. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR) of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity and protective

  6. A Plasmodium Promiscuous T Cell Epitope Delivered within the Ad5 Hexon Protein Enhances the Protective Efficacy of a Protein Based Malaria Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Jairo Andres; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Kashentseva, Elena A; Villegas, John Paul; Fernandez, Alejandra; Van Pelt, Amelia; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Moreno, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A malaria vaccine is a public health priority. In order to produce an effective vaccine, a multistage approach targeting both the blood and the liver stage infection is desirable. The vaccine candidates also need to induce balanced immune responses including antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Protein-based subunit vaccines like RTS,S are able to induce strong antibody response but poor cellular reactivity. Adenoviral vectors have been effective inducing protective CD8+ T cell responses in several models including malaria; nonetheless this vaccine platform exhibits a limited induction of humoral immune responses. Two approaches have been used to improve the humoral immunogenicity of recombinant adenovirus vectors, the use of heterologous prime-boost regimens with recombinant proteins or the genetic modification of the hypervariable regions (HVR) of the capsid protein hexon to express B cell epitopes of interest. In this study, we describe the development of capsid modified Ad5 vectors that express a promiscuous Plasmodium yoelii T helper epitope denominated PyT53 within the hexon HVR2 region. Several regimens were tested in mice to determine the relevance of the hexon modification in enhancing protective immune responses induced by the previously described protein-based multi-stage experimental vaccine PyCMP. A heterologous prime-boost immunization regime that combines a hexon modified vector with transgenic expression of PyCMP followed by protein immunizations resulted in the induction of robust antibody and cellular immune responses in comparison to a similar regimen that includes a vector with unmodified hexon. These differences in immunogenicity translated into a better protective efficacy against both the hepatic and red blood cell stages of P. yoelii. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a hexon modification is used to deliver a promiscuous T cell epitope. Our data support the use of such modification to enhance the immunogenicity and protective

  7. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Kh Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15-22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2-5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6-11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7-12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16-30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences.

  8. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  9. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint. PMID:26715528

  10. Chimeric peptide constructs comprising linear B-cell epitopes: application to the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yudong; Li, Zhong; Teng, Huan; Xu, Hongke; Qi, Songnan; He, Jian’an; Gu, Dayong; Chen, Qijun; Ma, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Linear B-cell epitopes are ideal biomarkers for the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases. However, the long-predicted diagnostic value of epitopes has not been realized. Here, we demonstrated a method, diagnostic epitopes in four steps (DEIFS), that delivers a combination of epitopes for the serodiagnosis of infectious diseases with a high success rate. Using DEIFS for malaria, we identified 6 epitopes from 8 peptides and combined them into 3 chimeric peptide constructs. Along with 4 other peptides, we developed a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), which is able to differentiate Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) from Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infections with 95.6% overall sensitivity and 99.1% overall specificity. In addition to applications in diagnosis, DEIFS could also be used in the diagnosis of virus and bacterium infections, discovery of vaccine candidates, evaluation of vaccine potency, and study of disease progression. PMID:26293607

  11. Structure of viral B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1990-01-01

    Four categories of viral epitopes can be distinguished that have been designated cryptotopes, neotopes, metatopes and neutralization epitopes. Specific examples of each epitope type are presented and the methods used for locating their positions in viral proteins are described. The epitopes of four well-characterized viruses, namely poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, influenza virus and tobacco mosaic virus are briefly described.

  12. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  13. What is a B-cell epitope?

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, Marc H V

    2009-01-01

    The antigenicity of proteins resides in different types of antigenic determinants known as continuous and discontinuous epitopes, cryptotopes, neotopes, and mimotopes. All epitopes have fuzzy boundaries and can be identified only by their ability to bind to certain antibodies. Antigenic cross-reactivity is a common phenomenon because antibodies are always able to recognize a considerable number of related epitopes. This places severe limits to the specificity of antibodies. Antigenicity, which is the ability of an epitope to react with an antibody, must be distinguished from its immunogenicity or ability to induce antibodies in a competent vertebrate host. Failure to make this distinction partly explains why no successful peptide-based vaccines have yet been developed. Methods for predicting the epitopes of proteins are discussed and the reasons for the low success rate of epitope prediction are analyzed.

  14. T cell epitope-based allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Larché, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) with extracts containing intact allergen molecules is clinically efficacious, but associated with frequent adverse events related to the allergic sensitization of the patient. As a result, treatment is initiated in an incremental dose fashion which ultimately achieves a plateau (maintenance dose) that may be continued for several years. Reduction of allergic adverse events may allow safer and more rapid treatment Thus, many groups have developed and evaluated strategies to reduce allergenicity whilst maintaining immunogenicity, the latter being required to achieve specific modulation of the immune response. Peptide immunotherapy can be used to target T and/or B cells in an antigen-specific manner. To date, only approaches that target T cells have been clinically evaluated. Short, synthetic peptides representing immunodominant T cell epitopes of major allergens are able to modulate allergen-specific T cell responses in the absence of IgE cross linking and activation of effector cells. Here we review clinical and mechanistic studies associated with peptide immunotherapy targeting allergy to cats or to bee venom. 

  15. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  16. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-08-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  17. Benchmarking B cell epitope prediction: underperformance of existing methods.

    PubMed

    Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    Sequence profiling is used routinely to predict the location of B-cell epitopes. In the postgenomic era, the need for reliable epitope prediction is clear. We assessed 484 amino acid propensity scales in combination with ranges of plotting parameters to examine exhaustively the correlation of peaks and epitope location within 50 proteins mapped for polyclonal responses. After examining more than 10(6) combinations, we found that even the best set of scales and parameters performed only marginally better than random. Our results confirm the null hypothesis: Single-scale amino acid propensity profiles cannot be used to predict epitope location reliably. The implication for studies using such methods is obvious. PMID:15576553

  18. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  19. First multi-epitope subunit vaccine against extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli delivered by a bacterial type-3 secretion system (T3SS).

    PubMed

    Wieser, Andreas; Magistro, Giuseppe; Nörenberg, Dominik; Hoffmann, Christiane; Schubert, Sören

    2012-01-01

    Infections due to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are very common in humans as well as in animals. In humans ExPEC infections include urinary tract infections (UTI), septicemia, and wound infections, which result in significant morbidity, mortality, and substantial healthcare costs. In view of the increasing number of ExPEC infections caused by more and more resistant strains, effective prevention would be desirable. Given the rising treatment costs, a vaccine may be cost-effective in selected patient groups, such as women with recurrent UTI, patients with neurologic disorders impairing bladder function and men with prostate hyperplasia. Previous vaccine studies used single target proteins or whole inactivated ExPEC cells. Here, we describe a vaccine system for oral application based on artificial multiple subunit vaccine proteins. Those multi-epitope proteins are composed of predicted epitopes derived from ExPEC virulence-associated proteins. As ExPEC are known to form intracellular biofilms in the urothelium and can also resist killing by non-activated macrophages, T-cell responses are supposed to be an important measure to counteract these stages of ExPEC during infection. Therefore, a live bacterial antigen delivery system based upon the Salmonella type-III secretion system (T3SS) was used in this study to directly deliver the vaccine proteins into the cytoplasm of the host cells. Epitope-rich domains of the proteins FyuA, IroN, ChuA, IreA, Iha, and Usp were expressed in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain and translocated into target cells for extended periods of time inducing a strong T-cell response. No significant antibody titre increase against the secreted vaccine proteins could be detected in vaginal wash or serum. Despite that, one of the vaccine proteins was able to significantly reduce bacterial load in the challenge model of intraperitoneal sepsis. This study shows that a vaccine encompassing distinct epitopes of

  20. T cell epitopes and post-translationally modified epitopes in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McGinty, John W; Marré, Meghan L; Bajzik, Veronique; Piganelli, Jon D; James, Eddie A

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which progressive loss of self-tolerance, evidenced by accumulation of auto-antibodies and auto-reactive T cells that recognize diverse self-proteins, leads to immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells and loss of insulin secretion. In this review, we discuss antigens and epitopes in T1D and the role that post-translational modifications play in circumventing tolerance mechanisms and increasing antigenic diversity. Emerging data suggest that, analogous to other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and celiac disease, enzymatically modified epitopes are preferentially recognized in T1D. Modifying enzymes such as peptidyl deiminases and tissue transglutaminase are activated in response to beta cell stress, providing a mechanistic link between post-translational modification and interactions with the environment. Although studies of such responses in the at-risk population have been limited, current data suggests that breakdown in tolerance through post-translational modification represents an important checkpoint in the development of T1D. PMID:26370701

  1. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES. PMID:24358361

  2. Immunoregulatory T cell epitope peptides: the new frontier in allergy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, S R; Rolland, J M; O'Hehir, R E

    2015-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been practised since 1911 and remains the only therapy proven to modify the natural history of allergic diseases. Although efficacious in carefully selected individuals, the currently licensed whole allergen extracts retain the risk of IgE-mediated adverse events, including anaphylaxis and occasionally death. This together with the need for prolonged treatment regimens results in poor patient adherence. The central role of the T cell in orchestrating the immune response to allergen informs the choice of T cell targeted therapies for down-regulation of aberrant allergic responses. Carefully mapped short synthetic peptides that contain the dominant T cell epitopes of major allergens and bind to a diverse array of HLA class II alleles, can be delivered intradermally into non-inflamed skin to induce sustained clinical and immunological tolerance. The short peptides from allergenic proteins are unable to cross-link IgE and possess minimal inflammatory potential. Systematic progress has been made from in vitro human models of allergen T cell epitope-based peptide anergy in the early 1990s, through proof-of-concept murine allergy models and early human trials with longer peptides, to the current randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with the potential new class of synthetic short immune-regulatory T cell epitope peptide therapies. Sustained efficacy with few adverse events is being reported for cat, house dust mite and grass pollen allergy after only a short course of treatment. Underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be fully delineated but anergy, deletion, immune deviation and Treg induction all seem contributory to successful outcomes, with changes in IgG4 apparently less important compared to conventional AIT. T cell epitope peptide therapy is promising a safe and effective new class of specific treatment for allergy, enabling wider application even for more severe allergic diseases. PMID:25900315

  3. CD45 epitope mapping of human CD1a+ dendritic cells and peripheral blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Freudenthal, P. S.; Edinger, A.; Steinman, R. M.; Warnke, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors studied the pattern of leukocyte common antigen (CD45) epitope expression on dendritic cells in sections of human epidermis, tonsillar epithelium, dermatopathic lymph nodes, and in isolates from blood. The monoclonal antibodies (MAb) used were specific for all known CD45 epitopes, including the seven different CD45 common epitopes as well as the four known CD45R epitopes (two CD45RA, one CD45RB, and one CD45RO). Dendritic cells in all sites were uniformly reactive for the CD45 common epitopes tested except 2B11, which may recognize a CD45R rather than CD45 epitope. By single-label immunoperoxidase and double-label immunofluorescence epitope mapping of CD1a+ dendritic cells in tissue sections, it was generally difficult or impossible to detect expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, CD45RO, or 2B11. In blood dendritic cells, however, low levels of these CD45R epitopes were detected consistently using single-label immunoperoxidase staining of cytocentrifuge preparations. Monocytes were similar to blood dendritic cells except that the staining with MAb to CD45RO and 2B11 was slightly stronger. The authors conclude that dendritic cells differ from most subpopulations of lymphocytes in that CD45 common epitopes are readily detectable but the existing RA, RB, and RO epitopes are either undetectable or expressed at relatively low levels. These studies raise the possibility that CD1a+ dendritic cells may express a novel dominant CD45 isoform. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1711291

  4. Ab and T cell epitopes of influenza A virus, knowledge and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Peters, Bjoern; Assarsson, Erika; Mbawuike, Innocent; Sette, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resources (IEDB) (www.immuneepitope.org) was recently developed to capture epitope related data. IEDB also hosts various bioinformatics tools that can be used to identify novel epitopes as well as to analyze and visualize existing epitope data. Herein, a comprehensive analysis was undertaken (i) to compile and inventory existing knowledge regarding influenza A epitopes and (ii) to determine possible cross-reactivities of identified epitopes among avian H5N1 and human influenza strains. At present, IEDB contains >600 different epitopes derived from 58 different strains and 10 influenza A proteins. By using the IEDB analysis resources, conservancy analyses were performed, and several conserved and possibly cross-reactive epitopes were identified. Significant gaps in the current knowledge were also revealed, including paucity of Ab epitopes in comparison with T cell epitopes, limited number of epitopes reported for avian influenza strains/subtypes, and limited number of epitopes reported from proteins other than hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein. This analysis provides a resource for researchers to access existing influenza epitope data. At the same time, the analysis illustrates gaps in our collective knowledge that should inspire directions for further study of immunity against the influenza A virus. PMID:17200302

  5. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  6. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  7. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  8. Synthetic Peptide libraries for T-cell epitope identification.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, H S; Drijfhout, J W; Koning, F

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes a methodology for elucidating immunogenic epitopes stimulatory for CD4(+) T-cell clones (Fig. 1). The methodology makes use of synthetic peptide libraries and must be regarded as an alternative to other approaches, such as peptide elution or the application of genetic libraries. The methodology only requires knowledge about the restriction element of the T-cell clone. The restriction element determines which major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding anchor motif must be built into the library peptides. A synthetic peptide library is prepared comprising approx 8 million peptides. The synthesis proceeds via a mix-and-split protocol using a solidphase approach on a hybrid resin (1,2). On a hybrid resin, most of the peptide material (84%) is attached via an acid-labile linker whereas the remaining part of the peptide material is acid-stable attached (3). During synthesis, resinbound peptides comprising 14 amino acid residues are produced, with each resin bead containing one unique peptide (4,5). The beads are split into 384 pools, with each pool containing 20,000 beads. From each pool, about 28% of the peptide material is cleaved from every bead. Subsequently, in the first screening round, the 384 pools, each containing 20,000 solubilized peptides, are tested in a proliferation assay with the T-cell clone. Fig. 1. Flow diagram of the complete procedure for the identification of T-cell epitopes using synthetic peptide libraries (1).

  9. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Machao; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  10. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  11. Sequence variation of cytotoxic T cell epitopes in different isolates of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Apolloni, A; Moss, D; Stumm, R; Burrows, S; Suhrbier, A; Misko, I; Schmidt, C; Sculley, T

    1992-01-01

    Previous results have identified two distinct cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes encoded by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), TETA (ORF BLRF3/BERF1 residues 329-353) and EENL (ORF BERF3/BERF4 residues 290-309). Measurement of the specificities of CTL clones (TETA-specific clone 13 and EENL-specific clone 7) directed against these epitopes indicated that the EENL epitope is conserved in all strains of EBV tested while the TETA epitope varied between individual virus strains. Sequencing of the DNA regions encoding these two CTL epitopes in different EBV isolates confirmed these interpretations and demonstrated that different TETA epitope sequences were encoded by B-type EBV strains and by the B95-8 isolate of EBV compared to the other A-type EBV strains. Titration of synthetic variants of the TETA epitope revealed that the epitope encoded by B95-8 was 15-fold less efficient as a T cell epitope than the sequence encoded by other A-type viral strains while the TETA variant encoded by the B-type strains displayed essentially no activity as a T cell epitope.

  12. Bioinformatics Resources and Tools for Conformational B-Cell Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pingping; Ju, Haixu; Liu, Zhenbang; Ning, Qiao; Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaowei; Huang, Yanxin; Ma, Zhiqiang; Li, Yuxin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of epitopes which invoke strong humoral responses is an essential issue in the field of immunology. Localizing epitopes by experimental methods is expensive in terms of time, cost, and effort; therefore, computational methods feature for its low cost and high speed was employed to predict B-cell epitopes. In this paper, we review the recent advance of bioinformatics resources and tools in conformational B-cell epitope prediction, including databases, algorithms, web servers, and their applications in solving problems in related areas. To stimulate the development of better tools, some promising directions are also extensively discussed. PMID:23970944

  13. Determination of B-Cell Epitopes in Patients with Celiac Disease: Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Marietta, Eric V.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Rajasekaran, John; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Wang, Tianhao; Bei, Kang; Krishna, Karthik; Krishnamurthy, Hari K.; Snyder, Melissa R.; Jayaraman, Vasanth; Murray, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most antibodies recognize conformational or discontinuous epitopes that have a specific 3-dimensional shape; however, determination of discontinuous B-cell epitopes is a major challenge in bioscience. Moreover, the current methods for identifying peptide epitopes often involve laborious, high-cost peptide screening programs. Here, we present a novel microarray method for identifying discontinuous B-cell epitopes in celiac disease (CD) by using a silicon-based peptide array and computational methods. Methods Using a novel silicon-based microarray platform with a multi-pillar chip, overlapping 12-mer peptide sequences of all native and deamidated gliadins, which are known to trigger CD, were synthesized in situ and used to identify peptide epitopes. Results Using a computational algorithm that considered disease specificity of peptide sequences, 2 distinct epitope sets were identified. Further, by combining the most discriminative 3-mer gliadin sequences with randomly interpolated3- or 6-mer peptide sequences, novel discontinuous epitopes were identified and further optimized to maximize disease discrimination. The final discontinuous epitope sets were tested in a confirmatory cohort of CD patients and controls, yielding 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions These novel sets of epitopes derived from gliadin have a high degree of accuracy in differentiating CD from controls, compared with standard serologic tests. The method of ultra-high-density peptide microarray described here would be broadly useful to develop high-fidelity diagnostic tests and explore pathogenesis. PMID:26824466

  14. Identification and translational validation of novel mammaglobin-A CD8 T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Soysal, S. D.; Kan-Mitchell, J.; Huarte, E.; Zhang, X.; Wilkinson-Ryan, I.; Fleming, T.; Tiriveedhi, V.; Mohanakumar, T.; Li, L.; Herndon, J.; Oertli, D.; Goedegebuure, S. P.; Gillanders, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammaglobin-A (MAM-A) is a secretory protein that is overexpressed in 80 % of human breast cancers. Its near-universal expression in breast cancer as well as its exquisite tissue specificity makes it an attractive target for a breast cancer prevention vaccine, and we recently initiated a phase 1 clinical trial of a MAM-A DNA vaccine. Previously, we have identified multiple MAM-A CD8 T cell epitopes using a reverse immunology candidate epitope approach based on predicted binding, but to date no attempt has been made to identify epitopes using an unbiased approach. In this study, we used human T cells primed in vitro with autologous dendritic cells expressing MAM-A to systematically identify MAM-A CD8 T cell epitopes. Using this unbiased approach, we identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted MAM-A epitopes. CD8 T cells specific for these epitopes are able to recognize and lyse human breast cancer cells in a MAM-A-specific, HLA-A2-dependent fashion. HLA-A2+/MAM-A+ breast cancer patients have an increased prevalence of CD8 T cells specific for these novel MAM-A epitopes, and vaccination with a MAM-A DNA vaccine significantly increases the number of these CD8 T cells. The identification and translational validation of novel MAM-A epitopes has important implications for the ongoing clinical development of vaccine strategies targeting MAM-A. The novel MAM-A epitopes represent attractive targets for epitope-based vaccination strategies, and can also be used to monitor immune responses. Taken together these studies provide additional support for MAM-A as an important therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25212176

  15. A novel conformational B-cell epitope prediction method based on mimotope and patch analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pingping; Qi, Jialiang; Zhao, Yizhu; Huang, Yanxin; Yang, Guifu; Ma, Zhiqiang; Li, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    A B-cell epitope is a group of residues on the surface of an antigen that stimulates humoral immune responses. Identifying B-cell epitopes is important for effective vaccine design. Predicting epitopes by experimental methods is expensive in terms of time, cost and effort; therefore, computational methods that have a low cost and high speed are widely used to predict B-cell epitopes. Recently, epitope prediction based on random peptide library screening has been viewed as a promising method. Some novel software and web-based servers have been proposed that have succeeded in some test cases. Herein, we propose a novel epitope prediction method based on amino acid pairs and patch analysis. The method first divides antigen surfaces into overlapping patches based on both radius (R) and number (N), then predict epitopes based on Amino Acid Pairs (AAPs) from mimotopes and the surface patch. The proposed method yields a mean sensitivity of 0.53, specificity of 0.77, ACC of 0.75 and F-measure of 0.45 for 39 test cases. Compared with mimotope-based methods, patch-based methods and two other prediction methods, the sensitivity of the new method offers a certain improvement. Our findings demonstrate that this proposed method was successful for patch and AAPs analysis and allowed for conformational B-cell epitope prediction. PMID:26804644

  16. Immune activation promotes evolutionary conservation of T-cell epitopes in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Nebot, Miguel R; Peris, Joan B; Alcamí, José

    2013-01-01

    The immune system should constitute a strong selective pressure promoting viral genetic diversity and evolution. However, HIV shows lower sequence variability at T-cell epitopes than elsewhere in the genome, in contrast with other human RNA viruses. Here, we propose that epitope conservation is a consequence of the particular interactions established between HIV and the immune system. On one hand, epitope recognition triggers an anti-HIV response mediated by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs), but on the other hand, activation of CD4(+) helper T lymphocytes (TH cells) promotes HIV replication. Mathematical modeling of these opposite selective forces revealed that selection at the intrapatient level can promote either T-cell epitope conservation or escape. We predict greater conservation for epitopes contributing significantly to total immune activation levels (immunodominance), and when TH cell infection is concomitant to epitope recognition (trans-infection). We suggest that HIV-driven immune activation in the lymph nodes during the chronic stage of the disease may offer a favorable scenario for epitope conservation. Our results also support the view that some pathogens draw benefits from the immune response and suggest that vaccination strategies based on conserved TH epitopes may be counterproductive.

  17. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines.

  18. Epitope-driven DNA vaccine design employing immunoinformatics against B-cell lymphoma: a biotech's challenge.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Fazio, Vito Michele; Rinaldi, Monica

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccination has been widely explored to develop new, alternative and efficient vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. DNA vaccines offer several benefits such as specific targeting, use of multiple genes to enhance immunity and reduced risk compared to conventional vaccines. Rapid developments in molecular biology and immunoinformatics enable rational design approaches. These technologies allow construction of DNA vaccines encoding selected tumor antigens together with molecules to direct and amplify the desired effector pathways, as well as highly targeted vaccines aimed at specific epitopes. Reliable predictions of immunogenic T cell epitope peptides are crucial for rational vaccine design and represent a key problem in immunoinformatics. Computational approaches have been developed to facilitate the process of epitope detection and show potential applications to the immunotherapeutic treatment of cancer. In this review a number of different epitope prediction methods are briefly illustrated and effective use of these resources to support experimental studies is described. Epitope-driven vaccine design employs these bioinformatics algorithms to identify potential targets of vaccines against cancer. In this paper the selection of T cell epitopes to develop epitope-based vaccines, the need for CD4(+) T cell help for improved vaccines and the assessment of vaccine performance against tumor are reviewed. We focused on two applications, namely prediction of novel T cell epitopes and epitope enhancement by sequence modification, and combined rationale design with bioinformatics for creation of new synthetic mini-genes. This review describes the development of epitope-based DNA vaccines and their antitumor effects in preclinical research against B-cell lymphoma, corroborating the usefulness of this platform as a potential tool for cancer therapy. Achievements in the field of DNA vaccines allow to overcome hurdles to clinical translation. In a scenario where the vaccine

  19. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    PubMed

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  20. HIV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cell responses strongly associated with delayed disease progression cross-recognize epitope variants efficiently.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Emma L; Lopes, A Ross; Jones, Nicola A; Cornforth, David; Newton, Phillipa; Aldam, Diana; Pellegrino, Pierre; Turner, Jo; Williams, Ian; Wilson, Craig M; Goepfert, Paul A; Maini, Mala K; Borrow, Persephone

    2006-05-15

    The ability of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to recognize epitope variants resulting from viral sequence variation in vivo may affect the ease with which HIV-1 can escape T cell control and impact on the rate of disease progression in HIV-1-infected humans. Here, we studied the functional cross-reactivity of CD8 responses to HIV-1 epitopes restricted by HLA class I alleles associated with differential prognosis of infection. We show that the epitope-specific responses exhibiting the most efficient cross-recognition of amino acid-substituted variants were those strongly associated with delayed progression to disease. Not all epitopes restricted by the same HLA class I allele showed similar variant cross-recognition efficiency, consistent with the hypothesis that the reported associations between particular HLA class I alleles and rate of disease progression may be due to the quality of responses to certain "critical" epitopes. Irrespective of their efficiency of functional cross-recognition, CD8(+) T cells of all HIV-1 epitope specificities examined showed focused TCR usage. Furthermore, interpatient variability in variant cross-reactivity correlated well with use of different dominant TCR Vbeta families, suggesting that flexibility is not conferred by the overall clonal breadth of the response but instead by properties of the dominant TCR(s) used for epitope recognition. A better understanding of the features of T cell responses associated with long-term control of viral replication should facilitate rational vaccine design.

  1. HIV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cell responses strongly associated with delayed disease progression cross-recognize epitope variants efficiently.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Emma L; Lopes, A Ross; Jones, Nicola A; Cornforth, David; Newton, Phillipa; Aldam, Diana; Pellegrino, Pierre; Turner, Jo; Williams, Ian; Wilson, Craig M; Goepfert, Paul A; Maini, Mala K; Borrow, Persephone

    2006-05-15

    The ability of HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to recognize epitope variants resulting from viral sequence variation in vivo may affect the ease with which HIV-1 can escape T cell control and impact on the rate of disease progression in HIV-1-infected humans. Here, we studied the functional cross-reactivity of CD8 responses to HIV-1 epitopes restricted by HLA class I alleles associated with differential prognosis of infection. We show that the epitope-specific responses exhibiting the most efficient cross-recognition of amino acid-substituted variants were those strongly associated with delayed progression to disease. Not all epitopes restricted by the same HLA class I allele showed similar variant cross-recognition efficiency, consistent with the hypothesis that the reported associations between particular HLA class I alleles and rate of disease progression may be due to the quality of responses to certain "critical" epitopes. Irrespective of their efficiency of functional cross-recognition, CD8(+) T cells of all HIV-1 epitope specificities examined showed focused TCR usage. Furthermore, interpatient variability in variant cross-reactivity correlated well with use of different dominant TCR Vbeta families, suggesting that flexibility is not conferred by the overall clonal breadth of the response but instead by properties of the dominant TCR(s) used for epitope recognition. A better understanding of the features of T cell responses associated with long-term control of viral replication should facilitate rational vaccine design. PMID:16670322

  2. HIV Control Is Mediated in Part by CD8+ T-Cell Targeting of Specific Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Florencia; Heckerman, David; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Kadie, Carl; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Karel, Daniel; Goldenthal, Ariel; Davis, Oliver B.; DeZiel, Charles E.; Lin, Tienho; Peng, Jian; Piechocka, Alicja; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the hypothesis that the correlation between the class I HLA types of an individual and whether that individual spontaneously controls HIV-1 is mediated by the targeting of specific epitopes by CD8+ T cells. By measuring gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay responses to a panel of 257 optimally defined epitopes in 341 untreated HIV-infected persons, including persons who spontaneously control viremia, we found that the correlation between HLA types and control is mediated by the targeting of specific epitopes. Moreover, we performed a graphical model-based analysis that suggested that the targeting of specific epitopes is a cause of such control—that is, some epitopes are protective rather than merely associated with control—and identified eight epitopes that are significantly protective. In addition, we use an in silico analysis to identify protein regions where mutations are likely to affect the stability of a protein, and we found that the protective epitopes identified by the ELISPOT analysis correspond almost perfectly to such regions. This in silico analysis thus suggests a possible mechanism for control and could be used to identify protective epitopes that are not often targeted in natural infection but that may be potentially useful in a vaccine. Our analyses thus argue for the inclusion (and exclusion) of specific epitopes in an HIV vaccine. IMPORTANCE Some individuals naturally control HIV replication in the absence of antiretroviral therapy, and this ability to control is strongly correlated with the HLA class I alleles that they express. Here, in a large-scale experimental study, we provide evidence that this correlation is mediated largely by the targeting of specific CD8+ T-cell epitopes, and we identify eight epitopes that are likely to cause control. In addition, we provide an in silico analysis indicating that control occurs because mutations within these epitopes change the stability of the

  3. T-cell epitope vaccine design by immunoinformatics.

    PubMed

    Patronov, Atanas; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-08

    Vaccination is generally considered to be the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. All vaccinations work by presenting a foreign antigen to the immune system in order to evoke an immune response. The active agent of a vaccine may be intact but inactivated ('attenuated') forms of the causative pathogens (bacteria or viruses), or purified components of the pathogen that have been found to be highly immunogenic. The increased understanding of antigen recognition at molecular level has resulted in the development of rationally designed peptide vaccines. The concept of peptide vaccines is based on identification and chemical synthesis of B-cell and T-cell epitopes which are immunodominant and can induce specific immune responses. The accelerating growth of bioinformatics techniques and applications along with the substantial amount of experimental data has given rise to a new field, called immunoinformatics. Immunoinformatics is a branch of bioinformatics dealing with in silico analysis and modelling of immunological data and problems. Different sequence- and structure-based immunoinformatics methods are reviewed in the paper.

  4. [Study on the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein].

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin-Jun; Shen, Xin-Xin; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Hao; Wang, Li-Hua; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2014-05-01

    To study the B cell linear epitopes of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein, peptides were synthesized according to the amino acid sequences of B cell linear epitopes. Linear epitopes predicted by bioinformatics analysis were evaluated with immunological techniques. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that titers of antibodies to peptides (355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein) were above 1:12 800 in mouse sera. The antibodies recognized denatured rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in Western blot analysis. Purified anti-peptide antibodies recognized natural rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein in BHK-21 cells in indirect fluorescent antibody test. The 355-369 and 385-400 residues of rabies virus CVS-11 nucleoprotein were validated as B cell linear epitopes.

  5. CD4+ T Cells Targeting Dominant and Cryptic Epitopes from Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Ascough, Stephanie; Ingram, Rebecca J; Chu, Karen K Y; Musson, Julie A; Moore, Stephen J; Gallagher, Theresa; Baillie, Les; Williamson, Ethel D; Robinson, John H; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is an endemic infection in many countries, particularly in the developing world. The causative agent, Bacillus anthracis, mediates disease through the secretion of binary exotoxins. Until recently, research into adaptive immunity targeting this bacterial pathogen has largely focused on the humoral response to these toxins. There is, however, growing recognition that cellular immune responses involving IFNγ producing CD4+ T cells also contribute significantly to a protective memory response. An established concept in adaptive immunity to infection is that during infection of host cells, new microbial epitopes may be revealed, leading to immune recognition of so called 'cryptic' or 'subdominant' epitopes. We analyzed the response to both cryptic and immunodominant T cell epitopes derived from the toxin component lethal factor and presented by a range of HLA-DR alleles. Using IFNγ-ELISpot assays we characterized epitopes that elicited a response following immunization with synthetic peptide and the whole protein and tested their capacities to bind purified HLA-DR molecules in vitro. We found that DR1 transgenics demonstrated T cell responses to a greater number of domain III cryptic epitopes than other HLA-DR transgenics, and that this pattern was repeated with the immunodominant epitopes, as a greater proportion of these epitopes induced a T cell response when presented within the context of the whole protein. Immunodominant epitopes LF457-476 and LF467-487 were found to induce a T cell response to the peptide, as well as to the whole native LF protein in DR1 and DR15, but not in DR4 transgenics. The analysis of Domain I revealed the presence of several unique cryptic epitopes all of which showed a strong to moderate relative binding affinity to HLA-DR4 molecules. However, none of the cryptic epitopes from either domain III or I displayed notably high binding affinities across all HLA-DR alleles assayed. These responses were influenced by the specific HLA

  6. Cross-reactive human B cell and T cell epitopes between influenza A and B viruses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses form different genera, which were originally distinguished by antigenic differences in their nucleoproteins and matrix 1 proteins. Cross-protection between these two genera has not been observed in animal experiments, which is consistent with the low homology in viral proteins common to both viruses except for one of three polymerase proteins, polymerase basic 1 (PB1). Recently, however, antibody and CD4+ T cell epitopes conserved between the two genera were identified in humans. A protective antibody epitope was located in the stalk region of the surface glycoprotein, hemagglutinin, and a CD4+ T cell epitope was located in the fusion peptide of the hemagglutinin. The fusion peptide was also found to contain antibody epitopes in humans and animals. A short stretch of well-conserved peptide was also identified in the other surface glycoprotein, neuraminidase, and antibodies binding to this peptide were generated by peptide immunization in rabbits. Although PB1, the only protein which has relatively high overall sequence homology between influenza A and B viruses, is not considered an immunodominant protein in the T cell responses to influenza A virus infection, amino acid sequence comparisons show that a considerable number of previously identified T cell epitopes in the PB1 of influenza A viruses are conserved in the PB1 of influenza B viruses. These data indicate that B and T cell cross-reactivity exists between influenza A and B viruses, which may have modulatory effects on the disease process and recovery. Although the antibody titers and the specific T cell frequencies induced by natural infection or standard vaccination may not be high enough to provide cross protection in humans, it might be possible to develop immunization strategies to induce these cross-reactive responses more efficiently. PMID:23886073

  7. Characterization of Immunodominant BK Polyomavirus 9mer Epitope T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, M.; Leboeuf, C.; Comoli, P.; Ginevri, F.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) causes polyomavirus‐associated nephropathy and allograft loss. Reducing immunosuppression is associated with clearing viremia and nephropathy and increasing BKPyV‐specific T cell responses in most patients; however, current immunoassays have limited sensitivity, target mostly CD4+ T cells, and largely fail to predict onset and clearance of BKPyV replication. To characterize BKPyV‐specific CD8+ T cells, bioinformatics were used to predict 9mer epitopes in the early viral gene region (EVGR) presented by 14 common HLAs in Europe and North America. Thirty‐nine EVGR epitopes were experimentally confirmed by interferon‐γ enzyme‐linked immunospot assays in at least 30% of BKPyV IgG–seropositive healthy participants. Most 9mers clustered in domains, and some were presented by more than one HLA class I, as typically seen for immunodominant epitopes. Specific T cell binding using MHC class I streptamers was demonstrated for 21 of 39 (54%) epitopes. In a prospective cohort of 118 pediatric KTRs, 19 patients protected or recovering from BKPyV viremia were experimentally tested, and 13 epitopes were validated. Single HLA mismatches were not associated with viremia, suggesting that failing immune control likely involves multiple factors including maintenance immunosuppression. Combining BKPyV load and T cell assays using immunodominant epitopes may help in evaluating risk and reducing immunosuppression and may lead to safe adoptive T cell transfer. PMID:26663765

  8. Hybrid methods for B-cell epitope prediction.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2014-01-01

    Many computational approaches to B-cell epitope prediction have been published, including combinations of previously proposed methods, which complicates the tasks of further developing such computational approaches and of selecting those most appropriate for practical applications (e.g., the design of novel immunodiagnostics and vaccines). These tasks are considered together herein to clarify their close but often overlooked interrelationship, thereby providing a guide to their performance in mutual support of one another, with emphasis on key physicochemical and biological considerations that are relevant from an applications perspective. This aims to assist investigators in performing either or both tasks, with the overall goals of successfully applying computational tools towards practical ends and of generating informative new data towards iterative improvement of the tools, particularly as regards the design of peptide-based immunogens for eliciting the production of antipeptide antibodies that modulate biological activity of protein targets via functionally relevant cross-reactivity in relation to the phenomena of protein folding and protein disorder.

  9. Discovery of protective B-cell epitopes for development of antimicrobial vaccines and antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Jacqueline; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Lu, Zhaohua; Yang, Chiou-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Protective antibodies play an essential role in immunity to infection by neutralizing microbes or their toxins and recruiting microbicidal effector functions. Identification of the protective B-cell epitopes, those parts of microbial antigens that contact the variable regions of the protective antibodies, can lead to development of antibody therapeutics, guide vaccine design, enable assessment of protective antibody responses in infected or vaccinated individuals, and uncover or localize pathogenic microbial functions that could be targeted by novel antimicrobials. Monoclonal antibodies are required to link in vivo or in vitro protective effects to specific epitopes and may be obtained from experimental animals or from humans, and their binding can be localized to specific regions of antigens by immunochemical assays. The epitopes are then identified with mapping methods such as X-ray crystallography of antigen-antibody complexes, antibody inhibition of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the antigen, antibody-induced alteration of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the antigen, and experimentally validated computational docking of antigen-antibody complexes. The diversity in shape, size and structure of protective B-cell epitopes, and the increasing importance of protective B-cell epitope discovery to development of vaccines and antibody therapeutics are illustrated through examples from different microbe categories, with emphasis on epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies to pathogens of high antigenic variation. Examples include the V-shaped Ab52 glycan epitope in the O-antigen of Francisella tularensis, the concave CR6261 peptidic epitope in the haemagglutinin stem of influenza virus H1N1, and the convex/concave PG16 glycopeptidic epitope in the gp120 V1/V2 loop of HIV type 1.

  10. Discovery of protective B-cell epitopes for development of antimicrobial vaccines and antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Jacqueline; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Lu, Zhaohua; Yang, Chiou-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Protective antibodies play an essential role in immunity to infection by neutralizing microbes or their toxins and recruiting microbicidal effector functions. Identification of the protective B-cell epitopes, those parts of microbial antigens that contact the variable regions of the protective antibodies, can lead to development of antibody therapeutics, guide vaccine design, enable assessment of protective antibody responses in infected or vaccinated individuals, and uncover or localize pathogenic microbial functions that could be targeted by novel antimicrobials. Monoclonal antibodies are required to link in vivo or in vitro protective effects to specific epitopes and may be obtained from experimental animals or from humans, and their binding can be localized to specific regions of antigens by immunochemical assays. The epitopes are then identified with mapping methods such as X-ray crystallography of antigen–antibody complexes, antibody inhibition of hydrogen–deuterium exchange in the antigen, antibody-induced alteration of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the antigen, and experimentally validated computational docking of antigen–antibody complexes. The diversity in shape, size and structure of protective B-cell epitopes, and the increasing importance of protective B-cell epitope discovery to development of vaccines and antibody therapeutics are illustrated through examples from different microbe categories, with emphasis on epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies to pathogens of high antigenic variation. Examples include the V-shaped Ab52 glycan epitope in the O-antigen of Francisella tularensis, the concave CR6261 peptidic epitope in the haemagglutinin stem of influenza virus H1N1, and the convex/concave PG16 glycopeptidic epitope in the gp120 V1/V2 loop of HIV type 1. PMID:24219801

  11. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Andres H; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E; Brockmeier, Susan L; Hughes, Holly R; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  12. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Andres H.; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  13. Chemical Modification of Influenza CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes Enhances Their Immunogenicity Regardless of Immunodominance

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Josine; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Jacobi, Ronald H. J.; Hendriks, Marion; Kapteijn, Kim; Ouwerkerk, Casper; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib; de Jonge, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    T cells are essential players in the defense against infection. By targeting the MHC class I antigen-presenting pathway with peptide-based vaccines, antigen-specific T cells can be induced. However, low immunogenicity of peptides poses a challenge. Here, we set out to increase immunogenicity of influenza-specific CD8+ T cell epitopes. By substituting amino acids in wild type sequences with non-proteogenic amino acids, affinity for MHC can be increased, which may ultimately enhance cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses. Since preventive vaccines against viruses should induce a broad immune response, we used this method to optimize influenza-specific epitopes of varying dominance. For this purpose, HLA-A*0201 epitopes GILGFVFTL, FMYSDFHFI and NMLSTVLGV were selected in order of decreasing MHC-affinity and dominance. For all epitopes, we designed chemically enhanced altered peptide ligands (CPLs) that exhibited greater binding affinity than their WT counterparts; even binding scores of the high affinity GILGFVFTL epitope could be improved. When HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice were vaccinated with selected CPLs, at least 2 out of 4 CPLs of each epitope showed an increase in IFN-γ responses of splenocytes. Moreover, modification of the low affinity epitope NMLSTVLGV led to an increase in the number of mice that responded. By optimizing three additional influenza epitopes specific for HLA-A*0301, we show that this strategy can be extended to other alleles. Thus, enhancing binding affinity of peptides provides a valuable tool to improve the immunogenicity and range of preventive T cell-targeted peptide vaccines. PMID:27333291

  14. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  15. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  16. Identification and characterization of B-cell epitopes of 3FTx and PLA(2) toxins from Micrurus corallinus snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castro, K L; Duarte, C G; Ramos, H R; Machado de Avila, R A; Schneider, F S; Oliveira, D; Freitas, C F; Kalapothakis, E; Ho, P L; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop a strategy to identify B-cell epitopes on four different three finger toxins (3FTX) and one phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from Micrurus corallinus snake venom. 3FTx and PLA2 are highly abundant components in Elapidic venoms and are the major responsibles for the toxicity observed in envenomation by coral snakes. Overlapping peptides from the sequence of each toxin were prepared by SPOT method and three different anti-elapidic sera were used to map the epitopes. After immunogenicity analysis of the spot-reactive peptides by EPITOPIA, a computational method, nine sequences from the five toxins were chemically synthesized and antigenically and immunogenically characterized. All the peptides were used together as immunogens in rabbits, delivered with Freund's adjuvant for a first cycle of immunization and Montanide in the second. A good antibody response against individual synthetic peptides and M. corallinus venom was achieved. Anti-peptide IgGs were also cross-reactive against Micrurus frontalis and Micrurus lemniscatus crude venoms. In addition, anti-peptide IgGs inhibits the lethal and phospholipasic activities of M. corallinus crude venom. Our results provide a rational basis to the identification of neutralizing epitopes on coral snake toxins and show that their corresponding synthetic peptides could improve the generation of immuno-therapeutics. The use of synthetic peptide for immunization is a reasonable approach, since it enables poly-specificity, low risk of toxic effects and large scale production.

  17. Epitope Specificity Delimits the Functional Capabilities of Vaccine-Induced CD8 T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brenna J.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Ende, Zachary; Ambrozak, David R.; Quinn, Kylie M.; Darko, Sam; Gostick, Emma; Wooldridge, Linda; van den Berg, Hugo A.; Venturi, Vanessa; Larsen, Martin; Davenport, Miles P.; Seder, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress toward understanding the correlates of protective T cell immunity in HIV infection, the optimal approach to Ag delivery by vaccination remains uncertain. We characterized two immunodominant CD8 T cell populations generated in response to immunization of BALB/c mice with a replication-deficient adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing the HIV-derived Gag and Pol proteins at equivalent levels. The Gag-AI9/H-2Kd epitope elicited high-avidity CD8 T cell populations with architecturally diverse clonotypic repertoires that displayed potent lytic activity in vivo. In contrast, the Pol-LI9/H-2Dd epitope elicited motif-constrained CD8 T cell repertoires that displayed lower levels of physical avidity and lytic activity despite equivalent measures of overall clonality. Although low-dose vaccination enhanced the functional profiles of both epitope-specific CD8 T cell populations, greater polyfunctionality was apparent within the Pol-LI9/H-2Dd specificity. Higher proportions of central memory-like cells were present after low-dose vaccination and at later time points. However, there were no noteworthy phenotypic differences between epitope-specific CD8 T cell populations across vaccine doses or time points. Collectively, these data indicate that the functional and phenotypic properties of vaccine-induced CD8 T cell populations are sensitive to dose manipulation, yet constrained by epitope specificity in a clonotype-dependent manner. PMID:25348625

  18. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang . E-mail: jianglf909@yahoo.com.cn; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-03-15

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed.

  19. Identification of Conserved and HLA Promiscuous DENV3 T-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Khan, Asif M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Guzman, Nicole; Paulaitis, Michael; de Melo, Andréa Barbosa; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Gil, Laura V. G.; Lemonnier, Françoir; Rinaldo, Charles; August, J. Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-dengue T-cell responses have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. However, most of the T-cell studies for dengue include few epitopes, with limited knowledge of their inter-serotype variation and the breadth of their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) affinity. In order to expand our knowledge of HLA-restricted dengue epitopes, we screened T-cell responses against 477 overlapping peptides derived from structural and non-structural proteins of the dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3) by use of HLA class I and II transgenic mice (TgM): A2, A24, B7, DR2, DR3 and DR4. TgM were inoculated with peptides pools and the T-cell immunogenic peptides were identified by ELISPOT. Nine HLA class I and 97 HLA class II novel DENV3 epitopes were identified based on immunogenicity in TgM and their HLA affinity was further confirmed by binding assays analysis. A subset of these epitopes activated memory T-cells from DENV3 immune volunteers and was also capable of priming naïve T-cells, ex vivo, from dengue IgG negative individuals. Analysis of inter- and intra-serotype variation of such an epitope (A02-restricted) allowed us to identify altered peptide ligands not only in DENV3 but also in other DENV serotypes. These studies also characterized the HLA promiscuity of 23 HLA class II epitopes bearing highly conserved sequences, six of which could bind to more than 10 different HLA molecules representing a large percentage of the global population. These epitope data are invaluable to investigate the role of T-cells in dengue immunity/pathogenesis and vaccine design. PMID:24130917

  20. Cross‐reactivity of hepatitis C virus specific vaccine‐induced T cells at immunodominant epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Christabel; Swadling, Leo; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Folgori, Antonella; Salio, Mariolina; Klenerman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Viral diversity is a challenge to the development of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine. Following vaccination of humans with adenoviral vectors, we determined the capacity of T cells to target common viral variants at immundominant epitopes ex vivo. We identified two major variants for epitopes NS31073 and NS31446, and multiple variants for epitope NS31406 that occurred in >5% of genotype 1 and 3 sequences at a population level. Cross‐reactivity of vaccine‐induced T cells was determined using variant peptides in IFN‐γ ELISPOT assays. Vaccine‐induced T cells targeted approximately 90% of NS31073 genotype 1 sequences and 50% of NS31446 genotype 1 and 3 sequences. For NS31406, 62% of subtype‐1b sequences were targeted. Next, we assessed whether an in vitro priming system, using dendritic cells and T cells from healthy donors, could identify a variant of NS31406 that was maximally cross‐reactive. In vitro priming assays showed that of those tested the NS31406 vaccine variant was the most immunogenic. T cells primed with genotype 1 variants from subtype 1a or 1b were broadly cross‐reactive with other variants from the same subtype. We conclude that immunization with candidate HCV adenoviral vaccines generates cross‐reactive T cells at immunodominant epitopes. The degree of cross‐reactivity varies between epitopes and may be HCV‐subtype specific. PMID:25263407

  1. Combinatorial tetramer staining and mass cytometry analysis facilitate T-cell epitope mapping and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Evan W; Sigal, Natalia; Nair, Nitya; Kidd, Brian A; Greenberg, Harry B; Davis, Mark M

    2013-01-01

    It is currently not possible to predict which epitopes will be recognized by T cells in different individuals. This is a barrier to the thorough analysis and understanding of T-cell responses after vaccination or infection. Here, by combining mass cytometry with combinatorial peptide–MHC tetramer staining, we have developed a method allowing the rapid and simultaneous identification and characterization of T cells specific for many epitopes. We use this to screen up to 109 different peptide–MHC tetramers in a single human blood sample, while still retaining at least 23 labels to analyze other markers of T-cell phenotype and function. Among 77 candidate rotavirus epitopes, we identified six T-cell epitopes restricted to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 in the blood of healthy individuals. T cells specific for epitopes in the rotavirus VP3 protein displayed a distinct phenotype and were present at high frequencies in intestinal epithelium. This approach should be useful for the comprehensive analysis of T-cell responses to infectious diseases or vaccines. PMID:23748502

  2. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine. PMID:26552001

  3. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine.

  4. Vaccination with Lipid Core Peptides Fails to Induce Epitope-Specific T Cell Responses but Confers Non-Specific Protective Immunity in a Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Simon H.; Groves, Penny L.; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Fujita, Yoshio; Chang, Chenghung; Toth, Istvan; Doolan, Denise L.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP) vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge. PMID:22936972

  5. Protective CD4 T cells targeting cryptic epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resist infection-driven terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Joshua S; Aagaard, Claus Sindbjerg; Hansen, Paul R; Cassidy, Joseph P; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter

    2014-04-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial to the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are a key component of current vaccine strategies. Conversely, immune-mediated pathology drives disease, and recent evidence suggests that adaptive and innate responses are evolutionarily beneficial to M. tuberculosis. We compare the functionality of CD4 T cell responses mounted against dominant and cryptic epitopes of the M. tuberculosis 6-kDa early secreted Ag (ESAT-6) before and postinfection. Protective T cells against cryptic epitopes not targeted during natural infection were induced by vaccinating mice with a truncated ESAT-6 protein, lacking the dominant epitope. The ability to generate T cells that recognize multiple cryptic epitopes was MHC-haplotype dependent, including increased potential via heterologous MHC class II dimers. Before infection, cryptic epitope-specific T cells displayed enhanced proliferative capacity and delayed cytokine kinetics. After aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge, vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells expanded and recruited to the lung. In chronic infection, dominant epitope-specific T cells developed a terminal differentiated KLRG1(+)/PD-1(lo) surface phenotype that was significantly reduced in the cryptic epitope-specific T cell populations. Dominant epitope-specific T cells in vaccinated animals developed into IFN-γ- and IFN-γ,TNF-α-coproducing effector cells, characteristic of the endogenous response. In contrast, cryptic epitope-specific CD4 T cells maintained significantly greater IFN-γ(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) and TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) memory-associated polyfunctionality and enhanced proliferative capacity. Vaccine-associated IL-17A production by cryptic CD4 T cells was also enhanced, but without increased neutrophilia/pathology. Direct comparison of dominant/cryptic epitope-specific CD4 T cells within covaccinated mice confirmed the superior ability of protective cryptic epitope-specific T cells to resist M. tuberculosis infection-driven T cell

  6. The influence of orientation and number of copies of T and B cell epitopes on the specificity and affinity of antibodies induced by chimeric peptides.

    PubMed

    Partidos, C; Stanley, C; Steward, M

    1992-10-01

    CBA and TO mice were immunized with chimeric peptide immunogens consisting of B cell (residues 404-414) and T cell (residues 288-302) epitopes from the F protein of measles virus. The chimeras were co-linearly synthesized to contain one or two copies of the T cell epitope linked to one or two copies of the B cell epitope via a glycine.glycine spacer. Two orientations were synthesized such that the T cell epitope(s) were located at either the amino or carboxyl terminus of the B cell epitope(s). The levels of antibody induced following immunization with the chimeras were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using microtiter plates coated with either the homologous chimera or the B cell epitope sequence. The affinities of the anti-chimera antibodies for the B cell epitope were assessed by a fluid-phase double-isotope radioimmunoassay. All the chimeras induced good antibody responses in both strains of mice with specificity for the B cell epitope. Chimeras containing two copies of the T cell epitope induced antibodies with higher affinity for the B cell epitope than did chimeras containing one copy of the T cell epitope or two copies of the B cell epitope. Furthermore, the amino terminal location of the T cell epitope in relation to the B cell epitope in the chimera induced higher affinity anti-B cell antibody than did the reverse orientation. These results suggest that orientation of epitopes and amino acid composition of chimeric peptides affect antigen processing and presentation to T cells which govern both the specificity and affinity of antibody produced. Thus, for the production of synthetic peptide immunogens with vaccine potential, attention needs to be given to the number and orientation of the component epitopes required to produce highest affinity antibody.

  7. Distribution of pectic epitopes in cell walls of the sugar beet root.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Florence; Guillon, Fabienne; Bonnin, Estelle; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Chevalier, Thérèse; Knox, J Paul; Liners, Françoise; Thibault, Jean-François

    2005-10-01

    Immunolabelling techniques with antibodies specific to partially methyl-esterified homogalacturonan (JIM5: unesterified residues flanked by methylesterified residues. JIM7: methyl-esterified residues flanked by unesterified residues), a blockwise de-esterified homogalacturonan (2F4), 1,4-galactan (LM5) and 1,5-arabinan (LM6) were used to map the distribution of pectin motifs in cell walls of sugar beet root (Beta vulgaris). PME and alkali treatments of sections were used in conjunction with JIM5-7 and 2F4. The JIM7 epitope was abundant and equally distributed in all cells. In storage parenchyma, the JIM5 epitope was restricted to some cell junctions and the lining of intercellular spaces while in vascular tissues it occurred at cell junctions in some phloem walls and in xylem derivatives. After secondary wall formation, the JIM5 epitope was restricted to inner cell wall regions between secondary thickenings. The 2F4 epitope was not detected without de-esterification treatment. PME treatments prior to the use of 2F4 indicated that HG at cell corners was not acetylated. The LM5 epitope was mainly present in the cambial zone and when present in storage parenchyma, it was restricted to the wall region closest to the plasma membrane. The LM6 epitope was widely distributed throughout primary walls but was more abundant in bundles than in medullar ray tissue and storage parenchyma. These data show that the occurrence of oligosaccharide motifs of pectic polysaccharides are spatially regulated in sugar beet root cell walls and that the spatial patterns vary between cell types suggesting that structural variants of pectic polymers are involved in the modulation of cell wall properties.

  8. The clinical value of intracellular autoantigens B-cell epitopes in systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Routsias, John G; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2004-02-01

    A hallmark of autoimmune diseases is the production of autoantibodies against intracellular autoantigens. Although their pathogenetic and their etiologic relationship are not fully understood, these autoantibodies are important tools for establishing the diagnosis, classification and prognosis of autoimmune diseases. Systemic rheumatic diseases are among the most complex disorders because their clinical presentation and constellation of findings are in part reflected by the wide spectrum of autoantibodies found in the sera of patients suffering from these disorders. These autoantibodies usually target large complexes consisting of protein antigens noncovalently associated with (ribo)-nucleic acid(s), like the spliceosome or Ro/La-RNPs. In this review, we first address the main characteristics and the clinical value of several autoantibodies, with respect to their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Subsequently, we provide a brief overview of the antigenic determinant types that have been identified on the corresponding autoantigens. The antibody targets of autontigens include primary, secondary, tertiary and quarternary structure epitopes, as well as cryptotopes, neoepitopes and mimotopes. We next focus on antigenic structures corresponding to B-cell epitopes with high disease specificity and sensitivity for all the major autoantigens in systemic autoimmunity including the Ro/La and U1 ribonucleoprotein complexes and the Ku70/80, ribosomal P, DNA topoisomerase I, filaggrin, Jo-1 and PM/SCl-100 autoantigens. These epitopes, defined at the peptide level, can be chemically synthesized and engineered for the development of new inexpensive and easier to perform assays and the improvement of the methods for autoantibody detection. Specific examples of newly developed assays that incorporate (i) epitopes with high disease specificity and sensitivity, (ii) modified epitopes, (iii) conformational epitopes and (iv) complementary epitopes are discussed in detail. Finally

  9. Defining Species-Specific Immunodominant B Cell Epitopes for Molecular Serology of Chlamydia Species

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, K. Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U.; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens. PMID:25761461

  10. [Mapping of the B Cell Neutralizing Epitopes on ED III of Envelope Protein from Dengue Virus].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yaying; Wen, Kun; Guo, Yonghui; Qiu, Liwen; Pan, Yuxian; Yu, Lan; Di, Biao; Chen, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) envelope [E] protein is the major surface protein of the virions that indued neutralizing antibodies. The domain III of envelope protein (EDIII) is an immunogenic region that holds potential for the development of vaccines; however, the epitopes of DENV EDIII, especially neutralizing B-cell linear epitopes, have not been comprehensively mapped. We mapped neutralizing B-cell linear epitopes on DENV-1 EDIII using 27 monoclonal antibodies against DENV-1 EDIII proteins from mice immunized with the DENV-1 EDIII. Epitope recognition analysis was performed using two set of sequential overlapping peptides (16m and 12m) that spanned the entire EDIII protein from DENV-1, respectively. This strategy identified a DENV-1 type- specific and a group-specific neutralizing epitope, which were highly conserved among isolates of DENV-1 and the four DENV serotypes and located at two regions from DENV-1 E, namely amino acid residues 309-320 and 381-392(aa 309-320 and 381-392), respectively. aa310 -319(310KEVAETQHGT319)was similar among the four DENV serotypes and contact residues on aa 309 -320 from E protein were defined and found that substitution of residues E309 , V312, A313 and V320 in DENV-2, -3, -4 isolates were antigenically silent. We also identified a DENV-1 type-specific strain-restricted neutralizing epitope, which was located at the region from DENV-1 E, namely amino acid residues 329-348 . These novel type- and group-specific B-cell epitopes of DENV EDIII may aid help us elucidate the dengue pathogenesis and accelerate vaccine design. PMID:26951013

  11. Defining species-specific immunodominant B cell epitopes for molecular serology of Chlamydia species.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens.

  12. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage. PMID:26581676

  13. Harnessing Computational Biology for Exact Linear B-Cell Epitope Prediction: A Novel Amino Acid Composition-Based Feature Descriptor.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Gautham, Namasivayam

    2015-10-01

    Proteins embody epitopes that serve as their antigenic determinants. Epitopes occupy a central place in integrative biology, not to mention as targets for novel vaccine, pharmaceutical, and systems diagnostics development. The presence of T-cell and B-cell epitopes has been extensively studied due to their potential in synthetic vaccine design. However, reliable prediction of linear B-cell epitope remains a formidable challenge. Earlier studies have reported discrepancy in amino acid composition between the epitopes and non-epitopes. Hence, this study proposed and developed a novel amino acid composition-based feature descriptor, Dipeptide Deviation from Expected Mean (DDE), to distinguish the linear B-cell epitopes from non-epitopes effectively. In this study, for the first time, only exact linear B-cell epitopes and non-epitopes have been utilized for developing the prediction method, unlike the use of epitope-containing regions in earlier reports. To evaluate the performance of the DDE feature vector, models have been developed with two widely used machine-learning techniques Support Vector Machine and AdaBoost-Random Forest. Five-fold cross-validation performance of the proposed method with error-free dataset and dataset from other studies achieved an overall accuracy between nearly 61% and 73%, with balance between sensitivity and specificity metrics. Performance of the DDE feature vector was better (with accuracy difference of about 2% to 12%), in comparison to other amino acid-derived features on different datasets. This study reflects the efficiency of the DDE feature vector in enhancing the linear B-cell epitope prediction performance, compared to other feature representations. The proposed method is made as a stand-alone tool available freely for researchers, particularly for those interested in vaccine design and novel molecular target development for systems therapeutics and diagnostics: https://github.com/brsaran/LBEEP.

  14. Computationally driven deletion of broadly distributed T cell epitopes in a biotherapeutic candidate

    PubMed Central

    Salvat, Regina S.; Parker, Andrew S; Guilliams, Andrew; Choi, Yoonjoo

    2014-01-01

    Biotherapeutics are subject to immune surveillance within the body, and anti-biotherapeutic immune responses can compromise drug efficacy and patient safety. Initial development of targeted antidrug immune memory is coordinated by T cell recognition of immunogenic subsequences, termed “T cell epitopes.” Biotherapeutics may therefore be deimmunized by mutating key residues within cognate epitopes, but there exist complex trade-offs between immunogenicity, mutational load, and protein structure–function. Here, a protein deimmunization algorithm has been applied to P99 beta-lactamase, a component of antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapies. The algorithm, integer programming for immunogenic proteins, seamlessly integrates computational prediction of T cell epitopes with both 1- and 2-body sequence potentials that assess protein tolerance to epitope-deleting mutations. Compared to previously deimmunized P99 variants, which bore only one or two mutations, the enzymes designed here contain 4–5 widely distributed substitutions. As a result, they exhibit broad reductions in major histocompatibility complex recognition. Despite their high mutational loads and markedly reduced immunoreactivity, all eight engineered variants possessed wild-type or better catalytic activity. Thus, the protein design algorithm is able to disrupt broadly distributed epitopes while maintaining protein function. As a result, this computational tool may prove useful in expanding the repertoire of next-generation biotherapeutics. PMID:24880662

  15. Computationally driven deletion of broadly distributed T cell epitopes in a biotherapeutic candidate.

    PubMed

    Salvat, Regina S; Parker, Andrew S; Guilliams, Andrew; Choi, Yoonjoo; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2014-12-01

    Biotherapeutics are subject to immune surveillance within the body, and anti-biotherapeutic immune responses can compromise drug efficacy and patient safety. Initial development of targeted antidrug immune memory is coordinated by T cell recognition of immunogenic subsequences, termed "T cell epitopes." Biotherapeutics may therefore be deimmunized by mutating key residues within cognate epitopes, but there exist complex trade-offs between immunogenicity, mutational load, and protein structure-function. Here, a protein deimmunization algorithm has been applied to P99 beta-lactamase, a component of antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapies. The algorithm, integer programming for immunogenic proteins, seamlessly integrates computational prediction of T cell epitopes with both 1- and 2-body sequence potentials that assess protein tolerance to epitope-deleting mutations. Compared to previously deimmunized P99 variants, which bore only one or two mutations, the enzymes designed here contain 4-5 widely distributed substitutions. As a result, they exhibit broad reductions in major histocompatibility complex recognition. Despite their high mutational loads and markedly reduced immunoreactivity, all eight engineered variants possessed wild-type or better catalytic activity. Thus, the protein design algorithm is able to disrupt broadly distributed epitopes while maintaining protein function. As a result, this computational tool may prove useful in expanding the repertoire of next-generation biotherapeutics.

  16. In vivo immunogenicity of Tax(11-19) epitope in HLA-A2/DTR transgenic mice: implication for dendritic cell-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Divya; Masih, Shet; Schell, Todd; Jacobson, Steven; Comber, Joseph D; Philip, Ramila; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja; Khan, Zafar K

    2014-05-30

    Viral oncoprotein Tax plays key roles in transformation of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1)-infected T cells leading to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), and is the key antigen recognized during HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM). In HLA-A2+ asymptomatic carriers as well as ATL and HAM patients, Tax(11-19) epitope exhibits immunodominance. Here, we evaluate CD8 T-cell immune response against this epitope in the presence and absence of dendritic cells (DCs) given the recent encouraging observations made with Phase 1 DC-based vaccine trial for ATL. To facilitate these studies, we first generated an HLA-A2/DTR hybrid mouse strain carrying the HLA-A2.1 and CD11c-DTR genes. We then studied CD8 T-cell immune response against Tax(11-19) epitope delivered in the absence or presence of Freund's adjuvant and/or DCs. Overall results demonstrate that naturally presented Tax epitope could initiate an antigen-specific CD8T cell response in vivo but failed to do so upon DC depletion. Presence of adjuvant potentiated Tax(11-19)-specific response. Elevated serum IL-6 levels coincided with depletion of DCs whereas decreased TGF-β was associated with adjuvant use. Thus, Tax(11-19) epitope is a potential candidate for the DC-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine and the newly hybrid mouse strain could be used for investigating DC involvement in human class-I-restricted immune responses.

  17. Searching for Borrelial T cell Epitopes Associated with Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Elise E.; Glickstein, Lisa; Kwok, William W.; Nepom, Gerald T.; Steere, Allen C.

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis is believed to result from an infection-induced autoimmune response triggered by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Disease susceptibility is associated with the HLA alleles DRB1*0101, 0401, 0402, 0404, 0405 and DRB5*0101, and all these MHC molecules bind the Bb epitope OspA163-175. However, not all patients have a proliferative response to this epitope. To identify other possible Bb epitopes involved in this disease process, the algorithm TEPITOPE was used to scan 17 immunogenetic Bb proteins for potential T cell epitopes with a refractory arthritis-associated MHC binding profile, and the Bb proteome was searched for peptides with sequence homology to OspA165-173. Sixteen promising T epitopes were identified and their MHC binding profiles to 13 MHC molecules were verified using in vitro MHC/peptide binding assays. One peptide, BBK32392-404, had a strong refractory-arthritis associated MHC binding profile, and another GK297-306 shared sequence homology to OspA165-173. However, patient cells did not proliferate in response to either peptide making it highly unlikely they were involved in a refractory course. A comparison of the in silico and in vitro results revealed that TEPITOPE correctly predicted 74% of the in vitro binding peptides, but it incorrectly predicted that 44% of the in vitrononbinding peptides would bind. For a particular MHC molecule, concordance between the in silico and in vitro results varied anywhere between 33% and 100%. Therefore, while additional Bb epitopes may be involved in the development of antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, recognition of OspA163-175 remains the only known Bb epitope associated with this disease. PMID:18191206

  18. Searching for borrelial T cell epitopes associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Elise E; Glickstein, Lisa; Kwok, William W; Nepom, Gerald T; Steere, Allen C

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis is believed to result from an infection-induced autoimmune response triggered by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Disease susceptibility is associated with the HLA alleles DRB1*0101, 0401, 0402, 0404, 0405 and DRB5*0101, and all these MHC molecules bind the Bb epitope OspA(163-175.) However, not all patients have a proliferative response to this epitope. To identify other possible Bb epitopes involved in this disease process, the algorithm TEPITOPE was used to scan 17 immunogenic Bb proteins for potential T cell epitopes with a refractory arthritis-associated MHC binding profile, and the Bb proteome was searched for peptides with sequence homology to OspA(165-173). Sixteen promising T epitopes were identified and their MHC binding profiles to 13 MHC molecules were verified using in vitro MHC/peptide binding assays. One peptide, BBK32(392-404), had a strong refractory arthritis-associated MHC binding profile, and another GK(297-306) shared sequence homology to OspA(165-173). However, patient cells did not proliferate in response to either peptide making it highly unlikely they were involved in a refractory course. A comparison of the in silico and in vitro results revealed that TEPITOPE correctly predicted 74% of the in vitro binding peptides, but it incorrectly predicted that 44% of the in vitrononbinding peptides would bind. For a particular MHC molecule, concordance between the in silico and in vitro results varied anywhere between 33% and 100%. Therefore, while additional Bb epitopes may be involved in the development of antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, recognition of OspA(163-175) remains the only known Bb epitope associated with this disease course.

  19. Identification of promiscuous HPV16-derived T helper cell epitopes for therapeutic HPV vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Riemer, Angelika B

    2015-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma and several other human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced malignancies are a global public health problem, thus novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an attractive option for treatment of HPV infection and HPV-mediated premalignant and malignant lesions. However, previous approaches--focusing on the induction of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs)--have as yet not yielded clinical successes. Since CD4+ T cells have been shown to be crucial for the induction and maintenance of CTL responses, and more recently to be also important for direct anti-tumor immunity, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted epitopes are intensively investigated to improve the efficacy of peptide-based HPV immunotherapy. We here present an approach to identify promiscuous HPV16-derived CD4+ T helper epitopes, which are capable of inducing T cell immunity in a large proportion of the population. To this end, we combined HLA class II epitope prediction servers with in vitro immunological evaluation to identify HPV16 E2-, E5-, E6-, and E7-derived CD4+ T cell epitopes. Candidate selected HPV16-derived epitopes were found to be restricted by up to nine HLA-DR molecules. Furthermore, they were found to induce frequent and robust HPV16 peptide-specific Th1 responses in healthy donors, as monitored by interferon (IFN)-γ ELISPOT and cytokine secretion assays. Moreover, these selected peptides also induced specific IFN-γ T cell responses in blood from HPV16+ CIN2/3 and cervical carcinoma patients. We thus conclude that the identified T helper epitopes are valuable candidates for the development of a comprehensive therapeutic HPV vaccine.

  20. Vertical T cell immunodominance and epitope entropy determine HIV-1 escape

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Michael K.P.; Hawkins, Natalie; Ritchie, Adam J.; Ganusov, Vitaly V.; Whale, Victoria; Brackenridge, Simon; Li, Hui; Pavlicek, Jeffrey W.; Cai, Fangping; Rose-Abrahams, Melissa; Treurnicht, Florette; Hraber, Peter; Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive; Ferrari, Guido; Tanner, Rachel; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; B, CHAVI Core; Cohen, Myron; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Haynes, Barton; Borrow, Persephone; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Williamson, Carolyn; Korber, Bette T.; Gao, Feng; Self, Steve; McMichael, Andrew; Goonetilleke, Nilu

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 accumulates mutations in and around reactive epitopes to escape recognition and killing by CD8+ T cells. Measurements of HIV-1 time to escape should therefore provide information on which parameters are most important for T cell–mediated in vivo control of HIV-1. Primary HIV-1–specific T cell responses were fully mapped in 17 individuals, and the time to virus escape, which ranged from days to years, was measured for each epitope. While higher magnitude of an individual T cell response was associated with more rapid escape, the most significant T cell measure was its relative immunodominance measured in acute infection. This identified subject-level or “vertical” immunodominance as the primary determinant of in vivo CD8+ T cell pressure in HIV-1 infection. Conversely, escape was slowed significantly by lower population variability, or entropy, of the epitope targeted. Immunodominance and epitope entropy combined to explain half of all the variability in time to escape. These data explain how CD8+ T cells can exert significant and sustained HIV-1 pressure even when escape is very slow and that within an individual, the impacts of other T cell factors on HIV-1 escape should be considered in the context of immunodominance. PMID:23221345

  1. In silico cloning and B/T cell epitope prediction of triosephosphate isomerase from Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Ye, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Because the methods of diagnosis and treatment for cystic echinococcosis were limited, it is still necessary to screen target proteins for the development of new anti-hydatidosis vaccine. In this study, the triosephosphate isomerase gene of E. granulosus was in silico cloned. The B cell and T cell epitopes were predicted by bioinformatics methods. The cDNA sequence of EgTIM was composition of 1094 base pairs, with an open reading frame of 753 base pairs. The deduced amino acid sequences were composed of 250 amino acids. Five cross-reactive epitopes, locating on 21aa-35aa, 43aa-57aa, 94aa-107aa, 115-129aa, and 164aa-183aa, could be expected to serve as candidate epitopes in the development of vaccine against E. granulosus. These results could provide bases for gene cloning, recombinant expression, and the designation of anti-hydatidosis vaccine.

  2. Identification of canine helper T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Souravi; Walker, John; Jackson, David C

    2001-01-01

    The fusion protein of canine distemper virus (CDV-F), a 662 amino-acid envelope protein, was used as the target molecule for identification of canine T helper (Th) epitopes. A library of 94 peptides, each 17 residues in length overlapping by 10 residues and covering the entire sequence of CDV-F, was screened using a lymphocyte proliferation assay with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from dogs inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine. Initially we observed low and inconsistent proliferation of PBMC in response to these peptides, even when using cells obtained from dogs that had received multiple doses of CDV. Subsequently, the use of expanded cell populations derived by in vitro stimulation of canine PBMC with pools of peptides allowed the identification of a number of putative canine Th-epitopes within the protein sequence of CDV-F. There were two major clusters of Th-epitopes identified close to the cleavage site of the F0 fusion protein, while some others were scattered in both the F1 and F2 fragments of the protein. Some of these peptides, in particular peptide 35 (p35), were stimulatory in dogs of different breeds and ages. The identification of such promiscuous canine Th-epitopes encouraged us to assemble p35 in tandem with luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) a 10 amino-acid residue synthetic peptide representing a B-cell epitope which alone induces no antibody in dogs. The totally synthetic immunogen was able to induce the production of very high titres of antibodies against LHRH in all dogs tested. These results indicate that p35 could be an ideal candidate for use as a Th-epitope for use in outbred dogs. PMID:11576221

  3. Titrating T cell Epitopes within Self-Assembled Vaccines Optimizes CD4+ Helper T Cell and Antibody Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Verbus, Emily A.; Han, Huifang; Fridman, Arthur; McNeely, Tessie; Collier, Joel H.; Chong, Anita S.

    2014-01-01

    Epitope content plays a critical role in determining T cell and antibody responses to vaccines, biomaterials, and protein therapeutics, but its effects are nonlinear and difficult to isolate. Here, molecular self-assembly was used to build a vaccine with precise control over epitope content, in order to finely tune the magnitude and phenotype of T helper and antibody responses. Self-adjuvanting peptide nanofibers were formed by co-assembling a high-affinity universal CD4+ T cell epitope (PADRE) and a B cell epitope from Staphylococcus aureus at specifiable concentrations. Increasing the PADRE concentration from μM to mM elicited bell-shaped dose-responses that were unique to different T cell populations. Notably, the epitope ratios that maximized T follicular helper and antibody responses differed by an order of magnitude from those that maximized Th1 or Th2 responses. Thus, modular materials assembly provides a means of controlling epitope content and efficiently skewing the adaptive immune response in the absence of exogenous adjuvant; this approach may contribute to the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies. PMID:24923735

  4. Titrating T-cell epitopes within self-assembled vaccines optimizes CD4+ helper T cell and antibody outputs.

    PubMed

    Pompano, Rebecca R; Chen, Jianjun; Verbus, Emily A; Han, Huifang; Fridman, Arthur; McNeely, Tessie; Collier, Joel H; Chong, Anita S

    2014-11-01

    Epitope content plays a critical role in determining T-cell and antibody responses to vaccines, biomaterials, and protein therapeutics, but its effects are nonlinear and difficult to isolate. Here, molecular self-assembly is used to build a vaccine with precise control over epitope content, in order to finely tune the magnitude and phenotype of T helper and antibody responses. Self-adjuvanting peptide nanofibers are formed by co-assembling a high-affinity universal CD4+ T-cell epitope (PADRE) and a B-cell epitope from Staphylococcus aureus at specifiable concentrations. Increasing the PADRE concentration from micromolar to millimolar elicited bell-shaped dose-responses that are unique to different T-cell populations. Notably, the epitope ratios that maximize T follicular helper and antibody responses differed by an order of magnitude from those that maximized Th1 or Th2 responses. Thus, modular materials assembly provides a means of controlling epitope content and efficiently skewing the adaptive immune response in the absence of exogenous adjuvant; this approach may contribute to the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies.

  5. Class I T-cell epitope prediction: improvements using a combination of proteasome cleavage, TAP affinity, and MHC binding.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2006-05-01

    Cleavage by the proteasome is responsible for generating the C terminus of T-cell epitopes. Modeling the process of proteasome cleavage as part of a multi-step algorithm for T-cell epitope prediction will reduce the number of non-binders and increase the overall accuracy of the predictive algorithm. Quantitative matrix-based models for prediction of the proteasome cleavage sites in a protein were developed using a training set of 489 naturally processed T-cell epitopes (nonamer peptides) associated with HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. The models were validated using an external test set of 227 T-cell epitopes. The performance of the models was good, identifying 76% of the C-termini correctly. The best model of proteasome cleavage was incorporated as the first step in a three-step algorithm for T-cell epitope prediction, where subsequent steps predicted TAP affinity and MHC binding using previously derived models. PMID:16524630

  6. Identification of linear B-cell epitopes on goose parvovirus non-structural protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Fei; Ma, Bo; Wang, Jun-Wei

    2016-10-15

    Goose parvovirus (GPV) infection can cause a highly contagious and lethal disease in goslings and muscovy ducklings which is widespread in all major goose (Anser anser) and Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) farming countries, leading to a huge economic loss. Humoral immune responses play a major role in GPV immune protection during GPV infection. However, it is still unknown for the localization and immunological characteristics of B-cell epitopes on GPV non-structural protein (NSP). Therefore, in this study, the epitopes on the NSP of GPV were identified by means of overlapping peptides expressed in Escherichia coli in combination with Western blot. The results showed that the antigenic epitopes on the GPV NSP were predominantly localized in the C-terminal (aa 485-627), and especially, the fragment NS (498-532) was strongly positive. These results may facilitate future investigations on the function of NSP of GPV and the development of immunoassays for the diagnosis of GPV infection. PMID:27590430

  7. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Bresciani, Anne; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina; Dillon, Myles B; Bancroft, Tara; Greenbaum, Jason; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-05-01

    Several mechanisms exist to avoid or suppress inflammatory T-cell immune responses that could prove harmful to the host due to targeting self-antigens or commensal microbes. We hypothesized that these mechanisms could become evident when comparing the immunogenicity of a peptide from a pathogen or allergen with the conservation of its sequence in the human proteome or the healthy human microbiome. Indeed, performing such comparisons on large sets of validated T-cell epitopes, we found that epitopes that are similar with self-antigens above a certain threshold showed lower immunogenicity, presumably as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and potentially the polarization) of T-cell responses to a given epitope is influenced and to some extent predictable based on its similarity to self-antigens and commensal antigens.

  8. Selective Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells by High-Epitope Density Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Gabriel A.; Czeisler, Catherine; Niece, Krista L.; Beniash, Elia; Harrington, Daniel A.; Kessler, John A.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2004-02-01

    Neural progenitor cells were encapsulated in vitro within a three-dimensional network of nanofibers formed by self-assembly of peptide amphiphile molecules. The self-assembly is triggered by mixing cell suspensions in media with dilute aqueous solutions of the molecules, and cells survive the growth of the nanofibers around them. These nanofibers were designed to present to cells the neurite-promoting laminin epitope IKVAV at nearly van der Waals density. Relative to laminin or soluble peptide, the artificial nanofiber scaffold induced very rapid differentiation of cells into neurons, while discouraging the development of astrocytes. This rapid selective differentiation is linked to the amplification of bioactive epitope presentation to cells by the nanofibers.

  9. Nasal immunization using a mimovirus vaccine based on the Eppin B-cell epitope induced suppressed fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengqiong; Shen, Zigang; Li, Jintao; He, Wei; Yang, Ying; Liang, Zhiqing

    2014-01-01

    To elicit potent humoral immunity and produce adequate neutralizing antibody especially in the genital tract and eventually to promote its immunogenicity, we designed an Eppin B-cell-dominant-epitope-based mimovirus vaccine with an RGD motif which can be nasally inoculated into male mice. Our results indicate that this immune strategy successfully generated a high antibody response with significantly higher anti-Eppin IgA in the genital tract, and eventually achieve significant inhibition of fertility without any interference with testis function and alteration in structural integrity. The fertility rate of the females mating with the vaccinated males declined and the progeny size was greatly reduced, but the contraceptive efficacy was still far from that of immunocontraceptives for human use. However, the research showed a new contraceptive vaccine construction and inoculation avenue, that is, mimovirus vaccine delivered nasally. Further investigation geared toward improving fertility inhibition efficacy using this inoculation strategy still remains to be explored. PMID:25424926

  10. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3) is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK) (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time), or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope: i) it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii) it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii) HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to monitor HLA-A2

  11. Positive-unlabeled learning for the prediction of conformational B-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The incomplete ground truth of training data of B-cell epitopes is a demanding issue in computational epitope prediction. The challenge is that only a small fraction of the surface residues of an antigen are confirmed as antigenic residues (positive training data); the remaining residues are unlabeled. As some of these uncertain residues can possibly be grouped to form novel but currently unknown epitopes, it is misguided to unanimously classify all the unlabeled residues as negative training data following the traditional supervised learning scheme. Results We propose a positive-unlabeled learning algorithm to address this problem. The key idea is to distinguish between epitope-likely residues and reliable negative residues in unlabeled data. The method has two steps: (1) identify reliable negative residues using a weighted SVM with a high recall; and (2) construct a classification model on the positive residues and the reliable negative residues. Complex-based 10-fold cross-validation was conducted to show that this method outperforms those commonly used predictors DiscoTope 2.0, ElliPro and SEPPA 2.0 in every aspect. We conducted four case studies, in which the approach was tested on antigens of West Nile virus, dihydrofolate reductase, beta-lactamase, and two Ebola antigens whose epitopes are currently unknown. All the results were assessed on a newly-established data set of antigen structures not bound by antibodies, instead of on antibody-bound antigen structures. These bound structures may contain unfair binding information such as bound-state B-factors and protrusion index which could exaggerate the epitope prediction performance. Source codes are available on request. PMID:26681157

  12. A T Cell Epitope-Based Vaccine Protects Against Chlamydial Infection in HLA-DR4 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Lanka, Gopala Krishna; Chetty, Senthilnath L; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Chambers, James P.; Zhong, Guangming; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with recombinant chlamydial protease-like activity factor (rCPAF) has been shown to provide robust protection against genital Chlamydia infection. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ competent CPAF-specific CD4+ T cells was sufficient to induce early resolution of chlamydial infection and reduction of subsequent pathology in recipient IFN-γ-deficient mice indicating the importance of IFN-γ secreting CD4+ T cells in host defense against Chlamydia. In this study, we identify CD4+ T cell reactive CPAF epitopes and characterize the activation of epitope-specific CD4+ T cells following antigen immunization or Chlamydia challenge. Using the HLA-DR4 (HLA-DRB1*0401) transgenic mouse for screening overlapping peptides that induced T cell IFN-γ production, we identified at least 5 CPAF T cell epitopes presented by the HLA-DR4 complex. Immunization of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with a rCPAFep fusion protein containing these 5 epitopes induced a robust cell-mediated immune response and significantly accelerated the resolution of genital and pulmonary Chlamydia infection. rCPAFep vaccination induced CPAF-specific CD4+ T cells in the spleen were detected using HLA-DR4/CPAF-epitope tetramers. Additionally, CPAF-specific CD4+ clones could be detected in the mouse spleen following C. muridarum and a human C. trachomatis strain challenge using these novel tetramers. These results provide the first direct evidence that a novel CPAF epitope vaccine can provide protection and that HLA-DR4/CPAF-epitope tetramers can detect CPAF epitope-specific CD4+ T cells in HLA-DR4 mice following C. muridarum or C. trachomatis infection. Such tetramers could be a useful tool for monitoring CD4+ T cells in immunity to Chlamydia infection and in developing epitope-based human vaccines using the murine model. PMID:24096029

  13. Selection of Conserved Epitopes from Hepatitis C Virus for Pan-Populational Stimulation of T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Molero-Abraham, Magdalena; Lafuente, Esther M.; Flower, Darren R.; Reche, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is able to persist as a chronic infection, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is evidence that clearance of HCV is linked to strong responses by CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), suggesting that eliciting CTL responses against HCV through an epitope-based vaccine could prove an effective means of immunization. However, HCV genomic plasticity as well as the polymorphisms of HLA I molecules restricting CD8 T-cell responses challenges the selection of epitopes for a widely protective vaccine. Here, we devised an approach to overcome these limitations. From available databases, we first collected a set of 245 HCV-specific CD8 T-cell epitopes, all known to be targeted in the course of a natural infection in humans. After a sequence variability analysis, we next identified 17 highly invariant epitopes. Subsequently, we predicted the epitope HLA I binding profiles that determine their potential presentation and recognition. Finally, using the relevant HLA I-genetic frequencies, we identified various epitope subsets encompassing 6 conserved HCV-specific CTL epitopes each predicted to elicit an effective T-cell response in any individual regardless of their HLA I background. We implemented this epitope selection approach for free public use at the EPISOPT web server. PMID:24348677

  14. Limited Variation in BK Virus T-Cell Epitopes Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Malaya K; Tan, Susanna K; Chen, Sharon F; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Concepcion, Katherine R; Kjelson, Lynn; Mallempati, Kalyan; Farina, Heidi M; Fernández-Viña, Marcelo; Tyan, Dolly; Grimm, Paul C; Anderson, Matthew W; Concepcion, Waldo; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2015-10-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection causing end-organ disease remains a formidable challenge to the hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and kidney transplant fields. As BKV-specific treatments are limited, immunologic-based therapies may be a promising and novel therapeutic option for transplant recipients with persistent BKV infection. Here, we describe a whole-genome, deep-sequencing methodology and bioinformatics pipeline that identify BKV variants across the genome and at BKV-specific HLA-A2-, HLA-B0702-, and HLA-B08-restricted CD8 T-cell epitopes. BKV whole genomes were amplified using long-range PCR with four inverse primer sets, and fragmentation libraries were sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). An error model and variant-calling algorithm were developed to accurately identify rare variants. A total of 65 samples from 18 pediatric HCT and kidney recipients with quantifiable BKV DNAemia underwent whole-genome sequencing. Limited genetic variation was observed. The median number of amino acid variants identified per sample was 8 (range, 2 to 37; interquartile range, 10), with the majority of variants (77%) detected at a frequency of <5%. When normalized for length, there was no statistical difference in the median number of variants across all genes. Similarly, the predominant virus population within samples harbored T-cell epitopes similar to the reference BKV strain that was matched for the BKV genotype. Despite the conservation of epitopes, low-level variants in T-cell epitopes were detected in 77.7% (14/18) of patients. Understanding epitope variation across the whole genome provides insight into the virus-immune interface and may help guide the development of protocols for novel immunologic-based therapies.

  15. Limited Variation in BK Virus T-Cell Epitopes Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Malaya K.; Tan, Susanna K.; Chen, Sharon F.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Concepcion, Katherine R.; Kjelson, Lynn; Mallempati, Kalyan; Farina, Heidi M.; Fernández-Viña, Marcelo; Tyan, Dolly; Grimm, Paul C.; Anderson, Matthew W.; Concepcion, Waldo

    2015-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection causing end-organ disease remains a formidable challenge to the hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and kidney transplant fields. As BKV-specific treatments are limited, immunologic-based therapies may be a promising and novel therapeutic option for transplant recipients with persistent BKV infection. Here, we describe a whole-genome, deep-sequencing methodology and bioinformatics pipeline that identify BKV variants across the genome and at BKV-specific HLA-A2-, HLA-B0702-, and HLA-B08-restricted CD8 T-cell epitopes. BKV whole genomes were amplified using long-range PCR with four inverse primer sets, and fragmentation libraries were sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). An error model and variant-calling algorithm were developed to accurately identify rare variants. A total of 65 samples from 18 pediatric HCT and kidney recipients with quantifiable BKV DNAemia underwent whole-genome sequencing. Limited genetic variation was observed. The median number of amino acid variants identified per sample was 8 (range, 2 to 37; interquartile range, 10), with the majority of variants (77%) detected at a frequency of <5%. When normalized for length, there was no statistical difference in the median number of variants across all genes. Similarly, the predominant virus population within samples harbored T-cell epitopes similar to the reference BKV strain that was matched for the BKV genotype. Despite the conservation of epitopes, low-level variants in T-cell epitopes were detected in 77.7% (14/18) of patients. Understanding epitope variation across the whole genome provides insight into the virus-immune interface and may help guide the development of protocols for novel immunologic-based therapies. PMID:26202116

  16. CD4+ T-cell epitope prediction using antigen processing constraints.

    PubMed

    Mettu, Ramgopal R; Charles, Tysheena; Landry, Samuel J

    2016-05-01

    T-cell CD4+ epitopes are important targets of immunity against infectious diseases and cancer. State-of-the-art methods for MHC class II epitope prediction rely on supervised learning methods in which an implicit or explicit model of sequence specificity is constructed using a training set of peptides with experimentally tested MHC class II binding affinity. In this paper we present a novel method for CD4+ T-cell eptitope prediction based on modeling antigen-processing constraints. Previous work indicates that dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes tend to occur adjacent to sites of initial proteolytic cleavage. Given an antigen with known three-dimensional structure, our algorithm first aggregates four types of conformational stability data in order to construct a profile of stability that allows us to identify regions of the protein that are most accessible to proteolysis. Using this profile, we then construct a profile of epitope likelihood based on the pattern of transitions from unstable to stable regions. We validate our method using 35 datasets of experimentally measured CD4+ T cell responses of mice bearing I-Ab or HLA-DR4 alleles as well as of human subjects. Overall, our results show that antigen processing constraints provide a significant source of predictive power. For epitope prediction in single-allele systems, our approach can be combined with sequence-based methods, or used in instances where little or no training data is available. In multiple-allele systems, sequence-based methods can only be used if the allele distribution of a population is known. In contrast, our approach does not make use of MHC binding prediction, and is thus agnostic to MHC class II genotypes. PMID:26891811

  17. Fine mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes of peste des petits ruminants virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruisong; Fan, Xiaoming; Xu, Wanxiang; Li, Wentao; Dong, Shijuan; Zhu, Yumin; He, Yaping; Tang, Haiping; Du, Rong; Li, Zhen

    2015-01-30

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein of morbillivirus, and is presently the basis of most diagnostic assays for peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). In this study, fine epitope mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes on the PPRV NP has been undertaken using biosynthetic peptides. Nineteen linear B-cell epitopes were identified and their corresponding minimal motifs were located on the NP of PPRV China/Tibet/Geg/07-30. Conservation analysis indicated that ten of the 19 minimal motifs were conserved among 46 PPRV strains. Peptides containing the minimal motifs were recognized using anti-PPRV serum from a goat immunized with PPRV vaccine strain Nigeria 75/1. Identified epitopes and their motifs improve our understanding of the antigenic characteristics of PPRV NP and provide a basis for the development of epitope-based diagnostic assays. PMID:25465659

  18. Cutting edge: identification of novel T cell epitopes in Lol p5a by computational prediction.

    PubMed

    de Lalla, C; Sturniolo, T; Abbruzzese, L; Hammer, J; Sidoli, A; Sinigaglia, F; Panina-Bordignon, P

    1999-08-15

    Although atopic allergy affects cell epitopes that were able to stimulate T cells from atopic patients. We generated a panel of Lol p5a-specific T cell clones, the majority of which recognized the peptides in a cross-reactive fashion. The computational prediction of DR ligands might thus allow the design of T cell epitopes with potential useful application in novel immunotherapy strategies.

  19. Human CD8(+) T Cells Target Multiple Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Daniel; Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Jahn, Gerhard; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a serious health problem in young children, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The development of novel prevention strategies, such as a vaccine to RSV, is a high priority. One strategy is to design a peptide-based vaccine that activates appropriate CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, this approach is limited by the low number of RSV peptide epitopes defined to date that activate CD8(+) T cells. We aimed to identify peptide epitopes that are presented by common human leukocyte antigen types (HLA-A*01, -A*02, and -B*07). We identify one novel HLA-A*02-restricted and two novel HLA-A*01-restricted peptide epitopes from RSV polymerase. Peptide-HLA multimer staining of specific T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cell, the memory phenotype of such peptide-specific T cells ex vivo, and functional IFNγ responses in short-term stimulation assays suggest that these peptides are recognized during RSV infection. Such peptides are candidates for inclusion into a peptide-based RSV vaccine designed to stimulate defined CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  20. Babesia bigemina: identification of B cell epitopes associated with parasitized erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vidotto, O; McElwain, T F; Machado, R Z; Perryman, L E; Suarez, C E; Palmer, G H

    1995-12-01

    Rhoptries are involved in host cell invasion and rhoptry polypeptides, including the Babesia bigemina rhoptry-associated protein-1 (RAP-1), are targets for protective immune responses. Polyclonal antisera produced against isolated rhoptries is directed predominantly against RAP-1 and reacts with both the merozoite and the membrane of parasitized erythrocytes. To determine whether these B cell epitopes associated with the parasitized erythrocyte are derived from RAP-1 or, alternatively, from previously undetected merozoite polypeptides, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated from mice immunized with rhoptries isolated from the JG-29 clone of the Mexico strain. The anti-RAP-1 mAbs bound only merozoites in a punctate immunofluorescence pattern. A second group of four mAbs, none of which were reactive with RAP-1, bound the parasitized erythrocyte. Two of these latter mAbs, 64/44.17.3 and 64/05.7.2, reacted only with parasitized erythrocytes that had been permeabilized. MAb 64/44.17.3 bound a 54-kDa merozoite polypeptide while 64/05.7.2 bound a > or = 225-kDa merozoite polypeptide. MAbs 64/32.8.5 and 64/38.5.3 recognized epitopes on 17.5- and 76-kDa polypeptides exposed on the external surface of intact parasitized erythrocytes. The results indicate that the identified RAP-1 epitopes are not associated with the erythrocyte cytoskeleton or membrane and that anti-RAP-1 immunity is most likely generated against the free merozoite. All new mAbs reacted with every B. bigemina strain tested (Mexico, Puerto Rico, St. Croix, Texcoco, Jaboticabal). The conservation of RAP-1 epitopes among these strains supports the continued testing of RAP-1 as a vaccine component. In addition, the identification of epitopes expressed on the surface of erythrocytes infected with all five strains provides new candidate immunogens.

  1. Conformational B-Cell Epitopes Prediction from Sequences Using Cost-Sensitive Ensemble Classifiers and Spatial Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Pingping; Gao, Bo; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitopes are regions of the antigen surface which can be recognized by certain antibodies and elicit the immune response. Identification of epitopes for a given antigen chain finds vital applications in vaccine and drug research. Experimental prediction of B-cell epitopes is time-consuming and resource intensive, which may benefit from the computational approaches to identify B-cell epitopes. In this paper, a novel cost-sensitive ensemble algorithm is proposed for predicting the antigenic determinant residues and then a spatial clustering algorithm is adopted to identify the potential epitopes. Firstly, we explore various discriminative features from primary sequences. Secondly, cost-sensitive ensemble scheme is introduced to deal with imbalanced learning problem. Thirdly, we adopt spatial algorithm to tell which residues may potentially form the epitopes. Based on the strategies mentioned above, a new predictor, called CBEP (conformational B-cell epitopes prediction), is proposed in this study. CBEP achieves good prediction performance with the mean AUC scores (AUCs) of 0.721 and 0.703 on two benchmark datasets (bound and unbound) using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). When compared with previous prediction tools, CBEP produces higher sensitivity and comparable specificity values. A web server named CBEP which implements the proposed method is available for academic use. PMID:25045691

  2. Conformational B-cell epitopes prediction from sequences using cost-sensitive ensemble classifiers and spatial clustering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Pingping; Gao, Bo; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitopes are regions of the antigen surface which can be recognized by certain antibodies and elicit the immune response. Identification of epitopes for a given antigen chain finds vital applications in vaccine and drug research. Experimental prediction of B-cell epitopes is time-consuming and resource intensive, which may benefit from the computational approaches to identify B-cell epitopes. In this paper, a novel cost-sensitive ensemble algorithm is proposed for predicting the antigenic determinant residues and then a spatial clustering algorithm is adopted to identify the potential epitopes. Firstly, we explore various discriminative features from primary sequences. Secondly, cost-sensitive ensemble scheme is introduced to deal with imbalanced learning problem. Thirdly, we adopt spatial algorithm to tell which residues may potentially form the epitopes. Based on the strategies mentioned above, a new predictor, called CBEP (conformational B-cell epitopes prediction), is proposed in this study. CBEP achieves good prediction performance with the mean AUC scores (AUCs) of 0.721 and 0.703 on two benchmark datasets (bound and unbound) using the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). When compared with previous prediction tools, CBEP produces higher sensitivity and comparable specificity values. A web server named CBEP which implements the proposed method is available for academic use. PMID:25045691

  3. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  4. Specific immunotherapy modifies allergen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in an epitope-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wambre, Erik; DeLong, Jonathan H.; James, Eddie A.; Torres-Chinn, Nadia; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Möbs, Christian; Durham, Stephen R.; Till, Stephen J.; Robinson, David; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system induces and controls allergic inflammation at the T cell epitope level is critical for the design of new allergy vaccine strategies. Objective To characterize allergen-specific T cell responses linked with allergy or peripheral tolerance and to determine how CD4+ T cell responses to individual allergen-derived epitopes change over allergen-specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Methods Timothy grass pollen (TGP) allergy was used as a model for studying grass pollen allergies. The breadth, magnitude, epitope hierarchy and phenotype of the DR04:01-restricted TGP-specific T cell responses in ten grass pollen allergic, five non-atopic and six allergy vaccine-treated individuals was determined using an ex vivo pMHCII-tetramer approach. Results CD4+ T cells in allergic individuals are directed to a broad range of TGP epitopes characterized by defined immunodominance hierarchy patterns and with distinct functional profiles that depend on the epitope recognized. Epitopes that are restricted specifically to either TH2 or TH1/TR1 responses were identified. ASIT was associated with preferential deletion of allergen-specific TH2 cells and without significant change in frequency of TH1/TR1 cells. Conclusions Preferential allergen-specific TH2-cells deletion after repeated high doses antigen stimulation can be another independent mechanism to restore tolerance to allergen during immunotherapy. PMID:24373351

  5. Expression of Epitope-Tagged Proteins in Mammalian Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jay M; Styers, Melanie L; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Before the advent of molecular methods to tag proteins, visualization of proteins within cells required the use of antibodies directed against the protein of interest. Thus, only proteins for which antibodies were available could be visualized. Epitope tagging allows the detection of all proteins with existing sequence information, irrespective of the availability of antibodies directed against them. This technique involves the generation of DNA constructs that express the protein of interest tagged with an epitope that can be recognized by a commercially available antibody. Proteins can be tagged with a wide variety of epitopes using commercially available vectors that allow expression in mammalian cells. Epitope-tagged proteins are easily transfected into mammalian cell lines and, in most cases, tightly mimic the behavior of the endogenous protein. Tagged proteins exogenously expressed in cells provide different types of information depending on the subsequent detection approaches. Using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy with anti-tag antibodies, relative to known markers of cellular organelles, can provide information on the subcellular localization of the tagged protein and may provide clues regarding the protein's function. Immunofluorescence with anti-tag antibodies can also be utilized to assess the tagged protein's responses to cellular signals and pharmacological treatments. Immunoprecipitations with anti-tag antibodies can recover protein complexes containing the protein of interest, resulting in the identification of interacting proteins. Recovery of tagged proteins on affinity matrices allows their purification for use in biochemical assays. In addition, specialized fluorescent tags, such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) allow the analysis of cellular dynamics in live cells in real time. PMID:27515071

  6. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  7. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8–9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies. PMID:10884430

  8. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  9. In silico methods for predicting T-cell epitopes: Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde?

    PubMed

    Gowthaman, Uthaman; Agrewala, Javed N

    2009-10-01

    In silico tools offer an attractive alternative strategy to the cumbersome experimental approaches to identify T-cell epitopes. These computational tools have metamorphosed over the years into complex algorithms that attempt to efficiently predict the binding of a plethora of peptides to HLA alleles. In recent years, the scientific community has embraced these techniques to reduce the burden of wet-laboratory experimentation. Although there are some splendid examples of the utility of these methods, there are also evidences where they fall short and remain inconsistent. Hence, are these computational tools 'Dr Jekyll' or 'Mr Hyde' to the researcher, who wishes to utilize them intrepidly? This article reviews the progress and pitfalls of the in silico tools that identify T-cell epitopes. PMID:19811074

  10. The two-faced T cell epitope: examining the host-microbe interface with JanusMatrix.

    PubMed

    Moise, Leonard; Gutierrez, Andres H; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Terry, Frances; Leng, Qibin; Abdel Hady, Karim M; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Sztein, Marcelo B; Losikoff, Phyllis T; Martin, William D; Rothman, Alan L; De Groot, Anne S

    2013-07-01

    Advances in the field of T cell immunology have contributed to the understanding that cross-reactivity is an intrinsic characteristic of the T cell receptor (TCR), and that each TCR can potentially interact with many different T cell epitopes. To better define the potential for TCR cross-reactivity between epitopes derived from the human genome, the human microbiome, and human pathogens, we developed a new immunoinformatics tool, JanusMatrix, that represents an extension of the validated T cell epitope mapping tool, EpiMatrix. Initial explorations, summarized in this synopsis, have uncovered what appear to be important differences in the TCR cross-reactivity of selected regulatory and effector T cell epitopes with other epitopes in the human genome, human microbiome, and selected human pathogens. In addition to exploring the T cell epitope relationships between human self, commensal and pathogen, JanusMatrix may also be useful to explore some aspects of heterologous immunity and to examine T cell epitope relatedness between pathogens to which humans are exposed (Dengue serotypes, or HCV and Influenza, for example). In Hand-Foot-Mouth disease (HFMD) for example, extensive enterovirus and human microbiome cross-reactivity (and limited cross-reactivity with the human genome) seemingly predicts immunodominance. In contrast, more extensive cross-reactivity with proteins contained in the human genome as compared to the human microbiome was observed for selected Treg epitopes. While it may be impossible to predict all immune response influences, the availability of sequence data from the human genome, the human microbiome, and an array of human pathogens and vaccines has made computationally-driven exploration of the effects of T cell epitope cross-reactivity now possible. This is the first description of JanusMatrix, an algorithm that assesses TCR cross-reactivity that may contribute to a means of predicting the phenotype of T cells responding to selected T cell epitopes

  11. Immunogenicity of genetically engineered glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing a T-cell epitope from diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, S; Dermody, K; Metcalf, B

    1995-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) has been shown to induce a marginal antibody response in experimental animals as well as partial protection against a number of parasitic worms, including Schistosoma and Fasciola species. The objective of our study was to increase the immunogenicity of GST by adding heterologous T-cell epitopes at the carboxy terminus of the protein. We generated recombinant GST proteins by attaching one or three tandem repeats of a T-cell epitope of CRM197, a nontoxic variant of diphtheria toxin. This T-cell epitope encoding the region of amino acids 366 to 383 of CRM197, when contained in a GST fusion protein and/or after purification as a recombinant peptide, retained the ability to induce a CRM197-specific T-cell response. The fusion protein containing a single T-cell epitope induced a strong T-cell proliferative response to GST and also enhanced anti-GST antibody production in mice. The addition of three repeats of the epitope did not augment the responses when compared with the responses of GST itself. The results suggest that the addition of a single T-cell epitope to a larger protein like GST increases the immunogenicity of the protein. PMID:7534277

  12. Identification of B-cell epitopes on the S4 subunit of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Ibsen, P H; Holm, A; Petersen, J W; Olsen, C E; Heron, I

    1993-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to identify B-cell epitopes on the S4 subunit of pertussis toxin (PT) by the synthetic peptide approach. Two strategies were followed: (i) screening of two series of overlapping peptides (12- and 25-residue peptides) covering the entire S4 sequence by a panel of murine monoclonal anti-PT antibodies and various polyclonal anti-PT antisera in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and (ii) analysis of the S4 amino acid sequence by a predictive algorithm followed by synthesis and immunization of mice with the predicted peptides coupled to diphtheria toxoid. The anti-peptide conjugate antisera were tested in an ELISA for cross-reactivity with native PT, B oligomer, and S4. Screening of the free peptides in an ELISA by the PT antisera indicated the presence of six B-cell epitope-containing domains covered by residues 18 to 32, 33 to 46, 39 to 52, 51 to 65, 71 to 84, and 91 to 106. None of the peptides, however, were recognized by the monoclonal anti-PT antibodies in an ELISA. Immunization with six computer-predicted peptides (B1 to B6) and three potential T-cell epitopes (T1 to T3) gave rise to very high antibody responses towards the homologous conjugates. With the exception of the anti-T1/diphtheria toxoid antisera, all anti-peptide conjugate antisera cross-reacted with PT in an ELISA at different levels. None of these anti-peptide conjugate antisera, however, showed any PT-neutralizing effect as measured by the Chinese hamster ovary cell assay and the leukocytosis-promoting activity test. The results of the present study suggest that discontinuous epitopes are predominant in the S4 subunit of native PT. PMID:7684728

  13. Molecular Determinants of T Cell Epitope Recognition to the Common Timothy Grass Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Oseroff, Carla; Sidney, John; Kotturi, Maya F.; Kolla, Ravi; Alam, Rafeul; Broide, David H.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Weiskopf, Daniela; McKinney, Denise M.; Chung, Jo L.; Petersen, Arnd; Grey, Howard; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular determinants of allergen-derived T cell epitopes in humans utilizing the Phleum pratense (Timothy grass) allergens (Phl p). PBMCs from allergic individuals were tested in ELISPOT assays with overlapping peptides spanning known Phl p allergens. A total of 43 distinct antigenic regions were recognized, illustrating the large breadth of grass-specific T cell epitopes. Th2 cytokines (as represented by IL-5) were predominant, whereas IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 were detected less frequently. Responses from specific immunotherapy treatment individuals were weaker and less consistent, yet similar in epitope specificity and cytokine pattern to allergic donors, whereas nonallergic individuals were essentially nonreactive. Despite the large breadth of recognition, nine dominant antigenic regions were defined, each recognized by multiple donors, accounting for 51% of the total response. Multiple HLA molecules and loci restricted the dominant regions, and the immunodominant epitopes could be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms specific for 23 common HLA-DR, DP, and DQ molecules. Immunodominance was also apparent at the Phl p Ag level. It was found that 52, 19, and 14% of the total response was directed to Phl p 5, 1, and 3, respectively. Interestingly, little or no correlation between Phl p-specific IgE levels and T cell responses was found. Thus, certain intrinsic features of the allergen protein might influence immunogenicity at the level of T cell reactivity. Consistent with this notion, different Phl p Ags were associated with distinct patterns of IL-5, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 production. PMID:20554959

  14. Identification of MAGE-C1 (CT-7) epitopes for T-cell therapy of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Larry D.; Cook, Danielle R.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Berger, Carolina; Maloney, David G.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is incurable with standard therapies but is susceptible to a T-cell-mediated graft versus myeloma effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We sought to identify myeloma-specific antigens that might be used for T-cell immunotherapy of myeloma. MAGE-C1 (CT-7) is a cancer-testis antigen that is expressed by tumor cells in >70% of myeloma patients and elicits a humoral response in up to 93% of patients with CT-7+ myeloma. No CD8+ T-cell epitopes have been described for CT-7, so we used a combination of reverse immunology and immunization of HLA-A2 transgenic mice with a novel cell-based vaccine to identify three immunogenic epitopes of CT-7 that are recognized by human CD8+ T-cells. CT-7-specific T-cells recognizing two of these peptides are able to recognize myeloma cells as well as CT-7 gene-transduced tumor cells, demonstrating that these epitopes are naturally processed and presented by tumor cells. This is the first report of the identification of immunogenic CD8+ T-cell epitopes of MAGE-C1 (CT-7), which is the most commonly expressed cancer-testis antigen found in myeloma, and these epitopes may be promising candidate targets for vaccination or T-cell therapy of myeloma or other CT-7+ malignancies. PMID:21461886

  15. Conservation and Diversity of Influenza A H1N1 HLA-Restricted T Cell Epitope Candidates for Epitope-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Paul ThiamJoo; Heiny, A. T.; Miotto, Olivo; Salmon, Jerome; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Lemonnier, Francois; August, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54) peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-γ ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007–2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes. Conclusions/Significance Seventeen (17) T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus. PMID:20090904

  16. T cell epitope redundancy: cross-conservation of the TCR face between pathogens and self and its implications for vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Moise, Leonard; Beseme, Sarah; Tassone, Ryan; Liu, Rui; Kibria, Farzana; Terry, Frances; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S

    2016-05-01

    T cells are extensively trained on 'self' in the thymus and then move to the periphery, where they seek out and destroy infections and regulate immune response to self-antigens. T cell receptors (TCRs) on T cells' surface recognize T cell epitopes, short linear strings of amino acids presented by antigen-presenting cells. Some of these epitopes activate T effectors, while others activate regulatory T cells. It was recently discovered that T cell epitopes that are highly conserved on their TCR face with human genome sequences are often associated with T cells that regulate immune response. These TCR-cross-conserved or 'redundant epitopes' are more common in proteins found in pathogens that have co-evolved with humans than in other non-commensal pathogens. Epitope redundancy might be the link between pathogens and autoimmune disease. This article reviews recently published data and addresses epitope redundancy, the "elephant in the room" for vaccine developers and T cell immunologists.

  17. Immunogenicity of polysaccharides conjugated to peptides containing T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Lett, E; Gangloff, S; Zimmermann, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1994-01-01

    To develop a general model of polysaccharide-peptide vaccine, we have investigated the efficiency of linear peptides derived from protein SR, and adhesin of the I/II protein antigen family of oral streptococci, to act as carriers for two T cell-independent polysaccharides: serogroup f polysaccharide from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (poly f) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan. Peptide 3 (YEKEPTPPTRTPDQ) and peptide 6 (TPEDPTDPTDPQDPSS), accessible on the native SR protein as demonstrated by their reactivity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with rat antisera raised against protein SR, correspond to immunodominant regions of SR. Peptide 3 contains at least one B- and one T-cell epitope, as demonstrated by its ability to induce peptide- and SR-specific antibody responses without any carrier and to stimulate the proliferation of rat lymph node cells primed either with free peptide or native SR, whereas peptide 6 contains only B-cell epitope(s). Peptide 3 was then covalently coupled though reductive amination to either poly f or mannan, and peptide 6 was coupled to poly f. Subcutaneous immunizations of rats with poly f-peptide 3 or mannan-peptide 3 conjugates produced a systemic immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody response, and the elicited antibodies reacted with free poly f or mannan, peptide 3, protein SR, and S. mutans or S. cerevisiae whole cells. Rats immunized with poly f-peptide 6 did not develop any antipeptide or anti-SR response. Furthermore, a booster immunization of animals with poly f-peptide 3 or mannan-peptide 3 conjugates induced high titers of anti-peptide 3, anti-poly f, and antimannan antibodies, which occurred quickly. The response is anamnestic for the peptide and the polysaccharides and is characterized by an Ig switch from IgM to IgG. The data presented here confirm that the presence of B- and T-cell epitopes is necessary to induce an anamnestic antipeptide response and that a peptide containing relevant B- and T-cell epitopes can act

  18. MHC Class I-Presented T Cell Epitopes Identified by Immunoproteomics Analysis Are Targets for a Cross Reactive Influenza-Specific T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Testa, James S.; Shetty, Vivekananda; Hafner, Julie; Nickens, Zacharie; Kamal, Shivali; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Philip, Ramila

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus infection and the resulting complications are a significant global public health problem. Improving humoral immunity to influenza is the target of current conventional influenza vaccines, however, these are generally not cross-protective. On the contrary, cell-mediated immunity generated by primary influenza infection provides substantial protection against serologically distinct viruses due to recognition of cross-reactive T cell epitopes, often from internal viral proteins conserved between viral subtypes. Efforts are underway to develop a universal flu vaccine that would stimulate both the humoral and cellular immune responses leading to long-lived memory. Such a universal vaccine should target conserved influenza virus antibody and T cell epitopes that do not vary from strain to strain. In the last decade, immunoproteomics, or the direct identification of HLA class I presented epitopes, has emerged as an alternative to the motif prediction method for the identification of T cell epitopes. In this study, we used this method to uncover several cross-specific MHC class I specific T cell epitopes naturally presented by influenza A-infected cells. These conserved T cell epitopes, when combined with a cross-reactive antibody epitope from the ectodomain of influenza M2, generate cross-strain specific cell mediated and humoral immunity. Overall, we have demonstrated that conserved epitope-specific CTLs could recognize multiple influenza strain infected target cells and, when combined with a universal antibody epitope, could generate virus specific humoral and T cell responses, a step toward a universal vaccine concept. These epitopes also have potential as new tools to characterize T cell immunity in influenza infection, and may serve as part of a universal vaccine candidate complementary to current vaccines. PMID:23144892

  19. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides.

  20. Immunodominant West Nile Virus T Cell Epitopes Are Fewer in Number and Fashionably Late.

    PubMed

    Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Kim, Sojung; Jain, Rinki; Bardet, Wilfried; Schafer, Fredda B; Davenport, Jason L; Martin, Aaron D; Diamond, Michael S; Weidanz, Jon A; Hansen, Ted H; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-05-15

    Class I HLA molecules mark infected cells for immune targeting by presenting pathogen-encoded peptides on the cell surface. Characterization of viral peptides unique to infected cells is important for understanding CD8(+) T cell responses and for the development of T cell-based immunotherapies. Having previously reported a series of West Nile virus (WNV) epitopes that are naturally presented by HLA-A*02:01, in this study we generated TCR mimic (TCRm) mAbs to three of these peptide/HLA complexes-the immunodominant SVG9 (E protein), the subdominant SLF9 (NS4B protein), and the immunorecessive YTM9 (NS3 protein)-and used these TCRm mAbs to stain WNV-infected cell lines and primary APCs. TCRm staining of WNV-infected cells demonstrated that the immunorecessive YTM9 appeared several hours earlier and at 5- to 10-fold greater density than the more immunogenic SLF9 and SVG9 ligands, respectively. Moreover, staining following inhibition of the TAP demonstrated that all three viral ligands were presented in a TAP-dependent manner despite originating from different cellular compartments. To our knowledge, this study represents the first use of TCRm mAbs to define the kinetics and magnitude of HLA presentation for a series of epitopes encoded by one virus, and the results depict a pattern whereby individual epitopes differ considerably in abundance and availability. The observations that immunodominant ligands can be found at lower levels and at later time points after infection suggest that a reevaluation of the factors that combine to shape T cell reactivity may be warranted. PMID:27183642

  1. Human homologues of a Borrelia T cell epitope associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Elise E; Glickstein, Lisa; Kwok, William W; Nepom, Gerald T; Steere, Allen C

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, which may result from infection-induced autoimmunity, is associated with HLA-DR molecules that bind an epitope of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) outer-surface protein A (OspA(165-173)) and with T cell reactivity with this epitope. One potential mechanism to explain these associations is molecular mimicry between OspA(165-173) and a self-peptide. Here, we searched the published human genome for peptides with sequence homology with OspA(165-173). The two peptides identified with the greatest sequence homology with the OspA epitope were MAWD-BP(276-288), which had identity at eight of the nine core amino acid residues, and T-span7(58-70), which had identity at six residues. MAWD-BP mRNA was expressed by synoviocytes, while T-span7 mRNA was not. However, neither peptide bound all of the HLA-DR molecules associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Among 11 patients, 9 had T cell reactivity with OspA(161-170), 6 had responses to MAWD-BP(276-288), and 3 had reactivity with T-span7(58-70), but reactivity with the self-peptides was lower than that induced by the spirochetal epitope. Thus, there remains an association between OspA(165-173) and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, and infection-induced autoimmunity is an attractive hypothesis to explain this outcome. However, molecular mimicry due to sequence homology between OspA(165-173) and a human peptide seems unlikely to be the critical mechanism.

  2. Human Homologues of a Borrelia T cell Epitope Associated with Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Elise E.; Glickstein, Lisa; Kwok, William W.; Nepom, Gerald T.; Steere, Allen C.

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, which may result from infection-induced autoimmunity, is associated with HLA-DR molecules that bind an epitope of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) outer-surface protein A (OspA165−173) and with T cell reactivity with this epitope. One potential mechanism to explain these associations is molecular mimicry between OspA165−173 and a self-peptide. Here, we searched the published human genome for peptides with sequence homology with OspA165−173. The two peptides identified with the greatest sequence homology with the OspA epitope were MAWD-BP276−288, which had identity at eight of the nine core amino acid residues, and T-span758−70, which had identity at six residues. MAWD-BP mRNA was expressed by synoviocytes, while T-span7 mRNA was not. However, neither peptide bound all of the HLA-DR molecules associated with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Among 11 patients, nine had T cell reactivity with OspA161−170, six had responses to MAWD-BP276−288, and three had reactivity with T-span758−70, but reactivity with the self-peptides was lower than that induced by the spirochetal epitope. Thus, there remains an association between OspA165−173 and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis, and infection-induced autoimmunity is an attractive hypothesis to explain this outcome. However, molecular mimicry due to sequence homology between OspA165−173 and a human peptide seems unlikely to be the critical mechanism. PMID:17555819

  3. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines.

  4. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  5. Biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles as drug delivering injectable cell scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanhong; Gallego, Monica Ramos; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Jorgensen, Lene; Everland, Hanne; Møller, Eva Horn; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2011-11-30

    Injectable cell scaffolds play a dual role in tissue engineering by supporting cellular functions and delivering bioactive molecules. The present study aimed at developing biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles with sustained drug delivery properties thus potentially being suitable for autologous stem cell therapy. Semi-crystalline poly(l-lactide/dl-lactide) (PLDL70) and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA85) were used to prepare nanoparticles by the double emulsion method. Uniform and spherical nanoparticles were obtained at an average size of 270-300 nm. The thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 (TRAP-6) was successfully loaded in PLDL70 and PLGA85 nanoparticles. During the 30 days' release, PLDL70 nanoparticles showed sustainable release with only 30% TRAP-6 released within the first 15 days, while almost 80% TRAP-6 was released from PLGA85 nanoparticles during the same time interval. The release mechanism was found to depend on the crystallinity and composition of the nanoparticles. Subsequently, mPEG-PLGA nanocomposite microparticles containing PLDL70 nanoparticles were produced by the ultrasonic atomization method and evaluated to successfully preserve the intrinsic particulate properties and the sustainable release profile, which was identical to that of the nanoparticles. Good cell adhesion of the human fibroblasts onto the nanocomposite microparticles was observed, indicating the desired cell biocompatibility. The presented results thus demonstrate the development of nanocomposite microparticles tailored for sustainable drug release for application as injectable cell scaffolds. PMID:21787815

  6. Identification of CD4+ T-cell epitopes on iron-regulated surface determinant B of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Simiao; Zhang, Hua; Yao, Di; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xintong; Chen, Xiaoting; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhenghai; Wang, Jiannan; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Cui, Yudong

    2015-12-01

    Iron-regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective CD4(+) T-cell immune response. A pivotal role of CD4(+) T-cells in effective immunity against S. aureus infection has been proved, but CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on the S. aureus IsdB have not been well identified. In this study, MHC binding assay was firstly used to predict CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on S. aureus IsdB protein, and six peptides were synthesized to validate the probable epitopes. Two novel IsdB CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, P1 (residues 159-178) and P4 (residues 287-306), were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from IsdB-immunized C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) and BALB/c (H-2(d)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that P1 and P4 emulsified in Freund's adjuvant (FA) induced much higher cell proliferation compared with PBS emulsified in FA. CD4(+) T-cells stimulated with peptides P1 and P4 secreted significantly higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A. However, the level of the cytokine IL-4 almost remained unchanged, suggesting that P1 and P4 preferentially elicited polarized Th1-type responses. In addition, BALB/c mice just respond to P4 not P1, while C57BL/6 mice respond to P1 not P4, implying that epitope P1 and P4 were determined as H-2(b) and H-2(d) restricted epitope, respectively. Taken together, our data may provide an explanation of the IsdB-induced protection against S. aureus and highlight the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine against the S. aureus.

  7. T cell recognition of an HLA-A2-restricted epitope derived from a cleaved signal sequence

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    An alternative pathway for class I-restricted antigen presentation has been suggested on the basis of peptides bound to HLA-A2 molecules in cells lacking the transporter for antigen presentation (TAP). Most of these peptides were derived from signal sequences for translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, it is not known whether these peptides can be presented to T cells. The hydrophobic nature of an HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitope (M1 58-66) was exploited to test whether it could be presented to T cells when derived from a signal sequence. Replacing the signal sequence of the influenza virus hemagglutinin molecule H3 with an artificial sequence containing that HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitope resulted in efficient translocation of H3 molecules into the ER and transport to the cell surface. This signal sequence-derived epitope was presented to HLA-A2-restricted T cells. Involvement of cytosolic processing for this presentation is very unlikely, because (a) presentation occurred in cells lacking TAP; (b) expression of H3 molecules with the artificial signal sequence did not produce a detectable cytosolic form of H3; and (c) presentation of the same epitope expressed in cytosolic forms of antigen required TAP. Thus, a peptide derived from a signal sequence cleaved in the ER can provide an epitope for HLA-A2-restricted T cell recognition. PMID:7525846

  8. The Analysis of B-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Shcherbinin, D N; Alekseeva, S V; Shmarov, M M; Smirnov, Yu A; Naroditskiy, B S; Gintsburg, A L

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination has been successfully used to prevent influenza for a long time. Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which induces a humoral immune response in humans and protection against the flu, is the main antigenic component of modern influenza vaccines. However, new seasonal and pandemic influenza virus variants with altered structures of HA occasionally occur. This allows the pathogen to avoid neutralization with antibodies produced in response to previous vaccination. Development of a vaccine with the new variants of HA acting as antigens takes a long time. Therefore, during an epidemic, it is important to have passive immunization agents to prevent and treat influenza, which can be monoclonal or single-domain antibodies with universal specificity (broad-spectrum agents). We considered antibodies to conserved epitopes of influenza virus antigens as universal ones. In this paper, we tried to characterize the main B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin and analyze our own and literature data on broadly neutralizing antibodies. We conducted a computer analysis of the best known conformational epitopes of influenza virus HAs using materials of different databases. The analysis showed that the core of the HA molecule, whose antibodies demonstrate pronounced heterosubtypic activity, can be used as a target for the search for and development of broad-spectrum antibodies to the influenza virus. PMID:27099781

  9. Predictions versus high-throughput experiments in T-cell epitope discovery: competition or synergy?

    PubMed Central

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Prediction methods as well as experimental methods for T-cell epitope discovery have developed significantly in recent years. High-throughput experimental methods have made it possible to perform full-length protein scans for epitopes restricted to a limited number of MHC alleles. The high costs and limitations regarding the number of proteins and MHC alleles that are feasibly handled by such experimental methods have made in silico prediction models of high interest. MHC binding prediction methods are today of a very high quality and can predict MHC binding peptides with high accuracy. This is possible for a large range of MHC alleles and relevant length of binding peptides. The predictions can easily be performed for complete proteomes of any size. Prediction methods are still, however, dependent on good experimental methods for validation, and should merely be used as a guide for rational epitope discovery. We expect prediction methods as well as experimental validation methods to continue to develop and that we will soon see clinical trials of products whose development has been guided by prediction methods. PMID:22149708

  10. B-Pred, a structure based B-cell epitopes prediction server.

    PubMed

    Giacò, Luciano; Amicosante, Massimo; Fraziano, Maurizio; Gherardini, Pier Federico; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Colizzi, Vittorio; Cabibbo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The ability to predict immunogenic regions in selected proteins by in-silico methods has broad implications, such as allowing a quick selection of potential reagents to be used as diagnostics, vaccines, immunotherapeutics, or research tools in several branches of biological and biotechnological research. However, the prediction of antibody target sites in proteins using computational methodologies has proven to be a highly challenging task, which is likely due to the somewhat elusive nature of B-cell epitopes. This paper proposes a web-based platform for scoring potential immunological reagents based on the structures or 3D models of the proteins of interest. The method scores a protein's peptides set, which is derived from a sliding window, based on the average solvent exposure, with a filter on the average local model quality for each peptide. The platform was validated on a custom-assembled database of 1336 experimentally determined epitopes from 106 proteins for which a reliable 3D model could be obtained through standard modeling techniques. Despite showing poor sensitivity, this method can achieve a specificity of 0.70 and a positive predictive value of 0.29 by combining these two simple parameters. These values are slightly higher than those obtained with other established sequence-based or structure-based methods that have been evaluated using the same epitopes dataset. This method is implemented in a web server called B-Pred, which is accessible at http://immuno.bio.uniroma2.it/bpred. The server contains a number of original features that allow users to perform personalized reagent searches by manipulating the sliding window's width and sliding step, changing the exposure and model quality thresholds, and running sequential queries with different parameters. The B-Pred server should assist experimentalists in the rational selection of epitope antigens for a wide range of applications. PMID:22888263

  11. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  12. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  13. Identification and characterization of a linearized B-cell epitope on the pr protein of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Song, Ke-Yu; Zhao, Hui; Li, Shi-Hua; Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Ye, Qing; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Jiang, Zhen-You; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-07-01

    The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) represent one of the major mosquito-borne pathogens globally; so far no vaccine or specific antiviral is available. During virion maturation, the pr protein is cleaved from its precursor form the prM protein on the surface of immature DENV by host protease. Recent findings have demonstrated that the pr protein not only played critical roles in virion assembly and maturation, but was also involved in antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV infection. However, the B-cell epitopes on the pr protein of DENV have not been well characterized. In this study, a set of 11 partially overlapping peptides spanning the entire pr protein of DENV-2 were fused with glutathione S-transferase and expressed in Escherichia coli. ELISA screening with murine hyperimmune antiserum against immature DENV identified the P8 peptide (⁵⁷KQNEPEDIDCWCNST⁷¹) in the pr protein as the major immunodominant epitope. Fine mapping by truncated protein assays confirmed the 8-e peptide ⁵⁷KQNEPEDI⁶⁴ was the smallest unit capable of antibody binding. Importantly, the 8-e epitope reacted with sera from dengue fever patients. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed the asparagine residue at position 59 was important for epitope recognition. The 8-e epitope coincided well with the B-cell epitopes predicted by Immune Epitope Database analysis, and 3D structural modelling mapped the 8-e peptide on the surface of prM-E heterodimers. Overall, our findings characterized a linearized B-cell epitope on the pr protein of DENV, which will help to understand the life cycle of DENV and pathogenesis of dengue infections in human.

  14. HLA-restricted epitope identification and detection of functional T cell responses by using MHC–peptide and costimulatory microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Demkowicz, Walter E.; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2005-01-01

    Identification of T cell epitopes is a vital but often slow and difficult step in studying the immune response to infectious agents and autoantigens. We report a spatially addressable technique for screening large numbers of T cell epitopes for both specific antigen recognition and functional activity induced. This system uses microarrays of immobilized, recombinant MHC–peptide complexes, costimulatory molecules, and cytokine-capture antibodies. The array elements act as synthetic antigen-presenting cells and specifically elicit T cell responses, including adhesion, secretion of cytokines, and modulation of surface markers. The method allows facile identification of pertinent T cell epitopes in a large number of candidates and simultaneous determination of the functional outcome of the interaction. Using this method, we have characterized the activation of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells responding to vaccinia, influenza, HIV-1, and Epstein–Barr viruses. PMID:15728728

  15. Brucella melitensis T Cell Epitope Recognition in Humans with Brucellosis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cannella, Anthony P.; Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Sidney, John; Patra, Kailash P.; Torres, Katherine; Tsolis, Renee M.; Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L.; Saito, Mayuko; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Sette, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Brucella melitensis, one of the causative agents of human brucellosis, causes acute, chronic, and relapsing infection. While T cell immunity in brucellosis has been extensively studied in mice, no recognized human T cell epitopes that might provide new approaches to classifying and prognosticating B. melitensis infection have ever been delineated. Twenty-seven pools of 500 major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) restricted peptides were created by computational prediction of promiscuous MHC-II CD4+ T cell derived from the top 50 proteins recognized by IgG in human sera on a genome level B. melitensis protein microarray. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) analyses were used to quantify and compare Th1 and Th2 responses of leukapheresis-obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Peruvian subjects cured after acute infection (n = 9) and from patients who relapsed (n = 5). Four peptide epitopes derived from 3 B. melitensis proteins (BMEI 1330, a DegP/HtrA protease; BMEII 0029, type IV secretion system component VirB5; and BMEII 0691, a predicted periplasmic binding protein of a peptide transport system) were found repeatedly to produce significant IFN-γ ELISPOT responses in both acute-infection and relapsing patients; none of the peptides distinguished the patient groups. IL-5 responses against the panel of peptides were insignificant. These experiments are the first to systematically identify B. melitensis MHC-II-restricted CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by the human immune response, with the potential for new approaches to brucellosis diagnostics and understanding the immunopathogenesis related to this intracellular pathogen. PMID:24126518

  16. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased.

  17. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased. PMID:26474845

  18. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  19. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  20. In situ localization of epidermal stem cells using a novel multi epitope ligand cartography approach.

    PubMed

    Ruetze, Martin; Gallinat, Stefan; Wenck, Horst; Deppert, Wolfgang; Knott, Anja

    2010-06-01

    Precise knowledge of the frequency and localization of epidermal stem cells within skin tissue would further our understanding of their role in maintaining skin homeostasis. As a novel approach we used the recently developed method of multi epitope ligand cartography, applying a set of described putative epidermal stem cell markers. Bioinformatic evaluation of the data led to the identification of several discrete basal keratinocyte populations, but none of them displayed the complete stem cell marker set. The distribution of the keratinocyte populations within the tissue was remarkably heterogeneous, but determination of distance relationships revealed a population of quiescent cells highly expressing p63 and the integrins alpha(6)/beta(1) that represent origins of a gradual differentiation lineage. This population comprises about 6% of all basal cells, shows a scattered distribution pattern and could also be found in keratinocyte holoclone colonies. The data suggest that this population identifies interfollicular epidermal stem cells.

  1. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid, a versatile platform for foreign B-cell epitope display inducing protective humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Noelia; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Gómez, Yolanda; Crisci, Elisa; Montoya, María; Castón, José R.; Blanco, Esther; Bárcena, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), comprised of viral structural proteins devoid of genetic material, are tunable nanoparticles that can be chemically or genetically engineered, to be used as platforms for multimeric display of foreign antigens. Here, we report the engineering of chimeric VLPs, derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for presentation of foreign B-cell antigens to the immune system. The RHDV capsid comprises 180 copies of a single capsid subunit (VP60). To evaluate the ability of chimeric RHDV VLPs to elicit protective humoral responses against foreign antigens, we tested two B-cell epitopes: a novel neutralizing B-cell epitope, derived from feline calicivirus capsid protein, and a well characterized B-cell epitope from the extracellular domain of influenza A virus M2 protein (M2e). We generated sets of chimeric RHDV VLPs by insertion of the foreign B-cell epitopes at three different locations within VP60 protein (which involved different levels of surface accessibility) and in different copy numbers per site. The immunogenic potential of the chimeric VLPs was analyzed in the mouse model. The results presented here indicated that chimeric RHDV VLPs elicit potent protective humoral responses against displayed foreign B-cell epitopes, demonstrated by both, in vitro neutralization and in vivo protection against a lethal challenge. PMID:27549017

  2. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid, a versatile platform for foreign B-cell epitope display inducing protective humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Noelia; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Gómez, Yolanda; Crisci, Elisa; Montoya, María; Castón, José R; Blanco, Esther; Bárcena, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), comprised of viral structural proteins devoid of genetic material, are tunable nanoparticles that can be chemically or genetically engineered, to be used as platforms for multimeric display of foreign antigens. Here, we report the engineering of chimeric VLPs, derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for presentation of foreign B-cell antigens to the immune system. The RHDV capsid comprises 180 copies of a single capsid subunit (VP60). To evaluate the ability of chimeric RHDV VLPs to elicit protective humoral responses against foreign antigens, we tested two B-cell epitopes: a novel neutralizing B-cell epitope, derived from feline calicivirus capsid protein, and a well characterized B-cell epitope from the extracellular domain of influenza A virus M2 protein (M2e). We generated sets of chimeric RHDV VLPs by insertion of the foreign B-cell epitopes at three different locations within VP60 protein (which involved different levels of surface accessibility) and in different copy numbers per site. The immunogenic potential of the chimeric VLPs was analyzed in the mouse model. The results presented here indicated that chimeric RHDV VLPs elicit potent protective humoral responses against displayed foreign B-cell epitopes, demonstrated by both, in vitro neutralization and in vivo protection against a lethal challenge. PMID:27549017

  3. CMV-Specific T-cells Generated From Naïve T-cells Recognize Atypical Epitopes And May Be Protective in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Scheinberg, Phillip; Blaney, James W.; Demmler-Harrison, Gail; Cruz, C. Russell; Lam, Sharon; Krance, Robert A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rodgers, John R.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of adult-seropositive, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cells can effectively restore antiviral immunity after transplantation. Lack of CMV-specific memory T-cells in blood from CMV-seronegative adult and cord blood (CB) donors restricts the availability of donor-derived virus-specific T-cells for immunoprophylaxis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of naïve-donor-derived CMV-specific T-cell therapy for transplant recipients. Primed naïve T-cells recognized only atypical epitopes and with a similar avidity to CMV-seropositive-derived T-cells recognizing typical epitopes, but T-cells from CMV-seropositive donors recognizing atypical epitopes had a lower avidity suggesting the loss of high-avidity T-cells over time. Clonotypic analysis revealed T-cells recognizing atypical CMVpp65 epitopes in the peripheral blood of recipients of CB grafts who did not develop CMV. T-cell receptors from atypical epitopes were most common in unmanipulated CB units explaining why these T-cells expanded. When infused to recipients, naïve donor-derived virus specific T-cells that recognized atypical epitopes were associated with prolonged periods of CMV-free survival and complete remission. PMID:25925682

  4. CD8+ T cell recognition of epitopes within the capsid of adeno-associated virus 8-based gene transfer vectors depends on vectors' genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te-Lang; Li, Hua; Faust, Susan M; Chi, Emily; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, Fraser; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2014-01-01

    Self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing human factor IX (hF.IX) have achieved transient or sustained correction of hemophilia B in human volunteers. High doses of AAV2 or AAV8 vectors delivered to the liver caused in several patients an increase in transaminases accompanied by a rise in AAV capsid-specific T cells and a decrease in circulating hF.IX levels suggesting immune-mediated destruction of vector-transduced cells. Kinetics of these adverse events differed in patients receiving AAV2 or AAV8 vectors causing rise in transaminases at 3 versus 8 weeks after vector injection, respectively. To test if CD8+ T cells to AAV8 vectors, which are similar to AAV2 vectors are fully-gutted vectors and thereby fail to encode structural viral proteins, could cause damage at this late time point, we tested in a series of mouse studies how long major histocompatibility (MHC) class I epitopes within AAV8 capsid can be presented to CD8+ T cells. Our results clearly show that depending on the vectors' genome, CD8+ T cells can detect such epitopes on AAV8's capsid for up to 6 months indicating that the capsid of AAV8 degrades slowly in mice.

  5. VennVax, a DNA-prime, peptide-boost multi-T-cell epitope poxvirus vaccine, induces protective immunity against vaccinia infection by T cell response alone

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Buller, R. Mark; Schriewer, Jill; Lee, Jinhee; Frey, Sharon; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for smallpox to be disseminated in a bioterror attack has prompted development of new, safer smallpox vaccination strategies. We designed and evaluated immunogenicity and efficacy of a T-cell epitope vaccine based on conserved and antigenic vaccinia/variola sequences, identified using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Vaccination in HLA transgenic mice using a DNA-prime/peptide-boost strategy elicited significant T cell responses to multiple epitopes. No antibody response pre-challenge was observed, neither against whole vaccinia antigens nor vaccine epitope peptides. Remarkably, 100% of vaccinated mice survived lethal vaccinia challenge, demonstrating that protective immunity to vaccinia does not require B cell priming. PMID:21055490

  6. Identification of a dengue virus-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jinsheng; Duan, Zhiliang; Jiang, Lifang

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a combination of epitope-prediction programs and in vitro assays was used to identify dengue virus (DENV)-specific CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients who recovered from dengue fever were stimulated with candidate epitope peptides derived from DENV, which were predicted by using SYFPEITHI and RANKpep epitope-prediction programs. The IFN-gamma ELISpot results and the results of intracellular staining of IFN-gamma showed that peptides NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI), E_256 (QEGAMHTAL), NS3_205 (LPAIVREAI), NS5_210 (SRNSTHEMY), and NS3_207 (AIVREAIKR) could induce the recall response of CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, the results of the MHC-peptide complex stabilization assay revealed that peptide NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI) has a high affinity for HLA-A*0201 molecules. The IFN-gamma ELISpot results and staining of intracellular IFN-gamma confirmed that this peptide could induce high-level CD8(+) T cell response in HLA-A*0201 positive PBMCs. Peptide NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI) was identified as a novel DENV-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitope.

  7. Design and Evaluation of Optimized Artificial HIV-1 Poly-T Cell-Epitope Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Reguzova, Alena; Antonets, Denis; Karpenko, Larisa; Ilyichev, Alexander; Maksyutov, Rinat; Bazhan, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    A successful HIV vaccine in addition to induction of antibody responses should elicit effective T cell responses. Here we described possible strategies for rational design of T-cell vaccine capable to induce high levels of both CD4+ and CD8+ T- cell responses. We developed artificial HIV-1 polyepitope T-cell immunogens based on the conserved natural CD8+ and CD4+ T cell epitopes from different HIV-1 strains and restricted by the most frequent major human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Designed immunogens contain optimized core polyepitope sequence and additional “signal” sequences which increase epitope processing and presentation to CD8+ and CD4+ T-lymphocytes: N-terminal ubiquitin, N-terminal signal peptide and C-terminal tyrosine motif of LAMP-1 protein. As a result we engineered three T cell immunogens – TCI-N, TCI-N2, and TCI-N3, with different combinations of signal sequences. All designed immunogens were able to elicit HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following immunization. Attachment of either ubiquitin or ER-signal/LAMP-1 sequences increased both CD4+ and CD8+ mediated HIV-specific T cell responses in comparison with polyepitope immunogen without any additional signal sequences. Moreover, TCI-N3 polyepitope immunogen with ubiquitin generated highest magnitude of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in our study. Obtained data suggests that attachment of signal sequences targeting polyepitope immunogens to either MHC class I or MHC class II presentation pathways may improve immunogenicity of T-cell vaccines. These results support the strategy of the rational T cell immunogen design and contribute to the development of effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:25786238

  8. Identification of candidate T-cell epitopes and molecular mimics in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, B; Gran, B; Zhao, Y; Marques, A; Pascal, J; Tzou, A; Kondo, T; Cortese, I; Bielekova, B; Straus, S E; McFarland, H F; Houghten, R; Simon, R; Pinilla, C; Martin, R

    1999-12-01

    Elucidating the cellular immune response to infectious agents is a prerequisite for understanding disease pathogenesis and designing effective vaccines. In the identification of microbial T-cell epitopes, the availability of purified or recombinant bacterial proteins has been a chief limiting factor. In chronic infectious diseases such as Lyme disease, immune-mediated damage may add to the effects of direct infection by means of molecular mimicry to tissue autoantigens. Here, we describe a new method to effectively identify both microbial epitopes and candidate autoantigens. The approach combines data acquisition by positional scanning peptide combinatorial libraries and biometric data analysis by generation of scoring matrices. In a patient with chronic neuroborreliosis, we show that this strategy leads to the identification of potentially relevant T-cell targets derived from both Borrelia burgdorferi and the host. We also found that the antigen specificity of a single T-cell clone can be degenerate and yet the clone can preferentially recognize different peptides derived from the same organism, thus demonstrating that flexibility in T-cell recognition does not preclude specificity. This approach has potential applications in the identification of ligands in infectious diseases, tumors and autoimmune diseases.

  9. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d) crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine. PMID:26895191

  10. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d) crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine. PMID:26895191

  11. CD8+ T-Cell Epitope Mapping for Pneumonia Virus of Mice in H-2b Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sidney, John; Welch, Megan; Fremgen, Daniel M.; Sette, Alessandro; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2013-01-01

    The paramyxovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a rodent model of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) pathogenesis. Here we characterized the PVM-specific CD8+ T-cell repertoire in susceptible C57BL/6 mice. In total, 15 PVM-specific CD8+ T-cell epitopes restricted by H-2Db and/or H-2Kb were identified. These data open the door for using widely profiled, genetically manipulated C57BL/6 mice to study the contribution of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells to PVM pathogenesis. PMID:23824814

  12. Identification of helper T cell epitopes of dengue virus E-protein.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, C; Dériaud, E; Megret, F; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H; Deubel, V

    1993-05-01

    The T cell proliferative response to dengue 2 (Jamaica) E-glycoprotein (495 amino acids) was analyzed in vitro using either killed virus or E-protein fragments or synthetic peptides. Inactivated dengue virus stimulated dengue-specific lymph node (LN) CD4+T cell proliferation in BALB/c (H-2d), C3H (H-2k) and DBA/1 (H-2q) but not in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. Moreover, LN cells from dengue-virus primed BALB/c mice proliferated in vitro in response to three purified non-overlapping E-protein fragments expressed in E. coli as polypeptides fused to trpE (f22-205, f267-354, f366-424). To further determine T cell epitopes in the E-protein, synthetic peptides were selected using prediction algorithms for T cell epitopes. Highest proliferative responses were obtained after in vitro exposure of virus-primed LN cells to peptides p135-157, p270-298, p295-307 and p337-359. Peptide p59-78 was able to induce specific B and T cell responses in peptide-primed mice of H-2d, H-2q and H-2k haplotypes. Two peptides p59-78 corresponding to two dengue (Jamaica and Sri Lanka) isolates and differing only at position 71 cross-reacted at the B but not at the T cell level in H-2b mice. This analysis of murine T helper cell response to dengue E-protein may be of use in dengue subunit vaccine design.

  13. Systematic Bioinformatic Approach for Prediction of Linear B-Cell Epitopes on Dengue E and prM Protein.

    PubMed

    Nadugala, Mahesha N; Premaratne, Prasad H; Goonasekara, Charitha L

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitopes on the envelope (E) and premembrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) were predicted using bioinformatics tools, BepiPred, Ellipro, and SVMTriP. Predicted epitopes, 32 and 17 for E and prM proteins, respectively, were then characterized for their level of conservations. The epitopes, EP4/E (48-55), epitope number 4 of E protein at amino acids 48-55, EP9/E (165-182), EP11/E (218-233), EP20/E (322-349), EP21/E (326-353), EP23/E (356-365), and EP25/E (380-386), showed a high intraserotype conservancy with very low pan-serotype conservancy, demonstrating a potential target as serotype specific diagnostic markers. EP3 (30-41) located in domain-I and EP26/E (393-409), EP27/E (416-435), EP28/E (417-430) located in the stem region of E protein, and EP8/prM (93-112) from the prM protein have a pan-serotype conservancy higher than 70%. These epitopes indicate a potential use as universal vaccine candidates, subjected to verification of their potential in viral neutralization. EP2/E (16-21), EP5/E (62-123), EP6/E (63-89), EP19/E (310-329), and EP24/E (371-402), which have more than 50% pan-serotype conservancies, were found on E protein regions that are important in host cell attachment. Previous studies further show evidence for some of these epitopes to generate cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating their importance in antiviral strategies for DENV. This study suggests that bioinformatic approaches are attractive first line of screening for identification of linear B-cell epitopes. PMID:27688753

  14. Systematic Bioinformatic Approach for Prediction of Linear B-Cell Epitopes on Dengue E and prM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nadugala, Mahesha N.

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitopes on the envelope (E) and premembrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) were predicted using bioinformatics tools, BepiPred, Ellipro, and SVMTriP. Predicted epitopes, 32 and 17 for E and prM proteins, respectively, were then characterized for their level of conservations. The epitopes, EP4/E (48–55), epitope number 4 of E protein at amino acids 48–55, EP9/E (165–182), EP11/E (218–233), EP20/E (322–349), EP21/E (326–353), EP23/E (356–365), and EP25/E (380–386), showed a high intraserotype conservancy with very low pan-serotype conservancy, demonstrating a potential target as serotype specific diagnostic markers. EP3 (30–41) located in domain-I and EP26/E (393–409), EP27/E (416–435), EP28/E (417–430) located in the stem region of E protein, and EP8/prM (93–112) from the prM protein have a pan-serotype conservancy higher than 70%. These epitopes indicate a potential use as universal vaccine candidates, subjected to verification of their potential in viral neutralization. EP2/E (16–21), EP5/E (62–123), EP6/E (63–89), EP19/E (310–329), and EP24/E (371–402), which have more than 50% pan-serotype conservancies, were found on E protein regions that are important in host cell attachment. Previous studies further show evidence for some of these epitopes to generate cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating their importance in antiviral strategies for DENV. This study suggests that bioinformatic approaches are attractive first line of screening for identification of linear B-cell epitopes. PMID:27688753

  15. Systematic Bioinformatic Approach for Prediction of Linear B-Cell Epitopes on Dengue E and prM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nadugala, Mahesha N.

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitopes on the envelope (E) and premembrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) were predicted using bioinformatics tools, BepiPred, Ellipro, and SVMTriP. Predicted epitopes, 32 and 17 for E and prM proteins, respectively, were then characterized for their level of conservations. The epitopes, EP4/E (48–55), epitope number 4 of E protein at amino acids 48–55, EP9/E (165–182), EP11/E (218–233), EP20/E (322–349), EP21/E (326–353), EP23/E (356–365), and EP25/E (380–386), showed a high intraserotype conservancy with very low pan-serotype conservancy, demonstrating a potential target as serotype specific diagnostic markers. EP3 (30–41) located in domain-I and EP26/E (393–409), EP27/E (416–435), EP28/E (417–430) located in the stem region of E protein, and EP8/prM (93–112) from the prM protein have a pan-serotype conservancy higher than 70%. These epitopes indicate a potential use as universal vaccine candidates, subjected to verification of their potential in viral neutralization. EP2/E (16–21), EP5/E (62–123), EP6/E (63–89), EP19/E (310–329), and EP24/E (371–402), which have more than 50% pan-serotype conservancies, were found on E protein regions that are important in host cell attachment. Previous studies further show evidence for some of these epitopes to generate cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating their importance in antiviral strategies for DENV. This study suggests that bioinformatic approaches are attractive first line of screening for identification of linear B-cell epitopes.

  16. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  17. Identification of a novel B-cell epitope of Hantaan virus glycoprotein recognized by neutralizing 3D8 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guolin; Zhang, Yusi; Ma, Ying; Yi, Jing; Liu, Bei; Xu, Zhuwei; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Yang, Angang; Zhuang, Ran; Jin, Boquan

    2012-12-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, is a major agent causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, a high-mortality-rate disease threatening approximately 150 000 people around the world yearly. The 3D8 mAb displays a neutralizing activity to HTNV infection. In this study, the B-cell epitopes of HTNV glycoproteins (GPs) were finely mapped by peptide scanning. A new B-cell epitope (882)GFLCPEFPGSFRKKC(896) of HTNV, which locates on Gc, has been screened out from a set of 15-mer synthesized peptides covering the full-length of HTNV-GPs. It has been shown by the alanine-scanning technique that (885)C, (893)R, (894)K, (895)K and (896)C are the key amino acids of the binding sites of the GPs. The implications of identifying a novel B-cell epitope for hantavirus immunology and vaccinology are discussed.

  18. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine.

  19. DNA vaccines encoding altered peptide ligands for SSX2 enhance epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses☆

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Rekoske, Brian T.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmid DNA serves as a simple and easily modifiable form of antigen delivery for vaccines. The USDA approval of DNA vaccines for several non-human diseases underscores the potential of this type of antigen delivery method as a cost-effective approach for the treatment or prevention of human diseases, including cancer. However, while DNA vaccines have demonstrated safety and immunological effect in early phase clinical trials, they have not consistently elicited robust anti-tumor responses. Hence many recent efforts have sought to increase the immunological efficacy of DNA vaccines, and we have specifically evaluated several target antigens encoded by DNA vaccine as treatments for human prostate cancer. In particular, we have focused on SSX2 as one potential target antigen, given its frequent expression in metastatic prostate cancer. We have previously identified two peptides, p41–49 and p103–111, as HLA-A2-restricted SSX2-specific epitopes. In the present study we sought to determine whether the efficacy of a DNA vaccine could be enhanced by an altered peptide ligand (APL) strategy wherein modifications were made to anchor residues of these epitopes to enhance or ablate their binding to HLA-A2. A DNA vaccine encoding APL modified to increase epitope binding elicited robust peptide-specific CD8+ T cells producing Th1 cytokines specific for each epitope. Ablation of one epitope in a DNA vaccine did not enhance immune responses to the other epitope. These results demonstrate that APL encoded by a DNA vaccine can be used to elicit increased numbers of antigen-specific T cells specific for multiple epitopes simultaneously, and suggest this could be a general approach to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding tumor antigens. PMID:24492013

  20. B-Cell Epitopes in GroEL of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Madico, Guillermo; Li, Sheng; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Perkins, Hillary M.; Sompuram, Seshi R.; Kodela, Vani; Liu, Tong; Morris, Timothy; Wang, Daphne; Roche, Marly I.; Seaton, Barbara A.; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The chaperonin protein GroEL, also known as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is a prominent antigen in the human and mouse antibody response to the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft), the causative agent of tularemia. In addition to its presumed cytoplasmic location, FtGroEL has been reported to be a potential component of the bacterial surface and to be released from the bacteria. In the current study, 13 IgG2a and one IgG3 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for FtGroEL were classified into eleven unique groups based on shared VH-VL germline genes, and seven crossblocking profiles revealing at least three non-overlapping epitope areas in competition ELISA. In a mouse model of respiratory tularemia with the highly pathogenic Ft type A strain SchuS4, the Ab64 and N200 IgG2a mAbs, which block each other’s binding to and are sensitive to the same two point mutations in FtGroEL, reduced bacterial burden indicating that they target protective GroEL B-cell epitopes. The Ab64 and N200 epitopes, as well as those of three other mAbs with different crossblocking profiles, Ab53, N3, and N30, were mapped by hydrogen/deuterium exchange–mass spectrometry (DXMS) and visualized on a homology model of FtGroEL. This model was further supported by its experimentally-validated computational docking to the X-ray crystal structures of Ab64 and Ab53 Fabs. The structural analysis and DXMS profiles of the Ab64 and N200 mAbs suggest that their protective effects may be due to induction or stabilization of a conformational change in FtGroEL. PMID:24968190

  1. Identification of B- and T-Cell Epitopes of BB, a Carrier Protein Derived from the G Protein of Streptococcus Strain G148

    PubMed Central

    Goetsch, Liliane; Haeuw, Jean Francois; Champion, Thierry; Lacheny, Christine; N’Guyen, Thien; Beck, Alain; Corvaia, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    Most conventional vaccines consist of killed organisms or purified antigenic proteins. Such molecules are generally poorly immunogenic and need to be coupled to carrier proteins. We have identified a new carrier molecule, BB, derived from the G protein of Streptococcus strain G148. We show that BB is able to induce strong antibody responses when conjugated to peptides or polysaccharides. In order to localize T and B cell epitopes in BB and match them with the albumin-binding region of the molecule, we immunized mice with BB, performed B and T pepscan analyses, and compared the results with pepscan done with sera and cells from humans. Our results indicate that BB has two distinct T helper epitopes, seven linear B-cell epitopes, and one conformational B-cell epitope in BALB/c mice. Four linear B-cell epitopes were identified from human sera, three of which overlapped mouse B-cell epitopes. Finally, three human T-cell epitopes were detected on the BB protein. One of these T-cell epitopes is common to BALB/c mice and humans and was localized in the region that contains the albumin-binding site. These data are of interest for the optimization of new carrier molecules derived from BB. PMID:12522050

  2. A novel T-cell receptor mimic defines dendritic cells that present an immunodominant West Nile virus epitope in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojung; Pinto, Amelia K; Myers, Nancy B; Hawkins, Oriana; Doll, Krysten; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; Netland, Jason; Bevan, Michael J; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H; Diamond, Michael S; Hansen, Ted H

    2014-07-01

    We used a newly generated T-cell receptor mimic monoclonal antibody (TCRm MAb) that recognizes a known nonself immunodominant peptide epitope from West Nile virus (WNV) NS4B protein to investigate epitope presentation after virus infection in C57BL/6 mice. Previous studies suggested that peptides of different length, either SSVWNATTAI (10-mer) or SSVWNATTA (9-mer) in complex with class I MHC antigen H-2D(b) , were immunodominant after WNV infection. Our data establish that both peptides are presented on the cell surface after WNV infection and that CD8(+) T cells can detect 10- and 9-mer length variants similarly. This result varies from the idea that a given T-cell receptor (TCR) prefers a single peptide length bound to its cognate class I MHC. In separate WNV infection studies with the TCRm MAb, we show that in vivo the 10-mer was presented on the surface of uninfected and infected CD8α(+) CD11c(+) dendritic cells, which suggests the use of direct and cross-presentation pathways. In contrast, CD11b(+) CD11c(-) cells bound the TCRm MAb only when they were infected. Our study demonstrates that TCR recognition of peptides is not limited to certain peptide lengths and that TCRm MAbs can be used to dissect the cell-type specific mechanisms of antigen presentation in vivo. PMID:24723377

  3. Protective B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide in a mouse model of respiratory tularaemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaohua; Madico, Guillermo; Roche, Marly I; Wang, Qi; Hui, Julia H; Perkins, Hillary M; Zaia, Joseph; Costello, Catherine E; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2012-07-01

    Antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Francisella tularensis have been shown to be protective against respiratory tularaemia in mouse models, and we have previously described mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to non-overlapping terminal and internal epitopes of the F. tularensis LPS O-polysaccharide (OAg). In the current study, we used F. tularensis LPS oligosaccharides of defined OAg repeat length as molecular rulers in competition ELISA to demonstrate that the epitope targeted by the terminal OAg-binding mAb FB11 is contained within one tetrasaccharide repeat whereas the epitope targeted by the internal OAg-binding mAb Ab52 spans two tetrasaccharide repeats. Both mAbs conferred survival to BALB/c mice infected intranasally with the F. tularensis type B live vaccine strain and prolonged survival of BALB/c mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis type A strain SchuS4. The protective effects correlated with reduced bacterial burden in mAb-treated infected mice. These results indicate that an oligosaccharide with two OAg tetrasaccharide repeats covers both terminal and internal protective OAg epitopes, which may inform the design of vaccines for tularaemia. Furthermore, the FB11 and Ab52 mAbs could serve as reporters to monitor the response of vaccine recipients to protective B-cell epitopes of F. tularensis OAg.

  4. Immunoprofiling reveals unique cell-specific patterns of wall epitopes in the expanding Arabidopsis stem.

    PubMed

    Hall, Hardy C; Cheung, Jingling; Ellis, Brian E

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis inflorescence stem undergoes rapid directional growth, requiring massive axial cell-wall extension in all its tissues, but, at maturity, these tissues are composed of cell types that exhibit markedly different cell-wall structures. It is not clear whether the cell-wall compositions of these cell types diverge rapidly following axial growth cessation, or whether compositional divergence occurs at earlier stages in differentiation, despite the common requirement for cell-wall extensibility. To examine this question, seven cell types were assayed for the abundance and distribution of 18 major cell-wall glycan classes at three developmental stages along the developing inflorescence stem, using a high-throughput immunolabelling strategy. These stages represent a phase of juvenile growth, a phase displaying the maximum rate of stem extension, and a phase in which extension growth is ceasing. The immunolabelling patterns detected demonstrate that the cell-wall composition of most stem tissues undergoes pronounced changes both during and after rapid extension growth. Hierarchical clustering of the immunolabelling signals identified cell-specific binding patterns for some antibodies, including a sub-group of arabinogalactan side chain-directed antibodies whose epitope targets are specifically associated with the inter-fascicular fibre region during the rapid cell expansion phase. The data reveal dynamic, cell type-specific changes in cell-wall chemistry across diverse cell types during cell-wall expansion and maturation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem, and highlight the paradox between this structural diversity and the uniform anisotropic cell expansion taking place across all tissues during stem growth.

  5. Computational approach for predicting the conserved B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin H7 subtype influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangyu; Sun, Qi; Ye, Zhonghua; Hua, Ying; Shao, Na; Du, Yanli; Zhang, Qiwei; Wan, Chengsong

    2016-01-01

    An avian-origin influenza H7N9 virus epidemic occurred in China in 2013–2014, in which >422 infected people suffered from pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock. H7N9 viruses belong to the H7 subtype of avian-origin influenza viruses (AIV-H7). Hemagglutinin (HA) is a vital membrane protein of AIV that has an important role in host recognition and infection. The epitopes of HA are significant determinants of the regularity of epidemic and viral mutation and recombination mechanisms. The present study aimed to predict the conserved B-cell epitopes of AIV-H7 HA using a bioinformatics approach, including the three most effective epitope prediction softwares available online: Artificial Neural Network based B-cell Epitope Prediction (ABCpred), B-cell Epitope Prediction (BepiPred) and Linear B-cell Epitope Prediction (LBtope). A total of 24 strains of Euro-Asiatic AIV-H7 that had been associated with a serious poultry pandemic or had infected humans in the past 30 years were selected to identify the conserved regions of HA. Sequences were obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information and Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data databases. Using a combination of software prediction and sequence comparisons, the conserved epitopes of AIV-H7 were predicted and clarified. A total of five conserved epitopes [amino acids (aa) 37–52, 131–142, 215–234, 465–484 and 487–505] with a suitable length, high antigenicity and minimal variation were predicted and confirmed. Each obtained a score of >0.80 in ABCpred, 60% in LBtope and a level of 0.35 in Bepipred. In addition, a representative amino acid change (glutamine235-to-leucine235) in the HA protein of the 2013 AIV-H7N9 was discovered. The strategy adopted in the present study may have profound implications on the rapid diagnosis and control of infectious disease caused by H7N9 viruses, as well as by other virulent viruses, such as the Ebola virus. PMID:27703505

  6. An immunoinformatic approach for identification of Trypanosoma cruzi HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, Christopher S; Van Aartsen, Daniel; Terry, Frances E; Meymandi, Sheba K; Traina, Mahmoud M; Hernandez, Salvador; Martin, William D; Moise, Leonard; De Groot, Annie S; Hoft, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a major neglected tropical disease caused by persistent chronic infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. An estimated 8 million people are infected with T. cruzi, however only 2 drugs are approved for treatment and no vaccines are available. Thus there is an urgent need to develop vaccines and new drugs to prevent and treat Chagas disease. In this work, we identify T cell targets relevant for human infection with T. cruzi. The trans-sialidase (TS) gene family is a large family of homologous genes within the T. cruzi genome encoding over 1,400 members. There are 12 highly conserved TS gene family members which encode enzymatically active TS (functional TS; F-TS), while the remaining TS family genes are less conserved, enzymatically inactive and have been hypothesized to be involved in immune evasion (non-functional TS; NF-TS). We utilized immunoinformatic tools to identify HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes conserved within F-TS family members and NF-TS gene family members. We also utilized a whole-genome approach to identify T cell epitopes present within genes which have previously been shown to be expressed in life stages relevant for human infection (Non-TS genes). Thirty immunogenic HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes were identified using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays after vaccination of humanized HLA-A2 transgenic mice with mature dendritic cells pulsed with F-TS, NF-TS, and Non-TS peptide pools. The immunogenic HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitopes identified in this work may serve as potential components of an epitope-based T cell targeted vaccine for Chagas disease. PMID:26107442

  7. In silico analysis of MHC-I restricted epitopes of Chikungunya virus proteins: Implication in understanding anti-CHIKV CD8(+) T cell response and advancement of epitope based immunotherapy for CHIKV infection.

    PubMed

    Pratheek, B M; Suryawanshi, Amol R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus, responsible for acute febrile infection. The high morbidity and socio-economic loss associated with the recent CHIKV epidemics worldwide have raised a great public health concern and emphasize the need to study the immunological basis of CHIKV infection to control the disease. MHC-I restricted CD8(+) T cell response represent one of the major anti-viral immune responses. Accordingly, it is essential to have a detailed understanding towards CHIKV specific MHC-I restricted immunogenic epitopes for anti-viral CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. In the present study, a computational approach was used to predict the conserved MHC-I epitopes for mouse haplotypes (H2-Db and H2-Dd) and some alleles of the major HLA-I supertypes (HLA-A2, -A3, -A24, -B7, -B15) of all CHIKV proteins. Further, an in-depth computational analysis was carried out to validate the selected epitopes for their nature of conservation in different global CHIKV isolates to assess their binding affinities to the appropriate site of respective MHC-I molecules and to predict anti-CHIKV CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. Our analyses resulted in fifteen highly conserved epitopes for H2-Db and H2-Dd and fifty epitopes for different HLA-I supertypes. Out of these, the MHC-I epitopes VLLPNVHTL and MTPERVTRL were found to have highest predictable CTL immunogenicities and least binding energies for H2-Db and H2-Dd, whereas, for HLA-I, the epitope FLTLFVNTL was with the highest population coverage, CTL immunogenicity and least binding energy. Hence, our study has identified MHC-I restricted epitopes that may help in the advancement of MHC-I restricted epitope based anti-CHIKV immune responses against this infection and this will be useful towards the development of epitope based anti-CHIKV immunotherapy in the future. However, further experimental investigations for cross validation and evaluation are warranted to establish the ability of epitopes to induce CD8(+) T cell

  8. In silico analysis of MHC-I restricted epitopes of Chikungunya virus proteins: Implication in understanding anti-CHIKV CD8(+) T cell response and advancement of epitope based immunotherapy for CHIKV infection.

    PubMed

    Pratheek, B M; Suryawanshi, Amol R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus, responsible for acute febrile infection. The high morbidity and socio-economic loss associated with the recent CHIKV epidemics worldwide have raised a great public health concern and emphasize the need to study the immunological basis of CHIKV infection to control the disease. MHC-I restricted CD8(+) T cell response represent one of the major anti-viral immune responses. Accordingly, it is essential to have a detailed understanding towards CHIKV specific MHC-I restricted immunogenic epitopes for anti-viral CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. In the present study, a computational approach was used to predict the conserved MHC-I epitopes for mouse haplotypes (H2-Db and H2-Dd) and some alleles of the major HLA-I supertypes (HLA-A2, -A3, -A24, -B7, -B15) of all CHIKV proteins. Further, an in-depth computational analysis was carried out to validate the selected epitopes for their nature of conservation in different global CHIKV isolates to assess their binding affinities to the appropriate site of respective MHC-I molecules and to predict anti-CHIKV CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. Our analyses resulted in fifteen highly conserved epitopes for H2-Db and H2-Dd and fifty epitopes for different HLA-I supertypes. Out of these, the MHC-I epitopes VLLPNVHTL and MTPERVTRL were found to have highest predictable CTL immunogenicities and least binding energies for H2-Db and H2-Dd, whereas, for HLA-I, the epitope FLTLFVNTL was with the highest population coverage, CTL immunogenicity and least binding energy. Hence, our study has identified MHC-I restricted epitopes that may help in the advancement of MHC-I restricted epitope based anti-CHIKV immune responses against this infection and this will be useful towards the development of epitope based anti-CHIKV immunotherapy in the future. However, further experimental investigations for cross validation and evaluation are warranted to establish the ability of epitopes to induce CD8(+) T cell

  9. Conservation Analysis of Dengue Virus T-cell Epitope-Based Vaccine Candidates Using Peptide Block Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Zhang, Guang Lan; Keskin, Derin B.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Broad coverage of the pathogen population is particularly important when designing CD8+ T-cell epitope vaccines against viral pathogens. Traditional approaches are based on combinations of highly conserved T-cell epitopes. Peptide block entropy analysis is a novel approach for assembling sets of broadly covering antigens. Since T-cell epitopes are recognized as peptides rather than individual residues, this method is based on calculating the information content of blocks of peptides from a multiple sequence alignment of homologous proteins rather than using the information content of individual residues. The block entropy analysis provides broad coverage of variant antigens. We applied the block entropy analysis method to the proteomes of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) and found 1,551 blocks of 9-mer peptides, which cover 99% of available sequences with five or fewer unique peptides. In contrast, the benchmark study by Khan et al. (2008) resulted in 165 conserved 9-mer peptides. Many of the conserved blocks are located consecutively in the proteins. Connecting these blocks resulted in 78 conserved regions. Of the 1551 blocks of 9-mer peptides 110 comprised predicted HLA binder sets. In total, 457 subunit peptides that encompass the diversity of all sequenced DENV strains of which 333 are T-cell epitope candidates. PMID:22566858

  10. Identification of T-cell epitopes of Lol p 9, a major allergen of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen.

    PubMed

    Blaher, B; Suphioglu, C; Knox, R B; Singh, M B; McCluskey, J; Rolland, J M

    1996-07-01

    T-cell recognition of Lol p 9, a major allergen of ryegrass pollen, was investigated by using a T-cell line and T-cell clones generated from the peripheral blood of an atopic donor. The T-cell line reacted with purified Lol p 9, as well as with crude ryegrass pollen extract, but failed to cross-react with Bermuda grass pollen extract. All of six T-cell clones generated from this line proliferated in response to Lol p 9. Epitope mapping was carried out with a panel of 34 overlapping synthetic peptides, which spanned the entire sequence of the Lol p 9 12R isoform. The T-cell line responded to two of the peptides, Lol p 9 (105-116) and Lol p 9 (193-204), whereas reactivity with one or other of these peptides was shown by five T-cell clones. These two peptides contained sequences consistent with motifs previously reported for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted peptides. HLA antibody blocking studies showed that presentation of peptide Lol p 9 (105-116) to one T-cell clone was HLA-DR-restricted; this clone expressed a T helper cell phenotype (CD3+, CD4+) and the T-cell receptor alpha beta. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitope(s) on allergens is essential for devising safer and more effective immunotherapy strategies, which can interrupt the chain of events leading to allergic disease.

  11. An Improved Method for Predicting Linear B-cell Epitope Using Deep Maxout Networks.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yao; Huang, Ze Chi; Ge, Meng; Pan, Xian Ming

    2015-06-01

    To establish a relation between an protein amino acid sequence and its tendencies to generate antibody response, and to investigate an improved in silico method for linear B-cell epitope (LBE) prediction. We present a sequence-based LBE predictor developed using deep maxout network (DMN) with dropout training techniques. A graphics processing unit (GPU) was used to reduce the training time of the model. A 10-fold cross-validation test on a large, non-redundant and experimentally verified dataset (Lbtope_Fixed_ non_redundant) was performed to evaluate the performance. DMN-LBE achieved an accuracy of 68.33% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.743, outperforming other prediction methods in the field. A web server, DMN-LBE, of the improved prediction model has been provided for public free use. We anticipate that DMN-LBE will be beneficial to vaccine development, antibody production, disease diagnosis, and therapy.

  12. Aspartate-β-hydroxylase induces epitope-specific T cell responses in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tomimaru, Yoshito; Mishra, Sasmita; Safran, Howard; Charpentier, Kevin P; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S; Gregory, Stephen H; Wands, Jack R

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a poor prognosis due to high recurrence rate. Aspartate-β-hydroxylase (ASPH) is a highly conserved transmembrane protein, which is over expressed in HCC and promotes a malignant phenotype. The capability of ASPH protein-derived HLA class I and II peptides to generate antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) immune responses is unknown. Therefore, these studies aim to define the epitope specific components required for a peptide based candidate vaccine. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) generated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HCC patients were loaded with ASPH protein. Helper CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were co-incubated with the DCs; T cell activation was evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoinformatics tools were used to predict HLA class I- and class II-restricted ASPH sequences, and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. The immunogenicity of each peptide in cultures of human PBMCs was determined by IFN-γ ELISpot assay. ASPH protein-loaded DCs activated both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells contained within the PBMC population derived from HCC patients. Furthermore, the predicted HLA class I- and class II-restricted ASPH peptides were significantly immunogenic. Both HLA class I- and class II-restricted peptides derived from ASPH induce T cell activation in HCC. We observed that ASPH protein and related peptides were highly immunogenic in patients with HCC and produce the type of cellular immune responses required for generation of anti-tumor activity.

  13. Electrophysical characteristics of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 during interaction with antibodies to various cell surface epitopes.

    PubMed

    Guliy, Olga I; Matora, Larisa Y; Burygin, Gennady L; Dykman, Lev A; Ostudin, Nikolai A; Bunin, Viktor D; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Ignatov, Oleg V

    2007-11-15

    This work was undertaken to examine the electrooptical characteristics of cells of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 during their interaction with antibodies developed to various cell surface epitopes. We used the dependences of the cell suspension optical density changes induced by electroorientation on the orienting field frequency (740, 1000, 1450, 2000, and 2800kHz). Cell interactions with homologous strain-specific antibodies to the A. brasilense Sp245 O antigen and with homologous antibodies to whole bacterial cells brought about considerable changes in the electrooptical properties of the bacterial suspension. When genus-specific antibodies to the flagellin of the Azospirillum sheathed flagellum and antibodies to the serologically distinct O antigen of A. brasilense Sp7 were included in the A. brasilense Sp245 suspension, the changes caused in the electrooptical signal were slight and had values close to those for the above changes. These findings agree well with the immunochemical characteristics of the Azospirillum O antigens and with the data on the topographical distribution of the Azospirillum major cell surface antigens. The obtained results can serve as a basis for the development of a rapid test for the intraspecies detection of microorganisms.

  14. Prediction of T cell epitopes of Brucella abortus and evaluation of their protective role in mice.

    PubMed

    Afley, Prachiti; Dohre, Sudhir K; Prasad, G B K S; Kumar, Subodh

    2015-09-01

    Brucellae are Gram-negative intracellular bacteria that cause an important zoonotic disease called brucellosis. The animal vaccines are available but have disadvantage of causing abortions in a proportion of pregnant animals. The animal vaccines are also pathogenic to humans. Recent trend in vaccine design has shifted to epitope-based vaccines that are safe and specific. In this study, efforts were made to identify MHC-I- and MHC-II-restricted T cell epitopes of Brucella abortus and evaluate their vaccine potential in mice. The peptides were designed using online available immunoinformatics tools, and five MHC-I- and one MHC-II-restricted T cell peptides were selected on the basis of their ability to produce interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in in vivo studies. The selected peptides were co-administered with poly DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles and evaluated for immunogenicity and protection in BALB/c mice. Mice immunized with peptides either entrapped in PLG microparticles (EPLG-Pep) or adsorbed on PLG particles (APLG-Pep) showed significantly higher splenocyte proliferation and IFN-γ generation to all selected peptides than the mice immunized with corresponding irrelevant peptides formulated PLG microparticles or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A significant protection compared to PBS control was also observed in EPLG-Pep and APLG-Pep groups. A plasmid DNA vaccine construct (pVaxPep) for peptides encoding DNA sequences was generated and injected to mice by in vivo electroporation. Significant protection was observed (1.66 protection units) when compared with PBS and empty vector control group animals. Overall, the MHC-I and MHC-II peptides identified in this study are immunogenic and protective in mouse model and support the feasibility of peptide-based vaccine for brucellosis.

  15. Specific B-cell Epitope of Per a 1: A Major Allergen of American Cockroach (Periplaneta americana) and Anatomical Localization

    PubMed Central

    Sookrung, Nitat; Khetsuphan, Thanyathon; Chaisri, Urai; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Reamtong, Onrapak; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cockroach (CR) is a common source of indoor allergens, and Per a 1 is a major American CR (Periplaneta americana) allergen; however, several attributes of this protein remain unknown. This study identifies a novel specific B cell epitope and anatomical locations of Per a 1.0105. Methods Recombinant Per a 1.0105 (rPer a 1.0105) was used as BALB/c mouse immunogen for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAb). The MAb specific B cell epitope was identified by determining phage mimotopic peptides and pair-wise alignment of the peptides with the rPer a 1.0105 amino acid sequence. Locations of the Per a 1.0105 in P. americana were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. Results The rPer a 1.0105 (~13 kDa) had 100%, 98% and ≥90% identity to Per a 1.0105, Per a 1.0101, and Cr-PII, respectively. The B-cell epitope of the Per a 1.0105 specific-MAb was located at residues99 QDLLLQLRDKGV110 contained in all 5 Per a 1.01 isoforms and Per a 1.02. The epitope was analogous to the Bla g 1.02 epitope; however, this B-cell epitope was not an IgE inducer. Per a 1.0105 was found in the midgut and intestinal content of American CR but not in the other organs. The amount of the Per a 1 was ~544 ℃g per gram of feces. Conclusions The novel Per a 1 B-cell epitope described in this study is a useful target for allergen quantification in samples; however, the specific MAb can be used as an allergen detection reagent. The MAb based-affinity resin can be made for allergen purification, and the so-purified protein can serve as a standard and diagnostic allergen as well as a therapeutic vaccine component. The finding that the Per a 1 is contained in the midgut and feces is useful to increase yield and purity when preparing this allergen. PMID:24991456

  16. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A.; Friedrich, David P.; Gabriel, Erin E.; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7–30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  17. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A; Friedrich, David P; Gabriel, Erin E; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7-30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  18. Vaccines Targeting the Cancer Testis Antigen SSX-2 Elicit HLA-A2 Epitope-Specific Cytolytic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer-testis antigen SSX-2 is a potentially attractive target for tumor immunotherapy based upon its tissue-restricted expression to germline cells and its frequent expression in malignancies. The goal of the current study was to evaluate a genetic vaccine encoding SSX-2 to prioritize HLA-A2-specific epitopes and determine if a DNA vaccine can elicit SSX-2-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) capable of lysing prostate cancer cells. HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were identified based on their in vitro binding affinity for HLA-A2 and by the ability of a genetic vaccine to elicit peptide-specific CTL in A2/DR1 (HLA-A2.1+/HLA-DR1+/H-2 class I-/class II-knockout) transgenic mice. We found that SSX-2 peptides p41-49 (KASEKIFYV) and p103-111 (RLQGISPKI) had high affinity for HLA-A2 and were immunogenic in vivo, however peptide p103-111 was immunodominant with robust peptide-specific immune responses elicited in mice vaccinated with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding SSX-2. Furthermore, p103-111-specific CTL were able to lyse an HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cell line. The immunodominance of this epitope was found not to be due to a putative HLA-DR1 epitope (p98-112) flanking p103-111. Finally, we demonstrated that SSX-2 epitope-specific CTL could be detected and cultured from the peripheral blood of HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients, notably patients with advanced prostate cancer. Overall, we conclude that SSX-2 peptide p103-111 is an immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope, and epitope-specific CD8+ T cells can be detected in patients with prostate cancer, suggesting that tolerance to SSX-2 can be circumvented in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that SSX-2 may be a relevant target antigen for prostate cancer vaccine approaches. PMID:21904219

  19. Vaccines targeting the cancer-testis antigen SSX-2 elicit HLA-A2 epitope-specific cytolytic T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heath A; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-10-01

    The cancer-testis antigen synovial sarcoma X breakpoint-2 (SSX-2) is a potentially attractive target for tumor immunotherapy based upon its tissue-restricted expression to germline cells and its frequent expression in malignancies. The goal of this study was to evaluate genetic vaccine encoding SSX-2 to prioritize human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2-specific epitopes and determine if a DNA vaccine can elicit SSX-2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing prostate cancer cells. HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were identified based on their in vitro binding affinity for HLA-A2 and by the ability of a genetic vaccine to elicit peptide-specific CTL in A2/DR1 (HLA-A2.1+/HLA-DR1+/H-2 class I-/class II-knockout) transgenic mice. We found that SSX-2 peptides p41-49 (KASEKIFYV) and p103-111 (RLQGISPKI) had high affinity for HLA-A2 and were immunogenic in vivo; however, peptide p103-111 was immunodominant with robust peptide-specific immune responses elicited in mice vaccinated with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding SSX-2. Furthermore, p103-111-specific CTLs were able to lyse an HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cell line. The immunodominance of this epitope was found not to be due to a putative HLA-DR1 epitope (p98-112) flanking p103-111. Finally, we demonstrated that SSX-2 epitope-specific CTLs could be detected and cultured from the peripheral blood of HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients, notably patients with advanced prostate cancer. Overall, we conclude that SSX-2 peptide p103-111 is an immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope, and epitope-specific CD8 T cells can be detected in patients with prostate cancer, suggesting that tolerance to SSX-2 can be circumvented in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that SSX-2 may be a relevant target antigen for prostate cancer vaccine approaches. PMID:21904219

  20. Identification of murine CD8 T cell epitopes in codon-optimized SARS-associated coronavirus spike protein.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yan; Kobinger, Gary P; Jordan, Heather; Suchma, Katie; Weiss, Susan R; Shen, Hao; Schumer, Gregory; Gao, Guangping; Boyer, Julie L; Crystal, Ronald G; Wilson, James M

    2005-04-25

    The causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new type of coronavirus, SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV). CD8 T cells play an important role in controlling diseases caused by other coronaviruses and in mediating vaccine-induced protective immunity in corresponding animal models. The spike protein, a main surface antigen of SARS-CoV, is one of the most important antigen candidates for vaccine design. Overlapping peptides were used to identify major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted epitopes in mice immunized with vectors encoding codon-optimized SARS-CoV spike protein. CD8 T-cell responses were mapped to two H-2(b)-restricted epitopes (S436-443 and S525-532) and one H-2(d)-restricted epitope (S366-374). The identification of these epitopes will facilitate the evaluation of vaccine strategies in murine models of SARS-CoV infection. Furthermore, codon and promoter optimizations can greatly enhance the overall immunogenicity of spike protein in the context of replication-defective human and simian adenoviral vaccine carriers. The optimized recombinant adenoviral vaccine vectors encoding spike can generate robust antigen-specific cellular immunity in mice and may potentially be useful for control of SARS-CoV infection.

  1. Benchmarking B-cell epitope prediction with quantitative dose-response data on antipeptide antibodies: towards novel pharmaceutical product development.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction can enable novel pharmaceutical product development. However, a mechanistically framed consensus has yet to emerge on benchmarking such prediction, thus presenting an opportunity to establish standards of practice that circumvent epistemic inconsistencies of casting the epitope prediction task as a binary-classification problem. As an alternative to conventional dichotomous qualitative benchmark data, quantitative dose-response data on antibody-mediated biological effects are more meaningful from an information-theoretic perspective in the sense that such effects may be expressed as probabilities (e.g., of functional inhibition by antibody) for which the Shannon information entropy (SIE) can be evaluated as a measure of informativeness. Accordingly, half-maximal biological effects (e.g., at median inhibitory concentrations of antibody) correspond to maximally informative data while undetectable and maximal biological effects correspond to minimally informative data. This applies to benchmarking B-cell epitope prediction for the design of peptide-based immunogens that elicit antipeptide antibodies with functionally relevant cross-reactivity. Presently, the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) contains relatively few quantitative dose-response data on such cross-reactivity. Only a small fraction of these IEDB data is maximally informative, and many more of them are minimally informative (i.e., with zero SIE). Nevertheless, the numerous qualitative data in IEDB suggest how to overcome the paucity of informative benchmark data.

  2. Ubiquitin-like epitopes associated with Candida albicans cell surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, P; Lopez-Ribot, J L; Gozalbo, D; Cervera, A; Martinez, J P; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    We have recently reported the cloning of a Candida albicans polyubiquitin gene and the presence of ubiquitin in the cell wall of this fungus. The polyubiquitin cDNA clone was isolated because of its reactivity with antibodies generated against the candidal 37-kDa laminin-binding protein. In the present study, we have further investigated the relationship between ubiquitin and cell wall components displaying receptor-like activities, including the 37-kDa laminin receptor, the 58-kDa fibrinogen-binding mannoprotein, and the candidal C3d receptor. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and immunoblot experiments with antibodies against ubiquitin and the individually purified receptor-like molecules confirmed that these cell surface components are ubiquitinated. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, polyclonal antisera to each receptor reacted with ubiquitin, thus demonstrating that the purified receptor preparations used as immunogens contained ubiquitin-like epitopes. It is proposed that ubiquitin may play a role in modulating the activity of these receptors and in the interaction of C. albicans cells with host structures. PMID:8926122

  3. Using injectoporation to deliver genes to mechanosensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Wagner, Thomas; Yan, Linxuan; Grillet, Nicolas; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensation, the transduction of mechanical force into electrochemical signals, allows organisms to detect touch and sound, to register movement and gravity, and to sense changes in cell volume and shape. the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear are the mechanosensors for the detection of sound and head movement. the analysis of gene function in hair cells has been hampered by the lack of an efficient gene transfer method. Here we describe a method termed injectoporation that combines tissue microinjection with electroporation to express cDNAs and shRNAs in mouse cochlear hair cells. Injectoporation allows for gene transfer into dozens of hair cells, and it is compatible with the analysis of hair cell function using imaging approaches and electrophysiology. Tissue dissection and injectoporation can be carried out within a few hours, and the tissue can be cultured for days for subsequent functional analyses. PMID:25232939

  4. Identification of CD8+ T Cell Epitopes in the West Nile Virus Polyprotein by Reverse-Immunology Using NetCTL

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lelic, Alina; Parsons, Robin; Nielsen, Morten; Hoof, Ilka; Lamberth, Kasper; Loeb, Mark B.; Buus, Søren; Bramson, Jonathan; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) is a growing threat to public health and a greater understanding of the immune response raised against WNV is important for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings In a reverse-immunology approach, we used bioinformatics methods to predict WNV-specific CD8+ T cell epitopes and selected a set of peptides that constitutes maximum coverage of 20 fully-sequenced WNV strains. We then tested these putative epitopes for cellular reactivity in a cohort of WNV-infected patients. We identified 26 new CD8+ T cell epitopes, which we propose are restricted by 11 different HLA class I alleles. Aiming for optimal coverage of human populations, we suggest that 11 of these new WNV epitopes would be sufficient to cover from 48% to 93% of ethnic populations in various areas of the World. Conclusions/Significance The 26 identified CD8+ T cell epitopes contribute to our knowledge of the immune response against WNV infection and greatly extend the list of known WNV CD8+ T cell epitopes. A polytope incorporating these and other epitopes could possibly serve as the basis for a WNV vaccine. PMID:20856867

  5. Full protection of swine against foot-and-mouth disease by a bivalent B-cell epitope dendrimer peptide.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Esther; Guerra, Beatriz; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Defaus, Sira; Dekker, Aldo; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have reported (Cubillos et al., 2008) that a synthetic dendrimeric peptide consisting of four copies of a B-cell epitope [VP1(136-154)] linked through thioether bonds to a T-cell epitope [3A(21-35)] of FMDV [B4T(thi)] elicits potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confers solid protection in pigs to type C FMDV challenge. Herein we show that downsized versions of this peptide bearing two copies of a B-cell epitope from a type O isolate and using thioether [B2T(thi)] or maleimide [B2T(mal)] conjugation chemistries for their synthesis elicited in swine similar or higher B and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T(thi). Moreover, while partial protection was observed in animals immunized with B4T(thi) (60%) and B2T(thi) (80%), B2T(mal) conferred full (100%) protection against FMDV challenge, associated to high levels of circulating IgG2 and mucosal IgGA, and entirely prevented virus shedding. Interestingly, B2T(mal) is also the most advantageous option in terms of synthetic practicality. Taken together, the results reported here point out to B2T(mal) as a highly valuable, cost-effective FMDV candidate vaccine. PMID:26956030

  6. Novel T-cell epitopes of ovalbumin in BALB/c mouse: Potential for peptide-immunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Marie; Mine, Yoshinori

    2009-01-09

    The identification of food allergen T-cell epitopes provides a platform for the development of novel immunotherapies. Despite extensive knowledge of the physicochemical properties of hen ovalbumin (OVA), a major egg allergen, the complete T-cell epitope map of OVA has surprisingly not been defined in the commonly used BALB/c mouse model. In this study, spleen cells obtained from OVA-sensitized mice were incubated in the presence of 12-mer overlapping synthetic peptides, constructed using the SPOTS synthesis method. Proliferative activity was assessed by 72-h in vitro assays with use of the tetrazolium salt WST-1 and led to identification of four mitogenic sequences, i.e., A39R50, S147R158, K263E274, and A329E340. ELISA analyses of interferon (IFN)-{gamma} and interleukin (IL)-4 productions in cell culture supernatants upon stimulation with increasing concentrations of peptides confirmed their immunogenicity. Knowledge of the complete T-cell epitope map of OVA opens the way to a number of experimental investigations, including the exploration of peptide-based immunotherapy.

  7. Aspartate-β-hydroxylase Induces Epitope-specific T Cell Responses in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tomimaru, Yoshito; Mishra, Sasmita; Safran, Howard; Charpentier, Kevin P.; Martin, William; De Groot, Anne S.; Gregory, Stephen H.; Wands, Jack R.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a poor prognosis due to high recurrence rate. Aspartate-β-hydroxylase (ASPH) is a highly conserved transmembrane protein, which is over expressed in HCC and promotes a malignant phenotype. The capability of ASPH protein-derived HLA Class I and II peptides to generate antigen specific CD4+ and CD8+ immune responses is unknown. Therefore, these studies aim to define the epitope specific components required for a peptide based candidate vaccine. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) generated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HCC patients were loaded with ASPH protein. Helper CD4+ T cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were co-incubated with the DCs; T cell activation was evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoinformatics tools were used to predict HLA class I- and class II-restricted ASPH sequences, and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. The immunogenicity of each peptide in cultures of human PBMCs was determined by IFN-γ ELISpot assay. ASPH protein-loaded DCs activated both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells contained within the PBMC population derived from HCC patients. Furthermore, the predicted HLA class I- and class II-restricted ASPH peptides were significantly immunogenic. Both HLA class I- and class II-restricted peptides derived from ASPH induce T cell activation in HCC. We observed that ASPH protein and related peptides were highly immunogenic in patients with HCC and produce the type of cellular immune responses required for generation of anti-tumor activity. PMID:25629522

  8. Heterologous expression of rat epitope-tagged histamine H2 receptors in insect Sf9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Beukers, M W; Klaassen, C H W; De Grip, W J; Verzijl, D; Timmerman, H; Leurs, R

    1997-01-01

    Rat histamine H2 receptors were epitope-tagged with six histidine residues at the C-terminus to allow immunological detection of the receptor. Recombinant baculoviruses containing the epitope-tagged H2 receptor were prepared and were used to infect insect Sf9 cells. The His-tagged H2 receptors expressed in insect Sf9 cells showed typical H2 receptor characteristics as determined with [125I]-aminopotentidine (APT) binding studies. In Sf9 cells expressing the His-tagged H2 receptor histamine was able to stimulate cyclic AMP production 9 fold (EC50=2.1±0.1 μM) by use of the endogenous signalling pathway. The classical antagonists cimetidine, ranitidine and tiotidine inhibited histamine induced cyclic AMP production with Ki values of 0.60±0.43 μM, 0.25±0.15 μM and 28±7 nM, respectively (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). The expression of the His-tagged H2 receptors in infected Sf9 cells reached functional levels of 6.6±0.6 pmol mg−1 protein (mean±s.e.mean, n=3) after 3 days of infection. This represents about 2×106 copies of receptor/cell. Preincubation of the cells with 0.03 mM cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex resulted in an increase of [125I]-APT binding up to 169±5% (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). The addition of 0.03 mM cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex did not affect histamine-induced cyclic AMP production. The EC50 value of histamine was 3.1±1.7 μM in the absence of cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex and 11.1±5.5 μM in the presence of cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). Also, the amount of cyclic AMP produced in the presence of 100 μM histamine was identical, 85±18 pmol/106 cells in the absence and 81±11 pmol/106 cells in the presence of 0.03 mM cholesterol-β-cyclodextrin complex (mean±s.e.mean, n=3). Immunofluorescence studies with an antibody against the His-tag revealed that the majority of the His-tagged H2 receptors was localized inside the insect Sf9 cells, although plasma membrane labelling could be

  9. Murine whole-organ immune cell populations revealed by multi-epitope-ligand cartography.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Jenny; Ostalecki, Christian; Kuczera, Katarzyna; Schuler, Gerold; Pommer, Ansgar J; Lechmann, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Multi-epitope-ligand cartography (MELC) is an innovative high-throughput fluorescence microscopy-based method. A tissue section is analyzed through a repeated cycling of (1) incubation with a fluorophore-labeled antibody, (2) fluorescence imaging, and (3) soft bleaching. This method allows staining of the same tissue section with up to 100 fluorescent markers and to analyze their toponomic expression using further image processing and pixel-precise overlay of the corresponding images. In this study, we adapted this method to identify a large panel of murine leukocyte subpopulations in a whole frozen section of a peripheral lymph node. Using the resulting antibody library, we examined non-inflamed versus inflamed tissues of brain and spinal cord in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. The presence and activity of specific leukocyte subpopulations (different T cell subpopulations, dendritic cells, macrophages, etc.) could be assessed and the cellular localizations and the corresponding activation status in situ were investigated. The results were then correlated with quantitative RT-PCR.

  10. Murine Whole-Organ Immune Cell Populations Revealed by Multi-epitope-Ligand Cartography

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, Jenny; Ostalecki, Christian; Kuczera, Katarzyna; Schuler, Gerold; Lechmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Multi-epitope-ligand cartography (MELC) is an innovative high-throughput fluorescence microscopy–based method. A tissue section is analyzed through a repeated cycling of (1) incubation with a fluorophore-labeled antibody, (2) fluorescence imaging, and (3) soft bleaching. This method allows staining of the same tissue section with up to 100 fluorescent markers and to analyze their toponomic expression using further image processing and pixel-precise overlay of the corresponding images. In this study, we adapted this method to identify a large panel of murine leukocyte subpopulations in a whole frozen section of a peripheral lymph node. Using the resulting antibody library, we examined non-inflamed versus inflamed tissues of brain and spinal cord in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. The presence and activity of specific leukocyte subpopulations (different T cell subpopulations, dendritic cells, macrophages, etc.) could be assessed and the cellular localizations and the corresponding activation status in situ were investigated. The results were then correlated with quantitative RT-PCR. PMID:23160665

  11. Collaborative Enhancement of Endothelial Targeting of Nanocarriers by Modulating Platelet-Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1/CD31 Epitope Engagement.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Han, Jingyan; Greineder, Colin F; Zern, Blaine J; Mikitsh, John L; Nayak, Madhura; Menon, Divya; Johnston, Ian H; Poncz, Mortimer; Eckmann, David M; Davies, Peter F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-07-28

    Nanocarriers (NCs) coated with antibodies (Abs) to extracellular epitopes of the transmembrane glycoprotein PECAM (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1/CD31) enable targeted drug delivery to vascular endothelial cells. Recent studies revealed that paired Abs directed to adjacent, yet distinct epitopes of PECAM stimulate each other's binding to endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo ("collaborative enhancement"). This phenomenon improves targeting of therapeutic fusion proteins, yet its potential role in targeting multivalent NCs has not been addressed. Herein, we studied the effects of Ab-mediated collaborative enhancement on multivalent NC spheres coated with PECAM Abs (Ab/NC, ∼180 nm diameter). We found that PECAM Abs do mutually enhance endothelial cell binding of Ab/NC coated by paired, but not "self" Ab. In vitro, collaborative enhancement of endothelial binding of Ab/NC by paired Abs is modulated by Ab/NC avidity, epitope selection, and flow. Cell fixation, but not blocking of endocytosis, obliterated collaborative enhancement of Ab/NC binding, indicating that the effect is mediated by molecular reorganization of PECAM molecules in the endothelial plasmalemma. The collaborative enhancement of Ab/NC binding was affirmed in vivo. Intravascular injection of paired Abs enhanced targeting of Ab/NC to pulmonary vasculature in mice by an order of magnitude. This stimulatory effect greatly exceeded enhancement of Ab targeting by paired Abs, indicating that '"collaborative enhancement"' effect is even more pronounced for relatively large multivalent carriers versus free Abs, likely due to more profound consequences of positive alteration of epitope accessibility. This phenomenon provides a potential paradigm for optimizing the endothelial-targeted nanocarrier delivery of therapeutic agents. PMID:26153796

  12. Conserved MHC class I-presented dengue virus epitopes identified by immunoproteomics analysis are targets for cross-serotype reactive T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Testa, James S; Shetty, Vivekananda; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Nickens, Zacharie; Hafner, Julie; Kamal, Shivali; Zhang, Xianchao; Jett, Marti; Philip, Ramila

    2012-02-15

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are significant global public health problems, and understanding the overall immune response to infection will contribute to appropriate management of the disease and its potentially severe complications. Live attenuated and subunit vaccine candidates, which are under clinical evaluation, induce primarily an antibody response to the virus and minimal cross-reactive T-cell responses. Currently, there are no available tools to assess protective T-cell responses during infection or after vaccination. In this study, we utilize an immunoproteomics process to uncover novel HLA-A2-specific epitopes derived from dengue virus (DV)-infected cells. These epitopes are conserved, and we report that epitope-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) are cross-reactive against all 4 DV serotypes. These epitopes have potential as new informational and diagnostic tools to characterize T-cell immunity in DV infection and may serve as part of a universal vaccine candidate complementary to current vaccines in trial.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of the biostability and cell compatibility of novel conjugates of nucleobase, peptidic epitope, and saccharide

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Dan; Du, Xuewen; Shi, Junfeng; Zhou, Ning; Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed; Al Footy, Khalid Omar; Badahdah, Khadija Omar

    2015-01-01

    Summary This article reports the synthesis of a new class of conjugates containing a nucleobase, a peptidic epitope, and a saccharide and the evalution of their gelation, biostability, and cell compatibility. We demonstrate a facile synthetic process, based on solid-phase peptide synthesis of nucleopeptides, to connect a saccharide with the nucleopeptides for producing the target conjugates. All the conjugates themselves (1–8) display excellent solubility in water without forming hydrogels. However, a mixture of 5 and 8 self-assembles to form nanofibers and results in a supramolecular hydrogel. The proteolytic stabilities of the conjugates depend on the functional peptidic epitopes. We found that TTPV is proteolytic resistant and LGFNI is susceptible to proteolysis. In addition, all the conjugates are compatible to the mammalian cells tested. PMID:26425189

  14. Self-adjuvanting synthetic antitumor vaccines from MUC1 glycopeptides conjugated to T-cell epitopes from tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Chen, Mei-Sha; Sun, Zhan-Yi; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Kunz, Horst; Li, Yan-Mei

    2013-06-01

    The T-helper epitope peptide P30 (green in the scheme) from tetanus toxoid was used as the immunostimulant in MUC1 glycopeptide antitumor vaccines and apparently also acts as a built-in adjuvant. P30-conjugated glycopeptide vaccines containing three glycans in the immunodominant motifs PDTRP and GSTAP induced much stronger immune responses and complement dependent cytotoxicity mediated killing of tumor cells when applied in plain PBS solution without complete Freund's adjuvant.

  15. Identification of two T-cell epitopes on the candidate Epstein-Barr virus vaccine glycoprotein gp340 recognized by CD4+ T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, L E; Wright, J; Ulaeto, D O; Morgan, A J; Rickinson, A B

    1991-01-01

    Current efforts to develop an Epstein-Barr virus subunit vaccine are based on the major envelope glycoprotein gp340. Given the central role of CD4+ T cells in regulating immune responses to subunit vaccine antigens, the present study has begun the work of identifying linear epitopes which are recognized by human CD4+ T cells within the 907-amino-acid sequence of gp340. A panel of gp340-specific CD4+ T-cell clones from an Epstein-Barr virus-immune donor were first assayed for their proliferative responses to a series of truncated gp340 molecules expressed from recombinant DNA vectors in rat GH3 cells, by using an autologous B lymphoblastoid cell line as a source of antigen-presenting cells. The first four T-cell clones analyzed all responded to a truncated form of gp340 which contained only the first 260 N-terminal amino acids. These clones were subsequently screened for responses to each of a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides (15-mers) corresponding to the primary amino acid sequence of the first 260 N-terminal amino acids of gp340. One clone (CG2.7) responded specifically to peptides from the region spanning amino acids 61 to 81, while three other clones (CG5.15, CG5.24, and CG5.36) responded specifically to peptides from the region spanning amino acids 163 to 183. Work with individual peptides from these regions allowed finer mapping of the T-cell epitopes and also revealed the highly dose-dependent nature of peptide-induced responses, with inhibitory effects apparent when the most antigenic peptides were present at supraoptimal concentrations. Experiments using homozygous typing B lymphoblastoid cell lines as antigen-presenting cells showed that the T-cell clones with different epitope specificities were restricted through different HLA class II antigens; clone CG2.7 recognized epitope 61-81 in the context of HLA DRw15, whereas clones CG5.15, CG5.24, and CG5.36 recognized epitope 163-183 in the context of HLA DRw11. The present protocol therefore makes a

  16. Identification of CD8 T cell epitopes in VP2 and NS1 proteins of African horse sickness virus in IFNAR(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    de la Poza, Francisco; Marín-López, Alejandro; Castillo-Olivares, Javier; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Ortego, Javier

    2015-12-01

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an Orbivirus of the family Reoviridae that causes severe pathology in equids. Previous work in our laboratory showed the presence of AHSV-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice immunized with recombinant Modified Vaccinia Ankara (rMVA) expressing VP2 and NS1 proteins. In the present work, we selected potential CD8 T cell epitopes (MHC-class I binding peptides) for the 129 mouse strain from the VP2 and NS1 proteins of AHSV-4, using a combination of four epitope prediction algorithms (SYFPEITHI, BYMAS, NetMHC I and NetMHCpan). ELISPOT and Intracellular Cytokine Staining (ICS) analysis showed that the VP2-720 (MSLLNFGAV), VP2-1044 (YTFGNKFLL), and NS1-83 (CVIKNADYV) peptides elicited IFN-γ production in splenocytes of MVA-VP2 and MVA-NS1 immunized mice and were identified as CD8(+) T cell epitopes. In addition, these three MHC-class I-binding peptides induced the expression of CD107a in CD8(+) T cells, an indirect marker of cytotoxic activity. Importantly, VP2-1044 and NS1-83 epitopes are conserved among all nine AHSV serotypes. These data demonstrate the activation of AHSV specific T-cell epitopes during vaccination with rMVAs expressing VP2 and NS1. Furthermore, the characterization of these CD8(+) T-cell epitopes provides information useful for the design of novel marker multiserotype vaccines against AHSV.

  17. Software tools for simultaneous data visualization and T cell epitopes and disorder prediction in proteins.

    PubMed

    Jandrlić, Davorka R; Lazić, Goran M; Mitić, Nenad S; Pavlović, Mirjana D

    2016-04-01

    We have developed EpDis and MassPred, extendable open source software tools that support bioinformatic research and enable parallel use of different methods for the prediction of T cell epitopes, disorder and disordered binding regions and hydropathy calculation. These tools offer a semi-automated installation of chosen sets of external predictors and an interface allowing for easy application of the prediction methods, which can be applied either to individual proteins or to datasets of a large number of proteins. In addition to access to prediction methods, the tools also provide visualization of the obtained results, calculation of consensus from results of different methods, as well as import of experimental data and their comparison with results obtained with different predictors. The tools also offer a graphical user interface and the possibility to store data and the results obtained using all of the integrated methods in the relational database or flat file for further analysis. The MassPred part enables a massive parallel application of all integrated predictors to the set of proteins. Both tools can be downloaded from http://bioinfo.matf.bg.ac.rs/home/downloads.wafl?cat=Software. Appendix A includes the technical description of the created tools and a list of supported predictors. PMID:26851400

  18. Enzymatic removal of alpha-galactosyl epitopes from porcine endothelial cells diminishes the cytotoxic effect of natural antibodies.

    PubMed

    LaVecchio, J A; Dunne, A D; Edge, A S

    1995-10-27

    Xenotransplantation of tissues between discordant species such as pig into human is not yet feasible due to the problem of hyperacute rejection. This rapid response to xenogeneic tissue is mediated by natural antibodies that react with antigens on the xenograft. A number of xenoantigens consist of carbohydrate residues, and a terminal galactose in alpha linkage has been shown to be involved in hyperacute rejection of pig-to-human xenografts. We show that alpha-linked galactose on porcine endothelial cells is a major epitope recognized by IgG and IgM antibodies present in monkey and human sera. Endothelial cells that had been treated with alpha-galactosidase did not react with fluorescein-labeled Griffonia simplicifolia I B4 (GS-IB4), a lectin that detects the alpha-galactosyl epitope on intact cells. The reactivity of both human and cynomolgus monkey serum with endothelial cells was decreased by 59% to 90% after treatment with coffee bean alpha-galactosidase. Using a colorimetric assay for cell viability, we show that natural antibodies present in the sera of cynomolgus monkey and humans are cytotoxic to porcine endothelial cells in the presence of exogenously added complement. When the terminal alpha-galactosy residues were removed by enzymatic digestion, the cytotoxic effect of natural antibodies on porcine endothelial cells was diminished by > 80%. Evaluation of the time course of reappearance of the alpha-galactosyl epitope at the cell surface revealed that 48 hr after alpha-galactosidase treatment, binding of GS-IB4 was diminished by 60%. These results suggest that glycosidase treatment of cells to be transplanted could prevent hyperacute rejection mediated by natural antibodies.

  19. Multiple B-cell epitope vaccine induces a Staphylococcus enterotoxin B-specific IgG1 protective response against MRSA infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuo; Sun, He-Qiang; Wei, Shan-Shan; Li, Bin; Feng, Qiang; Zhu, Jiang; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming; Wu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    No vaccine against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been currently approved for use in humans. Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the most potent MRSA exotoxins. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and immunologic mechanisms of an SEB multiple B-cell epitope vaccine against MRSA infection. Synthetic overlapping peptide ELISA identified three novel B-cell immunodominant SEB epitopes (in addition to those previously known): SEB31-48, SEB133-150, and SEB193-210. Six B-cell immunodominant epitopes (amino acid residues 31-48, 97-114, 133-150, 193-210, 205-222, and 247-261) were sufficient to induce robust IgG1/IgG2b-specific protective responses against MRSA infection. Therefore, we constructed a recombinant MRSA SEB-specific multiple B-cell epitope vaccine Polypeptides by combining the six SEB immunodominant epitopes and demonstrated its ability to induce a robust SEB-specific IgG1 response to MRSA, as well as a Th2-directing isotype response. Moreover, Polypeptides-induced antisera stimulated synergetic opsonophagocytosis killing of MRSA. Most importantly, Polypeptides was more effective at clearing the bacteria in MRSA-infected mice than the whole SEB antigen, and was able to successfully protect mice from infection by various clinical MRSA isolates. Altogether, these results support further evaluation of the SEB multiple B-cell epitope-vaccine to address MRSA infection in humans.

  20. Multiple B-cell epitope vaccine induces a Staphylococcus enterotoxin B-specific IgG1 protective response against MRSA infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Sun, He-Qiang; Wei, Shan-Shan; Li, Bin; Feng, Qiang; Zhu, Jiang; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming; Wu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    No vaccine against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been currently approved for use in humans. Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the most potent MRSA exotoxins. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and immunologic mechanisms of an SEB multiple B-cell epitope vaccine against MRSA infection. Synthetic overlapping peptide ELISA identified three novel B-cell immunodominant SEB epitopes (in addition to those previously known): SEB31–48, SEB133–150, and SEB193–210. Six B-cell immunodominant epitopes (amino acid residues 31–48, 97–114, 133–150, 193–210, 205–222, and 247–261) were sufficient to induce robust IgG1/IgG2b-specific protective responses against MRSA infection. Therefore, we constructed a recombinant MRSA SEB-specific multiple B-cell epitope vaccine Polypeptides by combining the six SEB immunodominant epitopes and demonstrated its ability to induce a robust SEB-specific IgG1 response to MRSA, as well as a Th2-directing isotype response. Moreover, Polypeptides-induced antisera stimulated synergetic opsonophagocytosis killing of MRSA. Most importantly, Polypeptides was more effective at clearing the bacteria in MRSA-infected mice than the whole SEB antigen, and was able to successfully protect mice from infection by various clinical MRSA isolates. Altogether, these results support further evaluation of the SEB multiple B-cell epitope-vaccine to address MRSA infection in humans. PMID:26201558

  1. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: A Model for Evaluating and Delivering Stem Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, Natalie D.; Feigal, Ellen G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies. PMID:23197634

  2. Identification of the neutralizing epitopes of Merkel cell polyomavirus major capsid protein within the BC and EF surface loops.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Maxime J J; Nicol, Jérôme T J; Samimi, Mahtab; Arnold, Françoise; Cazal, Raphael; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Mercey, Olivier; Gonneville, Hélène; Combelas, Nicolas; Vautherot, Jean-Francois; Moreau, Thierry; Lorette, Gérard; Coursaget, Pierre; Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is the first polyomavirus clearly associated with a human cancer, i.e. the Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Polyomaviruses are small naked DNA viruses that induce a robust polyclonal antibody response against the major capsid protein (VP1). However, the polyomavirus VP1 capsid protein epitopes have not been identified to date. The aim of this study was to identify the neutralizing epitopes of the MCPyV capsid. For this goal, four VP1 mutants were generated by insertional mutagenesis in the BC, DE, EF and HI loops between amino acids 88-89, 150-151, 189-190, and 296-297, respectively. The reactivity of these mutants and wild-type VLPs was then investigated with anti-VP1 monoclonal antibodies and anti-MCPyV positive human sera. The findings together suggest that immunodominant conformational neutralizing epitopes are present at the surface of the MCPyV VLPs and are clustered within BC and EF loops. PMID:25812141

  3. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects.

  4. HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid and spike proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Y.-P.; Lin, J.-Y.; Jan, J.-T.; Leng, C.-H.; Chu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chen, S.-L. . E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    The immunogenicity of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) peptide in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nuclear capsid (N) and spike (S) proteins was determined by testing the proteins' ability to elicit a specific cellular immune response after immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice and in vitro vaccination of HLA-A2.1 positive human peripheral blood mononuclearcytes (PBMCs). First, we screened SARS N and S amino acid sequences for allele-specific motif matching those in human HLA-A2.1 MHC-I molecules. From HLA peptide binding predictions (http://thr.cit.nih.gov/molbio/hla{sub b}ind/), ten each potential N- and S-specific HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were synthesized. The high affinity HLA-A2.1 peptides were validated by T2-cell stabilization assays, with immunogenicity assays revealing peptides N223-231, N227-235, and N317-325 to be First identified HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of SARS-CoV N protein. In addition, previous reports identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of S protein (S978-986, S1203-1211, and S1167-1175), here we found two novel peptides S787-795 and S1042-1050 as S-specific CTL epitopes. Moreover, our identified N317-325 and S1042-1050 CTL epitopes could induce recall responses when IFN-{gamma} stimulation of blood CD8{sup +} T-cells revealed significant difference between normal healthy donors and SARS-recovered patients after those PBMCs were in vitro vaccinated with their cognate antigen. Our results would provide a new insight into the development of therapeutic vaccine in SARS.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of the Association Angle between T-cell Receptor Vα/Vβ Domains Reveals Important Features for Epitope Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Krackhardt, Angela M; Antes, Iris

    2015-07-01

    T-cell receptors (TCR) play an important role in the adaptive immune system as they recognize pathogen- or cancer-based epitopes and thus initiate the cell-mediated immune response. Therefore there exists a growing interest in the optimization of TCRs for medical purposes like adoptive T-cell therapy. However, the molecular mechanisms behind T-cell signaling are still predominantly unknown. For small sets of TCRs it was observed that the angle between their Vα- and Vβ-domains, which bind the epitope, can vary and might be important for epitope recognition. Here we present a comprehensive, quantitative study of the variation in the Vα/Vβ interdomain-angle and its influence on epitope recognition, performing a systematic bioinformatics analysis based on a representative set of experimental TCR structures. For this purpose we developed a new, cuboid-based superpositioning method, which allows a unique, quantitative analysis of the Vα/Vβ-angles. Angle-based clustering led to six significantly different clusters. Analysis of these clusters revealed the unexpected result that the angle is predominantly influenced by the TCR-clonotype, whereas the bound epitope has only a minor influence. Furthermore we could identify a previously unknown center of rotation (CoR), which is shared by all TCRs. All TCR geometries can be obtained by rotation around this center, rendering it a new, common TCR feature with the potential of improving the accuracy of TCR structure prediction considerably. The importance of Vα/Vβ rotation for signaling was confirmed as we observed larger variances in the Vα/Vβ-angles in unbound TCRs compared to epitope-bound TCRs. Our results strongly support a two-step mechanism for TCR-epitope: First, preformation of a flexible TCR geometry in the unbound state and second, locking of the Vα/Vβ-angle in a TCR-type specific geometry upon epitope-MHC association, the latter being driven by rotation around the unique center of rotation.

  6. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    E Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals. PMID:27621732

  7. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals.

  8. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals. PMID:27621732

  9. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    E Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals.

  10. Identification of protective B-cell epitopes of Atroxlysin-I: A metalloproteinase from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    Schneider, F S; de Almeida Lima, S; Reis de Ávila, G; Castro, K L; Guerra-Duarte, C; Sanchez, E F; Nguyen, C; Granier, C; Molina, F; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2016-03-29

    Atroxlysin-I (Atr-I) is a hemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) from Bothrops atrox venom, the snake responsible for the majority of bites in the north region of South America. SVMPs like Atr-I produce toxic effects in victims including hemorrhage, inflammation, necrosis and blood coagulation deficiency. Mapping of B-cell epitopes in SVMPs might result in the identification of non-toxic molecules capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies and improving the anti-venom therapy. Here, using the SPOT-synthesis technique we identified two epitopes located in the N-ter region of Atr-I (AtrEp1-(22)YNGNSDKIRRRIHQM(36); and AtrEp2-(55)GVEIWSNKDLINVQ(68)). Based on the sequence of AtrEp1 and AtrEp2 a third peptide named Atr-I biepitope (AtrBiEp) was designed and synthesized ((23)NGNSDKIRRRIH(34)GG(55)GVEIWSNKDLINVQ(68)). AtrBiEp was used to immunize BALB/c mice. Anti-AtrBiEp serum cross-reacted against Atr-I in western blot and was able to fully neutralize the hemorrhagic activity of Atr-I. Our results provide a rational basis for the identification of neutralizing epitopes on Atr-I snake venom toxin and show that the use of synthetic peptides could improve the generation of immuno-therapeutics. PMID:26917009

  11. Identification of protective B-cell epitopes of Atroxlysin-I: A metalloproteinase from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    Schneider, F S; de Almeida Lima, S; Reis de Ávila, G; Castro, K L; Guerra-Duarte, C; Sanchez, E F; Nguyen, C; Granier, C; Molina, F; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2016-03-29

    Atroxlysin-I (Atr-I) is a hemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) from Bothrops atrox venom, the snake responsible for the majority of bites in the north region of South America. SVMPs like Atr-I produce toxic effects in victims including hemorrhage, inflammation, necrosis and blood coagulation deficiency. Mapping of B-cell epitopes in SVMPs might result in the identification of non-toxic molecules capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies and improving the anti-venom therapy. Here, using the SPOT-synthesis technique we identified two epitopes located in the N-ter region of Atr-I (AtrEp1-(22)YNGNSDKIRRRIHQM(36); and AtrEp2-(55)GVEIWSNKDLINVQ(68)). Based on the sequence of AtrEp1 and AtrEp2 a third peptide named Atr-I biepitope (AtrBiEp) was designed and synthesized ((23)NGNSDKIRRRIH(34)GG(55)GVEIWSNKDLINVQ(68)). AtrBiEp was used to immunize BALB/c mice. Anti-AtrBiEp serum cross-reacted against Atr-I in western blot and was able to fully neutralize the hemorrhagic activity of Atr-I. Our results provide a rational basis for the identification of neutralizing epitopes on Atr-I snake venom toxin and show that the use of synthetic peptides could improve the generation of immuno-therapeutics.

  12. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Machkovech, Heather M.; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8+ T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8+ T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8+ T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8+ T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8+ T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. IMPORTANCE There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8+ T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  13. Ex vivo detection of adenovirus specific CD4{sup +} T-cell responses to HLA-DR-epitopes of the Hexon protein show a contracted specificity of T{sub HELPER} cells following stem cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Serangeli, Celine; Bicanic, Oliver; Scheible, Michael H.; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2010-02-20

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, especially after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Viral clearance has been attributed to CD4{sup +} T-cell responses against the Hexon-protein, but the frequency of specific T{sub HELPER} cells is extremely low or not detectable ex vivo and preference for different CD4{sup +} T-cell epitopes is variable among individuals. We therefore analyzed 44 healthy donors and 6 SCT-recipients for Hexon-specific CD4{sup +}-responses ex vivo, to identify epitopes which would be broadly applicable. We selected 19 candidate epitopes with predicted restriction to HLA-DR1/DR3/DR4/DR7; 16 were located within the highly conserved regions, indicating cross-reactivity of T cells among HAdV-subspecies. Ten epitopes induced CD4{sup +}-proliferation in >50% of individuals, confirmed by intracellular IFN-gamma detection. Three SCT recipients who recovered from an infection with HAdV displayed reactivity towards only a single hexon epitope, whereas healthy individuals were responsive to two to eight epitopes (median 3). The ex vivo detection of Hexon-specific CD4{sup +} T-cells, without any long-term culture in vitro, enables the detection and generation of HAdV-specific CD4{sup +} T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer against HAdV-infection post SCT.

  14. Myelin basic protein-specific T lymphocyte repertoire in multiple sclerosis. Complexity of the response and dominance of nested epitopes due to recruitment of multiple T cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Meinl, E; Weber, F; Drexler, K; Morelle, C; Ott, M; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Goebels, N; Ertl, B; Jechart, G; Giegerich, G

    1993-01-01

    The human T cell response to the myelin basic protein (MBP) has been studied with respect to T cell receptor (TCR) usage, HLA class II restriction elements, and epitope specificity using a total of 215 long-term MBP-specific T cell lines (TCL) isolated from the peripheral blood of 13 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 healthy donors. In most donors, the anti-MBP response was exceedingly heterogeneous. Using a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire length of human MBP, at least 26 epitopes recognized by human TCL could be distinguished. The MBP domain most commonly recognized was sequence 80-105 (31% of MS TCL, and 24% of control TCL). Sequence 29-48 was recognized more frequently by control-derived TCL (24%) than by TCL from MS patients (5%). The MBP epitopes were recognized in the context of DRB1 *0101, DRB5*0101, DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301, DRB1*0401, DRB1*1402, and DRB3*0102, as demonstrated using a panel of DR gene-transfected L cells. The TCR gene usage was also heterogeneous. V beta 5.2, a peptide of which is currently being used in a clinical trial for treatment of MS patients, was expressed by only one of our TCL. However, within this complex pattern of MBP-specific T cell responses, a minority of MS patients were found to exhibit a more restricted response with respect to their TCL epitope specificity. In these patients 75-87% of the TCL responded to a single, patient-specific cluster of immunodominant T cell epitopes located within a small (20-amino acid) domain of MBP. These nested clusters of immunodominant epitopes were noted within the amino acids 80-105, 108-131, and 131-153. The T cell response to the immunodominant epitopes was not monoclonal, but heterogeneous, with respect to fine specificity, TCR usage, and even HLA restriction. In one patient (H.K.), this restricted epitope profile remained stable for > 2 yr. The TCR beta chain sequences of TCL specific for the immunodominant region of HK are consistent with an

  15. An unstable Th epitope of P. falciparum fosters central memory T cells and anti-CS antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Parra-López, Carlos A; Bernal-Estévez, David; Yin, Liusong; Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Pulido-Calixto, Carolina; Salazar, Luz Mary; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is transmitted by Plasmodium-infected anopheles mosquitoes. Widespread resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides and resistance of parasites to drugs highlight the urgent need for malaria vaccines. The most advanced malaria vaccines target sporozoites, the infective form of the parasite. A major target of the antibody response to sporozoites are the repeat epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, which span almost one half of the protein. Antibodies to these repeats can neutralize sporozoite infectivity. Generation of protective antibody responses to the CS protein (anti-CS Ab) requires help by CD4 T cells. A CD4 T cell epitope from the CS protein designated T* was previously identified by screening T cells from volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites. The T* sequence spans twenty amino acids that contains multiple T cell epitopes restricted by various HLA alleles. Subunit malaria vaccines including T* are highly immunogenic in rodents, non-human primates and humans. In this study we characterized a highly conserved HLA-DRβ1*04:01 (DR4) restricted T cell epitope (QNT-5) located at the C-terminus of T*. We found that a peptide containing QNT-5 was able to elicit long-term anti-CS Ab responses and prime CD4 T cells in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice despite forming relatively unstable MHC-peptide complexes highly susceptible to HLA-DM editing. We attempted to improve the immunogenicity of QNT-5 by replacing the P1 anchor position with an optimal tyrosine residue. The modified peptide QNT-Y formed stable MHC-peptide complexes highly resistant to HLA-DM editing. Contrary to expectations, a linear peptide containing QNT-Y elicited almost 10-fold lower long-term antibody and IFN-γ responses compared to the linear peptide containing the wild type QNT-5 sequence. Some possibilities regarding why QNT-5 is more effective than QNT-Y in inducing long-term T cell and anti-CS Ab when used as vaccine are discussed.

  16. Differential fates of biomolecules delivered to target cells via extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Bachmann, Michael H; Hardy, Jonathan W; Frimannson, Daniel Omar; Bronsart, Laura; Wang, Andrew; Sylvester, Matthew D; Schmidt, Tobi L; Kaspar, Roger L; Butte, Manish J; Matin, A C; Contag, Christopher H

    2015-03-24

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), specifically exosomes and microvesicles (MVs), are presumed to play key roles in cell-cell communication via transfer of biomolecules between cells. The biogenesis of these two types of EVs differs as they originate from either the endosomal (exosomes) or plasma (MVs) membranes. To elucidate the primary means through which EVs mediate intercellular communication, we characterized their ability to encapsulate and deliver different types of macromolecules from transiently transfected cells. Both EV types encapsulated reporter proteins and mRNA but only MVs transferred the reporter function to recipient cells. De novo reporter protein expression in recipient cells resulted only from plasmid DNA (pDNA) after delivery via MVs. Reporter mRNA was delivered to recipient cells by both EV types, but was rapidly degraded without being translated. MVs also mediated delivery of functional pDNA encoding Cre recombinase in vivo to tissues in transgenic Cre-lox reporter mice. Within the parameters of this study, MVs delivered functional pDNA, but not RNA, whereas exosomes from the same source did not deliver functional nucleic acids. These results have significant implications for understanding the role of EVs in cellular communication and for development of EVs as delivery tools. Moreover, studies using EVs from transiently transfected cells may be confounded by a predominance of pDNA transfer. PMID:25713383

  17. In silico CD4+ T-cell epitope prediction and HLA distribution analysis for the potential proteins of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B--a clue for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir K; Smita, Suchi; Sarangi, Aditya Narayan; Srivastava, Mugdha; Akhoon, Bashir A; Rahman, Qamar; Gupta, Shailendra K

    2010-10-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, an exclusive human pathogen, is a major cause of mortality due to meningococcal meningitis and sepsis in many developing countries. Three meningococcal serogroup B proteins, i.e. T-cell stimulating protein A (TspA), autotransporter A (AutA), and IgA-specific serine endopeptidase (IGA1) elicits CD4+ T-cell response and may enhance the effectiveness of meningococcal vaccines by acting as protective immunogens. A very limited data on T-helper cell epitopes in MenB proteins is available. Hence, in silico prediction of peptide sequences which may act as helper T lymphocyte epitopes in MenB proteins was carried out by NetMHCIIpan web server. HLA distribution analysis was done by using the population coverage tool of Immune Epitope Database to determine the fraction of individuals in various populations expected to respond to a given set of predicted T-cell epitopes based on HLA genotype frequencies. Six epitopic core sequences, two from each MenB proteins, i.e. AutA, TspA and IgA1 protease were predicted to associate with a large number of HLA-DR alleles. These six peptides may act as T-cell epitope in more than 95% of populations in 8 out of 12 populations considered. The T-cell stimulation potential of these predicted peptides containing the core epitopic sequences is to be validated by using laboratory experiments for their efficient use as peptide vaccine candidates against N. meningitidis serogroup B.

  18. Finding epitopes with computers.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Rappuoli, Rino

    2013-10-24

    The goal of structural vaccinology is to enable the design and engineering of improved antigens. In a recent issue of Chemistry & Biology, Gourlay and colleagues provided evidence that structure-based computational methods allow prediction of B cell epitopes, a crucial step for antigen selection and optimization in vaccine development.

  19. Generation of potent mouse monoclonal antibodies to self-proteins using T-cell epitope “tags”

    PubMed Central

    Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer L; England, Elizabeth; Kemp, Benjamin; Rapley, Laura; Davis, Nicola HE; McCarthy, Grant R; Majithiya, Jayesh B; Corkill, Dominic J; Welsted, Sarah; Minton, Kevin; Cohen, E Suzanne; Robinson, Matthew J; Dobson, Claire; Wilkinson, Trevor CI; Vaughan, Tristan J; Groves, Maria AT; Tigue, Natalie J

    2015-01-01

    Immunization of mice or rats with a "non-self" protein is a commonly used method to obtain monoclonal antibodies, and relies on the immune system's ability to recognize the immunogen as foreign. Immunization of an antigen with 100% identity to the endogenous protein, however, will not elicit a robust immune response. To develop antibodies to mouse proteins, we focused on the potential for breaking such immune tolerance by genetically fusing two independent T-cell epitope-containing sequences (from tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA)) to a mouse protein, mouse ST2 (mST2). Wild-type CD1 mice were immunized with three mST2 tagged proteins (Fc, TT and DTA) and the specific serum response was determined. Only in mice immunized with the T-cell epitope-containing antigens were specific mST2 serum responses detected; hybridomas generated from these mice secreted highly sequence-diverse IgGs that were capable of binding mST2 and inhibiting the interaction of mST2 with its ligand, mouse interleukin (IL)-33 (mIL-33). Of the hundreds of antibodies profiled, we identified five potent antibodies that were able to inhibit IL-33 induced IL-6 release in a mast cell assay; notably one such antibody was sufficiently potent to suppress IL-5 release and eosinophilia infiltration in an Alternaria alternata challenge mouse model of asthma. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that T-cell epitope-containing tags have the ability to break tolerance in wild-type mice to 100% conserved proteins, and it provides a compelling argument for the broader use of this approach to generate antibodies against any mouse protein or conserved ortholog. PMID:25523454

  20. Pharmacologic Inhibition of Nedd8 Activation Enzyme Exposes CD4-Induced Epitopes within Env on Cells Expressing HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Andrey; Stoneham, Charlotte; Lewinski, Mary K.; Mukim, Amey; Deshmukh, Savitha; Vollbrecht, Thomas; Spina, Celsa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Vpu decreases the exposure of epitopes within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) on the surface of infected cells by downregulating both BST2 and CD4. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting Vpu activity would increase the exposure of these epitopes and sensitize infected cells to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), we treated cells with the Nedd8 activation enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924, which inhibits the cullin1-based ubiquitin ligase complex coopted by Vpu to degrade cellular targets. Treatment of HeLa cells with MLN4924 or expression of a dominant negative mutant of cullin1 inhibited the Vpu-mediated downregulation of CD4 but not the downregulation of BST2. NAE inhibition also increased the surface exposure of CD4-induced epitopes within Env on HEK293 cells containing an inducible HIV genome, on infected CEM T cells, and on infected primary T cells. In contrast, the Vpu-mediated downregulation of BST2 was substantially inhibited by MLN4924 only when T cells were treated with alpha interferon (IFN-α) to induce high levels of BST2 expression. As reported previously, the absence of vpu or nef and even more so the combined absence of these two genes sensitized infected cells to ADCC. However, NAE inhibition affected ADCC minimally. Paradoxically, even in infected, IFN-treated cells in which NAE inhibition substantially rescued the surface level of BST2, the surface level of Env detected with an antibody recognizing a CD4-independent epitope (2G12) was minimally increased. Mutation of the C-terminal Vpu residue W76, which supports the ability of Vpu to stimulate virion release by displacing BST2 from assembly sites on the plasma membrane by a cullin1-independent mechanism, increased the exposure of Env detected by 2G12 on infected T cells. Thus, inhibiting the displacement function of Vpu together with its ability to degrade CD4 and BST2 may be required to sensitize infected cells to ADCC. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic viruses encode gene

  1. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  2. Differential fates of biomolecules delivered to target cells via extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kanada, Masamitsu; Bachmann, Michael H.; Hardy, Jonathan W.; Frimannson, Daniel Omar; Bronsart, Laura; Wang, Andrew; Sylvester, Matthew D.; Schmidt, Tobi L.; Kaspar, Roger L.; Matin, A. C.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), specifically exosomes and microvesicles (MVs), are presumed to play key roles in cell–cell communication via transfer of biomolecules between cells. The biogenesis of these two types of EVs differs as they originate from either the endosomal (exosomes) or plasma (MVs) membranes. To elucidate the primary means through which EVs mediate intercellular communication, we characterized their ability to encapsulate and deliver different types of macromolecules from transiently transfected cells. Both EV types encapsulated reporter proteins and mRNA but only MVs transferred the reporter function to recipient cells. De novo reporter protein expression in recipient cells resulted only from plasmid DNA (pDNA) after delivery via MVs. Reporter mRNA was delivered to recipient cells by both EV types, but was rapidly degraded without being translated. MVs also mediated delivery of functional pDNA encoding Cre recombinase in vivo to tissues in transgenic Cre-lox reporter mice. Within the parameters of this study, MVs delivered functional pDNA, but not RNA, whereas exosomes from the same source did not deliver functional nucleic acids. These results have significant implications for understanding the role of EVs in cellular communication and for development of EVs as delivery tools. Moreover, studies using EVs from transiently transfected cells may be confounded by a predominance of pDNA transfer. PMID:25713383

  3. Target epitope in the Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I recognized by class I major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kannagi, M; Shida, H; Igarashi, H; Kuruma, K; Murai, H; Aono, Y; Maruyama, I; Osame, M; Hattori, T; Inoko, H

    1992-05-01

    A trans-acting regulatory gene product p40tax (Tax) of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is one of the main target antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for HTLV-I. A CTL epitope within the Tax protein was identified in this report. HTLV-I-specific CD8+ CTL lines established from two HTLV-I carriers with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy or Sjögren syndrome were previously demonstrated to kill predominantly the target cells expressing HTLV-I Tax. The CTL from two patients showed significant levels of cytotoxicity to autologous target cells pulsed with a synthetic peptide of 24 amino acids corresponding to the amino-terminal sequences of the Tax protein. Allogeneic target cells were also sensitized for CTL by this peptide when the target cells have HLA-A2. Tax-specific cytotoxicity, detected as cytolysis of the target cells infected with vaccinia virus-HTLV-I recombinant expressing Tax protein, was almost completely inhibited by competitor cells pulsed with the synthetic peptide. This indicates that a major CTL epitope is present in this peptide. Further analysis using shorter peptides revealed that the core sequence of the CTL epitope was LLFGYPVYV at positions 11 through 19. This sequence can be aligned with the HLA-A2-specific motifs reported recently. PMID:1373197

  4. In silico prediction of the T-cell and IgE-binding epitopes of Per a 6 and Bla g 6 allergens in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Hai-Wei; Wei, Ji-Fu; Tao, Ai-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Per a 6 and Bla g 6 are cockroach allergens found in Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica, respectively. The objective of the present study was to predict the B‑ and T‑cell epitopes of the Per a 6 and Bla g 6 allergens. Three immunoinformatics tools, the DNAStar Protean system, the Bioinformatics Predicted Antigenic Peptides system and the BepiPred 1.0 server, were used to predict the potential B‑cell epitopes, while Net‑MHCIIpan‑2.0 and NetMHCII‑2.2 were used to predict the T‑cell epitopes of the two allergens. As a result, seven peptides were predicted in the Per a 6 allergen and seven peptides were predicted in the Bla g 6 allergen in the B‑cell epitope predictions. In the T‑cell prediction, the Per a 6 allergen was predicted to have nine strongly binding nonamer core epitope sequences (IC50<50 nm) and 28 weakly binding sequences (50 nm

  5. Are there generic mechanisms governing interactions between nanoparticles and cells? Epitope mapping the outer layer of the protein material interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Iseult

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of a general paradigm for cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions. The basis of the paradigm is that the nature of the biomaterial or nanoparticle surface is not the important parameter, but rather the nature of the outermost layer of adsorbed proteins as well as long-lived misfolded proteins shed from the surfaces. If the adsorbed protein is irreversibly adsorbed onto the surface it may be sufficiently disrupted so that a variety of peptide units (here termed “cryptic epitopes”) not usually expressed in nature at the surface of the protein become exposed. Similarly, where there is a slow exchange time with the surface, surface-induced perturbations may lead to long-lived misfolded proteins being shed from the surface and continuing to express altered surface peptide sequences. In cases where the proteins have lost most of their tertiary structure, anomalous peptide sequences and geometries that are not displayed at the surface by the native protein may in fact be presented after surface adsorption of a protein. Such anomalous surface expressions could contain novel epitopes that trigger various signalling pathways or even diseases. Thus, future approaches to understanding cell-biomaterial and cell-nanoparticle interactions should focus on characterising the outer layer of the adsorbed proteins, or “epitope mapping” as well as examining the possibility of formation of essentially “new” proteins as a result of desorption of conformationally or geometrically altered proteins.

  6. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S.; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown, but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4+ T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4+ T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogeneticity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. PMID:25800545

  7. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T; Sullivan, Thomas D; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A; Jenkins, Marc K; Klein, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad-spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4(+) T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae, and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes, including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats, induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4(+) T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogenicity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. PMID:25800545

  8. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E.; Ladell, Kristin; Stryhn, Anette; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A.; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection, their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion. The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD244 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), which modulate the functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells. Design and methods: Here, we used an array of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B∗15 : 03 and HLA-B∗42 : 01 tetramers to characterize inhibitory receptor expression as a function of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations (n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. Results: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by effector memory CD8+ T cells. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are influenced by peptide/HLA class I antigen exposure. PMID:24906112

  9. Hepatitis B synthetic immunogen comprised of nucleocapsid T-cell sites and an envelope B-cell epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Milich, D R; Hughes, J L; McLachlan, A; Thornton, G B; Moriarty, A

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies located T-cell recognition of the nucleocapsid of the hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) to residues 120-140 in mice bearing the H-2s or H-2b haplotypes. Herein, we demonstrate that B10.S (H-2s) and B10 (H-2b) H-2 congenic strains recognize distinct T-cell sites within the p120-140 (a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 120-140 of HBcAg) sequence defined by p120-131 and p129-140, respectively. Peptide p120-131 stimulates B10.S HBcAg-primed T cells, and reciprocally p120-131-primed T cells recognize HBcAg. Similarly, the p129-140 sequence is a T-cell recognition site relevant to the native HBcAg in the B10 strain. It is also shown that these 12-residue peptides efficiently prime T-helper cells, which are capable of eliciting antibody production to HBcAg in vivo. These observations prompted us to examine the ability of the HBcAg-specific p120-140 sequence to function as a T-cell carrier moiety as a component of a totally synthetic hepatitis B vaccine. For this purpose a synthetic B-cell epitope from the pre-S(2) region (p133-140) of the viral envelope was chosen because this sequence represents a dominant antibody-binding site of the envelope. Immunization of B10.S and B10 strains with the synthetic composite peptide c120-140-(133-140) elicited anti-peptide antibody production, which was crossreactive with the native viral envelope. Furthermore, c120-140-(133-140) immunization primed p120-131-specific T cells in the B10.S strain and p129-140-specific T cells in the B10 strain, which recognized HBcAg and provided T-helper cell function for anti-envelope antibody production in vivo. These results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing complex synthetic immunogens that represent multiple proteins of a pathogen and are capable of engaging both T and B cells relevant to the native antigens. PMID:2449694

  10. Identification of protective linear B-cell epitopes on the subolesin/akirin orthologues of Ornithodoros spp. soft ticks.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Román, Raúl; Díaz-Martín, Verónica; Oleaga, Ana; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2015-02-18

    Subolesin/akirin is a protective antigen that is highly conserved across hematophagous vector species and is therefore potentially useful for the development of a universal vaccine for vector control, including soft ticks. Recent results have shown that in Ornithodoros erraticus and O. moubata soft ticks, RNAi-mediated subolesin gene knockdown inhibits tick oviposition and fertility by more than 90%; however, vaccination with recombinant subolesins resulted in remarkably low protective efficacies (5-24.5% reduction in oviposition). Here we report that vaccination with subolesin recombinants induces non-protective antibodies mainly directed against immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes located on highly structured regions of the subolesin protein, probably unrelated to its biological activity, while leaving the unstructured/disordered regions unrecognized. Accordingly, for a new vaccine trial we designed four synthetic peptides (OE1, OE2, OM1 and OM2) from the unrecognized/disordered regions of the Ornithodoros subolesin sequences and coupled them to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). These KLH-peptide conjugates induced the synthesis of antibodies that recognized linear B-cell epitopes located on the unstructured loops of the subolesin protein and provided up to 70.1% and 83.1% vaccine efficacies in O. erraticus and O. moubata, respectively. These results show that the protective effect of subolesin-based vaccines is highly dependent on the particular epitope recognized by antibodies on the subolesin sequence and strongly suggest that the biological activity of subolesin is exerted through its unstructured regions. The results reported here contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of protection of subolesin-based vaccines and reveal novel protective peptides that could be included among the array of candidate antigens useful for developing anti-vector vaccines based on subolesin/akirin. PMID:25597941

  11. A Nanoparticle Based Sp17 Peptide Vaccine Exposes New Immuno-Dominant and Species Cross-reactive B Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Sue D.; Gao, Qian; Wilson, Kirsty L.; Heyerick, Arne; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Sperm protein antigen 17 (Sp17), expressed in primary as well as in metastatic lesions in >83% of patients with ovarian cancer, is a promising ovarian cancer vaccine candidate. Herein we describe the formulation of nanoparticle based vaccines based on human Sp17 (hSp17) sequence derived peptides, and map the immuno-dominant T cell and antibody epitopes induced using such formulations. The primary T and B cell immuno-dominant region within Sp17 was found to be the same when using biocompatible nanoparticle carriers or the conventional “mix-in” pro-inflammatory adjuvant CpG, both mapping to amino acids (aa) 111–142. However, delivery of hSp17111–142 as a nanoparticle conjugate promoted a number of new properties, changing the dominant antibody isotype induced from IgG2a to IgG1 and the fine specificity of the B cell epitopes within hSp17111–142, from an immuno-dominant region 134–142 aa for CpG, to region 121–138 aa for nanoparticles. Associated with this change in specificity was a substantial increase in antibody cross-reactivity between mouse and human Sp17. These results indicate conjugation of antigen to nanoparticles can have major effects on fine antigen specificity, which surprisingly could be beneficially used to increase the cross-reactivity of antibody responses. PMID:26529027

  12. A Nanoparticle Based Sp17 Peptide Vaccine Exposes New Immuno-Dominant and Species Cross-reactive B Cell Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Sue D; Gao, Qian; Wilson, Kirsty L; Heyerick, Arne; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Sperm protein antigen 17 (Sp17), expressed in primary as well as in metastatic lesions in >83% of patients with ovarian cancer, is a promising ovarian cancer vaccine candidate. Herein we describe the formulation of nanoparticle based vaccines based on human Sp17 (hSp17) sequence derived peptides, and map the immuno-dominant T cell and antibody epitopes induced using such formulations. The primary T and B cell immuno-dominant region within Sp17 was found to be the same when using biocompatible nanoparticle carriers or the conventional "mix-in" pro-inflammatory adjuvant CpG, both mapping to amino acids (aa) 111-142. However, delivery of hSp17111-142 as a nanoparticle conjugate promoted a number of new properties, changing the dominant antibody isotype induced from IgG2a to IgG1 and the fine specificity of the B cell epitopes within hSp17111-142, from an immuno-dominant region 134-142 aa for CpG, to region 121-138 aa for nanoparticles. Associated with this change in specificity was a substantial increase in antibody cross-reactivity between mouse and human Sp17. These results indicate conjugation of antigen to nanoparticles can have major effects on fine antigen specificity, which surprisingly could be beneficially used to increase the cross-reactivity of antibody responses. PMID:26529027

  13. Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Nonhuman Primate B Cells Converts Destructive into Productive Processing of the Pathogenic CD8 T Cell Epitope in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Jagessar, S. Anwar; Holtman, Inge R.; Hofman, Sam; Morandi, Elena; Heijmans, Nicole; Laman, Jon D.; Gran, Bruno; Faber, Bart W.; van Kasteren, Sander I.; Eggen, Bart J. L.

    2016-01-01

    EBV is the major infectious environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Patient studies do not allow manipulation in vivo. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models in the common marmoset and rhesus monkey to model the association of EBV and MS. We report that B cells infected with EBV-related lymphocryptovirus (LCV) are requisite APCs for MHC-E–restricted autoaggressive effector memory CTLs specific for the immunodominant epitope 40-48 of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). These T cells drive the EAE pathogenesis to irreversible neurologic deficit. The aim of this study was to determine why LCV infection is important for this pathogenic role of B cells. Transcriptome comparison of LCV-infected B cells and CD20+ spleen cells from rhesus monkeys shows increased expression of genes encoding elements of the Ag cross-presentation machinery (i.e., of proteasome maturation protein and immunoproteasome subunits) and enhanced expression of MHC-E and of costimulatory molecules (CD70 and CD80, but not CD86). It was also shown that altered expression of endolysosomal proteases (cathepsins) mitigates the fast endolysosomal degradation of the MOG40–48 core epitope. Finally, LCV infection also induced expression of LC3-II+ cytosolic structures resembling autophagosomes, which seem to form an intracellular compartment where the MOG40–48 epitope is protected against proteolytic degradation by the endolysosomal serine protease cathepsin G. In conclusion, LCV infection induces a variety of changes in B cells that underlies the conversion of destructive processing of the immunodominant MOG40–48 epitope into productive processing and cross-presentation to strongly autoaggressive CTLs. PMID:27412414

  14. Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Nonhuman Primate B Cells Converts Destructive into Productive Processing of the Pathogenic CD8 T Cell Epitope in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Holtman, Inge R; Hofman, Sam; Morandi, Elena; Heijmans, Nicole; Laman, Jon D; Gran, Bruno; Faber, Bart W; van Kasteren, Sander I; Eggen, Bart J L; 't Hart, Bert A

    2016-08-15

    EBV is the major infectious environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Patient studies do not allow manipulation in vivo. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models in the common marmoset and rhesus monkey to model the association of EBV and MS. We report that B cells infected with EBV-related lymphocryptovirus (LCV) are requisite APCs for MHC-E-restricted autoaggressive effector memory CTLs specific for the immunodominant epitope 40-48 of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). These T cells drive the EAE pathogenesis to irreversible neurologic deficit. The aim of this study was to determine why LCV infection is important for this pathogenic role of B cells. Transcriptome comparison of LCV-infected B cells and CD20(+) spleen cells from rhesus monkeys shows increased expression of genes encoding elements of the Ag cross-presentation machinery (i.e., of proteasome maturation protein and immunoproteasome subunits) and enhanced expression of MHC-E and of costimulatory molecules (CD70 and CD80, but not CD86). It was also shown that altered expression of endolysosomal proteases (cathepsins) mitigates the fast endolysosomal degradation of the MOG40-48 core epitope. Finally, LCV infection also induced expression of LC3-II(+) cytosolic structures resembling autophagosomes, which seem to form an intracellular compartment where the MOG40-48 epitope is protected against proteolytic degradation by the endolysosomal serine protease cathepsin G. In conclusion, LCV infection induces a variety of changes in B cells that underlies the conversion of destructive processing of the immunodominant MOG40-48 epitope into productive processing and cross-presentation to strongly autoaggressive CTLs. PMID:27412414

  15. T-cell epitopes in type 1 diabetes autoantigen tyrosine phosphatase IA-2: potential for mimicry with rotavirus and other environmental agents.

    PubMed

    Honeyman, M C; Stone, N L; Harrison, L C

    1998-04-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 is a molecular target of pancreatic islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. T-cell epitope peptides in autoantigens have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and they may hold clues to environmental agents with similar sequences that could trigger or exacerbate autoimmune disease. We identified 13 epitope peptides in IA-2 by measuring peripheral blood T-cell proliferation to 68 overlapping, synthetic peptides encompassing the intracytoplasmic domain of IA-2 in six at-risk type 1 diabetes relatives selected for HLA susceptibility haplotypes. The dominant epitope, VIVMLTPLVEDGVKQC (aa 805-820), which elicited the highest T-cell responses in all at-risk relatives, has 56% identity and 100% similarity over 9 amino acids (aa) with a sequence in VP7, a major immunogenic protein of human rotavirus. Both peptides bind to HLA-DR4(*0401) and are deduced to present identical aa to the T-cell receptor. The contiguous sequence of VP7 has 75% identity and 92% similarity over 12 aa with a known T-cell epitope in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), another autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. This dominant IA-2 epitope peptide also has 75-45% identity and 88-64% similarity over 8-14 aa to sequences in Dengue, cytomegalovirus, measles, hepatitis C, and canine distemper viruses, and the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae. Three other IA-2 epitope peptides are 71-100% similar over 7-12 aa to herpes, rhino-, hanta- and flaviviruses. Two others are 80-82% similar over 10-11 aa to sequences in milk, wheat, and bean proteins. Further studies should now be carried out to directly test the hypothesis that T-cell activation by rotavirus and possibly other viruses, and dietary proteins, could trigger or exacerbate beta-cell autoimmunity through molecular mimicry with IA-2 and (for rotavirus) GAD.

  16. Identification of epitopes recognised by mucosal CD4(+) T-cell populations from cattle experimentally colonised with Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Corbishley, Alexander; Connelley, Timothy K; Wolfson, Eliza B; Ballingall, Keith; Beckett, Amy E; Gally, David L; McNeilly, Tom N

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines targeting enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 shedding in cattle are only partially protective. The correlates of protection of these vaccines are unknown, but it is probable that they reduce bacterial adherence at the mucosal surface via the induction of blocking antibodies. Recent studies have indicated a role for cellular immunity in cattle during colonisation, providing an impetus to understand the bacterial epitopes recognised during this response. This study mapped the epitopes of 16 EHEC O157:H7 proteins recognised by rectal lymph node CD4(+) T-cells from calves colonised with Shiga toxin producing EHEC O157:H7 strains. 20 CD4(+) T-cell epitopes specific to E. coli from 7 of the proteins were identified. The highly conserved N-terminal region of Intimin, including the signal peptide, was consistently recognised by mucosal CD4(+) T-cell populations from multiple animals of different major histocompatibility complex class II haplotypes. These T-cell epitopes are missing from many Intimin constructs used in published vaccine trials, but are relatively conserved across a range of EHEC serotypes, offering the potential to develop cross protective vaccines. Antibodies recognising H7 flagellin have been consistently identified in colonised calves; however CD4(+) T-cell epitopes from H7 flagellin were not identified in this study, suggesting that H7 flagellin may act as a T-cell independent antigen. This is the first time that the epitopes recognised by CD4(+) T-cells following colonisation with an attaching and effacing pathogen have been characterised in any species. The findings have implications for the design of antigens used in the next generation of EHEC O157:H7 vaccines. PMID:27590451

  17. Strategies to Query and Display Allergy-Derived Epitope Data from the Immune Epitope Database

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Larche, Mark; Pomes, Anna; Broide, David; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of specific epitopes on allergens by antibodies and T cells is a key element in allergic processes. Analysis of epitope data may be of interest for basic immunopathology or for potential application in diagnostics or immunotherapy. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a freely available repository of epitope data from infectious disease agents, as well as epitopes defined for allergy, autoimmunity, and transplantation. The IEDB curates the experiments associated with each epitope and thus provides a variety of different ways to search the data. This review aims to demonstrate the utility of the IEDB and its query strategies, including searching by epitope structure (peptidic/nonpeptidic), by assay methodology, by host, by the allergen itself, or by the organism from which the allergen was derived. Links to tools for visualization of 3-D structures, epitope prediction, and analyses of B and T cell reactivity by host response frequency score are also highlighted. PMID:23172234

  18. Loss of Immunization-Induced Epitope-Specific CD4 T-Cell Response following Anaplasma marginale Infection Requires Presence of the T-Cell Epitope on the Pathogen and Is Not Associated with an Increase in Lymphocytes Expressing Known Regulatory Cell Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Turse, Joshua E.; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Johnson, Wendell C.; Scoles, Glen A.; Deringer, James R.; Sutten, Eric L.; Han, Sushan; Norimine, Junzo

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that in cattle previously immunized with outer membrane proteins, infection with Anaplasma marginale induces a functionally exhausted CD4 T-cell response to the A. marginale immunogen. Furthermore, T-cell responses following infection in nonimmunized cattle had a delayed onset and were sporadic and transient during persistent infection. The induction of an exhausted T-cell response following infection presumably facilitates pathogen persistence. In the current study, we hypothesized that the loss of epitope-specific T-cell responses requires the presence of the immunizing epitope on the pathogen, and T-cell dysfunction correlates with the appearance of regulatory T cells. In limited studies in cattle, regulatory T cells have been shown to belong to γδ T-cell subsets rather than be CD4 T cells expressing forkhead box protein P3 (FoxP3). Cattle expressing the DRB3*1101 haplotype were immunized with a truncated A. marginale major surface protein (MSP) 1a that contains a DRB3*1101-restricted CD4 T-cell epitope, F2-5B. Cattle either remained unchallenged or were challenged with A. marginale bacteria that express the epitope or with A. marginale subsp. centrale that do not. Peripheral blood and spleen mononuclear cells were monitored for MSP1a epitope F2-5B-specfic T-cell proliferative responses and were stained for γδ T-cell subsets or CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells before and during infection. As hypothesized, the induction of T-cell exhaustion occurred only following infection with A. marginale, which did not correlate with an increase in either CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells or any γδ T-cell subset examined. PMID:25924762

  19. Amorphous Alumina Nanowire Array Efficiently Delivers Ac-DEVD-CHO to Inhibit Apoptosis of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Lester; Timonen, Brittany; Smith, Sean; Davidge, Brittney; Li, Haiyan; Conley, John F.; Singer, Jeffrey D.; Jiao, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To create an effective well-ordered delivery platform still remains a challenge. Herein we fabricate vertically aligned alumina nanowire arrays via atomic layer deposition templated by carbon nanotubes. Using these arrays, a caspase-3/7 inhibitor was delivered into DC 2.4 cells and blocked apoptosis, as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24336780

  20. CTLs are targeted to kill β cells in patients with type 1 diabetes through recognition of a glucose-regulated preproinsulin epitope

    PubMed Central

    Skowera, Ania; Ellis, Richard J.; Varela-Calviño, Ruben; Arif, Sefina; Huang, Guo Cai; Van-Krinks, Cassie; Zaremba, Anna; Rackham, Chloe; Allen, Jennifer S.; Tree, Timothy I.M.; Zhao, Min; Dayan, Colin M.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Unger, Wendy; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Ossendorp, Ferry; Roep, Bart O.; Peakman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The final pathway of β cell destruction leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and clinical type 1 diabetes is unknown. Here we show that circulating CTLs can kill β cells via recognition of a glucose-regulated epitope. First, we identified 2 naturally processed epitopes from the human preproinsulin signal peptide by elution from HLA-A2 (specifically, the protein encoded by the A*0201 allele) molecules. Processing of these was unconventional, requiring neither the proteasome nor transporter associated with processing (TAP). However, both epitopes were major targets for circulating effector CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, cloned preproinsulin signal peptide–specific CD8+ T cells killed human β cells in vitro. Critically, at high glucose concentration, β cell presentation of preproinsulin signal epitope increased, as did CTL killing. This study provides direct evidence that autoreactive CTLs are present in the circulation of patients with type 1 diabetes and that they can kill human β cells. These results also identify a mechanism of self-antigen presentation that is under pathophysiological regulation and could expose insulin-producing β cells to increasing cytotoxicity at the later stages of the development of clinical diabetes. Our findings suggest that autoreactive CTLs are important targets for immune-based interventions in type 1 diabetes and argue for early, aggressive insulin therapy to preserve remaining β cells. PMID:18802479

  1. CD4 T cell epitope specificity determines follicular versus non-follicular helper differentiation in the polyclonal response to influenza infection or vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Knowlden, Zackery A. G.; Sant, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) are essential for B cell production of high-affinity, class-switched antibodies. Much interest in Tfh development focuses on the priming environment of CD4 T cells. Here we explored the role that peptide specificity plays in the partitioning of the polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire between Tfh and NonTfh lineages during the response to influenza. Surprisingly, we found that CD4 T cells specific for different epitopes exhibited distinct tendencies to segregate into Tfh or NonTfh. To alter the microenvironment and abundance, viral antigens were introduced as purified recombinant proteins in adjuvant as native proteins. Also, the most prototypical epitopes were expressed in a completely foreign protein. In many cases, the epitope-specific response patterns of Tfh vs. NonTfh persisted. The functional TcR avidity of only a subset of epitope-specific cells correlated with the tendency to drive a Tfh response. Thus, we conclude that in a polyclonal CD4 T cell repertoire, features of TcR-peptide:MHC class II complex have a strong deterministic influence on the ability of CD4 T cells to become a Tfh or a NonTfh. Our data is most consistent with at least 2 checkpoints of Tfh selection that include both TcR affinity and B cell presentation. PMID:27329272

  2. CTLs are targeted to kill beta cells in patients with type 1 diabetes through recognition of a glucose-regulated preproinsulin epitope.

    PubMed

    Skowera, Ania; Ellis, Richard J; Varela-Calviño, Ruben; Arif, Sefina; Huang, Guo Cai; Van-Krinks, Cassie; Zaremba, Anna; Rackham, Chloe; Allen, Jennifer S; Tree, Timothy I M; Zhao, Min; Dayan, Colin M; Sewell, Andrew K; Unger, Wendy W; Unger, Wendy; Drijfhout, Jan W; Ossendorp, Ferry; Roep, Bart O; Peakman, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The final pathway of beta cell destruction leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and clinical type 1 diabetes is unknown. Here we show that circulating CTLs can kill beta cells via recognition of a glucose-regulated epitope. First, we identified 2 naturally processed epitopes from the human preproinsulin signal peptide by elution from HLA-A2 (specifically, the protein encoded by the A*0201 allele) molecules. Processing of these was unconventional, requiring neither the proteasome nor transporter associated with processing (TAP). However, both epitopes were major targets for circulating effector CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, cloned preproinsulin signal peptide-specific CD8+ T cells killed human beta cells in vitro. Critically, at high glucose concentration, beta cell presentation of preproinsulin signal epitope increased, as did CTL killing. This study provides direct evidence that autoreactive CTLs are present in the circulation of patients with type 1 diabetes and that they can kill human beta cells. These results also identify a mechanism of self-antigen presentation that is under pathophysiological regulation and could expose insulin-producing beta cells to increasing cytotoxicity at the later stages of the development of clinical diabetes. Our findings suggest that autoreactive CTLs are important targets for immune-based interventions in type 1 diabetes and argue for early, aggressive insulin therapy to preserve remaining beta cells.

  3. In silico design of discontinuous peptides representative of B and T-cell epitopes from HER2-ECD as potential novel cancer peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Manijeh, Mahdavi; Mehrnaz, Keyhanfar; Violaine, Moreau; Hassan, Mohabatkar; Abbas, Jafarian; Mohammad, Rabbani

    2013-01-01

    At present, the most common cause of cancer-related death in women is breast cancer. In a large proportion of breast cancers, there is the overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). This receptor is a 185 KDa growth factor glycoprotein, also known as the first tumor-associated antigen for different types of breast cancers. Moreover, HER2 is an appropriate cell-surface specific antigen for passive immunotherapy, which relies on the repeated application of monoclonal antibodies that are transferred to the patient. However, vaccination is preferable because it would stimulate a patient's own immune system to actively respond to a disease. In the current study, several bioinformatics tools were used for designing synthetic peptide vaccines. PEPOP was used to predict peptides from HER2 ECD subdomain III in the form of discontinuous-continuous B-cell epitopes. Then, T-cell epitope prediction web servers MHCPred, SYFPEITHI, HLA peptide motif search, Propred, and SVMHC were used to identify class-I and II MHC peptides. In this way, PEPOP selected 12 discontinuous peptides from the 3D structure of the HER2 ECD subdomain III. Furthermore, T-cell epitope prediction analyses identified four peptides containing the segments 77 (384-391) and 99 (495-503) for both B and T-cell epitopes. This work is the only study to our knowledge focusing on design of in silico potential novel cancer peptide vaccines of the HER2 ECD subdomain III that contain epitopes for both B and T-cells. These findings based on bioinformatics analyses may be used in vaccine design and cancer therapy; saving time and minimizing the number of tests needed to select the best possible epitopes.

  4. Critical components of a DNA fusion vaccine able to induce protective cytotoxic T cells against a single epitope of a tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Rice, Jason; Buchan, Sarah; Stevenson, Freda K

    2002-10-01

    DNA vaccines can activate immunity against tumor Ags expressed as MHC class I-associated peptides. However, priming of CD8(+) CTL against weak tumor Ags may require adjuvant molecules. We have used a pathogen-derived sequence from tetanus toxin (fragment C (FrC)) fused to tumor Ag sequences to promote Ab and CD4(+) T cell responses. For induction of CD8(+) T cell responses, the FrC sequence has been engineered to remove potentially competitive MHC class I-binding epitopes and to improve presentation of tumor epitopes. The colon carcinoma CT26 expresses an endogenous retroviral gene product, gp70, containing a known H2-L(d)-restricted epitope (AH1). A DNA vaccine encoding gp70 alone was a poor inducer of CTL, and performance was not significantly improved by fusion of full-length FrC. However, use of a minimized domain of FrC, with the AH1 sequence fused to the 3' position, led to rapid induction of high levels of CTL. IFN-gamma-producing epitope-specific CTL were detectable ex vivo and these killed CT26 targets in vitro. The single epitope vaccine was more effective than GM-CSF-transfected CT26 tumor cells in inducing an AH1-specific CTL response and equally effective in providing protection against tumor challenge. Levels of AH1-specific CTL in vivo were increased following injection of tumor cells, and CTL expanded in vitro were able to kill CT26 cells in tumor bearers. Pre-existing immunity to tetanus toxoid had no effect on the induction of AH1-specific CTL. These data demonstrate the power of epitope-specific CTL against tumor cells and illustrate a strategy for priming immunity via a dual component DNA vaccine.

  5. Identification of novel rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus B-cell epitopes and their interaction with host histo-blood group antigens.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanhua; Wang, Fang; Fan, Zhiyu; Hu, Bo; Liu, Xing; Wei, Houjun; Xue, Jiabin; Xu, Weizhong; Qiu, Rulong

    2016-02-01

    Rabbit haemorrhagic disease, caused by rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), results in the death of millions of adult rabbits worldwide, with a mortality rate that exceeds 90%. The sole capsid protein, VP60, is divided into shell (S) and protruding (P) domains, and the more exposed P domain likely contains determinants for cell attachment and antigenic diversity. Nine mAbs against VP60 were screened and identified. To map antigenic epitopes, a set of partially overlapping and consecutive truncated proteins spanning VP60 were expressed. The minimal determinants of the linear B-cell epitopes of VP60 in the P domain, N(326)PISQV(331), D(338)MSFV(342) and K(562)STLVFNL(569), were recognized by one (5H3), four (1B8, 3D11, 4C2 and 4G2) and four mAbs (1D4, 3F7, 5G2 and 6B2), respectively. Sequence alignment showed epitope D(338)MSFV(342) was conserved among all RHDV isolates. Epitopes N(326)PISQV(331) and K(562)STLVFNL(569) were highly conserved among RHDV G1-G6 and variable in RHDV2 strains. Previous studies demonstrated that native viral particles and virus-like particles (VLPs) of RHDV specifically bound to synthetic blood group H type 2 oligosaccharides. We established an oligosaccharide-based assay to analyse the binding of VP60 and epitopes to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Results showed VP60 and its epitopes (aa 326-331 and 338-342) in the P2 subdomain could significantly bind to blood group H type 2. Furthermore, mAbs 1B8 and 5H3 could block RHDV VLP binding to synthetic H type 2. Collectively, these two epitopes might play a key role in the antigenic structure of VP60 and interaction of RHDV and HBGA. PMID:26612210

  6. In silico predicted conserved B-cell epitopes in the Merozoite Surface Antigen -2 family of B. bovis are neutralization-sensitive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Merozoite Surface Antigens-2 of Babesia bovis conform a family of GPI-anchored glycoproteins located at the parasite cell surface, that contain neutralization-sensitive B-cell epitopes, thus constituting putative vaccine candidates for bovine babesiosis. It was previously shown that (i) the MSA-...

  7. Identification of B cell and T cell epitopes using synthetic peptide combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, Clemencia; Appel, Jon R; Judkowski, Valeria; Houghten, Richard A

    2012-11-01

    This unit presents a combinatorial library method that consists of the synthesis and screening of mixture-based synthetic combinatorial libraries of peptide molecules. The protocols employ peptide libraries to identify peptides recognized by MAbs and T cells. The first protocol uses a positional scanning peptide library made up of hexapeptides to identify antigenic determinants recognized by MAbs. The 120 mixtures in the hexapeptide library are tested for their inhibitory activity in a competitive ELISA. The second protocol uses a decapeptide library to identify T cell peptide ligands. The 200 mixtures of the decapeptide library are tested for their ability to induce T cell activation. Support protocols cover optimization of the assay conditions for each MAb or T cell, to achieve the best level of sensitivity and reproducibility, and preparation of a hexapeptide library, along with deconvolution approaches.

  8. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  9. Doubly Branched Hexasaccharide Epitope on the Cell Wall Polysaccharide of Group A Streptococci Recognized by Human and Rabbit Antisera

    PubMed Central

    Michon, Francis; Moore, Samuel L.; Kim, John; Blake, Milan S.; Auzanneau, France-Isabelle; Johnston, Blair D.; Johnson, Margaret A.; Pinto, B. Mario

    2005-01-01

    A number of epitope specificities associated with the cell wall polysaccharide antigen of group A streptococci were identified in a polyclonal rabbit antiserum induced in rabbits by whole group A streptococci and in polyclonal convalescent human antisera from children that had recovered from streptococcal A infections. The identification was achieved by using a series of synthetic oligosaccharides, glycoconjugates, and bacterial polysaccharide inhibitors to inhibit the binding of the group A helical polysaccharide to the polyclonal antisera. The exclusively dominant epitope expressed in the convalescent human antisera was the doubly branched extended helical hexasaccharide with the structure α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap(1→3)α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap. The hexasaccharide epitope also bound with the highest immunoreactivity to the rabbit antiserum. In contrast, the human antisera did not show significant binding to the singly branched pentasaccharide with the structure α-l-Rhap(1→2)α-l-Rhap(1→3)α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap or the branched trisaccharide α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap, although both these haptens bound significantly to the same rabbit antiserum, albeit with less immunoreactivity than the hexasaccharide. Inhibition studies using streptococcal group A and B rabbit antisera and the inhibitors indicated above also suggested that the group A carbohydrate, unlike the group B streptococcal polysaccharide, does not contain the disaccharide α-l-Rhap(1→2)α-l-Rhap motif at its nonreducing chain terminus, stressing the importance of mapping the determinant specificities of these two important streptococcal subcapsular group polysaccharides to fully understand the serological relationships between group A and group B streptococci. PMID:16177309

  10. MEKC-LIF analysis of rhodamine123 delivered by carbon nanotubes in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Wu, Ren'an; Wu, Minghuo; Zou, Hanfa; Ma, Hong; Yang, Ling; Le, X Chris

    2009-06-01

    Oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (o-SWNTs) were employed as the drug carriers to deliver the small molecules of Rhodamine123 (Rho123) into the K562 cells via physical adsorption. However, due to the fluorescence quenching of Rho123 on carbon nanotubes, the quantitative determination of Rho123 in cells is difficult. Based on the MEKC coupled with LIF detection, a quantitative approach was developed for the determination of Rho123 delivered into K562 cells by o-SWNTs. Where the adsorbed Rho123 on o-SWNTs could be desorbed by SDS in running buffer and be simultaneously separated with o-SWNTs due to the differences of their electrophoretic mobility by applying the electric potential at the both ends of capillary. Using this approach, the intracellular uptakes of Rho123 in multidrug-resistant and multidrug-sensitive leukemia cells were quantified, and the results showed that o-SWNTs could be used as the potential drug carriers to deliver small molecules into cells via the physical adsorption along with the circumventing of multidrug resistance of leukemia cells.

  11. Therapeutic Vaccination against the Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus EBNA-1 Homologue, rhEBNA-1, Elicits T Cell Responses to Novel Epitopes in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Fogg, Mark H.; Leskowitz, Rachel M.; Ertl, Hildegund C.; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; Lieberman, Paul; Wang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a vaccine/immunotherapy target due to its association with several human malignancies. EBNA-1 is an EBV protein consistently expressed in all EBV-associated cancers. Herein, EBNA-1-specific T cell epitopes were evaluated after AdC–rhEBNA-1 immunizations in chronically lymphocryptovirus-infected rhesus macaques, an EBV infection model. Preexisting rhEBNA-1-specific responses were augmented in 4/12 animals, and new epitopes were recognized in 5/12 animals after vaccinations. This study demonstrated that EBNA-1-specific T cells can be expanded by vaccination. PMID:24089556

  12. Reconstitution of CD8 T Cells Protective against Cytomegalovirus in a Mouse Model of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Dynamics and Inessentiality of Epitope Immunodominance

    PubMed Central

    Holtappels, Rafaela; Lemmermann, Niels A. W.; Podlech, Jürgen; Ebert, Stefan; Reddehase, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful reconstitution of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8+ T cells by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) gives a favorable prognosis for the control of CMV reactivation and prevention of CMV disease after hematoablative therapy of hematopoietic malignancies. In the transient immunocompromised state after HCT, pre-emptive cytoimmunotherapy with viral epitope-specific effector or memory CD8+ T cells is a promising option to speed up antiviral control. Despite high-coding capacity of CMVs and a broad CD8+ T-cell response on the population level, which reflects polymorphism in major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) glycoproteins, the response in terms of quantity of CD8+ T cells in any individual is directed against a limited set of CMV-encoded epitopes selected for presentation by the private repertoire of MHC-I molecules. Such epitopes are known as “immunodominant” epitopes (IDEs). Besides host immunogenetics, genetic variance in CMV strains harbored as latent viruses by an individual HCT recipient can also determine the set of IDEs, which complicates a “personalized immunotherapy.” It is, therefore, an important question if IDE-specific CD8+ T-cell reconstitution after HCT is critical or dispensable for antiviral control. As viruses with targeted mutations of IDEs cannot be experimentally tested in HCT patients, we employed the well-established mouse model of HCT. Notably, control of murine CMV (mCMV) after HCT was comparably efficient for IDE-deletion mutant mCMV-Δ4IDE and the corresponding IDE-expressing revertant virus mCMV-Δ4IDE-rev. Thus, antigenicity-loss mutations in IDEs do not result in loss-of-function of a polyclonal CD8+ T-cell population. Although IDE deletion was not associated with global changes in the response to non-IDE epitopes, the collective of non-IDE-specific CD8+ T-cells infiltrates infected tissue and confines infection within nodular inflammatory foci. We conclude from the model, and predict also for human

  13. Reconstitution of CD8 T Cells Protective against Cytomegalovirus in a Mouse Model of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Dynamics and Inessentiality of Epitope Immunodominance.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Rafaela; Lemmermann, Niels A W; Podlech, Jürgen; Ebert, Stefan; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2016-01-01

    Successful reconstitution of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) gives a favorable prognosis for the control of CMV reactivation and prevention of CMV disease after hematoablative therapy of hematopoietic malignancies. In the transient immunocompromised state after HCT, pre-emptive cytoimmunotherapy with viral epitope-specific effector or memory CD8(+) T cells is a promising option to speed up antiviral control. Despite high-coding capacity of CMVs and a broad CD8(+) T-cell response on the population level, which reflects polymorphism in major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) glycoproteins, the response in terms of quantity of CD8(+) T cells in any individual is directed against a limited set of CMV-encoded epitopes selected for presentation by the private repertoire of MHC-I molecules. Such epitopes are known as "immunodominant" epitopes (IDEs). Besides host immunogenetics, genetic variance in CMV strains harbored as latent viruses by an individual HCT recipient can also determine the set of IDEs, which complicates a "personalized immunotherapy." It is, therefore, an important question if IDE-specific CD8(+) T-cell reconstitution after HCT is critical or dispensable for antiviral control. As viruses with targeted mutations of IDEs cannot be experimentally tested in HCT patients, we employed the well-established mouse model of HCT. Notably, control of murine CMV (mCMV) after HCT was comparably efficient for IDE-deletion mutant mCMV-Δ4IDE and the corresponding IDE-expressing revertant virus mCMV-Δ4IDE-rev. Thus, antigenicity-loss mutations in IDEs do not result in loss-of-function of a polyclonal CD8(+) T-cell population. Although IDE deletion was not associated with global changes in the response to non-IDE epitopes, the collective of non-IDE-specific CD8(+) T-cells infiltrates infected tissue and confines infection within nodular inflammatory foci. We conclude from the model, and predict also for

  14. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. PMID:26783342

  15. Identification and characterization of CD4⁺ T-cell epitopes on GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Yao, Di; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xintong; Yu, Simiao; Wei, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhenghai; Sun, Hunan; Yu, Liquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Song, Baifen; Cui, Yudong

    2016-02-01

    The GapC protein is highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) and is shown to be involved in bacterial virulence. Immunization of GapC protein can induce specific CD4(+) T-cell immune responses and protect against S. dysgalactiae infection. However, there are no studies to identify immunodominant CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. In this study, in silico MHC affinity measurement method was firstly used to predict potential CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. Six predictive 15-mer peptides were synthesized and two novel GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, GapC63-77 and GapC96-110, were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from GapC-immunized BALB/c (H-2(d)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that peptides containing 63-77 and 96-110 induced significant antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells proliferation response in vivo. At the same time, high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A, as well as moderate levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were detected in CD4(+) T-cells isolated from both GapC and peptide-immunized mice in vivo, suggesting that GapC63-77 and GapC96-110 preferentially elicited polarized Th1/Th17-type responses. The characterization of GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes not only helps us understand its protective immunity, but also contributes to design effective T-cell epitope-based vaccine against S. dysgalactiae infection.

  16. Characterization of T-cell response to woodchuck hepatitis virus core protein and protection of woodchucks from infection by immunization with peptides containing a T-cell epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Menne, S; Maschke, J; Tolle, T K; Lu, M; Roggendorf, M

    1997-01-01

    Specific activation of T cells appears to be a prerequisite for viral clearance during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The T-cell response to HBV core protein is essential in determining an acute or chronic outcome of HBV infection, but how this immune response contributes to the course of infection remains unclear. This is due to results obtained from humans, which are restricted to phenomenological observations occurring during the clinical onset after HBV infection. Thus, a useful animal model is needed. Characterization of the T-cell response to the core protein (WHcAg) of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) in woodchucks contributes to the understanding of these mechanisms. Therefore, we investigated the response of woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to WHcAg and WHcAg-derived peptides, using our 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine assay. We demonstrated WHcAg-specific proliferation of PBMCs and nylon wool-nonadherent cells from acutely WHV-infected woodchucks. Using a cross-reacting anti-human T-cell (CD3) antiserum, we identified nonadherent cells as woodchuck T cells. T-cell epitope mapping with overlapping peptides, covering the entire WHcAg, revealed T-cell responses of acutely WHV-infected woodchucks to peptide1-20, peptide100-119, and peptide112-131. Detailed epitope analysis in the WHcAg region from amino acids 97 to 140 showed that T cells especially recognized peptide97-110. Establishment of polyclonal T-cell lines with WHcAg or peptide97-110 revealed reciprocal stimulation by peptide97-110 or WHcAg, respectively. We vaccinated woodchucks with peptide97-110 or WHcAg to prove the importance of this immunodominant T-cell epitope. All woodchucks immunized with peptide97-110 or WHcAg were protected. Our results show that the cellular immune response to WHcAg or to one T-cell epitope protects woodchucks from WHV infection. PMID:8985324

  17. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes) that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome), together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49%) was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript) followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6) and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4). The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of individual wheat

  18. H7N9 T-cell epitopes that mimic human sequences are less immunogenic and may induce Treg-mediated tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Moise, Leonard; Tassone, Ryan; Gutierrez, Andres H; Terry, Frances E; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin H7N9 influenza is a novel influenza A virus (IAV) that emerged in humans in China in 2013. Using immunoinformatics tools, we identified several H7N9 T cell epitopes with T cell receptor (TCR)-facing residues identical to those of multiple epitopes from human proteins. We hypothesized that host tolerance to these peptides may impair T helper response and contribute to the low titer, weak hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody responses and diminished seroconversion rates that have been observed in human H7N9 infections and vaccine trials. We found that the magnitude of human T effector responses to individual H7N9 peptides was inversely correlated with the peptide's resemblance to self. Furthermore, a promiscuous T cell epitope from the hemagglutinin (HA) protein suppressed responses to other H7N9 peptides when co-administered in vitro. Along with other highly ‘human-like’ peptides from H7N9, this peptide was also shown to expand FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Thus, H7N9 may be camouflaged from effective human immune response by T cell epitope sequences that avert or regulate effector T cell responses through host tolerance. PMID:26090577

  19. Conformational HER-2/neu B-cell epitope peptide vaccine designed to incorporate two native disulfide bonds enhances tumor cell binding and antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Dakappagari, Naveen K; Lute, Kenneth D; Rawale, Sharad; Steele, Joan T; Allen, Stephanie D; Phillips, Gary; Reilly, R Todd; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2005-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to elicit an antibody response that target antigenic sites on a tumor antigen must closely mimic the three-dimensional structure of the corresponding region on the antigen. We have designed a complex immunogen derived from the extracellular domain of human HER-2/neu-(626-649) that represents a three-dimensional epitope. We have successfully introduced two disulfide bonds into this sequence, thereby recapitulating the natural disulfide pairings observed in the native protein. To evaluate the immunogenicity of the doubly cyclized disulfide-linked peptide versus the free uncyclized peptide we examined the induction of antibody responses in both inbred and outbred mice strains, with both constructs eliciting high titered antibodies. The disulfide-paired specific antibodies exhibited enhanced cross-reactivity to HER-2/neu expressed on BT-474 cell line as determined by flow cytometry. The antitumor activities of the disulfidepaired specific antibodies did not improve the in vitro growth inhibition of human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER-2, but showed superior antitumor responses in the context of ADCC and interferon-gamma induction. Inbred mice (FVB/n) vaccinated with the disulfide-paired epitope exhibited a statistically significant reduction in the development of exogenously administered tumors in vivo compared with mice receiving either the free uncyclized or the promiscuous T-cell epitope (MVF) control peptide (p = 0.001). This study demonstrates the feasibility and importance of designing conformational epitopes that mimic the tertiary structure of the native protein for eliciting biologically relevant anti-tumor antibodies. Such approaches are a prerequisite to the design of effective peptide vaccines.

  20. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2011-11-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138(260-268) (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138(+) MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8(+) activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4(+) T cell and naive CD8(+) T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ-interferon secretion to HLA-A2(+) /CD138(+) myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2(-) /CD138(+) or HLA-A2(+) /CD138(-) cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2(+) /CD138(+) cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138(260-268) (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  1. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138+ MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8+ activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4+ T cell and naive CD8+ T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ–interferon secretion to HLA-A2+/CD138+ myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2−/CD138+ or HLA-A2+/CD138− cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2+/CD138+ cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  2. In silico Identification and Validation of a Linear and Naturally Immunogenic B-Cell Epitope of the Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidate Merozoite Surface Protein-9

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Singh, Balwan; Jiang, Jianlin; Meyer, Esmeralda V. S.; Santos, Fátima; Banic, Dalma Maria; Moreno, Alberto; Galinski, Mary R.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptide vaccines provide the advantages of safety, stability and low cost. The success of this approach is highly dependent on efficient epitope identification and synthetic strategies for efficacious delivery. In malaria, the Merozoite Surface Protein-9 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP9) has been considered a vaccine candidate based on the evidence that specific antibodies were able to inhibit merozoite invasion and recombinant proteins were highly immunogenic in mice and humans. However the identities of linear B-cell epitopes within PvMSP9 as targets of functional antibodies remain undefined. We used several publicly-available algorithms for in silico analyses and prediction of relevant B cell epitopes within PMSP9. We show that the tandem repeat sequence EAAPENAEPVHENA (PvMSP9E795-A808) present at the C-terminal region is a promising target for antibodies, given its high combined score to be a linear epitope and located in a putative intrinsically unstructured region of the native protein. To confirm the predictive value of the computational approach, plasma samples from 545 naturally exposed individuals were screened for IgG reactivity against the recombinant PvMSP9-RIRII729-972 and a synthetic peptide representing the predicted B cell epitope PvMSP9E795-A808. 316 individuals (58%) were responders to the full repetitive region PvMSP9-RIRII, of which 177 (56%) also presented total IgG reactivity against the synthetic peptide, confirming it validity as a B cell epitope. The reactivity indexes of anti-PvMSP9-RIRII and anti-PvMSP9E795-A808 antibodies were correlated. Interestingly, a potential role in the acquisition of protective immunity was associated with the linear epitope, since the IgG1 subclass against PvMSP9E795-A808 was the prevalent subclass and this directly correlated with time elapsed since the last malaria episode; however this was not observed in the antibody responses against the full PvMSP9-RIRII. In conclusion, our findings identified and

  3. Chimeric peptide containing both B and T cells epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 enhances anti-tumor effects in HLA-A2 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Su-I; Huang, Ming-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Wen; Chen, I-Hua; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Bing-Mae; Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-07-28

    Synthetic peptides are attractive for cancer immunotherapy because of their safety and flexibility. In this report, we identified a new B cell epitope of tumor-associated antigen L6 (TAL6) that could induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vivo. We incorporated the B cell epitope with a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and a helper T (Th) epitope to form a chimeric long peptide. We formulated the chimeric peptide with different adjuvants to immunize HLA-A2 transgenic mice and evaluate their immunogenicity. The chimeric peptide formulated with an emulsion type nanoparticle (PELC) adjuvant and a toll-like receptor 9 agonist (CpG ODN) (PELC/CpG) induced the greatest ADCC and CTL responses. The induced anti-tumor immunity inhibited the growth of TAL6-positive cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that immunization with the chimeric peptide inhibited cancer cell migration in vitro and metastasis in vivo. These data suggest that a chimeric peptide containing both B and T cell epitopes of TAL6 formulated with PELC/CpG adjuvant is feasible for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27130449

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the Association Angle between T-cell Receptor Vα/Vβ Domains Reveals Important Features for Epitope Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Krackhardt, Angela M; Antes, Iris

    2015-07-01

    T-cell receptors (TCR) play an important role in the adaptive immune system as they recognize pathogen- or cancer-based epitopes and thus initiate the cell-mediated immune response. Therefore there exists a growing interest in the optimization of TCRs for medical purposes like adoptive T-cell therapy. However, the molecular mechanisms behind T-cell signaling are still predominantly unknown. For small sets of TCRs it was observed that the angle between their Vα- and Vβ-domains, which bind the epitope, can vary and might be important for epitope recognition. Here we present a comprehensive, quantitative study of the variation in the Vα/Vβ interdomain-angle and its influence on epitope recognition, performing a systematic bioinformatics analysis based on a representative set of experimental TCR structures. For this purpose we developed a new, cuboid-based superpositioning method, which allows a unique, quantitative analysis of the Vα/Vβ-angles. Angle-based clustering led to six significantly different clusters. Analysis of these clusters revealed the unexpected result that the angle is predominantly influenced by the TCR-clonotype, whereas the bound epitope has only a minor influence. Furthermore we could identify a previously unknown center of rotation (CoR), which is shared by all TCRs. All TCR geometries can be obtained by rotation around this center, rendering it a new, common TCR feature with the potential of improving the accuracy of TCR structure prediction considerably. The importance of Vα/Vβ rotation for signaling was confirmed as we observed larger variances in the Vα/Vβ-angles in unbound TCRs compared to epitope-bound TCRs. Our results strongly support a two-step mechanism for TCR-epitope: First, preformation of a flexible TCR geometry in the unbound state and second, locking of the Vα/Vβ-angle in a TCR-type specific geometry upon epitope-MHC association, the latter being driven by rotation around the unique center of rotation. PMID:26185983

  5. Conserved MHC class I-presented dengue virus epitopes identified by immunoproteomics analysis are targets for cross-serotype reactive T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Testa, James S; Shetty, Vivekananda; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Nickens, Zacharie; Hafner, Julie; Kamal, Shivali; Zhang, Xianchao; Jett, Marti; Philip, Ramila

    2012-02-15

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are significant global public health problems, and understanding the overall immune response to infection will contribute to appropriate management of the disease and its potentially severe complications. Live attenuated and subunit vaccine candidates, which are under clinical evaluation, induce primarily an antibody response to the virus and minimal cross-reactive T-cell responses. Currently, there are no available tools to assess protective T-cell responses during infection or after vaccination. In this study, we utilize an immunoproteomics process to uncover novel HLA-A2-specific epitopes derived from dengue virus (DV)-infected cells. These epitopes are conserved, and we report that epitope-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) are cross-reactive against all 4 DV serotypes. These epitopes have potential as new informational and diagnostic tools to characterize T-cell immunity in DV infection and may serve as part of a universal vaccine candidate complementary to current vaccines in trial. PMID:22246683

  6. Conserved MHC Class I–Presented Dengue Virus Epitopes Identified by Immunoproteomics Analysis Are Targets for Cross-Serotype Reactive T-Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Testa, James S.; Shetty, Vivekananda; Sinnathamby, Gomathinayagam; Nickens, Zacharie; Hafner, Julie; Kamal, Shivali; Zhang, Xianchao; Jett, Marti

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are significant global public health problems, and understanding the overall immune response to infection will contribute to appropriate management of the disease and its potentially severe complications. Live attenuated and subunit vaccine candidates, which are under clinical evaluation, induce primarily an antibody response to the virus and minimal cross-reactive T-cell responses. Currently, there are no available tools to assess protective T-cell responses during infection or after vaccination. In this study, we utilize an immunoproteomics process to uncover novel HLA-A2–specific epitopes derived from dengue virus (DV)–infected cells. These epitopes are conserved, and we report that epitope-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs) are cross-reactive against all 4 DV serotypes. These epitopes have potential as new informational and diagnostic tools to characterize T-cell immunity in DV infection and may serve as part of a universal vaccine candidate complementary to current vaccines in trial. PMID:22246683

  7. Induction of castration by immunization of male dogs with recombinant gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-canine distemper virus (CDV) T helper cell epitope p35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi-Jeong; Moon, Young-Chan; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Kim, Sun-Eui; Chang, Wha-Seok; Park, Seung-Young; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Hwi-Yool; Park, Keun-Kyu; McOrist, Steven; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2005-03-01

    Immunocastration is a considerable alternative to a surgical castration method especially in male animal species for alleviating unwanted male behaviors and characteristics. Induction of high titer of antibody specific for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) correlates with the regression of testes. Fusion proteins composed of canine GnRH and T helper (Th) cell epitope p35 originated from canine distemper virus (CDV) F protein and goat rotavirus VP6 protein were produced in E. coli. When these fusion proteins were injected to male dogs which were previously immunized with CDV vaccine, the fusion protein of GnRH-CDV Th cell epitope p35 induced much higher antibody than that of GnRH-rotavirus VP6 protein or GnRH alone. The degeneration of spermatogenesis was also verified in the male dogs immunized with the fusion protein of GnRH-CDV Th cell epitope p35. These results indicate that canine GnRH conjugated to CDV Th cell epitope p35 acted as a strong immunogen and the antibody to GnRH specifically neutralized GnRH in the testes. This study also implies a potential application of GnRH-based vaccines for immunocastration of male pets. PMID:15785119

  8. Synthetic Long Peptide Influenza Vaccine Containing Conserved T and B Cell Epitopes Reduces Viral Load in Lungs of Mice and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl Huber, S. K.; Camps, M. G. M.; Jacobi, R. H. J.; Mouthaan, J.; van Dijken, H.; van Beek, J.; Ossendorp, F.; de Jonge, J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently licensed influenza vaccines mainly induce antibodies against highly variable epitopes. Due to antigenic drift, protection is subtype or strain-specific and regular vaccine updates are required. In case of antigenic shifts, which have caused several pandemics in the past, completely new vaccines need to be developed. We set out to develop a vaccine that provides protection against a broad range of influenza viruses. Therefore, highly conserved parts of the influenza A virus (IAV) were selected of which we constructed antibody and T cell inducing peptide-based vaccines. The B epitope vaccine consists of the highly conserved HA2 fusion peptide and M2e peptide coupled to a CD4 helper epitope. The T epitope vaccine comprises 25 overlapping synthetic long peptides of 26-34 amino acids, thereby avoiding restriction for a certain MHC haplotype. These peptides are derived from nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1) and matrix protein 1 (M1). C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice, and ferrets were vaccinated with the B epitopes, 25 SLP or a combination of both. Vaccine-specific antibodies were detected in sera of mice and ferrets and vaccine-specific cellular responses were measured in mice. Following challenge, both mice and ferrets showed a reduction of virus titers in the lungs in response to vaccination. Summarizing, a peptide-based vaccine directed against conserved parts of influenza virus containing B and T cell epitopes shows promising results for further development. Such a vaccine may reduce disease burden and virus transmission during pandemic outbreaks. PMID:26046664

  9. CD4+ T cell epitopes of FliC conserved between strains of Burkholderia: implications for vaccines against melioidosis and cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Musson, Julie A; Reynolds, Catherine J; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Khaenam, Prasong; Favry, Emmanuel; Spink, Natasha; Chu, Karen K Y; De Soyza, Anthony; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M; Robinson, John H

    2014-12-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis characterized by pneumonia and fatal septicemia and prevalent in Southeast Asia. Related Burkholderia species are strong risk factors of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). The B. pseudomallei flagellar protein FliC is strongly seroreactive and vaccination protects challenged mice. We assessed B. pseudomallei FliC peptide binding affinity to multiple HLA class II alleles and then assessed CD4 T cell immunity in HLA class II transgenic mice and in seropositive individuals in Thailand. T cell hybridomas were generated to investigate cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and the related Burkholderia species associated with Cepacia Complex CF. B. pseudomallei FliC contained several peptide sequences with ability to bind multiple HLA class II alleles. Several peptides were shown to encompass strong CD4 T cell epitopes in B. pseudomallei-exposed individuals and in HLA transgenic mice. In particular, the p38 epitope is robustly recognized by CD4 T cells of seropositive donors across diverse HLA haplotypes. T cell hybridomas against an immunogenic B. pseudomallei FliC epitope also cross-reacted with orthologous FliC sequences from Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, important pathogens in CF. Epitopes within FliC were accessible for processing and presentation from live or heat-killed bacteria, demonstrating that flagellin enters the HLA class II Ag presentation pathway during infection of macrophages with B. cenocepacia. Collectively, the data support the possibility of incorporating FliC T cell epitopes into vaccination programs targeting both at-risk individuals in B. pseudomallei endemic regions as well as CF patients.

  10. Circulating anti-Tax cytotoxic T lymphocytes from human T-cell leukemia virus type I-infected people, with and without tropical spastic paraparesis, recognize multiple epitopes simultaneously.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, C E; Nightingale, S; Taylor, G P; Weber, J; Bangham, C R

    1994-01-01

    CD8+ T cells were freshly isolated from a human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected patient with tropical spastic paraparesis. These cells, which were specific for HTLV-I Tax, simultaneously recognized a minimum of five, and possibly as many as seven, distinct peptide epitopes within the protein. A further Tax epitope was recognized after a short period of culture without exogenous peptide stimulation. All but one of these epitopes were clustered in the N-terminal third of Tax, and one of the epitopes was clearly immunodominant on two separate occasions of testing. Recognition of the immunodominant epitope was restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B15, and recognition of all the others was by HLA A2. Similar patterns of cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition of the HLA A2-restricted Tax peptides in two healthy HTLV-I-seropositive individuals, each of whom carried the HLA A2 allele, were observed. PMID:7512153

  11. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  12. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  13. Large-Scale Analysis of B-Cell Epitopes on Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin – Implications for Cross-Reactivity of Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Kudahl, Ulrich J.; Simon, Christian; Cao, Zhiwei; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Fast gene mutation on surface proteins of influenza virus result in increasing resistance to current vaccines and available antiviral drugs. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) represent targets for prophylactic and therapeutic treatments of influenza. We performed a systematic bioinformatics study of cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against influenza virus surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). This study utilized the available crystal structures of HA complexed with the antibodies for the analysis of tens of thousands of HA sequences. The detailed description of B-cell epitopes, measurement of epitope area similarity among different strains, and estimation of antibody neutralizing coverage provide insights into cross-reactivity status of existing nAbs against influenza virus. We have developed a method to assess the likely cross-reactivity potential of bnAbs for influenza strains, either newly emerged or existing. Our method catalogs influenza strains by a new concept named discontinuous peptide, and then provide assessment of cross-reactivity. Potentially cross-reactive strains are those that share 100% identity with experimentally verified neutralized strains. By cataloging influenza strains and their B-cell epitopes for known bnAbs, our method provides guidance for selection of representative strains for further experimental design. The knowledge of sequences, their B-cell epitopes, and differences between historical influenza strains, we enhance our preparedness and the ability to respond to the emerging pandemic threats. PMID:24570677

  14. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  15. Epitope topography controls bioactivity in supramolecular nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Shantanu; Tantakitti, Faifan; Matson, John B.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating bioactivity into artificial scaffolds using peptide epitopes present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a well-known approach. A common strategy has involved epitopes that provide cells with attachment points and external cues through interaction with integrin receptors. Although a variety of bioactive sequences have been identified so far, less is known about their optimal display in a scaffold. We report here on the use of self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber matrices to investigate the impact of spatial presentation of the fibronectin derived epitope RGDS on cell response. Using one, three, or five glycine residues, RGDS epitopes were systematically spaced out from the surface of the rigid nanofibers. We found that cell morphology was strongly affected by the separation of the epitope from the nanofiber surface, with the longest distance yielding the most cell-spreading, bundling of actin filaments, and a round-to-polygonal transformation of cell shape. Cell response to this type of epitope display was also accompanied with activated integrin-mediated signaling and formation of stronger adhesions between cells and substrate. Interestingly, unlike length, changing the molecular flexibility of the linker had minimal influence on cell behavior on the substrate for reasons that remain poorly understood. The use in this study of high persistence length nanofibers rather than common flexible polymers allows us to conclude that epitope topography at the nanoscale structure of a scaffold influences its bioactive properties independent of epitope density and mechanical properties. PMID:25745558

  16. Codon Optimization of the Human Papillomavirus E7 Oncogene Induces a CD8+ T Cell Response to a Cryptic Epitope Not Harbored by Wild-Type E7

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Felix K. M.; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J.; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine. PMID:25799237

  17. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Felix K M; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine.

  18. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis Exosomes Deliver Cargo to Host Cells and Mediate Host∶Parasite Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Olivia; Lustig, Gila; Stevens, Grant C.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization. PMID:23853596

  20. Recents patents for isolating, delivering and tracking adult stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2010-06-01

    The field of regenerative medicine offers nowadays the potential to significantly impact a wide spectrum of healthcare issues, from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes, T1D) to cardiovascular disease. In tissue engineering biomaterials, biological factors, regeneration competent cells are used in the process of creating functional tissue. Regarding the type of stem or progenitor cells which represents the best candidate for therapy, embryonic stem cells have been considered the master cells capable of differentiating into every type of cells either in vitro or in vivo, in spite of serious ethical concerns. Nevertheless experimental evidence suggests that adult stem cells and even terminally differentiated somatic cells under appropriate microenvironmental treatments can be reprogrammed and contribute to a much wider spectrum of differentiated progeny than previously anticipated. One of the main goals is to exploit novel technologies aiming to isolate, expand and enrich sources of regeneration competent cells, especially adult somatic stem cells. Researchers are also trying to develop innovative strategies for effectively delivering regenerative cell populations and to implement 'tracking' tools to verify their engraftment and destiny in vivo. Here we review recent patents on the field issued over the past five years.

  1. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Sarah C.; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Microparticles are elevated in the plasma in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. • These microparticles initiate apoptosis in cultured cells. • Microparticles contain caspase 3 and they activate receptors for TNF-α and TRAIL. - Abstract: Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells.

  2. Identification of an immunogenic CD8+ T-cell epitope derived from γ-globin, a putative tumor-associated antigen for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Naoto; Butler, Marcus O.; Xia, Zhinan; Berezovskaya, Alla; Murray, Andrew P.; Ansén, Sascha; Kojima, Seiji; Nadler, Lee M.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation can induce long-term remissions, relapse rates remain high and innovative approaches are needed. Since donor lymphocyte infusions have clinical activity in JMML, T-cell-mediated immunotherapy could provide a nonredundant treatment approach to compliment current therapies. γ-Globin, an oncofetal protein overexpressed by clonogenic JMML cells, may serve as a target of an antitumor immune response. We predicted 5 γ-globin-derived peptides as potential human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and showed that 4 (g031, g071, g105, and g106) bind A2 molecules in vitro. Using an artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) that can process both the N- and C-termini of endogenously expressed proteins, we biochemically confirmed that g105 is naturally processed and presented by cell surface A2. Furthermore, g105-specific CD8+ CTLs generated from A2-positive healthy donors were able to specifically cytolyze γ-globin+, but not γ-globin- JMML cells in an A2-restricted manner. These results suggest that this aAPC-based approach enables the biochemical identification of CD8+ T-cell epitopes that are processed and presented by intact cells, and that CTL immunotherapy of JMML could be directed against the γ-globin-derived epitope g105. PMID:16778141

  3. Therapeutic Potential of Delivering Arsenic Trioxide into HPV-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells Using Liposomal Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Dong; Ghali, Lucy; Xia, Ruidong; Munoz, Leonardo P.; Garelick, Hemda; Bell, Celia; Wen, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and since this discovery, it has also been researched as a possible treatment for other haematological and solid cancers. Even though many positive results have been found in the laboratory, wider clinical use of ATO has been compromised by its toxicity at higher concentrations. The aim of this study was to explore an improved method for delivering ATO using liposomal nanotechnology to evaluate whether this could reduce drug toxicity and improve the efficacy of ATO in treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. HeLa, C33a, and human keratinocytes were exposed to 5 μm of ATO in both free and liposomal forms for 48 h. The stability of the prepared samples was tested using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) to measure the intracellular arsenic concentrations after treatment. Fluorescent double-immunocytochemical staining was carried out to evaluate the protein expression levels of HPV-E6 oncogene and caspase-3. Cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. Results showed that liposomal ATO was more effective than free ATO in reducing protein levels of HPV-E6 and inducing cell apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, lower toxicity was observed when liposomal-delivered ATO was used. This could be explained by lower intracellular concentrations of arsenic. The slowly accumulated intracellular ATO through liposomal delivery might act as a reservoir which releases ATO gradually to maintain its anti-HPV effects. To conclude, liposome-delivered ATO could protect cells from the direct toxic effects induced by higher concentrations of intracellular ATO. Different pathways may be involved in this process, depending on local architecture of the tissues and HPV status.

  4. Heterogeneity of silica and glycan-epitope distribution in epidermal idioblast cell walls in Adiantum raddianum laminae.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Olivier; Leroux, Frederic; Mastroberti, Alexandra Antunes; Santos-Silva, Fernanda; Van Loo, Denis; Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Bals, Sara; Popper, Zoë A; de Araujo Mariath, Jorge Ernesto

    2013-06-01

    Laminae of Adiantum raddianum Presl., a fern belonging to the family Pteridaceae, are characterised by the presence of epidermal fibre-like cells under the vascular bundles. These cells were thought to contain silica bodies, but their thickened walls leave no space for intracellular silica suggesting it may actually be deposited within their walls. Using advanced electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis we showed the presence of silica in the cell walls of the fibre-like idioblasts. However, it was specifically localised to the outer layers of the periclinal wall facing the leaf surface, with the thick secondary wall being devoid of silica. Immunocytochemical experiments were performed to ascertain the respective localisation of silica deposition and glycan polymers. Epitopes characteristic for pectic homogalacturonan and the hemicelluloses xyloglucan and mannan were detected in most epidermal walls, including the silica-rich cell wall layers. The monoclonal antibody, LM6, raised against pectic arabinan, labelled the silica-rich primary wall of the epidermal fibre-like cells and the guard cell walls, which were also shown to contain silica. We hypothesise that the silicified outer wall layers of the epidermal fibre-like cells support the lamina during cell expansion prior to secondary wall formation. This implies that silicification does not impede cell elongation. Although our results suggest that pectic arabinan may be implicated in silica deposition, further detailed analyses are needed to confirm this. The combinatorial approach presented here, which allows correlative screening and in situ localisation of silicon and cell wall polysaccharide distribution, shows great potential for future studies.

  5. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S.; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P.; Marques, Adriana R.

    2016-01-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen’s possible immune evasion mechanisms. PMID:26718339

  6. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen's possible immune evasion mechanisms.

  7. Direct visualization of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2 in recipient cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Qinghua; Tu, Haitao; Lim, Zijie; Pan, Shen Q

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a natural genetic engineer widely used to deliver DNA into various recipients, including plant, yeast and fungal cells. The bacterium can transfer single-stranded DNA molecules (T–DNAs) and bacterial virulence proteins, including VirE2. However, neither the DNA nor the protein molecules have ever been directly visualized after the delivery. In this report, we adopted a split-GFP approach: the small GFP fragment (GFP11) was inserted into VirE2 at a permissive site to create the VirE2-GFP11 fusion, which was expressed in A. tumefaciens; and the large fragment (GFP1–10) was expressed in recipient cells. Upon delivery of VirE2-GFP11 into the recipient cells, GFP fluorescence signals were visualized. VirE2-GFP11 was functional like VirE2; the GFP fusion movement could indicate the trafficking of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2. As the natural host, all plant cells seen under a microscope received the VirE2 protein in a leaf-infiltration assay; most of VirE2 moved at a speed of 1.3–3.1 μm sec−1 in a nearly linear direction, suggesting an active trafficking process. Inside plant cells, VirE2-GFP formed filamentous structures of different lengths, even in the absence of T-DNA. As a non-natural host recipient, 51% of yeast cells received VirE2, which did not move inside yeast. All plant cells seen under a microscope transiently expressed the Agrobacterium-delivered transgene, but only 0.2% yeast cells expressed the transgene. This indicates that Agrobacterium is a more efficient vector for protein delivery than T-DNA transformation for a non-natural host recipient: VirE2 trafficking is a limiting factor for the genetic transformation of a non-natural host recipient. The split-GFP approach could enable the real-time visualization of VirE2 trafficking inside recipient cells. PMID:24299048

  8. Direct visualization of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2 in recipient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyang; Yang, Qinghua; Tu, Haitao; Lim, Zijie; Pan, Shen Q

    2014-02-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a natural genetic engineer widely used to deliver DNA into various recipients, including plant, yeast and fungal cells. The bacterium can transfer single-stranded DNA molecules (T-DNAs) and bacterial virulence proteins, including VirE2. However, neither the DNA nor the protein molecules have ever been directly visualized after the delivery. In this report, we adopted a split-GFP approach: the small GFP fragment (GFP11) was inserted into VirE2 at a permissive site to create the VirE2-GFP11 fusion, which was expressed in A. tumefaciens; and the large fragment (GFP1-10) was expressed in recipient cells. Upon delivery of VirE2-GFP11 into the recipient cells, GFP fluorescence signals were visualized. VirE2-GFP11 was functional like VirE2; the GFP fusion movement could indicate the trafficking of Agrobacterium-delivered VirE2. As the natural host, all plant cells seen under a microscope received the VirE2 protein in a leaf-infiltration assay; most of VirE2 moved at a speed of 1.3-3.1 μm sec⁻¹ in a nearly linear direction, suggesting an active trafficking process. Inside plant cells, VirE2-GFP formed filamentous structures of different lengths, even in the absence of T-DNA. As a non-natural host recipient, 51% of yeast cells received VirE2, which did not move inside yeast. All plant cells seen under a microscope transiently expressed the Agrobacterium-delivered transgene, but only 0.2% yeast cells expressed the transgene. This indicates that Agrobacterium is a more efficient vector for protein delivery than T-DNA transformation for a non-natural host recipient: VirE2 trafficking is a limiting factor for the genetic transformation of a non-natural host recipient. The split-GFP approach could enable the real-time visualization of VirE2 trafficking inside recipient cells. PMID:24299048

  9. The use of cationic nanogels to deliver proteins to myeloma cells and primary T lymphocytes that poorly express heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kozo; Tsuchiya, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Tsubata, Takeshi

    2011-09-01

    Fusion proteins containing protein transduction domain (PTD) are widely used for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins. PTD-mediated delivery requires expression of heparan sulfate on the surface of the target cells. However, some of metastatic tumor cells and primary lymphocytes poorly express heparan sulfate. Here we demonstrate that proteins complexed with nanosize hydrogels formed by cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulans (cCHP) are efficiently delivered to myeloma cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes probably by induction of macropinocytosis, although these cells are resistant to PTD-mediated protein delivery as a consequence of poor heparan sulfate expression. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL delivered by cCHP nanogels efficiently blocked apoptosis of these cells, establishing functional regulation of cells by proteins delivered by cCHP nanogels. Thus, cCHP nanogel is a useful tool to deliver proteins for development of new cancer therapy and immune regulation. PMID:21605901

  10. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schock, Sarah C; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells. PMID:24976400

  11. Cell-Internalization SELEX: Method for Identifying Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers for Delivering siRNAs to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Thiel, Kristina W.; Flenker, Katie S.; Bair, Tom; Dupuy, Adam J.; McNamara, James O.; Miller, Francis J.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2015-01-01

    After a decade of work to address cellular uptake, the principal obstacle to RNAi-based therapeutics, there is now well-deserved, renewed optimism about RNAi-based drugs. Phase I and II studies have shown safe, strong, and durable-gene knockdown (80–90 %, lasting for a month after a single injection) and/or clinical benefit in treating several liver pathologies. Although promising, these studies have also highlighted the need for robust delivery techniques to develop RNAi therapeutics for treating other organ systems and diseases. Conjugation of siRNAs to cell-specific, synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) is being proposed as a viable solution to this problem. While encouraging, the extended use of RNA aptamers as a delivery tool for siRNAs awaits the identification of RNA aptamer sequences capable of targeting and entering the cytoplasm of many different cell types. We describe a cell-based selection process for the rapid identification and characterization of RNA aptamers suited for delivering siRNA drugs into the cytoplasm of target cells. This process, termed “cell-internalization SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment),” entails the combination of multiple sophisticated technologies, including cell culture-based SELEX procedures, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and novel bioinformatics tools. PMID:25319652

  12. Prussian blue nanoparticles as nanocargoes for delivering DNA drugs to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Sheng; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2013-08-01

    We studied the use of Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) as novel nanocarriers for sending DNA drugs into cancer cells. 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) was used to functionalize the surfaces of PBNPs (nanocubes with an average dimension of 75 nm) for subsequent covalent grafting of a 33-mer DNA drug with a FAM reporter at the 3‧ end. The PBNPs synthesis and DNA drug conjugation were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared absorption (FTIR), respectively. The drug was a decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (dODN) that inhibits the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). The DNA-PBNPs drug (dODN@MUA-PBNPs) was delivered into human prostate carcinoma 22rv1 cells by endocytosis in vitro as confirmed by confocal fluorescence microscopy. MTT cell viability assays were carried out to assess the effect of the DNA-PBNPs drug. The results showed that the dODN molecules were successfully conjugated to the MUA modified PBNPs via amide and/or disulfide bond formation and could thus be successfully delivered into the cancer cells. The control experiments showed that the unconjugated dODN molecules were not able to enter the cancer cells no matter whether non-functionalized PBNPs were present or not. It was also found that the DNA-PBNPs drugs were internalized and then distributed homogeneously throughout the cell, including cytoplasmic and nucleic regions, after endocytosis. The cancer cell-killing ability increased with the amount of dODN conjugated on PBNPs and the dosage of DNA-PBNPs drug internalized.

  13. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P < 0.015). Conclusions. The results of this preclinical trial support the screening strategy used to select the HSV-1 ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes, emphasize their valuable immunogenic and protective efficacy against ocular herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  14. Therapeutic assessment of mesenchymal stem cells delivered within a PEGylated fibrin gel following an ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Ricles, Laura M; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Dana, Nicholas; Rybalko, Viktoriya; Kraynak, Chelsea; Farrar, Roger P; Suggs, Laura J

    2016-09-01

    The intent of the current study was to investigate the therapeutic contribution of MSCs to vascular regeneration and functional recovery of ischemic tissue. We used a rodent hind limb ischemia model and intramuscularly delivered MSCs within a PEGylated fibrin gel matrix. Within this model, we demonstrated that MSC therapy, when delivered in PEGylated fibrin, results in significantly higher mature blood vessel formation, which allows for greater functional recovery of skeletal muscle tissue as assessed using force production measurements. We observed initial signs of vascular repair at early time points when MSCs were delivered without PEGylated fibrin, but this did not persist or lead to recovery of the tissue in the long-term. Furthermore, animals which were treated with PEGylated fibrin alone exhibited a greater number of mature blood vessels, but they did not arterialize and did not show improvements in force production. These results demonstrate that revascularization of ischemic tissue may be a necessary but not sufficient step to complete functional repair of the injured tissue. This work has implications on stem cell therapies for ischemic diseases and also potentially on how such therapies are evaluated. PMID:27318932

  15. Recognition of new citrulline-containing peptide epitopes by autoantibodies produced in vivo and in vitro by B cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, Eszter; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Huber, Krisztina; Szittner, Zoltán; Papp, Krisztián; Prechl, József; Pozsgay, Judit; Neer, Zsuzsa; Ádori, Monika; Nagy, György; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Gáti, Tamás; Kelemen, Judit; Baka, Zsuzsanna; Brózik, Márta; Pazár, Borbála; Poór, Gyula; Hudecz, Ferenc; Sármay, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibodies (ACPAs) are highly sensitive and specific markers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Identification of peptide epitopes that may detect different subgroups of RA patients might have diagnostic and prognostic significance. We have investigated citrulline- and arginine-containing peptide pairs derived from filaggrin, collagen or vimentin, and compared this citrulline-peptide panel with the serological assays conventionally used to detect ACPAs. Furthermore, we studied if the same citrulline-peptides identify antibody-secreting cells in in vitro cultures of RA B cells. Recognition of citrulline- and arginine-containing filaggrin, vimentin and collagen peptide epitopes were tested by Multipin ELISA system, by indirect ELISA and by a peptide-specific microarray. B cells were purified from blood by negative selection; antibody-producing cells were enumerated by ELISPOT assay. The panel composed of citrulline-peptide epitopes of filaggrin, collagen and vimentin was recognized by RA sera with a sensitivity and specificity comparable with the currently used tests. Moreover, the combined citrulline-peptide panel including the new short epitope peptide of filaggrin, fil311-315, also identified nearly one-third of RA cases that were negative for antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides, mutated citrullinated vimentin or for rheumatoid factor. The results with the peptide-specific microarray have shown that although most ACPAs recognizing the four citrulline peptides are IgG, some of them specifically recognizing citrulline-containing filaggrin peptides (fil311–315 and fil306–326) are IgM, and so may be produced either by newly formed activated B cells or by unswitched B memory cells. Furthermore, the citrulline-peptides of filaggrin and vimentin detect ACPA-producing cells, and so could also be applied to study the B cells of RA patients. PMID:24116744

  16. Recognition of new citrulline-containing peptide epitopes by autoantibodies produced in vivo and in vitro by B cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Eszter; Babos, Fruzsina; Magyar, Anna; Huber, Krisztina; Szittner, Zoltán; Papp, Krisztián; Prechl, József; Pozsgay, Judit; Neer, Zsuzsa; Ádori, Monika; Nagy, György; Rojkovich, Bernadette; Gáti, Tamás; Kelemen, Judit; Baka, Zsuzsanna; Brózik, Márta; Pazár, Borbála; Poór, Gyula; Hudecz, Ferenc; Sármay, Gabriella

    2014-02-01

    Anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibodies (ACPAs) are highly sensitive and specific markers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Identification of peptide epitopes that may detect different subgroups of RA patients might have diagnostic and prognostic significance. We have investigated citrulline- and arginine-containing peptide pairs derived from filaggrin, collagen or vimentin, and compared this citrulline-peptide panel with the serological assays conventionally used to detect ACPAs. Furthermore, we studied if the same citrulline-peptides identify antibody-secreting cells in in vitro cultures of RA B cells. Recognition of citrulline- and arginine-containing filaggrin, vimentin and collagen peptide epitopes were tested by Multipin ELISA system, by indirect ELISA and by a peptide-specific microarray. B cells were purified from blood by negative selection; antibody-producing cells were enumerated by ELISPOT assay. The panel composed of citrulline-peptide epitopes of filaggrin, collagen and vimentin was recognized by RA sera with a sensitivity and specificity comparable with the currently used tests. Moreover, the combined citrulline-peptide panel including the new short epitope peptide of filaggrin, fil311-315, also identified nearly one-third of RA cases that were negative for antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides, mutated citrullinated vimentin or for rheumatoid factor. The results with the peptide-specific microarray have shown that although most ACPAs recognizing the four citrulline peptides are IgG, some of them specifically recognizing citrulline-containing filaggrin peptides (fil311-315 and fil306-326) are IgM, and so may be produced either by newly formed activated B cells or by unswitched B memory cells. Furthermore, the citrulline-peptides of filaggrin and vimentin detect ACPA-producing cells, and so could also be applied to study the B cells of RA patients. PMID:24116744

  17. IL-12 Delivered Intratumorally by Multilamellar Liposomes Reactivates Memory T Cells in Human Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Purohit, Vivek S.; Pang, Wing Man; Iyer, Vandana; Odunsi, Kunle; Demmy, Todd L; Yokota, Sandra J.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Bankert, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Using a novel loading technique, IL-12 is reported here to be efficiently encapsulated within large multilamellar liposomes. The preclinical efficacy of the cytokine loaded liposomes to deliver IL-12 into human tumors and to reactive tumor-associated T cells in situ is tested using a human tumor xenograft model. IL-12 is released in vivo from these liposomes in a biologically active form when injected into tumor xenografts that are established by the subcutaneous implantation of non-disrupted pieces of human lung, breast or ovarian tumors into immunodeficient mice. The histological architecture of the original tumor tissue, including tumor-associated leukocytes, tumor cells and stromal cells is preserved anatomically and the cells remain functionally responsive to cytokines in these xenografts. The local and sustained release of IL-12 into the tumor microenvironment reactivates tumor-associated quiescent effector memory T cells to proliferate, produce and release IFN-γ resulting in the killing of tumor cells in situ. Very little IL-12 is detected in the serum of mice for up to 5 days after an intratumoral injection of the IL-12 liposomes. We conclude that IL-12 loaded large multilamellar liposomes provide a safe method for the local and sustained delivery of IL-12 to tumors and a therapeutically effective way of reactivating existing tumor-associated T cells in human solid tumor microenvironments. The potential of this local in situ T cell re-stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity is discussed. PMID:19395317

  18. B cell responses to a peptide epitope. VII. Antigen-dependent modulation of the germinal center reaction.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Nayak, B P; Rao, K V

    1998-12-01

    Germinal center responses to two analogous peptides, PS1CT3 and G32CT3, that differ in sequence only at one position within the B cell epitopic region were examined. In comparison with peptide PS1CT3, peptide G32CT3 elicited a poor germinal center response. By demonstrating equal facility of immune complexes with IgM and IgG Ab isotypes to seed germinal centers, we excluded differences in isotype profiles of early primary anti-PS1CT3 and anti-G32CT3 Ig as the probable cause. Quantitative differences in germinal center responses to the two peptides were also not due to either qualitative/quantitative differences in T cell priming or variation in the frequency of the early Ag-activated B cells induced. Rather, they resulted from qualitative differences in the nature of B cells primed. Analysis of early primary anti-PS1CT3 and anti-G32CT3 IgMs revealed that the latter population was of a distinctly lower affinity, implying the existence of an Ag affinity threshold that restricts germinal center recruitment of G32CT3-specific B cells. The impediment in anti-G32CT3 germinal center initiation could be overcome by making available an excess of Ag-activated Th cells at the time of immunization. This resulted in the appearance of a higher affinity population of G32CT3-specific B cells that, presumably, are now capable of seeding germinal centers. These data suggest that the strength of a germinal center reaction generated is Ag dependent. At least one regulatory parameter represents the quality of B cells that are initially primed.

  19. Relationship between Functional Profile of HIV-1 Specific CD8 T Cells and Epitope Variability with the Selection of Escape Mutants in Acute HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Nilu; Liu, Michael K. P.; Turnbull, Emma L.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Hawkins, Natalie; Self, Steve; Watson, Sydeaka; Betts, Michael R.; Gay, Cynthia; McGhee, Kara; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.; Gray, Clive M.; Borrow, Persephone; Roederer, Mario; McMichael, Andrew J.; Weinhold, Kent J.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the functional profile of CD8+ T-cell responses directed against autologous transmitted/founder HIV-1 isolates during acute and early infection, and examined whether multifunctionality is required for selection of virus escape mutations. Seven anti-retroviral therapy-naïve subjects were studied in detail between 1 and 87 weeks following onset of symptoms of acute HIV-1 infection. Synthetic peptides representing the autologous transmitted/founder HIV-1 sequences were used in multiparameter flow cytometry assays to determine the functionality of HIV-1-specific CD8+ T memory cells. In all seven patients, the earliest T cell responses were predominantly oligofunctional, although the relative contribution of multifunctional cell responses increased significantly with time from infection. Interestingly, only the magnitude of the total and not of the poly-functional T-cell responses was significantly associated with the selection of escape mutants. However, the high contribution of MIP-1β-producing CD8+ T-cells to the total response suggests that mechanisms not limited to cytotoxicity could be exerting immune pressure during acute infection. Lastly, we show that epitope entropy, reflecting the capacity of the epitope to tolerate mutational change and defined as the diversity of epitope sequences at the population level, was also correlated with rate of emergence of escape mutants. PMID:21347345

  20. Inclusion of Epitopes That Expand High-Avidity CD4+ T Cells Transforms Subprotective Vaccines to Efficacious Immunogens against Virulent Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lydia M; Crane, Deborah D; Wehrly, Tara D; Fletcher, Joshua R; Jones, Bradley D; Bosio, Catharine M

    2016-10-01

    T cells are the immunological cornerstone in host defense against infections by intracellular bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Francisella tularensis spp. tularensis (Ftt). The general paucity of novel vaccines for Ftt during the past 60 y can, in part, be attributed to the poor understanding of immune parameters required to survive infection. Thus, we developed a strategy utilizing classical immunological tools to elucidate requirements for effective adaptive immune responses directed against Ftt. Following generation of various Francisella strains expressing well-characterized lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitopes, we found that survival correlated with persistence of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells. Function of these cells was confirmed in their ability to more effectively control Ftt replication in vitro. The importance of understanding the Ag-specific response was underscored by our observation that inclusion of an epitope that elicits high-avidity CD4(+) T cells converted a poorly protective vaccine to one that engenders 100% protection. Taken together, these data suggest that improved efficacy of current tularemia vaccine platforms will require targeting appropriate Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell responses and that elucidation of Francisella epitopes that elicit high-avidity CD4(+) T cell responses, specifically in humans, will be required for successful vaccine development. PMID:27543611

  1. Tumor heterogeneity as a rationale for a multi-epitope approach in an autologous renal cell cancer tumor vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wittke, Stefan; Baxmann, Susann; Fahlenkamp, Dirk; Kiessig, Stephan T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An autologous tumor vaccine already used successfully in the immune therapy of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in detail. The evaluation of potential tumor markers should allow for the assessment of potency according to pharmaceutical regulations. Methods A panel of 36 tumor-associated antigens and cellular marker proteins was characterized in a total of 133 tumor cell lysates by methods such as ELISA, Western blots, and topological proteomics. The induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific antibodies was demonstrated by immunization in mice. Results Tumor heterogeneity was demonstrated: none of the tumor-associated antigens investigated were detectable in each tumor lysate. In parallel, the coincidental presence of potential danger signals was shown for HSP-60 and HSP-70. The presence of both antigen and danger signal allowed a successful induction of an immune response in a murine model. Conclusion The verified tumor heterogeneity indicates the need for a multi-epitope approach for the successful immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889089

  2. Recognition of Linear B-Cell Epitope of Betanodavirus Coat Protein by RG-M18 Neutralizing mAB Inhibits Giant Grouper Nervous Necrosis Virus (GGNNV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Cheng, Chao-An; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Betanodavirus is a causative agent of viral nervous necrosis syndrome in many important aquaculture marine fish larvae, resulting in high global mortality. The coat protein of Betanodavirus is the sole structural protein, and it can assemble the virion particle by itself. In this study, we used a high-titer neutralizing mAB, RG-M18, to identify the linear B-cell epitope on the viral coat protein. By mapping a series of recombinant proteins generated using the E. coli PET expression system, we demonstrated that the linear epitope recognized by RG-M18 is located at the C-terminus of the coat protein, between amino acid residues 195 and 338. To define the minimal epitope region, a set of overlapping peptides were synthesized and evaluated for RG-M18 binding. Such analysis identified the 195VNVSVLCR202 motif as the minimal epitope. Comparative analysis of Alanine scanning mutagenesis with dot-blotting and ELISA revealed that Valine197, Valine199, and Cysteine201 are critical for antibody binding. Substitution of Leucine200 in the RGNNV, BFNNV, and TPNNV genotypes with Methionine200 (thereby simulating the SJNNV genotype) did not affect binding affinity, implying that RG-M18 can recognize all genotypes of Betanodaviruses. In competition experiments, synthetic multiple antigen peptides of this epitope dramatically suppressed giant grouper nervous necrosis virus (GGNNV) propagation in grouper brain cells. The data provide new insights into the protective mechanism of this neutralizing mAB, with broader implications for Betanodavirus vaccinology and antiviral peptide drug development. PMID:25938761

  3. 5-Azacytidine delivered by mesoporous silica nanoparticles regulates the differentiation of P19 cells into cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Ding, Qian; Wang, Jia; Deng, Lin; Yang, Lu; Tao, Lei; Lei, Haihong; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the deadliest diseases causing mortality due to the limited regenerative capability of highly differentiated cardiomyocytes. Stem cell-based therapy in tissue engineering is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas and raises promising prospects for cardiac repair. In this study, we have synthesized FITC-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) based on a sol-gel method (known as Stöber's method) as a drug delivery platform to transport 5-azacytidine in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells. The surfactant CTAB is utilized as a liquid crystal template to self-aggregate into micelles, resulting in the synthesis of MSNs. Based on the cell viability assay, treatment with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine resulted in much more significant inhibition of the proliferation than 5-azacytidine alone. To study the mechanism, we have tested the differentiation genes and cardiac marker genes in P19 cells and found that these genes have been up-regulated in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells treated with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine + poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), with the changes of histone modifications on the regulatory region. In conclusion, with FMSNs as drug delivery platforms, 5-azacytidine can be more efficiently delivered into stem cells and can be used to monitor and track the transfection process in situ to clarify their effects on stem cell functions and the differentiation process, which can serve as a promising tool in tissue engineering and other biomedical fields.

  4. Epitope detection chromatography: a method to dissect the structural heterogeneity and inter-connections of plant cell-wall matrix glycans.

    PubMed

    Cornuault, Valérie; Manfield, Iain W; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Knox, J Paul

    2014-05-01

    Plant cell walls are complex, multi-macromolecular assemblies of glycans and other molecules and their compositions and molecular architectures vary extensively. Even though the chemistry of cell-wall glycans is now well understood, it remains a challenge to understand the diversity of glycan configurations and interactions in muro, and how these relate to changes in the biological and mechanical properties of cell walls. Here we describe in detail a method called epitope detection chromatography analysis of cell-wall matrix glycan sub-populations and inter-connections. The method combines chromatographic separations with use of glycan-directed monoclonal antibodies as detection tools. The high discrimination capacity and high sensitivity for the detection of glycan structural features (epitopes) provided by use of established monoclonal antibodies allows the study of oligosaccharide motifs on sets of cell-wall glycans in small amounts of plant materials such as a single organ of Arabidopsis thaliana without the need for extensive purification procedures. We describe the use of epitope detection chromatography to assess the heterogeneity of xyloglucan and pectic rhamnogalacturonan I sub-populations and their modulation in A. thaliana organs.

  5. Vaccination for 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A did not induce conserved epitope-specific memory CD8 T cell responses in HIV+ northern Thai children.

    PubMed

    Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Aurpibul, Linda; Wipasa, Jiraprapa

    2015-09-11

    The influenza virus causes severe illness in susceptible populations, including children and people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here, we investigated cell-mediated immune responses (CMI) against influenza CD8 T cell conserved epitopes in HIV-infected (HIV+) northern Thai children following the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A vaccination. Sixty HIV+ children were vaccinated with two doses of the 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine and their CD8T cell responses were assessed. We found no significant differences in the increase of cytokines-producing and CD107a-expressing CD8+ T cells or CD8+ memory T cells in response to pooled conserved epitopes stimulation in vitro between children with different serologic responses to the vaccine at all time points of the study. Our results suggest that the 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine did not induce the conserved epitope-specific immune responses in HIV+ children. Vaccine design and vaccination strategy against influenza in these populations warrant further studies.

  6. Prevention of allergy by a recombinant multi-allergen vaccine with reduced IgE binding and preserved T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Karamloo, Fariba; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Kussebi, Fatimah; Akdis, Mübeccel; Salagianni, Maria; von Beust, Barbara R; Reimers, Andrea; Zumkehr, Judith; Soldatova, Lyudmilla; Housley-Markovic, Zora; Müller, Ulrich; Kündig, Thomas; Kemeny, David M; Spangfort, Michael D; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2005-11-01

    Novel approaches for the prevention of allergy are required, because of the inevitably increasing prevalence of allergic diseases during the last 30 years. Here, a recombinant chimeric protein, which comprises the whole amino acid sequences of three bee venom major allergens has been engineered and used in prevention of bee venom sensitization in mice. Phospholipase A2 (Api m 1), hyaluronidase (Api m 2) and melittin (Api m 3) fragments with overlapping amino acids were assembled in a different order in the Api m (1/2/3) chimeric protein, which preserved entire T cell epitopes, whereas B cell epitopes of all three allergens were abrogated. Accordingly, IgE cross-linking leading to mast cell and basophil mediator release was profoundly reduced in humans. Supporting these findings, the Api m (1/2/3) induced 100 to 1000 times less type-1 skin test reactivity in allergic patients. Treatment of mice with Api m (1/2/3) led to a significant reduction of specific IgE development towards native allergen, representing a protective vaccine effect in vivo. These results demonstrate a novel prototype of a preventive allergy vaccine, which preserves the entire T cell epitope repertoire, but bypasses induction of IgE against native allergen, and side effects related to mast cell/basophil IgE FcepsilonRI cross-linking in sensitized individuals. PMID:16206231

  7. Ovine and murine T cell epitopes from the non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) are shared among viral serotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a non-enveloped dsRNA virus that causes a haemorrhagic disease mainly in sheep. It is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family. In order to estimate the importance of T cell responses during BTV infection, it is essential to identify the epitopes targeted by the immune system. In the present work, we selected potential T cell epitopes (3 MHC-class II-binding and 8 MHC-class I binding peptides) for the C57BL/6 mouse strain from the BTV-8 non-structural protein NS1, using H2b-binding predictive algorithms. Peptide binding assays confirmed all MHC-class I predicted peptides bound MHC-class I molecules. The immunogenicity of these 11 predicted peptides was then determined using splenocytes from BTV-8-inoculated C57BL/6 mice. Four MHC-class I binding peptides elicited specific IFN-γ production and generated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in BTV-8 infected mice. CTL specific for 2 of these peptides were also able to recognise target cells infected with different BTV serotypes. Similarly, using a combination of IFN-γ ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining and proliferation assays, two MHC-class II peptides were identified as CD4+ T cell epitopes in BTV-8 infected mice. Importantly, two peptides were also consistently immunogenic in sheep infected with BTV-8 using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. Both of these peptides stimulated CD4+ T cells that cross-reacted with other BTV serotypes. The characterisation of these T cell epitopes can help develop vaccines protecting against a broad spectrum of BTV serotypes and differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. PMID:24621015

  8. Differential presentation of tumor antigen-derived epitopes by MHC-class I and antigen-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Neumann, Frank; Sturm, Christine; Kaestner, Lars; Dauth, Nina; de Bruijn, Diederik R; Renner, Christoph; Lipp, Peter; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-10-15

    SSX2 is a member of the family of cancer/testis antigens. The SSX2 derived peptide SSX2(103-111) has been shown to be presented to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by Major-Histocompatibility (MHC) Class-I complexes after endogenous processing, more precisely by the allele HLA-A*0201. The HLA-A*0201- and SSX2-positive melanoma cell line SK-Mel-37 but not Me275 had been shown to elicit reactivity in SSX2(103-111) specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. To analyze the correlation between SSX2(103-111) presentation and T-cell stimulation, we intended to visualize presentation of SSX2(103-111) in these melanoma cell lines. Fab-antibodies were established from a human phage library with specificity for SSX2(103-111)/HLA-A*0201 complexes (but non-reactive with HLA-A*0201 or SSX2(103-111) alone) and used to visualize the presentation of SSX2(103-111) in the context of HLA-A*0201 by fluorescence microscopy. Presentation of SSX2(103-111) the context of HLA-A*0201 was demonstrated for the majority of SK-Mel-37, but for only a small fraction (<1%) of Me275 as indicated by a clear membrane-staining pattern in fluorescence microscopy. The presentation of SSX2(103-111) on SK-Mel37 and Me275, but not the expression of the SSX2 protein correlated with the capability of these cells to stimulate cells of an SSX2(103-111)-specific T-cell clone. MHC-peptide specific antibodies are a valuable tool for the analysis of antigenic peptides in the context of MHC-I molecules and for the structural definition of immunodominant epitopes. PMID:18688854

  9. Tweaking Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cell Immunomodulatory Properties with Viral Vectors Delivering Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Paola; Focosi, Daniele; Freer, Giulia; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-09-15

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) can be found in various body sites. Their main role is to differentiate into cartilage, bone, muscle, and fat cells to allow tissue maintenance and repair. During inflammation, MSCs exhibit important immunomodulatory properties that are not constitutive, but require activation, upon which they may exert immunosuppressive functions. MSCs are defined as "sensors of inflammation" since they modulate their ability of interfering with the immune system both in vitro and in vivo upon interaction with different factors. MSCs may influence immune responses through different mechanisms, such as direct cell-to-cell contact, release of soluble factors, and through the induction of anergy and apoptosis. Human MSCs are defined as plastic-adherent cells expressing specific surface molecules. Lack of MHC class II antigens makes them appealing as allogeneic tools for the therapy of both autoimmune diseases and cancer. MSC therapeutic potential could be highly enhanced by the expression of exogenous cytokines provided by transduction with viral vectors. In this review, we attempt to summarize the results of a great number of in vitro and in vivo studies aimed at improving the ability of MSCs as immunomodulators in the therapy of autoimmune, degenerative diseases and cancer. We will also compare results obtained with different vectors to deliver heterologous genes to these cells.

  10. Tweaking Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cell Immunomodulatory Properties with Viral Vectors Delivering Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Paola; Focosi, Daniele; Freer, Giulia; Pistello, Mauro

    2016-09-15

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) can be found in various body sites. Their main role is to differentiate into cartilage, bone, muscle, and fat cells to allow tissue maintenance and repair. During inflammation, MSCs exhibit important immunomodulatory properties that are not constitutive, but require activation, upon which they may exert immunosuppressive functions. MSCs are defined as "sensors of inflammation" since they modulate their ability of interfering with the immune system both in vitro and in vivo upon interaction with different factors. MSCs may influence immune responses through different mechanisms, such as direct cell-to-cell contact, release of soluble factors, and through the induction of anergy and apoptosis. Human MSCs are defined as plastic-adherent cells expressing specific surface molecules. Lack of MHC class II antigens makes them appealing as allogeneic tools for the therapy of both autoimmune diseases and cancer. MSC therapeutic potential could be highly enhanced by the expression of exogenous cytokines provided by transduction with viral vectors. In this review, we attempt to summarize the results of a great number of in vitro and in vivo studies aimed at improving the ability of MSCs as immunomodulators in the therapy of autoimmune, degenerative diseases and cancer. We will also compare results obtained with different vectors to deliver heterologous genes to these cells. PMID:27476883

  11. Delivering minocycline into brain endothelial cells with liposome-based technology

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Changhong; Levchenko, Tatyana; Guo, Shuzhen; Stins, Monique; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Lo, Eng H

    2012-01-01

    Minocycline has been proposed as a way to blunt neurovascular injury from matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) during stroke. However, recent clinical trials suggest that high levels of minocycline may have deleterious side-effects. Here, we showed that very high minocycline concentrations damage endothelial cells via calpain/caspase pathways. To alleviate this potential cytotoxicity, we encapsulated minocycline in liposomes. Low concentrations of minocycline could not reduce tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced MMP-9 release from endothelial cells. But low concentrations of minocycline-loaded liposomes significantly reduced TNFα-induced MMP-9 release. This study provides proof-of-concept that liposomes may be used to deliver lower levels of minocycline for targeting MMPs in cerebral endothelium. PMID:22491155

  12. A study of high cell density cultivation process of recombinant Helicobacter pylori multi-epitope vaccine engineering bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Pan, Xing; Wang, Hongren; Gao, Lizhen; Zhu, Jie; Zhou, Yongjun; Li, Wanyi; Li, Mingyuan; Wang, Baoning

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish high cell density cultivation process of recombinant Helicobacter pylori multi-epitope vaccine engineering bacteria BIB. Methods: Based on the results of shake flask fermentation, the process was magnified into volume of a 50 L fermenter to optimize and verify the factors affecting the yield of the target protein, such as the fermentation medium, working seed inoculation amount, inducer concentration, induction starting time, induction duration, inducer adding mode and feeding strategy. Results: After activated in modified TB medium at 37°C for 8 h, the BIB working seed was inoculated at 5% (v/v) and was induced for expression for another 11 h by the final concentration of 5 mmol/L lactose. In growth phase, glucose at rate of 80 ml/h was used as carbon source, and in induction phase, glycerol at rate of 40 ml/h was used as carbon source; ammonia water was added dropwise to control pH at about 7.0, and revolution speed is adjusted to control the dissolved oxygen at above 30%; ultimately the output of bacterial body was 70 g/L and protein expression amount was about 32%. Conclusion: After high cell density cultivation of the recombinant engineering bacteria, expression and yield of the target protein rBIB significantly increased. PMID:25784986

  13. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  14. Neo-epitopes are required for immunogenicity of the La/SS-B nuclear antigen in the context of late apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Z-J; Davis, K; Maier, S; Bachmann, M P; Kim-Howard, X R; Keech, C; Gordon, T P; McCluskey, J; Farris, A D

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for the induction of anti-nuclear autoantibodies (ANA) following exposure of the immune system to an excess of apoptotic cells are incompletely understood. In this study, the immunogenicity of late apoptotic cells expressing heterologous or syngeneic forms of La/SS-B was investigated following subcutaneous administration to A/J mice, a non-autoimmune strain in which the La antigenic system is well understood. Immunization of A/J mice with late apoptotic thymocytes taken from mice transgenic (Tg) for the human La (hLa) nuclear antigen resulted in the production of IgG ANA specific for human and mouse forms of La in the absence of foreign adjuvants. Preparations of phenotypically healthy cells expressing heterologous hLa were also immunogenic. However, hLa Tg late apoptotic cells accelerated and enhanced the apparent heterologous healthy cell-induced anti-La humoral response, while non-Tg late apoptotic cells did not. Subcutaneous administration of late apoptotic cells was insufficient to break existing tolerance to the hLa antigen in hLa Tg mice or to the endogenous mouse La (mLa) antigen in A/J mice immunized with syngeneic thymocytes, indicating a requirement for the presence of heterologous epitopes for anti-La ANA production. Lymph node dendritic cells (DC) but not B cells isolated from non-Tg mice injected with hLa Tg late apoptotic cells presented immunodominant T helper cell epitopes of hLa. These studies support a model in which the generation of neo-T cell epitopes is required for loss of tolerance to nuclear proteins after exposure of the healthy immune system to an excess of cells in late stages of apoptosis. PMID:16412047

  15. Predicting promiscuous antigenic T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mymA operon proteins binding to MHC Class I and Class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Saraav, Iti; Pandey, Kirti; Sharma, Monika; Singh, Swati; Dutta, Prasun; Bhardwaj, Anshu; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-10-01

    Limited efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine has raised the need to explore other immunogenic candidates to develop an effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play a critical role in host immunity to Mtb. Infection of macrophages with Mtb results in upregulation of mymA operon genes thereby suggesting their importance as immune targets. In the present study, after exclusion of self-peptides mymA operon proteins of Mtb were analyzed in silico for the presence of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I and Class II binding peptides using Bioinformatics and molecular analysis section, NetMHC 3.4, ProPred and Immune epitope database software. Out of 56 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 41 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic for MHC Class I. In MHC Class II, out of 336 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 142 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic. The comparative bioinformatics analysis of mymA operon proteins found Rv3083 to be the best vaccine candidate. Molecular docking was performed with the most antigenic peptides of Rv3083 (LASGAASVV with alleles HLA-B51:01, HAATSGTLI with HLA-A02, IVTATGLNI and EKIHYGLKVNTA with HLA-DRB1_01:01) to study the structural basis for recognition of peptides by various HLA molecules. The software binding prediction was validated by the obtained molecular docking score of peptide-HLA complex. These peptides can be further investigated for their immunological relevance in patients of tuberculosis using major histocompatibility complex tetramer approach. PMID:27389362

  16. Antibodies to both terminal and internal B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide produced by patients with tularemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaohua; Perkins, Hillary M; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, is considered a potential bioterrorism threat due to its low infectivity dose and the high morbidity and mortality from respiratory disease. We previously characterized two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the O-polysaccharide (O antigen [OAg]) of F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS): Ab63, which targets a terminal epitope at the nonreducing end of OAg, and Ab52, which targets a repeating internal OAg epitope. These two MAbs were protective in a mouse model of respiratory tularemia. To determine whether these epitope types are also targeted by humans, we tested the ability of each of 18 blood serum samples from 11 tularemia patients to inhibit the binding of Ab63 or Ab52 to F. tularensis LPS in a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Although all serum samples had Ab63- and Ab52-inhibitory activities, the ratios of Ab63 to Ab52 inhibitory potencies varied 75-fold. However, the variation was only 2.3-fold for sequential serum samples from the same patient, indicating different distributions of terminal- versus internal-binding antibodies in different individuals. Western blot analysis using class-specific anti-human Ig secondary antibodies showed that both terminal- and internal-binding OAg antibodies were of the IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes. These results support the use of a mouse model to discover protective B-cell epitopes for tularemia vaccines or prophylactic/therapeutic antibodies, and they present a general strategy for interrogating the antibody responses of patients and vaccinees to microbial carbohydrate epitopes that have been characterized in experimental animals.

  17. Characterization of T cell responses to cryptic epitopes in recipients of a noncodon-optimized HIV-1 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bet, Anne; Sterret, Sarah; Sato, Alicia; Bansal, Anju; Goepfert, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cryptic epitopes (CE) can be encoded by any of the 5 alternate reading frames (ARF, 2 sense and 3 antisense) of a known gene. While CE responses are commonly detected during HIV-1 infection, it is not known whether these responses are induced following vaccination. Methods Using a bioinformatic approach, we determined that vaccines with codon-optimized HIV inserts significantly skewed CE sequences and are not likely to induce cross-reactive responses to natural HIV CE. We then evaluated the CE- and protein-specific T-cell responses using Gag, Pol and ARF peptide pools among participants immunized with a noncodon-optimized vaccine regimen of two pGA2/JS7 DNA primes followed by two MVA/HIV62 Gag-Pol-Env vector boosts or four saline injections. Results Vaccinees had significantly more IFN-γ ELISpot responses toward Gag (p= 0.003) but not Pol protein than placebo recipients. However, CE-specific T-cell responses were low in magnitude and their frequencies did not differ significantly between vaccine and placebo recipients. Additionally, most positive CE responses could not be mapped to individual peptides. After expanding responses in a cultured assay, however, the frequency and median magnitude of responses to ARF peptides was significantly greater in vaccinees (p<0.0001), indicating CE-specific T cell responses are present but below an ex vivo assay’s limit of detection. Conclusions Our data demonstrates that HIV-1 vaccines currently in clinical trials are poorly immunogenic with regards to CE-specific T cell responses. Therefore, the context of HIV-1 immunogens may need to be modified as a comprehensive strategy to broaden vaccine-induced T cell responses. PMID:24442221

  18. Expression dynamics and ultrastructural localization of epitope-tagged Abutilon mosaic virus nuclear shuttle and movement proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinow, Tatjana; Tanwir, Fariha; Kocher, Cornelia; Krenz, Bjoern; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger

    2009-09-01

    The geminivirus Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) encodes two proteins which are essential for viral spread within plants. The nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) transfers viral DNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas the movement protein (MP) facilitates transport between cells through plasmodesmata and long-distance via phloem. An inducible overexpression system for epitope-tagged NSP and MP in plants yielded unprecedented amounts of both proteins. Western blots revealed extensive posttranslational modification and truncation for MP, but not for NSP. Ultrastructural examination of Nicotiana benthamiana tissues showed characteristic nucleopathic alterations, including fibrillar rings, when epitope-tagged NSP and MP were simultaneously expressed in leaves locally infected with an AbMV DNA A in which the coat protein gene was replaced by a green fluorescent protein encoding gene. Immunogold labelling localized NSP in the nucleoplasm and in the fibrillar rings. MP appeared at the cell periphery, probably the plasma membrane, and plasmodesmata.

  19. Identification of surface-exposed B-cell epitopes recognized by Haemophilus influenzae type b P1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Panezutti, H; James, O; Hansen, E J; Choi, Y; Harkness, R E; Klein, M H; Chong, P

    1993-05-01

    A panel of P1 synthetic peptides was synthesized to map the surface-exposed epitopes of Haemophilus influenzae type b outer membrane protein P1 recognized by three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs 7C8, 3E12, and 6B1). By using peptide-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, MAbs 6B1, 7C8, and 3E12 were shown to recognize distinct epitopes localized within residues 60 to 88, 165 to 193, and 400 to 437 of mature P1, respectively. Since MAb 7C8 was shown previously to be protective against certain H. influenzae type b subtypes in the infant rat model of bacteremia, its cognate epitope was further characterized by using truncated peptide analogs. Fine mapping of the 7C8 epitope by competitive inhibition studies revealed that it was localized within residues 184 and 193.

  20. Function and Potentials of M. tuberculosis Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Study of the function of epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens contributed significantly toward better understanding of the immunopathogenesis and to efforts for improving infection and disease control. Characterization of genetically permissively presented immunodominant epitopes has implications for the evolution of the host–parasite relationship, development of immunodiagnostic tests, and subunit prophylactic vaccines. Knowledge of the determinants of cross-sensitization, relevant to other pathogenic or environmental mycobacteria and to host constituents has advanced. Epitope-defined IFNγ assay kits became established for the specific detection of infection with tubercle bacilli both in humans and cattle. The CD4 T-cell epitope repertoire was found to be more narrow in patients with active disease than in latently infected subjects. However, differential diagnosis of active TB could not be made reliably merely on the basis of epitope recognition. The mechanisms by which HLA polymorphism can influence the development of multibacillary tuberculosis (TB) need further analysis of epitopes, recognized by Th2 helper cells for B-cell responses. Future vaccine development would benefit from better definition of protective epitopes and from improved construction and formulation of subunits with enhanced immunogenicity. Epitope-defined serology, due to its operational advantages is suitable for active case finding in selected high disease incidence populations, aiming for an early detection of infectious cases and hence for reducing the transmission of infection. The existing knowledge of HLA class I binding epitopes could be the basis for the construction of T-cell receptor-like ligands for immunotherapeutic application. Continued analysis of the functions of mycobacterial epitopes, recognized by T cells and antibodies, remains a fertile avenue in TB research. PMID:24715888

  1. B cell epitopes within VP1 of type O foot-and-mouth disease virus for detection of viral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan-dian; Du, Jun-zheng; Chang, Hui-yun; Cong, Guo-zheng; Shao, Jun-Jun; Lin, Tong; Song, Shuai; Xie, Qing-ge

    2010-02-01

    In this study, the coding region of type O FMDV capsid protein VP1 and a series of codon optimized DNA sequences coding for VP1 amino acid residues 141-160 (epitope1), tandem repeat 200-213 (epitope2 (+2)) and the combination of two epitopes (epitope1-2) was genetically cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pP(RO)ExHTb and pGEX4T-1, respectively. VP1 and the fused epitopes GST-E1, GST-E2 (+2) and GST-E1-2 were successfully solubly expressed in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and Western blot analysis demonstrated they retained antigenicity. Indirect VP1-ELISA and epitope ELISAs were subsequently developed to screen a panel of 80 field pig sera using LPB-ELISA as a standard test. For VP1-ELISA and all the epitope ELISAs, there were clear distinctions between the FMDV-positive and the FMDV-negative samples. Cross-reactions with pig sera positive to the viruses of swine vesicular disease virus that produce clinically indistinguishable syndromes in pigs or guinea pig antisera to FMDV strains of type A, C and Asia1 did not occur. The relative sensitivity and specificity for the GST-E1 ELISA, GST-E2 (+2), GST-E1-2 ELISA and VP1-ELISA in comparison with LPB-ELISA were 93.3% and 85.0%, 95.0% and 90%, 100% and 81.8%, 96.6% and 80.9% respectively. This study shows the potential use of the aforementioned epitopes as alternatives to the complex antigens used in current detection for antibody to FMDV structural proteins. PMID:20960280

  2. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  3. Pectic-β(1,4)-galactan, extensin and arabinogalactan–protein epitopes differentiate ripening stages in wine and table grape cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Moore, John P.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Willats, William G. T.; Vivier, Melané A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Cell wall changes in ripening grapes (Vitis vinifera) have been shown to involve re-modelling of pectin, xyloglucan and cellulose networks. Newer experimental techniques, such as molecular probes specific for cell wall epitopes, have yet to be extensively used in grape studies. Limited general information is available on the cell wall properties that contribute to texture differences between wine and table grapes. This study evaluates whether profiling tools can detect cell wall changes in ripening grapes from commercial vineyards. Methods Standard sugar analysis and infra-red spectroscopy were used to examine the ripening stages (green, véraison and ripe) in grapes collected from Cabernet Sauvignon and Crimson Seedless vineyards. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling (CoMPP) analysis was performed on cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid (CDTA) and NaOH extracts of alcohol-insoluble residue sourced from each stage using sets of cell wall probes (mAbs and CBMs), and the datasets were analysed using multivariate software. Key Results The datasets obtained confirmed previous studies on cell wall changes known to occur during grape ripening. Probes for homogalacturonan (e.g. LM19) were enriched in the CDTA fractions of Crimson Seedless relative to Cabernet Sauvignon grapes. Probes for pectic-β-(1,4)-galactan (mAb LM5), extensin (mAb LM1) and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs, mAb LM2) were strongly correlated with ripening. From green stage to véraison, a progressive reduction in pectic-β-(1,4)-galactan epitopes, present in both pectin-rich (CDTA) and hemicellulose-rich (NaOH) polymers, was observed. Ripening changes in AGP and extensin epitope abundance also were found during and after véraison. Conclusions Combinations of cell wall probes are able to define distinct ripening phases in grapes. Pectic-β-(1,4)-galactan epitopes decreased in abundance from green stage to véraison berries. From véraison there was an increase in abundance of

  4. Epitope-specific T cell tolerance to phospholipase A2 in bee venom immunotherapy and recovery by IL-2 and IL-15 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Blesken, T; Wymann, D; Alkan, S S; Müller, U; Blaser, K

    1996-01-01

    Bee venom phospholipase A2 (PLA) is the major allergen in bee sting allergy. It displays three peptide and a glycopeptide T cell epitopes, which are recognized by both allergic and non-allergic bee venom sensitized subjects. In this study PLA- and PLA epitope-specific T cell and cytokine responses in PBMC of bee sting allergic patients were investigated before and after 2 mo of rush immunotherapy with whole bee venom. After successful immunotherapy, PLA and T cell epitope peptide-specific T cell proliferation was suppressed. In addition the PLA- and peptide-induced secretion of type 2 (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13), as well as type 1 (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) cytokines were abolished, whereas tetanus toxoid-induced cytokine production and proliferation remained unchanged. By culturing PBMC with Ag in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15 the specifically tolerized T cell response could be restored with respect to specific proliferation and secretion of the type 1 T cell cytokines, IL-2 and IFN-gamma. In contrast, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 remained suppressed. Treatment of tolerized T cells with IL-4 only partially restored proliferation and induced formation of distinct type 2 cytokine pattern. In spite of the allergen-specific tolerance in T cells, in vitro produced anti-PLA IgE and IgG4 Ab and their corresponding serum levels slightly increased during immunotherapy, while the PLA-specific IgE/IgG4 ratio changed in favor of IgG4. These findings indicate that bee venom immunotherapy induces a state of peripheral tolerance in allergen-specific T cells, but not in specific B cells. The state of T cell tolerance and cytokine pattern can be in vitro modulated by the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, and IL-15, suggesting the importance of microenvironmental cytokines leading to success or failure in immunotherapy. PMID:8833918

  5. Biocompatible Mesoporous Nanotubular Structured Surface to Control Cell Behaviors and Deliver Bioactive Molecules.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kapil D; Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Jin, Guang-Zhen; Singh, Rajendra K; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-12-01

    Biocompatible nanostructured surfaces control the cell behaviors and tissue integration process of medical devices and implants. Here we develop a novel biocompatible nanostructured surface based on mesoporous silica nanotube (MSNT) by means of an electrodeposition. MSNTs, replicated from carbon nanotubes of 25 nm × 1200 nm size, were interfaced in combination with fugitive biopolymers (chitosan or collagen) onto a Ti metallic substrate. The MSNT-biopolymer deposits uniformly covered the substrate with weight gains controllable by the electrodeposition conditions. Random nanotubular networks were generated successfully, which alongside the high mesoporosity provided unique nanotopological properties for the cell responses and the loading/delivery of biomolecules. Of note, the adhesion and spreading behaviors of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were significantly altered, revealing more rapid cell anchorage and extensive nanofilopodia development along the nanotubular networks. Furthermore, the nanotubular surface improved the loading capacity of biomolecules (dexamethasone and bovine serum albumin) up to 5-7 times. The release of the biomolecules was highly sustained, exhibiting a diffusion-controlled pattern over 15 days. The therapeutic efficacy of the delivered biomolecules was also confirmed in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. While in vivo performance and applicability studies are needed further, the current biocompatible nanostructured surface may be considered as a novel biointerfacing platform to control cellular behaviors and biomolecular delivery.

  6. A Panel of Artificial APCs Expressing Prevalent HLA Alleles Permits Generation of Cytotoxic T Cells Specific for Both Dominant and Subdominant Viral Epitopes for Adoptive Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Aisha N.; Kollen, Wouter J.; Trivedi, Deepa; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Dupont, Bo; Sadelain, Michel; O'Reilly, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells can treat infections complicating allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants. However, autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are often limited in supply. Here, we describe a panel of artificial APCs (AAPCs) consisting of murine 3T3 cells transduced to express human B7.1, ICAM-1 and LFA-3 that each stably express one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. In comparative analyses, T cells sensitized with AAPCs expressing a shared HLA allele or autologous APCs loaded with a pool of 15-mers spanning the sequence of CMVpp65 produced similar yields of HLA-restricted CMVpp65 specific T cells; significantly higher yields could be achieved by sensitization with AAPCs transduced to express the CMVpp65 protein. T cells generated were CD8+, IFNγ+ and exhibited HLA-restricted CMVpp65 specific cytotoxicity. T cells sensitized with either peptide-loaded or transduced AAPCs recognized epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFNγ+ cytotoxic effector cells against subdominant epitopes that were either absent or in low frequencies in T cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This replenishable panel of AAPCs can be used for immediate sensitization and expansion of virus-specific T cells of desired HLA restriction for adoptive immunotherapy. It may be of particular value for recipients of transplants from HLA disparate donors. PMID:19635907

  7. Recognition of the immunodominant myelin basic protein peptide by autoantibodies and HLA-DR2-restricted T cell clones from multiple sclerosis patients. Identity of key contact residues in the B-cell and T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Wucherpfennig, K W; Catz, I; Hausmann, S; Strominger, J L; Steinman, L; Warren, K G

    1997-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) may be an important autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS), with the MBP(82-100) region being immunodominant for T cells and autoantibodies. The structural requirements for autoantibody recognition were compared to those previously defined for MBP-specific T cell clones. MBP autoantibodies were affinity-purified from central nervous system lesions of 11/12 postmortem cases studied. The MBP(83-97) peptide was immunodominant in all 11 cases since it inhibited autoantibody binding to MBP > 95%. Residues contributing to autoantibody binding were located in a 10-amino acid segment (V86-T95) that also contained the MHC/T cell receptor contact residues of the T cell epitope. In the epitope center, the same residues were important for antibody binding and T cell recognition. Based on the antibody-binding motif, microbial peptides were identified that were bound by purified autoantibodies. Autoantibody binding of microbial peptides required sequence identity at four or five contiguous residues in the epitope center. Microbial peptides previously found to activate T cell clones did not have such obvious homology to MBP since sequence identity was not required at MHC contacts. The similar fine specificity of B cells and T cells may be useful for tolerance induction to MBP in MS. PMID:9276728

  8. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2008-04-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  9. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  10. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  11. Complementary immunolocalization patterns of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins studied with the use of antibodies directed against different carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Swords, K M; Staehelin, L A

    1993-07-01

    Antisera raised against the major hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) in carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproot, extensin-1, and a minor HRGP, extensin-2, were characterized by western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and periodate oxidation and found to be directed against carbohydrate epitopes shared by both glycoproteins. The anti-extensin-1 antibodies (gE1) target periodate-sensitive epitopes and may recognize the terminal alpha-1,3-arabinoside of extensin-1. The anti-extensin-2 antibodies (gE2) recognize periodate-insensitive epitopes, possibly binding the reducing, internal beta-1,2-arabinosides on the carbohydrate side chains. Despite the cross-reactivity of these antibodies, immunolocalization studies of carrot taproot and green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf tissues reveal a spatial segregation of gE1- and gE2-labeling patterns. The gE1 antibodies bind only to the cellulose-rich region of the cell wall (J.P. Staehelin and L.A. Stafstrom [1988] Planta 174: 321-332), whereas gE2 labeling is restricted to the expanded middle lamella at three cell junctions. Periodate oxidation of nonosmicated, thin-sectioned tissue abolishes gE1 labeling but leads to labeling of the entire cell wall by gE2, presumably as a result of unmasking cryptic epitopes on extensin-1 in the cellulose layer. Purified extensin-2 protein is more efficient than extensin-1 protein at agglutinating avirulent Pseudomonas strains lacking extracellular polysaccharide. Our results indicate that extensin-2 does not form a heterologous HRGP network with extensin-1 and that, in contrast to extensin-1, which appears to serve a structural role, extensin-2 could participate in passive defense responses against phytopathogenic bacteria.

  12. Complementary immunolocalization patterns of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins studied with the use of antibodies directed against different carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Swords, K M; Staehelin, L A

    1993-01-01

    Antisera raised against the major hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) in carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproot, extensin-1, and a minor HRGP, extensin-2, were characterized by western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and periodate oxidation and found to be directed against carbohydrate epitopes shared by both glycoproteins. The anti-extensin-1 antibodies (gE1) target periodate-sensitive epitopes and may recognize the terminal alpha-1,3-arabinoside of extensin-1. The anti-extensin-2 antibodies (gE2) recognize periodate-insensitive epitopes, possibly binding the reducing, internal beta-1,2-arabinosides on the carbohydrate side chains. Despite the cross-reactivity of these antibodies, immunolocalization studies of carrot taproot and green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf tissues reveal a spatial segregation of gE1- and gE2-labeling patterns. The gE1 antibodies bind only to the cellulose-rich region of the cell wall (J.P. Staehelin and L.A. Stafstrom [1988] Planta 174: 321-332), whereas gE2 labeling is restricted to the expanded middle lamella at three cell junctions. Periodate oxidation of nonosmicated, thin-sectioned tissue abolishes gE1 labeling but leads to labeling of the entire cell wall by gE2, presumably as a result of unmasking cryptic epitopes on extensin-1 in the cellulose layer. Purified extensin-2 protein is more efficient than extensin-1 protein at agglutinating avirulent Pseudomonas strains lacking extracellular polysaccharide. Our results indicate that extensin-2 does not form a heterologous HRGP network with extensin-1 and that, in contrast to extensin-1, which appears to serve a structural role, extensin-2 could participate in passive defense responses against phytopathogenic bacteria. PMID:7506427

  13. Structural analysis of two HLA-DR-presented autoantigenic epitopes: crucial role of peripheral but not central peptide residues for T-cell receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, D B; Harfouch-Hammoud, E; Otto, H; Papandreou, N A; Stern, L J; Cohen, H; Boehm, B O; Bach, J; Caillat-Zucman, S; Walk, T; Jung, G; Eliopoulos, E; Papadopoulos, G K; van Endert, P M

    2000-10-01

    Specific and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted T-cell recognition of antigenic peptides is based on interactions of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with the MHC alpha helices and solvent exposed peptide residues termed TCR contacts. In the case of MHC class II-presented peptides, the latter are located in the positions p2/3, p5 and p7/8 between MHC anchor residues. For numerous epitopes, peptide substitution studies have identified the central residue p5 as primary TCR contact characterized by very low permissiveness for peptide substitution, while the more peripheral positions generally represent auxiliary TCR contacts. In structural studies of TCR/peptide/MHC complexes, this has been shown to be due to intimate contact between the TCR complementarity determining region (CDR) three loops and the central peptide residue. We asked whether this model also applied to two HLA-DR presented epitopes derived from an antigen targeted in type 1 diabetes. Large panels of epitope variants with mainly conservative single substitutions were tested for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II binding affinity and T cell stimulation. Both epitopes bind with high affinity to the presenting HLA-DR molecules. However, in striking contrast to the standard distribution of TCR contacts, recognition of the central p5 residue displayed high permissiveness even for non-conservative substitutions, while the more peripheral p2 and p8 TCR contacts showed very low permissiveness for substitution. This suggests that intimate TCR interaction with the central peptide residue is not always required for specific antigen recognition and can be compensated by interactions with positions normally acting as auxiliary contacts.

  14. Regulation and function of an activation-dependent epitope of the beta 1 integrins in vascular cells after balloon injury in baboon arteries and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, N.; Seki, J.; Vergel, S.; Mattsson, E. J.; Yednock, T.; Kovach, N. L.; Harlan, J. M.; Clowes, A. W.

    1996-01-01

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to the response to injury in damaged and atherosclerotic vessels. These events might be regulated by cellular interactions with extracellular matrix through the expression and activation of integrins. To study the functions of beta 1 integrins in the vessel wall, we used monoclonal antibody (MAb) 15/7, which recognizes an activation epitope of beta 1 integrin subunits, and MAb 8A2, which induces a high affinity form of beta 1 integrins recognized by MAb 15/7. Immunohistochemical analyses were done on samples of normal baboon saphenous arteries and from arteries subjected to balloon injury. EC and SMC expressed the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin in uninjured arteries. By contrast, in balloon-injured arteries 6 weeks after injury, regenerating EC did not express the activation epitope, and there was no decrease in the expression of total beta 1 integrin, whereas SMC migrating into the intima exhibited decreased expression of the total and activated beta 1 integrin. Flow cytometer analysis of cultured cells indicated that baboon EC and SMC weakly express the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin. Next, we determined by utilizing MAb 8A2 the effects of increased expression of activation epitope of beta 1 integrin on the functions of SMC and EC. The activation of beta 1 integrins on SMC induced by MAb 8A2 enhanced SMC adhesion and suppressed SMC migration in a Boyden chamber assay. SMC proliferation was inhibited by MAb 8A2 dose-dependently. Similarly, MAb 8A2-induced activation of beta 1 integrins on EC suppressed EC migration into a wound. However, MAb 8A2 did not affect the basic fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation of EC, although it blocked the decrease in EC number caused by the removal of basic fibroblast growth factor. These results suggest that activation of beta 1 integrins in vascular cells is regulated in a cell-type dependent manner and plays an

  15. Epitope-Tagged Autotransporters as Single-Cell Reporters for Gene Expression by a Salmonella Typhimurium wbaP Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Curkić, Ismeta; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Diard, Médéric; Claassen, Manfred; Linke, Dirk; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity is an important trait of bacterial populations and can enhance fitness of the existing genotype in a given environment. To characterize different subpopulations, several studies have analyzed differential gene expression using fluorescent reporters. These studies visualized either single or multiple genes within single cells using different fluorescent proteins. However, variable maturation and folding kinetics of different fluorophores complicate the study of dynamics of gene expression. Here, we present a proof-of-principle study for an alternative gene expression system in a wbaP mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) lacking the O-sidechain of the lipopolysaccharide. We employed the hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged inverse autotransporter invasin (invAHA) as a transcriptional reporter for the expression of the type three secretion system 1 (T1) in S. Tm. Using a two-reporter approach with GFP and the InvAHA in single cells, we verify that this reporter system can be used for T1 gene expression analysis, at least in strains lacking the O-antigen (wbaP), which are permissive for detection of the surface-exposed HA-epitope. When we placed the two reporters gfp and invAHA under the control of either one or two different promoters of the T1 regulon, we were able to show correlative expression of both reporters. We conclude that the invAHA reporter system is a suitable tool to analyze T1gene expression in S. Tm and propose its applicability as molecular tool for gene expression studies within single cells. PMID:27149272

  16. Mucosal immunogenicity of polysaccharides conjugated to a peptide or multiple-antigen peptide containing T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Lett, E; Klopfenstein, C; Klein, J P; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D

    1995-01-01

    In this study we investigated the mucosal and systemic responses to two T-cell-independent polysaccharides, a serogroup f polysaccharide (formed of rhamnose glucose polymers [RGPs]) from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 and a mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, covalently conjugated either to a linear peptide (peptide 3) or to a multiple-antigen peptide (MAP), both derived from S. mutans protein SR, an adhesin of the I/II protein antigen family of oral streptococci. Peptide 3 and MAP, which contained at least one B- and one T-cell epitope, were tested as carriers for the polysaccharides and as protective immunogens. Intragastric intubation of rats with the conjugates (RGPs-peptide 3, RGPs-MAP, mannan-peptide 3, and mannan-MAP) associated with liposomes produced salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies which reacted with RGPs or mannan, peptide 3 or MAP, protein SR, and S. mutans or S. cerevisiae cells. Administration of conjugate boosters to the animals showed that both carriers conjugated to the polysaccharides were able to induce, in immunized animals, a salivary antipolysaccharide IgA memory. In contrast, animals primed and challenged with unconjugated polysaccharide showed no anamnestic response. Rats orally immunized with the conjugates also developed systemic primary antipolysaccharide and antipeptide IgM antibody responses which were characterized by a switch from IgM to IgG during the course of the secondary response. Data presented here demonstrated that both peptide 3 and the MAP construct can act as good carriers for orally administered polysaccharides. Unexpectedly, the use of a MAP did not further improve the immunogenicity of polysaccharides at the mucosal level; nevertheless, such a construct should be of great interest in overcoming the problem of genetic restriction induced by linear peptides. PMID:7790080

  17. Identification of Immunodominant B-cell Epitope Regions of Reticulocyte Binding Proteins in Plasmodium vivax by Protein Microarray Based Immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Hee; Li, Jian; Wang, Bo; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Na, Sunghun; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum can invade all stages of red blood cells, while Plasmodium vivax can invade only reticulocytes. Although many P. vivax proteins have been discovered, their functions are largely unknown. Among them, P. vivax reticulocyte binding proteins (PvRBP1 and PvRBP2) recognize and bind to reticulocytes. Both proteins possess a C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane domain, which drives adhesion to reticulocytes. PvRBP1 and PvRBP2 are large (> 326 kDa), which hinders identification of the functional domains. In this study, the complete genome information of the P. vivax RBP family was thoroughly analyzed using a prediction server with bioinformatics data to predict B-cell epitope domains. Eleven pvrbp family genes that included 2 pseudogenes and 9 full or partial length genes were selected and used to express recombinant proteins in a wheat germ cell-free system. The expressed proteins were used to evaluate the humoral immune response with vivax malaria patients and healthy individual serum samples by protein microarray. The recombinant fragments of 9 PvRBP proteins were successfully expressed; the soluble proteins ranged in molecular weight from 16 to 34 kDa. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to each recombinant PvRBP protein indicated a high antigenicity, with 38-88% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Of them, N-terminal parts of PvRBP2c (PVX_090325-1) and PvRBP2 like partial A (PVX_090330-1) elicited high antigenicity. In addition, the PvRBP2-like homologue B (PVX_116930) fragment was newly identified as high antigenicity and may be exploited as a potential antigenic candidate among the PvRBP family. The functional activity of the PvRBP family on merozoite invasion remains unknown.

  18. Immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai; James, Eddie A

    2016-10-01

    Conversion of arginine into citrulline is a post-translational modification that is observed in normal physiological processes. However, abnormal citrullination can provoke autoimmunity by generating altered self-epitopes that are specifically targeted by autoantibodies and T cells. In this review we discuss the recognition of citrullinated antigens in human autoimmune diseases and the role that this modification plays in increasing antigenic diversity and circumventing tolerance mechanisms. Early published work demonstrated that citrullinated proteins are specifically targeted by autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis and that citrullinated peptides are more readily presented to T cells by arthritis-susceptible HLA class II 'shared epitope' proteins. Emerging data support the relevance of citrullinated epitopes in other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, whose susceptible HLA haplotypes also preferentially present citrullinated peptides. In these settings, autoimmune patients have been shown to have elevated responses to citrullinated epitopes derived from tissue-specific antigens. Contrasting evidence implicates autophagy or perforin and complement-mediated membrane attack as inducers of ectopic citrullination. In either case, the peptidyl deiminases responsible for citrullination are activated in response to inflammation or insult, providing a mechanistic link between this post-translational modification and interactions with the environment and infection. As such, it is likely that immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes also plays a role in pathogen clearance. Indeed, our recent data suggest that responses to citrullinated peptides facilitate recognition of novel influenza strains. Therefore, increased understanding of responses to citrullinated epitopes may provide important insights about the initiation of autoimmunity and recognition of heterologous viruses. PMID:27531825

  19. A cryptic vascular endothelial growth factor T-cell epitope: identification and characterization by mass spectrometry and T-cell assays.

    PubMed

    Weinzierl, Andreas O; Maurer, Dominik; Altenberend, Florian; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Klingel, Karin; Schoor, Oliver; Wernet, Dorothee; Joos, Thomas; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in various physiologic processes, such as angiogenesis or wound healing, but is also crucial in pathologic events, such as tumor growth. Thus, clinical anti-VEGF treatments have been developed that could already show beneficial effects for cancer patients. In this article, we describe the first VEGF-derived CD8(+) T-cell epitope. The natural HLA ligand SRFGGAVVR was identified by differential mass spectrometry in two primary renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and was significantly overpresented on both tumor tissues. SRFGGAVVR is derived from a cryptic translated region of VEGF presumably by initiation of translation at the nonclassic start codon CUG(499). SRFGGAVVR-specific T cells were generated in vitro using peptide-loaded dendritic cells or artificial antigen-presenting cells. SRFGGAVVR-specific CD8(+) T cells, identified by HLA tetramer analysis after in vitro stimulation, were fully functional T effector cells, which were able to secrete IFN-gamma on stimulation and killed tumor cells in vitro. Additionally, we have quantitatively analyzed VEGF mRNA and protein levels in RCC tumor and normal tissue samples by gene chip analysis, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, in situ hybridization, and bead-based immunoassay. In the future, T cells directed against VEGF as a tumor-associated antigen may represent a possible way of combining peptide-based anti-VEGF immunotherapy with already existent anti-VEGF cancer therapies. PMID:18381453

  20. CD8 T-cell responses against the immunodominant Theileria parva peptide Tp249-59 are composed of two distinct populations specific for overlapping 11-mer and 10-mer epitopes.

    PubMed

    Connelley, Timothy K; Li, Xiaoying; MacHugh, Niall; Colau, Didier; Graham, Simon P; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Taracha, Evans L; Gill, Andy; Morrison, William Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Immunity against Theileria parva is associated with CD8 T-cell responses that exhibit immunodominance, focusing the response against limited numbers of epitopes. As candidates for inclusion in vaccines, characterization of responses against immunodominant epitopes is a key component in novel vaccine development. We have previously demonstrated that the Tp249-59 and Tp1214-224 epitopes dominate CD8 T-cell responses in BoLA-A10 and BoLA-18 MHC I homozygous animals, respectively. In this study, peptide-MHC I tetramers for these epitopes, and a subdominant BoLA-A10-restricted epitope (Tp298-106 ), were generated to facilitate accurate and rapid enumeration of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. During validation of these tetramers a substantial proportion of Tp249-59 -reactive T cells failed to bind the tetramer, suggesting that this population was heterogeneous with respect to the recognized epitope. We demonstrate that Tp250-59 represents a distinct epitope and that tetramers produced with Tp50-59 and Tp49-59 show no cross-reactivity. The Tp249-59 and Tp250-59 epitopes use different serine residues as the N-terminal anchor for binding to the presenting MHC I molecule. Molecular dynamic modelling predicts that the two peptide-MHC I complexes adopt structurally different conformations and Tcell receptor β sequence analysis showed that Tp249-59 and Tp250-59 are recognized by non-overlapping T-cell receptor repertoires. Together these data demonstrate that although differing by only a single residue, Tp249-59 and Tp250-59 epitopes form distinct ligands for T-cell receptor recognition. Tetramer analysis of T. parva-specific CD8 T-cell lines confirmed the immunodominance of Tp1214-224 in BoLA-A18 animals and showed in BoLA-A10 animals that the Tp249-59 epitope response was generally more dominant than the Tp250-59 response and confirmed that the Tp298-106 response was subdominant.

  1. CD8 T-cell responses against the immunodominant Theileria parva peptide Tp249-59 are composed of two distinct populations specific for overlapping 11-mer and 10-mer epitopes.

    PubMed

    Connelley, Timothy K; Li, Xiaoying; MacHugh, Niall; Colau, Didier; Graham, Simon P; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Taracha, Evans L; Gill, Andy; Morrison, William Ivan

    2016-10-01

    Immunity against Theileria parva is associated with CD8 T-cell responses that exhibit immunodominance, focusing the response against limited numbers of epitopes. As candidates for inclusion in vaccines, characterization of responses against immunodominant epitopes is a key component in novel vaccine development. We have previously demonstrated that the Tp249-59 and Tp1214-224 epitopes dominate CD8 T-cell responses in BoLA-A10 and BoLA-18 MHC I homozygous animals, respectively. In this study, peptide-MHC I tetramers for these epitopes, and a subdominant BoLA-A10-restricted epitope (Tp298-106 ), were generated to facilitate accurate and rapid enumeration of epitope-specific CD8 T cells. During validation of these tetramers a substantial proportion of Tp249-59 -reactive T cells failed to bind the tetramer, suggesting that this population was heterogeneous with respect to the recognized epitope. We demonstrate that Tp250-59 represents a distinct epitope and that tetramers produced with Tp50-59 and Tp49-59 show no cross-reactivity. The Tp249-59 and Tp250-59 epitopes use different serine residues as the N-terminal anchor for binding to the presenting MHC I molecule. Molecular dynamic modelling predicts that the two peptide-MHC I complexes adopt structurally different conformations and Tcell receptor β sequence analysis showed that Tp249-59 and Tp250-59 are recognized by non-overlapping T-cell receptor repertoires. Together these data demonstrate that although differing by only a single residue, Tp249-59 and Tp250-59 epitopes form distinct ligands for T-cell receptor recognition. Tetramer analysis of T. parva-specific CD8 T-cell lines confirmed the immunodominance of Tp1214-224 in BoLA-A18 animals and showed in BoLA-A10 animals that the Tp249-59 epitope response was generally more dominant than the Tp250-59 response and confirmed that the Tp298-106 response was subdominant. PMID:27317384

  2. Identification of a conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope in the VP1 proteins of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Zhou, Guomei; Xin, Yinghao; Chen, Junhao; Lin, Shaoli; Tian, Ye; Xie, Zhijing; Jiang, Shijin

    2015-11-18

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH), mainly caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a severe disease threaten to duck industry and has worldwide distribution. As the major structural protein, the VP1 protein of DHAV is able to induce neutralizing antibody in ducks. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4F8 against the intact DHAV-1 particles was used to identify the possible epitope in the three serotypes of DHAV. The mAb 4F8 had weak neutralizing activities to both DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and reacted with the conserved linear B-cell epitopes of (75)GEIILT(80) in DHAV-1 VP1 and (75)GEVILT(80) in DHAV-3 VP1 protein, respectively, while not with DHAV-2 VP1. This was the first report about identification of the common conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which will facilitate understanding of the antigenic structure of VP1 and the serologic diagnosis of DHAV infection.

  3. Phage-displayed T-cell epitope grafted into immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining regions: an effective vaccine design tested in murine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Manoutcharian, K; Terrazas, L I; Gevorkian, G; Acero, G; Petrossian, P; Rodriguez, M; Govezensky, T

    1999-09-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (V(H)) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig V(H) domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction.

  4. Linear B-cell epitope mapping of MAPK3 and MAPK4 from Leishmania braziliensis: implications for the serodiagnosis of human and canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago Antônio; de Araújo Leão, Ana Carolina; de Souza Gomes, Matheus; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira

    2015-02-01

    The correct and early identification of humans and dogs infected with Leishmania are key steps in the control of leishmaniasis. Additionally, a method with high sensitivity and specificity at low cost that allows the screening of a large number of samples would be extremely valuable. In this study, we analyzed the potential of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPK3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase 4 (MAPK4) proteins from Leishmania braziliensis to serve as antigen candidates for the serodiagnosis of human visceral and tegumentary leishmaniasis, as well as canine visceral disease. Moreover, we mapped linear B-cell epitopes in these proteins and selected those epitopes with sequences that were divergent in the corresponding orthologs in Homo sapiens, in Canis familiaris, and in Trypanosoma cruzi. We compared the performance of these peptides with the recombinant protein using ELISA. Both MAPK3 and MAPK4 recombinant proteins showed better specificity in the immunodiagnosis of human and canine leishmaniasis than soluble parasite antigens and the EIE-leishmaniose-visceral-canina-bio-manguinhos (EIE-LVC) kit. Furthermore, the performance of this serodiagnosis assay was improved using synthetic peptides corresponding to B-cell epitopes derived from both proteins.

  5. A paradigm shift: Cancer therapy with peptide-based B-cell epitopes and peptide immunotherapeutics targeting multiple solid tumor types: Emerging concepts and validation of combination immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaumaya, Pravin TP

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognizable and urgent need to speed the development and application of novel, more efficacious anti-cancer vaccine therapies that inhibit tumor progression and prevent acquisition of tumor resistance. We have created and established a portfolio of validated peptide epitopes against multiple receptor tyrosine kinases and we have identified the most biologically effective combinations of EGFR (HER-1), HER-2, HER-3, VEGF and IGF-1R peptide vaccines/mimics to selectively inhibit multiple receptors and signaling pathways. The strategy is based on the use of chimeric conformational B-cell epitope peptides incorporating “promiscuous” T-cell epitopes that afford the possibility of generating an enduring immune response, eliciting protein-reactive high-affinity anti-peptide antibodies as potential vaccines and peptide mimics that act as antagonists to receptor signaling that drive cancer metastasis. In this review we will summarize our ongoing studies based on the development of combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies that act synergistically to enhance immune-mediated tumor killing aimed at addressing mechanisms of tumor resistance for several tumor types. PMID:25874884

  6. A paradigm shift: Cancer therapy with peptide-based B-cell epitopes and peptide immunotherapeutics targeting multiple solid tumor types: Emerging concepts and validation of combination immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognizable and urgent need to speed the development and application of novel, more efficacious anti-cancer vaccine therapies that inhibit tumor progression and prevent acquisition of tumor resistance. We have created and established a portfolio of validated peptide epitopes against multiple receptor tyrosine kinases and we have identified the most biologically effective combinations of EGFR (HER-1), HER-2, HER-3, VEGF and IGF-1R peptide vaccines/mimics to selectively inhibit multiple receptors and signaling pathways. The strategy is based on the use of chimeric conformational B-cell epitope peptides incorporating "promiscuous" T-cell epitopes that afford the possibility of generating an enduring immune response, eliciting protein-reactive high-affinity anti-peptide antibodies as potential vaccines and peptide mimics that act as antagonists to receptor signaling that drive cancer metastasis. In this review we will summarize our ongoing studies based on the development of combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies that act synergistically to enhance immune-mediated tumor killing aimed at addressing mechanisms of tumor resistance for several tumor types.

  7. Phage-Displayed T-Cell Epitope Grafted into Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Complementarity-Determining Regions: an Effective Vaccine Design Tested in Murine Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Manoutcharian, Karen; Terrazas, Luis Ignacio; Gevorkian, Goar; Acero, Gonzalo; Petrossian, Pavel; Rodriguez, Miriam; Govezensky, Tzipe

    1999-01-01

    A new type of immunogenic molecule was engineered by replacing all three complementarity-determining-region (CDR) loops of the human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable (VH) domain with the Taenia crassiceps epitope PT1 (PPPVDYLYQT) and by displaying this construct on the surfaces of M13 bacteriophage. When BALB/c mice were immunized with such phage particles (PIgphage), a strong protection against challenge infection in very susceptible female hosts was obtained. When specifically stimulated, the in vivo-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from mice immunized with PT1, both as a free peptide and as the PIgphage construct, proliferated in vitro, indicating efficient epitope presentation by both major histocompatibility complex class II and class I molecules in the specifically antigen-pulsed macrophages used as antigen-presenting cells. These data demonstrate the immunogenic potential of recombinant phage particles displaying CDR epitope-grafted Ig VH domains and establish an alternative approach to the design of an effective subunit vaccine for prevention of cysticercosis. The key advantage of this type of immunogen is that no adjuvant is required for its application. The proposed strategy for immunogen construction is potentially suitable for use in any host-pathogen interaction. PMID:10456929

  8. Immunogenicity of porcine P[6], P[7]-specific △VP8* rotavirus subunit vaccines with a tetanus toxoid universal T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wei, Xiaoman; Ran, Xuhua; Ni, Hongbo; Cao, Si; Zhang, Yao

    2015-08-26

    Currently, commercial porcine rotavirus vaccines remain varied limitations. The objective of this study is to develop an alternative porcine rotavirus subunit vaccine candidate by parenteral administration, which enables to elicit robust immune responses against most prevalence porcine rotavirus strains. The bacterially-expressed porcine rotavirus P[6]- or P[7]-specific truncated VP8* (aa 64-223) recombinant protein with or without a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was generated. All the recombinant subunit proteins △VP8*s or P2-△VP8*s were of high solubility and high yields. The immunogenicity of each purified △VP8* and P2-△VP8* was evaluated in mice (10 μg/dose) or guinea pigs (20 μg/dose) immunized IM with 600 μg aluminum hydroxide three times at 2-week interval. The introduction of P2T cell epitope to P[7]-△VP8* elicited significantly higher IgG titer in mice than its absence. Comparatively, P2 epitope slightly enhanced the immunogenicity of P[6]-△VP8*. P2-P[7]△VP8* elicited high titer of neutralizing antibody against heterotypic P[7]-specific rotaviruses with varied G type combination. Our data indicated that two subunit vaccines could be plausible bivalent rotavirus vaccine candidate to provide antigenic coverage of porcine rotavirus strains of global or regional importance.

  9. Competitive binding of pentraxins and IgM to newly exposed epitopes on late apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ciurana, Caroline L F; Hack, C Erik

    2006-01-01

    A random distribution of phospholipids among the inner and outer leaflet of the cell membrane occurs during apoptosis and is known as membrane flip-flop. Flip-flopped cells have binding sites for various plasma proteins, such as IgM and the pentraxins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). In this study, we investigated whether pentraxins and IgM antibodies recognize the same binding sites on apoptotic cells, and whether phospholipids constitute these binding sites. Except for SAP which also bound to early apoptotic cells, pentraxins and IgM preferentially bound to late apoptotic cells. Competition experiments with different phosphatemonoesters revealed that CRP and SAP as well as part of the IgM bound to the phospholipids head groups, SAP mainly to phosphorylethanolamine, CRP to phosphorylcholine and phosphorylethanolamine and to a lesser extent to phosphorylserine, and IgM to phosphorylcholine and phosphorylserine. These results were confirmed in experiments in which proteins were adsorbed from plasma with artificial phospholipids particles. IgM and the pentraxins variably competed for the same binding sites on late apoptotic cells, SAP having the highest and CRP the lowest apparent affinity. We conclude that CRP, SAP, and part of the IgM bind to the phospholipid head groups exposed on apoptotic cells. This shared specificity as well as their shared capability to activate complement, suggest that IgM and the pentraxins CRP and SAP exert similar functions in the removal of apoptotic cells.

  10. Antigen-specific immunomodulation for type 1 diabetes by novel recombinant antibodies directed against diabetes-associates auto-reactive T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Rony; Gebe, John A; Preisinger, Anton; James, Eddie A; Tendler, Mark; Nepom, Gerald T; Reiter, Yoram

    2013-12-01

    The trimolecular complex composed of autoreactive T-cell receptor, MHC class II, and an autoantigenic peptide plays a central role in the activation of pathogenic Islet-specific CD4+ T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We isolated and characterized novel antibodies against autoreactive T-cell epitopes associated with T1D. Our antibodies mimic the specificity of the T-cell receptor (TCR), while binding MHC class II/peptide complexes in an autoantigen peptide specific, MHC-restricted manner. The isolated TCR-like antibodies were directed against the minimal T-cell epitope GAD-555-567 in the context of the HLA-DR4-diabetic-associated molecule. A representative high-affinity TCR-like antibody clone (G3H8) enabled the detection of intra- and extra-cellular DR4/GAD-555-567 complexes in antigen presenting cells. I561M single mutation at the central position (P5) of the GAD-555-567 peptide abolished the binding of G3H8 to the DR4/GAD complex, demonstrating its high fine TCR-like specificity. The G3H8 TCR-like antibody significantly inhibited GAD-555-567 specific, DR4 restricted T-cell response in vitro and in vivo in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. Our findings constitute a proof-of-concept for the utility of TCR-like antibodies as antigen-specific immunomodulation agents for regulating pathogenic T-cells and suggest that TCR-like antibodies targeting autoreactive MHC class II epitopes are valuable research tools that enable studies related to antigen presentation as well as novel therapeutic agents that may be used to modulate autoimmune disorders such as T1D. PMID:24090977

  11. Antigen-specific immunomodulation for type 1 diabetes by novel recombinant antibodies directed against diabetes-associates auto-reactive T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Rony; Gebe, John A; Preisinger, Anton; James, Eddie A; Tendler, Mark; Nepom, Gerald T; Reiter, Yoram

    2013-12-01

    The trimolecular complex composed of autoreactive T-cell receptor, MHC class II, and an autoantigenic peptide plays a central role in the activation of pathogenic Islet-specific CD4+ T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We isolated and characterized novel antibodies against autoreactive T-cell epitopes associated with T1D. Our antibodies mimic the specificity of the T-cell receptor (TCR), while binding MHC class II/peptide complexes in an autoantigen peptide specific, MHC-restricted manner. The isolated TCR-like antibodies were directed against the minimal T-cell epitope GAD-555-567 in the context of the HLA-DR4-diabetic-associated molecule. A representative high-affinity TCR-like antibody clone (G3H8) enabled the detection of intra- and extra-cellular DR4/GAD-555-567 complexes in antigen presenting cells. I561M single mutation at the central position (P5) of the GAD-555-567 peptide abolished the binding of G3H8 to the DR4/GAD complex, demonstrating its high fine TCR-like specificity. The G3H8 TCR-like antibody significantly inhibited GAD-555-567 specific, DR4 restricted T-cell response in vitro and in vivo in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. Our findings constitute a proof-of-concept for the utility of TCR-like antibodies as antigen-specific immunomodulation agents for regulating pathogenic T-cells and suggest that TCR-like antibodies targeting autoreactive MHC class II epitopes are valuable research tools that enable studies related to antigen presentation as well as novel therapeutic agents that may be used to modulate autoimmune disorders such as T1D.

  12. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katrina J; Favreau, John T; Guyette, Jacques P; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R; Fitzpatrick, John P; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area was

  13. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  14. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  15. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 peptides in chimeric and multivalent constructs with promiscuous T-cell epitopes enhance immunogenicity and overcome genetic restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Lairmore, M D; DiGeorge, A M; Conrad, S F; Trevino, A V; Lal, R B; Kaumaya, P T

    1995-01-01

    Conventional strategies of viral peptide immunizations often elicit low-affinity antibody responses and have limited ability to elicit immune responses in outbred animals of diverse major histocompatibility (MHC) haplotypes. This genetically restricted T-cell-stimulatory activity of peptides is a serious obstacle to vaccine design. However, the use of promiscuous T-cell epitopes may circumvent this problem. Promiscuous T-cell epitopes from tetanus toxin (amino acids [aa] 580 to 599) and the measles virus F protein (aa 288 to 302) that bind to several isotypic and allotypic forms of human MHC class II molecules have been identified and have been used in highly immunogenic constructs to overcome haplotype-restricted immune responses. Chimeric and beta-template peptide constructs incorporating known human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) B- and T-cell epitopes from the surface envelope protein gp46 (SP2 [aa 86 to 107] and SP4a [aa 190 to 209]) and promiscuous T-cell peptides were synthesized, and their immunogenicities were evaluated in both rabbits and mouse strains of divergent haplotypes (C3H/HeJ [H-2k], C57BL/6 [H-2b], and BALB/c [H-2d]). In addition, peptide preparations were structurally characterized by analytical high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism. In contrast to their linear forms, the chimeric constructs of both the SP2 and SP4a epitopes displayed alpha-helical secondary structures. Immunogenicity of the peptide constructs was evaluated by direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), as well as by radioimmunoprecipitation, syncytium inhibition, and antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation assays. Immunization with the SP4a peptide without conjugation to a carrier protein produced antibodies specific for SP4a in two mouse strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6). However, BALB/c mice failed to respond to the peptide, indicating that the T-cell epitope of the SP4a sequence is MHC restricted. In

  16. CD8 and CD4 Epitope Predictions in RV144: No Strong Evidence of a T-Cell Driven Sieve Effect in HIV-1 Breakthrough Sequences from Trial Participants

    PubMed Central

    Dommaraju, Kalpana; Kijak, Gustavo; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Larsen, Brendan B.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Geraghty, Dan E.; Deng, Wenjie; Maust, Brandon S.; Edlefsen, Paul T.; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; deSouza, Mark S.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttihum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; O'Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Mullins, James I.; Kim, Jerome H.; Rolland, Morgane

    2014-01-01

    The modest protection afforded by the RV144 vaccine offers an opportunity to evaluate its mechanisms of protection. Differences between HIV-1 breakthrough viruses from vaccine and placebo recipients can be attributed to the RV144 vaccine as this was a randomized and double-blinded trial. CD8 and CD4 T cell epitope repertoires were predicted in HIV-1 proteomes from 110 RV144 participants. Predicted Gag epitope repertoires were smaller in vaccine than in placebo recipients (p = 0.019). After comparing participant-derived epitopes to corresponding epitopes in the RV144 vaccine, the proportion of epitopes that could be matched differed depending on the protein conservation (only 36% of epitopes in Env vs 84–91% in Gag/Pol/Nef for CD8 predicted epitopes) or on vaccine insert subtype (55% against CRF01_AE vs 7% against subtype B). To compare predicted epitopes to the vaccine, we analyzed predicted binding affinity and evolutionary distance measurements. Comparisons between the vaccine and placebo arm did not reveal robust evidence for a T cell driven sieve effect, although some differences were noted in Env-V2 (0.022≤p-value≤0.231). The paucity of CD8 T cell responses identified following RV144 vaccination, with no evidence for V2 specificity, considered together both with the association of decreased infection risk in RV 144 participants with V-specific antibody responses and a V2 sieve effect, lead us to hypothesize that this sieve effect was not T cell specific. Overall, our results did not reveal a strong differential impact of vaccine-induced T cell responses among breakthrough infections in RV144 participants. PMID:25350851

  17. Universal influenza DNA vaccine encoding conserved CD4+ T cell epitopes protects against lethal viral challenge in HLA-DR transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeff; Bilsel, Pamuk; del Guercio, Marie-France; Stewart, Stephani; Marinkovic-Petrovic, Aleksandra; Southwood, Scott; Crimi, Claire; Vang, Lo; Walker, Les; Ishioka, Glenn; Chitnis, Vivek; Sette, Alessandro; Assarsson, Erika; Hannaman, Drew; Botten, Jason; Newman, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design a vaccine that would provide universal protection against infection of humans with diverse influenza A viruses. Accordingly, protein sequences from influenza A virus strains currently in circulation (H1N1, H3N2), agents of past pandemics (H1N1, H2N2, H3N2) and zoonotic infections of man (H1N1, H5N1, H7N2, H7N3, H7N7, H9N2) were evaluated for the presence of amino acid sequences, motifs, that are predicted to mediate peptide epitope binding with high affinity to the most frequent HLA-DR allelic products. Peptides conserved among diverse influenza strains were then synthesized, evaluated for binding to purified HLA-DR molecules and for their capacity to induce influenza-specific immune recall responses using human donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Accordingly, 20 epitopes were selected for further investigation based on their conservancy among diverse influenza strains, predicted population coverage in diverse ethnic groups and capacity to recall influenza-specific responses. A DNA plasmid encoding the epitopes was constructed using amino acid spacers between epitopes to promote optimum processing and presentation. Immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine was measured using HLA-DR4 transgenic mice and the TriGrid™ in vivo electroporation device. Vaccination resulted in peptide-specific immune responses, augmented HA-specific antibody responses and protection of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice from lethal PR8 influenza virus challenge. These studies demonstrate the utility of this vaccine format and the contribution of CD4+ T cell responses to protection against influenza infection. PMID:19895924

  18. A hypothesis-effect of T cell epitope fusion peptide specific immunotherapy on signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao-Pin; Yang, Bang-He

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic nonspecific inflammatory disease of the airway primarily mediated by different inflammatory cells, including mast cells, eosinophils and T cells. We hereby specially focused on a signal pathway for Janus kinase-signal transducer and activators of transduction (JAK-STATs), which has been the interest of study in asthma since it more likely regulates cellular proliferation and differentiation, and consequently modulates immune system. In our consideration, knowledge on this signal pathway may provide an avenue for rational options in treatment of asthma on control of immune response basis. PMID:26770626

  19. Identification of a novel Aleutian mink disease virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against VP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Cheng, Shipeng; Yan, Xijun

    2016-09-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is a parvovirus that causes an immune complex-mediated disease in minks. Capsid protein VP2 is a major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose AMDV. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1M13, was produced against the AMDV VP2 protein (amino acids 291-502). A linear VP2-protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to be enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (386)HLQQNFSTRYIYD(398) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1M13. ELISA assays revealed that mink anti-AMDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Sequence alignments demonstrated that the linear epitope is highly conserved among AMDV strains except (386)H and is less conserved among Raccoon dog amdovirus, Gray fox amdovirus, Red fox amdovirus, Bat parvovirus and Mink enteritis parvovirus. Taken together, the generation of this VP2-specific mAb with a defined linear peptide epitope may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for AMDV. PMID:27354304

  20. Polyclonal B Cell Responses to Conserved Neutralization Epitopes in a Subset of HIV-1-Infected Individuals▿†

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Binley, James M.; Gray, Elin S.; Crooks, Emma T.; Osawa, Keiko; Moore, Penny L.; Tumba, Nancy; Tong, Tommy; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Decker, Julie; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gao, Feng; Alam, S. Munir; Easterbrook, Philippa; Abdool Karim, Salim; Kamanga, Gift; Crump, John A.; Cohen, Myron; Shaw, George M.; Mascola, John R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Montefiori, David C.; Morris, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    A small proportion of HIV-infected individuals generate a neutralizing antibody (NAb) response of exceptional magnitude and breadth. A detailed analysis of the critical epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies should help to define optimal targets for vaccine design. HIV-1-infected subjects with potent cross-reactive serum neutralizing antibodies were identified by assaying sera from 308 subjects against a multiclade panel of 12 “tier 2” viruses (4 each of subtypes A, B, and C). Various neutralizing epitope specificities were determined for the top 9 neutralizers, including clade A-, clade B-, clade C-, and clade A/C-infected donors, by using a comprehensive set of assays. In some subjects, neutralization breadth was mediated by two or more antibody specificities. Although antibodies to the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) were identified in some subjects, the subjects with the greatest neutralization breadth targeted gp120 epitopes, including the CD4 binding site, a glycan-containing quaternary epitope formed by the V2 and V3 loops, or an outer domain epitope containing a glycan at residue N332. The broadly reactive HIV-1 neutralization observed in some subjects is mediated by antibodies targeting several conserved regions on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. PMID:21849452

  1. A deimmunised form of the ribotoxin, α-sarcin, lacking CD4+ T cell epitopes and its use as an immunotoxin warhead

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Hearn, Arron R.; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Kozub, Dorota; Fogg, Mark H.; Carr, Francis J.; Baker, Matthew P.; Lacadena, Javier; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal ribotoxins that block protein synthesis can be useful warheads in the context of a targeted immunotoxin. α-Sarcin is a small (17 kDa) fungal ribonuclease produced by Aspergillus giganteus that functions by catalytically cleaving a single phosphodiester bond in the sarcin–ricin loop of the large ribosomal subunit, thus making the ribosome unrecognisable to elongation factors and leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Peptide mapping using an ex vivo human T cell assay determined that α-sarcin contained two T cell epitopes; one in the N-terminal 20 amino acids and the other in the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Various mutations were tested individually within each epitope and then in combination to isolate deimmunised α-sarcin variants that had the desired properties of silencing T cell epitopes and retention of the ability to inhibit protein synthesis (equivalent to wild-type, WT α-sarcin). A deimmunised variant (D9T/Q142T) demonstrated a complete lack of T cell activation in in vitro whole protein human T cell assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with diverse HLA allotypes. Generation of an immunotoxin by fusion of the D9T/Q142T variant to a single-chain Fv targeting Her2 demonstrated potent cell killing equivalent to a fusion protein comprising the WT α-sarcin. These results represent the first fungal ribotoxin to be deimmunised with the potential to construct a new generation of deimmunised immunotoxin therapeutics. PMID:27578884

  2. Availability of a diversely avid CD8+ T cell repertoire specific for the subdominant HLA-A2-restricted HIV-1 Gag p2419-27 epitope.

    PubMed

    Schaubert, Keri L; Price, David A; Frahm, Nicole; Li, Jinzhu; Ng, Hwee L; Joseph, Aviva; Paul, Elyse; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Gostick, Emma; Adams, Sharon; Marincola, Francesco M; Sewell, Andrew K; Altfeld, Marcus; Brenchley, Jason M; Douek, Daniel C; Yang, Otto O; Brander, Christian; Goldstein, Harris; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2007-06-15

    HLA-A2-restricted CTL responses to immunodominant HIV-1 epitopes do not appear to be very effective in the control of viral replication in vivo. In this study, we studied human CD8+ T cell responses to the subdominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope TV9 (Gag p24(19-27), TLNAWVKVV) to explore the possibility of increasing its immune recognition. We confirmed in a cohort of 313 patients, infected by clade B or clade C viruses, that TV9 is rarely recognized. Of interest, the functional sensitivity of the TV9 response can be relatively high. The potential T cell repertoires for TV9 and the characteristics of constituent clonotypes were assessed by ex vivo priming of circulating CD8+ T cells from healthy seronegative donors. TV9-specific CTLs capable of suppressing viral replication in vitro were readily generated, suggesting that the cognate T cell repertoire is not limiting. However, these cultures contained multiple discrete populations with a range of binding avidities for the TV9 tetramer and correspondingly distinct functional dependencies on the CD8 coreceptor. The lack of dominant clonotypes was not affected by the stage of maturation of the priming dendritic cells. Cultures primed by dendritic cells transduced to present endogenous TV9 were also incapable of clonal maturation. Thus, a diffuse TCR repertoire appeared to be an intrinsic characteristic of TV9-specific responses. These data indicate that subdominance is not a function of poor immunogenicity, cognate TCR repertoire availability, or the potential avidity properties thereof, but rather suggest that useful responses to this epitope are suppressed by competing CD8+ T cell populations during HIV-1 infection.

  3. Artificial antigen-presenting cells transduced with telomerase efficiently expand epitope-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Jakob; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Ma, Chia; Sadelain, Michel

    2005-06-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is overexpressed in most human tumors, making it a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. hTERT-derived CTL epitopes have been identified previously, including p865 (RLVDDFLLV) and p540 (ILAKFLHWL), which are restricted by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I A*0201 allele. However, it remains a major challenge to efficiently and consistently expand hTERT-specific CTLs from donor peripheral blood T lymphocytes. To bypass the need for generating conventional antigen-presenting cells (APC) on an autologous basis, we investigated the potential ability of fibroblast-derived artificial APCs (AAPC) to activate and expand HLA-A*0201-restricted CTLs. We show here that AAPCs stably expressing HLA-A*0201, human beta(2)-microglobulin, B7.1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and LFA-3, together with either p540 and p865 minigenes or the full-length hTERT, effectively stimulate tumoricidal, hTERT-specific CTLs. hTERT-expressing AAPCs stimulated both p540 and p865 CTLs as shown by peptide-specific cytolysis and tetramer staining, indicating that hTERT is processed by the AAPCs and that the two peptides are presented as codominant epitopes. The level of cytotoxic activity against a panel of tumors comprising hematologic and epithelial malignancies varied, correlating overall with the level of HLA-A2 and hTERT expression by the target cell. Starting from 100 mL blood, approximately 100 million hTERT-specific CTLs could be generated over the course of five sequential stimulations, representing an expansion of approximately 1 x 10(5). Our data show that AAPCs process hTERT antigen and efficiently stimulate hTERT-specific CTLs from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and suggest that sufficient expansion could be achieved to be clinically useful for adoptive cell therapy.

  4. Targeting cryptic epitope with modified antigen coupled to the surface of liposomes induces strong antitumor CD8 T-cell immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yutaka; Takagi, Akira; Uchida, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2015-12-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy, such as cancer vaccine, is based on the fundamental knowledge that tumor‑associated antigens (TAAs) are presented on MHC molecules for recognition by specific T cells. However, most TAAs are self-antigens and are also expressed on normal tissues, including the thymus. This fact raises the issue of the tolerance of the TAA‑specific T‑cell repertoire and consequently the inability to trigger a strong and efficient antitumor immune response. In the present study, we used antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes to target telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a widely expressed self/tumor antigen. Taking advantage of the high homology between mouse and human TERT, we investigated immunogenicity and antitumor efficiency of the liposomal TERT peptides in HLA-A*0201 transgenic HHD mice. Using the heteroclitical peptide-modifying approach with antigen‑coupled liposomes, we identified a novel cryptic epitope with low affinity for HLA*0201 molecules derived from TERT. The heteroclitical variant derived from this novel low affinity peptide exhibited strong affinity for HLA*0201 molecules. However, it induced only weak CD8 T‑cell immune responses in HHD mice when emulsified in IFA. By contrast, when coupled to the surface of the liposomes, it induced powerful CD8 T‑cell immune responses which cross-reacted against the original cryptic epitope. The induced CD8 T cells also recognized endogenously TERT‑expressing tumor cells and inhibited their growth in HHD mice. These data suggest that heteroclitical antigen derived from low affinity epitope of tumor antigens coupled to the surface of liposome may have a role as an effective cancer vaccine candidate.

  5. Targeting cryptic epitope with modified antigen coupled to the surface of liposomes induces strong antitumor CD8 T-cell immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    HORIUCHI, YUTAKA; TAKAGI, AKIRA; UCHIDA, TETSUYA; AKATSUKA, TOSHITAKA

    2015-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy, such as cancer vaccine, is based on the fundamental knowledge that tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are presented on MHC molecules for recognition by specific T cells. However, most TAAs are self-antigens and are also expressed on normal tissues, including the thymus. This fact raises the issue of the tolerance of the TAA-specific T-cell repertoire and consequently the inability to trigger a strong and efficient antitumor immune response. In the present study, we used antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes to target telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a widely expressed self/tumor antigen. Taking advantage of the high homology between mouse and human TERT, we investigated immunogenicity and antitumor efficiency of the liposomal TERT peptides in HLA-A*0201 transgenic HHD mice. Using the heteroclitical peptide-modifying approach with antigen-coupled liposomes, we identified a novel cryptic epitope with low affinity for HLA*0201 molecules derived from TERT. The heteroclitical variant derived from this novel low affinity peptide exhibited strong affinity for HLA*0201 molecules. However, it induced only weak CD8 T-cell immune responses in HHD mice when emulsified in IFA. By contrast, when coupled to the surface of the liposomes, it induced powerful CD8 T-cell immune responses which cross-reacted against the original cryptic epitope. The induced CD8 T cells also recognized endogenously TERT-expressing tumor cells and inhibited their growth in HHD mice. These data suggest that heteroclitical antigen derived from low affinity epitope of tumor antigens coupled to the surface of liposome may have a role as an effective cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:26398429

  6. Prediction and In Silico Identification of Novel B-Cells and T-Cells Epitopes in the S1-Spike Glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 (793/B) Infectious Bronchitis Virus Serotypes for Application in Peptide Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hair Bejo, Mohd; Kadkhodaei, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis was used to predict antigenic B-cell and T-cell epitopes within the S1 glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 IBV strains. A conserved linear B-cell epitope peptide, YTSNETTDVTS175–185, was identified in M41 IBV strains while three such epitopes types namely, VSNASPNSGGVD279–290, HPKCNFRPENI328–338, and NETNNAGSVSDCTAGT54–69, were predicted in CR88 IBV strains. Analysis of MHCI binding peptides in M41 IBV strains revealed the presence of 15 antigenic peptides out of which 12 were highly conserved in 96–100% of the total M41 strains analysed. Interestingly three of these peptides, GGPITYKVM208, WFNSLSVSI356, and YLADAGLAI472, relatively had high antigenicity index (>1.0). On the other hand, 11 MHCI binding epitope peptides were identified in CR88 IBV strains. Of these, five peptides were found to be highly conserved with a range between 90% and 97%. However, WFNSLSVSL358, SYNISAASV88, and YNISAASVA89 peptides comparably showed high antigenicity scores (>1.0). Combination of antigenic B-cells and T-cells peptides that are conserved across many strains as approach to evoke humoral and CTL immune response will potentially lead to a broad-based vaccine that could reduce the challenges in using live attenuated vaccine technology in the control of IBV infection in poultry. PMID:27667997

  7. Prediction and In Silico Identification of Novel B-Cells and T-Cells Epitopes in the S1-Spike Glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 (793/B) Infectious Bronchitis Virus Serotypes for Application in Peptide Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bande, Faruku; Arshad, Siti Suri; Hair Bejo, Mohd; Kadkhodaei, Saeid; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis was used to predict antigenic B-cell and T-cell epitopes within the S1 glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 IBV strains. A conserved linear B-cell epitope peptide, YTSNETTDVTS(175-185), was identified in M41 IBV strains while three such epitopes types namely, VSNASPNSGGVD(279-290), HPKCNFRPENI(328-338), and NETNNAGSVSDCTAGT(54-69), were predicted in CR88 IBV strains. Analysis of MHCI binding peptides in M41 IBV strains revealed the presence of 15 antigenic peptides out of which 12 were highly conserved in 96-100% of the total M41 strains analysed. Interestingly three of these peptides, GGPITYKVM(208), WFNSLSVSI(356), and YLADAGLAI(472), relatively had high antigenicity index (>1.0). On the other hand, 11 MHCI binding epitope peptides were identified in CR88 IBV strains. Of these, five peptides were found to be highly conserved with a range between 90% and 97%. However, WFNSLSVSL(358), SYNISAASV(88), and YNISAASVA(89) peptides comparably showed high antigenicity scores (>1.0). Combination of antigenic B-cells and T-cells peptides that are conserved across many strains as approach to evoke humoral and CTL immune response will potentially lead to a broad-based vaccine that could reduce the challenges in using live attenuated vaccine technology in the control of IBV infection in poultry. PMID:27667997

  8. Prediction and In Silico Identification of Novel B-Cells and T-Cells Epitopes in the S1-Spike Glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 (793/B) Infectious Bronchitis Virus Serotypes for Application in Peptide Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hair Bejo, Mohd; Kadkhodaei, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis was used to predict antigenic B-cell and T-cell epitopes within the S1 glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 IBV strains. A conserved linear B-cell epitope peptide, YTSNETTDVTS175–185, was identified in M41 IBV strains while three such epitopes types namely, VSNASPNSGGVD279–290, HPKCNFRPENI328–338, and NETNNAGSVSDCTAGT54–69, were predicted in CR88 IBV strains. Analysis of MHCI binding peptides in M41 IBV strains revealed the presence of 15 antigenic peptides out of which 12 were highly conserved in 96–100% of the total M41 strains analysed. Interestingly three of these peptides, GGPITYKVM208, WFNSLSVSI356, and YLADAGLAI472, relatively had high antigenicity index (>1.0). On the other hand, 11 MHCI binding epitope peptides were identified in CR88 IBV strains. Of these, five peptides were found to be highly conserved with a range between 90% and 97%. However, WFNSLSVSL358, SYNISAASV88, and YNISAASVA89 peptides comparably showed high antigenicity scores (>1.0). Combination of antigenic B-cells and T-cells peptides that are conserved across many strains as approach to evoke humoral and CTL immune response will potentially lead to a broad-based vaccine that could reduce the challenges in using live attenuated vaccine technology in the control of IBV infection in poultry.

  9. CD8(+) T cell cross-reactivity profiles and HIV-1 immune escape towards an HLA-B35-restricted immunodominant Nef epitope.

    PubMed

    Motozono, Chihiro; Miles, John J; Hasan, Zafrul; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Meribe, Stanley C; Price, David A; Oka, Shinichi; Sewell, Andrew K; Ueno, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    Antigen cross-reactivity is an inbuilt feature of the T cell compartment. However, little is known about the flexibility of T cell recognition in the context of genetically variable pathogens such as HIV-1. In this study, we used a combinatorial library containing 24 billion octamer peptides to characterize the cross-reactivity profiles of CD8(+) T cells specific for the immunodominant HIV-1 subtype B Nef epitope VY8 (VPLRPMTY) presented by HLA-B(*)35∶01. In conjunction, we examined naturally occurring antigenic variations within the VY8 epitope. Sequence analysis of plasma viral RNA isolated from 336 HIV-1-infected individuals revealed variability at position (P) 3 and P8 of VY8; Phe at P8, but not Val at P3, was identified as an HLA-B(*)35∶01-associated polymorphism. VY8-specific T cells generated from several different HIV-1-infected patients showed unique and clonotype-dependent cross-reactivity footprints. Nonetheless, all T cells recognized both the index Leu and mutant Val at P3 equally well. In contrast, competitive titration assays revealed that the Tyr to Phe substitution at P8 reduced T cell recognition by 50-130 fold despite intact peptide binding to HLA-B(*)35∶01. These findings explain the preferential selection of Phe at the C-terminus of VY8 in HLA-B(*)35∶01(+) individuals and demonstrate that HIV-1 can exploit the limitations of T cell recognition in vivo.

  10. Three novel NY-ESO-1 epitopes bound to DRB1*0803, DQB1*0401 and DRB1*0901 recognized by CD4 T cells from CHP-NY-ESO-1-vaccinated patients.

    PubMed

    Mizote, Yu; Taniguchi, Taku; Tanaka, Kei; Isobe, Midori; Wada, Hisashi; Saika, Takashi; Kita, Shoichi; Koide, Yukari; Uenaka, Akiko; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2010-07-19

    Three novel NY-ESO-1 CD4 T cell epitopes were identified using PBMC obtained from patients who were vaccinated with a complex of cholesterol-bearing hydrophobized pullulan (CHP) and NY-ESO-1 protein (CHP-NY-ESO-1). The restriction molecules were determined by antibody blocking and using various EBV-B cells with different HLA alleles as APC to present peptides to CD4 T cells. The minimal epitope peptides were determined using various N- and C-termini truncated peptides deduced from 18-mer overlapping peptides originally identified for recognition. Those epitopes were DRB1*0901-restricted NY-ESO-1 87-100, DQB1*0401-restricted NY-ESO-1 95-107 and DRB1*0803-restricted NY-ESO-1 124-134. CD4 T cells used to determine those epitope peptides recognized EBV-B cells or DC that were treated with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein or NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cell lysate, suggesting that the epitope peptides are naturally processed. These CD4 T cells showed a cytokine profile with Th1 characteristics. Furthermore, NY-ESO-1 87-100 peptide/HLA-DRB1*0901 tetramer staining was observed. Multiple Th1-type CD4 T cell responses are beneficial for inducing effective anti-tumor responses after NY-ESO-1 protein vaccination.

  11. Improving Serodiagnosis of Human and Canine Leishmaniasis with Recombinant Leishmania braziliensis Cathepsin L-like Protein and a Synthetic Peptide Containing Its Linear B-cell Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The early and correct diagnosis of human leishmaniasis is essential for disease treatment. Another important step in the control of visceral leishmaniasis is the identification of infected dogs, which are the main domestic reservoir of L. infantum. Recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides based on Leishmania genes have emerged as valuable targets for serodiagnosis due to their increased sensitivity, specificity and potential for standardization. Cathepsin L-like genes are surface antigens that are secreted by amastigotes and have little similarity to host proteins, factors that enable this protein as a good target for serodiagnosis of the leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We mapped a linear B-cell epitope within the Cathepsin L-like protein from L. braziliensis. A synthetic peptide containing the epitope and the recombinant protein was evaluated for serodiagnosis of human tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis, as well as canine visceral leishmaniasis. Conclusions/Significance The recombinant protein performed best for human tegumentary and canine visceral leishmaniasis, with 96.30% and 89.33% accuracy, respectively. The synthetic peptide was the best to discriminate human visceral leishmaniasis, with 97.14% specificity, 94.55% sensitivity and 96.00% accuracy. Comparison with T. cruzi-infected humans and dogs suggests that the identified epitope is specific to Leishmania parasites, which minimizes the likelihood of cross-reactions. PMID:25569432

  12. Comparison of gold nanoparticle mediated photoporation: vapor nanobubbles outperform direct heating for delivering macromolecules in live cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ranhua; Raemdonck, Koen; Peynshaert, Karen; Lentacker, Ine; De Cock, Ine; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Skirtach, Andre G; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2014-06-24

    There is a great interest in delivering macromolecular agents into living cells for therapeutic purposes, such as siRNA for gene silencing. Although substantial effort has gone into designing nonviral nanocarriers for delivering macromolecules into cells, translocation of the therapeutic molecules from the endosomes after endocytosis into the cytoplasm remains a major bottleneck. Laser-induced photoporation, especially in combination with gold nanoparticles, is an alternative physical method that is receiving increasing attention for delivering macromolecules in cells. By allowing gold nanoparticles to bind to the cell membrane, nanosized membrane pores can be created upon pulsed laser illumination. Depending on the laser energy, pores are created through either direct heating of the AuNPs or by vapor nanobubbles (VNBs) that can emerge around the AuNPs. Macromolecules in the surrounding cell medium can then diffuse through the pores directly into the cytoplasm. Here we present a systematic evaluation of both photoporation mechanisms in terms of cytotoxicity, cell loading, and siRNA transfection efficiency. We find that the delivery of macromolecules under conditions of VNBs is much more efficient than direct photothermal disturbance of the plasma membrane without any noticeable cytotoxic effect. Interestingly, by tuning the laser energy, the pore size could be changed, allowing control of the amount and size of molecules that are delivered in the cytoplasm. As only a single nanosecond laser pulse is required, we conclude that VNBs are an interesting photoporation mechanism that may prove very useful for efficient high-throughput macromolecular delivery in live cells.

  13. T cell participation in autoreactivity to NC16a epitopes in bullous pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Pickford, W J; Gudi, V; Haggart, A M; Lewis, B J; Herriot, R; Barker, R N; Ormerod, A D

    2015-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is a blistering skin disease characterized by autoantibodies against the NC16a domain of bullous pemphigoid 180. This study was performed to characterize and map the fine specificity of T cell responses to NC16a. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a total of 28 bullous pemphigoid patients and 14 matched controls were tested for proliferative and cytokine responses to recombinant NC16a and a complete panel of 21 overlapping peptides spanning this region of BP180. Proliferative responses to NC16A and the peptide panel in the patients with active disease were similar in frequency and magnitude to those in healthy donors, and included late responses typical of naive cells in approximately 60% of each group. Interleukin (IL)-4 responses were slightly stronger for six peptides, and significantly stronger for Nc16a, in patients than in controls. Factor analysis identified factors that separate responses to the peptide panel discretely into IL-4, T helper type 2 (Th2) pattern, interferon (IFN)-γ, Th1 pattern and IL-10 or transforming growth factor [TGF-β, regulatory T cell (Treg)] pattern. Factors segregating IL-10 versus IFN-γ were predicted by active blistering or remission, and TGF-β or IL-10 versus IFN-γ by age. Finally, we confirmed a significant up-regulation of IgE responses to BP180 in the patients with pemphigoid. This shows the complexity of T cell phenotype and fine autoreactive specificity in responses to NC16A, in patients and in normal controls. Important disease-associated factors determine the balance of cytokine responses. Of these, specific IL-4 and IgE responses show the strongest associations with pemphigoid, pointing to an important contribution by Th2 cytokines to pathogenesis. PMID:25472480

  14. Cytotoxic T cell recognition of allelic variants of HLA B35 bound to an Epstein-Barr virus epitope: influence of peptide conformation and TCR-peptide interaction.

    PubMed

    Khanna, R; Silins, S L; Weng, Z; Gatchell, D; Burrows, S R; Cooper, L

    1999-05-01

    Fine specificity analysis of HLA B35-restricted Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones revealed a unique heterogeneity whereby one group of these clones cross-recognized an EBV epitope (YPLHEQHGM) on virus-infected cells expressing either HLA B*3501 or HLA B*3503, while another group cross-recognized this epitope in association with either HLA B*3502 or HLA B*3503. Peptide binding and titration studies ruled out the possibility that these differences were due to variation in the efficiency of peptide presentation by the HLA B35 alleles. Sequence analysis of the TCR genetic elements showed that these clonotypes either expressed BV12/AV3 or BV14/ADV17S1 heterodimers. Interestingly, CTL analysis with monosubstituted alanine mutants of the YPLHEQHGM epitope indicated that the BV12/AV3+ clones preferentially recognized residues towards the C terminus of the peptide, while the BV14/ADV17S1+ clones interacted with residues towards N terminus of the peptide. Molecular modelling of the MHC-peptide complexes suggests that the differences in two floor positions (114 and 116) of the HLA B35 alleles dictate different conformations of the peptide residues L3 and/or H7 and directly contribute in the discerning allele-specific immune recognition by the CTL clonotypes. These results provide evidence for a critical role for the selective interaction of the TCR with specific residues within the peptide epitope in the fine specificity of CTL recognition of allelic variants of an HLA molecule.

  15. A new Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein and its non-described specific B cell conformational epitope applied in the serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Duarte, Mariana C; Costa, Lourena E; Garde, Esther; Dimer, Laura M; Kursancew, Amanda C S; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Roatt, Bruno M; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-04-01

    The serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) presents problems related to its sensitivity and/or specificity. In the present study, a new Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein, LiHyD, was produced as a recombinant protein (rLiHyD) and evaluated in ELISA experiments for the CVL serodiagnosis. LiHyD was characterized as antigenic in a recent immunoproteomic search performed with Leishmania infantum proteins and the sera of dogs developing visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Aiming to compare the efficacy between whole proteins and synthetic peptides, two linear and one conformational B cell epitopes of LiHyD were synthesized and also evaluated as diagnostic markers. The four antigens were recognized by the sera of dogs suffering VL. On the contrary, low reactivity was observed when they were assayed with sera from non-infected healthy dogs living in endemic or non-endemic areas of leishmaniasis. In addition, no reactivity was found against them using sera from dogs experimentally infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, Babesia canis, or Ehrlichia canis, or sera from animals vaccinated with the Leish-Tec® vaccine, a prophylactic preparation commercially available for CVL prevention in Brazil. As comparative diagnostic tools, a recombinant version of the amastigote-specific A2 protein and a soluble crude Leishmania extract were studied. Both antigens presented lower sensitivity and/or specificity values than the LiHyD-based products. The rLiHyD presented better results for the CVL serodiagnosis than its linear epitopes, although the peptide recreating the conformational epitope resulted also appropriate as a diagnostic marker of CVL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the use of a conformational epitope derived from a Leishmania protein for serodiagnosis of CVL. PMID:26782811

  16. Identification of a B-cell epitope of hyaluronidase, a major bee venom allergen, from its crystal structure in complex with a specific Fab.

    PubMed

    Padavattan, Sivaraman; Schirmer, Tilman; Schmidt, Margit; Akdis, Cezmi; Valenta, Rudolf; Mittermann, Irene; Soldatova, Lyudmila; Slater, Jay; Mueller, Ulrich; Markovic-Housley, Zora

    2007-05-01

    The major allergens of honeybee venom, hyaluronidase (Hyal) and phospholipase A2, can induce life-threatening IgE-mediated allergic reactions in humans. Although conventional immunotherapy is effective, up to 40% of patients develop allergic side effects including anaphylaxis and thus, there is a need for an improved immunotherapy. A murine monoclonal anti-Hyal IgG1 antibody (mAb 21E11), that competed for Hyal binding with IgEs from sera of bee venom allergic patients, was raised. The fragment of these IgG antibodies which bind to antigen (Fab) was produced and complexed (1:1) with Hyal. The crystal structure determination of Hyal/Fab 21E11 complex (2.6 A) enabled the identification of the Hyal-IgG interface which provides indirect information on the Hyal-IgE interaction (B-cell epitope). The epitope is composed of a linear array of nine residues (Arg138, His141-Arg148) located at the tip of a helix-turn-helix motive which protrudes away from the globular core and fits tightly into the deep surface pocket formed by the residues from the six complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the Fab. The epitope is continuous and yet its conformation appears to be essential for Ab recognition, since the synthetic 15-mer peptide comprising the entire epitope (Arg138-Glu152) is neither recognized by mAb 21E11 nor by human IgEs. The structure of the complex provides the basis for the rational design of Hyal derivatives with reduced allergenic activity, which could be used in the development of safer allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:17374540

  17. The Use of the Immune Epitope Database to Study Autoimmune Epitope Data Related to Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Sette, Alessandro; Paul, Sinu; Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-11-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a repository of published epitope data for infectious diseases, allergy, transplantation and autoimmunity. Herein we provide an introduction to the IEDB search interface, focusing on data related to autoimmune diseases, including alopecia areata (AA). We demonstrate how common questions related can be answered, such as how to search for specific autoantigens, epitope sequences, response types (B- and/or T-cell assays), or host, as well as how to search for epitopes of known major histocompatibility complex restriction and for data related to a specific disease. Our survey of the data found that while as a whole Autoimmunity-specific records represent a significant portion (∼30%); epitopes reported for AA are remarkably few, just 23 epitopes from six antigens. This reveals a significant knowledge gap for AA, and suggests that additional mapping of epitopes and identification of novel AA-associated autoantigens is warranted. Citing recently published examples, we show how bioinformatic, proteomic, and technological advances make it now increasingly feasible to identify epitopes and novel antigens in human disease. The goal herein was to increase awareness of the IEDB as a free resource for the scientific community and to demonstrate its use in finding (existing) and analyzing (prediction) epitope data. PMID:26551944

  18. Randomized Trial of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Delivered by Encapsulated Cell Intraocular Implants for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    BIRCH, DAVID G.; WELEBER, RICHARD G.; DUNCAN, JACQUE L.; JAFFE, GLENN J.; TAO, WENG

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the safety and effect on visual function of ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered via an intraocular encapsulated cell implant for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). DESIGN Ciliary neurotrophic factor for late-stage retinitis pigmentosa study 3 (CNTF3; n = 65) and ciliary neurotrophic factor for early-stage retinitis pigmentosa study 4 (CNTF4; n = 68) were multicenter, sham-controlled dose-ranging studies. METHODS Patients were randomly assigned to receive a high- or low-dose implant in 1 eye and sham surgery in the fellow eye. The primary endpoints were change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 12 months for CNTF3 and change in visual field sensitivity at 12 months for CNTF4. Patients had the choice of retaining or removing the implant at 12 months for CNTF3 and 24 months for CNTF4. RESULTS There were no serious adverse events related to either the encapsulated cell implant or the surgical procedure. In CNTF3, there was no change in acuity in either ciliary neurotrophic factor–or sham-treated eyes at 1 year. In CNTF4, eyes treated with the high-dose implant showed a significant decrease in sensitivity while no change was seen in sham- and low dose–treated eyes at 12 months. The decrease in sensitivity was reversible upon implant removal. In both studies, ciliary neurotrophic factor treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in retinal thickness. CONCLUSIONS Long-term intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor is achieved by the encapsulated cell implant. Neither study showed therapeutic benefit in the primary outcome variable. PMID:23668681

  19. Patr-A and B, the orthologues of HLA-A and B, present hepatitis C virus epitopes to CD8+ cytotoxic T cells from two chronically infected chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) show a disease progression similar to that observed for human patients. Although most infected animals develop a chronic hepatitis, virus persistence is associated with an ongoing immune response, for which the beneficial or detrimental effects are uncertain. Lines of virus-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL) have been previously established from liver biopsies of two common chimpanzees chronically infected with HCV-1. The viral epitopes recognized by six lines of CTL have been defined using synthetic peptides and shown to consist of 8 to 9-residue peptides derived from various viral proteins. Five of the epitopes derive from sequences that vary among strains of HCV. The majority of the corresponding variant epitopes from different HCV strains were either recognized less efficiently or not at all by the CTL, suggesting their response may have limited potential for controlling replication of HCV variants. Complementary DNAs encoding class I alleles of the two common chimpanzees, Patr-A, -B, and -C were cloned, sequenced, and transfected individually into a class I- deficient human cell line. Analysis of peptide presentation by the class I transfectants to CTL identified the Patr class I allotypes that present the six epitopes defined here and an additional epitope defined previously. The assignment of epitopes to class I allotypes based upon analysis of the transfected cells correlates precisely with the segregation of antigen-presenting function within a panel of common chimpanzee cell lines and the expression of class I heavy chains as defined by isoelectric focusing. Five of the HCV-1 epitopes are presented by Patr-B allotypes, two epitopes are presented by a Patr-A allotype, and none is presented by Patr-C allotypes. PMID:8666933

  20. Healthy HLA-DQ2.5+ Subjects Lack Regulatory and Memory T Cells Specific for Immunodominant Gluten Epitopes of Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Asbjørn; Risnes, Louise F; Bergseng, Elin; Lundin, Knut E A; Sollid, Ludvig M; Qiao, Shuo-Wang

    2016-03-15

    Celiac disease (CD) is an HLA-associated disorder characterized by a harmful T cell response to dietary gluten. It is not understood why most individuals who carry CD-associated HLA molecules, such as HLA-DQ2.5, do not develop CD despite continuous gluten exposure. In this study, we have used tetramers of HLA-DQ2.5 bound with immunodominant gluten epitopes to explore whether HLA-DQ2.5(+) healthy individuals mount a specific CD4(+) T cell response to gluten. We found that gluten tetramer-binding memory cells were rare in blood of healthy individuals. These cells showed lower tetramer-binding intensity and no signs of biased TCR usage compared with gluten tetramer-binding memory T cells from patients. After sorting and in vitro expansion, only 18% of the tetramer-binding memory cells from healthy subjects versus 79% in CD patients were gluten-reactive upon tetramer restaining. Further, T cell clones of tetramer-sorted memory cells of healthy individuals showed lower gluten-specific proliferative responses compared with those of CD patients, indicating that tetramer-binding memory cells in healthy control subjects may be cross-reactive T cells. In duodenal biopsy specimens of healthy control subjects, CD4(+) T cells were determined not to be gluten reactive. Finally, gluten tetramer-binding cells of healthy individuals did not coexpress regulatory T cell markers (Foxp3(+) CD25(+)) and cultured T cell clones did not express a cytokine profile that indicated immune-dampening properties. The results demonstrate that healthy HLA-DQ2.5(+) individuals do not mount a T cell response to immunodominant gluten epitopes of CD.

  1. Topology of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41: differential exposure of the Kennedy epitope on cell and viral membranes.

    PubMed

    Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sun, Chengqun; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail (CTT) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env) protein is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of Env structure and functional properties, including fusogenicity and antigenicity. While the CTT has been commonly referred to as the "intracytoplasmic domain" based on the assumption of an exclusive localization inside the membrane lipid bilayer, early antigenicity studies and recent biochemical analyses have produced a credible case for surface exposure of specific CTT sequences, including the classical "Kennedy epitope" (KE) of gp41, leading to an alternative model of gp41 topology with multiple membrane-spanning domains. The current study was designed to test these conflicting models of CTT topology by characterizing the exposure of native CTT sequences and substituted VSV-G epitope tags in cell- and virion-associated Env to reference monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Surface staining and FACS analysis of intact, Env-expressing cells demonstrated that the KE is accessible to binding by MAbs directed to both an inserted VSV-G epitope tag and the native KE sequence. Importantly, the VSV-G tag was only reactive when inserted into the KE; no reactivity was observed in cells expressing Env with the VSV-G tag inserted into the LLP2 domain. In contrast to cell-surface expressed Env, no binding of KE-directed MAbs was observed to Env on the surface of intact virions using either immune precipitation or surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. These data indicate apparently distinct CTT topologies for virion- and cell-associated Env species and add to the case for a reconsideration of CTT topology that is more complex than currently envisioned.

  2. Vaccine-Induced Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Responses Focused on a Single Nef Epitope Select for Escape Variants Shortly after Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Damien C.; Cruz, Michael A.; Power, Karen A.; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G.; Bean, David J.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Gadgil, Rujuta; Lima, Noemia S.; Magnani, Diogo M.; Ejima, Keisuke; Allison, David B.; Piatak, Michael; Altman, John D.; Parks, Christopher L.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Capuano, Saverio; Galler, Ricardo; Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Allen, Todd M.; Watkins, David I.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alleles (e.g., HLA-B*27) are enriched among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals who suppress viremia without treatment (termed “elite controllers” [ECs]). Likewise, Mamu-B*08 expression also predisposes rhesus macaques to control simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Given the similarities between Mamu-B*08 and HLA-B*27, SIV-infected Mamu-B*08+ animals provide a model to investigate HLA-B*27-mediated elite control. We have recently shown that vaccination with three immunodominant Mamu-B*08-restricted epitopes (Vif RL8, Vif RL9, and Nef RL10) increased the incidence of elite control in Mamu-B*08+ macaques after challenge with the pathogenic SIVmac239 clone. Furthermore, a correlate analysis revealed that CD8+ T cells targeting Nef RL10 was correlated with improved outcome. Interestingly, this epitope is conserved between SIV and HIV-1 and exhibits a delayed and atypical escape pattern. These features led us to postulate that a monotypic vaccine-induced Nef RL10-specific CD8+ T-cell response would facilitate the development of elite control in Mamu-B*08+ animals following repeated intrarectal challenges with SIVmac239. To test this, we vaccinated Mamu-B*08+ animals with nef inserts in which Nef RL10 was either left intact (group 1) or disrupted by mutations (group 2). Although monkeys in both groups mounted Nef-specific cellular responses, only those in group 1 developed Nef RL10-specific CD8+ T cells. These vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells did not prevent infection. Escape variants emerged rapidly in the group 1 vaccinees, and ultimately, the numbers of ECs were similar in groups 1 and 2. High-frequency vaccine-induced CD8+ T cells focused on a single conserved epitope and therefore did not prevent infection or increase the incidence of elite control in Mamu-B*08+ macaques. IMPORTANCE Since elite control of chronic-phase viremia is a classic

  3. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Victoria, E J; Pierce, S W; Branks, M J; Masouredis, S P

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10% (dog, 2.6%; rhesus monkey, 7.4%), consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3. Unlike RBC autoantibodies from antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors

  4. Cytotoxicity Effects of Mouse IgG Produced against Three Nanoliposomal Human DR5 Receptor Epitopes on Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Amirijavid, Shaghayegh; Entezari, Maliheh; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Mosavi-Jarahi, Alireza; Dehghani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Cancer causes cells to avoid death while being the second cause of death in the world itself. Damaged cells in the absence of apoptosis will increasingly amplify their inefficient genome. Of the two main apoptosis inducing pathways in cells, the first has p53 protein as the main initiating factor in the cascade. According to research results this protein s mutated in 50% of cancers and sointerest has cooncentrated on the second pathway that features death receptors. Among these receptors TRAIL1/DR5 is especially expressed in cancer cells. So targeting such receptors can initiate the apoptotic cascade in cells. Interestingly by substitution of activating ligands with antibodies as agonists, we could efficiently turn on the apoptosis pathway. First of all, three small peptides from the DR5 protein extracellular domain were synthesized and injected with two different kind of adjuvants (Fround and liposomal encapsulation) separately into mice at 15 day intervals. As a result, liposomal peptides induced the immune system more efficient than Frounds adjuvant and at the end point the antibodies which were obtained from liposomal peptide injection induced much more effective death. Liposomal formol could be used as an adjuvant in immunization utilizing small peptides. They carry, protect and deliver peptides very efficiently. In addition, small peptides of a certain size from the extracellular domain of DR5 proteins not only can induce immune system but also produce antibodies playing a remarkable anti-cancer roles against breast cancer cells (MCF-7). PMID:27165235

  5. Identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the avian leukosis virus P27 protein using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Qin, Liting; Zhu, Haibo; Sun, Yingjun; Cui, Xuezhi; Gao, Yadong; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors. The capsid protein P27 is the group-specific antigen of ALV and has many viral antigen sites that are easy to detect. In this study, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3A9, that is specific for the P27 protein. A series of partially overlapping peptides were screened to define (181)PPSAR(185) as the minimal linear epitope recognized by mAb 3A9. The identified epitope could be recognized by chicken anti-ALV and mouse anti-ALV P27 sera. The epitope was highly conserved among a number of ALV-A, ALV-B and ALV-J strains. MAb 3A9 might be a valuable tool for the development of new immunodiagnostic approaches for ALV, and the defined linear epitope might help further our understanding of the antigenic structure of the P27 protein. PMID:27438076

  6. Specificities of human CD4+ T cell responses to an inactivated flavivirus vaccine and infection: correlation with structure and epitope prediction.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Julia; Aberle, Judith H; Stiasny, Karin; Knapp, Bernhard; Schreiner, Wolfgang; Fae, Ingrid; Fischer, Gottfried; Scheinost, Ondrej; Chmelik, Vaclav; Heinz, Franz X

    2014-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus is endemic in large parts of Europe and Central and Eastern Asia and causes more than 10,000 annual cases of neurological disease in humans. It is closely related to the mosquito-borne yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and West Nile viruses, and vaccination with an inactivated whole-virus vaccine can effectively prevent clinical disease. Neutralizing antibodies are directed to the viral envelope protein (E) and an accepted correlate of immunity. However, data on the specificities of CD4(+) T cells that recognize epitopes in the viral structural proteins and thus can provide direct help to the B cells producing E-specific antibodies are lacking. We therefore conducted a study on the CD4(+) T cell response against the virion proteins in vaccinated people in comparison to TBE patients. The data obtained with overlapping peptides in interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays were analyzed in relation to the three-dimensional structures of the capsid (C) and E proteins as well as to epitope predictions based on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II peptide affinities. In the C protein, peptides corresponding to two out of four alpha helices dominated the response in both vaccinees and patients, whereas in the E protein concordance of immunodominance was restricted to peptides of a single domain (domain III). Epitope predictions were much better for C than for E and were especially erroneous for the transmembrane regions. Our data provide evidence for a strong impact of protein structural features that influence peptide processing, contributing to the discrepancies observed between experimentally determined and computer-predicted CD4(+) T cell epitopes. Importance: Tick-borne encephalitis virus is endemic in large parts of Europe and Asia and causes more than 10,000 annual cases of neurological disease in humans. It is closely related to yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and

  7. CD8(+) T-cell Cytotoxic Capacity Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Control Can Be Mediated through Various Epitopes and Human Leukocyte Antigen Types.

    PubMed

    Migueles, Stephen A; Mendoza, Daniel; Zimmerman, Matthew G; Martins, Kelly M; Toulmin, Sushila A; Kelly, Elizabeth P; Peterson, Bennett A; Johnson, Sarah A; Galson, Eric; Poropatich, Kate O; Patamawenu, Andy; Imamichi, Hiromi; Ober, Alexander; Rehm, Catherine A; Jones, Sara; Hallahan, Claire W; Follmann, Dean A; Connors, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Understanding natural immunologic control over Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 replication, as occurs in rare long-term nonprogressors/elite controllers (LTNP/EC), should inform the design of efficacious HIV vaccines and immunotherapies. Durable control in LTNP/EC is likely mediated by highly functional virus-specific CD8(+) T-cells. Protective Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles, like B*27 and B*57, are present in most, but not all LTNP/EC, providing an opportunity to investigate features shared by their HIV-specific immune responses. To better understand the contribution of epitope targeting and conservation to immune control, we compared the CD8(+) T-cell specificity and function of B*27/57(neg) LTNP/EC (n = 23), B*27/57(pos) LTNP/EC (n = 23) and B*27/57(neg) progressors (n = 13). Fine mapping revealed 11 previously unreported immunodominant responses. Although B*27/57(neg) LTNP/EC did not target more highly conserved epitopes, their CD8(+) T-cell cytotoxic capacity was significantly higher than progressors. Similar to B*27/57(pos) LTNP/EC, this superior cytotoxicity was mediated by preferential expansion of immunodominant responses and lysis through the predicted HLA. These findings suggest that increased CD8(+) T-cell cytotoxic capacity is a common mechanism of control in most LTNP/EC regardless of HLA type. They also suggest that potent cytotoxicity can be mediated through various epitopes and HLA molecules and could, in theory, be induced in most people. PMID:26137533

  8. A vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein epitope-incorporated oncolytic adenovirus overcomes CAR-dependency and shows markedly enhanced cancer cell killing and suppression of tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, A-Rum; Hong, Jinwoo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2015-01-01

    Utility of traditional oncolytic adenovirus (Ad) has been limited due to low expression of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in cancer cells which results in poor infectivity of Ads. Here with an aim of improving the efficiency of Ad's entry to the cell, we generated a novel tropism-expanded oncolytic Ad which contains the epitope of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) at the HI-loop of Ad fiber. We generated 9 variants of oncolytic Ads with varying linkers and partial deletion to the fiber. Only one VSVG epitope-incorporated variant, RdB-1L-VSVG, which contains 1 linker and no deletion to fiber, was produced efficiently. Production of 3-dimensionaly stable fiber in RdB-1L-VSVG was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. RdB-1L-VSVG shows a remarkable improvement in cytotoxicity and total viral yield in cancer cells. RdB-1L-VSVG demonstrates enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells with subdued CAR-expression as it can be internalized by an alternate pathway. Competition assays with a CAR-specific antibody (Ab) or VSVG receptor, phosphatidyl serine (PS), reveals that cell internalization of RdB-1L-VSVG is mediated by both CAR and PS. Furthermore, treatment with RdB-1L-VSVG significantly enhanced anti-tumor effect in vivo. These studies demonstrate that the strategy to expand oncolytic Ad tropism may significantly improve therapeutic profile for cancer treatment. PMID:26430798

  9. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  10. BIITE: A Tool to Determine HLA Class II Epitopes from T Cell ELISpot Data

    PubMed Central

    Boelen, Lies; O’Neill, Patrick K.; Quigley, Kathryn J.; Reynolds, Catherine J.; Maillere, Bernard; Robinson, John H.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Altmann, Daniel M.; Boyton, Rosemary J.; Asquith, Becca

    2016-01-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells requires the recognition of peptides that are presented by HLA class II molecules and can be assessed experimentally using the ELISpot assay. However, even given an individual’s HLA class II genotype, identifying which class II molecule is responsible for a positive ELISpot response to a given peptide is not trivial. The two main difficulties are the number of HLA class II molecules that can potentially be formed in a single individual (3–14) and the lack of clear peptide binding motifs for class II molecules. Here, we present a Bayesian framework to interpret ELISpot data (BIITE: Bayesian Immunogenicity Inference Tool for ELISpot); specifically BIITE identifies which HLA-II:peptide combination(s) are immunogenic based on cohort ELISpot data. We apply BIITE to two ELISpot datasets and explore the expected performance using simulations. We show this method can reach high accuracies, depending on the cohort size and the success rate of the ELISpot assay within the cohort. PMID:26953935

  11. Allergen structures and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H

    2011-07-01

    Human type 1 hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are characterized by allergen-specific IgE antibodies produced in allergic individuals after allergen exposure. IgE antibodies bound to receptors on the surface of effector cells trigger an allergic response by interacting with three-dimensional (conformational) epitopes on the allergen surface. Crystal structures are available for complexes of antibody specifically bound to five allergens, from birch pollen, bee venom, cockroach, cow's milk and timothy grass pollen. The details of the antibody-allergen interaction extending all the way to atomic resolution are available from such complexes. In vitro investigations using recombinant monoclonal antibodies and human basophils show that binding affinity is a key to triggering the allergic response. Continued molecular characterization of antibody-allergen interactions is paving the way for the use of recombinant allergens in allergen-specific diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:21668845

  12. Reduced TCR‐dependent activation through citrullination of a T‐cell epitope enhances Th17 development by disruption of the STAT3/5 balance

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitt, Christopher; Falconer, Jane; Stoop, Jeroen; van Eden, Willem; Robinson, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Citrullination is a post‐translational modification of arginine that commonly occurs in inflammatory tissues. Because T‐cell receptor (TCR) signal quantity and quality can regulate T‐cell differentiation, citrullination within a T‐cell epitope has potential implications for T‐cell effector function. Here, we investigated how citrullination of an immunedominant T‐cell epitope affected Th17 development. Murine naïve CD4+ T cells with a transgenic TCR recognising p89‐103 of the G1 domain of aggrecan (agg) were co‐cultured with syngeneic bone marrow‐derived dendritic cells (BMDC) presenting the native or citrullinated peptides. In the presence of pro‐Th17 cytokines, the peptide citrullinated on residue 93 (R93Cit) significantly enhanced Th17 development whilst impairing the Th2 response, compared to the native peptide. T cells responding to R93Cit produced less IL‐2, expressed lower levels of the IL‐2 receptor subunit CD25, and showed reduced STAT5 phosphorylation, whilst STAT3 activation was unaltered. IL‐2 blockade in native p89‐103‐primed T cells enhanced the phosphorylated STAT3/STAT5 ratio, and concomitantly enhanced Th17 development. Our data illustrate how a post‐translational modification of a TCR contact point may promote Th17 development by altering the balance between STAT5 and STAT3 activation in responding T cells, and provide new insight into how protein citrullination may influence effector Th‐cell development in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27173727

  13. Co-administration of vaccination with DNA encoding T cell epitope on the Der p and BCG inhibited airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Hong; Ahn, Joong Hyun; Kim, Seung Joon; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Young Kyoon; Kim, Kwan Hyoung; Moon, Hwa Sik; Song, Jeong Sup; Park, Sung Hak; Kwon, Soon Seog

    2006-01-01

    Therapeutic modalities of airway remodeling in asthma have proved to be unsuccessful regarding reversing the previously established chronic airway changes. Recently, the potential of plasmid DNA to inhibit the Th2 immune response has been demonstrated in animal models of asthma. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunization also induced immunomodulation, which appeared to be reliant on the properties of the interferon-gamma that was produced. Mice were immunized with house dust mite extract (HDM). At the 3 week point, we injected BCG subcutaneously into mice on three successive weeks. One week after the BCG injection, we immunized mice with the DNA plasmid encoding for murine T-cell epitope on Dermatophagoide pteronyssinus 2 thrice weekly. At 9 weeks after immunization, we measured airway responsiveness. Twenty four hours later, we performed bronchoalveolar lavage and histological examinations. Co-administration of DNA vaccination and BCG resulted in a partial suppression of the overproduction of goblet cells and the thickness of the peribronchial smooth muscle in ongoing allergic responses. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the number of total cells and eosinophils was reduced, and regarding the change of cytokines, the concentration of IL-4 was also decreased, but interferon-gamma was increased in the co-administration group, opposed to the asthma group. These results suggest that co-administration of vaccination with the DNA encoding T-cell epitope and BCG are effective regarding ongoing allergic response and might constitute an ideal method for combating allergic disease in the future.

  14. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound Bet v 1 peptides lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes reduces Bet v 1-specific T cell responses via blocking antibodies in a murine model for birch pollen allergy

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, B; Narayanan, M; Focke-Tejkl, M; Wrba, F; Vrtala, S; Valenta, R

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccines consisting of allergen-derived peptides lacking IgE reactivity and allergen-specific T cell epitopes bound to allergen-unrelated carrier molecules have been suggested as candidates for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Objective To study whether prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound peptides from the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes has influence on Bet v 1-specific T cell responses. Methods Three Bet v 1-derived peptides, devoid of Bet v 1-specific T cell epitopes, were coupled to KLH and adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide to obtain a Bet v 1-specific allergy vaccine. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized with the peptide vaccine before or after sensitization to Bet v 1. Bet v 1- and peptide-specific antibody responses were analysed by ELISA. T cell and cytokine responses to Bet v 1, KLH, and the peptides were studied in proliferation assays. The effects of peptide-specific and allergen-specific antibodies on T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation were studied using specific antibodies. Results Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination with carrier-bound Bet v 1 peptides induced a Bet v 1-specific IgG antibody response without priming/boosting of Bet v 1-specific T cells. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination of mice with the peptide vaccine induced Bet v 1-specific antibodies which suppressed Bet v 1-specific T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Vaccination with carrier-bound allergen-derived peptides lacking allergen-specific T cell epitopes induces allergen-specific IgG antibodies which suppress allergen-specific T cell responses and allergic lung inflammation. PMID:24447086

  15. ssDNA Aptamer Specifically Targets and Selectively Delivers Cytotoxic Drug Doxorubicin to HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ge; Li, Huan; Yang, Shuanghui; Wen, Jianguo; Niu, Junqi; Zu, Youli

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of death due to cancer worldwide with over 500,000 people affected annually. Although chemotherapy has been widely used to treat patients with HCC, alternate modalities to specifically deliver therapeutic cargos to cancer cells have been sought in recent years due to the severe side effects of chemotherapy. In this respect, aptamer-based tumor targeted drug delivery has emerged as a promising approach to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy and reduce or eliminate drug toxicity. In this study, we developed a new HepG2-specific aptamer (HCA#3) by a procedure known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and exploited its role as a targeting ligand to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) to HepG2 cells in vitro. The selected 76-base nucleotide aptamer preferentially bound to HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells but not to control cells. The aptamer HCA#3 was modified with paired CG repeats at the 5′-end to carry and deliver a high payload of intercalated Dox molecules at the CG sites. Four Dox molecules (mol/mol) were fully intercalated in each conjugate aptamer-Dox (ApDC) molecule. Biostability analysis showed that the ApDC molecules are stable in serum. Functional analysis showed that ApDC specifically targeted and released Dox within HepG2 cells but not in control cells, and treatment with HCA#3 ApDC induced HepG2 cell apoptosis but had minimal effect on control cells. Our study demonstrated that HCA#3 ApDC is a promising aptamer-targeted therapeutic that can specifically deliver and release a high doxorubicin payload in HCC cells. PMID:26808385

  16. Identification and immunogenic potential of B cell epitopes of outer membrane protein OmpF of Aeromonas hydrophila in translational fusion with a carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2015-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila, a ubiquitous and virulent bacterial pathogen, affects a variety of fishes, including Labeo rohita. Existing treatment strategies comprise antibiotic therapies and attenuated bacterial strain-based vaccines. No functional subunit vaccine has been available until now. Given their key role in determining pathogenicity, outer membrane proteins have been successfully explored as potential vaccine candidates. We have devised a direct strategy for eliminating non-specific responses by selectively aiming the immune response against specific immunodominant epitopes of the outer membrane protein F (OmpF) of A. hydrophila (AhOmpF). Five putative epitopes of AhOmpF predicted in silico were genetically conjugated with heat labile enterotoxin chain B of E. coli (LTB). Recombinant fusion proteins expressed in E. coli were purified from solubilized inclusion bodies and refolded. The fusion protein retained GM1 ganglioside receptor binding activity of LTB, indicating proper folding. Four of the five fusion proteins were found to be highly immunogenic. Of the four proteins, antisera against the fusion protein (anti-rEpiF1) harboring 66-80 amino acid residues of the OmpF gave maximum cross-reactivity with the targeted rOmpF in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and was able to recognize both fusion partners-rOmpF and rLTB-in Western blot. Antibody isotyping of the antisera and cytokine array analysis of the culture supernatants of splenocytes from sensitized mice manifested a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response with a bias toward Th2. Anti-rEpiF1 antibodies were able to bind to the cell membrane of live A. hydrophila cells and agglutinate them. Our results thus suggest that the OmpF epitope (66-80) in fusion with a carrier protein is a promising vaccine candidate against A. hydrophila.

  17. Mapping B-cell epitopes for the peroxidoxin of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and its potential for the clinical diagnosis of tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Santos, Thaís Teodoro de Oliveira; Silva, Ana Luíza Teixeira; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; de Carvalho, Silvio Fernando Guimarães; Coelho, Eduardo Antônio Ferraz; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The search toward the establishment of novel serological tests for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis and proper differential diagnosis may represent one alternative to the invasive parasitological methods currently used to identify infected individuals. In the present work, we investigated the potential use of recombinant peroxidoxin (rPeroxidoxin) of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis as a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of human tegumentary (TL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Linear B-cell epitope mapping was performed to identify polymorphic epitopes when comparing orthologous sequences present in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent for Chagas disease (CD), and the Homo sapiens and Canis familiaris hosts. The serological assay (ELISA) demonstrated that TL, VL and CVL individuals showed high levels of antibodies against rPeroxidoxin, allowing identification of infected ones with considerable sensitivity and great ability to discriminate (specificity) between non-infected and CD individuals (98.46% and 100%; 98.18% and 95.71%; 95.79% and 100%, respectively). An rPeroxidoxin ELISA also showed a greater ability to discriminate between vaccinated and infected animals, which is an important requirement for the public campaign control of CVL. A depletion ELISA assay using soluble peptides of this B-cell epitope confirmed the recognition of these sites only by Leishmania-infected individuals. Moreover, this work identifies two antigenic polymorphic linear B-cell epitopes of L. braziliensis. Specific recognition of TL and VL patients was confirmed by significantly decreased IgG reactivity against rPeroxidoxin after depletion of peptide-1- and peptide-2-specific antibodies (peptide 1: reduced by 32%, 42% and 5% for CL, ML and VL, respectively; peptide-2: reduced by 24%, 22% and 13% for CL, ML and VL, respectively) and only peptide-2 for CVL (reduced 9%). Overall, rPeroxidoxin may be a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of TL

  18. Amino acid residues that flank core peptide epitopes and the extracellular domains of CD4 modulate differential signaling through the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Hen egg lysozyme 52-61-specific CD4+ T cells responded by interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion to any peptide containing this epitope regardless of length of NH2- and COOH-terminal composition. However, CD4- variants could only respond to peptides containing the two COOH-terminal tryptophans at positions 62 and 63. Substitutions at these positions defined patterns of reactivity that were specific for individual T cells inferring a T cell receptor (TCR)-based phenomenon. Thus, the fine specificity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide recognition by the TCR was dramatically affected by CD4 and the COOH- terminal peptide composition. Peptides that failed to induce IL-2 secretion in the CD4- variants nevertheless induced strong tyrosine phosphorylation of CD3 zeta. Thus, whereas the TCR still recognized and bound to the MHC class II-peptide complex resulting in protein phosphorylation, this interaction failed to induce effective signal transduction manifested by IL-2 secretion. This provides a clear example of differential signaling mediated by peptides known to be naturally processed. In addition, the external domains of CD4, rather than its cytoplasmic tail, were critical in aiding TCR recognition of all peptides derived from a single epitope. These data suggest that the nested flanking residues, which are present on MHC class II but not class I bound peptides, are functionally relevant. PMID:7515103

  19. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  20. ALK as a novel lymphoma-associated tumor antigen: identification of 2 HLA-A2.1-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Passoni, Lorena; Scardino, Antonio; Bertazzoli, Carla; Gallo, Barbara; Coluccia, Addolorata M L; Lemonnier, François A; Kosmatopoulos, Konstadinos; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2002-03-15

    Oncogenic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion proteins (NPM/ALK and associated variants) are expressed in about 60% of anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCLs) but are absent in normal tissues. In this study, we investigated whether ALK, which is expressed at high levels in lymphoma cells, could be a target for antigen-specific cell-mediated immunotherapy. A panel of ALK-derived peptides was tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A*0201 molecules. Binding peptides were assessed for their capacity to elicit a specific immune response mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) both in vivo, in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice, and in vitro in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from healthy donors. Two HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes, p280-89 (SLAMLDLLHV) and p375-86 (GVLLWEIFSL), both located in the ALK kinase domain were identified. The p280-89- and p375-86-induced peptide-specific CTL lines were able to specifically release interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on stimulation with ALK peptide-pulsed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells (LCLs) or T2 cells. Anti-ALK CTLs lysed HLA-matched ALCL and neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing ALK proteins. CTL activity was inhibited by anti-HLA-A2 monoclonal antibody CR11.351, consistent with a class I-restricted mechanism of cytotoxicity. These results show the existence of functional anti-ALK CTL precursors within the peripheral T-cell repertoire of healthy donors, clearly indicating ALK as a tumor antigen and ALK-derived peptides, p280-89 and p375-86, as suitable epitopes for the development of vaccination strategies.

  1. CD4+ T-cell epitopes associated with antibody responses after intravenously and subcutaneously applied human FVIII in humanized hemophilic E17 HLA-DRB1*1501 mice

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, Katharina N.; van Helden, Pauline M.; Binder, Brigitte; Wraith, David C.; Unterthurner, Sabine; Hermann, Corinna; Schuster, Maria; Ahmad, Rafi U.; Weiller, Markus; Lubich, Christian; de la Rosa, Maurus; Schwarz, Hans Peter; Reipert, Birgit M.

    2014-01-01

    Today it is generally accepted that B cells require cognate interactions with CD4+ T cells to develop high-affinity antibodies against proteins. CD4+ T cells recognize peptides (epitopes) presented by MHC class II molecules that are expressed on antigen-presenting cells. Structural features of both the MHC class II molecule and the peptide determine the specificity of CD4+ T cells that can bind to the MHC class II-peptide complex. We used a new humanized hemophilic mouse model to identify FVIII peptides presented by HLA-DRB1*1501. This model carries a knock-out of all murine MHC class II molecules and expresses a chimeric murine-human MHC class II complex that contains the peptide-binding sites of the human HLA-DRB1*1501. When mice were treated with human FVIII, the proportion of mice that developed antibodies depended on the application route of FVIII and the activation state of the innate immune system. We identified 8 FVIII peptide regions that contained CD4+ T-cell epitopes presented by HLA-DRB1*1501 to CD4+ T cells during immune responses against FVIII. CD4+ T-cell responses after intravenous and subcutaneous application of FVIII involved the same immunodominant FVIII epitopes. Interestingly, most of the 8 peptide regions contained promiscuous epitopes that bound to several different HLA-DR proteins in in vitro binding assays. PMID:22394599

  2. 26-Week oral safety study in macaques for transgenic rice containing major human T-cell epitope peptides from Japanese cedar pollen allergens.

    PubMed

    Domon, Eiji; Takagi, Hidenori; Hirose, Sakiko; Sugita, Koichi; Kasahara, Saori; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2009-06-24

    A study of repeated oral administration of transgenic rice containing a hybrid peptide of major human T-cell epitopes (7Crp) from Japanese cedar pollen allergens was carried out in cynomolgus macaques over 26 weeks. The monkeys were divided into three groups, each comprising three males and three females, administered a high dose of transgenic rice, a low dose of transgenic rice, or a high dose of the parental rice strain. The transgenic rice 7crp#10 and the parental nontransgenic control were polished, steamed, mashed, and prepared in water at 40% (w/v). Monkeys were orally administered a high or low dose of transgenic rice or the nontransgenic control by gavage every day. No adverse effects on general behavior or body weight of animals were observed during the study. Analysis of blood from monkeys administered for 26 weeks showed that, with few exceptions, there were no significant differences in hematological or biochemical values between them. Additionally, neither pathological symptoms nor histopathological abnormalities were observed. Thus, it was concluded that oral administration of transgenic rice containing T-cell epitopes from Japanese cedar pollen allergens has no adverse effects.

  3. Expression and characterization of an M cell-specific ligand-fused dengue virus tetravalent epitope using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Luong; So, Kum-Kang; Kim, Jung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Hae; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    A fusion construct (Tet-EDIII-Co1) consisting of an M cell-specific peptide ligand (Co1) at the C-terminus of a recombinant tetravalent gene encoding the amino acid sequences of dengue envelope domain III (Tet-EDIII) from four serotypes was expressed and tested for binding activity to the mucosal immune inductive site M cells for the development of an oral vaccine. The yeast episomal expression vector, pYEGPD-TER, which was designed to direct gene expression using the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) promoter, a functional signal peptide of the amylase 1A protein from rice, and the GAL7 terminator, was used to clone the Tet-EDIII-Co1 gene and resultant plasmids were then used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PCR and back-transformation into Escherichia coli confirmed the presence of the Tet-EDIII-Co1 gene-containing plasmid in transformants. Northern blot analysis of transformed S. cerevisiae identified the presence of the Tet-EDIII-Co1-specific transcript. Western blot analysis indicated that the produced Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein with the expected molecular weight was successfully secreted into the culture medium. Quantitative Western blot analysis and ELISA revealed that the recombinant Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein comprised approximately 0.1-0.2% of cell-free extracts (CFEs). In addition, 0.1-0.2 mg of Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein per liter of culture filtrate was detected on day 1, and this quantity peaked on day 3 after cultivation. In vivo binding assays showed that the Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein was delivered specifically to M cells in Peyer's patches (PPs) while the Tet-EDIII protein lacking the Co1 ligand did not, which demonstrated the efficient targeting of this antigenic protein through the mucosal-specific ligand.

  4. Immunoinformatics prediction of linear epitopes from Taenia solium TSOL18

    PubMed Central

    Zimic, Mirko; Gutiérrez, Andrés Hazaet; Gilman, Robert Hugh; López, César; Quiliano, Miguel; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Gonzales, Armando; García, Héctor Hugo; Sheen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a public health problem in several developing countries. The oncosphere protein TSOL18 is the most immunogenic and protective antigen ever reported against porcine cysticercosis, although no specific epitope has been identified to account for these properties. Recent evidence suggests that protection might be associated with conformational epitopes. Linear epitopes from TSOL18 were computationally predicted and evaluated for immunogenicity and protection against porcine cysticercosis. A synthetic peptide was designed based on predicted linear B cell and T cell epitopes that are exposed on the surface of the theoretically modeled structure of TSOL18. Three surface epitopes from TSOL18 were predicted as immunogenic. A peptide comprising a linear arrangement of these epitopes was chemically synthesized. The capacity of the synthetic peptide to protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids was tested in a vaccine trial. The synthetic peptide was able to produce IgG antibodies in pigs and was associated to a reduction of the number of cysts, although was not able to provide complete protection, defined as the complete absence of cysts in necropsy. This study demonstrated that B cell and T cell predicted epitopes from TSOL18 were not able to completely protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids. Therefore, other linear epitopes or eventually conformational epitopes may be responsible for the protection conferred by TSOL18. PMID:21738328

  5. Toxoplasma gondii: Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding T- and B-cell epitopes of SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 elicits protection against acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Xun; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Qunli; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2015-11-27

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate, intracellular, protozoan parasite that infects large variety of warm-blooded animals including humans, livestock, and marine mammals, and causes the disease toxoplasmosis. Although T. gondii infection rates differ significantly from country to country, it still has a high morbidity and mortality. In these circumstances, developing an effective vaccine against T. gondii is urgently needed for preventing and treating toxoplasmosis. The aim of this study was to construct a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine and evaluate the immune protective efficacy against acute toxoplasmosis in mice. Therefore, twelve T- and B-cell epitopes from SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 of T. gondii were predicted by bioinformatics analysis, and then a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine was constructed. Mice immunized with the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine gained higher levels of IgG titers and IgG2a subclass titers, significant production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), percentage of T lymphocyte subsets, and longer survival times against the acute infection of T. gondii compared with those of mice administered with empty plasmid and those in control groups. Furthermore, a genetic adjuvant pEGFP-RANTES (pRANTES) could enhance the efficacy of the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine associating with humoral and cellular (Th1, CD8(+) T cell) immune responses. Above all, the DNA vaccine and the genetic adjuvant revealed in this study might be new candidates for further vaccine development against T. gondii infection.

  6. HLA-DR-restricted T-cell responses to Factor VIII epitopes in a mild haemophilia A family with missense substitution A2201P

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Ruth A.; James, Eddie A.; Kwok, William W.; Thompson, Arthur R.; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction An HLA-DRA-DRB1*0101-restricted T-cell epitope in the factor VIII (FVIII) C2 domain occurred in a mild haemophilia A patient with missense substitution FVIII-A2201P. His T cells responded to synthetic peptides FVIII2186-2205 and FVIII2194-2213. Aim T cells from family members with genotype FVIII-A2201P were analyzed to determine if FVIII-specific T cells occur in individuals with a hemophilic mutation but no clinically significant inhibitor response. Methods Fluorescent MHC class II tetramers corresponding to subjects’ HLA-DRB1 types were loaded with 20-mer peptides and utilized to label antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. T-cell responses to peptides spanning the FVIII-C2 sequence were evaluated. T cells recognizing specific peptides were cloned, and antigen specificity was verified by proliferation assays. Plasma and/or purified IgG samples were tested for FVIII inhibitory activity. Results CD4+ T cells and T-cell clones from two brothers who shared the DRB1*0101 allele responded to FVIII2194-2213. A haemophilic cousin’s HLA-DRA-DRB1*1104-restricted response to FVIII2202-2221 was detected only when CD4+CD25+ cells were depleted. A great uncle and two obligate carriers had no detectable FVIII-C2-specific T cells. Concentrated IgG from the brother without a clinical inhibitor response showed a low-titer FVIII inhibitor. Conclusion FVIII-specific T cells and inhibitory IgG were found in a previously infused, haemophilic subject who had a sub-clinical FVIII inhibitor. CD4+CD25+ depleted T cells from a non-infused haemophilic cousin recognized an overlapping FVIII epitope, indicating a latent HLA-DRA-DRB1*1104-restricted T-cell response to FVIII. Specific T-cell responses to FVIII can occur without clinically significant inhibitors. PMID:20536985

  7. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors. PMID:26250896

  8. Toxoplasma gondii-Derived Synthetic Peptides Containing B- and T-Cell Epitopes from GRA2 Protein Are Able to Enhance Mice Survival in a Model of Experimental Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Luciana M.; Macêdo, Arlindo G.; Silva, Murilo V.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Ramos, Eliezer L. P.; Santos, Fabiana A. A.; Pirovani, Carlos P.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.; Mineo, José R.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis distributed all over the world, which the etiologic agent is an intracellular protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. This disease may cause abortions and severe diseases in many warm-blood hosts, including humans, particularly the immunocompromised patients. The parasite specialized secretory organelles, as micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules, are critical for the successful parasitism. The dense granule protein 2 (GRA2) is a parasite immunogenic protein secreted during infections and previous studies have been shown that this parasite component is crucial for the formation of intravacuolar membranous nanotubular network (MNN), as well as for secretion into the vacuole and spatial organization of the parasites within the vacuole. In the present study, we produced a monoclonal antibody to GRA2 (C3C5 mAb, isotype IgG2b), mapped the immunodominant epitope of the protein by phage display and built GRA2 synthetic epitopes to evaluate their ability to protect mice in a model of experimental infection. Our results showed that synthetic peptides for B- and T-cell epitopes are able to improve survival of immunized animals. In contrast with non-immunized animals, the immunized mice with both B- and T-cell epitopes had a better balance of cytokines and demonstrated higher levels of IL-10, IL-4 and IL-17 production, though similar levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were observed. The immunization with both B- and T-cell epitopes resulted in survival rate higher than 85% of the challenged mice. Overall, these results demonstrate that immunization with synthetic epitopes for both B- and T-cells from GRA2 protein can be more effective to protect against infection by T. gondii. PMID:27313992

  9. Toxoplasma gondii-Derived Synthetic Peptides Containing B- and T-Cell Epitopes from GRA2 Protein Are Able to Enhance Mice Survival in a Model of Experimental Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Luciana M; Macêdo, Arlindo G; Silva, Murilo V; Santiago, Fernanda M; Ramos, Eliezer L P; Santos, Fabiana A A; Pirovani, Carlos P; Goulart, Luiz R; Mineo, Tiago W P; Mineo, José R

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a zoonosis distributed all over the world, which the etiologic agent is an intracellular protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. This disease may cause abortions and severe diseases in many warm-blood hosts, including humans, particularly the immunocompromised patients. The parasite specialized secretory organelles, as micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules, are critical for the successful parasitism. The dense granule protein 2 (GRA2) is a parasite immunogenic protein secreted during infections and previous studies have been shown that this parasite component is crucial for the formation of intravacuolar membranous nanotubular network (MNN), as well as for secretion into the vacuole and spatial organization of the parasites within the vacuole. In the present study, we produced a monoclonal antibody to GRA2 (C3C5 mAb, isotype IgG2b), mapped the immunodominant epitope of the protein by phage display and built GRA2 synthetic epitopes to evaluate their ability to protect mice in a model of experimental infection. Our results showed that synthetic peptides for B- and T-cell epitopes are able to improve survival of immunized animals. In contrast with non-immunized animals, the immunized mice with both B- and T-cell epitopes had a better balance of cytokines and demonstrated higher levels of IL-10, IL-4 and IL-17 production, though similar levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were observed. The immunization with both B- and T-cell epitopes resulted in survival rate higher than 85% of the challenged mice. Overall, these results demonstrate that immunization with synthetic epitopes for both B- and T-cells from GRA2 protein can be more effective to protect against infection by T. gondii. PMID:27313992

  10. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) nanogels for tracing and delivering genes to human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Yang, Han Na; Woo, Dae Gyun; Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Keun-Hong

    2013-11-01

    Drugs, proteins, and cells can be macro- and micro-encapsulated by unique materials that respond to specific stimuli. The phases and hydrophobic interactions of these materials are reversibly altered by environmental stimuli such as pH and temperature. These changes can lead to self-assembly of the materials, which enables controlled drug release and safe gene delivery into cells and tissues. The fate of stem cells delivered by such methods is of great interest. The formation of transgenic tissues requires genes to be delivered safely into stem cells. A cell tracing vehicle and a gene delivery carrier were simultaneously introduced into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A thermo-sensitive hydrogel, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (p(NiPAAm-co-AAc)), was created to generate self-assembled nanoparticles with nanogel characteristics. Hydrophobic interactions mediated the binding of the carboxyl group on the outside of p(NiPAAm-co-AAc) with the amine group of iron oxide. Nanogels carrying iron oxide and a fluorescent dye were complexed with specific genes. These nanogels could be internalized by hMSCs, and the transplantation of these cells into mice was monitored by in vivo imaging. Self-assembled p(NiPAAm-co-dAAc) nanogels complexed with green fluorescent protein were highly expressed in hMSCs and are a potential material for gene delivery. PMID:23937912

  11. B Epitope Multiplicity and B/T Epitope Orientation Influence Immunogenicity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Peptide Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Esther; Cubillos, Carolina; Moreno, Noelia; Bárcena, Juan; de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Andreu, David

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154) linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35) of FMD virus (FMDV) elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T) or four (B4T) copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype) were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFNγ. Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines. PMID:24454475

  12. Characterization of C-strain “Riems” TAV-epitope escape variants obtained through selective antibody pressure in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) C-strain “Riems” escape variants generated under selective antibody pressure with monoclonal antibodies and a peptide-specific antiserum in cell culture were investigated. Candidates with up to three amino acid exchanges in the immunodominant and highly conserved linear TAV-epitope of the E2-glycoprotein, and additional mutations in the envelope proteins ERNS and E1, were characterized both in vitro and in vivo. It was further demonstrated, that intramuscular immunization of weaner pigs with variants selected after a series of passages elicited full protection against lethal CSFV challenge infection. These novel CSFV C-strain variants with exchanges in the TAV-epitope present potential marker vaccine candidates. The DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) principle was tested for those variants using commercially available E2 antibody detection ELISA. Moreover, direct virus differentiation is possible using a real-time RT-PCR system specific for the new C-strain virus escape variants or using differential immunofluorescence staining. PMID:22515281

  13. Induction of Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses by Hepatitis B Virus Epitope Displayed on the Virus-Like Particles of Prawn Nodavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Chean Yeah; Yeap, Swee Keong; Goh, Zee Hong; Ho, Kok Lian; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a deadly pathogen that has killed countless people worldwide. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived HBV vaccines based upon hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly effective. However, the emergence of vaccine escape mutants due to mutations on the HBsAg and polymerase genes has produced a continuous need for the development of new HBV vaccines. In this study, the “a” determinant within HBsAg was displayed on the recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV), which can be purified easily in a single step through immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The purified protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) when observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric protein induced specific antibodies against the “a” determinant. In addition, it induced significantly more natural killer and cytotoxic T cells, as well as an increase in interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secretion, which are vital for virus clearance. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that the MrNV capsid protein is a potential carrier for the HBV “a” determinant, which can be further extended to display other foreign epitopes. This paper is the first to report the application of MrNV VLPs as a novel platform to display foreign epitopes. PMID:25416760

  14. Induction of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses by hepatitis B virus epitope displayed on the virus-like particles of prawn nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Yong, Chean Yeah; Yeap, Swee Keong; Goh, Zee Hong; Ho, Kok Lian; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Tan, Wen Siang

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a deadly pathogen that has killed countless people worldwide. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived HBV vaccines based upon hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly effective. However, the emergence of vaccine escape mutants due to mutations on the HBsAg and polymerase genes has produced a continuous need for the development of new HBV vaccines. In this study, the "a" determinant within HBsAg was displayed on the recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV), which can be purified easily in a single step through immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The purified protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) when observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric protein induced specific antibodies against the "a" determinant. In addition, it induced significantly more natural killer and cytotoxic T cells, as well as an increase in interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secretion, which are vital for virus clearance. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that the MrNV capsid protein is a potential carrier for the HBV "a" determinant, which can be further extended to display other foreign epitopes. This paper is the first to report the application of MrNV VLPs as a novel platform to display foreign epitopes. PMID:25416760

  15. Generation of robust CD8+ T-cell responses against subdominant epitopes in conserved regions of HIV-1 by repertoire mining with mimotopes.

    PubMed

    Schaubert, Keri L; Price, David A; Salkowitz, Janelle R; Sewell, Andrew K; Sidney, John; Asher, Tedi E; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Adams, Sharon; Marincola, Francesco M; Joseph, Aviva; Sette, Alessandro; Douek, Daniel C; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Storkus, Walter; Leung, Ming-Ying; Ng, Hwee L; Yang, Otto O; Goldstein, Harris; Wilson, Darcy B; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2010-07-01

    HLA-A 0201-restricted virus-specific CD8(+) CTL do not appear to control HIV effectively in vivo. To enhance the immunogenicity of a highly conserved subdominant epitope, TV9 (TLNAWVKVV, p24 Gag(19-27)), mimotopes were designed by screening a large combinatorial nonapeptide library with TV9-specific CTL primed in vitro from healthy donors. A mimic peptide with a low binding affinity to HLA-A 0201, TV9p6 (KINAWIKVV), was studied further. Parallel cultures of in vitro-primed CTL showed that TV9p6 consistently activated cross-reactive and equally functional CTL as measured by cytotoxicity, cytokine production and suppression of HIV replication in vitro. Comparison of TCRB gene usage between CTL primed from the same donors with TV9 or TV9p6 revealed a degree of clonal overlap in some cases and an example of a conserved TCRB sequence encoded distinctly at the nucleotide level between individuals (a "public" TCR); however, in the main, distinct clonotypes were recruited by each peptide antigen. These findings indicate that mimotopes can mobilize functional cross-reactive clonotypes that are less readily recruited from the naïve T-cell pool by the corresponding WT epitope. Mimotope-induced repertoire diversification could potentially override subdominance under certain circumstances and enhance vaccine-induced responses to conserved but poorly immunogenic determinants within the HIV proteome. PMID:20432235

  16. Generation of robust CD8+ T-cell responses against subdominant epitopes in conserved regions of HIV-1 by repertoire mining with mimotopes.

    PubMed

    Schaubert, Keri L; Price, David A; Salkowitz, Janelle R; Sewell, Andrew K; Sidney, John; Asher, Tedi E; Blondelle, Sylvie E; Adams, Sharon; Marincola, Francesco M; Joseph, Aviva; Sette, Alessandro; Douek, Daniel C; Ayyavoo, Velpandi; Storkus, Walter; Leung, Ming-Ying; Ng, Hwee L; Yang, Otto O; Goldstein, Harris; Wilson, Darcy B; Kan-Mitchell, June

    2010-07-01

    HLA-A 0201-restricted virus-specific CD8(+) CTL do not appear to control HIV effectively in vivo. To enhance the immunogenicity of a highly conserved subdominant epitope, TV9 (TLNAWVKVV, p24 Gag(19-27)), mimotopes were designed by screening a large combinatorial nonapeptide library with TV9-specific CTL primed in vitro from healthy donors. A mimic peptide with a low binding affinity to HLA-A 0201, TV9p6 (KINAWIKVV), was studied further. Parallel cultures of in vitro-primed CTL showed that TV9p6 consistently activated cross-reactive and equally functional CTL as measured by cytotoxicity, cytokine production and suppression of HIV replication in vitro. Comparison of TCRB gene usage between CTL primed from the same donors with TV9 or TV9p6 revealed a degree of clonal overlap in some cases and an example of a conserved TCRB sequence encoded distinctly at the nucleotide level between individuals (a "public" TCR); however, in the main, distinct clonotypes were recruited by each peptide antigen. These findings indicate that mimotopes can mobilize functional cross-reactive clonotypes that are less readily recruited from the naïve T-cell pool by the corresponding WT epitope. Mimotope-induced r