Science.gov

Sample records for cell epitopes delivered

  1. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8+ T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; Robinson, H.; Wang, R.; Kong, W.-P.; Kanekiyo, M.; Akahata, W.; Xu, L.; Matsuo, K.; Natarajan, K.; Asher, T. E.; Price, D. A.; Douek, D. C.; Margulies, D. H.; Nabel, G. J.

    2009-08-15

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  2. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8plus T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    M Honda; R Wang; W Kong; M Kanekiyo; Q Akahata; L Xu; K Matsuo; K Natarajan; H Robinson; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  3. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Potocnakova, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes. PMID:28127568

  4. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Potocnakova, Lenka; Bhide, Mangesh; Pulzova, Lucia Borszekova

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes.

  5. The two-faced T cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Gutierrez, Andres H.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Terry, Frances; Leng, Qibin; Abdel Hady, Karim M.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Losikoff, Phyllis T.; Martin, William D.; Rothman, Alan L; De Groot, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of T cell immunology have contributed to the understanding that cross-reactivity is an intrinsic characteristic of the T cell receptor (TCR), and that each TCR can potentially interact with many different T cell epitopes. To better define the potential for TCR cross-reactivity between epitopes derived from the human genome, the human microbiome, and human pathogens, we developed a new immunoinformatics tool, JanusMatrix, that represents an extension of the validated T cell epitope mapping tool, EpiMatrix. Initial explorations, summarized in this synopsis, have uncovered what appear to be important differences in the TCR cross-reactivity of selected regulatory and effector T cell epitopes with other epitopes in the human genome, human microbiome, and selected human pathogens. In addition to exploring the T cell epitope relationships between human self, commensal and pathogen, JanusMatrix may also be useful to explore some aspects of heterologous immunity and to examine T cell epitope relatedness between pathogens to which humans are exposed (Dengue serotypes, or HCV and Influenza, for example). In Hand-Foot-Mouth disease (HFMD) for example, extensive enterovirus and human microbiome cross-reactivity (and limited cross-reactivity with the human genome) seemingly predicts immunodominance. In contrast, more extensive cross-reactivity with proteins contained in the human genome as compared to the human microbiome was observed for selected Treg epitopes. While it may be impossible to predict all immune response influences, the availability of sequence data from the human genome, the human microbiome, and an array of human pathogens and vaccines has made computationally–driven exploration of the effects of T cell epitope cross-reactivity now possible. This is the first description of JanusMatrix, an algorithm that assesses TCR cross-reactivity that may contribute to a means of predicting the phenotype of T cells responding to selected T cell

  6. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  7. Relevant B Cell Epitopes in Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The 3-dimensional structure of an allergen defines the accessible parts on the surface of the molecule or epitopes that interact with antibodies. Mapping the antigenic determinants for IgE antibody binding has been pursued through strategies based on the use of overlapping synthetic peptides, recombinant allergenic fragments or unfolded allergens. These approaches led to the identification of mostly linear epitopes and are useful for food allergens that undergo digestion or food processing. For inhaled allergens, conformational epitopes appear to be the primary targets of IgE responses. Knowledge of the molecular structure of allergens alone and in complex with antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding is important to understand the immune recognition of B cell-antigenic determinants on allergens and the design of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy. Starting with the molecular cloning and expression of allergens, and with the advent of X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we have been able to visualize conformational epitopes on allergens. PMID:19940500

  8. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  9. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  10. Oral immunization with recombinant Lactococcus lactis delivering a multi-epitope antigen CTB-UE attenuates Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyang; Xing, Yingying; Guo, Le; Lv, Xiaobo; Song, Hui; Xi, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Urease is an essential virulence factor and colonization factor for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and is considered as an excellent vaccine candidate antigen. However, conventional technologies for preparing an injectable vaccine require purification of the antigenic protein and preparation of an adjuvant. Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 (L. lactis) could serve as an antigen-delivering vehicle for the development of edible vaccine. In previous study, we constructed a multi-epitope vaccine, designated CTB-UE, which is composed of the mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), three Th cell epitopes and two B-cell epitopes from urease subunits. To develop a novel type of oral vaccine against H. pylori, genetically modified L. lactis strains were established to secrete this epitope vaccine extracellularly in this study. Oral prophylactic immunization with recombinant L. lactis significantly elicited humoral anti-urease antibody responses (P < 0.001) and reduced the gastric colonization of H. pylori from 7.14 ± 0.95 to 4.68 ± 0.98 log10 CFU g(-1) stomach. This L. lactis oral vaccine offers a promising vaccine candidate for the control of H. pylori infection.

  11. Building Classifier Ensembles for B-Cell Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes in target antigens is a critical step in epitope-driven vaccine design, immunodiagnostic tests, and antibody production. B-cell epitopes could be linear, i.e., a contiguous amino acid sequence fragment of an antigen, or conformational, i.e., amino acids that are often not contiguous in the primary sequence but appear in close proximity within the folded 3D antigen structure. Numerous computational methods have been proposed for predicting both types of B-cell epitopes. However, the development of tools for reliably predicting B-cell epitopes remains a major challenge in immunoinformatics. Classifier ensembles a promising approach for combining a set of classifiers such that the overall performance of the resulting ensemble is better than the predictive performance of the best individual classifier. In this chapter, we show how to build a classifier ensemble for improved prediction of linear B-cell epitopes. The method can be easily adapted to build classifier ensembles for predicting conformational epitopes. PMID:25048130

  12. Removing T-cell epitopes with computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    King, Chris; Garza, Esteban N.; Mazor, Ronit; Linehan, Jonathan L.; Pastan, Ira; Pepper, Marion; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses can make protein therapeutics ineffective or even dangerous. We describe a general computational protein design method for reducing immunogenicity by eliminating known and predicted T-cell epitopes and maximizing the content of human peptide sequences without disrupting protein structure and function. We show that the method recapitulates previous experimental results on immunogenicity reduction, and we use it to disrupt T-cell epitopes in GFP and Pseudomonas exotoxin A without disrupting function. PMID:24843166

  13. T-Cell Epitope Discovery for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sri; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    The success of recent immune checkpoint blockade trials in solid tumors has demonstrated the tremendous potential of immune-mediated treatment strategies for cancer therapy. These immune therapies activate preexisting cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells (CTL) to selectively target and eradicate malignant cells. In vitro models suggest that these therapies may be more effective in combination with priming of CTL using cancer vaccines. CTL-mediated tumor targeting is achieved by its recognition of tumor antigenic epitopes presented on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by tumor cells. Discovering CTL-antigenic epitopes is therefore central to the design of therapeutic T-cell vaccines and immune monitoring of these complex immunotherapies. However, selecting and monitoring T-cell epitopes remains difficult due to the extensive polymorphism of HLA alleles and the presence of confounding non-immunogenic self-peptides. To overcome these challenges, this chapter presents methodologies for the design of CTL-targeted vaccines using selection of target HLA alleles, novel integrated computational strategies to predict HLA-class I CTL epitopes, and epitope validation methods using short-term ex vivo T-cell stimulation. This strategy results in the improved efficiency for selecting antigenic epitopes for CTL-mediated vaccines and for immune monitoring of tumor antigens.

  14. Identifying Novel B Cell Epitopes within Toxoplasma gondii GRA6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanhua; Wang, Guangxiang; Cai, Jian Ping

    2016-01-01

    The study of antigenic epitopes from Toxoplasma gondii has not only enhanced our understanding of the structure and function of antigens, the reactions between antigens and antibodies, and many other aspects of immunology, but it also plays a significant role in the development of new diagnostic reagents and vaccines. In the present study, T. gondii GRA6 epitopes were identified using bioinformatics tools and a synthetic peptide technique. The potential B cell epitopes of GRA6 predicted by bioinformatics tools concentrated upon 3 regions of GRA6, 1-20 aa, 44-103 aa, and 172-221 aa. Ten shorter peptides from the 3 regions were synthesized and assessed by ELISA using pig sera from different time points after infection. Three of the 10 peptides (amino acids 44-63, 172-191, and 192-211) tested were recognized by all sera and determined to be immunodominant B-cell epitopes of GRA6. The results indicated that we precisely and accurately located the T. gondii GRA6 epitopes using pig sera collected at different time points after infection. The identified epitopes may be very useful for further studies of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostic reagents. PMID:27658594

  15. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Brooke L.; Whitelock, John M.; O’Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S.

    2015-01-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells. PMID:26586669

  16. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  17. Enhancement of the antibody response to flavivirus B-cell epitopes by using homologous or heterologous T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, J T; Johnson, A J; Hunt, A R; Beaty, B J; Mathews, J H

    1992-01-01

    We have been investigating the T-helper (Th)-cell response to the flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein. In our studies with Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus, we previously identified synthetic peptides capable of priming Th lymphocytes for an in vitro antivirus proliferative response (J. H. Mathews, J. E. Allan, J. T. Roehrig, J. R. Brubaker, and A. R. Hunt, J. Virol. 65:5141-5148, 1991). We have now characterized in vivo Th-cell priming activity of one of these peptides (MVE 17, amino acids 356 to 376) and an analogous peptide derived from the E-glycoprotein sequence of the dengue (DEN) 2, Jamaica strain (DEN 17, amino acids 352 to 368). This DEN peptide also primed the Th-cell compartment in BALB/c mice, as measured by in vitro proliferation and interleukin production. The failure of some MVE and DEN virus synthetic peptides to elicit an antibody response in BALB/c mice could be overcome if a Th-cell epitope-containing peptide was included in the immunization mixture. A more detailed analysis of the structural interactions between Th-cell and B-cell epitope donor peptides revealed that the peptides must be linked to observe the enhanced antibody response. Blockage or deletion of the free cysteine residue on either peptide abrogated the antibody response. The most efficient T-B-cell epitope interaction occurred when the peptides were colinearly synthesized. These Th-cell-stimulating peptides were also functional with the heterologous B-cell epitope-containing peptides. The Th-cell epitope on DEN 17 was more potent than the Th-cell epitope on MVE 17. PMID:1374807

  18. Bcipep: A database of B-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sudipto; Bhasin, Manoj; Raghava, Gajendra PS

    2005-01-01

    Background Bcipep is a database of experimentally determined linear B-cell epitopes of varying immunogenicity collected from literature and other publicly available databases. Results The current version of Bcipep database contains 3031 entries that include 763 immunodominant, 1797 immunogenic and 471 null-immunogenic epitopes. It covers a wide range of pathogenic organisms like viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi. The database provides a set of tools for the analysis and extraction of data that includes keyword search, peptide mapping and BLAST search. It also provides hyperlinks to various databases such as GenBank, PDB, SWISS-PROT and MHCBN. Conclusion A comprehensive database of B-cell epitopes called Bcipep has been developed that covers information on epitopes from a wide range of pathogens. The Bcipep will be source of information for investigators involved in peptide-based vaccine design, disease diagnosis and research in allergy. It should also be a promising data source for the development and evaluation of methods for prediction of B-cell epitopes. The database is available at . PMID:15921533

  19. Tetramer-guided epitope mapping: rapid identification and characterization of immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Novak, E J; Liu, A W; Gebe, J A; Falk, B A; Nepom, G T; Koelle, D M; Kwok, W W

    2001-06-01

    T cell responses to Ags involve recognition of selected peptide epitopes contained within the antigenic protein. In this report, we describe a new approach for direct identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of complex Ags that uses human class II tetramers to identify reactive cells. With a panel of 60 overlapping peptides covering the entire sequence of the VP16 protein, a major Ag for HSV-2, we generated a panel of class II MHC tetramers loaded with peptide pools that were used to stain peripheral lymphocytes of an HSV-2 infected individual. With this approach, we identified four new DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401- and two DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404-restricted, VP16-specific epitopes. By using tetramers to sort individual cells, we easily obtained a large number of clones specific to these epitopes. Although DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 and DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404 are structurally very similar, nonoverlapping VP16 epitopes were identified, illustrating high selectivity of individual allele polymorphisms within common MHC variants. This rapid approach to detecting CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex Ags can be applied to any known Ag that gives a T cell response.

  20. [TEpredict: software for T-cell epitope prediction].

    PubMed

    Antonets, D V; Maksiutov, A Z

    2010-01-01

    A program named TEpredict was developed for T-cell epitope prediction. Original models for T-cell epitope prediction were constructed by means of Partial Least Squares regression method on the basis of data, extracted from the IEDB (Immune Epitope Database)--the most complete resource of experimental peptide-MHC binding data known to date. TEpredict is also able to predict proteasomal processing of protein antigens, and the ability of produced oligopeptides to bind to TAP (Tansporters Associated with Processing). TEpredict could exclude peptides, shearing local similarity with human proteins, from the set of predicted T-cell epitopes. It is also able to estimate expected population coverage by selected peptides, using known HLA allele genotypic frequencies data. The majority of produced models demonstrated high sensitivity of predictions (0.50-0.80) concurrent with high specificity (0.75-0.99). TEpredict was shown to be highly competitive or even superior in comparison with such programs as ProPred1, SVRMHC, SVMHC and SYFPEITHI. TEpredict demonstrated high quality of predictions and we expect that it could become a useful tool in the development ofpolyepitope vaccines against dangerous human pathogens, including HIV, influenza etc. The program and its source code could be freely downloaded from the project web-site: http://tepredict.sourceforge.net.

  1. Identification of cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes on swine viruses: multi-epitope design for universal T cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Chieh-Hua; Chung, Wen-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) are the primary diseases affecting the pig industry globally. Vaccine induced CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune response might be long-lived and cross-serotype and thus deserve further attention. Although large panels of synthetic overlapping peptides spanning the entire length of the polyproteins of a virus facilitate the detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, it is an exceedingly costly and cumbersome approach. Alternatively, computational predictions have been proven to be of satisfactory accuracy and are easily performed. Such a method enables the systematic identification of genome-wide CTL epitopes by incorporating epitope prediction tools in analyzing large numbers of viral sequences. In this study, we have implemented an integrated bioinformatics pipeline for the identification of CTL epitopes of swine viruses including the CSF virus (CSFV), FMD virus (FMDV) and PRRS virus (PRRSV) and assembled these epitopes on a web resource to facilitate vaccine design. Identification of epitopes for cross protections to different subtypes of virus are also reported in this study and may be useful for the development of a universal vaccine against such viral infections among the swine population. The CTL epitopes identified in this study have been evaluated in silico and possibly provide more and wider protection in compared to traditional single-reference vaccine design. The web resource is free and open to all users through http://sb.nhri.org.tw/ICES.

  2. Immunoregulatory T cell epitope peptides: the new frontier in allergy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, S R; Rolland, J M; O'Hehir, R E

    2015-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been practised since 1911 and remains the only therapy proven to modify the natural history of allergic diseases. Although efficacious in carefully selected individuals, the currently licensed whole allergen extracts retain the risk of IgE-mediated adverse events, including anaphylaxis and occasionally death. This together with the need for prolonged treatment regimens results in poor patient adherence. The central role of the T cell in orchestrating the immune response to allergen informs the choice of T cell targeted therapies for down-regulation of aberrant allergic responses. Carefully mapped short synthetic peptides that contain the dominant T cell epitopes of major allergens and bind to a diverse array of HLA class II alleles, can be delivered intradermally into non-inflamed skin to induce sustained clinical and immunological tolerance. The short peptides from allergenic proteins are unable to cross-link IgE and possess minimal inflammatory potential. Systematic progress has been made from in vitro human models of allergen T cell epitope-based peptide anergy in the early 1990s, through proof-of-concept murine allergy models and early human trials with longer peptides, to the current randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with the potential new class of synthetic short immune-regulatory T cell epitope peptide therapies. Sustained efficacy with few adverse events is being reported for cat, house dust mite and grass pollen allergy after only a short course of treatment. Underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be fully delineated but anergy, deletion, immune deviation and Treg induction all seem contributory to successful outcomes, with changes in IgG4 apparently less important compared to conventional AIT. T cell epitope peptide therapy is promising a safe and effective new class of specific treatment for allergy, enabling wider application even for more severe allergic diseases. PMID:25900315

  3. Differential expression of proteoglycan epitopes by ovine intervertebral disc cells

    PubMed Central

    MELROSE, JAMES; SMITH, SUSAN; GHOSH, PETER

    2000-01-01

    The alginate bead culture system has been utilised by several groups to examine the in vitro proteoglycan (PG) metabolism of chondrocytes and intervertebral disc cells, but the nature of the PGs produced has not been examined in detail. This is largely due to the difficulty of separating the anionically charged sodium alginate support matrix from PGs which are similarly charged. In the present study ovine annulus fibrosus, transitional zone and nucleus pulposus cells were dissociated enzymatically from their respective matrices by sequential digestion with pronase/clostridial collagenase and DNAase and then cultured in alginate beads for 10 d. The beads were solubilised and subjected to DEAE Sepharose CL6B anion exchange chromatography to separate the sodium alginate bead support matrix material quantitatively from the disc cell PGs. The alginate free bead PGs were then subjected to composite agarose polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to resolve PG populations and the PGs were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes by semidry electroblotting. The PGs were identified by probing the blots with a panel of antibodies to defined PG core protein and glycosaminoglycan side chain epitopes. Alginate beads of disc cells were also embedded in paraffin wax and 4μm sections cut to immunolocalise decorin, biglycan, versican, and the 7-D-4 PG epitope within the beads. Decorin and biglycan had similar distributions in the beads, being localised on the cell surface whereas versican and the 7-D-4 PG epitope were immunolocalised interterritoriarly. This study is the first to demonstrate that ovine disc cells synthesise versican in alginate bead culture. Furthermore the immunoblotting studies also showed that a proportion of the 7-D-4 PG epitope was colocalised with versican. PMID:11005711

  4. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  5. T-cell epitope peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Elsawa, Sherine F; Rodeberg, David A; Celis, Esteban

    2004-10-01

    T-cell immunotherapy is a promising treatment option for cancer. The identification of tumor antigens that are recognized by the immune system has allowed for the generation of vaccines for various malignancies. Due to the ease of manufacturing and characterizating peptide-based vaccines they have been used to stimulate antitumor T-cells. This article will review the use of peptide-based vaccines for the treatment of cancer by inducing antitumor T-lymphocyte responses.

  6. Hepatitis B surface antigen vector delivers protective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses to disease-relevant foreign epitopes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Wai-Ping; Doan, Tracy; Herd, Karen A; Netter, Hans-Jürgen; Tindle, Robert W

    2006-04-01

    Although hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) per se is highly immunogenic, its use as a vector for the delivery of foreign cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes has met with little success because of constraints on HBsAg stability and secretion imposed by the insertion of foreign sequence into critical hydrophobic/amphipathic regions. Using a strategy entailing deletion of DNA encoding HBsAg-specific CTL epitopes and replacement with DNA encoding foreign CTL epitopes, we have derived chimeric HBsAg DNA immunogens which elicited effector and memory CTL responses in vitro, and pathogen- and tumor-protective responses in vivo, when the chimeric HBsAg DNAs were used to immunize mice. We further show that HBsAg DNA recombinant for both respiratory syncytial virus and human papillomavirus CTL epitopes elicited simultaneous responses to both pathogens. These data demonstrate the efficacy of HBsAg DNA as a vector for the delivery of disease-relevant protective CTL responses. They also suggest the applicability of the approach of deriving chimeric HBsAg DNA immunogens simultaneously encoding protective CTL epitopes for multiple diseases. The DNAs we tested formed chimeric HBsAg virus-like particles (VLPs). Thus, our results have implications for the development of vaccination strategies using either chimeric HBsAg DNA or VLP vaccines. HBsAg is the globally administered vaccine for hepatitis B virus infection, inviting its usage as a vector for the delivery of immunogens from other diseases.

  7. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  8. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  9. Machine learning-based methods for prediction of linear B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsin-Wei; Pai, Tun-Wen

    2014-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction facilitates immunologists in designing peptide-based vaccine, diagnostic test, disease prevention, treatment, and antibody production. In comparison with T-cell epitope prediction, the performance of variable length B-cell epitope prediction is still yet to be satisfied. Fortunately, due to increasingly available verified epitope databases, bioinformaticians could adopt machine learning-based algorithms on all curated data to design an improved prediction tool for biomedical researchers. Here, we have reviewed related epitope prediction papers, especially those for linear B-cell epitope prediction. It should be noticed that a combination of selected propensity scales and statistics of epitope residues with machine learning-based tools formulated a general way for constructing linear B-cell epitope prediction systems. It is also observed from most of the comparison results that the kernel method of support vector machine (SVM) classifier outperformed other machine learning-based approaches. Hence, in this chapter, except reviewing recently published papers, we have introduced the fundamentals of B-cell epitope and SVM techniques. In addition, an example of linear B-cell prediction system based on physicochemical features and amino acid combinations is illustrated in details.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Human B Cell Epitopes Based on BCG Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis is a huge global health problem. BCG is the only vaccine used for about 100 years against TB, but the reasons for protection variability in populations remain unclear. To improve BCG efficacy and develop a strategy for new vaccines, the underlying genetic differences among BCG subtypes should be understood urgently. Methods and Findings. Human B cell epitope data were collected from the Immune Epitope Database. Epitope sequences were mapped with those of 15 genomes, including 13 BCGs, M. bovis AF2122/97, and M. tuberculosis H37Rv, to identify epitopes distribution. Among 398 experimentally verified B cell epitopes, 321 (80.7%) were conserved, while the remaining 77 (19.3%) were lost to varying degrees in BCGs. The variable protective efficacy of BCGs may result from the degree of B cell epitopes deficiency. Conclusions. Here we firstly analyzed the genetic characteristics of BCGs based on B cell epitopes and found that B cell epitopes distribution may contribute to vaccine efficacy. Restoration of important antigens or effective B cell epitopes in BCG could be a useful strategy for vaccine development. PMID:27382565

  11. Vaccine Design for H5N1 Based on B- and T-cell Epitope Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Sipahutar, Feimmy Ruth Pratiwi; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Kerami, Djati

    2016-01-01

    From 2003 to 2013, Indonesia had the highest number of avian influenza A cases in humans, with 192 cases and 160 fatalities. Avian influenza is caused by influenza virus type A, such as subtype H5N1. This virus has two glycoproteins: hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, which will become the primary target to be neutralized by vaccine. Vaccine is the most effective immunologic intervention. In this study, we use the epitope-based vaccine design from hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 Indonesian strain virus by using immunoinformatics approach in order to predict the binding of B-cell and T-cell epitopes (class I and class II human leukocyte antigen [HLA]). BCPREDS was used to predict the B-cell epitope. Propred, Propred I, netMHCpan, and netMHCIIpan were used to predict the T-cell epitope. Two B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin candidates and one B-cell epitope of neuraminidase candidates were obtained to bind T-cell CD4+ (class II HLA), and also five T-cell epitope hemagglutinin and four T-cell epitope neuraminidase were obtained to bind T-cell CD8+ (class I HLA). The visualization of epitopes was done using MOE 2008.10. It shows that the binding affinity of epitope–HLA was based on minimum binding free energy (ΔGbinding). Based on this result, visualization, and dynamic simulation, four hemagglutinin epitopes (MEKIVLLLA, CPYLGSPSF, KCQTPMGAI, and IGTSTLNQR) and two neuraminidase epitopes (NPNQKIITI and CYPDAGEIT) were computed as having the best binding affinity from HLA ligand. The results mentioned above are from in silico experiments and need to be validated using wet experiment. PMID:27147821

  12. T-Cell Proliferation Assay: Determination of Immunodominant T-Cell Epitopes of Food Allergens.

    PubMed

    Masilamani, Madhan; Pascal, Mariona; Sampson, Hugh A

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of allergen-specific T cells is critical to understand their contribution to disease pathogenesis. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitopes is crucial for development of T-cell-based vaccines. Peptide-specific T-cell proliferation studies are usually performed in a library of short synthetic peptides (15mer or 20mer) with 3 or 5 offset spanning the entire length of the allergen. T-cell peptide epitopes lack the primary and tertiary structure of the native protein to cross-link IgE, but retain the ability to stimulate T cells. The peptides sequences can also be obtained either by in silico approaches and in vitro binding assays. The efficacy of T-cell epitope-based peptide immunotherapy has been proven in certain allergies. The present methodology describes T-cell proliferation assays using whole blood sample from allergic subjects.

  13. A combination of epitope prediction and molecular docking allows for good identification of MHC class I restricted T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue Wu

    2013-08-01

    In silico identification of T-cell epitopes is emerging as a new methodology for the study of epitope-based vaccines against viruses and cancer. In order to improve accuracy of prediction, we designed a novel approach, using epitope prediction methods in combination with molecular docking techniques, to identify MHC class I restricted T-cell epitopes. Analysis of the HIV-1 p24 protein and influenza virus matrix protein revealed that the present approach is effective, yielding prediction accuracy of over 80% with respect to experimental data. Subsequently, we applied such a method for prediction of T-cell epitopes in SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S, N and M proteins. Based on available experimental data, the prediction accuracy is up to 90% for S protein. We suggest the use of epitope prediction methods in combination with 3D structural modelling of peptide-MHC-TCR complex to identify MHC class I restricted T-cell epitopes for use in epitope based vaccines like HIV and human cancers, which should provide a valuable step forward for the design of better vaccines and may provide in depth understanding about activation of T-cell epitopes by MHC binding peptides.

  14. Construction and characterization of an HCV-derived multi-epitope peptide antigen containing B-cell HVR1 mimotopes and T-cell conserved epitopes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Gong, Yuping; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping; Qi, Zhongtian

    2006-10-01

    Hepatitis C (HCV) genome is highly variable, particularly in the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of its E2 envelope gene. The variability of HCV genome has been a major obstacle for developing HCV vaccines. Due to B-cell HVR1 mimotopes mimicking the antigenicity of natural HVR1 epitopes and some T-cell epitopes from the consensus sequence of HCV genes conserving among the different HCV genotypes, we synthesized an minigene of HCV-derived multi-epitope peptide antigen (CMEP), which contains 9 B-cell HVR1 mimotopes in E2, 2 conserved CTL epitopes in C, 1 conserved CTL epitope in NS3 and 1 conserved Th epitope in NS3. This minigene was cloned into a GST expression vector to generate a fusion protein GST-CMEP. The immunogenic properties of CEMP were characterized by HCV infected patients' sera, and found that the reactivity frequency reached 75%. The cross reactivity of anti-CEMP antibody with different natural HVR1 variants was up to 90%. Meanwhile, we constructed an HCV DNA vaccine candidate, plasmid pVAX1.0-st-CMEP carrying the recombinant gene (st) of a secretion signal peptide and PADRE universal Th cell epitope sequence in front of the CMEP minigene. Immunization of rabbits with pVAX1.0-st-CMEP resulted in the production of antibody, which was of the same cross reactivity as the fusion protein GST-CMEP. Our findings indicate that the HCV-derived multi-epitope peptide antigen in some degree possessed the characteristics of neutralizing HCV epitopes, and would be of the value as a candidate for the development of HCV vaccines.

  15. Identification of linear B-cell epitopes within Tarp of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shanli; Feng, Yan; Chen, Jun; Lin, Xiaoyun; Xue, Xiangyang; Chen, Shao; Zhong, Xiaozhi; Li, WenShu; Zhang, Lifang

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted pathogens. There is currently no commercially available vaccine against C. trachomatis. Chlamydial translocated actin-recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) can induce cellular and humoral immune responses in murine models and has been regarded as a potential vaccine candidate. In this report, the amino acid sequence of Tarp was analyzed using computer-assisted techniques to scan B-cell epitopes, and six possible linear B-cell epitopes peptides (aa80-95, aa107-123, aa152-170, aa171-186, aa239-253 and aa497-513) with high predicted antigenicity and high conservation were investigated. Sera from mice immunized with these potential immunodominant peptides was analyzed by ELISA, which showed that epitope 152-170 elicited serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) response and epitope 171-186 elicited both serum IgG and mucosal secretory immunoglobulin A response. The response of immune sera of epitope 171-186 to endogenous Tarp antigen obtained from the Hela229 cells infected with C. trachomatis was confirmed by Western blot and indirect fluorescence assay. In addition, binding of the antibodies against epitope 171-186 to endogenous Tarp was further confirmed by competitive ELISA. Our results demonstrated that the putative epitope (aa171-186) was an immunodominant B-cell epitope of Tarp. If proven protective and safe, this epitope, in combination with other well-documented epitopes, might be included into a candidate epitope-based vaccine against C. trachomatis.

  16. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  17. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines.

  18. Immunological consequences of intragenus conservation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; Paul, Sinu; Mele, Federico; Huang, Charlie; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Vita, Randi; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Sallusto, Federica; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    A previous unbiased genome-wide analysis of CD4 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) recognition using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals with latent MTB infection (LTBI) or nonexposed healthy controls (HCs) revealed that certain MTB sequences were unexpectedly recognized by HCs. In the present study, it was found that, based on their pattern of reactivity, epitopes could be divided into LTBI-specific, mixed reactivity, and HC-specific categories. This pattern corresponded to sequence conservation in nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs), suggesting environmental exposure as an underlying cause of differential reactivity. LTBI-specific epitopes were found to be hyperconserved, as previously reported, whereas the opposite was true for NTM conserved epitopes, suggesting that intragenus conservation also influences host pathogen adaptation. The biological relevance of this observation was demonstrated further by several observations. First, the T cells elicited by MTB/NTM cross-reactive epitopes in HCs were found mainly in a CCR6+CXCR3+ memory subset, similar to findings in LTBI individuals. Thus, both MTB and NTM appear to elicit a phenotypically similar T-cell response. Second, T cells reactive to MTB/NTM-conserved epitopes responded to naturally processed epitopes from MTB and NTMs, whereas T cells reactive to MTB-specific epitopes responded only to MTB. Third, cross-reactivity could be translated to antigen recognition. Several MTB candidate vaccine antigens were cross-reactive, but others were MTB-specific. Finally, NTM-specific epitopes that elicit T cells that recognize NTMs but not MTB were identified. These epitopes can be used to characterize T-cell responses to NTMs, eliminating the confounding factor of MTB cross-recognition and providing insights into vaccine design and evaluation. PMID:25548174

  19. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y.; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states. PMID:26637014

  20. Mapping of the immunodominant T cell epitopes of the protein topoisomerase I

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, S; Renzoni, E; Jeal, H; Jones, M; Hammer, J; Wells, A; Black, C; Welsh, K; du Bois, R M

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the immunodominant T cell epitopes of the topoisomerase I protein in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and control subjects, using computational analysis software (TEPITOPE) and T cell proliferation assays. Methods: Six oligopeptides, predicted by TEPITOPE software as potential topoisomerase protein epitopes, were used to perform T cell proliferation assays in 21 patients with SSc and 15 healthy controls. Results: A positive response to at least one of the peptides was seen in 10/21 patients and 7/15 healthy controls. Among responders, the proliferative response was limited to a single peptide in 6/7 healthy controls, whereas 5/10 patients responded to more than one peptide. In responding patients a significant correlation was found between disease duration and number of peptides inducing a response (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Several T cell epitopes of the topoisomerase I protein have been identified and evidence has been found to suggest epitope spreading in patients with SSc. PMID:15249326

  1. TCR contact residue hydrophobicity is a hallmark of immunogenic CD8+ T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Chowell, Diego; Krishna, Sri; Cocita, Clément; Shu, Jack; Tan, Xuefang; Greenberg, Philip D.; Klavinskis, Linda S.; Blattman, Joseph N.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding peptide prediction algorithms, the development of T-cell vaccines against pathogen and tumor antigens remains challenged by inefficient identification of immunogenic epitopes. CD8+ T cells must distinguish immunogenic epitopes from nonimmunogenic self peptides to respond effectively against an antigen without endangering the viability of the host. Because this discrimination is fundamental to our understanding of immune recognition and critical for rational vaccine design, we interrogated the biochemical properties of 9,888 MHC class I peptides. We identified a strong bias toward hydrophobic amino acids at T-cell receptor contact residues within immunogenic epitopes of MHC allomorphs, which permitted us to develop and train a hydrophobicity-based artificial neural network (ANN-Hydro) to predict immunogenic epitopes. The immunogenicity model was validated in a blinded in vivo overlapping epitope discovery study of 364 peptides from three HIV-1 Gag protein variants. Applying the ANN-Hydro model on existing peptide-MHC algorithms consistently reduced the number of candidate peptides across multiple antigens and may provide a correlate with immunodominance. Hydrophobicity of TCR contact residues is a hallmark of immunogenic epitopes and marks a step toward eliminating the need for empirical epitope testing for vaccine development. PMID:25831525

  2. DNA vaccine with discontinuous T-cell epitope insertions into HSP65 scaffold as a potential means to improve immunogenicity of multi-epitope Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Manli; Li, Min; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    DNA-based vaccine is a promising candidate for immunization and induction of a T-cell-focused protective immune response against infectious pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). To induce multi-functional T response against multi-TB antigens, a multi-epitope DNA vaccine and a 'protein backbone grafting' design method is adopted to graft five discontinuous T-cell epitopes into HSP65 scaffold protein of M. tb for enhancement of epitope processing and immune presentation. A DNA plasmid with five T-cell epitopes derived from ESAT-6, Ag85B, MTB10.4, PPE25 and PE19 proteins of H37Rv strain of M. tb genetically inserted into HSP65 backbone was constructed and designated as pPES. After confirmation of its in vitro expression efficiency, pPES DNA was i.m. injected into C57BL/6 mice with four doses of 50 µg DNA followed by mycobacterial challenge 4 weeks after the final immunization. It was found that pPES DNA injection maintained the ability of HSP65 backbone to induce specific serum IgG. ELISPOT assay demonstrated that pPES epitope-scaffold construct was significantly more potent to induce IFN-γ(+) T response to five T-cell epitope proteins than other DNA constructs (with epitopes alone or with epitope series connected to HSP65), especially in multi-functional-CD4(+) T response. It also enhanced granzyme B(+) CTL and IL-2(+) CD8(+) T response. Furthermore, significantly improved protection against Mycobacterium bovis BCG challenge was achieved by pPES injection compared to other DNA constructs. Taken together, HSP65 scaffold grafting strategy for multi-epitope DNA vaccine represents a successful example of rational protein backbone engineering design and could prove useful in TB vaccine design.

  3. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J O; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recovered animals were less strong than those of the naive animals. Cells from recovered vervets, but not those from naive vervets, also proliferated in response to parasite antigens and synthetic T-cell epitopes. Likewise, cells from recovered animals released gamma interferon and either interleukin 2 (IL-2) or IL-4 into culture media in response to both of the above-mentioned antigens, whereas cells from control animals did not. The fact that no IL-5 could be measured following parasite antigen or synthetic T-cell epitope stimulation of PBMC suggested that cells proliferating in response to these molecules belonged to the Th1 subset. Phenotypic analysis of the PBMC showed a marked increase in T-cell but not B-cell populations in recovered animals. Among this population was an increased number of CD45R0+ memory cells. The data from this study are in keeping with the earlier finding that vervet monkeys provide an excellent model system for leishmaniasis. Further, these data support the contention that synthetic T-cell epitopes are prime candidates for molecularly defined Leishmania vaccines. PMID:7513306

  4. Localization of non-linear neutralizing B cell epitopes on ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit (RTA).

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Joanne M; Kasten-Jolly, Jane C; Reynolds, Claire E; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to develop a vaccine for ricin toxin are focused on identifying highly immunogenic, safe, and thermostable recombinant derivatives of ricin's enzymatic A subunit (RTA). As a means to guide vaccine design, we have embarked on an effort to generate a comprehensive neutralizing and non-neutralizing B cell epitope map of RTA. In a series of previous studies, we identified three spatially distinct linear (continuous), neutralizing epitopes on RTA, as defined by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PB10 (and R70), SyH7, and GD12. In this report we now describe a new collection of 19 toxin-neutralizing mAbs that bind non-linear epitopes on RTA. The most potent toxin-neutralizing mAbs in this new collection, namely WECB2, TB12, PA1, PH12 and IB2 each had nanamolar (or sub-nanomolar) affinities for ricin and were each capable of passively protecting mice against a 5-10xLD50 toxin challenge. Competitive binding assays by surface plasmon resonance revealed that WECB2 binds an epitope that overlaps with PB10 and R70; TB12, PA1, PH12 recognize epitope(s) close to or overlapping with SyH7's epitope; and GD12 and IB2 recognize epitopes that are spatially distinct from all other toxin-neutralizing mAbs. We estimate that we have now accounted for ∼75% of the predicted epitopes on the surface of RTA and that toxin-neutralizing mAbs are directed against a very limited number of these epitopes. Having this information provides a framework for further refinement of RTA mutagenesis and vaccine design.

  5. Discovery of protective B-cell epitopes for development of antimicrobial vaccines and antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Jacqueline; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Lu, Zhaohua; Yang, Chiou-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Protective antibodies play an essential role in immunity to infection by neutralizing microbes or their toxins and recruiting microbicidal effector functions. Identification of the protective B-cell epitopes, those parts of microbial antigens that contact the variable regions of the protective antibodies, can lead to development of antibody therapeutics, guide vaccine design, enable assessment of protective antibody responses in infected or vaccinated individuals, and uncover or localize pathogenic microbial functions that could be targeted by novel antimicrobials. Monoclonal antibodies are required to link in vivo or in vitro protective effects to specific epitopes and may be obtained from experimental animals or from humans, and their binding can be localized to specific regions of antigens by immunochemical assays. The epitopes are then identified with mapping methods such as X-ray crystallography of antigen-antibody complexes, antibody inhibition of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the antigen, antibody-induced alteration of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the antigen, and experimentally validated computational docking of antigen-antibody complexes. The diversity in shape, size and structure of protective B-cell epitopes, and the increasing importance of protective B-cell epitope discovery to development of vaccines and antibody therapeutics are illustrated through examples from different microbe categories, with emphasis on epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies to pathogens of high antigenic variation. Examples include the V-shaped Ab52 glycan epitope in the O-antigen of Francisella tularensis, the concave CR6261 peptidic epitope in the haemagglutinin stem of influenza virus H1N1, and the convex/concave PG16 glycopeptidic epitope in the gp120 V1/V2 loop of HIV type 1.

  6. In Vivo Validation of Predicted and Conserved T Cell Epitopes in a Swine Influenza Model

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Andres H.; Loving, Crystal; Moise, Leonard; Terry, Frances E.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Hughes, Holly R.; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious respiratory viral infection in pigs that is responsible for significant financial losses to pig farmers annually. Current measures to protect herds from infection include: inactivated whole-virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, and alpha replicon-based vaccines. As is true for influenza vaccines for humans, these strategies do not provide broad protection against the diverse strains of influenza A virus (IAV) currently circulating in U.S. swine. Improved approaches to developing swine influenza vaccines are needed. Here, we used immunoinformatics tools to identify class I and II T cell epitopes highly conserved in seven representative strains of IAV in U.S. swine and predicted to bind to Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) alleles prevalent in commercial swine. Epitope-specific interferon-gamma (IFNγ) recall responses to pooled peptides and whole virus were detected in pigs immunized with multi-epitope plasmid DNA vaccines encoding strings of class I and II putative epitopes. In a retrospective analysis of the IFNγ responses to individual peptides compared to predictions specific to the SLA alleles of cohort pigs, we evaluated the predictive performance of PigMatrix and demonstrated its ability to distinguish non-immunogenic from immunogenic peptides and to identify promiscuous class II epitopes. Overall, this study confirms the capacity of PigMatrix to predict immunogenic T cell epitopes and demonstrate its potential for use in the design of epitope-driven vaccines for swine. Additional studies that match the SLA haplotype of animals with the study epitopes will be required to evaluate the degree of immune protection conferred by epitope-driven DNA vaccines in pigs. PMID:27411061

  7. Chemical Modification of Influenza CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes Enhances Their Immunogenicity Regardless of Immunodominance

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Josine; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Jacobi, Ronald H. J.; Hendriks, Marion; Kapteijn, Kim; Ouwerkerk, Casper; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib; de Jonge, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    T cells are essential players in the defense against infection. By targeting the MHC class I antigen-presenting pathway with peptide-based vaccines, antigen-specific T cells can be induced. However, low immunogenicity of peptides poses a challenge. Here, we set out to increase immunogenicity of influenza-specific CD8+ T cell epitopes. By substituting amino acids in wild type sequences with non-proteogenic amino acids, affinity for MHC can be increased, which may ultimately enhance cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses. Since preventive vaccines against viruses should induce a broad immune response, we used this method to optimize influenza-specific epitopes of varying dominance. For this purpose, HLA-A*0201 epitopes GILGFVFTL, FMYSDFHFI and NMLSTVLGV were selected in order of decreasing MHC-affinity and dominance. For all epitopes, we designed chemically enhanced altered peptide ligands (CPLs) that exhibited greater binding affinity than their WT counterparts; even binding scores of the high affinity GILGFVFTL epitope could be improved. When HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice were vaccinated with selected CPLs, at least 2 out of 4 CPLs of each epitope showed an increase in IFN-γ responses of splenocytes. Moreover, modification of the low affinity epitope NMLSTVLGV led to an increase in the number of mice that responded. By optimizing three additional influenza epitopes specific for HLA-A*0301, we show that this strategy can be extended to other alleles. Thus, enhancing binding affinity of peptides provides a valuable tool to improve the immunogenicity and range of preventive T cell-targeted peptide vaccines. PMID:27333291

  8. Chemical Modification of Influenza CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes Enhances Their Immunogenicity Regardless of Immunodominance.

    PubMed

    Rosendahl Huber, Sietske K; Luimstra, Jolien J; van Beek, Josine; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Jacobi, Ronald H J; Hendriks, Marion; Kapteijn, Kim; Ouwerkerk, Casper; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib; de Jonge, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    T cells are essential players in the defense against infection. By targeting the MHC class I antigen-presenting pathway with peptide-based vaccines, antigen-specific T cells can be induced. However, low immunogenicity of peptides poses a challenge. Here, we set out to increase immunogenicity of influenza-specific CD8+ T cell epitopes. By substituting amino acids in wild type sequences with non-proteogenic amino acids, affinity for MHC can be increased, which may ultimately enhance cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses. Since preventive vaccines against viruses should induce a broad immune response, we used this method to optimize influenza-specific epitopes of varying dominance. For this purpose, HLA-A*0201 epitopes GILGFVFTL, FMYSDFHFI and NMLSTVLGV were selected in order of decreasing MHC-affinity and dominance. For all epitopes, we designed chemically enhanced altered peptide ligands (CPLs) that exhibited greater binding affinity than their WT counterparts; even binding scores of the high affinity GILGFVFTL epitope could be improved. When HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice were vaccinated with selected CPLs, at least 2 out of 4 CPLs of each epitope showed an increase in IFN-γ responses of splenocytes. Moreover, modification of the low affinity epitope NMLSTVLGV led to an increase in the number of mice that responded. By optimizing three additional influenza epitopes specific for HLA-A*0301, we show that this strategy can be extended to other alleles. Thus, enhancing binding affinity of peptides provides a valuable tool to improve the immunogenicity and range of preventive T cell-targeted peptide vaccines.

  9. Multiple linear B-cell epitopes of classical swine fever virus glycoprotein E2 expressed in E.coli as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Yan; Wei, Jian-Chao; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2011-07-30

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. Epitope-based vaccines is one of the current focuses in the development of new vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Two B-cell linear epitopes rE2-ba from the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV, rE2-a (CFRREKPFPHRMDCVTTTVENED, aa844-865) and rE2-b (CKEDYRYAISSTNEIGLLGAGGLT, aa693-716), were constructed and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as multiple epitope vaccine. Fifteen 6-week-old specified-pathogen-free (SPF) piglets were intramuscularly immunized with epitopes twice at 2-week intervals. All epitope-vaccinated pigs could mount an anamnestic response after booster vaccination with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256. At this time, the pigs were subjected to challenge infection with a dose of 1 × 106 TCID50 virulent CSFV strain. After challenge infection, all of the rE2-ba-immunized pigs were alive and without symptoms or signs of CSF. In contrast, the control pigs continuously exhibited signs of CSF and had to be euthanized because of severe clinical symptoms at 5 days post challenge infection. The data from in vivo experiments shown that the multiple epitope rE2-ba shown a greater protection (similar to that of HCLV vaccine) than that of mono-epitope peptide(rE2-a or rE2-b). Therefore, The results demonstrated that this multiple epitope peptide expressed in a prokaryotic system can be used as a potential DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) vaccine. The E.coli-expressed E2 multiple B-cell linear epitopes retains correct immunogenicity and is able to induce a protective immune response against CSFV infection.

  10. Live Cell Characterization of DNA Aggregation Delivered through Lipofection

    PubMed Central

    Mieruszynski, Stephen; Briggs, Candida; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Jones, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    DNA trafficking phenomena, such as information on where and to what extent DNA aggregation occurs, have yet to be fully characterised in the live cell. Here we characterise the aggregation of DNA when delivered through lipofection by applying the Number and Brightness (N&B) approach. The N&B analysis demonstrates extensive aggregation throughout the live cell with DNA clusters in the extremity of the cell and peri-nuclear areas. Once within the nucleus aggregation had decreased 3-fold. In addition, we show that increasing serum concentration of cell media results in greater cytoplasmic aggregation. Further, the effects of the DNA fragment size on aggregation was explored, where larger DNA constructs exhibited less aggregation. This study demonstrates the first quantification of DNA aggregation when delivered through lipofection in live cells. In addition, this study has presents a model for alternative uses of this imaging approach, which was originally developed to study protein oligomerization and aggregation. PMID:26013547

  11. Mapping of B-Cell Epitopes in a Trypanosoma cruzi Immunodominant Antigen Expressed in Natural Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lesénéchal, Mylène; Becquart, Laurence; Lacoux, Xavier; Ladavière, Laurent; Baida, Renata C. P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; da Silveira, José Franco

    2005-01-01

    Tc40 is an immunodominant antigen present in natural Trypanosoma cruzi infections. This immunogen was thoroughly mapped by using overlapping amino acid sequences identified by gene cloning and chemical peptide synthesis. To map continuous epitopes of the Tc40 antigen, an epitope expression library was constructed and screened with sera from human chagasic patients. A major, linear B-cell epitope spanning residues 403 to 426 (PAKAAAPPAA) was identified in the central domain of Tc40. A synthetic peptide spanning this region reacted strongly with 89.8% of the serum samples from T. cruzi-infected individuals. This indicates that the main antigenic site is defined by the linear sequence of the peptide rather than a conformation-dependent structure. The major B-cell epitope of Tc40 shares a high degree of sequence identity with T. cruzi ribosomal and RNA binding proteins, suggesting the existence of cross-reactivity among these molecules. PMID:15699429

  12. Identification and characterization of B-cell epitopes of 3FTx and PLA(2) toxins from Micrurus corallinus snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castro, K L; Duarte, C G; Ramos, H R; Machado de Avila, R A; Schneider, F S; Oliveira, D; Freitas, C F; Kalapothakis, E; Ho, P L; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop a strategy to identify B-cell epitopes on four different three finger toxins (3FTX) and one phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from Micrurus corallinus snake venom. 3FTx and PLA2 are highly abundant components in Elapidic venoms and are the major responsibles for the toxicity observed in envenomation by coral snakes. Overlapping peptides from the sequence of each toxin were prepared by SPOT method and three different anti-elapidic sera were used to map the epitopes. After immunogenicity analysis of the spot-reactive peptides by EPITOPIA, a computational method, nine sequences from the five toxins were chemically synthesized and antigenically and immunogenically characterized. All the peptides were used together as immunogens in rabbits, delivered with Freund's adjuvant for a first cycle of immunization and Montanide in the second. A good antibody response against individual synthetic peptides and M. corallinus venom was achieved. Anti-peptide IgGs were also cross-reactive against Micrurus frontalis and Micrurus lemniscatus crude venoms. In addition, anti-peptide IgGs inhibits the lethal and phospholipasic activities of M. corallinus crude venom. Our results provide a rational basis to the identification of neutralizing epitopes on coral snake toxins and show that their corresponding synthetic peptides could improve the generation of immuno-therapeutics. The use of synthetic peptide for immunization is a reasonable approach, since it enables poly-specificity, low risk of toxic effects and large scale production.

  13. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  14. Selection of SARS-Coronavirus-specific B cell epitopes by phage peptide library screening and evaluation of the immunological effect of epitope-based peptides on mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hua; Jiang Lifang . E-mail: jianglf909@yahoo.com.cn; Fang Danyun; Yan Huijun; Zhou Jingjiao; Zhou Junmei; Liang Yu; Gao Yang; Zhao, Wei; Long Beiguo

    2007-03-15

    Antibodies to SARS-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-specific B cell epitopes might recognize the pathogen and interrupt its adherence to and penetration of host cells. Hence, these epitopes could be useful for diagnosis and as vaccine constituents. Using the phage-displayed peptide library screening method and purified Fab fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG Fab) from normal human sera and convalescent sera from SARS-CoV-infected patients as targets, 11 B cell epitopes of SARS-CoV spike glycoprotein (S protein) and membrane protein (M protein) were screened. After a bioinformatics tool was used to analyze these epitopes, four epitope-based S protein dodecapeptides corresponding to the predominant epitopes were chosen for synthesis. Their antigenic specificities and immunogenicities were studied in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT analysis of lymphocytes as well as a serologic analysis of antibody showed that these peptides could trigger a rapid, highly effective, and relatively safe immune response in BALB/c mice. These findings might aid development of SARS diagnostics and vaccines. Moreover, the role of S and M proteins as important surface antigens is confirmed.

  15. Cross-reactivity of hepatitis C virus specific vaccine-induced T cells at immunodominant epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Christabel; Swadling, Leo; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Folgori, Antonella; Salio, Mariolina; Klenerman, Paul; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity is a challenge to the development of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine. Following vaccination of humans with adenoviral vectors, we determined the capacity of T cells to target common viral variants at immundominant epitopes ex vivo. We identified two major variants for epitopes NS3(1073) and NS3(1446), and multiple variants for epitope NS3(1406) that occurred in >5% of genotype 1 and 3 sequences at a population level. Cross-reactivity of vaccine-induced T cells was determined using variant peptides in IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. Vaccine-induced T cells targeted approximately 90% of NS3(1073) genotype 1 sequences and 50% of NS3(1446) genotype 1 and 3 sequences. For NS3(1406), 62% of subtype-1b sequences were targeted. Next, we assessed whether an in vitro priming system, using dendritic cells and T cells from healthy donors, could identify a variant of NS3(1406) that was maximally cross-reactive. In vitro priming assays showed that of those tested the NS3(1406) vaccine variant was the most immunogenic. T cells primed with genotype 1 variants from subtype 1a or 1b were broadly cross-reactive with other variants from the same subtype. We conclude that immunization with candidate HCV adenoviral vaccines generates cross-reactive T cells at immunodominant epitopes. The degree of cross-reactivity varies between epitopes and may be HCV-subtype specific.

  16. Cross‐reactivity of hepatitis C virus specific vaccine‐induced T cells at immunodominant epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Christabel; Swadling, Leo; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Folgori, Antonella; Salio, Mariolina; Klenerman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Viral diversity is a challenge to the development of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine. Following vaccination of humans with adenoviral vectors, we determined the capacity of T cells to target common viral variants at immundominant epitopes ex vivo. We identified two major variants for epitopes NS31073 and NS31446, and multiple variants for epitope NS31406 that occurred in >5% of genotype 1 and 3 sequences at a population level. Cross‐reactivity of vaccine‐induced T cells was determined using variant peptides in IFN‐γ ELISPOT assays. Vaccine‐induced T cells targeted approximately 90% of NS31073 genotype 1 sequences and 50% of NS31446 genotype 1 and 3 sequences. For NS31406, 62% of subtype‐1b sequences were targeted. Next, we assessed whether an in vitro priming system, using dendritic cells and T cells from healthy donors, could identify a variant of NS31406 that was maximally cross‐reactive. In vitro priming assays showed that of those tested the NS31406 vaccine variant was the most immunogenic. T cells primed with genotype 1 variants from subtype 1a or 1b were broadly cross‐reactive with other variants from the same subtype. We conclude that immunization with candidate HCV adenoviral vaccines generates cross‐reactive T cells at immunodominant epitopes. The degree of cross‐reactivity varies between epitopes and may be HCV‐subtype specific. PMID:25263407

  17. Strategy for identifying dendritic cell-processed CD4+ T cell epitopes from the HIV gag p24 protein.

    PubMed

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Yu, Haiqiang; Dengjel, Jörn; Trumpfheller, Christine; Zebroski, Henry A; Zhang, Nawei; Küttner, Victoria; Ueberheide, Beatrix M; Deng, Haiteng; Chait, Brian T; Steinman, Ralph M; Mojsov, Svetlana; Fenyö, David

    2012-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry (MS) is becoming a preferred method to identify class I and class II peptides presented on major histocompability complexes (MHC) on antigen presenting cells (APC). We describe a combined computational and MS approach to identify exogenous MHC II peptides presented on mouse spleen dendritic cells (DCs). This approach enables rapid, effective screening of a large number of possible peptides by a computer-assisted strategy that utilizes the extraordinary human ability for pattern recognition. To test the efficacy of the approach, a mixture of epitope peptide mimics (mimetopes) from HIV gag p24 sequence were added exogenously to Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L)-mobilized splenic DCs. We identified the exogenously added peptide, VDRFYKTLRAEQASQ, and a second peptide, DRFYKLTRAEQASQ, derived from the original exogenously added 15-mer peptide. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our strategy works efficiently with HIV gag p24 protein when delivered, as vaccine protein, to Flt3L expanded mouse splenic DCs in vitro through the DEC-205 receptor. We found that the same MHC II-bound HIV gag p24 peptides, VDRFYKTLRAEQASQ and DRFYKLTRAEQASQ, were naturally processed from anti-DEC-205 HIV gag p24 protein and presented on DCs. The two identified VDRFYKTLRAEQASQ and DRFYKLTRAEQASQ MHC II-bound HIV gag p24 peptides elicited CD4(+) T-cell mediated responses in vitro. Their presentation by DCs to antigen-specific T cells was inhibited by chloroquine (CQ), indicating that optimal presentation of these exogenously added peptides required uptake and vesicular trafficking in mature DCs. These results support the application of our strategy to identify and characterize peptide epitopes derived from vaccine proteins processed by DCs and thus has the potential to greatly accelerate DC-based vaccine development.

  18. Delivering factors for reprogramming a somatic cell to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Um, Soong Ho

    2012-05-01

    An adult cell originates from stem cell. The stem cell is usually categorized into three species including an embryonic stem cell (ESc), an adult stem cell, and an induced stem cell (iPSc). iPSc features pluripotency, which is meant to be differentiated into any types of cells. Accordingly, it is much attractive to anyone who pursuit a regenerative medicine, owing to the potential almighty. They are simply produced by reprogramming a somatic cell via a transfer of transcription factors. The efficiency and productivity of iPS are considerably subject to delivering methods of exogenous genes into a variety of targeted mammalians. Conventional and well-run gene delivery techniques have been reviewed here. This details the methods and principles of delivery factors and provides an overview of the research, with an emphasis on their potential for use as clinical therapeutic platforms.

  19. Clinical Control of HIV-1 by Cytotoxic T Cells Specific for Multiple Conserved Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Murakoshi, Hayato; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chikata, Takayuki; Naruto, Takuya; Maruyama, Rie; Tamura, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Naoki; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification and characterization of CD8+ T cells effectively controlling HIV-1 variants are necessary for the development of AIDS vaccines and for studies of AIDS pathogenesis, although such CD8+ T cells have been only partially identified. In this study, we sought to identify CD8+ T cells controlling HIV-1 variants in 401 Japanese individuals chronically infected with HIV-1 subtype B, in which protective alleles HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 are very rare, by using comprehensive and exhaustive methods. We identified 13 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells controlling HIV-1 in Japanese individuals, though 9 of these epitopes were not previously reported. The breadths of the T cell responses to the 13 epitopes were inversely associated with plasma viral load (P = 2.2 × 10−11) and positively associated with CD4 count (P = 1.2 × 10−11), indicating strong synergistic effects of these T cells on HIV-1 control in vivo. Nine of these epitopes were conserved among HIV-1 subtype B-infected individuals, whereas three out of four nonconserved epitopes were cross-recognized by the specific T cells. These findings indicate that these 12 epitopes are strong candidates for antigens for an AIDS vaccine. The present study highlighted a strategy to identify CD8+ T cells controlling HIV-1 and demonstrated effective control of HIV-1 by those specific for 12 conserved or cross-reactive epitopes. IMPORTANCE HLA-B*27-restricted and HLA-B*57-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a key role in controlling HIV-1 in Caucasians and Africans, whereas it is unclear which CTLs control HIV-1 in Asian countries, where HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 are very rare. A recent study showed that HLA-B*67:01 and HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotypes were protective alleles in Japanese individuals, but it is unknown whether CTLs restricted by these alleles control HIV-1. In this study, we identified 13 CTLs controlling HIV-1 in Japan by using comprehensive and exhaustive methods. They included 5 HLA-B*52

  20. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Sidney, John; Dinh, Kenny; Southwood, Scott; Newman, Mark J; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA) alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at . Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine), and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups. PMID:16545123

  1. Dengue virus-infected human dendritic cells reveal hierarchies of naturally expressed novel NS3 CD8 T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Piazza, P; Campbell, D; Marques, E; Hildebrand, W H; Buchli, R; Mailliard, R; Rinaldo, C R

    2014-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of dengue virus (DENV) cell-mediated immunity is limited. In this study we characterize CD8(+) T lymphocytes recognizing three novel and two known non-structural protein 3 peptide epitopes in DENV-infected dendritic cells. Three epitopes displayed high conservation (75-100%), compared to the others (0-50%). A hierarchy ranking based on magnitude and polyfunctionality of the antigen-specific response showed that dominant epitopes were both highly conserved and cross-reactive against multiple DENV serotypes. These results are relevant to DENV pathogenesis and vaccine design.

  2. Conservation of HIV-1 T cell epitopes across time and clades: validation of immunogenic HLA-A2 epitopes selected for the GAIA HIV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Levitz, Lauren; Koita, Ousmane A; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Boyle, Christine M; Rozehnal, John; Tounkara, Karamoko; Dao, Sounkalo M; Koné, Youssouf; Koty, Zoumana; Buus, Soren; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2012-12-14

    HIV genomic sequence variability has complicated efforts to generate an effective globally relevant vaccine. Regions of the viral genome conserved in sequence and across time may represent the "Achilles' heel" of HIV. In this study, highly conserved T-cell epitopes were selected using immunoinformatics tools combining HLA-A2 supertype binding predictions with relative global conservation. Analysis performed in 2002 on 10,803 HIV-1 sequences, and again in 2009, on 43,822 sequences, yielded 38 HLA-A2 epitopes. These epitopes were experimentally validated for HLA binding and immunogenicity with PBMCs from HIV-infected patients in Providence, Rhode Island, and/or Bamako, Mali. Thirty-five (92%) stimulated an IFNγ response in PBMCs from at least one subject. Eleven of fourteen peptides (79%) were confirmed as HLA-A2 epitopes in both locations. Validation of these HLA-A2 epitopes conserved across time, clades, and geography supports the hypothesis that such epitopes could provide effective coverage of virus diversity and would be appropriate for inclusion in a globally relevant HIV vaccine.

  3. Conservation of HIV-1 T cell epitopes across time and clades: Validation of immunogenic HLA-A2 epitopes selected for the GAIA HIV vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, Lauren; Koita, Ousmane A.; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T.; Boyle, Christine M.; Rozehnal, John; Tounkara, Karamoko; Dao, Sounkalo M.; Koné, Youssouf; Koty, Zoumana; Buus, Soren; Moise, Leonard; Martin, William D.; De Groot, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    HIV genomic sequence variability has complicated efforts to generate an effective globally relevant vaccine. Regions of the viral genome conserved in sequence and across time may represent the “Achilles’ heel” of HIV. In this study, highly conserved T-cell epitopes were selected using immunoinformatics tools combining HLA-A2 supertype binding predictions with relative global conservation. Analysis performed in 2002 on 10,803 HIV-1 sequences, and again in 2009, on 43,822 sequences, yielded 38 HLA-A2 epitopes. These epitopes were experimentally validated for HLA binding and immunogenicity with PBMCs from HIV-infected patients in Providence, Rhode Island, and/or Bamako, Mali. Thirty-five (92%) stimulated an IFNγ response in PBMCs from at least one subject. Eleven of fourteen peptides (79%) were confirmed as HLA-A2 epitopes in both locations. Validation of these HLA-A2 epitopes conserved across time, clades, and geography supports the hypothesis that such epitopes could provide effective coverage of virus diversity and would be appropriate for inclusion in a globally relevant HIV vaccine. PMID:23102976

  4. Analysis of B cell epitopes of a glycoprotein porcine zona pellucida (pZP1).

    PubMed

    Shigeta, M; Hasegawa, A; Hamada, Y; Koyama, K

    2000-07-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) of mammalian oocytes forms an extracellular matrix composed of three major glycoproteins and plays an important role in sperm-zona interactions. As ZP had a strong organ-specific but species-cross-reactive antigenicity and passive or active immunization with ZP antigens could impair fertilization, the possibility of developing a immunocontraceptive vaccine has been extensively studied. Studies on active immunization with porcine ZP (pZP) that contain B cell epitopes and T cell epitopes demonstrated that a temporary infertility could be induced along with the elevation of antibody titers, but it was always associated with ovarian failure. This could be due to the oophoritis by activation of pathogenic T cell immunity. It is the general consideration that any adverse effects by vaccination should be avoided for an immunocontraception. From this point of view, the analysis of B cell epitopes of pZP protein would be helpful for construction of a safe immunocontraceptive vaccine with zona antigens. We determined the amino acid sequence of the B epitope in the pZP1 protein by using a monoclonal antibody (MAb-5H4) that possesses a fertilization blocking ability. In addition, antiserum raised to the epitope sequence was revealed to block in vitro fertilization of homologous animal species.

  5. Defining species-specific immunodominant B cell epitopes for molecular serology of Chlamydia species.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens.

  6. In vivo immunogenicity of Tax(11-19) epitope in HLA-A2/DTR transgenic mice: implication for dendritic cell-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Divya; Masih, Shet; Schell, Todd; Jacobson, Steven; Comber, Joseph D; Philip, Ramila; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja; Khan, Zafar K

    2014-05-30

    Viral oncoprotein Tax plays key roles in transformation of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1)-infected T cells leading to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), and is the key antigen recognized during HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM). In HLA-A2+ asymptomatic carriers as well as ATL and HAM patients, Tax(11-19) epitope exhibits immunodominance. Here, we evaluate CD8 T-cell immune response against this epitope in the presence and absence of dendritic cells (DCs) given the recent encouraging observations made with Phase 1 DC-based vaccine trial for ATL. To facilitate these studies, we first generated an HLA-A2/DTR hybrid mouse strain carrying the HLA-A2.1 and CD11c-DTR genes. We then studied CD8 T-cell immune response against Tax(11-19) epitope delivered in the absence or presence of Freund's adjuvant and/or DCs. Overall results demonstrate that naturally presented Tax epitope could initiate an antigen-specific CD8T cell response in vivo but failed to do so upon DC depletion. Presence of adjuvant potentiated Tax(11-19)-specific response. Elevated serum IL-6 levels coincided with depletion of DCs whereas decreased TGF-β was associated with adjuvant use. Thus, Tax(11-19) epitope is a potential candidate for the DC-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine and the newly hybrid mouse strain could be used for investigating DC involvement in human class-I-restricted immune responses.

  7. In vivo immunogenicity of Tax 11-19 epitope in HLA-A2/DTR transgenic mice: implication for dendritic cell-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Divya; Masih, Shet; Schell, Todd; Jacobson, Steven; Comber, Joseph D.; Philip, Ramila; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja; Khan, Zafar K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral oncoprotein Tax plays key roles in transformation of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1)-infected T cells leading to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), and is the key antigen recognized during HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM). In HLA-A2+ asymptomatic carriers as well as ATL and HAM patients, Tax(11-19) epitope exhibits immunodominance. Here, we evaluate CD8 T-cell immune response against this epitope in the presence and absence of dendritic cells (DCs) given the recent encouraging observations made with Phase 1 DC-based vaccine trial for ATL. To facilitate these studies, we first generated an HLA-A2/DTR hybrid mouse strain carrying the HLA-A2.1 and CD11c-DTR genes. We then studied CD8 T-cell immune response against Tax(11-19) epitope delivered in the absence or presence of Freund’s adjuvant and/or DCs. Overall results demonstrate that naturally presented Tax epitope could initiate an antigen-specific CD8 T cell response in vivo but failed to do so upon DC depletion. Presence of adjuvant potentiated Tax(11-19)-specific response. Elevated serum IL-6 levels coincided with depletion of DCs whereas decreased TGF-β was associated with adjuvant use. Thus, Tax(11-19) epitope is a potential candidate for the DC-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine and the newly hybrid mouse strain could be used for investigating DC involvement in human class-I-restricted immune responses. PMID:24739247

  8. Proteins with epitopes of the acetylcholine receptor in epithelial cell cultures of thymomas in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, A.; Kirchner, T.; Hoppe, F.; O'Connor, R.; Schalke, B.; Tzartos, S.; Müller-Hermelink, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    Thymomas from 12 patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated for the presence of epitopes of the alpha-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR) using monoclonal antibodies (MAb) reacting against the AchR. In all but two of the tumors epitopes corresponding to antigenic determinants located on the cytoplasmic side of the AchR were identified. From eight thymomas cell lines were established that have been kept in culture for up to 6 months. The cultured cells expressed the same AchR-epitopes as did the primary tumors. During early passages the percentage of epithelial cells positive for the AchR epitopes approximately mirrored the percentage of positive cells in the original tumors. With passaging the relative number of positive cells usually declined but in some cultures an increase was observed. Three cell lines that showed extensive staining with an MAb against the AchR were radiolabeled to characterize the antigen. From protein extracts of these three cell lines proteins of 45 kd and 156 kd molecular weight (MW) were precipitated. These proteins are different from other proteins described in the context of both thymomas and MG. The negative reactivity with MAb against other epitopes of the alpha-subunit, especially against the main immunogenic region (MIR), speaks in favor of membrane-associated proteins of only limited crossreactivity to the AchR. A previous study found an almost exclusive occurrence of these AchR-epitopes in thymomas associated with MG, but not in other thymomas of similar histologic type. The expression of the proteins described here could therefore play a role in the triggering of the autoimmune process against the AchR of the motor, endplate in MG patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2468286

  9. Harnessing Computational Biology for Exact Linear B-Cell Epitope Prediction: A Novel Amino Acid Composition-Based Feature Descriptor.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Vijayakumar; Gautham, Namasivayam

    2015-10-01

    Proteins embody epitopes that serve as their antigenic determinants. Epitopes occupy a central place in integrative biology, not to mention as targets for novel vaccine, pharmaceutical, and systems diagnostics development. The presence of T-cell and B-cell epitopes has been extensively studied due to their potential in synthetic vaccine design. However, reliable prediction of linear B-cell epitope remains a formidable challenge. Earlier studies have reported discrepancy in amino acid composition between the epitopes and non-epitopes. Hence, this study proposed and developed a novel amino acid composition-based feature descriptor, Dipeptide Deviation from Expected Mean (DDE), to distinguish the linear B-cell epitopes from non-epitopes effectively. In this study, for the first time, only exact linear B-cell epitopes and non-epitopes have been utilized for developing the prediction method, unlike the use of epitope-containing regions in earlier reports. To evaluate the performance of the DDE feature vector, models have been developed with two widely used machine-learning techniques Support Vector Machine and AdaBoost-Random Forest. Five-fold cross-validation performance of the proposed method with error-free dataset and dataset from other studies achieved an overall accuracy between nearly 61% and 73%, with balance between sensitivity and specificity metrics. Performance of the DDE feature vector was better (with accuracy difference of about 2% to 12%), in comparison to other amino acid-derived features on different datasets. This study reflects the efficiency of the DDE feature vector in enhancing the linear B-cell epitope prediction performance, compared to other feature representations. The proposed method is made as a stand-alone tool available freely for researchers, particularly for those interested in vaccine design and novel molecular target development for systems therapeutics and diagnostics: https://github.com/brsaran/LBEEP.

  10. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage.

  11. Major histocompatibility complex and T cell interactions of a universal T cell epitope from Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed

    Parra-López, Carlos; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Cameron, Thomas O; Vargas, Luis E; Salazar, Luz Mary; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Nardin, Elizabeth; Stern, Lawrence J

    2006-05-26

    A 20-residue sequence from the C-terminal region of the circumsporozoite protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is considered a universal helper T cell epitope because it is immunogenic in individuals of many major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. Subunit vaccines containing T* and the major B cell epitope of the circumsporozoite protein induce high antibody titers to the malaria parasite and significant T cell responses in humans. In this study we have evaluated the specificity of the T* sequence with regard to its binding to the human class II MHC protein DR4 (HLA-DRB1*0401), its interactions with antigen receptors on T cells, and the effect of natural variants of this sequence on its immunogenicity. Computational approaches identified multiple potential DR4-binding epitopes within T*, and experimental binding studies confirmed the following two tight binding epitopes: one located toward the N terminus (the T*-1 epitope) and one at the C terminus (the T*-5 epitope). Immunization of a human DR4 volunteer with a peptide-based vaccine containing the T* sequence elicited CD4+ T cells that recognize each of these epitopes. Here we present an analysis of the immunodominant N-terminal epitope T*-1. T*-1 residues important for interaction with DR4 and with antigen receptors on T*-specific T cells were mapped. MHC tetramers carrying DR4/T*-1 MHC-peptide complexes stained and efficiently stimulated these cells in vitro. T*-1 overlaps a region of the protein that has been described as highly polymorphic; however, the particular T*-1 residues required for anchoring to DR4 were highly conserved in Plasmodium sequences described to date.

  12. Wall teichoic acids prevent antibody binding to epitopes within the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Samir; Kim, Taehan; Lester, Evan; Deep, Deeksha; Spiegel, David A

    2016-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that produces a range of infections including cellulitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The principle mechanism in antistaphylococcal host defense is opsonization with antibodies and complement proteins, followed by phagocytic clearance. Here we use a previously developed technique for installing chemical epitopes in the peptidoglycan cell wall to show that surface glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids conceal cell wall epitopes, preventing their recognition and opsonization by antibodies. Thus, our results reveal a previously unrecognized immunoevasive role for wall teichoic acids in S. aureus: repulsion of peptidoglycan-targeted antibodies.

  13. M. tuberculosis T Cell Epitope Analysis Reveals Paucity of Antigenic Variation and Identifies Rare Variable TB Antigens.

    PubMed

    Coscolla, Mireia; Copin, Richard; Sutherland, Jayne; Gehre, Florian; de Jong, Bouke; Owolabi, Olumuiya; Mbayo, Georgetta; Giardina, Federica; Ernst, Joel D; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-11-11

    Pathogens that evade adaptive immunity typically exhibit antigenic variation. By contrast, it appears that although the chronic human tuberculosis (TB)-causing pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis needs to counter host T cell responses, its T cell epitopes are hyperconserved. Here we present an extensive analysis of the T cell epitopes of M. tuberculosis. We combined population genomics with experimental immunology to determine the number and identity of T cell epitope sequence variants in 216 phylogenetically diverse strains of M. tuberculosis. Antigen conservation is indeed a hallmark of M. tuberculosis. However, our analysis revealed a set of seven variable antigens that were immunogenic in subjects with active TB. These findings suggest that M. tuberculosis uses mechanisms other than antigenic variation to evade T cells. T cell epitopes that exhibit sequence variation may not be subject to the same evasion mechanisms, and hence vaccines that include such variable epitopes may be more efficacious.

  14. Vertical T cell immunodominance and epitope entropy determine HIV-1 escape

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Michael K.P.; Hawkins, Natalie; Ritchie, Adam J.; Ganusov, Vitaly V.; Whale, Victoria; Brackenridge, Simon; Li, Hui; Pavlicek, Jeffrey W.; Cai, Fangping; Rose-Abrahams, Melissa; Treurnicht, Florette; Hraber, Peter; Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive; Ferrari, Guido; Tanner, Rachel; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; B, CHAVI Core; Cohen, Myron; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Haynes, Barton; Borrow, Persephone; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Williamson, Carolyn; Korber, Bette T.; Gao, Feng; Self, Steve; McMichael, Andrew; Goonetilleke, Nilu

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 accumulates mutations in and around reactive epitopes to escape recognition and killing by CD8+ T cells. Measurements of HIV-1 time to escape should therefore provide information on which parameters are most important for T cell–mediated in vivo control of HIV-1. Primary HIV-1–specific T cell responses were fully mapped in 17 individuals, and the time to virus escape, which ranged from days to years, was measured for each epitope. While higher magnitude of an individual T cell response was associated with more rapid escape, the most significant T cell measure was its relative immunodominance measured in acute infection. This identified subject-level or “vertical” immunodominance as the primary determinant of in vivo CD8+ T cell pressure in HIV-1 infection. Conversely, escape was slowed significantly by lower population variability, or entropy, of the epitope targeted. Immunodominance and epitope entropy combined to explain half of all the variability in time to escape. These data explain how CD8+ T cells can exert significant and sustained HIV-1 pressure even when escape is very slow and that within an individual, the impacts of other T cell factors on HIV-1 escape should be considered in the context of immunodominance. PMID:23221345

  15. State of the art and challenges in sequence based T-cell epitope prediction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sequence based T-cell epitope predictions have improved immensely in the last decade. From predictions of peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex molecules with moderate accuracy, limited allele coverage, and no good estimates of the other events in the antigen-processing pathway, the field has evolved significantly. Methods have now been developed that produce highly accurate binding predictions for many alleles and integrate both proteasomal cleavage and transport events. Moreover have so-called pan-specific methods been developed, which allow for prediction of peptide binding to MHC alleles characterized by limited or no peptide binding data. Most of the developed methods are publicly available, and have proven to be very useful as a shortcut in epitope discovery. Here, we will go through some of the history of sequence-based predictions of helper as well as cytotoxic T cell epitopes. We will focus on some of the most accurate methods and their basic background. PMID:21067545

  16. Analysis of Conformational B-Cell Epitopes in the Antibody-Antigen Complex Using the Depth Function and the Convex Hull.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang; Wang, Kui; Hanlon, Michelle; Gao, Jianzhao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of conformational b-cell epitopes plays an important role in immunoinformatics. Several computational methods are proposed on the basis of discrimination determined by the solvent-accessible surface between epitopes and non-epitopes, but the performance of existing methods is far from satisfying. In this paper, depth functions and the k-th surface convex hull are used to analyze epitopes and exposed non-epitopes. On each layer of the protein, we compute relative solvent accessibility and four different types of depth functions, i.e., Chakravarty depth, DPX, half-sphere exposure and half space depth, to analyze the location of epitopes on different layers of the proteins. We found that conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in charged residues Asp, Glu, Lys, Arg, His; aliphatic residues Gly, Pro; non-charged residues Asn, Gln; and aromatic residue Tyr. Conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in coils. Conservation of epitopes is not significantly lower than that of exposed non-epitopes. The average depths (obtained by four methods) for epitopes are significantly lower than that of non-epitopes on the surface using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Epitopes are more likely to be located in the outer layer of the convex hull of a protein. On the benchmark dataset, the cumulate 10th convex hull covers 84.6% of exposed residues on the protein surface area, and nearly 95% of epitope sites. These findings may be helpful in building a predictor for epitopes.

  17. Mapping of SLE-specific Sm B cell epitopes using murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pruijn, G J; Schoute, F; Thijssen, J P; Smeenk, R J; van Venrooij, W J

    1997-04-01

    In this study we have used a number of monoclonal antibodies with various anti-Sm specificities originating from MRL/lpr mice to map B cell epitopes of the Sm-B/B' and Sm-D1 proteins. Selection of Sm-B subfragments reactive with the Sm-B/B'-specific monoclonal antibody ANA125 from a DNaseI fragment expression library revealed that the epitope recognized by this monoclonal antibody is located between amino acids 146 and 158: GRGTVAAAAAAAT. The epitopes recognized by two distinct Sm-D1-specific monoclonal antibodies, 7.13 and ANA127, appeared to be located in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated deletion mutants of Sm-D1. These epitopes are probably identical and not simply composed of a GR repeat, which is a characteristic feature of this part of the protein. Immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated deletion mutants of both Sm-B and Sm-D1 was also employed to determine the sequence requirements for recognition by two monoclonal antibodies that are cross-reactive with several Sm proteins, Y12 and ANA128. The epitope recognized by these two monoclonal antibodies is probably also identical and composed by the juxtaposition of several regions in the folded protein. The low, but significant, level of immunoprecipitation of truncated versions of both Sm-B and Sm-D1, suggests that the Sm domain, which is shared by all Sm proteins, in particular the amino-terminal part of the Sm1 motif of Sm-B and Sm-D1, plays an important role in formation of the cross-reactive epitope and might contribute to cross-reactivity with other Sm proteins. The results of immunoprecipitation experiments with cellular extracts show that the epitopes recognized by all anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies used in this study are accessible in the assembled snRNPs.

  18. Titrating T-cell epitopes within self-assembled vaccines optimizes CD4+ helper T cell and antibody outputs.

    PubMed

    Pompano, Rebecca R; Chen, Jianjun; Verbus, Emily A; Han, Huifang; Fridman, Arthur; McNeely, Tessie; Collier, Joel H; Chong, Anita S

    2014-11-01

    Epitope content plays a critical role in determining T-cell and antibody responses to vaccines, biomaterials, and protein therapeutics, but its effects are nonlinear and difficult to isolate. Here, molecular self-assembly is used to build a vaccine with precise control over epitope content, in order to finely tune the magnitude and phenotype of T helper and antibody responses. Self-adjuvanting peptide nanofibers are formed by co-assembling a high-affinity universal CD4+ T-cell epitope (PADRE) and a B-cell epitope from Staphylococcus aureus at specifiable concentrations. Increasing the PADRE concentration from micromolar to millimolar elicited bell-shaped dose-responses that are unique to different T-cell populations. Notably, the epitope ratios that maximize T follicular helper and antibody responses differed by an order of magnitude from those that maximized Th1 or Th2 responses. Thus, modular materials assembly provides a means of controlling epitope content and efficiently skewing the adaptive immune response in the absence of exogenous adjuvant; this approach may contribute to the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies.

  19. Titrating T cell Epitopes within Self-Assembled Vaccines Optimizes CD4+ Helper T Cell and Antibody Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianjun; Verbus, Emily A.; Han, Huifang; Fridman, Arthur; McNeely, Tessie; Collier, Joel H.; Chong, Anita S.

    2014-01-01

    Epitope content plays a critical role in determining T cell and antibody responses to vaccines, biomaterials, and protein therapeutics, but its effects are nonlinear and difficult to isolate. Here, molecular self-assembly was used to build a vaccine with precise control over epitope content, in order to finely tune the magnitude and phenotype of T helper and antibody responses. Self-adjuvanting peptide nanofibers were formed by co-assembling a high-affinity universal CD4+ T cell epitope (PADRE) and a B cell epitope from Staphylococcus aureus at specifiable concentrations. Increasing the PADRE concentration from μM to mM elicited bell-shaped dose-responses that were unique to different T cell populations. Notably, the epitope ratios that maximized T follicular helper and antibody responses differed by an order of magnitude from those that maximized Th1 or Th2 responses. Thus, modular materials assembly provides a means of controlling epitope content and efficiently skewing the adaptive immune response in the absence of exogenous adjuvant; this approach may contribute to the development of improved vaccines and immunotherapies. PMID:24923735

  20. Multiple B- and T-cell epitopes on a major allergen of Kentucky Bluegrass pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Yang, M; Chong, P; Mohapatra, S S

    1996-01-01

    The B- and T-cell epitopes of a recombinant grass allergen, rKBG60, were delineated using a set of overlapping synthetic peptides. Direct binding by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing serum pools led to the identification of 13 murine immunoglobulin-, and nine to 13 human IgG- and five to seven human IgE-reactive overlapping peptides. Of the peptides which bound to human IgE antibodies, all but three peptides bound to human and/or murine IgG antibodies. Furthermore, eight out of 12 synthetic peptides induced antigen-specific antibodies in mice, suggesting that these peptides contained epitopes that recognized and/or induced T cells. These results, in conjunction with cross-recognition of different peptides at the C-terminus of rKBG60 by antibodies to neighbouring or non-overlapping peptides suggest that the C-terminus of this antigen represents a dominant antigenic and allergenic site. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation studies using these synthetic peptides for 13 grass allergic individuals indicated that seven potential human T-cell epitopes exist on this allergen. Taken together, the results demonstrate that multiple B- and T-cell epitopes exist on this major group of grass allergens, the majority of which are localized at the C-terminus of this antigen. PMID:8698392

  1. Quantifying and imaging NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1-derived epitopes on tumor cells using high affinity T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Purbhoo, Marco A; Sutton, Deborah H; Brewer, Joanna E; Mullings, Rebecca E; Hill, Maxine E; Mahon, Tara M; Karbach, Julia; Jäger, Elke; Cameron, Brian J; Lissin, Nikolai; Vyas, Paresh; Chen, Ji-Li; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2006-06-15

    Presentation of intracellular tumor-associated Ags (TAAs) in the context of HLA class I molecules offers unique cancer-specific cell surface markers for the identification and targeting of tumor cells. For most peptide Ags, the levels of and variations in cell surface presentation remain unknown, yet these parameters are of crucial importance when considering specific TAAs as targets for anticancer therapy. Here we use a soluble TCR with picomolar affinity for the HLA-A2-restricted 157-165 epitope of the NY-ESO-1 and LAGE-1 TAAs to investigate presentation of this immunodominant epitope on the surface of a variety of cancer cells. By single molecule fluorescence microscopy, we directly visualize HLA-peptide presentation for the first time, demonstrating that NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1-positive tumor cells present 10-50 NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1(157-165) epitopes per cell.

  2. Genetically modified anthrax lethal toxin safely delivers whole HIV protein antigens into the cytosol to induce T cell immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yichen; Friedman, Rachel; Kushner, Nicholas; Doling, Amy; Thomas, Lawrence; Touzjian, Neal; Starnbach, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2000-07-01

    Bacillus anthrax lethal toxin can be engineered to deliver foreign proteins to the cytosol for antigen presentation to CD8 T cells. Vaccination with modified toxins carrying 8-9 amino acid peptide epitopes induces protective immunity in mice. To evaluate whether large protein antigens can be used with this system, recombinant constructs encoding several HIV antigens up to 500 amino acids were produced. These candidate HIV vaccines are safe in animals and induce CD8 T cells in mice. Constructs encoding gag p24 and nef stimulate gag-specific CD4 proliferation and a secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in HIV-infected donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. These results lay the foundation for future clinical vaccine studies.

  3. Identification of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope from proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Hui-Zhong; Liu, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Bao-Fu; Chen, Fei-Fei; Pei, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2011-02-01

    Peptide-based immunotherapy strategies appear promising as an approach to successfully induce an antitumor immune response and prolong survival in patients with various cancers. Protein antigens and their specific epitopes are formulation targets for anti-tumor vaccines. Bioinformatical approaches to predict major histocompatibility complex binding peptides can facilitate the resource-consuming effort of T cell epitope identification. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen including Ki-67 and PCNA, associated with the proliferation process of the cell, seems to be an attractive new target for tumor-specific immunotherapy. In this study, we predicted seven HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL candidate epitope of Ki-67 and eight epitope of PCNA by computer algorithm SYFPEITHI, BIMAS, and IEDB_ANN. Subsequently, biological functions of these peptides were tested by experiments in vitro. We found Ki-67((280-288)) (LQGETQLLV) had the strongest binding-affinity with HLA-A*0201. Further study revealed that Ki-67((280-288)) increased the frequency of IFN-γ-producing T cells compared to a negative peptide. Because Ki-67 was broadly expressed in most advanced malignant tumors, indicating a potential anti-tumor application in the future.

  4. CELL WALL CARBOHYDRATE EPITOPES IN THE GREEN ALGA OEDOGONIUM BHARUCHAE F. MINOR (OEDOGONIALES, CHLOROPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Estevez, José M; Leonardi, Patricia I; Alberghina, Josefina S

    2008-10-01

    Cell wall changes in vegetative and suffultory cells (SCs) and in oogonial structures from Oedogonium bharuchae N. D. Kamat f. minor Vélez were characterized using monoclonal antibodies against several carbohydrate epitopes. Vegetative cells and SCs develop only a primary cell wall (PCW), whereas mature oogonial cells secrete a second wall, the oogonium cell wall (OCW). Based on histochemical and immunolabeling results, (1→4)-β-glucans in the form of crystalline cellulose together with a variable degree of Me-esterified homogalacturonans (HGs) and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) epitopes were detected in the PCW. The OCW showed arabinosides of the extensin type and low levels of arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) glycans but lacked cellulose, at least in its crystalline form. Surprisingly, strong colabeling in the cytoplasm of mature oogonia cells with three different antibodies (LM-5, LM-6, and CCRC-M2) was found, suggesting the presence of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-like structures. Our results are discussed relating the possible functions of these cell wall epitopes with polysaccharides and O-glycoproteins during oogonium differentiation. This study represents the first attempt to characterize these two types of cell walls in O. bharuchae, comparing their similarities and differences with those from other green algae and land plants. This work represents a contribution to the understanding of how cell walls have evolved from simple few-celled to complex multicelled organisms.

  5. In silico prediction of B cell epitopes of the extracellular domain of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bayrami, Vahid; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Mahdavi, Manijeh; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a transmembrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. The receptor plays a critical role in cancer. Using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the IGF-1R, typically blocks ligand binding and enhances down-regulation of the cell-surface IGF-1R. Some MAbs such as cixutumumab are under clinical trial investigation. Targeting multiple distinct epitopes on IGF-1R, might be an effective strategy to inhibit IGF-1R pathway in cancer. In this study, new linear B cell epitopes for the extracellular domains of IGF-1R were predicted by in silico methods using a combination of linear B cell epitope prediction web servers such as ABCpred, Bepired, BCPREDs, Bcepred and Elliprro. Moreover, Discotope, B- pred and PEPOP web server tools were employed to predict new conformational B cell epitopes. In contrast to previously reported epitopes from extracellular region of the IGF-1R, we predicted new linear P8: (RQPQDGYLYRHNYCSK) and conformational Pc4: (HYYYAGVCVPACPPNTYRFE), Ppc6: (KMCPSTGKRENNESAPDNDT) and Ppc20: (ANILSAESSDSEFMQEPSGFI) epitopes. These epitopes are useful for further study as peptide antigens to actively immune host animals to develop new MAbs. Furthermore, the epitopes can be used in peptide-based cancer vaccines design. PMID:28261624

  6. Prediction of Pan-Specific B-Cell Epitopes From Nucleocapsid Protein of Hantaviruses Causing Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalaiselvan, Sagadevan; Sankar, Sathish; Ramamurthy, Mageshbabu; Ghosh, Asit Ranjan; Nandagopal, Balaji; Sridharan, Gopalan

    2017-01-20

    Hantaviruses are emerging viral pathogens that causes hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the Americas, a severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in humans with a case fatality rate of ≥50%. IgM and IgG-based serological detection methods are the most common approaches used for laboratory diagnosis of hantaviruses. Such emerging viral pathogens emphasizes the need for improved rapid diagnostic devices and vaccines incorporating pan-specific epitopes of genotypes. We predicted linear B-cell epitopes for hantaviruses that are specific to genotypes causing HCPS in humans using in silico prediction servers. We modeled the Andes and Sin Nombre hantavirus nucleocapsid protein to locate the identified epitopes. Based on the mean percent prediction probability score, epitope IMASKSVGS/TAEEKLKKKSAF was identified as the best candidate B-cell epitope specific for hantaviruses causing HCPS. Promiscuous epitopes were identified in the C-terminal of the protein. Our study for the first time has reported pan-specific B-cell epitopes for developing immunoassays in the detection of antibodies to hantaviruses causing HCPS. Identification of epitopes with pan-specific recognition of all genotypes causing HCPS could be valuable for the development of immunodiagnositic tools toward pan-detection of hantavirus antibodies in ELISA. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-5, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Generation of functional CD8+ T Cells by human dendritic cells expressing glypican-3 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican 3 (GPC-3) is an oncofoetal protein that is expressed in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). Since it is a potential target for T cell immunotherapy, we investigated the generation of functional, GPC-3 specific T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were derived from adherent PBMC cultured at 37°C for 7 days in X-Vivo, 1% autologous plasma, and 800 u/ml GM-CSF plus 500 u/ml IL-4. Immature DC were transfected with 20 μg of in vitro synthesised GPC-3 mRNA by electroporation using the Easy-ject plus system (Equibio, UK) (300 V, 150 μF and 4 ms pulse time), or pulsed with peptide, and subsequently matured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Six predicted GPC-3 peptide epitopes were synthesized using standard f-moc technology and tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A2.1 molecules using the cell line T2. Results DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA but not control DC demonstrated strong intracellular staining for GPC-3 and in vitro generated interferon-gamma expressing T cells from autologous PBMC harvested from normal subjects. One peptide, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, fulfilled our criteria as a naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope: i) it showed high affinity binding to HLA-A2, in T2 cell binding assay; ii) it was generated by the MHC class I processing pathway in DC transfected with GPC-3 mRNA, and iii) HLA-A2 positive DC loaded with the peptide stimulated proliferation in autologous T cells and generated CTL that lysed HLA-A2 and GPC-3 positive target cells. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that electroporation of GPC-3 mRNA is an efficient method to load human monocyte-derived DC with antigen because in vitro they generated GPC-3-reactive T cells that were functional, as shown by interferon-gamma production. Furthermore, this study identified a novel naturally processed, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope, GPC-3522-530 FLAELAYDL, which can be used to monitor HLA-A2

  8. Biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles as drug delivering injectable cell scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yanhong; Gallego, Monica Ramos; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Jorgensen, Lene; Everland, Hanne; Møller, Eva Horn; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2011-11-30

    Injectable cell scaffolds play a dual role in tissue engineering by supporting cellular functions and delivering bioactive molecules. The present study aimed at developing biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles with sustained drug delivery properties thus potentially being suitable for autologous stem cell therapy. Semi-crystalline poly(l-lactide/dl-lactide) (PLDL70) and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA85) were used to prepare nanoparticles by the double emulsion method. Uniform and spherical nanoparticles were obtained at an average size of 270-300 nm. The thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 (TRAP-6) was successfully loaded in PLDL70 and PLGA85 nanoparticles. During the 30 days' release, PLDL70 nanoparticles showed sustainable release with only 30% TRAP-6 released within the first 15 days, while almost 80% TRAP-6 was released from PLGA85 nanoparticles during the same time interval. The release mechanism was found to depend on the crystallinity and composition of the nanoparticles. Subsequently, mPEG-PLGA nanocomposite microparticles containing PLDL70 nanoparticles were produced by the ultrasonic atomization method and evaluated to successfully preserve the intrinsic particulate properties and the sustainable release profile, which was identical to that of the nanoparticles. Good cell adhesion of the human fibroblasts onto the nanocomposite microparticles was observed, indicating the desired cell biocompatibility. The presented results thus demonstrate the development of nanocomposite microparticles tailored for sustainable drug release for application as injectable cell scaffolds.

  9. Selection of Conserved Epitopes from Hepatitis C Virus for Pan-Populational Stimulation of T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Molero-Abraham, Magdalena; Lafuente, Esther M.; Flower, Darren R.; Reche, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is able to persist as a chronic infection, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is evidence that clearance of HCV is linked to strong responses by CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), suggesting that eliciting CTL responses against HCV through an epitope-based vaccine could prove an effective means of immunization. However, HCV genomic plasticity as well as the polymorphisms of HLA I molecules restricting CD8 T-cell responses challenges the selection of epitopes for a widely protective vaccine. Here, we devised an approach to overcome these limitations. From available databases, we first collected a set of 245 HCV-specific CD8 T-cell epitopes, all known to be targeted in the course of a natural infection in humans. After a sequence variability analysis, we next identified 17 highly invariant epitopes. Subsequently, we predicted the epitope HLA I binding profiles that determine their potential presentation and recognition. Finally, using the relevant HLA I-genetic frequencies, we identified various epitope subsets encompassing 6 conserved HCV-specific CTL epitopes each predicted to elicit an effective T-cell response in any individual regardless of their HLA I background. We implemented this epitope selection approach for free public use at the EPISOPT web server. PMID:24348677

  10. CD4+ T-cell Epitope Prediction Using Antigen Processing Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Tysheena; Landry, Samuel J.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell CD4+ epitopes are important targets of immunity against infectious diseases and cancer. State-of-the-art methods for MHC class II epitope prediction rely on supervised learning methods in which an implicit or explicit model of sequence specificity is constructed using a training set of peptides with experimentally tested MHC class II binding affinity. In this paper we present a novel method for CD4+ T-cell eptitope prediction based on modeling antigen-processing constraints. Previous work indicates that dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes tend to occur adjacent to sites of initial proteolytic cleavage. Given an antigen with known three-dimensional structure, our algorithm first aggregates four types of conformational stability data in order to construct a profile of stability that allows us to identify regions of the protein that are most accessible to proteolysis. Using this profile, we then construct a profile of epitope likelihood based on the pattern of transitions from unstable to stable regions. We validate our method using 35 datasets of experimentally measured CD4+ T cell responses of mice bearing I-Ab or HLA-DR4 alleles as well as of human subjects. Overall, our results show that antigen processing constraints provide a significant source of predictive power. For epitope prediction in single-allele systems, our approach can be combined with sequence-based methods, or used in instances where little or no training data is available. In multiple-allele systems, sequence-based methods can only be used if the allele distribution of a population is known. In contrast, our approach does not make use of MHC binding prediction, and is thus agnostic to MHC class II genotypes. PMID:26891811

  11. Nucleosomal peptide epitopes for nephritis-inducing T helper cells of murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Nucleosome-specific T helper (Th) cells provide major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted, cognate help to nephritogenic antinuclear autoantibody-producing B cells in lupus. However, the lupus Th cells do not respond when components of the nucleosome, such as free DNA or histones, are individually presented by antigen-presenting cells. Thus critical peptide epitopes for the pathogenic Th cells are probably protected during uptake and processing of the native nucleosome particle as a whole. Therefore, herein we tested 145 overlapping peptides spanning all four core histones in the nucleosome. We localized three regions in core histones, one in H2B at amino acid position 10-33 (H2B(10-33)), and two in H4, at position 16- 39 (H4(16-39)) and position 71-94 (H4(71-94)), that contained the peptide epitopes recognized by the pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th cells of lupus. The peptide autoepitopes also triggered the pathogenic Th cells of (SWR x NZB)F1 lupus mice in vivo to induce the development of severe lupus nephritis. The nucleosomal autoepitopes stimulated the production of Th1-type cytokines, consistent with immunoglobulin IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 being the isotypes of nephritogenic autoantibodies induced in the lupus mice. Interestingly, the Th cell epitopes overlapped with regions in histones that contain B cell epitopes targeted by autoantibodies, as well as the sites where histones contact with DNA in the nucleosome. Identification of the disease-relevant autoepitopes in nucleosomes will help in understanding how the pathogenic Th cells of spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus emerge, and potentially lead to the development of peptide-based tolerogenic therapy for this major autoimmune disease. PMID:8676066

  12. An efficient T-cell epitope discovery strategy using in silico prediction and the iTopia assay platform

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Arthur; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Peruzzi, Daniela; Pak, Irene; La Monica, Nicola; Bagchi, Ansuman; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Aurisicchio, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell epitope discovery is a key process for the development of novel immunotherapies, particularly for cancer immunology. In silico epitope prediction is a common strategy to try to achieve this objective. However, this approach suffers from a significant rate of false-negative results and epitope ranking lists that often are not validated by practical experience. A high-throughput platform for the identification and prioritization of potential T-cell epitopes is the iTopiaTM Epitope Discovery SystemTM, which allows measuring binding and stability of selected peptides to MHC Class I molecules. So far, the value of iTopia combined with in silico epitope prediction has not been investigated systematically. In this study, we have developed a novel in silico selection strategy based on three criteria: (1) predicted binding to one out of five common MHC Class I alleles; (2) uniqueness to the antigen of interest; and (3) increased likelihood of natural processing. We predicted in silico and characterized by iTopia 225 candidate T-cell epitopes and fixed-anchor analogs from three human tumor-associated antigens: CEA, HER2 and TERT. HLA-A2-restricted fragments were further screened for their ability to induce cell-mediated responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. The iTopia binding assay was only marginally informative while the stability assay proved to be a valuable experimental screening method complementary to in silico prediction. Thirteen novel T-cell epitopes and analogs were characterized and additional potential epitopes identified, providing the basis for novel anticancer immunotherapies. In conclusion, we show that combination of in silico prediction and an iTopia-based assay may be an accurate and efficient method for MHC Class I epitope discovery among tumor-associated antigens. PMID:23243589

  13. T-cell epitope mapping of the Borrelia garinii outer surface protein A in lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Widhe, M; Ekerfelt, C; Jarefors, S; Skogman, B H; Peterson, E M; Bergström, S; Forsberg, P; Ernerudh, J

    2009-08-01

    We studied the T-cell reactivity to overlapping peptides of B. garinii OspA, in order to locate possible immunodominant T-cell epitopes in neuroborreliosis. Cells from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood from 39 patients with neuroborreliosis and 31 controls were stimulated with 31 overlapping peptides, and interferon-gamma secreting cells were detected by ELISPOT. The peptides OspA(17-36), OspA(49-68), OspA(105-124), OspA(137-156), OspA(193-212) and OspA(233-252) showed the highest frequency of positive responses, being positive in CSF from 38% to 50% of patients with neuroborreliosis. These peptides also elicited higher responses in CSF compared with controls (P = 0.004). CSF cells more often showed positive responses to these peptides than blood cells (P = 0.001), in line with a compartmentalization to the central nervous system. Thus, a set of potential T-cell epitopes were identified in CSF cells from patients with neuroborreliosis. Further studies may reveal whether these epitopes can be used diagnostically and studies involving HLA interactions may show their possible pathogenetic importance.

  14. Fine mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes of peste des petits ruminants virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruisong; Fan, Xiaoming; Xu, Wanxiang; Li, Wentao; Dong, Shijuan; Zhu, Yumin; He, Yaping; Tang, Haiping; Du, Rong; Li, Zhen

    2015-01-30

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein of morbillivirus, and is presently the basis of most diagnostic assays for peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). In this study, fine epitope mapping and conservation analysis of linear B-cell epitopes on the PPRV NP has been undertaken using biosynthetic peptides. Nineteen linear B-cell epitopes were identified and their corresponding minimal motifs were located on the NP of PPRV China/Tibet/Geg/07-30. Conservation analysis indicated that ten of the 19 minimal motifs were conserved among 46 PPRV strains. Peptides containing the minimal motifs were recognized using anti-PPRV serum from a goat immunized with PPRV vaccine strain Nigeria 75/1. Identified epitopes and their motifs improve our understanding of the antigenic characteristics of PPRV NP and provide a basis for the development of epitope-based diagnostic assays.

  15. Reliable B cell epitope predictions: impacts of method development and improved benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between antibodies and antigens is one of the most important immune system mechanisms for clearing infectious organisms from the host. Antibodies bind to antigens at sites referred to as B-cell epitopes. Identification of the exact location of B-cell epitopes is essential in several biomedical applications such as; rational vaccine design, development of disease diagnostics and immunotherapeutics. However, experimental mapping of epitopes is resource intensive making in silico methods an appealing complementary approach. To date, the reported performance of methods for in silico mapping of B-cell epitopes has been moderate. Several issues regarding the evaluation data sets may however have led to the performance values being underestimated: Rarely, all potential epitopes have been mapped on an antigen, and antibodies are generally raised against the antigen in a given biological context not against the antigen monomer. Improper dealing with these aspects leads to many artificial false positive predictions and hence to incorrect low performance values. To demonstrate the impact of proper benchmark definitions, we here present an updated version of the DiscoTope method incorporating a novel spatial neighborhood definition and half-sphere exposure as surface measure. Compared to other state-of-the-art prediction methods, Discotope-2.0 displayed improved performance both in cross-validation and in independent evaluations. Using DiscoTope-2.0, we assessed the impact on performance when using proper benchmark definitions. For 13 proteins in the training data set where sufficient biological information was available to make a proper benchmark redefinition, the average AUC performance was improved from 0.791 to 0.824. Similarly, the average AUC performance on an independent evaluation data set improved from 0.712 to 0.727. Our results thus demonstrate that given proper benchmark definitions, B-cell epitope prediction methods achieve highly significant

  16. Recovery of known T-cell epitopes by computational scanning of a viral genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logean, Antoine; Rognan, Didier

    2002-04-01

    A new computational method (EpiDock) is proposed for predicting peptide binding to class I MHC proteins, from the amino acid sequence of any protein of immunological interest. Starting from the primary structure of the target protein, individual three-dimensional structures of all possible MHC-peptide (8-, 9- and 10-mers) complexes are obtained by homology modelling. A free energy scoring function (Fresno) is then used to predict the absolute binding free energy of all possible peptides to the class I MHC restriction protein. Assuming that immunodominant epitopes are usually found among the top MHC binders, the method can thus be applied to predict the location of immunogenic peptides on the sequence of the protein target. When applied to the prediction of HLA-A*0201-restricted T-cell epitopes from the Hepatitis B virus, EpiDock was able to recover 92% of known high affinity binders and 80% of known epitopes within a filtered subset of all possible nonapeptides corresponding to about one tenth of the full theoretical list. The proposed method is fully automated and fast enough to scan a viral genome in less than an hour on a parallel computing architecture. As it requires very few starting experimental data, EpiDock can be used: (i) to predict potential T-cell epitopes from viral genomes (ii) to roughly predict still unknown peptide binding motifs for novel class I MHC alleles.

  17. Cutting edge: identification of novel T cell epitopes in Lol p5a by computational prediction.

    PubMed

    de Lalla, C; Sturniolo, T; Abbruzzese, L; Hammer, J; Sidoli, A; Sinigaglia, F; Panina-Bordignon, P

    1999-08-15

    Although atopic allergy affects cell epitopes that were able to stimulate T cells from atopic patients. We generated a panel of Lol p5a-specific T cell clones, the majority of which recognized the peptides in a cross-reactive fashion. The computational prediction of DR ligands might thus allow the design of T cell epitopes with potential useful application in novel immunotherapy strategies.

  18. H5N1 strain-specific hemagglutinin CD4+ T cell epitopes restricted by HLA DR4.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junbao; Gebe, John A; Huston, Laurie; James, Eddie; Tan, Venus; Yue, Betty B; Nepom, Gerald T; Kwok, William W

    2009-06-12

    CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the viral immunity, and as such identification of unique strain-specific HLA class II restricted epitopes is essential for monitoring cellular strain-specific viral immunity. Using Tetramer-Guided Epitope Mapping technique, we identified HLA-DR0401 restricted HA epitopes that are strain-specific to H5N1 virion. Two immunodominant epitopes H5HA(441-460) and H5HA(57-76) were identified from in vitro stimulated human PBMC. Both epitopes elicit strong cellular immune responses when HLA-DR0401 transgenic mice are immunized with H5N1 subvirion indicating in vivo naturally processed immunodominant epitopes. The H5HA(57-76) epitope is unique for the H5N1 strain but conserved among all H5N1 clades recommended for vaccine development by World Health Organization. The unique H5HA(57-76) response was uncommon in unexposed individuals and only observed in the naïve T cell subset. Thus, H5N1 strain-specific H5HA(57-76) immunogenic epitope represents a unique marker for monitoring the efficacy of vaccination or as a candidate vaccine peptide.

  19. H5N1 Strain-Specific Hemagglutinin CD4+ T cell Epitopes Restricted by HLA DR4

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junbao; Gebe, John A.; Huston, Laurie; James, Eddie; Tan, Venus; Yue, Betty B.; Nepom, Gerald T.; Kwok, William W.

    2009-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the viral immunity, and as such identification of unique strain specific HLA class II restricted epitopes is essential for monitoring cellular strain specific viral immunity. Using Tetramer-Guided Epitope Mapping technique, we identified HLA-DR0401 restricted HA epitopes that are strain-specific to H5N1 virion. Two immunodominant epitopes H5HA441-460 and H5HA57-76 were identified from in vitro stimulated human PBMC. Both epitopes elicit strong cellular immune responses when HLA-DR0401 transgenic mice are immunized with H5N1 subvirion indicating in vivo naturally processed immunodominant epitopes. The H5HA57-76 epitope is unique for the H5N1 strain but conserved among all H5N1 clades recommended for vaccine development by World Health Organization. The unique H5HA57-76 response was uncommon in unexposed individuals and only observed in the naïve T cell subset. Thus, H5N1 strain-specific H5HA57-76 immunogenic epitope represents a unique marker for monitoring the efficacy of vaccination or as a candidate vaccine peptide. PMID:19446935

  20. HLA-B*35-Restricted CD8+-T-Cell Epitope in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2903c

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michèl R.; Hammond, Abdulrahman S.; Smith, Steve M.; Jaye, Assan; Lukey, Pauline T.; McAdam, Keith P. W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Few human CD8+ T-cell epitopes in mycobacterial antigens have been described to date. Here we have identified a novel HLA-B*35-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitope in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2903c based on a reverse immunogenetics approach. Peptide-specific CD8 T cells were able to kill M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages and produce gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha. PMID:11796635

  1. Identification of a Conserved B-Cell Epitope on Duck Hepatitis A Type 1 Virus VP1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoying; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qingshan; Wulin, Shaozhou; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Yue; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background The VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in ducks; however, B-cell epitopes on the VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A genotype 1 virus (DHAV-1) have not been characterized. Methods and Results To characterize B-cell epitopes on VP1, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2D10 against Escherichia coli-expressed VP1 of DHAV-1. In vitro, mAb 2D10 neutralized DHAV-1 virus. By using an array of overlapping 12-mer peptides, we found that mAb 2D10 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif LPAPTS. Sequence alignment showed that the epitope 173LPAPTS178 is highly conserved among the DHAV-1 genotypes. Moreover, the six amino acid peptide LPAPTS was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with maximal binding activity to mAb 2D10. DHAV-1–positive duck serum reacted with the epitope in dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of the six amino acids of the epitope for antibody-epitope binding. Competitive inhibition assays of mAb 2D10 binding to synthetic LPAPTS peptides and truncated VP1 protein fragments, detected by Western blotting, also verify that LPAPTS was the VP1 epitope. Conclusions and Significance We identified LPAPTS as a VP1-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb 2D10. Our findings have potential applications in the development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against DHAV-1. PMID:25706372

  2. Recognition of a common mycobacterial T-cell epitope in MPB59 of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Lightbody, K A; Girvin, R M; Pollock, D A; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    1998-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, which persists as a residual level of infection in many European countries, has implications not only for the economy of farming communities but also for human health. The aim of this study was to identify a common mycobacterial antigen which was recognized in bovine tuberculosis and to characterize the response to this antigen at the epitope level. A T-cell clone, phenotype CD4+, raised from an animal experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis was shown to proliferate in response to a panel of sonicates derived from different mycobacterial species indicating recognition of an antigen with broad specificity. This antigen was subsequently shown to be MPB59. Recognition of MPB59 at the epitope level was determined in experimental and field cases of bovine tuberculosis using a panel of synthetic peptides (20-mers with 10-residue overlaps) incorporating the signal sequence and mature protein. The results showed that in vitro interferon-gamma was predominantly produced in response to adjacent peptides numbers 10 and 11, suggesting that the dominant epitope was contained in the overlap, correlating to residues 101-110 (YYQSGLSIVM). This epitope was recognized by 54% of tuberculous cattle of mixed breeds, which suggests that it may be genetically permissive in terms of major histocompatibility complex presentation. Sequence analysis confirmed that there were only minor differences in the amino acid composition within this region for various mycobacterial species, which could explain the common T-cell recognition described in this study. Common recognition of this epitope indicates that it would have limited potential for use as a diagnostic reagent per se but may have potential for inclusion in a subunit vaccine. PMID:9640240

  3. Vaccination with Altered Peptide Ligands of a Plasmodium berghei Circumsporozoite Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope: A Model to Generate T Cells Resistant to Immune Interference by Polymorphic Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Minigo, Gabriela; Flanagan, Katie L.; Slattery, Robyn M.; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, display high levels of polymorphism within T-cell epitope regions of proteins associated with protective immunity. The T-cell epitope variants are often non-cross-reactive. Herein, we show in a murine model, which modifies a protective CD8 T-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium berghei (SYIPSAEKI), that simultaneous or sequential co-stimulation with two of its putative similarly non-cross-reactive altered peptide ligand (APL) epitopes (SYIPSAEDI or SYIPSAEAI) has radically different effects on immunity. Hence, co-immunization or sequential stimulation in vivo of SYIPSAEKI with its APL antagonist SYIPSAEDI decreases immunity to both epitopes. By contrast, co-immunization with SYIPSAEAI has no apparent initial effect, but it renders the immune response to SYIPSAEKI resistant to being turned off by subsequent immunization with SYIPSAEDI. These results suggest a novel strategy for vaccines that target polymorphic epitopes potentially capable of mutual immune interference in the field, by initiating an immune response by co-immunization with the desired index epitope, together with a carefully selected “potentiator” APL peptide. PMID:28261200

  4. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Shorter, Shayla K; Schnell, Frederick J; McMaster, Sean R; Pinelli, David F; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  5. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  6. Definition of Human Epitopes Recognized in Tetanus Toxoid and Development of an Assay Strategy to Detect Ex Vivo Tetanus CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Paul, Sinu; Sidney, John; Weiskopf, Daniela; Dan, Jennifer M.; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Crotty, Shane; Sette, Alessandro; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite widespread uses of tetanus toxoid (TT) as a vaccine, model antigen and protein carrier, TT epitopes have been poorly characterized. Herein we defined the human CD4+ T cell epitope repertoire by reevaluation of previously described epitopes and evaluation of those derived from prediction of HLA Class II binding. Forty-seven epitopes were identified following in vitro TT stimulation, with 28 epitopes accounting for 90% of the total response. Despite this diverse range of epitopes, individual responses were associated with only a few immunodominant epitopes, with each donor responding on average to 3 epitopes. For the top 14 epitopes, HLA restriction could be inferred based on HLA typing of the responding donors. HLA binding predictions re-identified the vast majority of known epitopes, and identified 24 additional novel epitopes. With these epitopes, we created a TT epitope pool, which allowed us to characterize TT responses directly ex vivo using a cytokine-independent Activation Induced Marker (AIM) assay. These TT responses were highly Th1 or Th2 polarized, which was dependent upon the original priming vaccine, either the cellular DTwP or acellular DTaP formulation. This polarization remained despite the original priming having occurred decades past and a recent booster immunization with a reduced acellular vaccine formulation. While TT responses following booster vaccination were not durably increased in magnitude, they were associated with a relative expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells. PMID:28081174

  7. Identification of human papillomavirus-16 E6 variation in cervical cancer and their impact on T and B cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop; Hussain, Showket; Yadav, Inderjit Singh; Gissmann, Lutz; Natarajan, K; Das, Bhudev C; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2015-06-15

    The infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the most important risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The intra-type variations of HPV have different biological and pathological consequences with respect to disease progression. In the present study, six major Indian variants were experimentally identified in E6 gene of HPV-16 and showed their impact on immunogenicity by in silico methods. Four different phylogenetic lineages were observed in sequences including European (E) prototype, European variant, Asian and American Asian variant classes and complete absence of African phylogenetic lineages. On the prediction of B- and T-cell epitopes, 18 and 23 potent epitopes for MHC-II alleles, 10 potent MHC-I and 15 B-cell epitopes in each reference and variant sequence were identified. Interestingly, the presence of variation H78Y and L83V result in creation of four new epitopes for the HLA-DQA1*0101/DQB1*0501. Out of 15 B-cell predicted epitopes, three most potent epitopes were identified in both reference and variant sequence. Notably the amino acid stretch from amino acid 16-60 and 76-94 are very important for the immunological properties of E6 protein because these regions contain majority of the predicted epitopes. In future, this could control the cervical cancer by targeting these amino acid stretches for the development of HPV-16 vaccine.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome-wide screen exposes multiple CD8+ T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, A S; Klein, M R; Corrah, T; Fox, A; Jaye, A; McAdam, K P; Brookes, R H

    2005-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted CD8+ T cells play a role in protective immunity against tuberculosis yet relatively few epitopes specific for the causative organism, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are reported. Here a total genome-wide screen of M. tuberculosis was used to identify putative HLA-B*3501 T cell epitopes. Of 479 predicted epitopes, 13 with the highest score were synthesized and used to restimulate lymphocytes from naturally exposed HLA-B*3501 healthy individuals in cultured and ex vivo enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays for interferon (IFN)-γ. All 13 peptides elicited a response that varied considerably between individuals. For three peptides CD8+ T cell lines were expanded and four of the 13 were recognized permissively through the HLA-B7 supertype family. Although further testing is required we show the genome-wide screen to be feasible for the identification of unknown mycobacterial antigens involved in immunity against natural infection. While the mechanisms of protective immunity against M. tuberculosis infection remain unclear, conventional class I-restricted CD8+ T cell responses appear to be widespread throughout the genome. PMID:15762882

  9. Estimation and extraction of B-cell linear epitopes predicted by mathematical morphology approaches.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao-Teng; Liu, Chih-Hong; Pai, Tun-Wen

    2008-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction facilitates the design and synthesis of short peptides for various immunological applications. Several algorithms have been developed to predict B-cell linear epitopes (LEs) from primary sequences of antigens, providing important information for immunobiological experiments and antibody design. This paper describes two robust methods, LE prediction with/without local peak extraction (LEP-LP and LEP-NLP), based on antigenicity scale and mathematical morphology for the prediction of B-cell LEs. Previous studies revealed that LEs could occur in regions with low-to-moderate but not globally high antigenicity scales. Hence, we developed a method adopting mathematical morphology to extract local peaks from a linear combination of the propensity scales of physico-chemical characteristics at each antigen residue. Comparison among LEP-LP/LEP-NLP, BepiPred and BEPITOPE revealed that our algorithms performed better in retrieving epitopes with low-to-moderate antigenicity and achieved comparable performance according to receiver operation characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. Of the identified LEs, over 30% were unable to be predicted by BepiPred and BEPITOPE employing an average threshold of antigenicity index or default settings. Our LEP-LP method provides a bioinformatics approach for predicting B-cell LEs with low- to-moderate antigenicity. The web-based server was established at http://biotools.cs.ntou.edu.tw/lepd_antigenicity. php for free use.

  10. Correlating low-similarity peptide sequences and HIV B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kanduc, Darja; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2008-02-01

    Although a large number of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) derived B-cell epitopes has been experimentally identified, the structural requirements underlying HIV humoral immune response remain unknown. Here, we review the current literature on HIV B-cell epitopes as catalogued in the www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology website, searching for common structural and/or functional immunogenic motifs. The analysis of HIV antibody data documents that the linear determinants recognized by human or murine humoral immune responses, are (or harbor) pentapeptide fragments with no or only very low similarity to the respective host proteome. The present literature analysis provides relevant insights that may be applied to design anti-HCV therapeutic approaches exempt from autoimmune collateral effects.

  11. Identification of class I HLA T cell control epitopes for West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Kaabinejadian, Saghar; Piazza, Paolo A; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Vernon, Stephen R; Cate, Steven J; Bardet, Wilfried; Schafer, Fredda B; Jackson, Kenneth W; Campbell, Diana M; Buchli, Rico; Rinaldo, Charles R; Hildebrand, William H

    2013-01-01

    The recent West Nile virus (WNV) outbreak in the United States underscores the importance of understanding human immune responses to this pathogen. Via the presentation of viral peptide ligands at the cell surface, class I HLA mediate the T cell recognition and killing of WNV infected cells. At this time, there are two key unknowns in regards to understanding protective T cell immunity: 1) the number of viral ligands presented by the HLA of infected cells, and 2) the distribution of T cell responses to these available HLA/viral complexes. Here, comparative mass spectroscopy was applied to determine the number of WNV peptides presented by the HLA-A*11:01 of infected cells after which T cell responses to these HLA/WNV complexes were assessed. Six viral peptides derived from capsid, NS3, NS4b, and NS5 were presented. When T cells from infected individuals were tested for reactivity to these six viral ligands, polyfunctional T cells were focused on the GTL9 WNV capsid peptide, ligands from NS3, NS4b, and NS5 were less immunogenic, and two ligands were largely inert, demonstrating that class I HLA reduce the WNV polyprotein to a handful of immune targets and that polyfunctional T cells recognize infections by zeroing in on particular HLA/WNV epitopes. Such dominant HLA/peptide epitopes are poised to drive the development of WNV vaccines that elicit protective T cells as well as providing key antigens for immunoassays that establish correlates of viral immunity.

  12. Conservation and Diversity of Influenza A H1N1 HLA-Restricted T Cell Epitope Candidates for Epitope-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Paul ThiamJoo; Heiny, A. T.; Miotto, Olivo; Salmon, Jerome; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Lemonnier, Francois; August, J. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54) peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-γ ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007–2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes. Conclusions/Significance Seventeen (17) T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus. PMID:20090904

  13. Protection against lethal cytomegalovirus infection by a recombinant vaccine containing a single nonameric T-cell epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Del Val, M; Schlicht, H J; Volkmer, H; Messerle, M; Reddehase, M J; Koszinowski, U H

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory immediate-early (IE) protein pp89 of murine cytomegalovirus induces CD8+ T lymphocytes that protect against lethal murine cytomegalovirus infection. The IE1 epitope is the only epitope of pp89 that is recognized by BALB/c cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). Using synthetic peptides, the optimal and minimal antigenic sequences of the IE1 epitope have been defined. To evaluate the predictive value of data obtained with synthetic peptides, recombinant vaccines encoding this single T-cell epitope were constructed using as a vector the hepatitis B virus core antigen encoded in recombinant vaccinia virus. In infected cells expressing the chimeric proteins, only IE1 epitope sequences that were recognized as synthetic peptides at concentrations lower than 10(-6) M were presented to CTL. Vaccination of mice with the recombinant vaccinia virus that encoded a chimeric protein carrying the optimal 9-amino-acid IE1 epitope sequence elicited CD8+ T lymphocytes with antiviral activity and, furthermore, protected against lethal disease. The results thus show for the first time that recombinant vaccines containing a single foreign nonameric CTL epitope can induce T-lymphocyte-mediated protective immunity. Images PMID:1710286

  14. Comprehensive, quantitative mapping of T cell epitopes in gluten in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Tye-Din, Jason A; Stewart, Jessica A; Dromey, James A; Beissbarth, Tim; van Heel, David A; Tatham, Arthur; Henderson, Kate; Mannering, Stuart I; Gianfrani, Carmen; Jewell, Derek P; Hill, Adrian V S; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Anderson, Robert P

    2010-07-21

    Celiac disease is a genetic condition that results in a debilitating immune reaction in the gut to antigens in grain. The antigenic peptides recognized by the T cells that cause this disease are incompletely defined. Our understanding of the epitopes of pathogenic CD4(+ )T cells is based primarily on responses shown by intestinal T-cells in vitro to hydrolysates or polypeptides of gluten, the causative antigen. A protease-resistant 33-amino acid peptide from wheat alpha-gliadin is the immunodominant antigen, but little is known about the spectrum of T cell epitopes in rye and barley or the hierarchy of immunodominance and consistency of recognition of T-cell epitopes in vivo. We induced polyclonal gluten-specific T cells in the peripheral blood of celiac patients by feeding them cereal and performed a comprehensive, unbiased analysis of responses to all celiac toxic prolamins, a class of plant storage protein. The peptides that stimulated T cells were the same among patients who ate the same cereal, but were different after wheat, barley and rye ingestion. Unexpectedly, a sequence from omega-gliadin (wheat) and C-hordein (barley) but not alpha-gliadin was immunodominant regardless of the grain consumed. Furthermore, T cells specific for just three peptides accounted for the majority of gluten-specific T cells, and their recognition of gluten peptides was highly redundant. Our findings show that pathogenic T cells in celiac disease show limited diversity, and therefore suggest that peptide-based therapeutics for this disease and potentially other strongly HLA-restricted immune diseases should be possible.

  15. TepiTool: A Pipeline for Computational Prediction of T Cell Epitope Candidates.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sinu; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-08-01

    Computational prediction of T cell epitope candidates is currently being used in several applications including vaccine discovery studies, development of diagnostics, and removal of unwanted immune responses against protein therapeutics. There have been continuous improvements in the performance of MHC binding prediction tools, but their general adoption by immunologists has been slow due to the lack of user-friendly interfaces and guidelines. Current tools only provide minimal advice on what alleles to include, what lengths to consider, how to deal with homologous peptides, and what cutoffs should be considered relevant. This protocol provides step-by-step instructions with necessary recommendations for prediction of the best T cell epitope candidates with the newly developed online tool called TepiTool. TepiTool, which is part of the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), provides some of the top MHC binding prediction algorithms for number of species including humans, chimpanzees, bovines, gorillas, macaques, mice, and pigs. The TepiTool is freely accessible at http://tools.iedb.org/tepitool/. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Molecular basis of cross-reactivity among allergen-specific human T cells: T-cell receptor V alpha gene usage and epitope structure.

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, S S; Mohapatra, S; Yang, M; Ansari, A A; Parronchi, P; Maggi, E; Romagnani, S

    1994-01-01

    Cross-reactivities between the major grass pollen allergens, at the level of T-cell recognition was examined employing several Lolium perenne I (Lol p I)-specific human T-cell clones. Nine of these Lol p I-specific T-cell clones exhibited cross-recognition of the recombinant Poa pratensis IX (Poa p IX) allergen, rKBG7.2, indicating that these two major antigens of a grass pollen share T-cell epitopes. Furthermore, proliferative responses of two other T-cell clones demonstrated that individual allergens of diverse grass pollens also possess common T-cell epitopes. Examination of the T-cell receptor (TcR) V alpha genes of these T-cell clones indicated that these cloned cells utilized distinct J alpha genes and that nine out of 10 clones possessed V alpha 13 gene. Furthermore, sequence comparisons of several allergenic molecules indicated that this cross-reactivity may be due to the presence of epitope(s) with structure(s) similar to the major T-cell epitope of Poa p IX allergens. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that the major grass pollen allergens share cross-reacting T-cell epitope(s), and that this cross-reactivity is due to the structural homologies among allergens and restricted usage of TcR V alpha genes. PMID:7510663

  17. Synthetic peptides representing T-cell epitopes act as carriers in pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    de Velasco, E A; Merkus, D; Anderton, S; Verheul, A F; Lizzio, E F; Van der Zee, R; Van Eden, W; Hoffman, T; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1995-01-01

    Improvement of antibody responses to polysaccharides through their linkage to proteins is thought to be mediated by protein-specific T helper (Th) cells. To investigate whether the carrier protein of a conjugate could be substituted by a Th epitope, Streptococcus pneumoniae type 17F polysaccharide (PS) was bromoacetylated and coupled to different peptides via their carboxy-terminal cysteines. Two peptides, one from the mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65) and the other from influenza virus hemagglutinin, are well-known Th epitopes. Two other peptides were selected from the pneumolysin sequence by Th epitope prediction methods; one of them was synthesized with cysteine either at the carboxy or the amino terminus. Three conjugates consistently elicited in mice anti-PS immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG responses that were not observed upon immunization with derivatized PS without peptide. The same conjugates induced no anti-PS antibody responses in athymic (nu/nu) mice, whereas clear responses were elicited in euthymic (nu/+) controls, demonstrating the thymus-dependent character of these conjugates. Only the three conjugates inducing anti-PS responses were capable of eliciting antipeptide antibodies. One of the immunogenic conjugates was studied in more detail. It induced significant protection and an anti-PS IgG response comprising all subclasses. On the basis of these results and proliferation studies with peptide and conjugate-primed cells, it is concluded that linkage of Th epitopes to PS in the right orientation enhances its immunogenicity in a thymus-dependent manner. Future possibilities for using peptides as carriers for inducing antibody responses to poorly immunogenic saccharide antigens are discussed. PMID:7532630

  18. A synthetic multi-epitope antigen enhances hepatitis C virus-specific B- and T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guimei; Chen, Shuwen; Zhu, Xiangying; Liang, Shenghua; Liu, Longding; Ren, Daming

    2011-04-01

    Combining results from previous studies, a multi-epitope antigen PCXZ against the hepatitis C virus was synthesized in this study. The antigenic specificity of PCXZ was determined by recognizing antibodies in serum samples from hepatitis C virus patients, but not from healthy subjects or subjects who had the hepatitis B virus. The characteristics of PCXZ immunogenicity were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Strong antibody responses were generated in mice immunized with either naked PCXZ or PCXZ in Freund's adjuvant. As for the T-cell responses, Freund's adjuvant significantly increased interferon-γ secretion and enhanced the lytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The epitope Pa, one component of PCXZ, made the most significant contribution to specific CTL lysis; this epitope was also a B-cell epitope and was able to induce high IgG titers. In summary, PCXZ was found to be highly immunogenic, and elicited both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  19. A West Nile virus CD4 T cell epitope improves the immunogenicity of dengue virus serotype 2 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Holly R; Crill, Wayne D; Davis, Brent S; Chang, Gwong-Jen J

    2012-03-15

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue virus (DENV) and West Nile virus (WNV), are among the most prevalent human disease-causing arboviruses world-wide. As they continue to expand their geographic range, multivalent flavivirus vaccines may become an important public health tool. Here we describe the immune kinetics of WNV DNA vaccination and the identification of a CD4 epitope that increases heterologous flavivirus vaccine immunogenicity. Lethal WNV challenge two days post-vaccination resulted in 90% protection with complete protection by four days, and was temporally associated with a rapid influx of activated CD4 T cells. CD4 T cells from WNV vaccinated mice could be stimulated from epitopic regions in the envelope protein transmembrane domain. Incorporation of this WNV epitope into DENV-2 DNA and virus-like particle vaccines significantly increased neutralizing antibody titers. Incorporating such potent epitopes into multivalent flavivirus vaccines could improve their immunogenicity and may help alleviate concerns of imbalanced immunity in multivalent vaccine approaches.

  20. Conserved B-Cell Epitopes among Human Bocavirus Species Indicate Potential Diagnostic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaying; Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Guo, Li; Wang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus species 1–4 (HBoV1–4) have been associated with respiratory and enteric infections in children. However, the immunological mechanisms in response to HBoV infections are not fully understood. Though previous studies have shown cross-reactivities between HBoV species, the epitopes responsible for this phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, we used genomic and immunologic approaches to identify the reactive epitopes conserved across multiple HBoV species and explored their potential as the basis of a novel diagnostic test for HBoVs. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated HBoV1–3 VP2 gene fragment phage display libraries (GFPDLs) and used these libraries to analyze mouse antisera against VP2 protein of HBoV1, 2, and 3, and human sera positive for HBoVs. Using this approach, we mapped four epitope clusters of HBoVs and identified two immunodominant peptides–P1 (1MSDTDIQDQQPDTVDAPQNT20), and P2 (162EHAYPNASHPWDEDVMPDL180)–that are conserved among HBoV1–4. To confirm epitope immunogenicity, we immunized mice with the immunodominant P1 and P2 peptides identified in our screen and found that they elicited high titer antibodies in mice. These two antibodies could only recognize the VP2 of HBoV 1–4 in Western blot assays, rather than those of the two other parvoviruses human parvovirus B19 and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4). Based on our findings, we evaluated epitope-based peptide-IgM ELISAs as potential diagnostic tools for HBoVs IgM antibodies. We found that the P1+P2-IgM ELISA showed a higher sensitivity and specificity in HBoVs IgM detection than the assays using a single peptide. Conclusions/Significance The identification of the conserved B-cell epitopes among human bocavirus species contributes to our understanding of immunological cross-reactivities of HBoVs, and provides important insights for the development of HBoV diagnostic tools. PMID:24475201

  1. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  2. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines.

  3. The Fas antigen (CD95) on human lymphoid cells: epitope analysis with ten antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Fusco, M; Ridings, J; Flego, L R; Weedon, H M; Nicholson, I; Organ, N; Roberton, D M; Macardle, P J

    1996-11-01

    The expression of CD95 antigen was examined on adult and cord blood lymphocytes using a highly sensitive immunofluorescence/flow cytometric procedure. CD95 was expressed by the majority of circulating blood T cells in adults, and by a smaller proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cord blood. The majority of circulating B cells did not react with seven CD95 antibodies, but three antibodies did stain B cells. In tonsil sections, CD95 was expressed throughout the tissue but germinal centres showed generally stronger staining than the surrounding follicular mantle and interfollicular areas. This was confirmed by flow cytometry, which showed expression preferentially on B cells with a germinal centre phenotype. Because different antibodies stained different proportions of B cells, CD95 epitopes were examined by inhibition, additive binding and protease susceptibility studies using a panel of ten CD95 antibodies. B cells apparently reacting selectively with CD95 antibodies were sorted and CD95 mRNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA and analyzed, in order to confirm the presence of CD95 in cells which reacted selectively and to explore the possible existence of CD95 isoforms. The major cDNA band was identical in the two populations. Inhibition of N-glycosylation suggested that the epitopes detected differentially could not be accounted for by differential N-glycosylation.

  4. Subdominant/Cryptic CD8 T Cell Epitopes Contribute to Resistance against Experimental Infection with a Human Protozoan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Mariana R.; Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    During adaptive immune response, pathogen-specific CD8+ T cells recognize preferentially a small number of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. Its biological implications during natural or vaccine-induced immune responses are still unclear. Earlier, we have shown that during experimental infection, the human intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi restricts the repertoire of CD8+ T cells generating strong immunodominance. We hypothesized that this phenomenon could be a mechanism used by the parasite to reduce the breath and magnitude of the immune response, favoring parasitism, and thus that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire could favor the host. Here, we confirmed our previous observation by showing that CD8+ T cells of H-2a infected mice recognized a single epitope of an immunodominant antigen of the trans-sialidase super-family. In sharp contrast, CD8+ T cells from mice immunized with recombinant genetic vaccines (plasmid DNA and adenovirus) expressing this same T. cruzi antigen recognized, in addition to the immunodominant epitope, two other subdominant epitopes. This unexpected observation allowed us to test the protective role of the immune response to subdominant epitopes. This was accomplished by genetic vaccination of mice with mutated genes that did not express a functional immunodominant epitope. We found that these mice developed immune responses directed solely to the subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes and a significant degree of protective immunity against infection mediated by CD8+ T cells. We concluded that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire contributes to host resistance against infection, a finding that has implications for the host-parasite relationship and vaccine development. PMID:21779365

  5. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased.

  6. Integrated computational prediction and experimental validation identifies promiscuous T cell epitopes in the proteome of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Damien; Jones, Gareth; Pirson, Christopher; Malone, Kerri; Rue-Albrecht, Kevin; Chubb, Anthony J.; Vordermeier, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antigens is an essential requirement in devising new diagnostics or vaccines for use in control programmes against human tuberculosis (TB) and bovine tuberculosis (bTB). Identification of potential epitopes recognised by CD4+ T cells requires prediction of peptide binding to MHC class-II, an obligatory prerequisite for T cell recognition. To comprehensively prioritise potential MHC-II-binding epitopes from Mycobacterium bovis, the agent of bTB and zoonotic TB in humans, we integrated three binding prediction methods with the M. bovisproteome using a subset of human HLA alleles to approximate the binding of epitope-containing peptides to the bovine MHC class II molecule BoLA-DRB3. Two parallel strategies were then applied to filter the resulting set of binders: identification of the top-scoring binders or clusters of binders. Our approach was tested experimentally by assessing the capacity of predicted promiscuous peptides to drive interferon-γ secretion from T cells of M. bovis infected cattle. Thus, 376 20-mer peptides, were synthesised (270 predicted epitopes, 94 random peptides with low predictive scores and 12 positive controls of known epitopes). The results of this validation demonstrated significant enrichment (>24 %) of promiscuously recognised peptides predicted in our selection strategies, compared with randomly selected peptides with low prediction scores. Our strategy offers a general approach to the identification of promiscuous epitopes tailored to target populations where there is limited knowledge of MHC allelic diversity. PMID:28348866

  7. Predictions versus high-throughput experiments in T-cell epitope discovery: competition or synergy?

    PubMed

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Prediction methods as well as experimental methods for T-cell epitope discovery have developed significantly in recent years. High-throughput experimental methods have made it possible to perform full-length protein scans for epitopes restricted to a limited number of MHC alleles. The high costs and limitations regarding the number of proteins and MHC alleles that are feasibly handled by such experimental methods have made in silico prediction models of high interest. MHC binding prediction methods are today of a very high quality and can predict MHC binding peptides with high accuracy. This is possible for a large range of MHC alleles and relevant length of binding peptides. The predictions can easily be performed for complete proteomes of any size. Prediction methods are still, however, dependent on good experimental methods for validation, and should merely be used as a guide for rational epitope discovery. We expect prediction methods as well as experimental validation methods to continue to develop and that we will soon see clinical trials of products whose development has been guided by prediction methods.

  8. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  9. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines.

  10. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  11. Polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells are associated with the vaccination-induced control of a novel recombinant influenza virus expressing an HCV epitope.

    PubMed

    Tan, Amabel C L; Eriksson, Emily M Y; Kedzierska, Katherine; Deliyannis, Georgia; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Zeng, Weiguang; Jackson, David C

    2012-05-01

    In hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, CD8(+) T cell responses have been shown to be important in viral clearance. Examining the efficacy of CD8(+) T cell vaccines against HCV has been limited by the lack of an HCV infectious model in mice and the differences between MHC restriction in humans and mice. Using HLA-A2 transgenic HHD mice, we demonstrate that intranasally delivered Pam2Cys-based lipopeptides containing HLA-A2-restricted HCV epitopes can induce polyfunctional CD8(+) T cell responses in several organs including the liver. To examine the activity of these responses in an infectious context, we developed a recombinant influenza virus that expresses the NS5B(2594-2602) epitope from non-structural protein 5B of hepatitis C virus (PR8-HCV(NS5B)). We showed that mice inoculated with a lipopeptide containing the NS5B epitope had reduced viral loads following challenge with the PR8-HCV(NS5B) virus. This reduction was associated with the induction of NS5B(2594-2602)-specific IFN-γ and TNF-α co-producing CD8(+) T cells. The T cell receptor usage in the NS5B(2594-2602) response was found to exhibit a Vβ8.1/8.2 bias that was characterized by a narrow repertoire and a common CDR3β motif. This work has identified CD8(+) T cell functions induced by lipopeptides that are associated with viral control and demonstrate the potential of lipopeptide-based vaccines as candidates for treatment of HCV infection.

  12. Immunogenicity of recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guèrin clones expressing T and B cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed

    Mohamud, Rohimah; Azlan, Maryam; Yero, Daniel; Alvarez, Nadine; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd-Nor

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) expressing three T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Ag85B antigen (P1, P2, P3) fused to the Mtb8.4 protein (rBCG018) or a combination of these antigens fused to B cell epitopes from ESAT-6, CFP-10 and MTP40 proteins (rBCG032) were used to immunize Balb/c mice. Total IgG responses were determined against Mtb8.4 antigen and ESAT-6 and CFP-10 B cell epitopes after immunization with rBCG032. Mice immunized with rBCG032 showed a significant increase in IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies against ESAT-6 and MTP40 (P1) B cell epitopes and IgG3 against both P1 and P2 B cell epitopes of MPT40. Splenocytes from mice immunized with rBCG018 proliferated against Ag85B P2 and P3 T cell epitopes and Mtb8.4 protein whereas those from mice-immunized with rBCG032 responded against all Ag85B epitopes and the ESAT-6 B cell epitope. CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ lymphocytes from mice immunized with rBCG018 produced primarily Th1 type cytokines in response to the T cell epitopes. Similar pattern of recognition against the T cell epitopes were obtained with rBCG032 with the additional recognition of ESAT-6, CFP-10 and one of the MTP40 B cell epitopes with the same pattern of cytokines. This study demonstrates that rBCG constructs expressing either T or T and B cell epitopes of MTB induced appropriate immunogenicity against MTB.

  13. CD8+ T cell recognition of epitopes within the capsid of adeno-associated virus 8-based gene transfer vectors depends on vectors' genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te-Lang; Li, Hua; Faust, Susan M; Chi, Emily; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, Fraser; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2014-01-01

    Self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing human factor IX (hF.IX) have achieved transient or sustained correction of hemophilia B in human volunteers. High doses of AAV2 or AAV8 vectors delivered to the liver caused in several patients an increase in transaminases accompanied by a rise in AAV capsid-specific T cells and a decrease in circulating hF.IX levels suggesting immune-mediated destruction of vector-transduced cells. Kinetics of these adverse events differed in patients receiving AAV2 or AAV8 vectors causing rise in transaminases at 3 versus 8 weeks after vector injection, respectively. To test if CD8+ T cells to AAV8 vectors, which are similar to AAV2 vectors are fully-gutted vectors and thereby fail to encode structural viral proteins, could cause damage at this late time point, we tested in a series of mouse studies how long major histocompatibility (MHC) class I epitopes within AAV8 capsid can be presented to CD8+ T cells. Our results clearly show that depending on the vectors' genome, CD8+ T cells can detect such epitopes on AAV8's capsid for up to 6 months indicating that the capsid of AAV8 degrades slowly in mice.

  14. Generation of potent mouse monoclonal antibodies to self-proteins using T-cell epitope "tags".

    PubMed

    Percival-Alwyn, Jennifer L; England, Elizabeth; Kemp, Benjamin; Rapley, Laura; Davis, Nicola H E; McCarthy, Grant R; Majithiya, Jayesh B; Corkill, Dominic J; Welsted, Sarah; Minton, Kevin; Cohen, E Suzanne; Robinson, Matthew J; Dobson, Claire; Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Vaughan, Tristan J; Groves, Maria A T; Tigue, Natalie J

    2015-01-01

    Immunization of mice or rats with a "non-self" protein is a commonly used method to obtain monoclonal antibodies, and relies on the immune system's ability to recognize the immunogen as foreign. Immunization of an antigen with 100% identity to the endogenous protein, however, will not elicit a robust immune response. To develop antibodies to mouse proteins, we focused on the potential for breaking such immune tolerance by genetically fusing two independent T-cell epitope-containing sequences (from tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin fragment A (DTA)) to a mouse protein, mouse ST2 (mST2). Wild-type CD1 mice were immunized with three mST2 tagged proteins (Fc, TT and DTA) and the specific serum response was determined. Only in mice immunized with the T-cell epitope-containing antigens were specific mST2 serum responses detected; hybridomas generated from these mice secreted highly sequence-diverse IgGs that were capable of binding mST2 and inhibiting the interaction of mST2 with its ligand, mouse interleukin (IL)-33 (mIL-33). Of the hundreds of antibodies profiled, we identified five potent antibodies that were able to inhibit IL-33 induced IL-6 release in a mast cell assay; notably one such antibody was sufficiently potent to suppress IL-5 release and eosinophilia infiltration in an Alternaria alternata challenge mouse model of asthma. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that T-cell epitope-containing tags have the ability to break tolerance in wild-type mice to 100% conserved proteins, and it provides a compelling argument for the broader use of this approach to generate antibodies against any mouse protein or conserved ortholog.

  15. Identification of Continuous Human B-Cell Epitopes in the Envelope Glycoprotein of Dengue Virus Type 3 (DENV-3)

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andréa N. M. Rangel; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Gil, Laura H. V. G.; Montenegro, Silvia M. L.; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is a growing global public health concern in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Dengue vaccine development has been hampered by concerns that cross-reactive immunological memory elicited by a candidate vaccine could increase the risk of development of more severe clinical forms. One possible strategy to reduce risks associated with a dengue vaccine is the development of a vaccine composed of selected critical epitopes of each of the serotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings Synthetic peptides were used to identify B-cell epitopes in the envelope (E) glycoprotein of dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3). Eleven linear, immunodominant epitopes distributed in five regions at amino acid (aa) positions: 51–65, 71–90, 131–170, 196–210 and 246–260 were identified by employing an enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using a pool of human sera from dengue type 3 infected individuals. Peptides 11 (aa51–65), 27 and 28 (aa131–150) also reacted with dengue 1 (DENV-1) and dengue 2 (DENV-2) patient sera as analyzed through the ROC curves generated for each peptide by ELISA and might have serotype specific diagnostic potential. Mice immunized against each one of the five immunogenic regions showed epitopes 51–65, 131–170, 196–210 and 246–260 elicited the highest antibody response and epitopes131–170, 196–210 and 246–260, elicited IFN-γ production and T CD4+ cell response, as evaluated by ELISA and ELISPOT assays respectively. Conclusions/Significance Our study identified several useful immunodominant IgG-specific epitopes on the envelope of DENV-3. They are important tools for understanding the mechanisms involved in antibody dependent enhancement and immunity. If proven protective and safe, in conjunction with others well-documented epitopes, they might be included into a candidate epitope-based vaccine. PMID:19826631

  16. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus capsid, a versatile platform for foreign B-cell epitope display inducing protective humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Noelia; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Gómez, Yolanda; Crisci, Elisa; Montoya, María; Castón, José R.; Blanco, Esther; Bárcena, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs), comprised of viral structural proteins devoid of genetic material, are tunable nanoparticles that can be chemically or genetically engineered, to be used as platforms for multimeric display of foreign antigens. Here, we report the engineering of chimeric VLPs, derived from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) for presentation of foreign B-cell antigens to the immune system. The RHDV capsid comprises 180 copies of a single capsid subunit (VP60). To evaluate the ability of chimeric RHDV VLPs to elicit protective humoral responses against foreign antigens, we tested two B-cell epitopes: a novel neutralizing B-cell epitope, derived from feline calicivirus capsid protein, and a well characterized B-cell epitope from the extracellular domain of influenza A virus M2 protein (M2e). We generated sets of chimeric RHDV VLPs by insertion of the foreign B-cell epitopes at three different locations within VP60 protein (which involved different levels of surface accessibility) and in different copy numbers per site. The immunogenic potential of the chimeric VLPs was analyzed in the mouse model. The results presented here indicated that chimeric RHDV VLPs elicit potent protective humoral responses against displayed foreign B-cell epitopes, demonstrated by both, in vitro neutralization and in vivo protection against a lethal challenge. PMID:27549017

  17. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  18. In situ localization of epidermal stem cells using a novel multi epitope ligand cartography approach.

    PubMed

    Ruetze, Martin; Gallinat, Stefan; Wenck, Horst; Deppert, Wolfgang; Knott, Anja

    2010-06-01

    Precise knowledge of the frequency and localization of epidermal stem cells within skin tissue would further our understanding of their role in maintaining skin homeostasis. As a novel approach we used the recently developed method of multi epitope ligand cartography, applying a set of described putative epidermal stem cell markers. Bioinformatic evaluation of the data led to the identification of several discrete basal keratinocyte populations, but none of them displayed the complete stem cell marker set. The distribution of the keratinocyte populations within the tissue was remarkably heterogeneous, but determination of distance relationships revealed a population of quiescent cells highly expressing p63 and the integrins alpha(6)/beta(1) that represent origins of a gradual differentiation lineage. This population comprises about 6% of all basal cells, shows a scattered distribution pattern and could also be found in keratinocyte holoclone colonies. The data suggest that this population identifies interfollicular epidermal stem cells.

  19. Synthetic peptides containing B- and T-cell epitope of dengue virus-2 E domain III provoked B- and T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanfeng; Peng, Liang; Zhao, Wei; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Fuchun; Yan, Ziqiang; Cao, Hong

    2011-05-09

    Our previous work applied a combination of bioinformatics approaches and in vitro assays to identify the dengue-2 virus (DENV-2)-specific B- and T-cell epitopes. In this report, we first evaluated the antigenicity of both B- and T-cell epitopes reacting with different sera against DENV-2 by ELISA as well as the ability of T-cell epitope to activate CD4(+) T-cell producing IFN-γ using ELISPOT, which showed a specific reactivity between either B- or T-cell epitope and DENV-2 antisera, and a significant increase of IFN-γ producing cells in DENV-2 infected mice. Then, a multi-epitope peptide containing the above B-, T-cell epitopes of envelope domain III (EDIII) of DENV-2 and pan-DR epitope (PADRE) was bioinformatically designed and synthesized. The verification of its immunogenicity and protective effect was performed in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The results showed that a high level of antibody in mice elicited by the multi-epitope peptide was detected by ELISA and the anti-peptide sera binding to the vero cells infected with DEN-2 was observed with immunofluorescence test. More importantly, the peptide could induce lymphoproliferation in vitro and a predominant Th1 type of immune response was examined by flow cytometry. We also found that the virus replication in the mice vaccinated with the multi-epitope peptide was obviously less than that of the control groups. These results may provide some important information for the development of dengue vaccine.

  20. Identification of a dengue virus-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jinsheng; Duan, Zhiliang; Jiang, Lifang

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a combination of epitope-prediction programs and in vitro assays was used to identify dengue virus (DENV)-specific CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients who recovered from dengue fever were stimulated with candidate epitope peptides derived from DENV, which were predicted by using SYFPEITHI and RANKpep epitope-prediction programs. The IFN-gamma ELISpot results and the results of intracellular staining of IFN-gamma showed that peptides NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI), E_256 (QEGAMHTAL), NS3_205 (LPAIVREAI), NS5_210 (SRNSTHEMY), and NS3_207 (AIVREAIKR) could induce the recall response of CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, the results of the MHC-peptide complex stabilization assay revealed that peptide NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI) has a high affinity for HLA-A*0201 molecules. The IFN-gamma ELISpot results and staining of intracellular IFN-gamma confirmed that this peptide could induce high-level CD8(+) T cell response in HLA-A*0201 positive PBMCs. Peptide NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI) was identified as a novel DENV-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitope.

  1. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d) crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine. PMID:26895191

  2. Identification of Zika virus epitopes reveals immunodominant and protective roles for dengue virus cross-reactive CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jinsheng; Tang, William Weihao; Sheets, Nicholas; Ellison, Julia; Sette, Alessandro; Kim, Kenneth; Shresta, Sujan

    2017-03-13

    CD8(+) T cells play an important role in controlling Flavivirus infection, including Zika virus (ZIKV). Here, we have identified 25 HLA-B*0702-restricted epitopes and 1 HLA-A*0101-restricted epitope using interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in ZIKV-infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient HLA transgenic mice. The cross-reactivity of ZIKV epitopes to dengue virus (DENV) was tested using IFN-γ-ELISPOT and IFN-γ-ICS on CD8(+) T cells from DENV-infected mice, and five cross-reactive HLA-B*0702-binding peptides were identified by both assays. ZIKV/DENV cross-reactive CD8(+) T cells in DENV-immune mice expanded post ZIKV challenge and dominated in the subsequent CD8(+) T cell response. ZIKV challenge following immunization of mice with ZIKV-specific and ZIKV/DENV cross-reactive epitopes elicited CD8(+) T cell responses that reduced infectious ZIKV levels, and CD8(+) T cell depletions confirmed that CD8(+) T cells mediated this protection. These results identify ZIKV-specific and ZIKV/DENV cross-reactive epitopes and demonstrate both an altered immunodominance pattern in the DENV-immune setting relative to naive, as well as a protective role for epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells against ZIKV. These results have important implications for ZIKV vaccine development and provide a mouse model for evaluating anti-ZIKV CD8(+) T cell responses of human relevance.

  3. Immunogenicity of epitope vaccines targeting different B cell antigenic determinants of human α-synuclein: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Petrushina, Irina; Davtyan, Hayk; Hovakimyan, Armine; Saing, Tommy; Davtyan, Arpine; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-07

    Immunotherapeutic approaches reducing α-synuclein deposits may provide therapeutic benefit for Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). Immunization with full-length human α-synuclein (hα-Syn) protein in a Parkinson's disease mouse model decreased the accumulation of the aggregated forms of this protein in neurons and reduced neurodegeneration. To enhance the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines and to avoid the risk of autoreactive anti-hα-Syn T-helper (Th) cell responses, we generated three peptide-based epitope vaccines composed of different B-cell epitopes of hα-Syn fused with a "non-self" Th epitope from tetanus toxin (P30). Immunization of mice with these epitope vaccines produced high titers of anti-hα-Syn antibodies that bound to Lewy bodies (LBs) and Lewy neurites (LNs) in brain tissue from DLB cases and induced robust Th cell responses to P30, but not to hα-Syn. Further development of these first generation epitope vaccines may facilitate induction of anti-hα-Syn immunotherapy without producing potentially harmful autoreactive Th cell responses.

  4. Identification of Caucasian CD4 T cell epitopes on the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax. T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Bilsborough, J; Carlisle, M; Good, M F

    1993-07-15

    We have identified a population of Caucasians with a defined past history of infection with Plasmodium vivax malaria. Using purified synthetic peptides overlapping the sequence of the circumsporozoite protein, we determined the percentage of individuals whose T cells proliferated or secreted IFN-gamma in response to peptide stimulation, for both this population and a population of nonmalaria-exposed control individuals. A number of peptides were recognized by both groups, but 11 peptides were uniquely recognized by the exposed population, and thus represented malaria-specific T cell epitopes. CD4 T cells were found to be responsible for the proliferative response. Humans last exposed to vivax sporozoites as long ago as 49 yr responded as well or better to these malaria-specific epitopes as individuals exposed within the previous month. Since such malaria-induced memory response may not be a feature of Plasmodium falciparum infections, and since P. falciparum does not have a persisting hypnozoite stage, our data argue that the persistence of T cell memory to vivax epitopes may result from antigenic persistence in the liver.

  5. Apoptotic Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Cells and Interferon Signaling Intersect in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Martini, Helene; Citro, Alessandra; Martire, Carmela; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Labbadia, Giancarlo; Accapezzato, Daniele; Piconese, Silvia; De Marzio, Paolo; Cavallari, Eugenio N; Calvo, Ludovica; Rizzo, Fabiana; Severa, Martina; Coccia, Eliana M; Grazi, Gian Luca; Di Filippo, Simona; Sidney, John; Vullo, Vincenzo; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    CD8(+) T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells represent a principal player in chronic immune activation. Here, we found that both apoptotic epitope-specific and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8(+) T cells were mostly confined within the effector memory (EM) or terminally differentiated EM CD45RA(+) cell subsets expressing a dysfunctional T-helper 1-like signature program in chronic HCV infection. However, apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells produced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 2 at the intrahepatic level significantly more than HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells, despite both populations expressing high levels of programmed death 1 receptor. Contextually, only apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells correlated with both interferon-stimulated gene levels in T cells and hepatic fibrosis score. Together, these data suggest that, compared with HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells, apoptotic epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells can better sustain chronic immune activation, owing to their capacity to produce tumor necrosis factor α, and exhibit greater resistance to inhibitory signals during chronic HCV infection.

  6. T-cell epitope analysis of Mag 3, an important allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, S; Ohno, K; Tategaki, A; Aki, T; Shigeta, S; Jyo, T; Suzuki, O; Ono, K

    2000-04-03

    Here we describe the detection of T-cell epitope region on the house dust mite allergen Mag 3, which has been shown to trigger T-cell proliferation in mite-allergic asthmatic patients. We first examined murine T-cell epitope using T-cell fraction prepared from recombinant Mag 3 (r-Mag 3)-primed H-2k mice. Initial proliferation assay with truncated r-Mag 3 indicated that N-terminal 113 amino acid region was required for triggering T-cell activation. Subsequent epitope scanning with synthetic overlapping peptides revealed that T-cell reactive region was assigned within amino acid range 56-75. We also explored human T-cell determinant using specific T-cells from mite-allergic patients. Intriguingly, we found that amino acid range 56-85, a portion partially overlapping with that identified in r-Mag 3-primed mice, was exclusively recognized by T-cells from different patients. Further investigation of unique T-cell epitope region found in this study would provide insight into the development of animal therapeutic model and/or peptide vaccine for asthma.

  7. Systematic Bioinformatic Approach for Prediction of Linear B-Cell Epitopes on Dengue E and prM Protein.

    PubMed

    Nadugala, Mahesha N; Premaratne, Prasad H; Goonasekara, Charitha L

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitopes on the envelope (E) and premembrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) were predicted using bioinformatics tools, BepiPred, Ellipro, and SVMTriP. Predicted epitopes, 32 and 17 for E and prM proteins, respectively, were then characterized for their level of conservations. The epitopes, EP4/E (48-55), epitope number 4 of E protein at amino acids 48-55, EP9/E (165-182), EP11/E (218-233), EP20/E (322-349), EP21/E (326-353), EP23/E (356-365), and EP25/E (380-386), showed a high intraserotype conservancy with very low pan-serotype conservancy, demonstrating a potential target as serotype specific diagnostic markers. EP3 (30-41) located in domain-I and EP26/E (393-409), EP27/E (416-435), EP28/E (417-430) located in the stem region of E protein, and EP8/prM (93-112) from the prM protein have a pan-serotype conservancy higher than 70%. These epitopes indicate a potential use as universal vaccine candidates, subjected to verification of their potential in viral neutralization. EP2/E (16-21), EP5/E (62-123), EP6/E (63-89), EP19/E (310-329), and EP24/E (371-402), which have more than 50% pan-serotype conservancies, were found on E protein regions that are important in host cell attachment. Previous studies further show evidence for some of these epitopes to generate cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating their importance in antiviral strategies for DENV. This study suggests that bioinformatic approaches are attractive first line of screening for identification of linear B-cell epitopes.

  8. Systematic Bioinformatic Approach for Prediction of Linear B-Cell Epitopes on Dengue E and prM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nadugala, Mahesha N.

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitopes on the envelope (E) and premembrane (prM) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) were predicted using bioinformatics tools, BepiPred, Ellipro, and SVMTriP. Predicted epitopes, 32 and 17 for E and prM proteins, respectively, were then characterized for their level of conservations. The epitopes, EP4/E (48–55), epitope number 4 of E protein at amino acids 48–55, EP9/E (165–182), EP11/E (218–233), EP20/E (322–349), EP21/E (326–353), EP23/E (356–365), and EP25/E (380–386), showed a high intraserotype conservancy with very low pan-serotype conservancy, demonstrating a potential target as serotype specific diagnostic markers. EP3 (30–41) located in domain-I and EP26/E (393–409), EP27/E (416–435), EP28/E (417–430) located in the stem region of E protein, and EP8/prM (93–112) from the prM protein have a pan-serotype conservancy higher than 70%. These epitopes indicate a potential use as universal vaccine candidates, subjected to verification of their potential in viral neutralization. EP2/E (16–21), EP5/E (62–123), EP6/E (63–89), EP19/E (310–329), and EP24/E (371–402), which have more than 50% pan-serotype conservancies, were found on E protein regions that are important in host cell attachment. Previous studies further show evidence for some of these epitopes to generate cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating their importance in antiviral strategies for DENV. This study suggests that bioinformatic approaches are attractive first line of screening for identification of linear B-cell epitopes. PMID:27688753

  9. Gluten-specific antibodies of celiac disease gut plasma cells recognize long proteolytic fragments that typically harbor T-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Dørum, Siri; Steinsbø, Øyvind; Bergseng, Elin; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; de Souza, Gustavo A.; Sollid, Ludvig M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify proteolytic fragments of gluten proteins recognized by recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibodies generated from single IgA plasma cells of celiac disease lesions. Peptides bound by monoclonal antibodies in complex gut-enzyme digests of gluten treated with the deamidating enzyme transglutaminase 2, were identified by mass spectrometry after antibody pull-down with protein G beads. The antibody bound peptides were long deamidated peptide fragments that contained the substrate recognition sequence of transglutaminase 2. Characteristically, the fragments contained epitopes with the sequence QPEQPFP and variants thereof in multiple copies, and they typically also harbored many different gluten T-cell epitopes. In the pull-down setting where antibodies were immobilized on a solid phase, peptide fragments with multivalent display of epitopes were targeted. This scenario resembles the situation of the B-cell receptor on the surface of B cells. Conceivably, B cells of celiac disease patients select gluten epitopes that are repeated multiple times in long peptide fragments generated by gut digestive enzymes. As the fragments also contain many different T-cell epitopes, this will lead to generation of strong antibody responses by effective presentation of several distinct T-cell epitopes and establishment of T-cell help to B cells. PMID:27146306

  10. Multiple linear epitopes (B-cell, CTL and Th) of JEV expressed in recombinant MVA as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengjuan; Feng, Xiuli; Zheng, Qisheng; Hou, Hongyan; Cao, Ruibing; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Qingtao; Liu, Xiaodong; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Deng, Wenlei; Chen, Puyan

    2012-09-17

    Epitope-based vaccination might play an important role in the protective immunity against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the immune characteristics of recombinant MVA carrying multi-epitope gene of JEV (rMVA-mep). The synthetic gene containing critical epitopes (B-cell, CTL and Th) of JEV was cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pGEM-K1L, and the rMVA-mep was prepared. BALB/c mice were immunized with different dosages of purified rMVA-mep and the immune responses were determined in the form of protective response against JEV, antibodies titers (IgG1 and IgG2a), spleen cell lymphocyte proliferation, and the levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 cytokines. The results showed that live rMVA-mep elicited strongly immune responses in dose-dependent manner, and the highest level of immune responses was observed from the groups immunized with 107 TCID50 rMVA-mep among the experimental three concentrations. There were almost no difference of cytokines and neutralizing antibody titers among 107 TCID50 rMVA-mep, recombinant ED3 and inactivated JEV vaccine. It was noteworthy that rMVA-mep vaccination potentiates the Th1 and Th2-type immune responses in dose-dependent manner, and was sufficient to protect the mice survival against lethal JEV challenge. These findings demonstrated that rMVA-mep can produce adequate humoral and cellular immune responses, and protection in mice, which suggested that rMVA-mep might be an attractive candidate vaccine for preventing JEV infection.

  11. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine.

  12. DNA vaccines encoding altered peptide ligands for SSX2 enhance epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heath A; Rekoske, Brian T; McNeel, Douglas G

    2014-03-26

    Plasmid DNA serves as a simple and easily modifiable form of antigen delivery for vaccines. The USDA approval of DNA vaccines for several non-human diseases underscores the potential of this type of antigen delivery method as a cost-effective approach for the treatment or prevention of human diseases, including cancer. However, while DNA vaccines have demonstrated safety and immunological effect in early phase clinical trials, they have not consistently elicited robust anti-tumor responses. Hence many recent efforts have sought to increase the immunological efficacy of DNA vaccines, and we have specifically evaluated several target antigens encoded by DNA vaccine as treatments for human prostate cancer. In particular, we have focused on SSX2 as one potential target antigen, given its frequent expression in metastatic prostate cancer. We have previously identified two peptides, p41-49 and p103-111, as HLA-A2-restricted SSX2-specific epitopes. In the present study we sought to determine whether the efficacy of a DNA vaccine could be enhanced by an altered peptide ligand (APL) strategy wherein modifications were made to anchor residues of these epitopes to enhance or ablate their binding to HLA-A2. A DNA vaccine encoding APL modified to increase epitope binding elicited robust peptide-specific CD8+ T cells producing Th1 cytokines specific for each epitope. Ablation of one epitope in a DNA vaccine did not enhance immune responses to the other epitope. These results demonstrate that APL encoded by a DNA vaccine can be used to elicit increased numbers of antigen-specific T cells specific for multiple epitopes simultaneously, and suggest this could be a general approach to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding tumor antigens.

  13. [Improved weighted cross-correlation coefficient with a new kernel and its application in predicting T cell epitopes].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Ma, Jian-hua; Liu, Nan; Qian, Shan-shan

    2010-10-01

    We designed a weighted cross-correlation coefficient considering the "anchor" of the T cell epitopes, and used an evolutionary algorithm to search for an optimal weight vector. A SVM model with this new peptide similarity kernel was evaluated on a T-cell data set. The results demonstrated a good performance of this method.

  14. Antibodies to two ZP3 B cell epitopes affect zona pellucida assembly.

    PubMed

    Borillo, Jason; Coonrod, Scott A; Wu, Jean; Zhou, Cindy; Lou, Yahuan

    2008-07-01

    Mouse zona pellucida (ZP) proteins are synthesized in developing oocytes and assembled into ZP after their secretion. This study has investigated whether anti-ZP3 antibodies affect ZP assembly. Peptides CP2 and CP3 were used to elicit antibodies to two ZP3 B cell epitopes, ZP3 (335-342) and ZP3 (171-180). Ovulated eggs from mice immunized with a mixture of CP2/CP3 showed an abnormal ZP; importantly, the ZP completely dissolved both in vitro and in vivo 12h after ovulation. Although CP3 immunization resulted also in abnormal ZP, the ZP did not dissociate. Binding of antibodies to the ZP prior to oocyte maturation was requisite, as in vitro incubation of ovulated eggs in combination with the two antibodies failed to induce ZP dissolution. Electron microscopic observation further demonstrated a significant abnormality in ZP structure in CP2/CP3-immunized mice, especially in mature follicles, suggesting that B cell epitopes may be involved in ZP assembly. Though antibody elicited by CP2 has been shown to inhibit fertilization, we now show that antibody induced by CP3 had no effect on fertility. However, immunization with CP3/CP2 resulted in a significantly lower fertility rate than CP2 alone. This suggests that infertility in these mice may be due to an unstable ZP structure. Our model provides a useful tool to study ZP assembly and its structure beyond molecular biology method.

  15. B-Cell Epitopes in GroEL of Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Madico, Guillermo; Li, Sheng; Yang, Chiou-Ying; Perkins, Hillary M.; Sompuram, Seshi R.; Kodela, Vani; Liu, Tong; Morris, Timothy; Wang, Daphne; Roche, Marly I.; Seaton, Barbara A.; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The chaperonin protein GroEL, also known as heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), is a prominent antigen in the human and mouse antibody response to the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis (Ft), the causative agent of tularemia. In addition to its presumed cytoplasmic location, FtGroEL has been reported to be a potential component of the bacterial surface and to be released from the bacteria. In the current study, 13 IgG2a and one IgG3 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for FtGroEL were classified into eleven unique groups based on shared VH-VL germline genes, and seven crossblocking profiles revealing at least three non-overlapping epitope areas in competition ELISA. In a mouse model of respiratory tularemia with the highly pathogenic Ft type A strain SchuS4, the Ab64 and N200 IgG2a mAbs, which block each other’s binding to and are sensitive to the same two point mutations in FtGroEL, reduced bacterial burden indicating that they target protective GroEL B-cell epitopes. The Ab64 and N200 epitopes, as well as those of three other mAbs with different crossblocking profiles, Ab53, N3, and N30, were mapped by hydrogen/deuterium exchange–mass spectrometry (DXMS) and visualized on a homology model of FtGroEL. This model was further supported by its experimentally-validated computational docking to the X-ray crystal structures of Ab64 and Ab53 Fabs. The structural analysis and DXMS profiles of the Ab64 and N200 mAbs suggest that their protective effects may be due to induction or stabilization of a conformational change in FtGroEL. PMID:24968190

  16. Insights into native epitopes of proliferating cell nuclear antigen using recombinant DNA protein products

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding full-length human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to generate a panel of in vitro translated labeled protein products with COOH-terminal deletions and to construct a set of fusion proteins with COOH- and NH2-terminal deletions. A rabbit antiserum raised against an NH2-terminal peptide, a well- characterized murine monoclonal antibody (mAb), and 14 human lupus sera with autoantibody to PCNA were analyzed for their reactivity with the constructs using both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques. The rabbit antiserum reacted in immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with constructs containing the appropriate NH2-terminal sequence and mAb reacted with a sequence from the midregion of PCNA. These experimentally induced antibodies also reacted with 15-mer synthetic peptides in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In contrast, none of the lupus sera reacted with synthetic peptides in ELISA. 9 of the 14 lupus sera also failed to react in Western immunoblotting with any recombinant fusion protein, although they all immunoprecipitated in vitro translated full-length protein. Four of the nine had variable patterns of immunoprecipitation with shorter constructs. The remaining five lupus sera were able to immunoprecipitate translation products as well as Western blot recombinant fusion proteins. From analysis of the patterns of reactivity of human lupus sera, it was deduced that the apparent heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to PCNA could be explained by immune response to highly conformational epitopes. These observations demonstrate that there might be special features in "native" epitopes of intranuclear antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies, and that these special features of native epitopes might not be present in prepared antigen used for experimental immunization. These features may be related to protein folding or to association of the antigen with other intranuclear proteins or nucleic acids, as

  17. Epitope-specific CD8+ T cell kinetics rather than viral variability determine the timing of immune escape in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Martyushev, Alexey P; Petravic, Janka; Grimm, Andrew J; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Gooneratne, Shayarana L; Reece, Jeanette C; Cromer, Deborah; Kent, Stephen J; Davenport, Miles P

    2015-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells are important for the control of chronic HIV infection. However, the virus rapidly acquires "escape mutations" that reduce CD8(+) T cell recognition and viral control. The timing of when immune escape occurs at a given epitope varies widely among patients and also among different epitopes within a patient. The strength of the CD8(+) T cell response, as well as mutation rates, patterns of particular amino acids undergoing escape, and growth rates of escape mutants, may affect when escape occurs. In this study, we analyze the epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells in 25 SIV-infected pigtail macaques responding to three SIV epitopes. Two epitopes showed a variable escape pattern and one had a highly monomorphic escape pattern. Despite very different patterns, immune escape occurs with a similar delay of on average 18 d after the epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells reach 0.5% of total CD8(+) T cells. We find that the most delayed escape occurs in one of the highly variable epitopes, and that this is associated with a delay in the epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells responding to this epitope. When we analyzed the kinetics of immune escape, we found that multiple escape mutants emerge simultaneously during the escape, implying that a diverse population of potential escape mutants is present during immune selection. Our results suggest that the conservation or variability of an epitope does not appear to affect the timing of immune escape in SIV. Instead, timing of escape is largely determined by the kinetics of epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells.

  18. Direct binding of a myasthenia gravis related epitope to MHC class II molecules on living murine antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mozes, E; Dayan, M; Zisman, E; Brocke, S; Licht, A; Pecht, I

    1989-01-01

    MHC gene products present antigenic epitopes to the antigen receptor on T cells. Nevertheless, direct binding of such epitopes to MHC class II proteins on normal living antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has not yet been demonstrated. We have previously shown a significant difference in the ability of T cells of myasthenia gravis (MG) patients to proliferate in response to the synthetic peptide p195-212 of the human acetylcholine receptor (AChR) alpha-subunit in comparison to healthy controls. The observed proliferative responses correlated significantly with HLA-DR5. Moreover, lymph node cells of various mouse strains that were primed with the T cell epitope, p195-212, were found to proliferate to different extents. To investigate these observations further, we designed an assay for direct binding of p195-212 to MHC class II proteins on the surface of freshly prepared splenic adherent cells. Binding of a biotinylated p195-212 was monitored using phycoerythrin-avidin by flow cytometry. Fifteen to sixty per cent of the cells were labeled following incubation with the biotinylated peptide. Binding was observed only to splenic adherent cells derived from mouse strains of which T cells were capable of proliferating in response to p195-212. The binding specificity, in terms of epitope structure and its site of interaction on the cells, was shown by its inhibition with an excess of the unlabeled peptide or with the relevant monoclonal anti-I-A antibodies. These results constitute the first direct evidence for the specific binding of a T cell epitope to live APC. PMID:2480232

  19. Using injectoporation to deliver genes to mechanosensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wagner, Thomas; Yan, Linxuan; Grillet, Nicolas; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    Mechanosensation, the transduction of mechanical force into electrochemical signals, allows organisms to detect touch and sound, to register movement and gravity, and to sense changes in cell volume and shape. The hair cells of the mammalian inner ear are the mechanosensors for the detection of sound and head movement. The analysis of gene function in hair cells has been hampered by the lack of an efficient gene transfer method. Here we describe a method termed injectoporation that combines tissue microinjection with electroporation to express cDNAs and shRNAs in mouse cochlear hair cells. Injectoporation allows for gene transfer into dozens of hair cells, and it is compatible with the analysis of hair cell function using imaging approaches and electrophysiology. Tissue dissection and injectoporation can be carried out within a few hours, and the tissue can be cultured for days for subsequent functional analyses.

  20. Human self-reactive T cell clones expressing identical T cell receptor beta chains differ in their ability to recognize a cryptic self-epitope

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Recognition of self-antigens by T lymphocytes is a central event in autoimmunity. Understanding of the molecular interactions between T cell receptors (TCR) and self-epitopes may explain how T cells escape thymic education and initiate an autoimmune reaction. We have studied five human in vivo activated T cell clones specific for the region 535- 551 of human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) established from a Graves' patient. Three clones (37, 72, and 73) expressed identical TCR beta and alpha chains rearranging V beta 1.1 and V alpha 15.1, and were considered sister clones. Clone 43 differed from clone 37 and its sisters in the J alpha region only. Clone NP-7 expressed V beta 6.5 but rearranged two in-frame TCR alpha chain, both using the V alpha 22.1 segment. Fine epitope mapping using nested peptides showed that clones using identical TCR beta chains, identical V alpha, but a different J alpha recognized distinct, nonoverlapping epitopes in the TPO 535-551 region. This finding shows that a different J alpha region alone leads to a heterogeneous pattern of recognition. This indicates that the "restricted" TCR V region usage sometimes found in autoimmune diseases may not always correspond to identical epitope recognition. To confirm that clones 37 (and its sisters) and 43 recognize different epitopes, the T cell clones were stimulated with a TPO-transfected autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cell line (TPO-EBV) that presents TPO epitopes afer endogenous processing. Only clone 37 and its sisters recognizes the TPO-EBV cell line, suggesting that the epitope recognized by clone 43 is not presented upon endogenous processing. We have shown that thyroid epithelial cells (TEC), the only cells that produce TPO, express HLA class II molecules in Graves' disease and can act as an antigen-presenting cells, presenting TPO after endogenous processing to autoantigen-reactive T cell clones. We tested, therefore, whether autologous TEC induced the same pattern of stimulation as TPO

  1. Protective B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide in a mouse model of respiratory tularaemia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Madico, Guillermo; Roche, Marly I; Wang, Qi; Hui, Julia H; Perkins, Hillary M; Zaia, Joseph; Costello, Catherine E; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Francisella tularensis have been shown to be protective against respiratory tularaemia in mouse models, and we have previously described mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to non-overlapping terminal and internal epitopes of the F. tularensis LPS O-polysaccharide (OAg). In the current study, we used F. tularensis LPS oligosaccharides of defined OAg repeat length as molecular rulers in competition ELISA to demonstrate that the epitope targeted by the terminal OAg-binding mAb FB11 is contained within one tetrasaccharide repeat whereas the epitope targeted by the internal OAg-binding mAb Ab52 spans two tetrasaccharide repeats. Both mAbs conferred survival to BALB/c mice infected intranasally with the F. tularensis type B live vaccine strain and prolonged survival of BALB/c mice infected intranasally with the highly virulent F. tularensis type A strain SchuS4. The protective effects correlated with reduced bacterial burden in mAb-treated infected mice. These results indicate that an oligosaccharide with two OAg tetrasaccharide repeats covers both terminal and internal protective OAg epitopes, which may inform the design of vaccines for tularaemia. Furthermore, the FB11 and Ab52 mAbs could serve as reporters to monitor the response of vaccine recipients to protective B-cell epitopes of F. tularensis OAg. PMID:22486311

  2. Identification of a Conserved B-cell Epitope on Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Envelope Protein by Screening a Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Gao, Hongbo; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A) is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. Methods and Results This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched 213SVQYHPL219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that 213SVQYHPL219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. Conclusions and Significance We identified 213SVQYHPL219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group. PMID:23185456

  3. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  4. Epitopes rationally selected through computational analyses induce T-cell proliferation in mice and are recognized by serum from individuals infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marcelo D; Oliveira, Flávio M; Coelho, Ivan E V; Passos, Maria J F; Alves, Clarice C; Taranto, Alex G; Júnior, Moacyr C; Santos, Luciana L; Fonseca, Cristina T; Villar, José A F P; Lopes, Débora O

    2017-04-03

    Schistosomiasis is the second leading cause of death due to parasitic diseases in the world. Seeking an alternative for the control of disease, the World Health Organization funded the genome sequencing of the major species related to schistosomiasis to identify potential vaccines and therapeutic targets. Therefore, the aim of this work was to select T and B-cell epitopes from Schistosoma mansoni through computational analyses and evaluate the immunological potential of epitopes in vitro. Extracellular regions of membrane proteins from the Schistosoma mansoni were used to predict promiscuous epitopes with affinity to different human Major Histocompatibility Class II (MHCII) molecules by bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of selected epitopes was constructed and used in molecular docking to verify the interaction with murine MHCII H2-IA(b) . In this process, four epitopes were selected and synthesized to assess their ability to stimulate proliferation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in mice splenocyte cultures. The results showed that Sm041370 and Sm168240 epitopes induced significant cell proliferation. Additionally, the four epitopes were used as antigens in the Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to assess the recognition by serum from individuals infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Sm140560, Sm168240 and Sm041370 epitopes were recognized by infected individuals IgG antibodies. Therefore, Sm041370 and Sm168240 epitopes that stood out in in silico and in vitro analyses could be promising antigens in schistosomiasis vaccine development or diagnostic kits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational approach for predicting the conserved B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin H7 subtype influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangyu; Sun, Qi; Ye, Zhonghua; Hua, Ying; Shao, Na; Du, Yanli; Zhang, Qiwei; Wan, Chengsong

    2016-01-01

    An avian-origin influenza H7N9 virus epidemic occurred in China in 2013–2014, in which >422 infected people suffered from pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock. H7N9 viruses belong to the H7 subtype of avian-origin influenza viruses (AIV-H7). Hemagglutinin (HA) is a vital membrane protein of AIV that has an important role in host recognition and infection. The epitopes of HA are significant determinants of the regularity of epidemic and viral mutation and recombination mechanisms. The present study aimed to predict the conserved B-cell epitopes of AIV-H7 HA using a bioinformatics approach, including the three most effective epitope prediction softwares available online: Artificial Neural Network based B-cell Epitope Prediction (ABCpred), B-cell Epitope Prediction (BepiPred) and Linear B-cell Epitope Prediction (LBtope). A total of 24 strains of Euro-Asiatic AIV-H7 that had been associated with a serious poultry pandemic or had infected humans in the past 30 years were selected to identify the conserved regions of HA. Sequences were obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information and Global Initiative on Sharing Avian Influenza Data databases. Using a combination of software prediction and sequence comparisons, the conserved epitopes of AIV-H7 were predicted and clarified. A total of five conserved epitopes [amino acids (aa) 37–52, 131–142, 215–234, 465–484 and 487–505] with a suitable length, high antigenicity and minimal variation were predicted and confirmed. Each obtained a score of >0.80 in ABCpred, 60% in LBtope and a level of 0.35 in Bepipred. In addition, a representative amino acid change (glutamine235-to-leucine235) in the HA protein of the 2013 AIV-H7N9 was discovered. The strategy adopted in the present study may have profound implications on the rapid diagnosis and control of infectious disease caused by H7N9 viruses, as well as by other virulent viruses, such as the Ebola virus. PMID:27703505

  6. Hypoxia upregulates the expression of the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine containing epitope H in human ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Leonidas D; Vassiou, Katerina; Kotrotsios, Anastasios; Sgantzos, Markos N

    2011-02-15

    Epitope H contains an O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue in a specific conformation and/or environment recognized by mouse IgM monoclonal antibody H (mabH). Epitope H is present in several types of cells and in several polypeptides outside the CNS. Previous results have shown that in the adult human brains, epitope H is confined mostly to a minority of fibrous astrocytes, and it is greatly upregulated in the reactive astrocytes. Post-translational modification with O-GlcNAc occurs on many proteins involved in several cell processes, such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis, proteasome degradation pathways, and modulation of cellular function in response to nutrition and stress. Hypoxia is one of the major causes of cellular stress. Therefore, in this study, we used the mAbH and the indirect immunoperoxidase method to investigate the expression of epitope H in ependymal cells in brains of persons who died with signs of hypoxic encephalopathy. The results of the present study showed that practically all ependymal cells showed cytoplasmic staining for epitope H in supranuclear cytoplasm in the brain of two premature neonates and in ten infants who died with signs of hypoxic encephalopathy. However, the overwhelming majority of ependymal cells of the nine human embryos taken from legal abortions, ranging from 26 days until 13 weeks of gestational age, and of the ten infants' brains without any sign of hypoxic encephalopathy remained negative. Only occasionally did the ependymal cells show weak cytoplasmic staining in some foci. In addition, the reactive astrocytes in the hypoxic brains showed strong cytoplasmic staining, confirming previous results.

  7. Design of multi-epitope, analogue-based cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fikes, John D; Sette, Alessandro

    2003-09-01

    The current objective of our cancer programme is to develop an effective vaccine based on rationally designed T cell epitope analogues, for use in the adjuvant setting for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colon cancer. Analogue epitopes, enhanced for either human leukocyte antigen (HLA) binding or T cell receptor (TCR) signalling, have been shown to be more effective at breaking immunological tolerance than cognate wild-type epitopes. Although encouraging early-phase clinical data has been obtained by others using a limited number of HLA-A2-restricted epitope analogues, the clinical benefits and immune correlates for vaccines comprised of multiple epitope analogues restricted by multiple HLA supertypes remains to be investigated. Clinical studies are currently being conducted on EP-2101, a prototype vaccine that delivers multiple HLA-A2-restricted analogue epitopes. In parallel, fixed anchor and heteroclitic analogues restricted by three other commonly expressed HLA supertypes are being identified. These analogues will be incorporated into future vaccines including optimised minigenes (epigenes) and tested in preclinical and clinical studies addressing various different cancer indications.

  8. Microfluidic jet injection for delivering macromolecules into cells

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, A.; Roushdy, O.; Dokov, R.; Sharei, A.; Jensen, K.F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a microfluidic based injection system designed to achieve intracellular delivery of macromolecules by directing a picoliter-jet of a solution towards individual cells. After discussing the concept, we present design specification and criteria, elucidate performance and discuss results. The method has the potential to be quantitative and high throughput, overcoming limitations of current intracellular delivery protocols. PMID:23956498

  9. Loss of multi-epitope specificity in memory CD4(+) T cell responses to B. pertussis with age.

    PubMed

    Han, Wanda G H; van Twillert, Inonge; Poelen, Martien C M; Helm, Kina; van de Kassteele, Jan; Verheij, Theo J M; Versteegh, Florens G A; Boog, Claire J P; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2013-01-01

    Pertussis is still occurring in highly vaccinated populations, affecting individuals of all ages. Long-lived Th1 CD4(+) T cells are essential for protective immunity against pertussis. For better understanding of the limited immunological memory to Bordetella pertussis, we used a panel of Pertactin and Pertussis toxin specific peptides to interrogate CD4(+) T cell responses at the epitope level in a unique cohort of symptomatic pertussis patients of different ages, at various time intervals after infection. Our study showed that pertussis epitope-specific T cell responses contained Th1 and Th2 components irrespective of the epitope studied, time after infection, or age. In contrast, the breadth of the pertussis-directed CD4(+) T cell response seemed dependent on age and closeness to infection. Multi-epitope specificity long-term after infection was lost in older age groups. Detailed knowledge on pertussis specific immune mechanisms and their insufficiencies is important for understanding resurgence of pertussis in highly vaccinated populations.

  10. Identification of T-cell epitopes of Lol p 9, a major allergen of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) pollen.

    PubMed

    Blaher, B; Suphioglu, C; Knox, R B; Singh, M B; McCluskey, J; Rolland, J M

    1996-07-01

    T-cell recognition of Lol p 9, a major allergen of ryegrass pollen, was investigated by using a T-cell line and T-cell clones generated from the peripheral blood of an atopic donor. The T-cell line reacted with purified Lol p 9, as well as with crude ryegrass pollen extract, but failed to cross-react with Bermuda grass pollen extract. All of six T-cell clones generated from this line proliferated in response to Lol p 9. Epitope mapping was carried out with a panel of 34 overlapping synthetic peptides, which spanned the entire sequence of the Lol p 9 12R isoform. The T-cell line responded to two of the peptides, Lol p 9 (105-116) and Lol p 9 (193-204), whereas reactivity with one or other of these peptides was shown by five T-cell clones. These two peptides contained sequences consistent with motifs previously reported for major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted peptides. HLA antibody blocking studies showed that presentation of peptide Lol p 9 (105-116) to one T-cell clone was HLA-DR-restricted; this clone expressed a T helper cell phenotype (CD3+, CD4+) and the T-cell receptor alpha beta. The identification of immunodominant T-cell epitope(s) on allergens is essential for devising safer and more effective immunotherapy strategies, which can interrupt the chain of events leading to allergic disease.

  11. Altered Peptide Ligands Revisited: Vaccine Design through Chemically Modified HLA-A2–Restricted T Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hoppes, Rieuwert; Oostvogels, Rimke; Luimstra, Jolien J.; Wals, Kim; Toebes, Mireille; Bies, Laura; Ekkebus, Reggy; Rijal, Pramila; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Huang, Julie H.; Emmelot, Maarten E.; Spaapen, Robbert M.; Lokhorst, Henk; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Mutis, Tuna; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-01-01

    Virus or tumor Ag–derived peptides that are displayed by MHC class I molecules are attractive starting points for vaccine development because they induce strong protective and therapeutic cytotoxic T cell responses. In thus study, we show that the MHC binding and consequent T cell reactivity against several HLA-A*02 restricted epitopes can be further improved through the incorporation of nonproteogenic amino acids at primary and secondary anchor positions. We screened more than 90 nonproteogenic, synthetic amino acids through a range of epitopes and tested more than 3000 chemically enhanced altered peptide ligands (CPLs) for binding affinity to HLA-A*0201. With this approach, we designed CPLs of viral epitopes, of melanoma-associated Ags, and of the minor histocompatibility Ag UTA2-1, which is currently being evaluated for its antileukemic activity in clinical dendritic cell vaccination trials. The crystal structure of one of the CPLs in complex with HLA-A*0201 revealed the molecular interactions likely responsible for improved binding. The best CPLs displayed enhanced affinity for MHC, increasing MHC stability and prolonging recognition by Ag-specific T cells and, most importantly, they induced accelerated expansion of antitumor T cell frequencies in vitro and in vivo as compared with the native epitope. Eventually, we were able to construct a toolbox of preferred nonproteogenic residues with which practically any given HLA-A*02 restricted epitope can be readily optimized. These CPLs could improve the therapeutic outcome of vaccination strategies or can be used for ex vivo enrichment and faster expansion of Ag-specific T cells for transfer into patients. PMID:25311806

  12. Human CTLs to wild-type and enhanced epitopes of a novel prostate and breast tumor-associated protein, TARP, lyse human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, SangKon; Terabe, Masaki; Pendleton, C David; Bhattacharyya, Anu; Bera, Tapan K; Epel, Malka; Reiter, Yoram; Phillips, John; Linehan, W Marston; Kasten-Sportes, Claude; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2004-04-01

    Vaccine therapy for prostate and breast cancer may have potential for treating these major causes of death in males and females, respectively. Critical to the development of tumor-specific vaccines is finding and characterizing novel antigens to be recognized by CD8(+) T cells. To define new CD8(+) T-cell tumor antigens, we determined two wild-type HLA-A2 epitopes from a recently found tumor-associated protein, TARP (T-cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein), expressed in prostate and breast cancer cells. We were also able to engineer epitope-enhanced peptides by sequence modifications. Both wild-type and enhanced epitopes induced peptide-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses in A2K(b) transgenic mice. In vitro restimulation of human CD8(+) T cells from a prostate cancer patient resulted in CD8(+) T cells reactive to the peptide epitopes that could lyse HLA-A2(+) human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) expressing TARP. Epitope-specific human CD8(+) T cells were also enumerated in patients' peripheral blood by tetramer staining. Our data suggest that HLA-A2-binding TARP epitopes and enhanced epitopes discovered in this study could be incorporated into a potential vaccine for both breast and prostate cancer.

  13. Identification of bovine T-cell epitopes for three Mycobacterium bovis antigens: MPB70, 19,000 MW and MPB57.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, J M; Douglas, A J; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D

    1994-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis remains a serious problem in several regions, partly due to a lack of specific diagnostic tests. The aim of this study was to identify bovine T-cell epitopes for defined Mycobacterium bovis antigens using an experimental model of the natural disease. Panels of synthetic peptides (16-mers with five residue overlaps) were produced from published amino acid sequences for MPB70, the 19,000 MW antigen and MPB57. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to identify T-cell epitopes. Lymphocytes from experimentally infected cattle proliferated in response to five epitopes (residues 88-105 and 144-163 for MPB70; 1-16 and 67-84 for the 19,000 MW antigen; and 85-100 for MBP57). These epitopes were not recognized by control, non-infected animals, but were recognized by field reactors to intradermal tuberculin testing. All five epitopes were recognized by three different breeds of cattle (Friesian, Charolais and Simmental). In addition, the bovine T-cell epitopes identified for the 19,000 MW antigen in this study were similar to epitopes previously reported for man and mouse. Thus, as well as identifying candidate reagents for improved diagnostic tests and vaccination, this study provides evidence for genetic promiscuity T-cell recognition of major myobacterial epitopes. PMID:7519175

  14. How Do Filamentous Pathogens Deliver Effector Proteins into Plant Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Kamoun, Sophien

    2014-01-01

    Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens. PMID:24586116

  15. Modulation of CD8+ T cell responses to AAV vectors with IgG-derived MHC class II epitopes.

    PubMed

    Hui, Daniel J; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Chen, Yifeng; Davidson, Robert J; Buchlis, George; Yazicioglu, Mustafa; Pien, Gary C; Finn, Jonathan D; Haurigot, Virginia; Tai, Alex; Scott, David W; Cousens, Leslie P; Zhou, Shangzhen; De Groot, Anne S; Mingozzi, Federico

    2013-09-01

    Immune responses directed against viral capsid proteins constitute a main safety concern in the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV) as gene transfer vectors in humans. Pharmacological immunosuppression has been proposed as a solution to the problem; however, the approach suffers from several potential limitations. Using MHC class II epitopes initially identified within human IgG, named Tregitopes, we showed that it is possible to modulate CD8+ T cell responses to several viral antigens in vitro. We showed that incubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with these epitopes triggers proliferation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells that suppress killing of target cells loaded with MHC class I antigens in an antigen-specific fashion, through a mechanism that seems to require cell-to-cell contact. Expression of a construct encoding for the AAV capsid structural protein fused to Tregitopes resulted in reduction of CD8+ T cell reactivity against the AAV capsid following immunization with an adenoviral vector expressing capsid. This was accompanied by an increase in frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells in spleens and lower levels of inflammatory infiltrates in injected tissues. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates modulation of CD8+ T cell reactivity to an antigen using regulatory T cell epitopes is possible.

  16. Identification of B-cell Epitope of Leishmania donovani and its application in diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Fauzia; Dikhit, Manas Ranjan; Singh, Manish K; Shivam, Pushkar; Kumari, Sarita; Pushpanjali, Sinha; Dubey, Amit K; Kumar, Prakash; Narayan, Shyam; Gupta, Anil K; Pandey, Krishna; Das, V N R; Bimal, Sanjiva; Das, Pradeep; Singh, Shubhankar K

    2016-12-26

    Diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is often hindered by cross-reactions with antigens from other related parasite infections. This study aimed to develop an immunochromatographic test (ICT) which can detect the antigen present in circulating immune complexes (CICs) of VL patients using B-cell epitope-specific antibodies. MS analysis of six immunoreactive 2DE spots revealed two epitopes i.e. RFFVQGDGIGQHSLQEALERR (P1) and RRVAVLVLLDRL (P2) (From a hypothetical protein [Acc No: XP_003861458.1]). The epitope conservancy analysis suggested that the linear epitope (P1P2) is 97-100% conserved among Leishmania species and diverged from Homo sapiens (61% query coverage and 80% identity). Further, immunoinformatics analysis of hydrophilicity and flexibility confirmed the antigenicity of the peptide fragment. The linear epitope (P1P2) was synthesized (98% purity) and the purity was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and MS. The indirect Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay results confirmed the presence of the corresponding antibody in VL patient's sera but not in those of healthy and other diseases. The result demonstrated a sensitivity 90%; Se Cl95% (82.16-96.27)% and specificity 100%; Sp Cl95% (84.56-100)% which indicated the possibility to be used as a diagnostic tool. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic efficiency of colloidal gold conjugated anti-P1P2 antibody ICT strip was 100, 95.2, and 96.7%, respectively, which is slightly better as compared to other ICT for VL. Though, our result indicated the utility of anti-P1P2 antibody to detect CICs epitopes, a large-scale inspection in endemic and non-endemic area and in different ethnic population is needed for its validation and authentication.

  17. B cell epitope specificity in ANCA-associated vasculitis: does it matter?

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2004-09-01

    Pauci-immune idiopathic small-vessel vasculitis is strongly associated with the presence of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA). Antibodies to PR3 predominate in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis; antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO) are found more frequently in patients with microscopic polyangiitis. There is increasing in vivo and in vitro evidence for a pathogenic role of ANCA in systemic vasculitis based on associations of ANCA with disease activity. If ANCA are pathogenic, why is the course of disease different from one patient to another? Antibodies can recognize different binding sites (epitopes) on their corresponding antigens. Differences in binding specificity may influence the pathogenic potential of the antibodies. Differences between epitope specificity of ANCA between patients or changes in epitope specificity of ANCA in time in an individual patient may, accordingly, result in differences in disease expression. This review will focus on epitope specificity of autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases and especially on the epitope specificity of PR3- and MPO-ANCA. We will discuss whether PR3-ANCA or MPO-ANCA recognize different epitopes on PR3 and MPO, respectively, and whether the epitopes recognized by ANCA change in parallel with the disease activity of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Finally, we will speculate if the direct pathogenic role of ANCA can be ascribed to one relapse- or disease-inducing epitope. Characterization of relapse- or disease-inducing epitopes bound by PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA is significant for understanding initiation and reactivation of ANCA-associated vasculitis. Elucidating a disease-inducing epitope bound by ANCA may lead to the development of epitope-specific therapeutic strategies.

  18. Signal peptides and trans-membrane regions are broadly immunogenic and have high CD8+ T cell epitope densities: Implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kovjazin, Riva; Volovitz, Ilan; Daon, Yair; Vider-Shalit, Tal; Azran, Roy; Tsaban, Lea; Carmon, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2011-04-01

    Cell mediated immune response has a major role in controlling the elimination of infectious agents. The rational design of sub-unit peptide vaccines against intracellular pathogens or cancer requires the use of antigenic sequence/s that can induce highly potent, long lasting and antigen-specific responses in the majority of the population. A promising peptide selection strategy is the detection of multi-epitope peptide sequences with an ability to bind multiple MHC alleles. While past research sought the best epitopes based on their specific antigenicity, we ask whether specific defined domains have high epitope densities. Signal peptides and trans-membrane domains were found to have exceptionally high epitope densities. The improved MHC binding of these domains relies on their hydrophobic nature and, in signal peptides, also on their specific sequence. The high epitope density of SP was computed using in-silico methods and corroborated by the high percentage of identified SP epitope in the IEDB (immune epitope database). The enhanced immunogenicity of SP was then experimentally confirmed using a panel of nine peptides derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) proteins used in human PBMC proliferation assays and T cell lines functional assays. Our results show the exceptionally high antigen specific response rates and population coverage to SP sequences compared with non-SP peptide antigens derived from the same proteins. The results suggest a novel scheme for the rational design of T cell vaccines using a domain based rather than an epitope based approach.

  19. Two human antibodies reacting with different epitopes on integrin beta 3 of platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jallu, V; Diaz-Ricart, M; Ordinas, A; Pico, M; Vezon, G; Nurden, A T

    1994-06-15

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is an inherited bleeding disorder that results from a deficit of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complexes in platelets. Patient (EBV) is an adult male with GP IIb-IIIa levels < 5% of normal values and a history of blood transfusions. Western-blot analysis revealed a strong IgG antibody to GP IIIa in his plasma. The determinants were localized to the minimum-sized fragment of GP IIIa (50 kDa) retained on chymotrypsin-treated platelets and were lost on reduction of disulphides. A female patient (AF), previously described by us [Jallu, V., Pico, M., Chevaleyre, J., Vezon, G., Kunicki, T.J. & Nurden, A.T. (1992) Hum. Antibod. Hybridomas 3, 93-106] developed her anti-GP-IIIa antibody during pregnancy. This antibody was poorly reactive with the 50-kDa proteolytic fragment, yet bound to 115-kDa and 60-kDa hydrolytic products of GP IIIa. Antibodies from both patients recognized the GP-IIIa-like protein of endothelial cells, thus confirming that they were directed against the integrin beta 3-subunit. The (EBV) antibody reacted strongly with GP IIb-IIIa in an antigen capture assay performed with each of a panel of four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing different epitopes on GP IIb-IIIa. In contrast, that from (AF) was specifically inhibited by AP-3, a murine mAb whose epitope is thought to be localized between amino acids 324-422 of GP IIIa. The residual GP IIb and GP IIIa contents of platelets from each patient were assessed in Western blotting using chemiluminescence detection. SZ-22, a murine mAb to the GP IIb heavy chain (140 kDa), located small amounts of a 130-kDa protein in (EBV) platelets. The anti-GP IIIa mAbs XII F9, P 37 and P 97 revealed trace amounts of protein with a relative mobility identical to that of GP IIIa in both (AF) and (EBV) platelets. This residual GP IIIa represented less than 0.5% of the amount in normal platelets. When, for each patient, plasma was tested in Western blotting against their own platelets

  20. The Alpha Stem Cell Clinic: A Model for Evaluating and Delivering Stem Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, Natalie D.; Feigal, Ellen G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cellular therapies require the careful preparation, expansion, characterization, and delivery of cells in a clinical environment. There are major challenges associated with the delivery of cell therapies and high costs that will limit the companies available to fully evaluate their merit in clinical trials, and will handicap their application at the present financial environment. Cells will be manufactured in good manufacturing practice or near-equivalent facilities with prerequisite safety practices in place, and cell delivery systems will be specialized and require well-trained medical and nursing staff, technicians or nurses trained to handle cells once delivered, patient counselors, as well as statisticians and database managers who will oversee the monitoring of patients in relatively long-term follow-up studies. The model proposed for Alpha Stem Cell Clinics will initially use the capacities and infrastructure that exist in the most advanced tertiary medical clinics for delivery of established bone marrow stem cell therapies. As the research evolves, they will incorporate improved procedures and cell preparations. This model enables commercialization of medical devices, reagents, and other products required for cell therapies. A carefully constructed cell therapy clinical infrastructure with the requisite scientific, technical, and medical expertise and operational efficiencies will have the capabilities to address three fundamental and critical functions: 1) fostering clinical trials; 2) evaluating and establishing safe and effective therapies, and 3) developing and maintaining the delivery of therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration, or other regulatory agencies. PMID:23197634

  1. Vaccines targeting the cancer-testis antigen SSX-2 elicit HLA-A2 epitope-specific cytolytic T cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heath A; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-10-01

    The cancer-testis antigen synovial sarcoma X breakpoint-2 (SSX-2) is a potentially attractive target for tumor immunotherapy based upon its tissue-restricted expression to germline cells and its frequent expression in malignancies. The goal of this study was to evaluate genetic vaccine encoding SSX-2 to prioritize human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2-specific epitopes and determine if a DNA vaccine can elicit SSX-2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) capable of lysing prostate cancer cells. HLA-A2-restricted epitopes were identified based on their in vitro binding affinity for HLA-A2 and by the ability of a genetic vaccine to elicit peptide-specific CTL in A2/DR1 (HLA-A2.1+/HLA-DR1+/H-2 class I-/class II-knockout) transgenic mice. We found that SSX-2 peptides p41-49 (KASEKIFYV) and p103-111 (RLQGISPKI) had high affinity for HLA-A2 and were immunogenic in vivo; however, peptide p103-111 was immunodominant with robust peptide-specific immune responses elicited in mice vaccinated with a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding SSX-2. Furthermore, p103-111-specific CTLs were able to lyse an HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cell line. The immunodominance of this epitope was found not to be due to a putative HLA-DR1 epitope (p98-112) flanking p103-111. Finally, we demonstrated that SSX-2 epitope-specific CTLs could be detected and cultured from the peripheral blood of HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients, notably patients with advanced prostate cancer. Overall, we conclude that SSX-2 peptide p103-111 is an immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted epitope, and epitope-specific CD8 T cells can be detected in patients with prostate cancer, suggesting that tolerance to SSX-2 can be circumvented in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that SSX-2 may be a relevant target antigen for prostate cancer vaccine approaches.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assays also showed that 144-A8 had higher antigen binding capacity than 297-D4. Affinity measurement revealed that 144-A8 had 1.54-fold higher binding affinity than 297-D4. Analysis of the heavy- and light-chain variable region sequences of two MAbs revealed that both MAbs belonged to the same heavy chain (Igh-V3660 VH3) and light chain subgroup (IGKV21) with just two amino acid differences in each framework region, indicating that both MAbs arise from the same germline origin. Seven amino acid differences were found between the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the two MAbs. Molecular modeling of the epitope-paratope complexes revealed that the epitope appeared to reside in closer proximity to the CDRs of 144-A8 than to those of 297-D4 with the stronger hydrogen bond interactions with the former than the latter. More interestingly, an additional hydrophobic interaction appeared to be established between the leucine residue of epitope and the paratope of 144-A8, due to the substitution of H-Tyr101 for H-Phe101 in 144-A8. Thus, the different binding specificity and affinity of 144-A8 appeared to be due to the different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction induced by the alterations of amino acids in CDRs of 144-A8. The results provide molecular insights into how the binding specificities and affinities of antibodies evolve with the same epitope in different microenvironments.

  3. Ubiquitin-like epitopes associated with Candida albicans cell surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, P; Lopez-Ribot, J L; Gozalbo, D; Cervera, A; Martinez, J P; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    We have recently reported the cloning of a Candida albicans polyubiquitin gene and the presence of ubiquitin in the cell wall of this fungus. The polyubiquitin cDNA clone was isolated because of its reactivity with antibodies generated against the candidal 37-kDa laminin-binding protein. In the present study, we have further investigated the relationship between ubiquitin and cell wall components displaying receptor-like activities, including the 37-kDa laminin receptor, the 58-kDa fibrinogen-binding mannoprotein, and the candidal C3d receptor. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and immunoblot experiments with antibodies against ubiquitin and the individually purified receptor-like molecules confirmed that these cell surface components are ubiquitinated. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, polyclonal antisera to each receptor reacted with ubiquitin, thus demonstrating that the purified receptor preparations used as immunogens contained ubiquitin-like epitopes. It is proposed that ubiquitin may play a role in modulating the activity of these receptors and in the interaction of C. albicans cells with host structures. PMID:8926122

  4. Self-adjuvanting influenza candidate vaccine presenting epitopes for cell-mediated immunity on a proteinaceous multivalent nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Szurgot, Inga; Szolajska, Ewa; Laurin, David; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Chaperot, Laurence; Schoehn, Guy; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2013-09-13

    We exploit the features of a virus-like particle, adenoviral dodecahedron (Ad Dd), for engineering a multivalent vaccination platform carrying influenza epitopes for cell-mediated immunity. The delivery platform, Ad Dd, is a proteinaceous, polyvalent, and biodegradable nanoparticle endowed with remarkable endocytosis activity that can be engineered to carry 60 copies of a peptide. Influenza M1 is the most abundant influenza internal protein with the conserved primary structure. Two different M1 immunodominant epitopes were separately inserted in Dd external positions without destroying the particles' dodecahedric structure. Both kinds of DdFluM1 obtained through expression in baculovirus system were properly presented by human dendritic cells triggering efficient activation of antigen-specific T cells responses. Importantly, the candidate vaccine was able to induce cellular immunity in vivo in chickens. These results warrant further investigation of Dd as a platform for candidate vaccine, able to stimulate cellular immune responses.

  5. Full protection of swine against foot-and-mouth disease by a bivalent B-cell epitope dendrimer peptide.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Esther; Guerra, Beatriz; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Defaus, Sira; Dekker, Aldo; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. We have reported (Cubillos et al., 2008) that a synthetic dendrimeric peptide consisting of four copies of a B-cell epitope [VP1(136-154)] linked through thioether bonds to a T-cell epitope [3A(21-35)] of FMDV [B4T(thi)] elicits potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confers solid protection in pigs to type C FMDV challenge. Herein we show that downsized versions of this peptide bearing two copies of a B-cell epitope from a type O isolate and using thioether [B2T(thi)] or maleimide [B2T(mal)] conjugation chemistries for their synthesis elicited in swine similar or higher B and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T(thi). Moreover, while partial protection was observed in animals immunized with B4T(thi) (60%) and B2T(thi) (80%), B2T(mal) conferred full (100%) protection against FMDV challenge, associated to high levels of circulating IgG2 and mucosal IgGA, and entirely prevented virus shedding. Interestingly, B2T(mal) is also the most advantageous option in terms of synthetic practicality. Taken together, the results reported here point out to B2T(mal) as a highly valuable, cost-effective FMDV candidate vaccine.

  6. Novel T-cell epitopes of ovalbumin in BALB/c mouse: Potential for peptide-immunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Marie; Mine, Yoshinori

    2009-01-09

    The identification of food allergen T-cell epitopes provides a platform for the development of novel immunotherapies. Despite extensive knowledge of the physicochemical properties of hen ovalbumin (OVA), a major egg allergen, the complete T-cell epitope map of OVA has surprisingly not been defined in the commonly used BALB/c mouse model. In this study, spleen cells obtained from OVA-sensitized mice were incubated in the presence of 12-mer overlapping synthetic peptides, constructed using the SPOTS synthesis method. Proliferative activity was assessed by 72-h in vitro assays with use of the tetrazolium salt WST-1 and led to identification of four mitogenic sequences, i.e., A39R50, S147R158, K263E274, and A329E340. ELISA analyses of interferon (IFN)-{gamma} and interleukin (IL)-4 productions in cell culture supernatants upon stimulation with increasing concentrations of peptides confirmed their immunogenicity. Knowledge of the complete T-cell epitope map of OVA opens the way to a number of experimental investigations, including the exploration of peptide-based immunotherapy.

  7. Peptide-pulsed dendritic cells induce the hepatitis C viral epitope-specific responses of naïve human T cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sasmita; Losikoff, Phyllis T; Self, Alyssa A; Terry, Frances; Ardito, Matthew T; Tassone, Ryan; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S; Gregory, Stephen H

    2014-05-30

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Spontaneous resolution of infection is associated with broad, MHC class I- (CD8(+)) and class II-restricted (CD4(+)) T cell responses to multiple viral epitopes. Only 20% of patients clear infection spontaneously, however, most develop chronic disease. The response to chemotherapy varies; therapeutic vaccination offers an additional treatment strategy. To date, therapeutic vaccines have demonstrated only limited success in clinical trials. Vector-mediated vaccination with multi-epitope-expressing DNA constructs provides an improved approach. Highly-conserved, HLA-A2-restricted HCV epitopes and HLA-DRB1-restricted immunogenic consensus sequences (ICS, each composed of multiple overlapping and highly conserved epitopes) were predicted using bioinformatics tools and synthesized as peptides. HLA binding activity was determined in competitive binding assays. Immunogenicity and the ability of each peptide to stimulate naïve human T cell recognition and IFN-γ production were assessed in cultures of total PBMCs and in co-cultures composed of peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) and purified T lymphocytes, cell populations derived from normal blood donors. Essentially all predicted HLA-A2-restricted epitopes and HLA-DRB1-restricted ICS exhibited HLA binding activity and the ability to elicit immune recognition and IFN-γ production by naïve human T cells. The ability of DCs pulsed with these highly-conserved HLA-A2- and -DRB1-restricted peptides to induce naïve human T cell reactivity and IFN-γ production ex vivo demonstrates the potential efficacy of a multi-epitope-based HCV vaccine targeted to dendritic cells.

  8. TCR Affinity Associated with Functional Differences between Dominant and Subdominant SIV Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Cells in Mamu-A*01+ Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Osuna, Christa E.; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Hung, Amy Shi; Ehlinger, Elizabeth; Anasti, Kara; Alam, S. Munir; Letvin, Norman L.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the factors that contribute to CD8+ T cell immunodominance hierarchies during viral infection are known. However, the functional differences that exist between dominant and subdominant epitope-specific CD8+ T cells remain poorly understood. In this study, we characterized the phenotypic and functional differences between dominant and subdominant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) epitope-specific CD8+ T cells restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele Mamu-A*01 during acute and chronic SIV infection. Whole genome expression analyses during acute infection revealed that dominant SIV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells had a gene expression profile consistent with greater maturity and higher cytotoxic potential than subdominant epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Flow-cytometric measurements of protein expression and anti-viral functionality during chronic infection confirmed these phenotypic and functional differences. Expression analyses of exhaustion-associated genes indicated that LAG-3 and CTLA-4 were more highly expressed in the dominant epitope-specific cells during acute SIV infection. Interestingly, only LAG-3 expression remained high during chronic infection in dominant epitope-specific cells. We also explored the binding interaction between peptide:MHC (pMHC) complexes and their cognate TCRs to determine their role in the establishment of immunodominance hierarchies. We found that epitope dominance was associated with higher TCR:pMHC affinity. These studies demonstrate that significant functional differences exist between dominant and subdominant epitope-specific CD8+ T cells within MHC-restricted immunodominance hierarchies and suggest that TCR:pMHC affinity may play an important role in determining the frequency and functionality of these cell populations. These findings advance our understanding of the regulation of T cell immunodominance and will aid HIV vaccine design. PMID:24743648

  9. TCR affinity associated with functional differences between dominant and subdominant SIV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in Mamu-A*01+ rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Christa E; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Hung, Amy Shi; Ehlinger, Elizabeth; Anasti, Kara; Alam, S Munir; Letvin, Norman L

    2014-04-01

    Many of the factors that contribute to CD8+ T cell immunodominance hierarchies during viral infection are known. However, the functional differences that exist between dominant and subdominant epitope-specific CD8+ T cells remain poorly understood. In this study, we characterized the phenotypic and functional differences between dominant and subdominant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) epitope-specific CD8+ T cells restricted by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele Mamu-A*01 during acute and chronic SIV infection. Whole genome expression analyses during acute infection revealed that dominant SIV epitope-specific CD8+ T cells had a gene expression profile consistent with greater maturity and higher cytotoxic potential than subdominant epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Flow-cytometric measurements of protein expression and anti-viral functionality during chronic infection confirmed these phenotypic and functional differences. Expression analyses of exhaustion-associated genes indicated that LAG-3 and CTLA-4 were more highly expressed in the dominant epitope-specific cells during acute SIV infection. Interestingly, only LAG-3 expression remained high during chronic infection in dominant epitope-specific cells. We also explored the binding interaction between peptide:MHC (pMHC) complexes and their cognate TCRs to determine their role in the establishment of immunodominance hierarchies. We found that epitope dominance was associated with higher TCR:pMHC affinity. These studies demonstrate that significant functional differences exist between dominant and subdominant epitope-specific CD8+ T cells within MHC-restricted immunodominance hierarchies and suggest that TCR:pMHC affinity may play an important role in determining the frequency and functionality of these cell populations. These findings advance our understanding of the regulation of T cell immunodominance and will aid HIV vaccine design.

  10. Subdominant CD8 T-cell epitopes account for protection against cytomegalovirus independent of immunodomination.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Rafaela; Simon, Christian O; Munks, Michael W; Thomas, Doris; Deegen, Petra; Kühnapfel, Birgit; Däubner, Torsten; Emde, Simone F; Podlech, Jürgen; Grzimek, Natascha K A; Oehrlein-Karpi, Silke A; Hill, Ann B; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2008-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection continues to be a complication in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Preexisting donor immunity is recognized as a favorable prognostic factor for the reconstitution of protective antiviral immunity mediated primarily by CD8 T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CMV-specific memory CD8 T (CD8-T(M)) cells is a therapeutic option for preventing CMV disease in HSCT recipients. Given the different CMV infection histories of donor and recipient, a problem may arise from an antigenic mismatch between the CMV variant that has primed donor immunity and the CMV variant acquired by the recipient. Here, we have used the BALB/c mouse model of CMV infection in the immunocompromised host to evaluate the importance of donor-recipient CMV matching in immundominant epitopes (IDEs). For this, we generated the murine CMV (mCMV) recombinant virus mCMV-DeltaIDE, in which the two memory repertoire IDEs, the IE1-derived peptide 168-YPHFMPTNL-176 presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecule L(d) and the m164-derived peptide 257-AGPPRYSRI-265 presented by the MHC-I molecule D(d), are both functionally deleted. Upon adoptive transfer, polyclonal donor CD8-T(M) cells primed by mCMV-DeltaIDE and the corresponding revertant virus mCMV-revDeltaIDE controlled infection of immunocompromised recipients with comparable efficacy and regardless of whether or not IDEs were presented in the recipients. Importantly, CD8-T(M) cells primed under conditions of immunodomination by IDEs protected recipients in which IDEs were absent. This shows that protection does not depend on compensatory expansion of non-IDE-specific CD8-T(M) cells liberated from immunodomination by the deletion of IDEs. We conclude that protection is, rather, based on the collective antiviral potential of non-IDEs independent of the presence or absence of IDE-mediated immunodomination.

  11. Murine whole-organ immune cell populations revealed by multi-epitope-ligand cartography.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Jenny; Ostalecki, Christian; Kuczera, Katarzyna; Schuler, Gerold; Pommer, Ansgar J; Lechmann, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Multi-epitope-ligand cartography (MELC) is an innovative high-throughput fluorescence microscopy-based method. A tissue section is analyzed through a repeated cycling of (1) incubation with a fluorophore-labeled antibody, (2) fluorescence imaging, and (3) soft bleaching. This method allows staining of the same tissue section with up to 100 fluorescent markers and to analyze their toponomic expression using further image processing and pixel-precise overlay of the corresponding images. In this study, we adapted this method to identify a large panel of murine leukocyte subpopulations in a whole frozen section of a peripheral lymph node. Using the resulting antibody library, we examined non-inflamed versus inflamed tissues of brain and spinal cord in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. The presence and activity of specific leukocyte subpopulations (different T cell subpopulations, dendritic cells, macrophages, etc.) could be assessed and the cellular localizations and the corresponding activation status in situ were investigated. The results were then correlated with quantitative RT-PCR.

  12. Identification of a dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) serotype-specific B-cell epitope and detection of DEN-2-immunized animal serum samples using an epitope-based peptide antigen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Chung; Jung, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chien-Yu; Chao, Ting-Ting; Lai, Szu-Chia; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Shaio, Men-Fang

    2003-10-01

    In this study, a serotype-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), D(2) 16-1 (Ab4), against dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) was generated. The specificity of Ab4, which recognized DEN-2 non-structural protein 1, was determined by ELISA, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. The serotype-specific B-cell epitope of Ab4 was identified further from a random phage-displayed peptide library; selected phage clones reacted specifically with Ab4 and did not react with other mAbs. Immunopositive phage clones displayed a consensus motif, His-Arg/Lys-Leu/Ile, and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the phage-displayed peptide bound specifically to Ab4. The His and Arg residues in this epitope were found to be crucial for peptide binding to Ab4 and binding activity decreased dramatically when these residues were changed to Leu. The epitope-based synthetic peptide not only identified serum samples from DEN-2-immunized mice and rabbits by ELISA but also differentiated clearly between serum samples from DEN-2- and Japanese encephalitis virus-immunized mice. This mAb and its epitope-based peptide antigen will be useful for serologic diagnosis of DEN-2 infection. Furthermore, DEN-2 epitope identification makes it feasible to dissect antibody responses to DEN and to address the role of antibodies in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary DEN-2 infections.

  13. An epitope in hepatitis C virus core region recognized by cytotoxic T cells in mice and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, M; Okada, H; Nishioka, M; Akatsuka, T; Wychowski, C; Houghten, R; Pendleton, C D; Feinstone, S M; Berzofsky, J A

    1994-01-01

    Several cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes have been defined in hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins. CTL may play an important role in the control of infection by HCV. Here, we identify a highly conserved antigenic site in the HCV core recognized by both murine and human CTL. Spleen cells from mice immunized with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the HCV core gene were restimulated in vitro with 11 peptides from the core protein. CTL from H-2d mice responded to a single 16-residue synthetic peptide (HCV 129-144). This conserved epitope was presented by a murine class I major histocompatibility molecule (H-2Dd) to conventional CD4- CD8+ CTL mapped by using transfectants expressing Dd, Ld, or Kd, but was not seen by CTL restricted by H-2b. The murine epitope was mapped to the decapeptide LMGYIPLVGA. The same 16-residue peptide was recognized by CTL from two HCV-seropositive patients but not by CTL from any seronegative donors. CTL from two HLA-A2-positive patients with acute and chronic hepatitides C recognized a 9-residue fragment (DLMGYIPLV) of the peptide presented by HLA-A2 and containing an HLA-A2-binding motif, extending only 1 residue beyond the murine epitope. Therefore, this conserved peptide, seen with murine CTL and human CTL with a very prevalent HLA class I molecule, may be a valuable component of an HCV vaccine against a broad range of HCV isolates. This study demonstrates that the screening for CTL epitopes in mice prior to human study may be useful. PMID:7512163

  14. Identification of a Novel Haemophilus parasuis-Specific B Cell Epitope Using Monoclonal Antibody against the OppA Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Fang; Jiang, Fucheng; Wang, Xiangling; Zhang, Xueyun; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1B3 against Haemophilus parasuis (H. parasuis) was generated by fusing SP2/0 murine myeloma cells and spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with the whole-bacterial-cell suspension of H. parasuis HS80 (serotype 5). The MAb 1B3 showed strong reactivity with 15 serotype reference strains of H. parasuis using Dot blot and Western blot analysis. Immunoprecipitation and protein spectral analysis indicated that MAb 1B3 recognized by Oligopeptide permease A (OppA) belongs to the ATP binding cassette transporter family. In addition, a linear B-cell epitope recognized by MAb 1B3 was identified by the screening of a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library. Sequence analysis showed that MAb 1B3 was recognized by phages-displaying peptides with the consensus motif KTPSEXR (X means variable amino acids). Its amino acid sequence matched 469KTPAEAR475 of H. parasuis OppA protein. A series of progressively truncated peptides were synthesized to define the minimal region that was required for MAb 1B3 binding. The epitope was highly conserved in OppA protein sequences from the isolated H. parasuis strains, which was confirmed by alignment analysis. Furthermore, the minimal linear epitope was highly specific among 75 different bacterial strains as shown in sequence alignments. These results indicated MAb 1B3 might be potentially used to develop serological diagnostic tools for H. parasuis. PMID:24416241

  15. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  16. Mechanism of Collaborative Enhancement of Binding of Paired Antibodies to Distinct Epitopes of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1

    PubMed Central

    Greineder, Colin F.; Villa, Carlos H.; Hood, Elizabeth D.; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Sun, Jing; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Abraham, Valsamma; DeLisser, Horace M.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to extracellular epitopes of human and mouse Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CD31 or PECAM-1) stimulate binding of other mAbs to distinct adjacent PECAM-1 epitopes. This effect, dubbed Collaborative Enhancement of Paired Affinity Ligands, or CEPAL, has been shown to enhance delivery of mAb-targeted drugs and nanoparticles to the vascular endothelium. Here we report new insights into the mechanism underlying this effect, which demonstrates equivalent amplitude in the following models: i) cells expressing a full length PECAM-1 and mutant form of PECAM-1 unable to form homodimers; ii) isolated fractions of cellular membranes; and, iii) immobilized recombinant PECAM-1. These results indicate that CEPAL is mediated not by interference in cellular functions or homophilic PECAM-1 interactions, but rather by conformational changes within the cell adhesion molecule induced by ligand binding. This mechanism, mediated by exposure of partially occult epitopes, is likely to occur in molecules other than PECAM-1 and may represent a generalizable phenomenon with valuable practical applications. PMID:28085903

  17. Computational methods for prediction of T-cell epitopes--a framework for modelling, testing, and applications.

    PubMed

    Brusic, Vladimir; Bajic, Vladimir B; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2004-12-01

    Computational models complement laboratory experimentation for efficient identification of MHC-binding peptides and T-cell epitopes. Methods for prediction of MHC-binding peptides include binding motifs, quantitative matrices, artificial neural networks, hidden Markov models, and molecular modelling. Models derived by these methods have been successfully used for prediction of T-cell epitopes in cancer, autoimmunity, infectious disease, and allergy. For maximum benefit, the use of computer models must be treated as experiments analogous to standard laboratory procedures and performed according to strict standards. This requires careful selection of data for model building, and adequate testing and validation. A range of web-based databases and MHC-binding prediction programs are available. Although some available prediction programs for particular MHC alleles have reasonable accuracy, there is no guarantee that all models produce good quality predictions. In this article, we present and discuss a framework for modelling, testing, and applications of computational methods used in predictions of T-cell epitopes.

  18. Computational Identification and Characterization of a Promiscuous T-Cell Epitope on the Extracellular Protein 85B of Mycobacterium spp. for Peptide-Based Subunit Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Saddam; Chowdhury, Parveen Afroz; Wakayama, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a reemerging disease that remains as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. To identify and characterize a T-cell epitope suitable for vaccine design, we have utilized the Vaxign server to assess all antigenic proteins of Mycobacterium spp. recorded to date in the Protegen database. We found that the extracellular protein 85B displayed the most robust antigenicity among the proteins identified. Computational tools for identifying T-cell epitopes predicted an epitope, 181-QQFIYAGSLSALLDP-195, that could bind to at least 13 major histocompatibility complexes, revealing the promiscuous nature of the epitope. Molecular docking simulation demonstrated that the epitope could bind to the binding groove of MHC II and MHC I molecules by several hydrogen bonds. Molecular docking analysis further revealed that the epitope had a distinctive binding pattern to all DRB1 and A and B series of MHC molecules and presented almost no polymorphism in its binding site. Moreover, using “Allele Frequency Database,” we checked the frequency of HLA alleles in the worldwide population and found a higher frequency of both class I and II HLA alleles in individuals living in TB-endemic regions. Our results indicate that the identified peptide might be a universal candidate to produce an efficient epitope-based vaccine for TB.

  19. The Use of Reverse Vaccinology and Molecular Modeling Associated with Cell Proliferation Stimulation Approach to Select Promiscuous Epitopes from Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Flávio M; Coelho, Ivan E V; Lopes, Marcelo D; Taranto, Alex G; Junior, Moacyr C; Santos, Luciana L D; Villar, José A P F; Fonseca, Cristina T; Lopes, Débora D O

    2016-07-01

    Schistosomiasis remains an important parasitic disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite the availability of chemotherapy, the occurrence of constant reinfection demonstrates the need for additional forms of intervention and the development of a vaccine represents a relevant strategy to control this disease. With the advent of genomics and bioinformatics, new strategies to search for vaccine targets have been proposed, as the reverse vaccinology. In this work, computational analyses of Schistosoma mansoni membrane proteins were performed to predict epitopes with high affinity for different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1. Ten epitopes were selected and along with murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule had their three-dimensional structures optimized. Epitope interactions were evaluated against murine MHC class II molecule through molecular docking, electrostatic potential, and molecular volume. The epitope Sm141290 and Sm050890 stood out in most of the molecular modeling analyses. Cellular proliferation assay was performed to evaluate the ability of these epitopes to bind to murine MHC II molecules and stimulate CD4+ T cells showing that the same epitopes were able to significantly stimulate cell proliferation. This work showed an important strategy of peptide selection for epitope-based vaccine design, achieved by in silico analyses that can precede in vivo and in vitro experiments, avoiding excessive experimentation.

  20. Vaccine Targeting of Subdominant CD8+ T Cell Epitopes Increases the Breadth of the T Cell Response upon Viral Challenge, but May Impair Immediate Virus Control.

    PubMed

    Steffensen, Maria A; Pedersen, Louise H; Jahn, Marie L; Nielsen, Karen N; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2016-03-15

    As a result of the difficulties in making efficient vaccines against genetically unstable viruses such as HIV, it has been suggested that future vaccines should preferentially target subdominant epitopes, the idea being that this should allow a greater breadth of the induced T cell response and, hence, a greater efficiency in controlling escape variants. However, to our knowledge the evidence supporting this concept is limited at best. To improve upon this, we used the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus model and adenoviral vectors to compare a vaccine expressing unmodified Ag to a vaccine expressing the same Ag without its immunodominant epitope. We found that removal of the dominant epitope allowed the induction of CD8(+) T cell responses targeting at least two otherwise subdominant epitopes. Importantly, the overall magnitude of the induced T cell responses was similar, allowing us to directly compare the efficiency of these vaccines. Doing this, we observed that mice vaccinated with the vaccine expressing unmodified Ag more efficiently controlled an acute viral challenge. In the course of a more chronic viral infection, mice vaccinated using the vaccine targeting subdominant epitopes caught up with the conventionally vaccinated mice, and analysis of the breadth of the CD8(+) T cell response revealed that this was notably greater in the former mice. However, under the conditions of our studies, we never saw any functional advantage of this. This may represent a limitation of our model, but clearly our findings underscore the importance of carefully weighing the pros and cons of changes in epitope targeting before any implementation.

  1. CD133 protein N-glycosylation processing contributes to cell surface recognition of the primitive cell marker AC133 epitope.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anthony B; Blakely, Kim M; Williams, Rashida A; Penttilä, Pier-Andrée; Shukalyuk, Andrey I; Osman, Khan T; Kasimer, Dahlia; Ketela, Troy; Moffat, Jason

    2011-11-25

    The AC133 epitope expressed on the CD133 glycoprotein has been widely used as a cell surface marker of numerous stem cell and cancer stem cell types. It has been recently proposed that posttranslational modification and regulation of CD133 may govern cell surface AC133 recognition. Therefore, we performed a large scale pooled RNA interference (RNAi) screen to identify genes involved in cell surface AC133 expression. Gene hits could be validated at a rate of 70.5% in a secondary assay using an orthogonal RNAi system, demonstrating that our primary RNAi screen served as a powerful genetic screening approach. Within the list of hits from the primary screen, genes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis were significantly enriched as determined by Ingenuity Canonical Pathway analyses. Indeed, inhibiting biosynthesis of the N-glycan precursor using the small molecule tunicamycin or inhibiting its transfer to CD133 by generating N-glycan-deficient CD133 mutants resulted in undetectable cell surface AC133. Among the screen hits involved in N-glycosylation were genes involved in complex N-glycan processing, including the poorly characterized MGAT4C, which we demonstrate to be a positive regulator of cell surface AC133 expression. Our study identifies a set of genes involved in CD133 N-glycosylation as a direct contributing factor to cell surface AC133 recognition and provides biochemical evidence for the function and structure of CD133 N-glycans.

  2. Pep-3D-Search: a method for B-cell epitope prediction based on mimotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan Xin; Bao, Yong Li; Guo, Shu Yan; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Chun Guang; Li, Yu Xin

    2008-01-01

    Background The prediction of conformational B-cell epitopes is one of the most important goals in immunoinformatics. The solution to this problem, even if approximate, would help in designing experiments to precisely map the residues of interaction between an antigen and an antibody. Consequently, this area of research has received considerable attention from immunologists, structural biologists and computational biologists. Phage-displayed random peptide libraries are powerful tools used to obtain mimotopes that are selected by binding to a given monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a similar way to the native epitope. These mimotopes can be considered as functional epitope mimics. Mimotope analysis based methods can predict not only linear but also conformational epitopes and this has been the focus of much research in recent years. Though some algorithms based on mimotope analysis have been proposed, the precise localization of the interaction site mimicked by the mimotopes is still a challenging task. Results In this study, we propose a method for B-cell epitope prediction based on mimotope analysis called Pep-3D-Search. Given the 3D structure of an antigen and a set of mimotopes (or a motif sequence derived from the set of mimotopes), Pep-3D-Search can be used in two modes: mimotope or motif. To evaluate the performance of Pep-3D-Search to predict epitopes from a set of mimotopes, 10 epitopes defined by crystallography were compared with the predicted results from a Pep-3D-Search: the average Matthews correlation oefficient (MCC), sensitivity and precision were 0.1758, 0.3642 and 0.6948. Compared with other available prediction algorithms, Pep-3D-Search showed comparable MCC, specificity and precision, and could provide novel, rational results. To verify the capability of Pep-3D-Search to align a motif sequence to a 3D structure for predicting epitopes, 6 test cases were used. The predictive performance of Pep-3D-Search was demonstrated to be superior to that of other

  3. Identification of the Neutralizing Epitopes of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Major Capsid Protein within the BC and EF Surface Loops

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Maxime J. J.; Nicol, Jérôme T. J.; Samimi, Mahtab; Arnold, Françoise; Cazal, Raphael; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Mercey, Olivier; Gonneville, Hélène; Combelas, Nicolas; Vautherot, Jean-Francois; Moreau, Thierry; Lorette, Gérard; Coursaget, Pierre; Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is the first polyomavirus clearly associated with a human cancer, i.e. the Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Polyomaviruses are small naked DNA viruses that induce a robust polyclonal antibody response against the major capsid protein (VP1). However, the polyomavirus VP1 capsid protein epitopes have not been identified to date. The aim of this study was to identify the neutralizing epitopes of the MCPyV capsid. For this goal, four VP1 mutants were generated by insertional mutagenesis in the BC, DE, EF and HI loops between amino acids 88-89, 150-151, 189-190, and 296-297, respectively. The reactivity of these mutants and wild-type VLPs was then investigated with anti-VP1 monoclonal antibodies and anti-MCPyV positive human sera. The findings together suggest that immunodominant conformational neutralizing epitopes are present at the surface of the MCPyV VLPs and are clustered within BC and EF loops. PMID:25812141

  4. Recognition of helper T cell epitopes in envelope (E) glycoprotein of Japanese encephalitis, west Nile and Dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Kutubuddin, M; Kolaskar, A S; Galande, S; Gore, M M; Ghosh, S N; Banerjee, K

    1991-01-01

    Helper T (Th) cell antigenic sites were predicted from the primary amino acid sequence (approximately 500 in length) of the envelope (E) glycoprotein (gp) of Japanese encephalitis (JE), West Nile (WN) and Dengue (DEN) I-IV flaviviruses. Prediction of Th epitopes was done by analyzing the occurrence of amphipathic segments, Rothbard-Taylor tetra/pentamer motifs and presence of alpha helix-preferring amino acids. The simultaneous occurrence of all these parameters in segments of E gp were used as criteria for prediction as Th epitopes. Only one cross reactive epitope was predicted in the C-terminal region of the E gp predicted segments of all flaviviruses analyzed. This region is one of the longest amphipathic stretch (approximately from 420 to 455) and also has a fairly large amphipathic score. Based on the predicted findings three selected peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to induce in vitro T cell proliferative response in different inbred strains of mice (Balb/c, C57BL6, C3H/HeJ). Synthetic peptide I and II prepared from C-terminal region gave a cross reactive response to JE, WN and Den-II in Balb/c and C3H/HeJ mice. Synthetic peptide III prepared from N-terminal region gave a proliferative response to DEN-II in Balb/c strain only, indicating differential antigen presentation.

  5. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects.

  6. HLA-B*27 subtype specificity determines targeting and viral evolution of a hepatitis C virus-specific CD8+ T-cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Katja; Barriga, Alejandro; Schmidt, Julia; Timm, Jörg; Viazov, Sergei; Kuntzen, Thomas; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Allen, Todd M.; Gaudieri, Silvana; Rauch, Andri; Lange, Christian M.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Eiermann, Thomas; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Thimme, Robert; López, Daniel; Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims HLA-B*27 is associated with spontaneous HCV genotype 1 clearance. HLA-B*27-restricted CD8+ T-cells target three NS5B epitopes. Two of these epitopes are dominantly targeted in the majority of HLA-B*27+ patients. In chronic infection, viral escape occurs consistently in these two epitopes. The third epitope (NS5B2820) was dominantly targeted in an acutely infected patient. This was in contrast, however, to the lack of recognition and viral escape in the large majority of HLA-B*27+ patients. Here, we set out to determine the host factors contributing to selective targeting of this epitope. Methods Four-digit HLA class I typing and viral sequence analyses were performed in 78 HLA-B*27+ patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection. CD8+ T-cell analyses were performed in a subset of patients. In addition, HLA/peptide affinity was compared for HLA-B*27:02 and 05. Results The NS5B2820 epitope is only restricted by the HLA-B*27 subtype HLA-B*27:02 (that is frequent in Mediterranean populations), but not by the prototype HLA-B*27 subtype B*27:05. Indeed, the epitope is very dominant in HLA-B*27:02+ patients and is associated with viral escape mutations at the anchor position for HLA-binding in 12 out of 13 HLA-B*27:02+ chronically infected patients. Conclusions The NS5B2820 epitope is immunodominant in the context of HLA-B*27:02, but is not restricted by other HLA-B*27 subtypes. This finding suggests an important role of HLA subtypes in the restriction of HCV-specific CD8+ responses. With minor HLA subtypes covering up to 39% of specific populations, these findings may have important implications for the selection of epitopes for global vaccines. PMID:23978718

  7. Isolating subpopulations of human epidermal basal cells based on polyclonal serum against trypsin-resistant CSPG4 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Anders Patrik; Christensen, Rikke; Praetorius, Jeppe; Jensen, Uffe Birk

    2017-01-15

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is highly expressed by human epidermal keratinocytes located at the tip of the dermal papilla where keratinocytes show characteristics of stem cells. However, since available antibodies to CSPG4 are directed against trypsin-sensitive epitopes we have been unable to study these keratinocytes isolated directly from skin samples by flow cytometry. By choosing epitopes of CSPG4 relatively close to the cell membrane we were able to generate a polyclonal antibody that successfully detects CSPG4 on keratinocytes after trypsinization. Although CSPG4-positive basal cells express higher levels of Itgβ1 the colony-forming efficiency is slightly lower than CSPG4-negative basal cells. Sorting the directly isolated keratinocytes based on Itgβ1 did not reveal differences in colony-forming efficiency between keratinocytes expressing high or low levels of Itgβ1. However, after the first passage Itgβ1 could be used to predict colony-forming efficiency whether the culture was established from CSPG4-positive or CSPG4-negative basal cell keratinocytes. Although we were unable to detect differences in the colony-forming assay, global gene expression profiling showed that CSPG4-positive basal cell keratinocytes are distinct from CSPG4-negative basal cell keratinocytes. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to generate antibodies against trypsin-resistant epitopes of CSPG4. Our study also documents a marked change in behaviour upon cell culturing and challenges the way we assess for stemness within the human epidermal basal layer.

  8. A powerful combination: the use of positional scanning libraries and biometrical analysis to identify cross-reactive T cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nino-Vasquez, J Javier; Allicotti, Gina; Borras, Eva; Wilson, Darcy B; Valmori, Danila; Simon, Richard; Martin, Roland; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2004-02-01

    Studies on the elucidation of the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) at the antigen and peptide level have contributed to the current understanding of T cell cross-reactivity. Historically, most studies of T cell specificity and degeneracy have relied on the determination of the effects on T cell recognition of amino acid changes at individual positions or MHC binding residues, and thus they have been limited to a small set of possible ligands. Synthetic combinatorial libraries (SCLs), and in particular positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCLs) represent collections of millions to trillions of peptides which allow the unbiased elucidation of T cell ligands that stimulate clones of both known and unknown specificity. PS-SCLs have been used successfully to study T cell recognition and to identify and optimize T cell clone (TCC) epitopes in infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders and tumor antigens. PS-SCL-based biometrical analysis represents a further refinement in the analysis of the data derived from the screening of a library with a TCC. It combines this data with information derived from protein sequence databases to identify natural peptide ligands. PS-SCL-based biometrical analysis provides a method for the determination of new microbial antigen and autoantigen sequences based solely on functional data rather than sequence homology or motifs, making the method ideally suited for the prediction and identification of both native and cross-reactive epitopes by virtue of its ability to integrate the examination of trillions of peptides in a systematic manner with all of the protein sequences in a given database. We review here the application of PS-SCLs and biometrical analysis to identify cross-reactive T cell epitopes, as well as the current efforts to refine this strategy.

  9. An Anti-Human Lutheran Glycoprotein Phage Antibody Inhibits Cell Migration on Laminin-511: Epitope Mapping of the Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto-Okawa, Yurie; Maeda, Yuka; Harashima, Nozomi; Sugawara, Yumika; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Hui, Kam Man; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Ito, Yuji; Kikkawa, Yamato

    2017-01-01

    The Lutheran glycoprotein (Lu), also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM), is an Ig superfamily (IgSF) transmembrane receptor for laminin α5. Although Lu is not present in normal hepatocytes, its expression is significantly increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we isolated thirteen phage antibodies to Lu from a phage library of peripheral blood from HCC patients, suggesting that these patients produced autoantibodies against endogenous Lu. To characterize the phage antibodies, we determined the Lu domains they recognize. The extracellular domain of Lu contains five IgSF domains, D1-D2-D3-D4-D5. The epitope of one phage antibody (A7) was localized to the D5 domain. The other phage antibodies recognized the D2 domain, which is also recognized by a function blocking mouse monoclonal antibody. One of the antibodies to D2 (C7) inhibited the binding of Lu to ligand, and it also prevented tumor cell migration on laminin-511 (LM-511). However, the C7 scFv purified from the periplasm fraction of bacteria did not exhibit the inhibitory effects, indicating that the scFv form could not sterically inhibit the binding of Lu to LM-511. We also identified the amino acid residues that form the epitope recognized by the C7 phage antibody. Mutagenesis studies showed that Arg247 is necessary for forming the epitope. The C7 phage antibody and its epitope may be useful for developing drugs to prevent HCC progression and/or metastasis. PMID:28060819

  10. HLA-A*0201 T-cell epitopes in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus nucleocapsid and spike proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, Y.-P.; Lin, J.-Y.; Jan, J.-T.; Leng, C.-H.; Chu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-C.; Chen, S.-L. . E-mail: showlic@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-05-26

    The immunogenicity of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) peptide in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nuclear capsid (N) and spike (S) proteins was determined by testing the proteins' ability to elicit a specific cellular immune response after immunization of HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice and in vitro vaccination of HLA-A2.1 positive human peripheral blood mononuclearcytes (PBMCs). First, we screened SARS N and S amino acid sequences for allele-specific motif matching those in human HLA-A2.1 MHC-I molecules. From HLA peptide binding predictions (http://thr.cit.nih.gov/molbio/hla{sub b}ind/), ten each potential N- and S-specific HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were synthesized. The high affinity HLA-A2.1 peptides were validated by T2-cell stabilization assays, with immunogenicity assays revealing peptides N223-231, N227-235, and N317-325 to be First identified HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of SARS-CoV N protein. In addition, previous reports identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL epitopes of S protein (S978-986, S1203-1211, and S1167-1175), here we found two novel peptides S787-795 and S1042-1050 as S-specific CTL epitopes. Moreover, our identified N317-325 and S1042-1050 CTL epitopes could induce recall responses when IFN-{gamma} stimulation of blood CD8{sup +} T-cells revealed significant difference between normal healthy donors and SARS-recovered patients after those PBMCs were in vitro vaccinated with their cognate antigen. Our results would provide a new insight into the development of therapeutic vaccine in SARS.

  11. Dendritic Cells Transfected with a DNA Construct Encoding Tumour-associated Antigen Epitopes Induce a Cytotoxic Immune Response Against Autologous Tumour Cells in a Culture of Mononuclear Cells from Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, E V; Kurilin, V V; Shevchenko, J A; Obleukhova, I A; Khrapov, E A; Boyarskikh, U A; Filipenko, M L; Shorokhov, R V; Yakushenko, V K; Sokolov, A V; Sennikov, S V

    2015-08-01

    Significant effort has been devoted to developing effective cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with various tumour antigens, including DNA constructs that carry sequences of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs). Such vaccines efficiently and selectively activate the T cell immune response. In this study, we describe a method to induce an antitumour immune response in mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from colorectal cancer patients using DNA-transfected DCs encoding TAA epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule and mucin 4. DCs were obtained from peripheral blood monocytes of colorectal cancer patients. Magnetic-assisted transfection was used to deliver the genetic constructs to DCs. To assess the potency of the immune response, the antitumour cytotoxic response was assessed by lymphocyte intracellular perforin and the MNC cytotoxic activity against autologous tumour cells. We showed that polyepitope DNA-transfected DCs enhanced MNC antitumour activity, increasing tumour cell death and the percentage of perforin-positive lymphocytes. In addition, DNA-transfected DCs elicited a cytotoxic response that was as efficient as that of tumour lysate-loaded DCs. Taken together, the data suggest that it is feasible to induce an antitumour immune response in colorectal MNCs using transfected DCs. Thus, the DNA construct reported in this study may potentially be used in therapeutic and prophylactic DC-based vaccines.

  12. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals. PMID:27621732

  13. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assays also showed that 144-A8 had higher antigen binding capacity than 297-D4. Affinity measurement revealed that 144-A8 had 1.54-fold higher binding affinity than 297-D4. Analysis of the heavy- and light-chain variable region sequences of two MAbs revealed that both MAbs belonged to the same heavy chain (Igh-V3660 VH3) and light chain subgroup (IGKV21) with just two amino acid differences in each framework region, indicating that both MAbs arise from the same germline origin. Seven amino acid differences were found between the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the two MAbs. Molecular modeling of the epitope-paratope complexes revealed that the epitope appeared to reside in closer proximity to the CDRs of 144-A8 than to those of 297-D4 with the stronger hydrogen bond interactions with the former than the latter. More interestingly, an additional hydrophobic interaction appeared to be established between the leucine residue of epitope and the paratope of 144-A8, due to the substitution of H-Tyr101 for H-Phe101 in 144-A8. Thus, the different binding specificity and affinity of 144-A8 appeared to be due to the different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction induced by the alterations of amino acids in CDRs of 144-A8. The results provide molecular insights into how the binding specificities and affinities of antibodies evolve with the same epitope in different microenvironments. PMID:27907150

  14. A Synthetic Virus-Like Particle Streptococcal Vaccine Candidate Using B-Cell Epitopes from the Proline-Rich Region of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A.

    PubMed

    Tamborrini, Marco; Geib, Nina; Marrero-Nodarse, Aniebrys; Jud, Maja; Hauser, Julia; Aho, Celestine; Lamelas, Araceli; Zuniga, Armando; Pluschke, Gerd; Ghasparian, Arin; Robinson, John A

    2015-10-16

    Alternatives to the well-established capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae that circumvent limitations arising from limited serotype coverage and the emergence of resistance due to capsule switching (serotype replacement) are being widely pursued. Much attention is now focused on the development of recombinant subunit vaccines based on highly conserved pneumococcal surface proteins and virulence factors. A further step might involve focusing the host humoral immune response onto protective protein epitopes using as immunogens structurally optimized epitope mimetics. One approach to deliver such epitope mimetics to the immune system is through the use of synthetic virus-like particles (SVLPs). SVLPs are made from synthetic coiled-coil lipopeptides that are designed to spontaneously self-assemble into 20-30 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous buffer. Multivalent display of epitope mimetics on the surface of SVLPs generates highly immunogenic nanoparticles that elicit strong epitope-specific humoral immune responses without the need for external adjuvants. Here, we set out to demonstrate that this approach can yield vaccine candidates able to elicit a protective immune response, using epitopes derived from the proline-rich region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). These streptococcal SVLP-based vaccine candidates are shown to elicit strong humoral immune responses in mice. Following active immunization and challenge with lethal doses of streptococcus, SVLP-based immunogens are able to elicit significant protection in mice. Furthermore, a mimetic-specific monoclonal antibody is shown to mediate partial protection upon passive immunization. The results show that SVLPs combined with synthetic epitope mimetics may have potential for the development of an effective vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  15. A Synthetic Virus-Like Particle Streptococcal Vaccine Candidate Using B-Cell Epitopes from the Proline-Rich Region of Pneumococcal Surface Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Tamborrini, Marco; Geib, Nina; Marrero-Nodarse, Aniebrys; Jud, Maja; Hauser, Julia; Aho, Celestine; Lamelas, Araceli; Zuniga, Armando; Pluschke, Gerd; Ghasparian, Arin; Robinson, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Alternatives to the well-established capsular polysaccharide-based vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae that circumvent limitations arising from limited serotype coverage and the emergence of resistance due to capsule switching (serotype replacement) are being widely pursued. Much attention is now focused on the development of recombinant subunit vaccines based on highly conserved pneumococcal surface proteins and virulence factors. A further step might involve focusing the host humoral immune response onto protective protein epitopes using as immunogens structurally optimized epitope mimetics. One approach to deliver such epitope mimetics to the immune system is through the use of synthetic virus-like particles (SVLPs). SVLPs are made from synthetic coiled-coil lipopeptides that are designed to spontaneously self-assemble into 20–30 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous buffer. Multivalent display of epitope mimetics on the surface of SVLPs generates highly immunogenic nanoparticles that elicit strong epitope-specific humoral immune responses without the need for external adjuvants. Here, we set out to demonstrate that this approach can yield vaccine candidates able to elicit a protective immune response, using epitopes derived from the proline-rich region of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). These streptococcal SVLP-based vaccine candidates are shown to elicit strong humoral immune responses in mice. Following active immunization and challenge with lethal doses of streptococcus, SVLP-based immunogens are able to elicit significant protection in mice. Furthermore, a mimetic-specific monoclonal antibody is shown to mediate partial protection upon passive immunization. The results show that SVLPs combined with synthetic epitope mimetics may have potential for the development of an effective vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26501327

  16. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Machkovech, Heather M.; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8+ T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8+ T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8+ T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8+ T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8+ T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8+ T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. IMPORTANCE There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8+ T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  17. Ex vivo detection of adenovirus specific CD4{sup +} T-cell responses to HLA-DR-epitopes of the Hexon protein show a contracted specificity of T{sub HELPER} cells following stem cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Serangeli, Celine; Bicanic, Oliver; Scheible, Michael H.; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert

    2010-02-20

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, especially after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Viral clearance has been attributed to CD4{sup +} T-cell responses against the Hexon-protein, but the frequency of specific T{sub HELPER} cells is extremely low or not detectable ex vivo and preference for different CD4{sup +} T-cell epitopes is variable among individuals. We therefore analyzed 44 healthy donors and 6 SCT-recipients for Hexon-specific CD4{sup +}-responses ex vivo, to identify epitopes which would be broadly applicable. We selected 19 candidate epitopes with predicted restriction to HLA-DR1/DR3/DR4/DR7; 16 were located within the highly conserved regions, indicating cross-reactivity of T cells among HAdV-subspecies. Ten epitopes induced CD4{sup +}-proliferation in >50% of individuals, confirmed by intracellular IFN-gamma detection. Three SCT recipients who recovered from an infection with HAdV displayed reactivity towards only a single hexon epitope, whereas healthy individuals were responsive to two to eight epitopes (median 3). The ex vivo detection of Hexon-specific CD4{sup +} T-cells, without any long-term culture in vitro, enables the detection and generation of HAdV-specific CD4{sup +} T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer against HAdV-infection post SCT.

  18. Myelin basic protein-specific T lymphocyte repertoire in multiple sclerosis. Complexity of the response and dominance of nested epitopes due to recruitment of multiple T cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    Meinl, E; Weber, F; Drexler, K; Morelle, C; Ott, M; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Goebels, N; Ertl, B; Jechart, G; Giegerich, G

    1993-01-01

    The human T cell response to the myelin basic protein (MBP) has been studied with respect to T cell receptor (TCR) usage, HLA class II restriction elements, and epitope specificity using a total of 215 long-term MBP-specific T cell lines (TCL) isolated from the peripheral blood of 13 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 healthy donors. In most donors, the anti-MBP response was exceedingly heterogeneous. Using a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire length of human MBP, at least 26 epitopes recognized by human TCL could be distinguished. The MBP domain most commonly recognized was sequence 80-105 (31% of MS TCL, and 24% of control TCL). Sequence 29-48 was recognized more frequently by control-derived TCL (24%) than by TCL from MS patients (5%). The MBP epitopes were recognized in the context of DRB1 *0101, DRB5*0101, DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301, DRB1*0401, DRB1*1402, and DRB3*0102, as demonstrated using a panel of DR gene-transfected L cells. The TCR gene usage was also heterogeneous. V beta 5.2, a peptide of which is currently being used in a clinical trial for treatment of MS patients, was expressed by only one of our TCL. However, within this complex pattern of MBP-specific T cell responses, a minority of MS patients were found to exhibit a more restricted response with respect to their TCL epitope specificity. In these patients 75-87% of the TCL responded to a single, patient-specific cluster of immunodominant T cell epitopes located within a small (20-amino acid) domain of MBP. These nested clusters of immunodominant epitopes were noted within the amino acids 80-105, 108-131, and 131-153. The T cell response to the immunodominant epitopes was not monoclonal, but heterogeneous, with respect to fine specificity, TCR usage, and even HLA restriction. In one patient (H.K.), this restricted epitope profile remained stable for > 2 yr. The TCR beta chain sequences of TCL specific for the immunodominant region of HK are consistent with an

  19. Direct discovery and validation of a peptide/MHC epitope expressed in primary human breast cancer cells using a TCRm monoclonal antibody with profound antitumor properties.

    PubMed

    Verma, Bhavna; Hawkins, Oriana E; Neethling, Francisca A; Caseltine, Shannon L; Largo, Sherly R; Hildebrand, William H; Weidanz, Jon A

    2010-04-01

    The identification and validation of new cancer-specific T cell epitopes continues to be a major area of research interest. Nevertheless, challenges remain to develop strategies that can easily discover and validate epitopes expressed in primary cancer cells. Regarded as targets for T cells, peptides presented in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These mAbs are of special importance as they lend themselves to the detection of epitopes expressed in primary tumor cells. Here, we use an approach that has been successfully utilized in two different infectious disease applications (WNV and influenza). A direct peptide-epitope discovery strategy involving mass spectrometric analysis led to the identification of peptide YLLPAIVHI in the context of MHC A*02 allele (YLL/A2) from human breast carcinoma cell lines. We then generated and characterized an anti-YLL/A2 mAb designated as RL6A TCRm. Subsequently, the TCRm mAb was used to directly validate YLL/A2 epitope expression in human breast cancer tissue, but not in normal control breast tissue. Moreover, mice implanted with human breast cancer cells grew tumors, yet when treated with RL6A TCRm showed a marked reduction in tumor size. These data demonstrate for the first time a coordinated direct discovery and validation strategy that identified a peptide/MHC complex on primary tumor cells for antibody targeting and provide a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy.

  20. A transgenic plant cell-suspension system for expression of epitopes on chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus particles.

    PubMed

    Muthamilselvan, Thangarasu; Lee, Chin-Wei; Cho, Yu-Hsin; Wu, Feng-Chao; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liang, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel strategy to produce vaccine antigens using a plant cell-suspension culture system in lieu of the conventional bacterial or animal cell-culture systems. We generated transgenic cell-suspension cultures from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves carrying wild-type or chimeric Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) expression constructs encoding the viral protein 1 (VP1) epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Antigens accumulated to high levels in BdT38 and BdT19 transgenic cell lines co-expressing silencing suppressor protein P38 or P19. BaMV chimeric virus particles (CVPs) were subsequently purified from the respective cell lines (1.5 and 2.1 mg CVPs/20 g fresh weight of suspended biomass, respectively), and the resulting CVPs displayed VP1 epitope on the surfaces. Guinea pigs vaccinated with purified CVPs produced humoral antibodies. This study represents an important advance in the large-scale production of immunopeptide vaccines in a cost-effective manner using a plant cell-suspension culture system.

  1. Oral administration of an immunodominant T-cell epitope downregulates Th1/Th2 cytokines and prevents experimental myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Baggi, Fulvio; Andreetta, Francesca; Caspani, Elisabetta; Milani, Monica; Longhi, Renato; Mantegazza, Renato; Cornelio, Ferdinando; Antozzi, Carlo

    1999-01-01

    The mucosal administration of the native antigen or peptide fragments corresponding to immunodominant regions is effective in preventing or treating several T cell–dependent models of autoimmune disease. No data are yet available on oral tolerance with immunodominant T-cell peptides in experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), an animal model of B cell–dependent disease. We report that oral administration of the T-cell epitope α146-162 of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (TAChR) α-subunit suppressed T-cell responses to AChR and ameliorated the disease in C57Bl/6 (B6) mice. Protection from EAMG was associated with reduced serum Ab’s to mouse AChR and reduced AChR loss in muscle. The effect of Tα146-162 feeding was specific; treatment with a control peptide did not affect EAMG manifestations. The protective effect induced by peptide Tα146-162 was mediated by reduced production of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10 by TAChR-reactive cells, suggesting T-cell anergy. TGF-β–secreting Th3 cells did not seem to be involved in tolerance induction. We therefore demonstrate that feeding a single immunodominant epitope can prevent an Ab-mediated experimental model of autoimmune disease. PMID:10545527

  2. Inferring Protective CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes for NS5 Protein of Four Serotypes of Dengue Virus Chinese Isolates Based on HLA-A, -B and -C Allelic Distribution: Implications for Epitope-Based Universal Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wu, Meini; Hu, Ningzhu; Li, Jianfan; Li, Yanhan; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Yunzhang

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most globally serious vector-borne infectious diseases in tropical and subtropical areas for which there are currently no effective vaccines. The most highly conserved flavivirus protein, NS5, is an indispensable target of CD8+ T-cells, making it an ideal vaccine design target. Using the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), CD8+ T-cell epitopes of the dengue virus (DENV) NS5 protein were predicted by genotypic frequency of the HLA-A,-B, and-C alleles in Chinese population. Antigenicity scores of all predicted epitopes were analyzed using VaxiJen v2.0. The IEDB analysis revealed that 116 antigenic epitopes for HLA-A (21),-B (53), and-C (42) had high affinity for HLA molecules. Of them, 14 had 90.97-99.35% conversancy among the four serotypes. Moreover, five candidate epitopes, including 200NS5210 (94.84%, A*11:01), 515NS5525 (98.71%, A*24:02), 225NS5232 (99.35%, A*33:03), 516NS5523 (98.71%, A*33:03), and 284NS5291 (98.06%, A*33:03), were presented by HLA-A. Four candidate epitopes, including 234NS5241 (96.77%, B*13:01), 92NS599 (98.06%, B*15:01, B*15:02, and B*46:01), 262NS5269 (92.90%, B*38:02), and 538NS5547 (90.97%, B*51:01), were presented by HLA-B. Another 9 candidate epitopes, including 514NS5522 (98.71%, C*01:02), 514NS5524 (98.71%, C*01:02 and C*14:02), 92NS599 (98.06%, C*03:02 and C*15:02), 362NS5369 (44.84%, C*03:04 and C*08:01), 225NS5232 (99.35%, C*04:01), 234NS5241(96.77%, C*04:01), 361NS5369 (94.84%, C*04:01), 515NS5522 (98.71%, C*14:02), 515NS5524 (98.71%, C*14:02), were presented by HLA-C. Further data showed that the four-epitope combination of 92NS599 (B*15:01, B*15:02, B*46:01, C*03:02 and C*15:02), 200NS5210 (A*11:01), 362NS5369 (C*03:04, C*08:01), and 514NS5524 (C*01:02, C*14:02) could vaccinate >90% of individuals in China. Further in vivo study of our inferred novel epitopes will be needed for a T-cell epitope-based universal vaccine development that may prevent all four China-endemic DENV serotypes.

  3. An Unstable Th Epitope of P. falciparum Fosters Central Memory T Cells and Anti-CS Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Parra-López, Carlos A.; Bernal-Estévez, David; Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Pulido-Calixto, Carolina; Salazar, Luz Mary; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is transmitted by Plasmodium-infected anopheles mosquitoes. Widespread resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides and resistance of parasites to drugs highlight the urgent need for malaria vaccines. The most advanced malaria vaccines target sporozoites, the infective form of the parasite. A major target of the antibody response to sporozoites are the repeat epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, which span almost one half of the protein. Antibodies to these repeats can neutralize sporozoite infectivity. Generation of protective antibody responses to the CS protein (anti-CS Ab) requires help by CD4 T cells. A CD4 T cell epitope from the CS protein designated T* was previously identified by screening T cells from volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites. The T* sequence spans twenty amino acids that contains multiple T cell epitopes restricted by various HLA alleles. Subunit malaria vaccines including T* are highly immunogenic in rodents, non-human primates and humans. In this study we characterized a highly conserved HLA-DRβ1*04:01 (DR4) restricted T cell epitope (QNT-5) located at the C-terminus of T*. We found that a peptide containing QNT-5 was able to elicit long-term anti-CS Ab responses and prime CD4 T cells in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice despite forming relatively unstable MHC-peptide complexes highly susceptible to HLA-DM editing. We attempted to improve the immunogenicity of QNT-5 by replacing the P1 anchor position with an optimal tyrosine residue. The modified peptide QNT-Y formed stable MHC-peptide complexes highly resistant to HLA-DM editing. Contrary to expectations, a linear peptide containing QNT-Y elicited almost 10-fold lower long-term antibody and IFN-γ responses compared to the linear peptide containing the wild type QNT-5 sequence. Some possibilities regarding why QNT-5 is more effective than QNT-Y in inducing long-term T cell and anti-CS Ab when used as vaccine are discussed. PMID:24983460

  4. An unstable Th epitope of P. falciparum fosters central memory T cells and anti-CS antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Parra-López, Carlos A; Bernal-Estévez, David; Yin, Liusong; Vargas, Luis Eduardo; Pulido-Calixto, Carolina; Salazar, Luz Mary; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is transmitted by Plasmodium-infected anopheles mosquitoes. Widespread resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides and resistance of parasites to drugs highlight the urgent need for malaria vaccines. The most advanced malaria vaccines target sporozoites, the infective form of the parasite. A major target of the antibody response to sporozoites are the repeat epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, which span almost one half of the protein. Antibodies to these repeats can neutralize sporozoite infectivity. Generation of protective antibody responses to the CS protein (anti-CS Ab) requires help by CD4 T cells. A CD4 T cell epitope from the CS protein designated T* was previously identified by screening T cells from volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites. The T* sequence spans twenty amino acids that contains multiple T cell epitopes restricted by various HLA alleles. Subunit malaria vaccines including T* are highly immunogenic in rodents, non-human primates and humans. In this study we characterized a highly conserved HLA-DRβ1*04:01 (DR4) restricted T cell epitope (QNT-5) located at the C-terminus of T*. We found that a peptide containing QNT-5 was able to elicit long-term anti-CS Ab responses and prime CD4 T cells in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice despite forming relatively unstable MHC-peptide complexes highly susceptible to HLA-DM editing. We attempted to improve the immunogenicity of QNT-5 by replacing the P1 anchor position with an optimal tyrosine residue. The modified peptide QNT-Y formed stable MHC-peptide complexes highly resistant to HLA-DM editing. Contrary to expectations, a linear peptide containing QNT-Y elicited almost 10-fold lower long-term antibody and IFN-γ responses compared to the linear peptide containing the wild type QNT-5 sequence. Some possibilities regarding why QNT-5 is more effective than QNT-Y in inducing long-term T cell and anti-CS Ab when used as vaccine are discussed.

  5. Japanese encephalitis protein vaccine candidates expressing neutralizing epitope and M.T hsp70 induce virus-specific memory B cells and long-lasting antibodies in swine.

    PubMed

    Fei-fei, Ge; Jian, Wang; Feng, Xu; Li-ping, Sheng; Quan-yun, Sun; Jin-ping, Zhou; Pu-yan, Chen; Pei-hong, Liu

    2008-10-16

    Swine are an important amplifier of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus in the paradomestic environment. In this study, two JE protein vaccine candidates were evaluated for immunogenicity in swine. Both vaccine plasmids are based on a prokaryotic vector pET-32a(+). One plasmid, designated pET-32a(+)-epitope, encode a cassette consisting of a neutralizing epitope on envelope (E) protein of JE virus, whereas the other plasmid, designated pET-32a(+)-epitope-hsp70, express the fusion protein of the epitope and M.T hsp70. Some differences were detected in the immunogenicity of these two proteins in swine. Swine immunized twice with 2000pmol of the neutralizing epitope or the fusion protein developed neutralizing antibody titers of respectively, 154 and 300, and anti-neutralizing epitope antibody titers of 10(4.25) and 10(6.0) by 3 weeks after the second immunization. In addition, swine immunized with the neutralizing epitope emulsified with adjuvant S206 or with imported mineral oil and Tween-80 induced neutralizing antibody titers of 196 and 244, and anti-neutralizing epitope antibody titers of 10(5.25) or 10(5.6) at the same time point. However, swine administered two doses of a commercial JE vaccine (attenuated virus preparation; JEV SA14-14-2 strain) developed less favorable antibody responses with neutralizing antibody titer 40 and anti-neutralizing epitope antibody titers 10(3.7). The anamnestic response was followed by monitoring titers 1 week after boosting with a viral antigen; swine immunized twice with the fusion protein showed a 177-fold increase in anti-neutralizing epitope titer, indicating a strong recall of the antibody response. The animals maintained detectable levels of anti-neutralizing epitope antibody for at least 105 days after two immunizations, indicating that these four protein antigens are able to stimulate virus-specific memory B cells and long-lasting antibodies at higher levels than is achieved using a current commercial attenuated JEV vaccine

  6. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We found that the peptide-drug conjugate is dramatically more effective than paclitaxel alone at inhibiting tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model, delivering significantly higher levels of drug to the tumor site. We believe these studies open the way to the development of a new class of therapeutic compounds that exploit the EphA2 receptor for drug delivery to cancer cells. PMID:22329578

  7. Cross-genotype-reactivity of the immunodominant HCV CD8 T-cell epitope NS3-1073.

    PubMed

    Fytili, P; Dalekos, G N; Schlaphoff, V; Suneetha, P V; Sarrazin, C; Zauner, W; Zachou, K; Berg, T; Manns, M P; Klade, C S; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H

    2008-07-23

    The HCV-specific HLA-A2-restricted NS3(1073) epitope is one of the most frequently recognized epitopes in hepatitis C. NS3(1073)-specific T-cell responses are associated with clearance of acute HCV-infection. Therefore this epitope is an interesting candidate for a HCV-peptide vaccine. However, heterogeneity between genotypes and mutations in the epitope has to be considered as an obstacle. We here identified 34 naturally occurring NS3(1073)-variants, as compared with the wild type genotype-1 variants (CVNGVCWTV/CINGVCWTV) by sequencing sera of 251 Greek and German patients and searching for published HCV-genomes. The frequency of variants among genotype-1 patients was 10%. Importantly, HLA-A2 binding was reduced only in 3 genotype 1 mutants while all non-genotype 1 variants showed strong HLA-A2-binding. By screening 28 variants in ELISPOT assays from T cell lines we could demonstrate that HCV-NS3(1073)-wild-type-specific T-cells displayed cross-genotype-reactivity, in particular against genotypes 4-6 variants. However, single aa changes within the TCR-binding domain completely abolished recognition even in case of conservative aa exchanges within genotype-1. NS3(1073)-specific T-cell lines from recovered, chronically infected, and HCV-negative individuals showed no major difference in the pattern of cross-recognition although the proliferation of NS3(1073)-specific T-cells differed significantly between the groups. Importantly, the recognition pattern against the 28 variants was also identical directly ex vivo in a patient with acute HCV infection and a healthy volunteer vaccinated with the peptide vaccine IC41 containing the NS3(1073)-wild-type peptide. Thus, partial cross-genotype recognition of HCV NS3(1073)-specific CD8 T cells is possible; however, even single aa exchanges can significantly limit the potential efficacy of vaccines containing the NS3(1073)-wild-type peptide.

  8. Cytotoxic T cell responses to multiple conserved HIV epitopes in HIV-resistant prostitutes in Nairobi.

    PubMed Central

    Rowland-Jones, S L; Dong, T; Fowke, K R; Kimani, J; Krausa, P; Newell, H; Blanchard, T; Ariyoshi, K; Oyugi, J; Ngugi, E; Bwayo, J; MacDonald, K S; McMichael, A J; Plummer, F A

    1998-01-01

    Many people who remain persistently seronegative despite frequent HIV exposure have HIV-specific immune responses. The study of these may provide information about mechanisms of natural protective immunity to HIV-1. We describe the specificity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to HIV in seronegative prostitutes in Nairobi who are apparently resistant to HIV infection. These women have had frequent exposure to a range of African HIV-1 variants, primarily clades A, C, and D, for up to 12 yr without becoming infected. Nearly half of them have CTL directed towards epitopes previously defined for B clade virus, which are largely conserved in the A and D clade sequences. Stronger responses are frequently elicited using the A or D clade version of an epitope to stimulate CTL, suggesting that they were originally primed by exposure to these virus strains. CTL responses have been defined to novel epitopes presented by HLA class I molecules associated with resistance to infection in the cohort, HLA-A*6802 and HLA-B18. Estimates using a modified interferon-gamma Elispot assay indicate a circulating frequency of CTL to individual epitopes of between 1:3,200 and 1:50,000. Thus, HIV-specific immune responses-particularly cross-clade CTL activity- may be responsible for protection against persistent HIV infection in these African women. PMID:9802890

  9. Epitope mapping on the dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) pathogen-attachment factor.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Estecha, Ana; Samaniego, Rafael; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena; Colmenares, María; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Steinman, Ralph M; Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Corbí, Angel L

    2010-01-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin) is a myeloid pathogen-attachment factor C-type lectin which recognizes mannose- and fucose-containing oligosaccharide ligands on clinically relevant pathogens. Intracellular signaling initiated upon ligand engagement of DC-SIGN interferes with TLR-initiated signals, and modulates the T cell activating and polarizing ability of antigen-presenting cells. The C-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN is preceded by a neck domain composed of eight 23-residue repeats which mediate molecule multimerization, and whose polymorphism correlates with altered susceptibility to SARS and HIV infection. Naturally occurring isoforms and chimaeric molecules, in combination with established recognition properties, were used to define seven structural and functional epitopes on DC-SIGN. Three epitopes mapped to the CRD, one of which is multimerization-dependent and only exposed on DC-SIGN monomers. Epitopes within the neck domain were conformation-independent and unaltered upon molecule multimerization, but were differentially affected by neck domain truncations. Although neck-specific antibodies exhibited lower function-blocking ability, they were more efficient at inducing molecule internalization. Moreover, crosslinking of the different epitopes resulted in distinct levels of microclustering on the cell surface. The identification of independent epitopes on the DC-SIGN molecule might facilitate the design of reagents that modulate the T cell activating and polarizing ability of DC-SIGN-expressing cells without preventing its antigen- and pathogen-recognition capacities.

  10. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  11. In silico prediction of the T-cell and IgE-binding epitopes of Per a 6 and Bla g 6 allergens in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Yang, Hai-Wei; Wei, Ji-Fu; Tao, Ai-Lin

    2014-10-01

    Per a 6 and Bla g 6 are cockroach allergens found in Periplaneta americana and Blattella germanica, respectively. The objective of the present study was to predict the B‑ and T‑cell epitopes of the Per a 6 and Bla g 6 allergens. Three immunoinformatics tools, the DNAStar Protean system, the Bioinformatics Predicted Antigenic Peptides system and the BepiPred 1.0 server, were used to predict the potential B‑cell epitopes, while Net‑MHCIIpan‑2.0 and NetMHCII‑2.2 were used to predict the T‑cell epitopes of the two allergens. As a result, seven peptides were predicted in the Per a 6 allergen and seven peptides were predicted in the Bla g 6 allergen in the B‑cell epitope predictions. In the T‑cell prediction, the Per a 6 allergen was predicted to have nine strongly binding nonamer core epitope sequences (IC50<50 nm) and 28 weakly binding sequences (50 nm

  12. FMC46, a cell protrusion-associated leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 epitope on human lymphocytes and thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarski, L M; Turley, E A; Shaw, A R; Gallatin, W M; Laderoute, M P; Gillitzer, R; Beckman, I G; Zola, H

    1991-07-01

    In this report, we describe a 76-kDa glycoprotein recognized by mAb FMC46 that, by virtue of its concentration on cell protrusions involved in motility, may be important in lymphoid cell locomotion. FMC46 detects an epitope of the leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (LAM-1), a member of the selecting family (LAM-1, Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecular-1 (ELAM-1), and Granule Membrane Protein-140 (GMP-140), that is expressed on LAM-1-transfected cell lines, is a glycosylation epitope based on its loss after culture in tunicamycin, and is closely related to the LAM-1.2 epitope. FMC46 is expressed at high density on the majority of CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ peripheral blood T cells (60 to 70%) and on a subset of thymocytes that includes the multinegative CD3- CD4- CD8- progenitor cells (100% FMC46hi) and the CD45R0- presumptive thymic generative lineage (70% FMC46hi). It appears at reduced density and frequency on CD45RA- thymocytes (50% FMC46lo), comprised mainly of death-committed thymocytes. Among thymic subsets defined by expression of CD4 and/or CD8, FMC46 is expressed at high density predominantly on a subset of single-positive cells and not on double-positive cells. These results suggest a fundamental role for LAM-1 in thymic development, with a high density preferentially expressed on cells involved in thymic generative processes and a low density on cells progressing to intrathymic death. A major subset of peripheral blood B cells and thymic B cells also express FMC46. Immunohistochemistry on frozen sections indicated strong staining in splenic follicles and around blood vessels, staining of the thymic medulla and subcapsular areas, and staining of the mantle zone of germinal centers of the lymph node. FMC46+ lymphocytes accumulated along high endothelial venules in the lymph node. On locomoting multinegative thymocytes, FMC46 is concentrated on the leading tip of extended processes, on pseudopods, and on ruffles, unlike the distribution of either CD44 or TQ1 (LAM 1

  13. Combining computer algorithms with experimental approaches permits the rapid and accurate identification of T cell epitopes from defined antigens.

    PubMed

    Schirle, M; Weinschenk, T; Stevanović, S

    2001-11-01

    The identification of T cell epitopes from immunologically relevant antigens remains a critical step in the development of vaccines and methods for monitoring of T cell responses. This review presents an overview of strategies that employ computer algorithms for the selection of candidate peptides from defined proteins and subsequent verification of their in vivo relevance by experimental approaches. Several computer algorithms are currently being used for epitope prediction of various major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules, based either on the analysis of natural MHC ligands or on the binding properties of synthetic peptides. Moreover, the analysis of proteasomal digests of peptides and whole proteins has led to the development of algorithms for the prediction of proteasomal cleavages. In order to verify the generation of the predicted peptides during antigen processing in vivo as well as their immunogenic potential, several experimental approaches have been pursued in the recent past. Mass spectrometry-based bioanalytical approaches have been used specifically to detect predicted peptides among isolated natural ligands. Other strategies employ various methods for the stimulation of primary T cell responses against the predicted peptides and subsequent testing of the recognition pattern towards target cells that express the antigen.

  14. Producer T cells: Using genetically engineered T cells as vehicles to generate and deliver therapeutics to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander K.; Davila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is an emerging anticancer therapy that has shown promise in various malignancies. Redirecting antigen specificity by genetically engineering T cells to stably express receptors has become an effective variant of ACT. A novel extension of this approach is to utilize engineered T cells to produce and deliver anticancer therapeutics that enhance cytotoxic T cell function and simultaneously inhibit immunosuppressive processes. Here, we review the potential of using T cells as therapeutic-secreting vehicles for immunotherapies and present theoretical and established arguments in support of further development of this unique cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:27467930

  15. MHC-I-restricted epitopes conserved among variola and other related orthopoxviruses are recognized by T cells 30 years after vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tang, S T; Wang, M; Lamberth, K; Harndahl, M; Dziegiel, M H; Claesson, M H; Buus, S; Lund, O

    2008-01-01

    It is many years since the general population has been vaccinated against smallpox virus. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted T cell epitopes can be recognized more than 30 years after vaccination. Using bioinformatic methods, we predicted 177 potential cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes. Eight epitopes were confirmed to stimulate IFN-gamma release by T cells in smallpox-vaccinated subjects. The epitopes were restricted by five supertypes (HLA-A1, -A2, -A24 -A26 and -B44). Significant T cell responses were detected against 8 of 45 peptides with an HLA class I affinity of K(D) less than or equal to 5 nM, whereas no T cell responses were detected against 60 peptides with an HLA affinity of K(D) more than 5 nM. All epitopes were fully conserved in seven variola, vaccinia and cowpox strains. Knowledge of the long-term response to smallpox vaccination may lead to a better understanding of poxvirus immunity and may aid in the development of new improved vaccines and diagnostic tools.

  16. Dengue virus-reactive CD8+ T cells display quantitative and qualitative differences in their response to variant epitopes of heterologous viral serotypes.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Hema S; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    Reactivation of serotype cross-reactive CD8+ memory T lymphocytes is thought to contribute to the immunopathogenesis of dengue disease during secondary infection by a heterologous serotype. Using cytokine flow cytometry, we have defined four novel HLA-A*02-restricted dengue viral epitopes recognized by up to 1.5% of circulating CD8+ T cells in four donors after primary vaccination. All four donors had the highest cytokine response to the epitope NS4b 2353. We also studied the effect of sequence differences in heterologous dengue serotypes on dengue-reactive CD8+ memory T cell cytokine and proliferative responses. The D3 variant of a different NS4b epitope 2423 and the D2 variant of the NS4a epitope 2148 induced the largest cytokine response, compared with their respective heterologous sequences in all donors regardless of the primary vaccination serotype. Stimulation with variant peptides also altered the relative frequencies of the various subsets of cells that expressed IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, MIP-1beta, and combinations of these cytokines. These results indicate that the prior infection history of the individual as well as the serotypes of the primary and heterologous secondary viruses influence the nature of the secondary response. These differences in the effector functions of serotype cross-reactive memory T cells induced by heterologous variant epitopes, which are both quantitative and qualitative, may contribute to the clinical outcome of secondary dengue infection.

  17. T cell epitope-specific defects in the immune response to cat allergen in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Raquel; Reefer, Amanda; Wilson, Barbara; Hammer, Juergen; Platts-Mills, Thomas; Custis, Natalie; Woodfolk, Judith

    2004-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is often associated with high titer IgE antibodies (ab) to allergens, and IL-10-mediated regulation of IFN-gamma has been proposed to contribute to this IgE ab production. However, the relevance of IL-10 and IFN-gamma to IgE associated with AD has not been examined in the context of an allergen-specific system. Analysis of PBMC responses in vitro showed deficient T cell proliferation to overlapping IL-10- (peptide (P) 2:1) and IFN-gamma- (P2:2) inducing chain 2 major epitopes of cat allergen (Fel d 1) in cultures from sensitized AD patients (mean IgE to cat=20.9 IU/ml). Diminished IFN-gamma induction by Fel d 1 and P2:2, along with elevated peptide-induced IL-10 (except for P2:1) was observed in PBMC cultures from AD subjects compared with non-AD (sensitized and non-sensitized) subjects. Neither T cell proliferation nor IFN-gamma production to chain 2 epitopes could be restored by anti-IL-10 mAb in cultures from sensitized AD subjects. Moreover, allergen avoidance was associated with a paradoxical decrease in both IL-10 and IFN-gamma in peptide-stimulated PBMC from these subjects. Control of IFN-gamma production to chain 2 epitopes by IL-10 may be relevant to sensitization status. Development of high titer IgE ab in AD could reflect a failure of this mechanism.

  18. Identification of protective linear B-cell epitopes on the subolesin/akirin orthologues of Ornithodoros spp. soft ticks.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Román, Raúl; Díaz-Martín, Verónica; Oleaga, Ana; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2015-02-18

    Subolesin/akirin is a protective antigen that is highly conserved across hematophagous vector species and is therefore potentially useful for the development of a universal vaccine for vector control, including soft ticks. Recent results have shown that in Ornithodoros erraticus and O. moubata soft ticks, RNAi-mediated subolesin gene knockdown inhibits tick oviposition and fertility by more than 90%; however, vaccination with recombinant subolesins resulted in remarkably low protective efficacies (5-24.5% reduction in oviposition). Here we report that vaccination with subolesin recombinants induces non-protective antibodies mainly directed against immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes located on highly structured regions of the subolesin protein, probably unrelated to its biological activity, while leaving the unstructured/disordered regions unrecognized. Accordingly, for a new vaccine trial we designed four synthetic peptides (OE1, OE2, OM1 and OM2) from the unrecognized/disordered regions of the Ornithodoros subolesin sequences and coupled them to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). These KLH-peptide conjugates induced the synthesis of antibodies that recognized linear B-cell epitopes located on the unstructured loops of the subolesin protein and provided up to 70.1% and 83.1% vaccine efficacies in O. erraticus and O. moubata, respectively. These results show that the protective effect of subolesin-based vaccines is highly dependent on the particular epitope recognized by antibodies on the subolesin sequence and strongly suggest that the biological activity of subolesin is exerted through its unstructured regions. The results reported here contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of protection of subolesin-based vaccines and reveal novel protective peptides that could be included among the array of candidate antigens useful for developing anti-vector vaccines based on subolesin/akirin.

  19. Identification of continuous human B-cell epitopes in the VP35, VP40, nucleoprotein and glycoprotein of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Becquart, Pierre; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Nkoghe, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly virulent human pathogen. Recovery of infected patients is associated with efficient EBOV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses, whereas fatal outcome is associated with defective humoral immunity. As B-cell epitopes on EBOV are poorly defined, we sought to identify specific epitopes in four EBOV proteins (Glycoprotein (GP), Nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix Viral Protein (VP)40 and VP35). For the first time, we tested EBOV IgG+ sera from asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic Gabonese survivors, collected during the early humoral response (seven days after the end of symptoms) and the late memory phase (7-12 years post-infection). We also tested sera from EBOV-seropositive patients who had never had clinical signs of hemorrhagic fever or who lived in non-epidemic areas (asymptomatic subjects). We found that serum from asymptomatic individuals was more strongly reactive to VP40 peptides than to GP, NP or VP35. Interestingly, anti-EBOV IgG from asymptomatic patients targeted three immunodominant regions of VP40 reported to play a crucial role in virus assembly and budding. In contrast, serum from most survivors of the three outbreaks, collected a few days after the end of symptoms, reacted mainly with GP peptides. However, in asymptomatic subjects the longest immunodominant domains were identified in GP, and analysis of the GP crystal structure revealed that these domains covered a larger surface area of the chalice bowl formed by three GP1 subunits. The B-cell epitopes we identified in the EBOV VP35, VP40, NP and GP proteins may represent important tools for understanding the humoral response to this virus and for developing new antibody-based therapeutics or detection methods.

  20. Identification of Continuous Human B-Cell Epitopes in the VP35, VP40, Nucleoprotein and Glycoprotein of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Becquart, Pierre; Mahlakõiv, Tanel; Nkoghe, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly virulent human pathogen. Recovery of infected patients is associated with efficient EBOV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses, whereas fatal outcome is associated with defective humoral immunity. As B-cell epitopes on EBOV are poorly defined, we sought to identify specific epitopes in four EBOV proteins (Glycoprotein (GP), Nucleoprotein (NP), and matrix Viral Protein (VP)40 and VP35). For the first time, we tested EBOV IgG+ sera from asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic Gabonese survivors, collected during the early humoral response (seven days after the end of symptoms) and the late memory phase (7–12 years post-infection). We also tested sera from EBOV-seropositive patients who had never had clinical signs of hemorrhagic fever or who lived in non-epidemic areas (asymptomatic subjects). We found that serum from asymptomatic individuals was more strongly reactive to VP40 peptides than to GP, NP or VP35. Interestingly, anti-EBOV IgG from asymptomatic patients targeted three immunodominant regions of VP40 reported to play a crucial role in virus assembly and budding. In contrast, serum from most survivors of the three outbreaks, collected a few days after the end of symptoms, reacted mainly with GP peptides. However, in asymptomatic subjects the longest immunodominant domains were identified in GP, and analysis of the GP crystal structure revealed that these domains covered a larger surface area of the chalice bowl formed by three GP1 subunits. The B-cell epitopes we identified in the EBOV VP35, VP40, NP and GP proteins may represent important tools for understanding the humoral response to this virus and for developing new antibody-based therapeutics or detection methods. PMID:24914933

  1. Identification of a Highly Antigenic Linear B Cell Epitope within Plasmodium vivax Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA-1)

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Morais, Cristiane Guimarães; Mourão, Luíza Carvalho; de Ávila, Ricardo Andrez Machado; Soares, Irene Silva; Fontes, Cor Jesus; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Olórtegui, Carlos Chavez; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Braga, Érika Martins

    2011-01-01

    Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) is considered to be a major candidate antigen for a malaria vaccine. Previous immunoepidemiological studies of naturally acquired immunity to Plasmodium vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1) have shown a higher prevalence of specific antibodies to domain II (DII) of AMA-1. In the present study, we confirmed that specific antibody responses from naturally infected individuals were highly reactive to both full-length AMA-1 and DII. Also, we demonstrated a strong association between AMA-1 and DII IgG and IgG subclass responses. We analyzed the primary sequence of PvAMA-1 for B cell linear epitopes co-occurring with intrinsically unstructured/disordered regions (IURs). The B cell epitope comprising the amino acid sequence 290–307 of PvAMA-1 (SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK), with the highest prediction scores, was identified in domain II and further selected for chemical synthesis and immunological testing. The antigenicity of the synthetic peptide was identified by serological analysis using sera from P. vivax-infected individuals who were knowingly reactive to the PvAMA-1 ectodomain only, domain II only, or reactive to both antigens. Although the synthetic peptide was recognized by all serum samples specific to domain II, serum with reactivity only to the full-length protein presented 58.3% positivity. Moreover, IgG reactivity against PvAMA-1 and domain II after depletion of specific synthetic peptide antibodies was reduced by 18% and 33% (P = 0.0001 for both), respectively. These results suggest that the linear epitope SASDQPTQYEEEMTDYQK is highly antigenic during natural human infections and is an important antigenic region of the domain II of PvAMA-1, suggesting its possible future use in pre-clinical studies. PMID:21713006

  2. A rice-based edible vaccine expressing multiple T-cell epitopes to induce oral tolerance and inhibit allergy.

    PubMed

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2007-02-01

    Plant pollens are the most common cause of seasonal allergic disease. The number of patients undergoing treatment for allergies to the pollen of Japanese cedar (major antigens, Cry j 1 and Cry j 2) has increased steadily each year. A rice seed-based edible vaccine has been shown to be effective for treating Japanese cedar pollinosis. Rice seeds containing the major T-cell epitopes derived from cedar pollen allergens were orally administrated to mice before systemic challenge with total pollen protein. Mucosal immune tolerance leading to a reduction of allergen-specific IgE, T-cell proliferative reactions, and histamine were induced, resulting in suppression of allergy-specific symptoms such as sneezing. Oral seed-based peptide immunotherapy offers a safe, simple, and cost-effective alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy using crude allergen extracts for treating allergic disease. A human version of rice seed-based edible vaccine containing seven T-cell epitopes from the Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 allergens was recently developed and is undergoing safety assessments.

  3. Production of IFN-γ and IL-4 Against Intact Catalase and Constructed Catalase Epitopes of Helicobacter pylori From T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Fazeli, Hossein; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Adib, Minoo; Rashidi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent in the developing countries. It causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastrocarcinoma. Treatment with drugs and antibiotics is problematic due to the following reasons: cost, resistance to antibiotics, prolonged treatment and using multiple drugs. Catalase is highly conserved among the Helicobacter species and is important to the survival of the organism. It is expressed in high amounts and is exposed to the surface of this bacterium; therefore it represents a suitable candidate vaccine antigen. Objectives: A suitable approach in H. pylori vaccinology is the administration of epitope based vaccines. Therefore the responses of T-cells (IFN-γ and IL-4 production) against the catalase of H. pylori were determined. Then the quality of the immune responses against intact catalase and three epitopes of catalase were compared. Materials and Methods: In this study, a composition of three epitopes of the H. pylori catalase was selected based on Propred software. The effect of catalase epitopes on T-cells were assayed and immune responses identified. Results: The results of IFN-γ, IL-4 production against antigens, epitopes, and recombinant catalase by T-cells were compared for better understanding of epitope efficiency. Conclusions: The current research demonstrated that epitope sequence stimulates cellular immune responses effectively. In addition, increased safety and potency as well as a reduction in time and cost were advantages of this method. Authors are going to use this sequence as a suitable vaccine candidate for further research on animal models and humans in future. PMID:26862387

  4. Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Nonhuman Primate B Cells Converts Destructive into Productive Processing of the Pathogenic CD8 T Cell Epitope in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Jagessar, S. Anwar; Holtman, Inge R.; Hofman, Sam; Morandi, Elena; Heijmans, Nicole; Laman, Jon D.; Gran, Bruno; Faber, Bart W.; van Kasteren, Sander I.; Eggen, Bart J. L.

    2016-01-01

    EBV is the major infectious environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Patient studies do not allow manipulation in vivo. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models in the common marmoset and rhesus monkey to model the association of EBV and MS. We report that B cells infected with EBV-related lymphocryptovirus (LCV) are requisite APCs for MHC-E–restricted autoaggressive effector memory CTLs specific for the immunodominant epitope 40-48 of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). These T cells drive the EAE pathogenesis to irreversible neurologic deficit. The aim of this study was to determine why LCV infection is important for this pathogenic role of B cells. Transcriptome comparison of LCV-infected B cells and CD20+ spleen cells from rhesus monkeys shows increased expression of genes encoding elements of the Ag cross-presentation machinery (i.e., of proteasome maturation protein and immunoproteasome subunits) and enhanced expression of MHC-E and of costimulatory molecules (CD70 and CD80, but not CD86). It was also shown that altered expression of endolysosomal proteases (cathepsins) mitigates the fast endolysosomal degradation of the MOG40–48 core epitope. Finally, LCV infection also induced expression of LC3-II+ cytosolic structures resembling autophagosomes, which seem to form an intracellular compartment where the MOG40–48 epitope is protected against proteolytic degradation by the endolysosomal serine protease cathepsin G. In conclusion, LCV infection induces a variety of changes in B cells that underlies the conversion of destructive processing of the immunodominant MOG40–48 epitope into productive processing and cross-presentation to strongly autoaggressive CTLs. PMID:27412414

  5. T-cell epitopes in type 1 diabetes autoantigen tyrosine phosphatase IA-2: potential for mimicry with rotavirus and other environmental agents.

    PubMed Central

    Honeyman, M. C.; Stone, N. L.; Harrison, L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 is a molecular target of pancreatic islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. T-cell epitope peptides in autoantigens have potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and they may hold clues to environmental agents with similar sequences that could trigger or exacerbate autoimmune disease. We identified 13 epitope peptides in IA-2 by measuring peripheral blood T-cell proliferation to 68 overlapping, synthetic peptides encompassing the intracytoplasmic domain of IA-2 in six at-risk type 1 diabetes relatives selected for HLA susceptibility haplotypes. The dominant epitope, VIVMLTPLVEDGVKQC (aa 805-820), which elicited the highest T-cell responses in all at-risk relatives, has 56% identity and 100% similarity over 9 amino acids (aa) with a sequence in VP7, a major immunogenic protein of human rotavirus. Both peptides bind to HLA-DR4(*0401) and are deduced to present identical aa to the T-cell receptor. The contiguous sequence of VP7 has 75% identity and 92% similarity over 12 aa with a known T-cell epitope in glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), another autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. This dominant IA-2 epitope peptide also has 75-45% identity and 88-64% similarity over 8-14 aa to sequences in Dengue, cytomegalovirus, measles, hepatitis C, and canine distemper viruses, and the bacterium Haemophilus influenzae. Three other IA-2 epitope peptides are 71-100% similar over 7-12 aa to herpes, rhino-, hanta- and flaviviruses. Two others are 80-82% similar over 10-11 aa to sequences in milk, wheat, and bean proteins. Further studies should now be carried out to directly test the hypothesis that T-cell activation by rotavirus and possibly other viruses, and dietary proteins, could trigger or exacerbate beta-cell autoimmunity through molecular mimicry with IA-2 and (for rotavirus) GAD. PMID:9606176

  6. Use of multiple peptides containing T cell epitopes is a feasible approach for peptide-based immunotherapy in Can f 1 allergy

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Anu K; Taivainen, Antti H; Närvänen, Ale T O; Kinnunen, Tuure T; Saarelainen, Soili A; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja A; Virtanen, Tuomas I

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major dog allergen Can f 1 contains seven T cell epitope regions, none of which was preferentially recognized. To identify the immune characteristics of Can f 1 epitopes and to verify their suitability for peptide-based allergen immunotherapy, short-term T cell lines were generated with epitope-containing peptides from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Can f 1 skinprick test-positive allergic and healthy control subjects. The lines were examined for their proliferative capacity and cytokine production upon stimulation with the allergen peptide, a homologous peptide from human tear lipocalin (TL) and Can f 1 and TL proteins. Can f 1 peptides induced proliferation of T cells and gave rise to T cell lines with comparable efficiencies. In particular, the T cell lines of allergic subjects induced with p33–48 and p107–122 favoured the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-10, respectively. A greater number of Can f 1-specific T cell lines were generated from allergic than from healthy individuals. Two p107–122-induced Can f 1-specific T cell lines also reacted to a homologous peptide of human TL. Our results suggest that several T cell epitope-containing peptides should be used in combination for specific immunotherapy in Can f 1 allergy. PMID:17233739

  7. Excessive sodium ions delivered into cells by nanodiamonds: implications for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Li, Wenxin; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jing; Liang, Le; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Chen, Nan; Sun, Yanhong; Chen, Wen; Tai, Renzhong; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Qing

    2012-06-11

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) possess many excellent physical and chemical properties that make them attractive materials for applications in biomedicine. In this paper, the adsorption and delivery of a large amount of sodium ions into the cell interior by NDs in serum-free medium is demonstrated. The excess sodium ions inside the cells induce osmotic stresses followed by cell swelling and an increase in the intracellular levels of calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to severe cellular damage. In complete culture medium, however, serum proteins wrapped around the NDs effectively prevent the sodium ions from adsorbing onto the NDs, and thus the NDs show no cytotoxicity. This work is the first to elaborate on the correlation between the sodium ions adsorbed on the nanomaterials and their bio-effects. Excessive ions delivered into cells by NDs might have potential applications in tumor therapy.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Delivering Arsenic Trioxide into HPV-Infected Cervical Cancer Cells Using Liposomal Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Dong; Ghali, Lucy; Xia, Ruidong; Munoz, Leonardo P.; Garelick, Hemda; Bell, Celia; Wen, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been used successfully to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia, and since this discovery, it has also been researched as a possible treatment for other haematological and solid cancers. Even though many positive results have been found in the laboratory, wider clinical use of ATO has been compromised by its toxicity at higher concentrations. The aim of this study was to explore an improved method for delivering ATO using liposomal nanotechnology to evaluate whether this could reduce drug toxicity and improve the efficacy of ATO in treating human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers. HeLa, C33a, and human keratinocytes were exposed to 5 μm of ATO in both free and liposomal forms for 48 h. The stability of the prepared samples was tested using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) to measure the intracellular arsenic concentrations after treatment. Fluorescent double-immunocytochemical staining was carried out to evaluate the protein expression levels of HPV-E6 oncogene and caspase-3. Cell apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. Results showed that liposomal ATO was more effective than free ATO in reducing protein levels of HPV-E6 and inducing cell apoptosis in HeLa cells. Moreover, lower toxicity was observed when liposomal-delivered ATO was used. This could be explained by lower intracellular concentrations of arsenic. The slowly accumulated intracellular ATO through liposomal delivery might act as a reservoir which releases ATO gradually to maintain its anti-HPV effects. To conclude, liposome-delivered ATO could protect cells from the direct toxic effects induced by higher concentrations of intracellular ATO. Different pathways may be involved in this process, depending on local architecture of the tissues and HPV status.

  9. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Sarah C.; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Microparticles are elevated in the plasma in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. • These microparticles initiate apoptosis in cultured cells. • Microparticles contain caspase 3 and they activate receptors for TNF-α and TRAIL. - Abstract: Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells.

  10. Polymorphism of 41 kD Flagellin Gene and Its Human B-Cell Epitope in Borrelia burgdorferi Strains of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huixin; Liu, Wei; Hou, Xuexia; Zhang, Lin; Hao, Qin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    The 41 kD flagellin of Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi) is a major component of periplasmic flagellar filament core and a good candidate for serodiagnosis in early stage of Lyme disease. Here, we chose 89 B. burgdorferi strains in China, amplified the gene encoding the 41 kD flagellin, and compared the sequences. The results showed that genetic diversity presented in the 41 kD flagellin genes of all 89 strains among the four genotypes of B. burgdorferi, especially in the genotype of B. garinii. Some specific mutation sites for each genotype of the 41 kD flagellin genes were found, which could be used for genotyping B. burgdorferi strains in China. Human B-cell epitope analysis showed that thirteen of 15 nonsynonymous mutations occurred in the epitope region of 41 kD flagellin and thirty of 42 B-cell epitopes were altered due to all 13 nonsynonymous mutations in the epitope region, which may affect the function of the antigen. Nonsynonymous mutations and changed human B-cell epitopes exist in 41 kD flagellin of B. burgdorferi sensu lato strains; these changes should be considered in serodiagnosis of Lyme disease.

  11. Identification of Dominant Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Epitopes on the Hemagglutinin Antigen of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vikram; Yang, Zheng; Hung, Ivan Fan Ngai; Xu, Jianqing; Zheng, Bojian

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) bridges innate and adaptive immunity, and it involves both humoral and cellular immune responses. ADCC has been found to be a main route of immune protection against viral infections in vivo. Hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus is highly immunogenic and considered the most important target for immune protection. Several potent cross-reactive HA-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been reported, and their conserved neutralizing epitopes have been revealed, but there has been no report so far about ADCC epitopes on HA. Here we identified two dominant ADCC epitopes, designated E1 (amino acids [aa] 92 to 117) and E2 (aa 124 to 159), on HA of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus by epitope mapping of convalescent-phase plasma IgG antibodies from six H1N1-infected human subjects in China that exhibited different levels of ADCC activity. The E1 and E2 ADCC epitopes overlapped with immunodominant epitopes of HA. Depletion of purified patient plasma IgG antibodies with EBY100 yeast cells expressing E1 or E2 decreased the ADCC activity of the IgG antibodies. E1 and E2 sequences were found to be highly conserved in H1N1 strains but less so in other subtypes of influenza A viruses. Our study may aid in designing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with high ADCC activity. Vaccine immunogens designed to include the structural determinants of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies and ADCC epitopes may confer comprehensive immune protection against influenza virus infection. PMID:23487456

  12. In silico predicted conserved B-cell epitopes in the Merozoite Surface Antigen -2 family of B. bovis are neutralization-sensitive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Merozoite Surface Antigens-2 of Babesia bovis conform a family of GPI-anchored glycoproteins located at the parasite cell surface, that contain neutralization-sensitive B-cell epitopes, thus constituting putative vaccine candidates for bovine babesiosis. It was previously shown that (i) the MSA-...

  13. Salmonella expressing a T-cell epitope from Sendai virus are able to induce anti-infection immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Wang, Ye-Jun; White, Aaron P; Meng, Jia-Zi; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial fimbriae can accept foreign peptides and display them on the cell surface. A highly efficient gene replacement method was used to generate peptide vaccines based on Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. DNA encoding an epitope from Sendai virus, SV9 (Sendai virus nucleoprotein peptide 324-332, FAPGNYPAL), which is known to induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes, was incorporated into the gene encoding AgfA (the major subunit protein of thin aggregative fimbriae of Salmonella) by replacing an equal length DNA segment. To improve cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition, both termini of the peptide were flanked by double alanine (AA) or arginine (RR) residues. Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy using AgfA-specific antiserum verified the expression of chimeric AgfA; expression was also proved by a Congo red binding assay. Oral immunizations of C57BL/6 mice with the four strains induced an epitope-specific T-cell response (detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay). When the mice were challenged with the Sendai virus, the magnitude of the infection was significantly reduced in the immunized groups compared with the controls. The Salmonella fimbrial display system efficiently induces a cellular immune response and anti-infection immunity in vivo, providing a new strategy for the development of efficient peptide vaccination.

  14. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schock, Sarah C; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells.

  15. Identification of a human immunodominant B-cell epitope within the immunoglobulin A1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Francesca; Beghetto, Elisa; Spadoni, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca; Felici, Franco; Oggioni, Marco R; Gargano, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Background The IgA1 protease of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a proteolytic enzyme that specifically cleaves the hinge regions of human IgA1, which dominates most mucosal surfaces and is the major IgA isotype in serum. This protease is expressed in all of the known pneumococcal strains and plays a major role in pathogen's resistance to the host immune response. The present work was focused at identifying the immunodominant regions of pneumococcal IgA1 protease recognized by the human antibody response. Results An antigenic sequence corresponding to amino acids 420–457 (epiA) of the iga gene product was identified by screening a pneumococcal phage display library with patients' sera. The epiA peptide is conserved in all pneumococci and in two out of three S. mitis strains, while it is not present in other oral streptococci so far sequenced. This epitope was specifically recognized by antibodies present in sera from 90% of healthy adults, thus representing an important target of the humoral response to S. pneumoniae and S. mitis infection. Moreover, sera from 68% of children less than 4 years old reacted with the epiA peptide, indicating that the human immune response against streptococcal antigens occurs during childhood. Conclusion The broad and specific recognition of the epiA polypeptide by human sera demonstrate that the pneumococcal IgA1 protease contains an immunodominant B-cell epitope. The use of phage display libraries to identify microbe or disease-specific antigens recognized by human sera is a valuable approach to epitope discovery. PMID:18088426

  16. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  17. Identification of B-Cell Epitope of Dengue Virus Type 1 and Its Application in Diagnosis of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Han-Chung; Huang, Yue-Ling; Chao, Ting-Ting; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Huang, Jau-Ling; Chiang, Hsien-Yuan; King, Chwan-Chuen; Shaio, Men-Fang

    2001-01-01

    Using a serotype-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1), 15F3-1, we identified the B-cell epitope of DEN-1 from a random peptide library displayed on phage. Fourteen immunopositive phage clones that bound specifically to MAb 15F3-1 were selected. These phage-borne peptides had a consensus motif of HxYaWb (a = S/T, b = K/H/R) that mimicked the sequence HKYSWK, which corresponded to amino acid residues 111 to 116 of the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of DEN-1. Among the four synthetic peptides corresponding to amino acid residues 110 to 117 of the NS1 of DEN-1, -2, -3, and -4, only one peptide, EHKYSWKS (P14M) of DEN-1, was found to bind to 15F3-1 specifically. Furthermore, P14M was shown to inhibit the binding of phage particles to 15F3-1 in a competitive inhibition assay. Histidine111 (His111) was crucial to the binding of P14M to 15F3-1, since its binding activity dramatically reduced when it changed to leucine111 (Leu111). This epitope-based peptide demonstrated its clinical diagnostic potential when it reacted with a high degree of specificity with serum samples obtained from both DEN-1-infected rabbits and patients. Based on these observations, our DEN-1 epitope-based serologic test could be useful in laboratory viral diagnosis and in understanding the pathogenesis of DEN-1. PMID:11230414

  18. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934). Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex. PMID:21729328

  19. Therapeutic Vaccination against the Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus EBNA-1 Homologue, rhEBNA-1, Elicits T Cell Responses to Novel Epitopes in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Fogg, Mark H.; Leskowitz, Rachel M.; Ertl, Hildegund C.; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; Lieberman, Paul; Wang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a vaccine/immunotherapy target due to its association with several human malignancies. EBNA-1 is an EBV protein consistently expressed in all EBV-associated cancers. Herein, EBNA-1-specific T cell epitopes were evaluated after AdC–rhEBNA-1 immunizations in chronically lymphocryptovirus-infected rhesus macaques, an EBV infection model. Preexisting rhEBNA-1-specific responses were augmented in 4/12 animals, and new epitopes were recognized in 5/12 animals after vaccinations. This study demonstrated that EBNA-1-specific T cells can be expanded by vaccination. PMID:24089556

  20. Protective Effect of Human Leukocyte Antigen B27 in Hepatitis C Virus Infection Requires the Presence of a Genotype-Specific Immunodominant CD8+ T-Cell Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Nadine; Fitzmaurice, Karen; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Kemper, Michael N.; Humphreys, Isla; McKiernan, Susan; Kelleher, Dermot; Lohmann, Volker; Bowness, Paul; Huzly, Daniela; Rosen, Hugo R.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Allen, Todd M.; Barnes, Eleanor; Roggendorf, Michael; Blum, Hubert E.; Thimme, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is associated with protection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This protective role is linked to single immunodominant HLA-B27-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes in both infections. In order to define the relative contribution of a specific HLA-B27-restricted epitope to the natural course of HCV infection, we compared the biological impact of the highly conserved HCV genotype 1 epitope, for which the protective role has been described, with the corresponding region in genotype 3 that differs in its sequence by three amino acid residues. The genotype 3a peptide was not recognized by CD8+ T cells specific for the genotype 1 peptide. Furthermore, patients with acute or chronic infection with HCV genotype 3a did not mount T-cell responses to this epitope region, and their autologous viral sequences showed no evidence of T-cell pressure. Finally, we found a significantly higher frequency of HLA-B27 positivity in patients with chronic HCV genotype 3a infection compared to genotype 1 infection, indicating that there is no protection by HLA-B27 in HCV genotype 3 infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that the protective effect of HLA-B27 is limited to HCV genotype 1 infection and does not expand to other genotypes such as genotype 3a. This can most likely be explained by intergenotype sequence diversity leading to the loss of the immunodominant HLA-B27 epitope in viral strains other than genotype 1. Our results underline the central role of a single HLA-B27-restricted epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell response in mediating protection in HCV genotype 1 infection. PMID:20034048

  1. Reconstitution of CD8 T Cells Protective against Cytomegalovirus in a Mouse Model of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Dynamics and Inessentiality of Epitope Immunodominance

    PubMed Central

    Holtappels, Rafaela; Lemmermann, Niels A. W.; Podlech, Jürgen; Ebert, Stefan; Reddehase, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful reconstitution of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8+ T cells by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) gives a favorable prognosis for the control of CMV reactivation and prevention of CMV disease after hematoablative therapy of hematopoietic malignancies. In the transient immunocompromised state after HCT, pre-emptive cytoimmunotherapy with viral epitope-specific effector or memory CD8+ T cells is a promising option to speed up antiviral control. Despite high-coding capacity of CMVs and a broad CD8+ T-cell response on the population level, which reflects polymorphism in major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) glycoproteins, the response in terms of quantity of CD8+ T cells in any individual is directed against a limited set of CMV-encoded epitopes selected for presentation by the private repertoire of MHC-I molecules. Such epitopes are known as “immunodominant” epitopes (IDEs). Besides host immunogenetics, genetic variance in CMV strains harbored as latent viruses by an individual HCT recipient can also determine the set of IDEs, which complicates a “personalized immunotherapy.” It is, therefore, an important question if IDE-specific CD8+ T-cell reconstitution after HCT is critical or dispensable for antiviral control. As viruses with targeted mutations of IDEs cannot be experimentally tested in HCT patients, we employed the well-established mouse model of HCT. Notably, control of murine CMV (mCMV) after HCT was comparably efficient for IDE-deletion mutant mCMV-Δ4IDE and the corresponding IDE-expressing revertant virus mCMV-Δ4IDE-rev. Thus, antigenicity-loss mutations in IDEs do not result in loss-of-function of a polyclonal CD8+ T-cell population. Although IDE deletion was not associated with global changes in the response to non-IDE epitopes, the collective of non-IDE-specific CD8+ T-cells infiltrates infected tissue and confines infection within nodular inflammatory foci. We conclude from the model, and predict also for human

  2. Human neural stem cells can target and deliver therapeutic genes to breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kyeung Min; Park, In H; Shin, Ji Y; Jin, Juyoun; Kang, Bong Gu; Kim, Mi Hyun; Lee, Se Jeong; Jo, Mi-young; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2009-03-01

    The tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) led to the development of a novel strategy for delivering therapeutic genes to tumors in the brain. To apply this strategy to the treatment of brain metastases, we made a human NSC line expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD), which converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer agent. In vitro, the F3.CD cells significantly inhibited the growth of tumor cell lines in the presence of the prodrug 5-FC. In vivo, MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells were implanted into the brain of immune-deficient mouse stereotactically, and F3.CD cells were injected into the contralateral hemisphere followed by systemic 5-FC administration. The F3.CD cells migrated selectively into the brain metastases located in the opposite hemisphere and resulted in significantly reduced volumes. The F3.CD and 5-FC treatment also decreased both tumor volume and number of tumor mass significantly, when immune-deficient mouse had MDA-MB-435 cells injected into the internal carotid artery and F3.CD cells were transplanted into the contralateral brain hemisphere stereotactically. Taken together, brain transplantation of human NSCs, encoding the suicide enzyme CD, combined with systemic administration of the prodrug 5-FC, is an effective treatment regimen for brain metastases of tumors.

  3. Automatic Generation of Validated Specific Epitope Sets.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Pro, Sebastian; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of B and T cell responses is a valuable tool to study autoimmunity, allergies, immunity to pathogens, and host-pathogen interactions and assist in the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines and immunotherapies. In this context, it is desirable to elucidate a method to select validated reference sets of epitopes to allow detection of T and B cells. However, the ever-growing information contained in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) and the differences in quality and subjects studied between epitope assays make this task complicated. In this study, we develop a novel method to automatically select reference epitope sets according to a categorization system employed by the IEDB. From the sets generated, three epitope sets (EBV, mycobacteria and dengue) were experimentally validated by detection of T cell reactivity ex vivo from human donors. Furthermore, a web application that will potentially be implemented in the IEDB was created to allow users the capacity to generate customized epitope sets.

  4. Phase I active immunotherapy with combination of two chimeric, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, B-cell epitopes fused to a promiscuous T-cell epitope in patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu; Garrett, Joan; Rawale, Sharad V; Vicari, Daniele; Thurmond, Jennifer M; Lamb, Tammy; Mani, Aruna; Kane, Yahaira; Balint, Catherine R; Chalupa, Donald; Otterson, Gregory A; Shapiro, Charles L; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Grever, Michael R; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Carson, William E

    2009-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety profile, and immunogenicity of two chimeric, B-cell epitopes derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) extracellular domain in a combination vaccine with a promiscuous T-cell epitope (ie, MVF) and nor-muramyl-dipeptide as adjuvant emulsified in SEPPIC ISA 720. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors received three inoculations on days 1, 22, and 43 at doses of total peptide that ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mg. Immunogenicity was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and HER2 signaling assays. Results Twenty-four patients received three inoculations at the intended dose levels, which elicited antibodies able to recognize native HER2 receptor and inhibited both the proliferation of HER2-expressing cell lines and phosphorylation of the HER2 protein. The MTD was determined to be the highest dose level of 3.0 mg of the combination vaccine. There was a significant increase from dose level 1 (0.5 mg) to dose level 4 (3.0 mg) in HER2-specific antibodies. Four patients (one each with adrenal, colon, ovarian, and squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary) were judged to have stable disease; two patients (one each with endometrial and ovarian cancer) had partial responses; and 11 patients had progressive disease. Patients with stable disease received 6-month boosts, and one patient received a 20-month boost. CONCLUSION The combination vaccines were safe and effective in eliciting antibody responses in a subset of patients (62.5%) and were associated with no serious adverse events, autoimmune disease, or cardiotoxicity. There was preliminary evidence of clinical activity in several patients.

  5. Identification and characterization of CD4⁺ T-cell epitopes on GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Yao, Di; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xintong; Yu, Simiao; Wei, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhenghai; Sun, Hunan; Yu, Liquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Song, Baifen; Cui, Yudong

    2016-02-01

    The GapC protein is highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) and is shown to be involved in bacterial virulence. Immunization of GapC protein can induce specific CD4(+) T-cell immune responses and protect against S. dysgalactiae infection. However, there are no studies to identify immunodominant CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. In this study, in silico MHC affinity measurement method was firstly used to predict potential CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. Six predictive 15-mer peptides were synthesized and two novel GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, GapC63-77 and GapC96-110, were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from GapC-immunized BALB/c (H-2(d)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that peptides containing 63-77 and 96-110 induced significant antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells proliferation response in vivo. At the same time, high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A, as well as moderate levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were detected in CD4(+) T-cells isolated from both GapC and peptide-immunized mice in vivo, suggesting that GapC63-77 and GapC96-110 preferentially elicited polarized Th1/Th17-type responses. The characterization of GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes not only helps us understand its protective immunity, but also contributes to design effective T-cell epitope-based vaccine against S. dysgalactiae infection.

  6. Dendritic cell-mediated, DNA-based vaccination against hepatitis C induces the multi-epitope-specific response of humanized, HLA transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sasmita; Lavelle, Bianca J; Desrosiers, Joe; Ardito, Matt T; Terry, Frances; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S; Gregory, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the etiologic agent of chronic liver disease, hepatitis C. Spontaneous resolution of viral infection is associated with vigorous HLA class I- and class II-restricted T cell responses to multiple viral epitopes. Unfortunately, only 20% of patients clear infection spontaneously, most develop chronic disease and require therapy. The response to chemotherapy varies, however; therapeutic vaccination offers an additional treatment strategy. To date, therapeutic vaccines have demonstrated only limited success. Vector-mediated vaccination with multi-epitope-expressing DNA constructs alone or in combination with chemotherapy offers an additional treatment approach. Gene sequences encoding validated HLA-A2- and HLA-DRB1-restricted epitopes were synthesized and cloned into an expression vector. Dendritic cells (DCs) derived from humanized, HLA-A2/DRB1 transgenic (donor) mice were transfected with these multi-epitope-expressing DNA constructs. Recipient HLA-A2/DRB1 mice were vaccinated s.c. with transfected DCs; control mice received non-transfected DCs. Peptide-specific IFN-γ production by splenic T cells obtained at 5 weeks post-immunization was quantified by ELISpot assay; additionally, the production of IL-4, IL-10 and TNF-α were quantified by cytokine bead array. Splenocytes derived from vaccinated HLA-A2/DRB1 transgenic mice exhibited peptide-specific cytokine production to the vast majority of the vaccine-encoded HLA class I- and class II-restricted T cell epitopes. A multi-epitope-based HCV vaccine that targets DCs offers an effective approach to inducing a broad immune response and viral clearance in chronic, HCV-infected patients.

  7. Celiac disease T-cell epitopes from gamma-gliadins: immunoreactivity depends on the genome of origin, transcript frequency, and flanking protein variation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is caused by an uncontrolled immune response to gluten, a heterogeneous mixture of wheat storage proteins. The CD-toxicity of these proteins and their derived peptides is depending on the presence of specific T-cell epitopes (9-mer peptides; CD epitopes) that mediate the stimulation of HLA-DQ2/8 restricted T-cells. Next to the thoroughly characterized major T-cell epitopes derived from the α-gliadin fraction of gluten, γ-gliadin peptides are also known to stimulate T-cells of celiac disease patients. To pinpoint CD-toxic γ-gliadins in hexaploid bread wheat, we examined the variation of T-cell epitopes involved in CD in γ-gliadin transcripts of developing bread wheat grains. Results A detailed analysis of the genetic variation present in γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (T. aestivum, allo-hexaploid, carrying the A, B and D genome), together with genomic γ-gliadin sequences from ancestrally related diploid wheat species, enabled the assignment of sequence variants to one of the three genomic γ-gliadin loci, Gli-A1, Gli-B1 or Gli-D1. Almost half of the γ-gliadin transcripts of bread wheat (49%) was assigned to locus Gli-D1. Transcripts from each locus differed in CD epitope content and composition. The Gli-D1 transcripts contained the highest frequency of canonical CD epitope cores (on average 10.1 per transcript) followed by the Gli-A1 transcripts (8.6) and the Gli-B1 transcripts (5.4). The natural variants of the major CD epitope from γ-gliadins, DQ2-γ-I, showed variation in their capacity to induce in vitro proliferation of a DQ2-γ-I specific and HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell clone. Conclusions Evaluating the CD epitopes derived from γ-gliadins in their natural context of flanking protein variation, genome specificity and transcript frequency is a significant step towards accurate quantification of the CD toxicity of bread wheat. This approach can be used to predict relative levels of CD toxicity of individual wheat

  8. A rice-based edible vaccine expressing multiple T cell epitopes induces oral tolerance for inhibition of Th2-mediated IgE responses.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hidenori; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Lijun; Tada, Yoshifumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takamura, Kaoru; Ishimitsu, Ryotaro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2005-11-29

    Peptide immunotherapy using multiple predominant allergen-specific T cell epitopes is a safe and promising strategy for the control of type I allergy. In this study, we developed transgenic rice plants expressing mouse dominant T cell epitope peptides of Cry j I and Cry j II allergens of Japanese cedar pollen as a fusion protein with the soybean seed storage protein glycinin. Under the control of the rice seed storage protein glutelin GluB-1 promoter, the fusion protein was specifically expressed and accumulated in seeds at a level of 0.5% of the total seed protein. Oral feeding to mice of transgenic rice seeds expressing the T cell epitope peptides of Cry j I and Cry j II before systemic challenge with total protein of cedar pollen inhibited the development of allergen-specific serum IgE and IgG antibody and CD4(+) T cell proliferative responses. The levels of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cell-derived allergy-associated T helper 2 cytokine production of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 and histamine release in serum were significantly decreased. Moreover, the development of pollen-induced clinical symptoms was inhibited in our experimental sneezing mouse model. These results indicate the potential of transgenic rice seeds in production and mucosal delivery of allergen-specific T cell epitope peptides for the induction of oral tolerance to pollen allergens.

  9. H7N9 T-cell epitopes that mimic human sequences are less immunogenic and may induce Treg-mediated tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Moise, Leonard; Tassone, Ryan; Gutierrez, Andres H; Terry, Frances E; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin H7N9 influenza is a novel influenza A virus (IAV) that emerged in humans in China in 2013. Using immunoinformatics tools, we identified several H7N9 T cell epitopes with T cell receptor (TCR)-facing residues identical to those of multiple epitopes from human proteins. We hypothesized that host tolerance to these peptides may impair T helper response and contribute to the low titer, weak hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody responses and diminished seroconversion rates that have been observed in human H7N9 infections and vaccine trials. We found that the magnitude of human T effector responses to individual H7N9 peptides was inversely correlated with the peptide's resemblance to self. Furthermore, a promiscuous T cell epitope from the hemagglutinin (HA) protein suppressed responses to other H7N9 peptides when co-administered in vitro. Along with other highly ‘human-like’ peptides from H7N9, this peptide was also shown to expand FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Thus, H7N9 may be camouflaged from effective human immune response by T cell epitope sequences that avert or regulate effector T cell responses through host tolerance. PMID:26090577

  10. 5-Azacytidine delivered by mesoporous silica nanoparticles regulates the differentiation of P19 cells into cardiomyocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Ding, Qian; Wang, Jia; Deng, Lin; Yang, Lu; Tao, Lei; Lei, Haihong; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the deadliest diseases causing mortality due to the limited regenerative capability of highly differentiated cardiomyocytes. Stem cell-based therapy in tissue engineering is one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas and raises promising prospects for cardiac repair. In this study, we have synthesized FITC-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) based on a sol-gel method (known as Stöber's method) as a drug delivery platform to transport 5-azacytidine in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells. The surfactant CTAB is utilized as a liquid crystal template to self-aggregate into micelles, resulting in the synthesis of MSNs. Based on the cell viability assay, treatment with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine resulted in much more significant inhibition of the proliferation than 5-azacytidine alone. To study the mechanism, we have tested the differentiation genes and cardiac marker genes in P19 cells and found that these genes have been up-regulated in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cells treated with FMSNs + 5-azacytidine + poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), with the changes of histone modifications on the regulatory region. In conclusion, with FMSNs as drug delivery platforms, 5-azacytidine can be more efficiently delivered into stem cells and can be used to monitor and track the transfection process in situ to clarify their effects on stem cell functions and the differentiation process, which can serve as a promising tool in tissue engineering and other biomedical fields.

  11. A novel B cell epitope in cold-shock DEAD-box protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanan; Zhu, Ting; Yu, Shenye; Liu, Huifang; Wang, Xiumei; Chen, Liping; Si, Wei; Pang, Hai; Liu, Siguo

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a hybridoma-based technique and phage display technology were used to obtain mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against cold-shock DEAD-box protein A (CsdA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to determine the location of the relevant epitope. One highly specific mAb, named A3G5, was developed against the recombinant CsdA protein (rCsdA) and could detect rCsdA protein in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and Western blot assays. By screening a phage displayed library of random 12-mers (Ph.D.-12), 10 positive phage clones were randomly selected after three rounds of bio-panning and identified by ELISA. Eight of these clones were sequenced, and their amino acid sequences were deduced. One B-cell epitope (-APDPPLSRR-) in the rCsdA protein was identified with mAb A3G5. A synthetic peptide (-MAPDPPLSRR-) (Cpep) matched well with the CsdA sequence at 443-451 aa and was confirmed by affinity ELISA, competitive inhibition assays and the development of an immune response in mice. These results may be of great potential value in the further analysis of the function and structure of the CsdA protein from M. tuberculosis.

  12. Delivering hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemotherapeutics simultaneously by magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles to inhibit cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Jixi; Sun, Wei; Xie, Qian Reuben; Xia, Weiliang; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-01-01

    Using nanoparticles to deliver chemotherapeutics offers new opportunities for cancer therapy, but challenges still remain when they are used for the delivery of multiple drugs, especially for the synchronous delivery of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs in combination therapies. In this paper, we developed an approach to deliver hydrophilic-hydrophobic anticancer drug pairs by employing magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs). We prepared 50 nm-sized MMSNs with uniform pore size and evaluated their capability for the loading of two combinations of chemotherapeutics, namely doxorubicin-paclitaxel and doxorubicin-rapamycin, by means of sequential adsorption from the aqueous solution of doxorubicin and nonaqueous solutions of paclitaxel or rapamycin. Experimental results showed that the present strategy successfully realized the co-loading of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs with high-loading content and widely tunable ratio range. We elaborate on the theory behind the molecular interaction between the silica hydroxyl groups and drug molecules, which underlie the controllable loading, and the subsequent release of the drug pairs. Then we demonstrate that the multidrug-loaded MMSNs could be easily internalized by A549 human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells, and produce enhanced tumor cell apoptosis and growth inhibition as compared to single-drug loaded MMSNs. Our study thus realized simultaneous and dose-tunable delivery of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs, which were endowed with improved anticancer efficacy. This strategy could be readily extended to other chemotherapeutic combinations and might have clinically translatable significance.

  13. In silico Identification and Validation of a Linear and Naturally Immunogenic B-Cell Epitope of the Plasmodium vivax Malaria Vaccine Candidate Merozoite Surface Protein-9

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Singh, Balwan; Jiang, Jianlin; Meyer, Esmeralda V. S.; Santos, Fátima; Banic, Dalma Maria; Moreno, Alberto; Galinski, Mary R.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Joseli; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptide vaccines provide the advantages of safety, stability and low cost. The success of this approach is highly dependent on efficient epitope identification and synthetic strategies for efficacious delivery. In malaria, the Merozoite Surface Protein-9 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP9) has been considered a vaccine candidate based on the evidence that specific antibodies were able to inhibit merozoite invasion and recombinant proteins were highly immunogenic in mice and humans. However the identities of linear B-cell epitopes within PvMSP9 as targets of functional antibodies remain undefined. We used several publicly-available algorithms for in silico analyses and prediction of relevant B cell epitopes within PMSP9. We show that the tandem repeat sequence EAAPENAEPVHENA (PvMSP9E795-A808) present at the C-terminal region is a promising target for antibodies, given its high combined score to be a linear epitope and located in a putative intrinsically unstructured region of the native protein. To confirm the predictive value of the computational approach, plasma samples from 545 naturally exposed individuals were screened for IgG reactivity against the recombinant PvMSP9-RIRII729-972 and a synthetic peptide representing the predicted B cell epitope PvMSP9E795-A808. 316 individuals (58%) were responders to the full repetitive region PvMSP9-RIRII, of which 177 (56%) also presented total IgG reactivity against the synthetic peptide, confirming it validity as a B cell epitope. The reactivity indexes of anti-PvMSP9-RIRII and anti-PvMSP9E795-A808 antibodies were correlated. Interestingly, a potential role in the acquisition of protective immunity was associated with the linear epitope, since the IgG1 subclass against PvMSP9E795-A808 was the prevalent subclass and this directly correlated with time elapsed since the last malaria episode; however this was not observed in the antibody responses against the full PvMSP9-RIRII. In conclusion, our findings identified and

  14. Enhanced potency of cell-based therapy for ischemic tissue repair using an injectable bioactive epitope presenting nanofiber support matrix.

    PubMed

    Tongers, Jörn; Webber, Matthew J; Vaughan, Erin E; Sleep, Eduard; Renault, Marie-Ange; Roncalli, Jerome G; Klyachko, Ekaterina; Thorne, Tina; Yu, Yang; Marquardt, Katja-Theres; Kamide, Christine E; Ito, Aiko; Misener, Sol; Millay, Meredith; Liu, Ting; Jujo, Kentaro; Qin, Gangjian; Losordo, Douglas W; Stupp, Samuel I; Kishore, Raj

    2014-09-01

    The translation of cell-based therapies for ischemic tissue repair remains limited by several factors, including poor cell survival and limited target site retention. Advances in nanotechnology enable the development of specifically designed delivery matrices to address these limitations and thereby improve the efficacy of cell-based therapies. Given the relevance of integrin signaling for cellular homeostasis, we developed an injectable, bioactive peptide-based nanofiber matrix that presents an integrin-binding epitope derived from fibronectin, and evaluated its feasibility as a supportive artificial matrix for bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic cells (BMPACs) used as a therapy in ischemic tissue repair. Incubation of BMPACs with these peptide nanofibers in vitro significantly attenuated apoptosis while enhancing proliferation and adhesion. Pro-angiogenic function was enhanced, as cells readily formed tubes. These effects were, in part, mediated via p38, and p44/p42 MAP kinases, which are downstream pathways of focal adhesion kinase. In a murine model of hind limb ischemia, an intramuscular injection of BMPACs within this bioactive peptide nanofiber matrix resulted in greater retention of cells, enhanced capillary density, increased limb perfusion, reduced necrosis/amputation, and preserved function of the ischemic limb compared to treatment with cells alone. This self-assembling, bioactive peptide nanofiber matrix presenting an integrin-binding domain of fibronectin improves regenerative efficacy of cell-based strategies in ischemic tissue by enhancing cell survival, retention, and reparative functions.

  15. Delivering minocycline into brain endothelial cells with liposome-based technology.

    PubMed

    Xing, Changhong; Levchenko, Tatyana; Guo, Shuzhen; Stins, Monique; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Lo, Eng H

    2012-06-01

    Minocycline has been proposed as a way to blunt neurovascular injury from matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) during stroke. However, recent clinical trials suggest that high levels of minocycline may have deleterious side-effects. Here, we showed that very high minocycline concentrations damage endothelial cells via calpain/caspase pathways. To alleviate this potential cytotoxicity, we encapsulated minocycline in liposomes. Low concentrations of minocycline could not reduce tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced MMP-9 release from endothelial cells. But low concentrations of minocycline-loaded liposomes significantly reduced TNFα-induced MMP-9 release. This study provides proof-of-concept that liposomes may be used to deliver lower levels of minocycline for targeting MMPs in cerebral endothelium.

  16. T-cell epitope strength in WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas is an important determinant in PD1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Using the SV40 transgenic WAP-T/WAP-TNP mouse models for mammary carcinomas, we compared the response to immune checkpoint blockade therapy in tumor mice expressing either SV40 T-antigen containing the LCMV NP-epitope (T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice), or the unmodified T-antigen (T-Ag in WAP-T mice). Specifically, we asked, whether the presence of the highly immunogenic NP-epitope in T-AgNP influences this response in comparison to the weakly immunogenic T-cell epitopes of T-Ag in WAP-T tumor mice. Treatment of WAP-TNP tumor mice with either anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies led to tumor regression, with anti-PD-L1 treatment being more effective. However, tumors had fully re-appeared after 21 days, indicating that CTL exhaustion had been rapidly re-established. Surprisingly, the same treatment applied to WAP-T tumor mice resulted in a significantly prolonged period of tumor regression. We provide evidence that in contrast to the weak antigenic stimuli exerted by T-cell epitopes of T-Ag, the strong antigenic stimulus of the NP-epitope in T-AgNP has a dual effect: (i) a rapid generation of active NP-specific CTLs, accompanied (ii) by accelerated CTL exhaustion. Our data support the hypothesis that the immunogenicity of tumor antigen T-cell epitopes strongly influences the success of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27579535

  17. Identification of conserved subdominant HIV Type 1 CD8(+) T Cell epitopes restricted within common HLA Supertypes for therapeutic HIV Type 1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Kløverpris, Henrik; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Stryhn, Anette; Buus, Søren; Karlsson, Annika; Vinner, Lasse; Goulder, Philip; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2012-11-01

    The high HIV-1 prevalence, up to 4.6% in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, makes it a relevant location for testing of therapeutic vaccines. With the aim of performing a clinical study in Guinea-Bissau, after first testing the vaccine for safety in Denmark, Europe, we here describe the design of a universal epitope peptide-based T cell vaccine with relevance for any geographic locations. The two major obstacles when designing such a vaccine are the high diversities of the HIV-1 genome and of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. We selected 15 CD8-restricted epitopes predicted from conserved regions of HIV-1 that were subdominant (i.e., infrequently targeted) within natural infections. Moreover, the epitopes were predicted to be restricted to at least one of the five common HLA supertypes (HLA-A01, A02, A03, B07, and B44). Here, we validated the resulting peptide-specific, HLA-restricted T cell specificities using peptide-MHC class I tetramer labeling of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. The selected vaccine epitopes are infrequently targeted in HIV-1-infected individuals from both locations. Moreover, we HLA-typed HIV-1-infected individuals and demonstrated that the selected vaccine epitopes, when targeted, are restricted to the five most common HLA supertypes at both locations. Thus, the HLA supertype-directed approach achieved HLA coverage of 95% and 100% of the examined cohorts in Guinea-Bissau and Denmark, respectively. In conclusion, the selected vaccine epitopes match the host populations and HIV-1 strains of these two distant geographic regions, justifying clinical testing in both locations.

  18. Agrobacterium delivers VirE2 protein into host cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyang; Pan, Shen Q.

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens can cause crown gall tumors on a wide range of host plants. As a natural genetic engineer, the bacterium can transfer both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) [transferred DNA (T-DNA)] molecules and bacterial virulence proteins into various recipient cells. Among Agrobacterium-delivered proteins, VirE2 is an ssDNA binding protein that is involved in various steps of the transformation process. However, it is not clear how plant cells receive the T-DNA or protein molecules. Using a split–green fluorescent protein approach, we monitored the VirE2 delivery process inside plant cells in real time. We observed that A. tumefaciens delivered VirE2 from the bacterial lateral sides that were in close contact with plant membranes. VirE2 initially accumulated on plant cytoplasmic membranes at the entry points. VirE2-containing membranes were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis to form endomembrane compartments. VirE2 colocalized with the early endosome marker SYP61 but not with the late endosome marker ARA6, suggesting that VirE2 escaped from early endosomes for subsequent trafficking inside the cells. Dual endocytic motifs at the carboxyl-terminal tail of VirE2 were involved in VirE2 internalization and could interact with the μ subunit of the plant clathrin-associated adaptor AP2 complex (AP2M). Both the VirE2 cargo motifs and AP2M were important for the transformation process. Because AP2-mediated endocytosis is well conserved, our data suggest that the A. tumefaciens pathogen hijacks conserved endocytic pathways to facilitate the delivery of virulence factors. This might be important for Agrobacterium to achieve both a wide host range and a high transformation efficiency. PMID:28345032

  19. Mapping IgE-binding epitopes of Ric c 1 and Ric c 3, allergens from Ricinus communis, by mast cell degranulation assay.

    PubMed

    Felix, S P; Mayerhoffer, R O; Damatta, R A; Verícimo, M A; Nascimento, V V; Machado, O L T

    2008-04-01

    Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 are the major castor bean allergens. In order to identify continuous IgE-epitopes in Ric c 1 and Ric c 3, pools of sera from rats immunized with a pool of 2S albumin from these seeds, Ric c 1 and Ric c 3 overlapping synthetic peptides, were used to screen for IgE-binding epitopes. The allergenic properties were monitored by mast cell degranulation assays, histamine quantification and human-IgE binding. Large and small chains isolated from these proteins present allergenic properties. Four continuous epitopes were identified in Ric c 3 and two in Ric c 1. This knowledge may allow the induction of protective antibody responses to antagonize the IgE recognition.

  20. Analysis of the T Cell Response to Zika Virus and Identification of a Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitope in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pardy, Ryan D.; Rajah, Maaran M.; Taylor, Nathan G.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV infection is typically mild and self-limiting in healthy adults, infection has been associated with neurological symptoms such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, and a causal link has been established between fetal microcephaly and ZIKV infection during pregnancy. These risks, and the magnitude of the ongoing ZIKV pandemic, have created an urgent need for the development of animal models to study the immune response to ZIKV infection. Previous animal models have primarily focused on pathogenesis in immunocompromised mice. In this study, we provide a model of ZIKV infection in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, and have provided an analysis of the immune response to infection. We evaluated the activation of several innate immune cell types, and studied the kinetics, phenotype, and functionality of T cell responses to ZIKV infection. Our results demonstrate that ZIKV infection is mild in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, resulting in minimal morbidity. Our data establish that at the peak of the adaptive response, antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells polarize to a Th1 phenotype, and antigen-experienced CD8+ T cells exhibit an activated effector phenotype, producing both effector cytokines and cytolytic molecules. Furthermore, we have identified a novel ZIKV CD8+ T cell epitope in the envelope protein that is recognized by the majority of responding cells. Our model provides an important reference point that will help dissect the impact of polymorphisms in the circulating ZIKV strains on the immune response and ZIKV pathogenesis. In addition, the identification of a ZIKV epitope will allow for the design of tetramers to study epitope-specific T cell responses, and will have important implications for the design and development of ZIKV vaccine strategies. PMID:28231312

  1. Analysis of the T Cell Response to Zika Virus and Identification of a Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitope in Immunocompetent Mice.

    PubMed

    Pardy, Ryan D; Rajah, Maaran M; Condotta, Stephanie A; Taylor, Nathan G; Sagan, Selena M; Richer, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV infection is typically mild and self-limiting in healthy adults, infection has been associated with neurological symptoms such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, and a causal link has been established between fetal microcephaly and ZIKV infection during pregnancy. These risks, and the magnitude of the ongoing ZIKV pandemic, have created an urgent need for the development of animal models to study the immune response to ZIKV infection. Previous animal models have primarily focused on pathogenesis in immunocompromised mice. In this study, we provide a model of ZIKV infection in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, and have provided an analysis of the immune response to infection. We evaluated the activation of several innate immune cell types, and studied the kinetics, phenotype, and functionality of T cell responses to ZIKV infection. Our results demonstrate that ZIKV infection is mild in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, resulting in minimal morbidity. Our data establish that at the peak of the adaptive response, antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells polarize to a Th1 phenotype, and antigen-experienced CD8+ T cells exhibit an activated effector phenotype, producing both effector cytokines and cytolytic molecules. Furthermore, we have identified a novel ZIKV CD8+ T cell epitope in the envelope protein that is recognized by the majority of responding cells. Our model provides an important reference point that will help dissect the impact of polymorphisms in the circulating ZIKV strains on the immune response and ZIKV pathogenesis. In addition, the identification of a ZIKV epitope will allow for the design of tetramers to study epitope-specific T cell responses, and will have important implications for the design and development of ZIKV vaccine strategies.

  2. Monocyte derived microvesicles deliver a cell death message via encapsulated caspase-1.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anasuya; Mitra, Srabani; Mehta, Sonya; Raices, Raquel; Wewers, Mark D

    2009-09-25

    Apoptosis depends upon the activation of intracellular caspases which are classically induced by either an intrinsic (mitochondrial based) or extrinsic (cytokine) pathway. However, in the process of explaining how endotoxin activated monocytes are able to induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells when co-cultured, we uncovered a transcellular apoptosis inducing pathway that utilizes caspase-1 containing microvesicles. Endotoxin stimulated monocytes induce the cell death of VSMCs but this activity is found in 100,000 g pellets of cell free supernatants of these monocytes. This activity is not a direct effect of endotoxin, and is inhibited by the caspase-1 inhibitor YVADcmk but not by inhibitors of Fas-L, IL-1beta and IL-18. Importantly, the apoptosis inducing activity co-purifies with 100 nm sized microvesicles as determined by TEM of the pellets. These microvesicles contain caspase-1 and caspase-1 encapsulation is required since disruption of microvesicular integrity destroys the apoptotic activity but not the caspase-1 enzymatic activity. Thus, monocytes are capable of delivering a cell death message which depends upon the release of microvesicles containing functional caspase-1. This transcellular apoptosis induction pathway describes a novel pathway for inflammation induced programmed cell death.

  3. Monocyte Derived Microvesicles Deliver a Cell Death Message via Encapsulated Caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anasuya; Mitra, Srabani; Mehta, Sonya; Raices, Raquel; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis depends upon the activation of intracellular caspases which are classically induced by either an intrinsic (mitochondrial based) or extrinsic (cytokine) pathway. However, in the process of explaining how endotoxin activated monocytes are able to induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells when co-cultured, we uncovered a transcellular apoptosis inducing pathway that utilizes caspase-1 containing microvesicles. Endotoxin stimulated monocytes induce the cell death of VSMCs but this activity is found in 100,000 g pellets of cell free supernatants of these monocytes. This activity is not a direct effect of endotoxin, and is inhibited by the caspase-1 inhibitor YVADcmk but not by inhibitors of Fas-L, IL-1β and IL-18. Importantly, the apoptosis inducing activity co-purifies with 100 nm sized microvesicles as determined by TEM of the pellets. These microvesicles contain caspase-1 and caspase-1 encapsulation is required since disruption of microvesicular integrity destroys the apoptotic activity but not the caspase-1 enzymatic activity. Thus, monocytes are capable of delivering a cell death message which depends upon the release of microvesicles containing functional caspase-1. This transcellular apoptosis induction pathway describes a novel pathway for inflammation induced programmed cell death. PMID:19779610

  4. Synthetic Long Peptide Influenza Vaccine Containing Conserved T and B Cell Epitopes Reduces Viral Load in Lungs of Mice and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl Huber, S. K.; Camps, M. G. M.; Jacobi, R. H. J.; Mouthaan, J.; van Dijken, H.; van Beek, J.; Ossendorp, F.; de Jonge, J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently licensed influenza vaccines mainly induce antibodies against highly variable epitopes. Due to antigenic drift, protection is subtype or strain-specific and regular vaccine updates are required. In case of antigenic shifts, which have caused several pandemics in the past, completely new vaccines need to be developed. We set out to develop a vaccine that provides protection against a broad range of influenza viruses. Therefore, highly conserved parts of the influenza A virus (IAV) were selected of which we constructed antibody and T cell inducing peptide-based vaccines. The B epitope vaccine consists of the highly conserved HA2 fusion peptide and M2e peptide coupled to a CD4 helper epitope. The T epitope vaccine comprises 25 overlapping synthetic long peptides of 26-34 amino acids, thereby avoiding restriction for a certain MHC haplotype. These peptides are derived from nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1) and matrix protein 1 (M1). C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice, and ferrets were vaccinated with the B epitopes, 25 SLP or a combination of both. Vaccine-specific antibodies were detected in sera of mice and ferrets and vaccine-specific cellular responses were measured in mice. Following challenge, both mice and ferrets showed a reduction of virus titers in the lungs in response to vaccination. Summarizing, a peptide-based vaccine directed against conserved parts of influenza virus containing B and T cell epitopes shows promising results for further development. Such a vaccine may reduce disease burden and virus transmission during pandemic outbreaks. PMID:26046664

  5. Mapping and comparison of the B-cell epitopes recognized on the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein by immune Colombians and immunized Aotus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Herrera, M; Roggero, M A; Gonzalez, J M; Vergara, J; Corradin, G; López, J A; Herrera, S

    1998-07-01

    Plasma samples of individuals from two malaria-endemic villages on the Colombian Pacific coast and synthetic peptides representing different fragments of the central and flanking regions of the Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were used to perform a fine mapping of the B-cell epitopes on the whole CSP. In addition, the immunogenicity of long polypeptides corresponding to the amino (N) and carboxyl (C) regions was evaluated in Aotus monkeys. The epitopes recognized after natural infection of humans and after immunization of Aotus with these synthetic peptides were compared. Human samples more frequently contained specific antibodies to the central region. The type-I repeat region of the CSP was predominantly recognized by the human sera (by 68% of those from the village of Zacarías and 75% of those from Bajo Calima), a significantly smaller population reacting with the type-II repeat (20% and 11%, respectively). Most of the sera reacting with the type-I repeat recognized the minimal epitope AGDR. Although the N- and C-terminal polypeptides were both highly immunogenic in Aotus and induced long-lasting antibodies, titres of antibodies to the C-terminal polypeptide were higher than those of antibodies to the N-terminal. Competitive inhibition assays performed using human and monkey plasma allowed the identification of dominant B-cell epitopes on sequence 71-90 (p8) from the amino region and sequence 332-361 (p24/p25) from the carboxyl region. The high prevalence of naturally induced antibodies to the three epitopes, the possible functional role of the corresponding sequences, and the high immunogenicity of these epitopes in Aotus could be of great importance in the development of a malaria vaccine based on P. vivax CSP.

  6. New frontiers in human cell biology and medicine: can pluripotent stem cells deliver?

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-12

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide enormous opportunities to treat disease using cell therapy. But human stem cells can also drive biomedical and cell biological discoveries in a human model system, which can be directly linked to understanding disease or developing new therapies. Finally, rigorous scientific studies of these cells can and should inform the many science and medical policy issues that confront the translation of these technologies to medicine. In this paper, I discuss these issues using amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as an example.

  7. CD4+ T cell epitopes of FliC conserved between strains of Burkholderia - implications for vaccines against melioidosis and Cepacia Complex in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Musson, Julie A.; Reynolds, Catherine J; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Khaenam, Prasong; Favry, Emmanuel; Spink, Natasha; Chu, Karen KY; De Soyza, Anthony; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M.; Robinson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp), is the causative agent of melioidosis, characterized by pneumonia and fatal septicemia and prevalent in SE Asia. Related Burkholderia species are strong risk factors of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). The Bp flagellar protein FliC is strongly seroreactive and vaccination protects challenged mice. We assessed Bp FliC peptide binding affinity to multiple HLA class II alleles, then assessed CD4 T cell immunity in HLA class II transgenic mice and in seropositive individuals in Thailand. T cell hybridomas were generated to investigate cross-reactivity between Bp and the related Burkholderia species associated with Cepacia Complex CF. Bp FliC contained several peptide sequences with ability to bind multiple HLA class II alleles. Several peptides were shown to encompass strong CD4 T cell epitopes in Bp-exposed individuals and in HLA transgenic mice. In particular, the p38 epitope is robustly recognized by CD4 T cells of seropositive donors across diverse HLA haplotypes. T cell hybridomas against an immunogenic Bp FliC epitope also cross-reacted with orthologous FliC sequences from B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia, important pathogens in CF. Epitopes within FliC were accessible for processing and presentation from live or heat-killed bacteria, demonstrating that flagellin enters the HLA class II antigen presentation pathway during infection of macrophages with B. cenocepacia. Collectively, the data support the possibility of incorporating FliC T cell epitopes into vaccination programs targeting both at-risk individuals in Bp endemic regions as well as CF patients. PMID:25392525

  8. CD4+ T cell epitopes of FliC conserved between strains of Burkholderia: implications for vaccines against melioidosis and cepacia complex in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Musson, Julie A; Reynolds, Catherine J; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Khaenam, Prasong; Favry, Emmanuel; Spink, Natasha; Chu, Karen K Y; De Soyza, Anthony; Bancroft, Gregory J; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Maillere, Bernard; Boyton, Rosemary J; Altmann, Daniel M; Robinson, John H

    2014-12-15

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis characterized by pneumonia and fatal septicemia and prevalent in Southeast Asia. Related Burkholderia species are strong risk factors of mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF). The B. pseudomallei flagellar protein FliC is strongly seroreactive and vaccination protects challenged mice. We assessed B. pseudomallei FliC peptide binding affinity to multiple HLA class II alleles and then assessed CD4 T cell immunity in HLA class II transgenic mice and in seropositive individuals in Thailand. T cell hybridomas were generated to investigate cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and the related Burkholderia species associated with Cepacia Complex CF. B. pseudomallei FliC contained several peptide sequences with ability to bind multiple HLA class II alleles. Several peptides were shown to encompass strong CD4 T cell epitopes in B. pseudomallei-exposed individuals and in HLA transgenic mice. In particular, the p38 epitope is robustly recognized by CD4 T cells of seropositive donors across diverse HLA haplotypes. T cell hybridomas against an immunogenic B. pseudomallei FliC epitope also cross-reacted with orthologous FliC sequences from Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia, important pathogens in CF. Epitopes within FliC were accessible for processing and presentation from live or heat-killed bacteria, demonstrating that flagellin enters the HLA class II Ag presentation pathway during infection of macrophages with B. cenocepacia. Collectively, the data support the possibility of incorporating FliC T cell epitopes into vaccination programs targeting both at-risk individuals in B. pseudomallei endemic regions as well as CF patients.

  9. Specific subcellular localization of siRNAs delivered by lipoplex in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Carole; Thierry, Alain R

    2007-10-01

    In order to better understand the mechanism of delivery of siRNAs by lipid-based vectors, we investigated the subcellular distribution of siRNAs directed against cyclin D1 delivered by the DLS system in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Cells were treated with cyclopentenone or 17beta-estradiol to modulate the level of expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. We qualitatively observed that siRNA localized to specific cytoplasmic compartments in the periphery of the nucleus in granular-like structures that do not correspond to early endosomal vesicles. In cells treated with either cyclopentenone or 17beta-estradiol cellular distribution of siRNAs was not affected but variations in the amount of siRNAs present in cells were found. We suggest these variations might be associated with the effects of cyclopentenone and 17beta-estradiol in cyclin D1 gene expression. Low cytotoxicity and highly cellular uptake of lipoplexes was observed in the presence of serum indicating that the DLS system could be a useful tool for siRNA vectorization in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Identification of a Conserved Linear B-Cell Epitope of Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC Protein by Screening Phage-Displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Wang, Xintong; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    The GapC of Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective humoral immune response in animals. However, B-cell epitopes on the S. dysgalactiae GapC have not been well identified. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb5B7) against the GapC1-150 protein was prepared. After passive transfer, mAb5B7 could partially protect mice against S. dysgalactiae infection. Eleven positive phage clones recognized by mAb5B7 were identified by screening phage-displayed random 12-peptide library, most of which matched the consensus motif DTTQGRFD. The motif sequence exactly matches amino acids 48-55 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC protein. In addition, the motif 48DTTQGRFD55 shows high homology among various streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues D48, T50, Q51, G52 and F54 formed the core motif of 48DTTQGRFD55. This motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb5B7. As expected, epitope-peptide evoked protective immune response against S. dysgalactiae infection in immunized mice. Taken together, this identified conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC could provide very valuable insights for vaccine design against S. dysgalactiae infection. PMID:26121648

  11. A nondenatured, noncrosslinked collagen matrix to deliver stem cells to the heart

    PubMed Central

    Kouris, Nicholas A; Squirrell, Jayne M; Jung, Jangwook P; Pehlke, Carolyn A; Hacker, Timothy; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Ogle, Brenda M

    2011-01-01

    Aims Stem cell transplantation holds promise as a therapeutic approach for the repair of damaged myocardial tissue. One challenge of this approach is efficient delivery and long-term retention of the stem cells. Although several synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed for this purpose, the ideal formulation has yet to be identified. Materials & methods Here we investigate the utility of a nondenatured, noncrosslinked, commercially available natural biomaterial (TissueMend® [TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, USA]) for delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the murine heart. Results We found that MSCs attached, proliferated and migrated within and out of the TissueMend matrix in vitro. Human MSCs delivered to damaged murine myocardium via the matrix (2.3 × 104 ± 0.8 × 104 CD73+ cells/matrix) were maintained in vivo for 3 weeks and underwent at least three population doublings during that period (21.9 × 104 ± 14.4 × 104 CD73+ cells/matrix). In addition, collagen within the TissueMend matrix could be remodeled by MSCs in vivo, resulting in a significant decrease in the coefficient of alignment of fibers (0.12 ± 0.12) compared with the matrix alone (0.28 ± 0.07), and the MSCs were capable of migrating out of the matrix and into the host tissue. Conclusion Thus, TissueMend matrix offers a commercially available, biocompatible and malleable vehicle for the delivery and retention of stem cells to the heart. PMID:21916593

  12. Vertical silicon nanowires as a universal platform for delivering biomolecules into living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shalek, Alex K.; Robinson, Jacob T.; Karp, Ethan S.; Lee, Jin Seok; Ahn, Dae-Ro; Yoon, Myung-Han; Sutton, Amy; Jorgolli, Marsela; Gertner, Rona S.; Gujral, Taranjit S.; MacBeath, Gavin; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Park, Hongkun

    2010-01-01

    A generalized platform for introducing a diverse range of biomolecules into living cells in high-throughput could transform how complex cellular processes are probed and analyzed. Here, we demonstrate spatially localized, efficient, and universal delivery of biomolecules into immortalized and primary mammalian cells using surface-modified vertical silicon nanowires. The method relies on the ability of the silicon nanowires to penetrate a cell’s membrane and subsequently release surface-bound molecules directly into the cell’s cytosol, thus allowing highly efficient delivery of biomolecules without chemical modification or viral packaging. This modality enables one to assess the phenotypic consequences of introducing a broad range of biological effectors (DNAs, RNAs, peptides, proteins, and small molecules) into almost any cell type. We show that this platform can be used to guide neuronal progenitor growth with small molecules, knock down transcript levels by delivering siRNAs, inhibit apoptosis using peptides, and introduce targeted proteins to specific organelles. We further demonstrate codelivery of siRNAs and proteins on a single substrate in a microarray format, highlighting this technology’s potential as a robust, monolithic platform for high-throughput, miniaturized bioassays. PMID:20080678

  13. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomarasca, Marta; F C Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens.

  14. Design and pre-clinical development of epitope-based DNA vaccines against B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Fazio, Vito Michele; Rinaldi, Monica

    2011-10-01

    Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. The unique immunoglobulin (Ig) idiotype on the surface of each B-cell lymphoma represents an ideal tumor-specific antigen for use as a cancer vaccine. It has been theorized that effective cancer vaccines can be developed using the minimum essential subset of T cell and B cell epitopes that comprise the 'immunome', the universe of neoplasm-derived peptides that interface with B and T cells of the host immune system. Idiotypic antigenic determinants of a B-cell lymphoma lie within the hypervariable regions and mainly within the complementarity-determining regions (CDR)s 3. Thus, the CDR3s are considered a "hot spot" of particular interest for construction of subunit vaccines. DNA vaccines, whose safety and tolerability are substantiated in completed and ongoing clinical trials, have emerged as a novel lymphoma vaccine formulation for antigen-specific immunotherapy. The molecular precision tools offered by gene-based vaccines allow to explore the use of CDR3 sequence as an anti-lymphoma vaccine.

  15. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  16. A novel approach to the identification of T-cell epitopes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using human T-lymphocyte clones.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J R; Young, D B

    1987-01-01

    Current approaches to the analysis of antigens involved in the cellular immune response to mycobacterial infection rely on the initial identification and isolation of molecular components using monoclonal antibodies. In order to overcome the constraints of this approach, we have utilized a procedure involving T-cell recognition of antigens fractionated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and added to proliferation assays after blotting onto nitrocellulose membranes. Analysis of human T-cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG by this procedure revealed distinctive patterns of reactivity to different molecular weight components indicative of the selective recognition of immunodominant and species-specific determinants. Human T-cell clones were subsequently derived, and SDS-PAGE immunoblotting was used to identify the antigen recognized by each clone. Three epitopes defined by individual T-cell clones were identified on separate polypeptides with molecular weights 16,000-18,000 (clone P53), 18,000-20,000 (clone P57) and 52,000-55,000 (clone P35). This study demonstrates the potential application of T-cell cloning in conjunction with SDS-PAGE immunoblotting for the dissection and analysis of the cellular immune response to pathogenic agents during human infection. Images Figure 1 PMID:2434413

  17. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  18. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P < 0.015). Conclusions. The results of this preclinical trial support the screening strategy used to select the HSV-1 ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes, emphasize their valuable immunogenic and protective efficacy against ocular herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  19. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen's possible immune evasion mechanisms.

  20. Sulfation of the FLAG epitope is affected by co-expression of G protein-coupled receptors in a mammalian cell model

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Morag Rose; Grimsey, Natasha Lillia; Glass, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets and therefore extensively studied. Like most transmembrane proteins, there has been considerable difficulty in developing reliable specific antibodies for them. To overcome this, epitope tags are often used to facilitate antibody recognition in studies on fundamental receptor signalling and trafficking. In our study of cannabinoid CB1/dopamine D2 interactions we sought to generate HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged D2 for use in antibody-based assays of GPCR localisation and trafficking activity, however observed that stable FLAG-hD2 expression was particularly challenging to maintain. In contrast, when expressed in cell lines expressing hCB1 robust and stable FLAG-hD2 expression was observed. We hypothesised that co-expression of CB1 might stabilise surface FLAG-hD2 expression, and therefore investigated this further. Here, we describe the observation that co-expression of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors in HEK293 decreases the sulfation of a FLAG epitope appended at the N-terminus of the dopamine D2 receptor. Sulfation alters epitope recognition by some anti-FLAG antibodies, leading to the detection of fewer receptors, even though expression is maintained. This demonstrates that cannabinoid receptor expression modifies posttranslational processing of the FLAG-hD2 receptor, and importantly, has wider implications for the utilisation and interpretation of receptor studies involving epitope tags. PMID:27273047

  1. Heterogeneity of silica and glycan-epitope distribution in epidermal idioblast cell walls in Adiantum raddianum laminae.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Olivier; Leroux, Frederic; Mastroberti, Alexandra Antunes; Santos-Silva, Fernanda; Van Loo, Denis; Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Bals, Sara; Popper, Zoë A; de Araujo Mariath, Jorge Ernesto

    2013-06-01

    Laminae of Adiantum raddianum Presl., a fern belonging to the family Pteridaceae, are characterised by the presence of epidermal fibre-like cells under the vascular bundles. These cells were thought to contain silica bodies, but their thickened walls leave no space for intracellular silica suggesting it may actually be deposited within their walls. Using advanced electron microscopy in conjunction with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis we showed the presence of silica in the cell walls of the fibre-like idioblasts. However, it was specifically localised to the outer layers of the periclinal wall facing the leaf surface, with the thick secondary wall being devoid of silica. Immunocytochemical experiments were performed to ascertain the respective localisation of silica deposition and glycan polymers. Epitopes characteristic for pectic homogalacturonan and the hemicelluloses xyloglucan and mannan were detected in most epidermal walls, including the silica-rich cell wall layers. The monoclonal antibody, LM6, raised against pectic arabinan, labelled the silica-rich primary wall of the epidermal fibre-like cells and the guard cell walls, which were also shown to contain silica. We hypothesise that the silicified outer wall layers of the epidermal fibre-like cells support the lamina during cell expansion prior to secondary wall formation. This implies that silicification does not impede cell elongation. Although our results suggest that pectic arabinan may be implicated in silica deposition, further detailed analyses are needed to confirm this. The combinatorial approach presented here, which allows correlative screening and in situ localisation of silicon and cell wall polysaccharide distribution, shows great potential for future studies.

  2. Inhibition of serine-peptidase activity enhances the generation of a survivin-derived HLA-A2-presented CTL epitope in colon-carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Preta, G; Marescotti, D; Fortini, C; Carcoforo, P; Castelli, C; Masucci, M; Gavioli, R

    2008-12-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes eliminate tumor cells expressing antigenic peptides in the context of MHC-I molecules. Peptides are generated during protein degradation by the proteasome and resulting products, surviving cytosolic amino-peptidases activity, may be presented by MHC-I molecules. The MHC-I processing pathway is altered in a large number of malignancies and modulation of antigen generation is one strategy employed by cells to evade immune control. In this study we analyzed the generation and presentation of a survivin-derived CTL epitope in HLA-A2-positive colon-carcinoma cells. Although all cell lines expressed the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, some tumors were poorly recognized by ELTLGEFLKL (ELT)-specific CTL cultures. The expression of MHC-I or TAP molecules was similar in all cell lines suggesting that tumors not recognized by CTLs may present defects in the generation of the ELT-epitope which could be due either to lack of generation or to subsequent degradation of the epitope. The cells were analyzed for the expression and the activity of extra-proteasomal peptidases. A significant overexpression and higher activity of TPPII was observed in colon-carcinoma cells which are not killed by ELT-specific CTLs, suggesting a possible role of TPPII in the degradation of the ELT-epitope. To confirm the role of TPPII in the degradation of the ELT-peptide, we showed that treatment of colon-carcinoma cells with a TPPII inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent increased sensitivity to ELT-specific CTLs. These results suggest that TPPII is involved in degradation of the ELT-peptide, and its overexpression may contribute to the immune escape of colon-carcinoma cells.

  3. Plasmodium vivax Cell-Traversal Protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites: Naturally Acquired Humoral Immune Response and B-Cell Epitope Mapping in Brazilian Amazon Inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Soares, Isabela Ferreira; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Têva, Antônio; Ramos Franco, Antônia Maria; Pinheiro, Francimeire Gomes; Chaves, Lana Bitencourt; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Banic, Dalma Maria; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2017-01-01

    The cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS), a highly conserved antigen involved in sporozoite motility, plays an important role in the traversal of host cells during the preerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium species. Recently, it has been considered an alternative target when designing novel antimalarial vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum. However, the potential of Plasmodium vivax CelTOS as a vaccine target is yet to be explored. This study evaluated the naturally acquired immune response against a recombinant P. vivax CelTOS (PvCelTOS) (IgG and IgG subclass) in 528 individuals from Brazilian Amazon, as well as the screening of B-cell epitopes in silico and peptide assays to associate the breadth of antibody responses of those individuals with exposition and/or protection correlates. We show that PvCelTOS is naturally immunogenic in Amazon inhabitants with 94 individuals (17.8%) showing specific IgG antibodies against the recombinant protein. Among responders, the IgG reactivity indexes (RIs) presented a direct correlation with the number of previous malaria episodes (p = 0.003; r = 0.315) and inverse correlation with the time elapsed from the last malaria episode (p = 0.031; r = -0.258). Interestingly, high responders to PvCelTOS (RI > 2) presented higher number of previous malaria episodes, frequency of recent malaria episodes, and ratio of cytophilic/non-cytophilic antibodies than low responders (RI < 2) and non-responders (RI < 1). Moreover, a high prevalence of the cytophilic antibody IgG1 over all other IgG subclasses (p < 0.0001) was observed. B-cell epitope mapping revealed five immunogenic regions in PvCelTOS, but no associations between the specific IgG response to peptides and exposure/protection parameters were found. However, the epitope (PvCelTOSI136-E143) was validated as a main linear B-cell epitope, as 92% of IgG responders to PvCelTOS were also responders to this peptide sequence. This

  4. Plasmodium vivax Cell-Traversal Protein for Ookinetes and Sporozoites: Naturally Acquired Humoral Immune Response and B-Cell Epitope Mapping in Brazilian Amazon Inhabitants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-da-Silva, Rodrigo Nunes; Soares, Isabela Ferreira; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Martins da Silva, João Hermínio; Perce-da-Silva, Daiana de Souza; Têva, Antônio; Ramos Franco, Antônia Maria; Pinheiro, Francimeire Gomes; Chaves, Lana Bitencourt; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Banic, Dalma Maria; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa

    2017-01-01

    The cell-traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites (CelTOS), a highly conserved antigen involved in sporozoite motility, plays an important role in the traversal of host cells during the preerythrocytic stage of Plasmodium species. Recently, it has been considered an alternative target when designing novel antimalarial vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum. However, the potential of Plasmodium vivax CelTOS as a vaccine target is yet to be explored. This study evaluated the naturally acquired immune response against a recombinant P. vivax CelTOS (PvCelTOS) (IgG and IgG subclass) in 528 individuals from Brazilian Amazon, as well as the screening of B-cell epitopes in silico and peptide assays to associate the breadth of antibody responses of those individuals with exposition and/or protection correlates. We show that PvCelTOS is naturally immunogenic in Amazon inhabitants with 94 individuals (17.8%) showing specific IgG antibodies against the recombinant protein. Among responders, the IgG reactivity indexes (RIs) presented a direct correlation with the number of previous malaria episodes (p = 0.003; r = 0.315) and inverse correlation with the time elapsed from the last malaria episode (p = 0.031; r = −0.258). Interestingly, high responders to PvCelTOS (RI > 2) presented higher number of previous malaria episodes, frequency of recent malaria episodes, and ratio of cytophilic/non-cytophilic antibodies than low responders (RI < 2) and non-responders (RI < 1). Moreover, a high prevalence of the cytophilic antibody IgG1 over all other IgG subclasses (p < 0.0001) was observed. B-cell epitope mapping revealed five immunogenic regions in PvCelTOS, but no associations between the specific IgG response to peptides and exposure/protection parameters were found. However, the epitope (PvCelTOSI136-E143) was validated as a main linear B-cell epitope, as 92% of IgG responders to PvCelTOS were also responders to this peptide sequence. This

  5. Dominant recognition of a cross-reactive B-cell epitope in Mycobacterium leprae 10 K antigen by immunoglobulin G1 antibodies across the disease spectrum in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, R; Dockrell, H M; Chiang, T J

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibodies in patients with leprosy show a direct correlation with bacterial load (ρ=0·748; P < 0002) suggesting that IgG1 B-cell responses may be surrogate markers of disease progression. To investigate if this upregulation was a general feature of IgG1 responses to all M. leprae (ML) antigens, we analysed responses to several recombinant purified ML heat-shock proteins (HSP). Three recombinant HSPs (ML10 K, ML 18 K and ML 65 K) were tested for their ability to induce various IgG subclasses in patients with either the lepromatous (LL/BL, n = 26) or tuberculoid form (BT/TT, n = 39) of the disease as well as in healthy households (HC, n = 14) and endemic controls (EC = 19). Our major findings were: (1) selective augmentation of IgG1 antibody responses to ML10 K; (2) recognition of a restricted number of epitopes across the disease spectrum and healthy controls by IgG1 antibodies; (3) dominant recognition of cross-reactive epitopes which were common to both ML and MT 10 K. This response was not related to contamination with endotoxin. Epitope mapping using 15-mer overlapping peptides spanning the ML 10 000 MW revealed an immunodominant IgG1 binding peptide (aa41–55) in patients as well as healthy controls. This peptide is a shared epitope with M. tuberculosis 10 K suggesting that postswitched IgG1 B cells recognizing this epitope rather than naive B cells are being expanded. PMID:10233750

  6. Antagonism of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells by C-terminal truncation of a minimum epitope

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Stone, Jennifer D.; Anikeeva, Nadezhda; Heitman, John W.; Wilson, Ingrid C.; Hirschkorn, Dale F.; Clark, Margaret J.; Moffett, Howell F.; Cameron, Thomas O.; Sykulev, Yuri; Stern, Lawrence J.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Antagonism of T cell responses by variants of the cognate peptide is a potential mechanism of viral escape from immune responses and may play a role in the ability of HIV to evade immune control. We show here a rarely described mechanism of antagonism by a peptide shorter than the minimum length epitope for an HIV p24-specific CD4+ T cell clone. The shorter antagonist peptide-MHC complex bound the T cell receptor (TCR), albeit with lower affinity than the full-length agonist peptide. Prior work showing the crystal structure of the peptide-MHC complex revealed a unique glycine hinge near the C-terminus of the agonist peptide, allowing the generation of full-length antagonist peptide lacking the hinge. These results confirm the dependence of productive TCR engagement on residues spilling out from the C-terminus of the MHC binding groove and show that partial engagement of the TCR with a truncated, low-affinity ligand can result in T cell antagonism. PMID:16216327

  7. A deimmunised form of the ribotoxin, α-sarcin, lacking CD4+ T cell epitopes and its use as an immunotoxin warhead.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim D; Hearn, Arron R; Holgate, Robert G E; Kozub, Dorota; Fogg, Mark H; Carr, Francis J; Baker, Matthew P; Lacadena, Javier; Gehlsen, Kurt R

    2016-08-29

    Fungal ribotoxins that block protein synthesis can be useful warheads in the context of a targeted immunotoxin. α-Sarcin is a small (17 kDa) fungal ribonuclease produced by Aspergillus giganteus that functions by catalytically cleaving a single phosphodiester bond in the sarcin-ricin loop of the large ribosomal subunit, thus making the ribosome unrecognisable to elongation factors and leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Peptide mapping using an ex vivo human T cell assay determined that α-sarcin contained two T cell epitopes; one in the N-terminal 20 amino acids and the other in the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Various mutations were tested individually within each epitope and then in combination to isolate deimmunised α-sarcin variants that had the desired properties of silencing T cell epitopes and retention of the ability to inhibit protein synthesis (equivalent to wild-type, WT α-sarcin). A deimmunised variant (D9T/Q142T) demonstrated a complete lack of T cell activation in in vitro whole protein human T cell assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with diverse HLA allotypes. Generation of an immunotoxin by fusion of the D9T/Q142T variant to a single-chain Fv targeting Her2 demonstrated potent cell killing equivalent to a fusion protein comprising the WT α-sarcin. These results represent the first fungal ribotoxin to be deimmunised with the potential to construct a new generation of deimmunised immunotoxin therapeutics.

  8. Regeneration and control of human fibroblast cell density by intermittently delivered pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Bei, Marianna; Sheridan, Robert L; Yarmush, Martin L

    2013-06-01

    Proliferative scarring is a human disease with neither available effective treatment nor relevant animal model. One of the hypotheses for scar formation involves deregulation of fibroblast signaling and delayed apoptosis. Here, we introduce a new chemical-free method for fibroblast density control in culture by intermittently delivered pulsed electric fields (IDPEF), which cause irreversible damage to cell membranes. Using 5-100 pulses with electric field strength of 150 V/mm, pulse duration 70 µs, and frequency of 1 Hz, we investigated the effects of PEF application on growth, death, and regeneration of normal human dermal fibroblasts in culture. We found that the fraction of fibroblasts that survive depends on the number of pulses applied and follows a Weibull distribution. We have successfully developed an IDPEF protocol that controls fibroblasts density in culture. Specifically, through application of IDPEF every 72 h for 12 days, we maintain a normal human dermal fibroblast density in the 3.1 ± 0.2 × 10(5) -1.4 ± 0.2 × 10(5)  cell/mL range. Our results suggest that IDPEFs may prove useful as a non-chemical method for fibroblast density control in human wound healing.

  9. Chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection actively down-regulates CD4+ T cell responses directed against a broad range of epitopes.

    PubMed

    Mothé, Bianca R; Stewart, Barbara S; Oseroff, Carla; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Stogiera, Stephanie; Garcia, Zacarias; Dow, Courtney; Rodriguez-Carreno, Maria Pilar; Kotturi, Maya; Pasquetto, Valerie; Botten, Jason; Crotty, Shane; Janssen, Edith; Buchmeier, Michael J; Sette, Alessandro

    2007-07-15

    Activation of CD4(+) T cells helps establish and sustain CD8(+) T cell responses and is required for the effective clearance of acute infection. CD4-deficient mice are unable to control persistent infection and CD4(+) T cells are usually defective in chronic and persistent infections. We investigated the question of how persistent infection impacted pre-existing lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. We identified class II-restricted epitopes from the entire set of open reading frames from LCMV Armstrong in BALB/c mice (H-2(d)) acutely infected with LCMV Armstrong. Of nine epitopes identified, six were restricted by I-A(d), one by I-E(d) and two were dually restricted by both I-A(d) and I-E(d) molecules. Additional experiments revealed that CD4(+) T cell responses specific for these epitopes were not generated following infection with the immunosuppressive clone 13 strain of LCMV. Most importantly, in peptide-immunized mice, established CD4(+) T cell responses to these LCMV CD4 epitopes as well as nonviral, OVA-specific responses were actively suppressed following infection with LCMV clone 13 and were undetectable within 12 days after infection, suggesting an active inhibition of established helper responses. To address this dysfunction, we performed transfer experiments using both the Smarta and OT-II systems. OT-II cells were not detected after clone 13 infection, indicating physical deletion, while Smarta cells proliferated but were unable to produce IFN-gamma, suggesting impairment of the production of this cytokine. Thus, multiple mechanisms may be involved in the impairment of helper responses in the setting of early persistent infection.

  10. Identification of novel human aggrecan T cell epitopes in HLA-B27 transgenic mice associated with spondyloarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Kuon, Wolfgang; Kuhne, Maren; Busch, Dirk H; Atagunduz, Pamir; Seipel, Martina; Wu, Peihua; Morawietz, Lars; Fernahl, Gabriele; Appel, Heiner; Weiss, Elisabeth H; Krenn, Veit; Sieper, Joachim

    2004-10-15

    The pathology of ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and other spondyloarthropathies (SpA) is closely associated with the human leukocyte class I Ag HLA-B27. A characteristic finding in SpA is inflammation of cartilage structures of the joint, in particular at the site of ligament/tendon and bone junction (enthesitis). In this study, we investigated the role of CD8+ T cells in response to the cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan as a potential candidate autoantigen in BALB/c-B27 transgenic mice. We identified four new HLA-B27-restricted nonamer peptides, one of them (no. 67) with a particularly strong T cell immunogenicity. Peptide no. 67 immunization was capable of stimulating HLA-B27-restricted, CD8+ T cells in BALB/c-B27 transgenic animals, but not in wild-type BALB/c mice. The peptide was specifically recognized on P815-B27 transfectants by HLA-B27-restricted CTLs, which were also detectable by HLA tetramer staining ex vivo as well as in situ. Most importantly, analysis of the joints from peptide no. 67-immunized mice induced typical histological signs of SpA. Our data indicate that HLA-B27-restricted epitopes derived from human aggrecan are involved in the induction of inflammation (tenosynovitis), underlining the importance of HLA-B27 in the pathogenesis of SpA.

  11. Heparin increases the infectivity of Human Papillomavirus type 16 independent of cell surface proteoglycans and induces L1 epitope exposure.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Carla; Liu, Yan; Kühling, Lena; Chai, Wengang; Hafezi, Wali; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Kühn, Joachim E; Feizi, Ten; Schelhaas, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer, and HPV-16 is the most prevalent type. Several HPVs require heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for cell binding. Here, we analyse the phenomenon that preincubation of HPV-16 with increasing concentrations of heparin results in partial restoration rather than more efficient inhibition of infection. While corroborating that the HSPGs are cell-binding receptors for HPV-16, heparin-preincubated virus bound to the extracellular matrix (ECM) via laminin-332. Furthermore, the interaction of virions with heparin, a representative of the highly sulfated S-domains of heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HSPGs, allowed HPV-16 infection in the absence of cell surface HSPGs. Therefore, we concluded that specific glycan moieties but not specific HSPG protein backbones are required for infection. The increased binding of an epitope-specific antibody to the viral capsid after heparin binding suggested that initial conformational changes in the HPV-16 virion occur during infection by interaction with'heparin-like' domains of cellular HSPGs. We propose that HS sequences with specific sulfation patterns are required to facilitate HPV-16 infection.

  12. Epitope recognition and T cell receptors in recurrent autoimmune anterior uveitis in Lewis rats immunized with myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Adamus, G; Manczak, M; Sugden, B; Arendt, A; Hargrave, P A; Offner, H

    2000-08-01

    Lewis rats immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) develop experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and associated anterior uveitis (AU). Rats recover and become resistant to further reinduction of EAE. We investigated whether the resistance to reinduction of EAE was associated with the resistance to AU in LEW rats reinjected with MBP. We demonstrated that while rats remained resistant to EAE, they become susceptible to uveitis after recovery, and suffered a second episode of disease. The susceptibility to reinduced disease was associated with the recognition of new MBP epitopes. In contrast to the initial episode of AU, TCR Vbeta8.2 predominance was not observed in the iris/ciliary body. Our results suggest that T cells specific for MBP, which are rapidly reactivated when re-exposed to antigen, are sufficient to induce clinical uveitis in LEW rats. This process may involve a shifting of T cell specificity from the major encephalitogenic peptide utilizing the Vbeta8.2 receptor to a more diverse cell repertoire.

  13. Tumor heterogeneity as a rationale for a multi-epitope approach in an autologous renal cell cancer tumor vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wittke, Stefan; Baxmann, Susann; Fahlenkamp, Dirk; Kiessig, Stephan T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An autologous tumor vaccine already used successfully in the immune therapy of renal cell carcinoma was investigated in detail. The evaluation of potential tumor markers should allow for the assessment of potency according to pharmaceutical regulations. Methods A panel of 36 tumor-associated antigens and cellular marker proteins was characterized in a total of 133 tumor cell lysates by methods such as ELISA, Western blots, and topological proteomics. The induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific antibodies was demonstrated by immunization in mice. Results Tumor heterogeneity was demonstrated: none of the tumor-associated antigens investigated were detectable in each tumor lysate. In parallel, the coincidental presence of potential danger signals was shown for HSP-60 and HSP-70. The presence of both antigen and danger signal allowed a successful induction of an immune response in a murine model. Conclusion The verified tumor heterogeneity indicates the need for a multi-epitope approach for the successful immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889089

  14. Recognition of Linear B-Cell Epitope of Betanodavirus Coat Protein by RG-M18 Neutralizing mAB Inhibits Giant Grouper Nervous Necrosis Virus (GGNNV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Cheng, Chao-An; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Betanodavirus is a causative agent of viral nervous necrosis syndrome in many important aquaculture marine fish larvae, resulting in high global mortality. The coat protein of Betanodavirus is the sole structural protein, and it can assemble the virion particle by itself. In this study, we used a high-titer neutralizing mAB, RG-M18, to identify the linear B-cell epitope on the viral coat protein. By mapping a series of recombinant proteins generated using the E. coli PET expression system, we demonstrated that the linear epitope recognized by RG-M18 is located at the C-terminus of the coat protein, between amino acid residues 195 and 338. To define the minimal epitope region, a set of overlapping peptides were synthesized and evaluated for RG-M18 binding. Such analysis identified the 195VNVSVLCR202 motif as the minimal epitope. Comparative analysis of Alanine scanning mutagenesis with dot-blotting and ELISA revealed that Valine197, Valine199, and Cysteine201 are critical for antibody binding. Substitution of Leucine200 in the RGNNV, BFNNV, and TPNNV genotypes with Methionine200 (thereby simulating the SJNNV genotype) did not affect binding affinity, implying that RG-M18 can recognize all genotypes of Betanodaviruses. In competition experiments, synthetic multiple antigen peptides of this epitope dramatically suppressed giant grouper nervous necrosis virus (GGNNV) propagation in grouper brain cells. The data provide new insights into the protective mechanism of this neutralizing mAB, with broader implications for Betanodavirus vaccinology and antiviral peptide drug development. PMID:25938761

  15. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Novel HLA-DRB1*04:01-Restricted α-Enolase T Cell Epitope in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Christina; Dubnovitsky, Anatoly; Sandin, Charlotta; Kozhukh, Genadiy; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; James, Eddie A.; Rönnelid, Johan; Ytterberg, Anders Jimmy; Pieper, Jennifer; Reed, Evan; Tandre, Carolina; Rieck, Mary; Zubarev, Roman A.; Rönnblom, Lars; Sandalova, Tatyana; Buckner, Jane H.; Achour, Adnane; Malmström, Vivianne

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to citrullinated proteins, common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, are strongly associated to a specific set of HLA-DR alleles including HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04, and *01:01. Here, we first demonstrate that autoantibody levels toward the dominant citrullinated B cell epitope from α-enolase are significantly elevated in HLA-DRB1*04:01-positive RA patients. Furthermore, we identified α-enolase-derived T cell epitopes and demonstrated that native and citrullinated versions of several peptides bind with different affinities to HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04, and *01:01. The citrulline residues in the eight identified peptides are distributed throughout the entire length of the presented epitopes and more specifically, localized at peptide positions p-2, p2, p4, p6, p7, p10, and p11. Importantly, in contrast to its native version peptide 26 (TSKGLFRAAVPSGAS), the HLA-DRB1*04:01-restricted citrullinated peptide Cit26 (TSKGLFCitAAVPSGAS) elicited significant functional T cell responses in primary cells from RA patients. Comparative analysis of the crystal structures of HLA-DRB1*04:01 in complex with peptide 26 or Cit26 demonstrated that the posttranslational modification did not alter the conformation of the peptide. And since citrullination is the only structural difference between the two complexes, this indicates that the neo-antigen Cit26 is recognized by T cells with high specificity to the citrulline residue. PMID:27895642

  16. Epitope detection chromatography: a method to dissect the structural heterogeneity and inter-connections of plant cell-wall matrix glycans.

    PubMed

    Cornuault, Valérie; Manfield, Iain W; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Knox, J Paul

    2014-05-01

    Plant cell walls are complex, multi-macromolecular assemblies of glycans and other molecules and their compositions and molecular architectures vary extensively. Even though the chemistry of cell-wall glycans is now well understood, it remains a challenge to understand the diversity of glycan configurations and interactions in muro, and how these relate to changes in the biological and mechanical properties of cell walls. Here we describe in detail a method called epitope detection chromatography analysis of cell-wall matrix glycan sub-populations and inter-connections. The method combines chromatographic separations with use of glycan-directed monoclonal antibodies as detection tools. The high discrimination capacity and high sensitivity for the detection of glycan structural features (epitopes) provided by use of established monoclonal antibodies allows the study of oligosaccharide motifs on sets of cell-wall glycans in small amounts of plant materials such as a single organ of Arabidopsis thaliana without the need for extensive purification procedures. We describe the use of epitope detection chromatography to assess the heterogeneity of xyloglucan and pectic rhamnogalacturonan I sub-populations and their modulation in A. thaliana organs.

  17. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus matrix protein, p17gag: identification of epitopes exposed at the surfaces of infected cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, F; Huang, H; Revesz, K; Chen, H C; Herz, R; Pinter, A

    1991-09-01

    Eight monoclonal antibodies reactive with the matrix protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), p17gag, were isolated from rats which had been immunized with solubilized HIV-1 lysate. The epitope specificities of these antibodies were determined with a series of synthetic peptides representing overlapping regions of p17. Six of the antibodies were mapped to three distinct regions of p17, while two antibodies (G11g1 and G11h3) reacted only with intact recombinant p17, suggesting that they were directed against conformational or discontinuous epitopes. All the antibodies bound to HIV-infected cells which had been permeabilized with acetone, but only G11g1 and G11h3 reacted with live HIV-infected cells. Specificity studies with diverse virus strains demonstrated that these two antibodies recognized distinct epitopes, one which was group specific for HIV-1, and one which was shared with HIV type 2 and simian immunodeficiency virus. Binding competition studies indicated that these epitopes were proximal in native p17. Despite their reactivity with intact cells, these two antibodies did not possess appreciable virus-neutralizing activity. These results indicate that a form of p17 is expressed on the surfaces of live HIV-infected cells which is accessible to some, but not all, antibodies against p17. These cell surface molecules may play a role in the generation of antibodies against p17gag that are characteristic of early stages of HIV infection, and they may act as natural targets for the immune system and as potential targets for immunotherapy of HIV-infected cells.

  18. Recombinant multi-epitope vaccine induce predefined epitope-specific antibodies against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Liu, Zu-Qiang; Ding, Jian; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2002-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2F5 recognizing ELDKWA-epitope on HIV-1 gp41 has significant neutralization potency against 90% of the investigated viruses of African, Asia, American and European strains, but antibodies responses to ELDKWA-epitope in HIV-1 infected individuals were very low. Based on the epitope-vaccine strategy suggested by us, a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-MELDKWAGELDKWAGELDKWAVDIGPGRAFYGPGRAFYGPGRAFY) as vaccine antigen containing three repeats of neutralizing epitope ELDKWA on gp41 and GPGRAFY on gp120 was designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. After vaccination course, the recombinant multi-epitope vaccine could induce high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies in mice. These antibodies in sera could bind to both neutralizing epitopes on gp41 peptide, V3 loop peptide and recombinant soluble gp41 (aa539-684) in ELISA assay (antisera dilution: 1:1,600-25,600), while normal sera did not. Moreover, these antibodies in sera could recognize the CHO-WT cells which expressed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces, indicating that the predefined epitope-specific antibodies could recognize natural envelope protein of HIV-1 though these antibodies were induced by recombinant multi-epitope-vaccine. These experimental results suggested a possible way to develop recombinant multi-epitope vaccine inducing multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1.

  19. Efficient control of chronic LCMV infection by a CD4 T cell epitope-based heterologous prime-boost vaccination in a murine model.

    PubMed

    He, Ran; Yang, Xinxin; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Xiangyu; Wang, Lin; Xiao, Minglu; Ye, Jianqiang; Wu, Yuzhang; Ye, Lilin

    2017-03-13

    CD4(+) T cells are essential for sustaining CD8(+) T cell responses during a chronic infection. The adoptive transfer of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells has been shown to efficiently rescue exhausted CD8(+) T cells. However, the question of whether endogenous virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses can be enhanced by certain vaccination strategies and subsequently reinvigorate exhausted CD8(+) T cells remains unexplored. In this study, we developed a CD4(+) T cell epitope-based heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and examined the efficacy of this strategy using a mouse model of chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. We primed chronically LCMV-infected mice with a Listeria monocytogenes vector that expressed the LCMV glycoprotein-specific I-A(b)-restricted CD4(+) T cell epitope GP61-80 (LM-GP61) and subsequently boosted the primed mice with an influenza virus A (PR8 strain) vector that expressed the same CD4(+) T cell epitope (IAV-GP61). This heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy elicited strong anti-viral CD4(+) T cell responses, which further improved both the quantity and quality of the virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and led to better control of the viral loads. The combination of this strategy and the blockade of the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) inhibitory pathway further enhanced the anti-viral CD8(+) T cell responses and viral clearance. Thus, a heterologous prime-boost immunization that selectively induces virus-specific CD4(+) T cell responses in conjunction with blockade of the inhibitory pathway may represent a promising therapeutic approach to treating patients with chronic viral infections.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 13 March 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.3.

  20. Differential presentation of tumor antigen-derived epitopes by MHC-class I and antigen-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Neumann, Frank; Sturm, Christine; Kaestner, Lars; Dauth, Nina; de Bruijn, Diederik R; Renner, Christoph; Lipp, Peter; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-10-15

    SSX2 is a member of the family of cancer/testis antigens. The SSX2 derived peptide SSX2(103-111) has been shown to be presented to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by Major-Histocompatibility (MHC) Class-I complexes after endogenous processing, more precisely by the allele HLA-A*0201. The HLA-A*0201- and SSX2-positive melanoma cell line SK-Mel-37 but not Me275 had been shown to elicit reactivity in SSX2(103-111) specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. To analyze the correlation between SSX2(103-111) presentation and T-cell stimulation, we intended to visualize presentation of SSX2(103-111) in these melanoma cell lines. Fab-antibodies were established from a human phage library with specificity for SSX2(103-111)/HLA-A*0201 complexes (but non-reactive with HLA-A*0201 or SSX2(103-111) alone) and used to visualize the presentation of SSX2(103-111) in the context of HLA-A*0201 by fluorescence microscopy. Presentation of SSX2(103-111) the context of HLA-A*0201 was demonstrated for the majority of SK-Mel-37, but for only a small fraction (<1%) of Me275 as indicated by a clear membrane-staining pattern in fluorescence microscopy. The presentation of SSX2(103-111) on SK-Mel37 and Me275, but not the expression of the SSX2 protein correlated with the capability of these cells to stimulate cells of an SSX2(103-111)-specific T-cell clone. MHC-peptide specific antibodies are a valuable tool for the analysis of antigenic peptides in the context of MHC-I molecules and for the structural definition of immunodominant epitopes.

  1. T helper cell recognition of muscle acetylcholine receptor in myasthenia gravis. Epitopes on the gamma and delta subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, A A; Protti, M P; Dalton, M W; Howard, J F; Conti-Tronconi, B M

    1993-01-01

    We tested the response of CD4+ cells and/or total lymphocytes from the blood of 22 myasthenic patients and 10 healthy controls to overlapping synthetic peptides, 20 residues long, to screen the sequence of the gamma and delta subunits of human muscle acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The gamma subunit is part of the AChR expressed in embryonic muscle and is substituted in the AChRs of most adult muscles by an epsilon subunit. The delta subunit is present in both embryonic and adult AChRs. Adult extrinsic ocular muscles, which are preferentially and sometimes uniquely affected by myasthenic symptoms, and thymus, which has a still obscure but important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, express the embryonic gamma subunit. Anti-AChR CD4+ responses were more easily detected after CD8+ depletion. All responders recognized epitopes on both the gamma and delta subunits and had severe symptoms. In four patients the CD4+ cell response was tested twice, when the symptoms were severe and during a period of remission. Consistently, the response was only detectable, or larger, when the patients were severely affected. Images PMID:7688757

  2. Identification and immunogenicity of two new HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes on dengue NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Zeng, Gucheng; Pang, Xianwu; Liang, Mifang; Zhou, Junmei; Fang, Danyun; Liu, Yan; Li, Dexin; Jiang, Lifang

    2012-04-01

    Immunopathogenesis of dengue virus (DEN) infection remains poorly studied. Identification and characterization of human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes on DEN are necessary for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis of dengue infection and would facilitate the development of immunotherapy and vaccines to protect from dengue infection. Here, we identified two new HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) and DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) that are conserved in three or four major DEN serotypes, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that immunization of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice with DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) epitope peptide induced de novo synthesis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IFN-γ, two important pro-inflammatory molecules that are hard to be detected directly without in vitro antigenic re-stimulation. Importantly, we demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells specifically activated by DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) epitope peptide induced de novo synthesis of perforin. Furthermore, we observed that DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005)-specific CD8(+) T cells capable of producing large amounts of perforin, TNF-α and IFN-γ preferentially displayed CD27(+)CD45RA(-), but not CD27(-)CD45RA(+), phenotypes. This study, therefore, suggested the importance of synergistic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules which were produced by dengue-specific CD8(+) T cells in immunopathogenesis or anti-dengue immunity during dengue infection.

  3. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. PMID:20624430

  4. Mapping of immunodominant B-cell epitopes and the human serum albumin-binding site in natural hepatitis B virus surface antigen of defined genosubtype.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, D; Sominskaya, I; Jansons, J; Meisel, H; Schmitt, S; Heermann, K H; Kaluza, G; Pumpens, P; Gerlich, W H

    2000-02-01

    Twelve MAbs were generated by immunization of BALB/c mice with plasma-derived hepatitis B virus surface spherical antigen particles subtype ayw2 (HBsAg/ayw2 genotype D). Their epitopes were mapped by analysis of reactivity with plasma-derived HBsAg/ayw2 and HBsAg/adw2 (genotype A) in enzyme immunoassays and blots. Mapping was supported by nested sets of truncated preS2 proteins and preS2 peptides. Five antibodies were S domain-specific, seven were preS2-specific and 11 had a preference for genotype D. According to our data, group I of the three known epitope groups of preS2 has to be divided into IA and IB. Three preS2-specific MAbs forming the new group IA reacted with genotype D residues 3-15 which have not yet been described as an epitope region. IA antibodies strongly inhibited the binding of polymerized human serum albumin. Two antibodies (group II) reacted with the glycosylated N-terminal region of preS2 in plasma-derived HBsAg, but not with a preparation from transfected murine cells. One group III antibody was subtype-specific and reacted with the highly variable preS2 sequence 38-48. Only one antibody (group IB) mapped to the region (old group I) which was believed to be immunodominant and genotype-independent. Geno(sub)type-specific epitopes of preS2 are obviously the immunodominant components of natural HBsAg in BALB/c mice, but these epitopes may be masked by serum albumins in humans. The data may explain why it is difficult to detect anti-preS2 antibodies in human recipients of preS2-containing vaccines, in spite of the preS2 immunodominance in mice.

  5. A B Cell Epitope Peptide Derived from the Major Grass Pollen Allergen Phl p 1 Boosts Allergen-Specific Secondary Antibody Responses without Allergen-Specific T Cell Help.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Meena; Freidl, Raphaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Baranyi, Ulrike; Wekerle, Thomas; Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, Birgit

    2017-02-15

    More than 40% of allergic patients suffer from grass pollen allergy. Phl p 1, the major timothy grass pollen allergen, belongs to the cross-reactive group 1 grass pollen allergens that are thought to initiate allergic sensitization to grass pollen. Repeated allergen encounter boosts allergen-specific IgE production and enhances clinical sensitivity in patients. To investigate immunological mechanisms underlying the boosting of allergen-specific secondary IgE Ab responses and the allergen epitopes involved, a murine model for Phl p 1 was established. A B cell epitope-derived peptide of Phl p 1 devoid of allergen-specific T cell epitopes, as recognized by BALB/c mice, was fused to an allergen-unrelated carrier in the form of a recombinant fusion protein and used for sensitization. This fusion protein allowed the induction of allergen-specific IgE Ab responses without allergen-specific T cell help. Allergen-specific Ab responses were subsequently boosted with molecules containing the B cell epitope-derived peptide without carrier or linked to other allergen-unrelated carriers. Oligomeric peptide bound to a carrier different from that which had been used for sensitization boosted allergen-specific secondary IgE responses without a detectable allergen-specific T cell response. Our results indicate that allergen-specific secondary IgE Ab responses can be boosted by repetitive B cell epitopes without allergen-specific T cell help by cross-linking of the B cell epitope receptor. This finding has important implications for the design of new allergy vaccines.

  6. A genital tract peptide epitope vaccine targeting TLR-2 efficiently induces local and systemic CD8 + T cells and protects against herpes simplex virus type 2 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, G; Nesburn, AB; Wu, M; Zhu, X; Carpenter, D; Wechsler, SL; You, S; BenMohamed, L

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of needle-free mucosal vaccines is being rationally designed according to rules that govern the way in which the epitopes are recognized by and stimulate the genital mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that synthetic peptide epitopes extended with an agonist of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), that are abundantly expressed by dendritic and epithelial cells of the vaginal mucosa, would lead to induction of protective immunity against genital herpes. To test this hypothesis, we intravaginally (IVAG) immunized wild-type B6, TLR-2 (TLR2 −/−) or myeloid differentiation factor 88 deficient (MyD88 −/−) mice with a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) CD8 + T-cell peptide epitope extended by a palmitic acid moiety (a TLR-2 agonist). IVAG delivery of the lipopeptide generated HSV-2-specific memory CD8 + cytotoxic T cells both locally in the genital tract draining lymph nodes and systemically in the spleen. Moreover, lipopeptide-immunized TLR2 −/− and MyD88 −/− mice developed significantly less HSV-specific CD8 + T-cell response, earlier death, faster disease progression, and higher vaginal HSV-2 titers compared to lipopeptide-immunized wild-type B6 mice. IVAG immunization with self-adjuvanting lipid-tailed peptides appears to be a novel mucosal vaccine approach, which has attractive practical and immunological features. PMID:19129756

  7. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8⁺ T Cell Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Pablo D; Nörder, Miriam; Weissmann, Sebastian; Ljapoci, Ronny; Erfle, Volker; Drexler, Ingo; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2014-07-22

    Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8⁺ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags) are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5). Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5) and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector.

  8. A chimeric peptide of intestinal trefoil factor containing cholesteryl ester transfer protein B cell epitope significantly inhibits atherosclerosis in rabbits after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Qi, Gaofu; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shengying; Xin, Shanshan; Du, Peng; Zhang, Qingye; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2011-04-01

    Vaccination against cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is proven to be effective for inhibiting atherosclerosis in animal models. In this study, the proteases-resistant intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) was used as a molecular vehicle to construct chimeric TFF3 (cTFF3) containing CETP B cell epitope and tetanus toxin helper T cell epitope. It was found that cTFF3 still preserved a trefoil structure, and can resist proteases digestion in vitro. After oral immunization with cTFF3, the CETP-specific IgA and IgG could be found in intestine lavage fluid and serum, and the anti-CETP antibodies could inhibit partial CETP activity to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and inhibit atherosclerosis in animals. Therefore, TFF3 is a potential molecular vehicle for developing oral peptide vaccines. Our research highlights a novel strategy for developing oral peptide vaccines in the future.

  9. Expression dynamics and ultrastructural localization of epitope-tagged Abutilon mosaic virus nuclear shuttle and movement proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinow, Tatjana; Tanwir, Fariha; Kocher, Cornelia; Krenz, Bjoern; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger

    2009-09-01

    The geminivirus Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) encodes two proteins which are essential for viral spread within plants. The nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) transfers viral DNA between the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas the movement protein (MP) facilitates transport between cells through plasmodesmata and long-distance via phloem. An inducible overexpression system for epitope-tagged NSP and MP in plants yielded unprecedented amounts of both proteins. Western blots revealed extensive posttranslational modification and truncation for MP, but not for NSP. Ultrastructural examination of Nicotiana benthamiana tissues showed characteristic nucleopathic alterations, including fibrillar rings, when epitope-tagged NSP and MP were simultaneously expressed in leaves locally infected with an AbMV DNA A in which the coat protein gene was replaced by a green fluorescent protein encoding gene. Immunogold labelling localized NSP in the nucleoplasm and in the fibrillar rings. MP appeared at the cell periphery, probably the plasma membrane, and plasmodesmata.

  10. Identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the avian leukosis virus P27 protein using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Qin, Liting; Zhu, Haibo; Sun, Yingjun; Cui, Xuezhi; Gao, Yadong; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors. The capsid protein P27 is the group-specific antigen of ALV and has many viral antigen sites that are easy to detect. In this study, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3A9, that is specific for the P27 protein. A series of partially overlapping peptides were screened to define (181)PPSAR(185) as the minimal linear epitope recognized by mAb 3A9. The identified epitope could be recognized by chicken anti-ALV and mouse anti-ALV P27 sera. The epitope was highly conserved among a number of ALV-A, ALV-B and ALV-J strains. MAb 3A9 might be a valuable tool for the development of new immunodiagnostic approaches for ALV, and the defined linear epitope might help further our understanding of the antigenic structure of the P27 protein.

  11. Immunization with a peptide containing MHC class I and II epitopes derived from the tumor antigen SIM2 induces an effective CD4 and CD8 T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Kissick, Haydn T; Sanda, Martin G; Dunn, Laura K; Arredouani, Mohamed S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we sought to determine whether peptide vaccines designed harbor both class I as well as class II restricted antigenic motifs could concurrently induce CD4 and CD8 T cell activation against autologous tumor antigens. Based on our prior genome-wide interrogation of human prostate cancer tissues to identify genes over-expressed in cancer and absent in the periphery, we targeted SIM2 as a prototype autologous tumor antigen for these studies. Using humanized transgenic mice we found that the 9aa HLA-A*0201 epitope, SIM2(237-245), was effective at inducing an antigen specific response against SIM2-expressing prostate cancer cell line, PC3. Immunization with a multi-epitope peptide harboring both MHC-I and MHC-II restricted epitopes induced an IFN-γ response in CD8 T cells to the HLA-A*0201-restricted SIM2(237-245) epitope, and an IL-2 response by CD4 T cells to the SIM2(240-254) epitope. This peptide was also effective at inducing CD8+ T-cells that responded specifically to SIM2-expressing tumor cells. Collectively, the data presented in this study suggest that a single peptide containing multiple SIM2 epitopes can be used to induce both a CD4 and CD8 T cell response, providing a peptide-based vaccine formulation for potential use in immunotherapy of various cancers.

  12. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  13. Identification of Two New HLA-A*1101-Restricted Tax Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in an Adult T-Cell Leukemia Patient after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo. PMID:16014972

  14. Identification of two new HLA-A*1101-restricted tax epitopes recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes in an adult T-cell leukemia patient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Nanae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Shimizu, Yukiko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Takao; Okamura, Jun; Kannagi, Mari

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that Tax-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), directed to single epitopes restricted by HLA-A2 or A24, expanded in vitro and in vivo in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from some adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients after but not before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here, we demonstrated similar Tax-specific CTL expansion in PBMC from another post-HSCT ATL patient without HLA-A2 or A24, whose CTLs equally recognized two newly identified epitopes, Tax88-96 and Tax272-280, restricted by HLA-A11, suggesting that these immunodominant Tax epitopes are present in the ATL patient in vivo.

  15. Identification of HLA-DRB1*1501-restricted T-cell epitopes from prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Link, Jason; Oberle, Warren T; Kodak, James; Rich, Cathleen; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Alexander, Richard B

    2005-04-15

    The development of immunotherapy for prostate cancer based on the induction of autoimmunity to prostate tissue is very attractive because prostate is not a vital organ beyond the reproductive years. CD4 T cells play an important role in the development of antitumor immune responses, yet the identification of naturally processed MHC Class II-restricted epitopes derived from prostate differentiation antigens has not been described. To facilitate the search for prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-derived MHC class II-restricted peptides, we immunized mice transgenic for HLA-DRB1*1501 with human PSA and showed a robust dose-dependent immune response to the antigen. Screening a library of overlapping 20-mer peptides that span the entire PSA sequence identified two 20-mer peptides, PSA(171-190) and PSA(221-240), which were responsible for this reactivity. Immunization of DR2b transgenic mice with these peptides induced specific responses to the peptide and whole PSA. Identified peptides were used to stimulate CD4 T cells from HLA-DRB1*1501+ patients with a rare condition, granulomatous prostatitis, and who seem to have a preexisting immune response directed against the prostate gland. We previously showed a linkage of granulomatous prostatitis to HLA-DRB1*1501, suggesting that this disease may have an autoimmune etiology. Peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines were generated from the peripheral blood of these patients as well as one patient with prostate cancer. These lines also recognized whole, processed PSA in the context of HLA-DRB1*1501. This study will be instrumental in understanding the interaction between circulating self-reactive T cells, organ-specific autoimmunity, and antitumor immune response. The use of these peptides for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer is under investigation.

  16. Defining the mechanism(s) of protection by cytolytic CD8 T cells against a cryptic epitope derived from a retroviral alternative reading frame

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Ho, On; Green, William R.

    2009-01-01

    The biological significance of protective CD8 T-cell-mediated responses against non-traditional alternative reading frame epitopes remains relatively unknown. Cytolytic CD8 T cells (CTL) specific for a non-traditional cryptic MHC class I epitope, SYNTGRFPPL, are critically involved in the protection of mice during infection with the LP-BM5 murine retrovirus. The goal of this study was to determine the functional properties of the protective SYNTGRFPPL-specific CTL during LP-BM5 infection of susceptible BALB/c CD8−/− mice. Direct infection experiments and adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells derived from perforin (pfp)−/−, IFNγ−/−, FasL−/− and, as a positive control, wild-type BALB/c mice, were utilized to assess the effector mechanisms responsible for protection. Our results indicate that SYNTGRFPPL-specific effector CTL preferentially utilize perforin-mediated cytolysis to provide protection against LP-BM5-induced pathogenesis, whereas CTL production of IFNγ is not required. Our results also suggest a minimal contribution of FasL/Fas-mediated lysis during the effector response. Collectively, these results provide insight into effector mechanisms utilized by protective CTL directed against non-traditional cryptic epitopes during disease protection. PMID:19539970

  17. ssDNA Aptamer Specifically Targets and Selectively Delivers Cytotoxic Drug Doxorubicin to HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ge; Li, Huan; Yang, Shuanghui; Wen, Jianguo; Niu, Junqi; Zu, Youli

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of death due to cancer worldwide with over 500,000 people affected annually. Although chemotherapy has been widely used to treat patients with HCC, alternate modalities to specifically deliver therapeutic cargos to cancer cells have been sought in recent years due to the severe side effects of chemotherapy. In this respect, aptamer-based tumor targeted drug delivery has emerged as a promising approach to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy and reduce or eliminate drug toxicity. In this study, we developed a new HepG2-specific aptamer (HCA#3) by a procedure known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) and exploited its role as a targeting ligand to deliver doxorubicin (Dox) to HepG2 cells in vitro. The selected 76-base nucleotide aptamer preferentially bound to HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells but not to control cells. The aptamer HCA#3 was modified with paired CG repeats at the 5′-end to carry and deliver a high payload of intercalated Dox molecules at the CG sites. Four Dox molecules (mol/mol) were fully intercalated in each conjugate aptamer-Dox (ApDC) molecule. Biostability analysis showed that the ApDC molecules are stable in serum. Functional analysis showed that ApDC specifically targeted and released Dox within HepG2 cells but not in control cells, and treatment with HCA#3 ApDC induced HepG2 cell apoptosis but had minimal effect on control cells. Our study demonstrated that HCA#3 ApDC is a promising aptamer-targeted therapeutic that can specifically deliver and release a high doxorubicin payload in HCC cells. PMID:26808385

  18. Gluten T cell epitope targeting by TG3 and TG6; implications for dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia.

    PubMed

    Stamnaes, Jorunn; Dorum, Siri; Fleckenstein, Burkhard; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2010-11-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is well characterized as the main autoantigen of celiac disease. The ability of TG2 to deamidate and crosslink gluten peptides is essential for the gluten-dependent production of TG2 specific autoantibodies. In patients with primarily extraintestinal manifestation of gluten sensitivity the repertoire of autoantibodies may be different. In dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), TG3 appears to be the target autoantigen whereas in gluten ataxia (GA) autoantibodies reactive with TG6 are present. A functional role for TG3 and TG6 in these diseases has yet to be described. It is also not known whether these enzymes can use gluten peptides implicated in the pathology as substrates. We here report that similar to TG2, TG3 and TG6 can specifically deamidate gluten T cell epitopes. However, the fine specificities of the enzymes were found to differ. TG2 can form covalent complexes with gluten by iso-peptide and thioester bonds. We found that both TG3 and TG6 were able to complex with gluten peptides through thioester linkage although less efficiently than TG2, whereas TG6 but not TG3 was able to form iso-peptide linked complexes. Our findings lend credence to the notion that TG3 and TG6 are involved in the gluten-induced autoimmune responses of DH and GA.

  19. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2008-04-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  20. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  1. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  2. A vaccine-elicited, single viral epitope-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response does not protect against intravenous, cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Yasutomi, Y; Koenig, S; Woods, R M; Madsen, J; Wassef, N M; Alving, C R; Klein, H J; Nolan, T E; Boots, L J; Kessler, J A

    1995-01-01

    Protection against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge was assessed in rhesus monkeys with a vaccine-elicited, single SIV epitope-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in the absence of SIV-specific antibody. Strategies were first explored for eliciting an optimal SIV Gag epitope-specific CTL response. These studies were performed in rhesus monkeys expressing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I gene Mamu-A*01, a haplotype associated with a predominant SIV CTL epitope mapped to residues 182 to 190 of the Gag protein (p11C). We demonstrated that a combined modality immunization strategy using a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG-SIV Gag construct for priming, and peptide formulated in liposome for boosting, elicited a greater p11C-specific CTL response than did a single immunization with peptide-liposome alone. Vaccinated and control monkeys were then challenged with cell-free SIVmne by an intravenous route of inoculation. Despite a vigorous p11C-specific CTL response at the time of virus inoculation, all monkeys became infected with SIV. gag gene sequencing of the virus isolated from these monkeys demonstrated that the established viruses had no mutations in the p11C-coding region. Thus, the preexisting CTL response did not select for a viral variant that might escape T-cell immune recognition. These studies demonstrate that a potent SIV-specific CTL response can be elicited by combining live vector and peptide vaccine modalities. However, a single SIV Gag epitope-specific CTL response in the absence of SIV-specific antibody did not provide protection against a cell-free, intravenous SIV challenge. PMID:7884874

  3. Are cases of mumps in vaccinated patients attributable to mismatches in both vaccine T-cell and B-cell epitopes?: An immunoinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Homan, E Jane; Bremel, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Resurgent mumps outbreaks have raised questions about the current efficacy of mumps vaccines. We have applied immunoinformatics techniques based on principal component analysis to evaluate patterns in predicted B-cell linear epitopes, MHC binding affinity and cathepsin cleavage in the hemagglutinin neuraminidase protein of vaccine strains and wild-type mumps isolates. We have mapped predicted MHC-peptide binding for 37 MHC-I and 28 MHC-II alleles and predicted cleavage by cathepsin B, L and S. By all measures we applied Jeryl-Lynn JL5 major strain is an outlier with immunomic features arising from a small number of amino acid changes that distinguish it from other virus strains. Individuals vaccinated with Jeryl-Lynn who are not exposed to wild-type virus until their protective antibody titer has waned may be unable to recall a protective immune response when exposed to wild-type virus. Dependence on serology to evaluate mumps vaccines may have overemphasized the conservation of one neutralizing antibody epitope, at the expense of monitoring other related changes in the HN protein that could affect recall responses.

  4. Regulation and function of an activation-dependent epitope of the beta 1 integrins in vascular cells after balloon injury in baboon arteries and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, N.; Seki, J.; Vergel, S.; Mattsson, E. J.; Yednock, T.; Kovach, N. L.; Harlan, J. M.; Clowes, A. W.

    1996-01-01

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to the response to injury in damaged and atherosclerotic vessels. These events might be regulated by cellular interactions with extracellular matrix through the expression and activation of integrins. To study the functions of beta 1 integrins in the vessel wall, we used monoclonal antibody (MAb) 15/7, which recognizes an activation epitope of beta 1 integrin subunits, and MAb 8A2, which induces a high affinity form of beta 1 integrins recognized by MAb 15/7. Immunohistochemical analyses were done on samples of normal baboon saphenous arteries and from arteries subjected to balloon injury. EC and SMC expressed the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin in uninjured arteries. By contrast, in balloon-injured arteries 6 weeks after injury, regenerating EC did not express the activation epitope, and there was no decrease in the expression of total beta 1 integrin, whereas SMC migrating into the intima exhibited decreased expression of the total and activated beta 1 integrin. Flow cytometer analysis of cultured cells indicated that baboon EC and SMC weakly express the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin. Next, we determined by utilizing MAb 8A2 the effects of increased expression of activation epitope of beta 1 integrin on the functions of SMC and EC. The activation of beta 1 integrins on SMC induced by MAb 8A2 enhanced SMC adhesion and suppressed SMC migration in a Boyden chamber assay. SMC proliferation was inhibited by MAb 8A2 dose-dependently. Similarly, MAb 8A2-induced activation of beta 1 integrins on EC suppressed EC migration into a wound. However, MAb 8A2 did not affect the basic fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation of EC, although it blocked the decrease in EC number caused by the removal of basic fibroblast growth factor. These results suggest that activation of beta 1 integrins in vascular cells is regulated in a cell-type dependent manner and plays an

  5. Identification of Immunodominant B-cell Epitope Regions of Reticulocyte Binding Proteins in Plasmodium vivax by Protein Microarray Based Immunoscreening.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Hee; Li, Jian; Wang, Bo; Lee, Seong-Kyun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Na, Sunghun; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Han, Eun-Taek

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum can invade all stages of red blood cells, while Plasmodium vivax can invade only reticulocytes. Although many P. vivax proteins have been discovered, their functions are largely unknown. Among them, P. vivax reticulocyte binding proteins (PvRBP1 and PvRBP2) recognize and bind to reticulocytes. Both proteins possess a C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane domain, which drives adhesion to reticulocytes. PvRBP1 and PvRBP2 are large (> 326 kDa), which hinders identification of the functional domains. In this study, the complete genome information of the P. vivax RBP family was thoroughly analyzed using a prediction server with bioinformatics data to predict B-cell epitope domains. Eleven pvrbp family genes that included 2 pseudogenes and 9 full or partial length genes were selected and used to express recombinant proteins in a wheat germ cell-free system. The expressed proteins were used to evaluate the humoral immune response with vivax malaria patients and healthy individual serum samples by protein microarray. The recombinant fragments of 9 PvRBP proteins were successfully expressed; the soluble proteins ranged in molecular weight from 16 to 34 kDa. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to each recombinant PvRBP protein indicated a high antigenicity, with 38-88% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Of them, N-terminal parts of PvRBP2c (PVX_090325-1) and PvRBP2 like partial A (PVX_090330-1) elicited high antigenicity. In addition, the PvRBP2-like homologue B (PVX_116930) fragment was newly identified as high antigenicity and may be exploited as a potential antigenic candidate among the PvRBP family. The functional activity of the PvRBP family on merozoite invasion remains unknown.

  6. Epitope-Tagged Autotransporters as Single-Cell Reporters for Gene Expression by a Salmonella Typhimurium wbaP Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Curkić, Ismeta; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Diard, Médéric; Claassen, Manfred; Linke, Dirk; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity is an important trait of bacterial populations and can enhance fitness of the existing genotype in a given environment. To characterize different subpopulations, several studies have analyzed differential gene expression using fluorescent reporters. These studies visualized either single or multiple genes within single cells using different fluorescent proteins. However, variable maturation and folding kinetics of different fluorophores complicate the study of dynamics of gene expression. Here, we present a proof-of-principle study for an alternative gene expression system in a wbaP mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) lacking the O-sidechain of the lipopolysaccharide. We employed the hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged inverse autotransporter invasin (invAHA) as a transcriptional reporter for the expression of the type three secretion system 1 (T1) in S. Tm. Using a two-reporter approach with GFP and the InvAHA in single cells, we verify that this reporter system can be used for T1 gene expression analysis, at least in strains lacking the O-antigen (wbaP), which are permissive for detection of the surface-exposed HA-epitope. When we placed the two reporters gfp and invAHA under the control of either one or two different promoters of the T1 regulon, we were able to show correlative expression of both reporters. We conclude that the invAHA reporter system is a suitable tool to analyze T1gene expression in S. Tm and propose its applicability as molecular tool for gene expression studies within single cells. PMID:27149272

  7. Control of HIV-1 replication in vitro by vaccine-induced human CD8+ T cells through conserved subdominant Pol epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tina; Borthwick, Nicola J.; Gilmour, Jill; Hayes, Peter; Dorrell, Lucy; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Objective The specificity of CD8+ T cells is critical for early control of founder/transmitted and reactivated HIV-1. To tackle HIV-1 variability and escape, we designed vaccine immunogen HIVconsv assembled from 14 highly conserved regions of mainly Gag and Pol proteins. When administered to HIV-1-negative human volunteers in trial HIV-CORE 002, HIVconsv vaccines elicited CD8+ effector T cells which inhibited replication of up to 8 HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4+ cells. This inhibition correlated with interferon-γ production in response to Gag and Pol peptide pools, but direct evidence of the inhibitory specificity was missing. Here, we aimed to define through recognition of which epitopes these effectors inhibit HIV-1 replication. Design CD8+ T-cells from the 3 broadest HIV-1 inhibitors out of 23 vaccine recipients were expanded in culture by Gag or Pol peptide restimulation and tested in viral inhibition assay (VIA) using HIV-1 clade B and A isolates. Methods Frozen PBMCs were expanded first using peptide pools from Gag or Pol conserved regions and tested on HIV-1-infected cells in VIA or by individual peptides for their effector functions. Single peptide specificities responsible for inhibition of HIV-1 replication were then confirmed by single-peptide expanded effectors tested on HIV-1-infected cells. Results We formally demonstrated that the vaccine-elicited inhibitory human CD8+ T cells recognized conserved epitopes of both Pol and Gag proteins. We defined 7 minimum epitopes, of which 3 were novel, presumably naturally subdominant. The effectors were oligofunctional producing several cytokines and chemokines and killing peptide-pulsed target cells. Conclusions These results implicate the use of functionally conserved regions of Pol in addition to the widely used Gag for T-cell vaccine design. Proportion of volunteers developing these effectors and their frequency in circulating PBMC are separate issues, which can be addressed, if needed, by more efficient

  8. Fine-mapping of the B-cell epitope domain at the N-terminus of the preS2 region of the hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Sominskaya, Irina; Paulij, Wilma; Jansons, Juris; Sobotta, Dirk; Dreilina, Dzidra; Sunnen, Cecile; Meisel, Helga; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Pumpens, Paul

    2002-02-01

    In this study, we report the exact localization and substitutional characterization of a B-cell epitope domain at the N-terminus of the preS2 region of the hepatitis B surface antigen. A set of deletion variants containing preS2 sequences of different length was generated on the basis of frCP as a carrier. It was found after Western blot analysis that three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (2-11B1, 3-11C2, HB.OT10) recognized the linear preS2 sequence within the amino acid (aa) stretch 3-WNSTTFHQTLQDP-13. The importance of each aa residue of the epitope was proved by comparison of antibody binding to alanine-substituted peptides in both free-peptide and Pepscan variants.

  9. A novel plasmid for delivering genes into mammalian cells with noninvasive food and commensal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Ji, Xin; Jin, Ling; Spear, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Using food and commensal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as vehicles for DNA delivery into epithelial cells is a new strategy for vaccine delivery or gene therapy. However, present methods for DNA delivery with LAB have suffered low efficiency. Our goal was to develop a new system to deliver DNA into epithelial cells with high efficiency using food and commensal LAB. An Escherichia coli-LAB shuttle plasmid, pLKV1, for DNA delivery into eukaryotic cells was constructed. Two reporter plasmids with green and red fluorescent protein genes were also constructed to monitor the uptake of protein and DNA, respectively. Bacteria delivering these reporter plasmids into Caco-2 cells were monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Several methods that weaken the bacterial cell wall prior to co-culture with Caco-2 cells were evaluated for their role in the improvement of gene transfer efficiency. Treating Streptococcus gordonii with penicillin and lysozyme greatly increased its rate of gene delivery to mammalian cells compared to untreated control bacteria, while glycine pretreatment promoted the highest gene transfer rate for Lactococcus lactis. Uptake of green fluorescent bacteria by Caco-2 cells showed that the cell wall-weakening treatment promoted the internalization of the noninvasive bacteria into Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, we have developed a noninvasive system using LAB as a vehicle for vaccine delivery or gene therapy, and tested this system in vitro with Caco-2 cells.

  10. A paradigm shift: Cancer therapy with peptide-based B-cell epitopes and peptide immunotherapeutics targeting multiple solid tumor types: Emerging concepts and validation of combination immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaumaya, Pravin TP

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognizable and urgent need to speed the development and application of novel, more efficacious anti-cancer vaccine therapies that inhibit tumor progression and prevent acquisition of tumor resistance. We have created and established a portfolio of validated peptide epitopes against multiple receptor tyrosine kinases and we have identified the most biologically effective combinations of EGFR (HER-1), HER-2, HER-3, VEGF and IGF-1R peptide vaccines/mimics to selectively inhibit multiple receptors and signaling pathways. The strategy is based on the use of chimeric conformational B-cell epitope peptides incorporating “promiscuous” T-cell epitopes that afford the possibility of generating an enduring immune response, eliciting protein-reactive high-affinity anti-peptide antibodies as potential vaccines and peptide mimics that act as antagonists to receptor signaling that drive cancer metastasis. In this review we will summarize our ongoing studies based on the development of combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies that act synergistically to enhance immune-mediated tumor killing aimed at addressing mechanisms of tumor resistance for several tumor types. PMID:25874884

  11. Identification of a conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope in the VP1 proteins of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Zhou, Guomei; Xin, Yinghao; Chen, Junhao; Lin, Shaoli; Tian, Ye; Xie, Zhijing; Jiang, Shijin

    2015-11-18

    Duck virus hepatitis (DVH), mainly caused by duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), is a severe disease threaten to duck industry and has worldwide distribution. As the major structural protein, the VP1 protein of DHAV is able to induce neutralizing antibody in ducks. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4F8 against the intact DHAV-1 particles was used to identify the possible epitope in the three serotypes of DHAV. The mAb 4F8 had weak neutralizing activities to both DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, and reacted with the conserved linear B-cell epitopes of (75)GEIILT(80) in DHAV-1 VP1 and (75)GEVILT(80) in DHAV-3 VP1 protein, respectively, while not with DHAV-2 VP1. This was the first report about identification of the common conserved neutralizing linear B-cell epitope of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which will facilitate understanding of the antigenic structure of VP1 and the serologic diagnosis of DHAV infection.

  12. Immunogenicity of porcine P[6], P[7]-specific △VP8* rotavirus subunit vaccines with a tetanus toxoid universal T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaobo; Wei, Xiaoman; Ran, Xuhua; Ni, Hongbo; Cao, Si; Zhang, Yao

    2015-08-26

    Currently, commercial porcine rotavirus vaccines remain varied limitations. The objective of this study is to develop an alternative porcine rotavirus subunit vaccine candidate by parenteral administration, which enables to elicit robust immune responses against most prevalence porcine rotavirus strains. The bacterially-expressed porcine rotavirus P[6]- or P[7]-specific truncated VP8* (aa 64-223) recombinant protein with or without a universal tetanus toxoid CD4(+) T cell epitope P2 was generated. All the recombinant subunit proteins △VP8*s or P2-△VP8*s were of high solubility and high yields. The immunogenicity of each purified △VP8* and P2-△VP8* was evaluated in mice (10 μg/dose) or guinea pigs (20 μg/dose) immunized IM with 600 μg aluminum hydroxide three times at 2-week interval. The introduction of P2T cell epitope to P[7]-△VP8* elicited significantly higher IgG titer in mice than its absence. Comparatively, P2 epitope slightly enhanced the immunogenicity of P[6]-△VP8*. P2-P[7]△VP8* elicited high titer of neutralizing antibody against heterotypic P[7]-specific rotaviruses with varied G type combination. Our data indicated that two subunit vaccines could be plausible bivalent rotavirus vaccine candidate to provide antigenic coverage of porcine rotavirus strains of global or regional importance.

  13. Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) represents an immunogenic HLA-DR4-restricted epitope recognized by melanoma-reactive CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Zarour, H M; Kirkwood, J M; Kierstead, L S; Herr, W; Brusic, V; Slingluff, C L; Sidney, J; Sette, A; Storkus, W J

    2000-01-04

    The human Melan-A/MART-1 gene encodes an HLA-A2-restricted peptide epitope recognized by melanoma-reactive CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Here we report that this gene also encodes at least one HLA-DR4-presented peptide recognized by CD4(+) T cells. The Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) peptide was able to induce the in vitro expansion of specific CD4(+) T cells derived from normal DR4(+) donors or from DR4(+) patients with melanoma when pulsed onto autologous dendritic cells. CD4(+) responder T cells specifically produced IFN-gamma in response to, and also lysed, T2.DR4 cells pulsed with the Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) peptide and DR4(+) melanoma target cells naturally expressing the Melan-A/MART-1 gene product. Interestingly, CD4(+) T cell immunoreactivity against the Melan-A/MART-1(51-73) peptide typically coexisted with a high frequency of anti-Melan-A/MART-1(27-35) reactive CD8(+) T cells in freshly isolated blood harvested from HLA-A2(+)/DR4(+) patients with melanoma. Taken together, these data support the use of this Melan-A/MART-1 DR4-restricted melanoma epitope in future immunotherapeutic trials designed to generate, augment, and quantitate specific CD4(+) T cell responses against melanoma in vivo.

  14. Antigen-specific immunomodulation for type 1 diabetes by novel recombinant antibodies directed against diabetes-associates auto-reactive T cell epitope.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Rony; Gebe, John A; Preisinger, Anton; James, Eddie A; Tendler, Mark; Nepom, Gerald T; Reiter, Yoram

    2013-12-01

    The trimolecular complex composed of autoreactive T-cell receptor, MHC class II, and an autoantigenic peptide plays a central role in the activation of pathogenic Islet-specific CD4+ T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We isolated and characterized novel antibodies against autoreactive T-cell epitopes associated with T1D. Our antibodies mimic the specificity of the T-cell receptor (TCR), while binding MHC class II/peptide complexes in an autoantigen peptide specific, MHC-restricted manner. The isolated TCR-like antibodies were directed against the minimal T-cell epitope GAD-555-567 in the context of the HLA-DR4-diabetic-associated molecule. A representative high-affinity TCR-like antibody clone (G3H8) enabled the detection of intra- and extra-cellular DR4/GAD-555-567 complexes in antigen presenting cells. I561M single mutation at the central position (P5) of the GAD-555-567 peptide abolished the binding of G3H8 to the DR4/GAD complex, demonstrating its high fine TCR-like specificity. The G3H8 TCR-like antibody significantly inhibited GAD-555-567 specific, DR4 restricted T-cell response in vitro and in vivo in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice. Our findings constitute a proof-of-concept for the utility of TCR-like antibodies as antigen-specific immunomodulation agents for regulating pathogenic T-cells and suggest that TCR-like antibodies targeting autoreactive MHC class II epitopes are valuable research tools that enable studies related to antigen presentation as well as novel therapeutic agents that may be used to modulate autoimmune disorders such as T1D.

  15. Functional HLA-DR T cell epitopes of CEA identified in patients with colorectal carcinoma immunized with the recombinant protein CEA.

    PubMed

    Ullenhag, Gustav J; Fagerberg, Jan; Strigård, Karin; Frödin, Jan-Erik; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2004-04-01

    A baculovirus-produced recombinant CEA (rCEA) protein comprising the extracellular region was used for vaccination of CRC patients with or without GM-CSF as an adjuvant cytokine. Ten patients with a significant proliferative T cell response against rCEA were selected for T cell epitope mapping. Fifteen-aa-long overlapping peptides covering the entire aa sequence of the external domain of CEA were used in a proliferation assay. In six of the patients a repeatable T cell response against at least one peptide was demonstrated. For the first time, nine functional HLA-DR epitopes of CEA were defined. Two of the peptides were recognized by more than one patient, i.e., two and three patients, respectively. Those 15-mer peptides that induced a proliferative T cell response fitted to the actual HLA-DR type (SYFPEITHI). The affinity of the native peptides for the T cell receptor was in the low to intermediate range (scores 6-19). The 15-mer peptides also contained 9-mer peptide sequences that could be predicted to bind to the actual HLA-ABC genotypes (SYFPEITHI/BIMAS). Blocking experiments using monoclonal antibodies indicated that the proliferative T cell response was both MHC class I and II restricted. The defined HLA-DR T cell epitopes were spread over the entire CEA molecule, but a higher frequency was noted towards the C-terminal. Peptides with a dual specificity may form a basis for production of subunit cancer vaccines, but modifications should be done to increase the T cell affinity, thereby optimizing the antitumoral effects of the vaccine.

  16. Avian and Human Seasonal Influenza Hemagglutinin Proteins Elicit CD4 T Cell Responses That Are Comparable in Epitope Abundance and Diversity.

    PubMed

    DiPiazza, Anthony; Richards, Katherine; Poulton, Nicholas; Sant, Andrea J

    2017-03-01

    Avian influenza viruses remain a significant concern due to their pandemic potential. Vaccine trials have suggested that humans respond poorly to avian influenza vaccines relative to seasonal vaccines. It is important to understand, first, if there is a general deficiency in the ability of avian hemagglutinin (HA) proteins to generate immune responses and, if so, what underlies this defect. This question is of particular interest because it has been suggested that in humans, the poor immunogenicity of H7 vaccines may be due to a paucity of CD4 T cell epitopes. Because of the generally high levels of cross-reactive CD4 T cells in humans, it is not possible to compare the inherent immunogenicities of avian and seasonal HA proteins in an unbiased manner. Here, we empirically examine the epitope diversity and abundance of CD4 T cells elicited by seasonal and avian HA proteins. HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR4 transgenic mice were vaccinated with purified HA proteins, and CD4 T cells to specific epitopes were identified and quantified. These studies revealed that the diversity and abundance of CD4 T cells specific for HA do not segregate on the basis of whether the HA was derived from human seasonal or avian influenza viruses. Therefore, we conclude that failure in responses to avian vaccines in humans is likely due to a lack of cross-reactive CD4 T cell memory perhaps coupled with competition with or suppression of naive, HA-specific CD4 T cells by memory CD4 T cells specific for more highly conserved proteins.

  17. CD8 and CD4 epitope predictions in RV144: no strong evidence of a T-cell driven sieve effect in HIV-1 breakthrough sequences from trial participants.

    PubMed

    Dommaraju, Kalpana; Kijak, Gustavo; Carlson, Jonathan M; Larsen, Brendan B; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Geraghty, Dan E; Deng, Wenjie; Maust, Brandon S; Edlefsen, Paul T; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; deSouza, Mark S; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttihum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Mullins, James I; Kim, Jerome H; Rolland, Morgane

    2014-01-01

    The modest protection afforded by the RV144 vaccine offers an opportunity to evaluate its mechanisms of protection. Differences between HIV-1 breakthrough viruses from vaccine and placebo recipients can be attributed to the RV144 vaccine as this was a randomized and double-blinded trial. CD8 and CD4 T cell epitope repertoires were predicted in HIV-1 proteomes from 110 RV144 participants. Predicted Gag epitope repertoires were smaller in vaccine than in placebo recipients (p = 0.019). After comparing participant-derived epitopes to corresponding epitopes in the RV144 vaccine, the proportion of epitopes that could be matched differed depending on the protein conservation (only 36% of epitopes in Env vs 84-91% in Gag/Pol/Nef for CD8 predicted epitopes) or on vaccine insert subtype (55% against CRF01_AE vs 7% against subtype B). To compare predicted epitopes to the vaccine, we analyzed predicted binding affinity and evolutionary distance measurements. Comparisons between the vaccine and placebo arm did not reveal robust evidence for a T cell driven sieve effect, although some differences were noted in Env-V2 (0.022≤p-value≤0.231). The paucity of CD8 T cell responses identified following RV144 vaccination, with no evidence for V2 specificity, considered together both with the association of decreased infection risk in RV 144 participants with V-specific antibody responses and a V2 sieve effect, lead us to hypothesize that this sieve effect was not T cell specific. Overall, our results did not reveal a strong differential impact of vaccine-induced T cell responses among breakthrough infections in RV144 participants.

  18. CD8 and CD4 Epitope Predictions in RV144: No Strong Evidence of a T-Cell Driven Sieve Effect in HIV-1 Breakthrough Sequences from Trial Participants

    PubMed Central

    Dommaraju, Kalpana; Kijak, Gustavo; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Larsen, Brendan B.; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Geraghty, Dan E.; Deng, Wenjie; Maust, Brandon S.; Edlefsen, Paul T.; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; deSouza, Mark S.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttihum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; O'Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Mullins, James I.; Kim, Jerome H.; Rolland, Morgane

    2014-01-01

    The modest protection afforded by the RV144 vaccine offers an opportunity to evaluate its mechanisms of protection. Differences between HIV-1 breakthrough viruses from vaccine and placebo recipients can be attributed to the RV144 vaccine as this was a randomized and double-blinded trial. CD8 and CD4 T cell epitope repertoires were predicted in HIV-1 proteomes from 110 RV144 participants. Predicted Gag epitope repertoires were smaller in vaccine than in placebo recipients (p = 0.019). After comparing participant-derived epitopes to corresponding epitopes in the RV144 vaccine, the proportion of epitopes that could be matched differed depending on the protein conservation (only 36% of epitopes in Env vs 84–91% in Gag/Pol/Nef for CD8 predicted epitopes) or on vaccine insert subtype (55% against CRF01_AE vs 7% against subtype B). To compare predicted epitopes to the vaccine, we analyzed predicted binding affinity and evolutionary distance measurements. Comparisons between the vaccine and placebo arm did not reveal robust evidence for a T cell driven sieve effect, although some differences were noted in Env-V2 (0.022≤p-value≤0.231). The paucity of CD8 T cell responses identified following RV144 vaccination, with no evidence for V2 specificity, considered together both with the association of decreased infection risk in RV 144 participants with V-specific antibody responses and a V2 sieve effect, lead us to hypothesize that this sieve effect was not T cell specific. Overall, our results did not reveal a strong differential impact of vaccine-induced T cell responses among breakthrough infections in RV144 participants. PMID:25350851

  19. hTERT mRNA dendritic cell vaccination: complete response in a pancreatic cancer patient associated with response against several hTERT epitopes.

    PubMed

    Suso, Else M Inderberg; Dueland, Svein; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie; Vetrhus, Turid; Aamdal, Steinar; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Gaudernack, Gustav

    2011-06-01

    Immunotherapy targeting the hTERT subunit of telomerase has been shown to induce robust immune responses in cancer patients after vaccination with single hTERT peptides. Vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with hTERT mRNA has the potential to induce strong immune responses to multiple hTERT epitopes and is therefore an attractive approach to more potent immunotherapy. Blood samples from such patients provide an opportunity for identification of new, in vivo processed T-cell epitopes that may be clinically relevant. A 62-year-old female patient underwent radical surgery for a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. After relapse, she obtained stable disease on gemcitabine treatment. Due to severe neutropenia, the chemotherapy was terminated. The patient has subsequently been treated with autologous DCs loaded with hTERT mRNA for 3 years. Immunomonitoring was performed at regular intervals following start of vaccination and clinical outcome measured by CT and PET/CT evaluation. The patient developed an immune response against several hTERT-derived Th and CTL epitopes. She presently shows no evidence of active disease based on PET/CT scans. No serious adverse events were experienced and the patient continues to receive regular booster injections. We here provide evidence for the induction of hTERT-specific immune responses following vaccination of a pancreas cancer patient with DCs loaded with hTERT mRNA. These responses are associated with complete remission. A thorough analysis of this patient immune response has provided a unique opportunity to identify novel epitopes, associated with clinical effects. These will be included in future hTERT vaccines.

  20. Expression of recombinant T-cell epitopes of major Japanese cedar pollen allergens fused with cholera toxin B subunit in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Vinh Van; Zou, Yanshuang; Kurata, Kentaro; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    Peptides containing T-cell epitopes from allergens, which are not reactive to allergen-specific IgE, are appropriate candidates as antigens for specific immunotherapy against allergies. To develop a vaccine that can be used in practical application to prevent and treat Japanese cedar pollen allergy, four major T-cell epitopes from the Cry j 1 antigen and six from the Cry j 2 antigen were selected to design cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi, DNA constructs encoding artificial polypeptides of the selected epitopes. To apply cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as an adjuvant, cry j 1 epi and cry j 2 epi were linked and then fused to the CTB gene in tandem to construct a fusion gene, ctb-linker-cry j 1 epi- cry j 2 epi-flag. The fusion gene was introduced into a pET-28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The expressed recombinant protein was purified by a His-tag affinity column and confirmed by western blot analysis using anti-CTB and anti-FLAG antibodies. The purified recombinant protein also proved to be antigenic against anti-Cry j 1 and anti-Cry j 2 antibodies. Expression of the recombinant protein induced with 1mM IPTG reached a maximum in 3-5h, and recovery of the affinity-purified recombinant protein was approximately 120mg/L of culture medium. The present study indicates that production of sufficient amounts of recombinant protein with antigenic epitopes may be possible by recombinant techniques using E. coli or other bacterial strains for protein expression.

  1. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-02

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses.

  2. A deimmunised form of the ribotoxin, α-sarcin, lacking CD4+ T cell epitopes and its use as an immunotoxin warhead

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Hearn, Arron R.; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Kozub, Dorota; Fogg, Mark H.; Carr, Francis J.; Baker, Matthew P.; Lacadena, Javier; Gehlsen, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal ribotoxins that block protein synthesis can be useful warheads in the context of a targeted immunotoxin. α-Sarcin is a small (17 kDa) fungal ribonuclease produced by Aspergillus giganteus that functions by catalytically cleaving a single phosphodiester bond in the sarcin–ricin loop of the large ribosomal subunit, thus making the ribosome unrecognisable to elongation factors and leading to inhibition of protein synthesis. Peptide mapping using an ex vivo human T cell assay determined that α-sarcin contained two T cell epitopes; one in the N-terminal 20 amino acids and the other in the C-terminal 20 amino acids. Various mutations were tested individually within each epitope and then in combination to isolate deimmunised α-sarcin variants that had the desired properties of silencing T cell epitopes and retention of the ability to inhibit protein synthesis (equivalent to wild-type, WT α-sarcin). A deimmunised variant (D9T/Q142T) demonstrated a complete lack of T cell activation in in vitro whole protein human T cell assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from donors with diverse HLA allotypes. Generation of an immunotoxin by fusion of the D9T/Q142T variant to a single-chain Fv targeting Her2 demonstrated potent cell killing equivalent to a fusion protein comprising the WT α-sarcin. These results represent the first fungal ribotoxin to be deimmunised with the potential to construct a new generation of deimmunised immunotoxin therapeutics. PMID:27578884

  3. Vaccination with a single CD4 T cell peptide epitope from a Salmonella type III-secreted effector protein provides protection against lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Jonathan R; Petersen, Hailey E; Frederick, Daniel R; Morici, Lisa A; McLachlan, James B

    2014-06-01

    Salmonella infections affect millions worldwide and remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is known from mouse studies that CD4 T cells are essential mediators of immunity against Salmonella infection, yet it is not clear whether targeting CD4 T cell responses directly with peptide vaccines against Salmonella can be effective in combating infection. Additionally, it is not known whether T cell responses elicited against Salmonella secreted effector proteins can provide protective immunity against infection. In this study, we investigated both of these possibilities using prime-boost immunization of susceptible mice with a single CD4 T cell peptide epitope from Salmonella secreted effector protein I (SseI), a component of the Salmonella type III secretion system. This immunization conferred significant protection against lethal oral infection, equivalent to that conferred by whole heat-killed Salmonella bacteria. Surprisingly, a well-characterized T cell epitope from the flagellar protein FliC afforded no protection compared to immunization with an irrelevant control peptide. The protective response appeared to be most associated with polyfunctional CD4 T cells raised against the SseI peptide, since no antibodies were produced against any of the peptides and very little CD8 T cell response was observed. Overall, this study demonstrates that eliciting CD4 T cell responses against components of the Salmonella type III secretion system can contribute to protection against infection and should be considered in the design of future Salmonella subunit vaccines.

  4. HLA-DR3 restricted T cell epitope mimicry in induction of autoimmune response to lupus-associated antigen SmD

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Umesh S; Sim, Davis L; Dai, Chao; Kannapell, Carol J; Gaskin, Felicia; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan; David, Chella S; Fu, Shu Man

    2012-01-01

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multigenic autoimmune disorder, HLA-D is the most dominant genetic susceptibility locus. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that microbial peptides bind HLA-DR3 and activate T cells reactive with lupus autoantigens. Using HLA-DR3 transgenic mice and lupus-associated autoantigen SmD protein, SmD79–93 was identified to contain a dominant HLA-DR3 restricted T cell epitope. This T cell epitope was characterized by using a T-T hybridoma, C1P2, generated from SmD immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse. By pattern search analysis, 20 putative mimicry peptides (P2–P21) of SmD79–93, from microbial and human origin were identified. C1P2 cells responded to SmD, SmD79–93 and a peptide (P20) from Vibro cholerae. Immunization of HLA-DR3 mice with P20 induced T cell responses and IgG antibodies to SmD that were not cross-reactive with the immunogen. A T-T hybridoma, P20P1, generated from P20 immunized mice, not only responded to P20 and SmD79–93, but also to peptides from Streptococccus agalactiae (P17) and human-La related protein (P11). These three T cell mimics (P20, P11 and P17) induced diverse and different autoantibody response profiles. Our data demonstrates for the first time molecular mimicry at T cell epitope level between lupus-associated autoantigen SmD and microbial peptides. Considering distinct autoreactive T cell clones, activated by different microbial peptides, molecular mimicry at T cell epitope level can be an important pathway for the activation of autoreactive T cells resulting in the production of autoantibodies. In addition, the novel findings reported herein may have significant implications in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:21868195

  5. Prediction and In Silico Identification of Novel B-Cells and T-Cells Epitopes in the S1-Spike Glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 (793/B) Infectious Bronchitis Virus Serotypes for Application in Peptide Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hair Bejo, Mohd; Kadkhodaei, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatic analysis was used to predict antigenic B-cell and T-cell epitopes within the S1 glycoprotein of M41 and CR88 IBV strains. A conserved linear B-cell epitope peptide, YTSNETTDVTS175–185, was identified in M41 IBV strains while three such epitopes types namely, VSNASPNSGGVD279–290, HPKCNFRPENI328–338, and NETNNAGSVSDCTAGT54–69, were predicted in CR88 IBV strains. Analysis of MHCI binding peptides in M41 IBV strains revealed the presence of 15 antigenic peptides out of which 12 were highly conserved in 96–100% of the total M41 strains analysed. Interestingly three of these peptides, GGPITYKVM208, WFNSLSVSI356, and YLADAGLAI472, relatively had high antigenicity index (>1.0). On the other hand, 11 MHCI binding epitope peptides were identified in CR88 IBV strains. Of these, five peptides were found to be highly conserved with a range between 90% and 97%. However, WFNSLSVSL358, SYNISAASV88, and YNISAASVA89 peptides comparably showed high antigenicity scores (>1.0). Combination of antigenic B-cells and T-cells peptides that are conserved across many strains as approach to evoke humoral and CTL immune response will potentially lead to a broad-based vaccine that could reduce the challenges in using live attenuated vaccine technology in the control of IBV infection in poultry. PMID:27667997

  6. Three novel NY-ESO-1 epitopes bound to DRB1*0803, DQB1*0401 and DRB1*0901 recognized by CD4 T cells from CHP-NY-ESO-1-vaccinated patients.

    PubMed

    Mizote, Yu; Taniguchi, Taku; Tanaka, Kei; Isobe, Midori; Wada, Hisashi; Saika, Takashi; Kita, Shoichi; Koide, Yukari; Uenaka, Akiko; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2010-07-19

    Three novel NY-ESO-1 CD4 T cell epitopes were identified using PBMC obtained from patients who were vaccinated with a complex of cholesterol-bearing hydrophobized pullulan (CHP) and NY-ESO-1 protein (CHP-NY-ESO-1). The restriction molecules were determined by antibody blocking and using various EBV-B cells with different HLA alleles as APC to present peptides to CD4 T cells. The minimal epitope peptides were determined using various N- and C-termini truncated peptides deduced from 18-mer overlapping peptides originally identified for recognition. Those epitopes were DRB1*0901-restricted NY-ESO-1 87-100, DQB1*0401-restricted NY-ESO-1 95-107 and DRB1*0803-restricted NY-ESO-1 124-134. CD4 T cells used to determine those epitope peptides recognized EBV-B cells or DC that were treated with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein or NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cell lysate, suggesting that the epitope peptides are naturally processed. These CD4 T cells showed a cytokine profile with Th1 characteristics. Furthermore, NY-ESO-1 87-100 peptide/HLA-DRB1*0901 tetramer staining was observed. Multiple Th1-type CD4 T cell responses are beneficial for inducing effective anti-tumor responses after NY-ESO-1 protein vaccination.

  7. Improving Serodiagnosis of Human and Canine Leishmaniasis with Recombinant Leishmania braziliensis Cathepsin L-like Protein and a Synthetic Peptide Containing Its Linear B-cell Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The early and correct diagnosis of human leishmaniasis is essential for disease treatment. Another important step in the control of visceral leishmaniasis is the identification of infected dogs, which are the main domestic reservoir of L. infantum. Recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides based on Leishmania genes have emerged as valuable targets for serodiagnosis due to their increased sensitivity, specificity and potential for standardization. Cathepsin L-like genes are surface antigens that are secreted by amastigotes and have little similarity to host proteins, factors that enable this protein as a good target for serodiagnosis of the leishmaniasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We mapped a linear B-cell epitope within the Cathepsin L-like protein from L. braziliensis. A synthetic peptide containing the epitope and the recombinant protein was evaluated for serodiagnosis of human tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis, as well as canine visceral leishmaniasis. Conclusions/Significance The recombinant protein performed best for human tegumentary and canine visceral leishmaniasis, with 96.30% and 89.33% accuracy, respectively. The synthetic peptide was the best to discriminate human visceral leishmaniasis, with 97.14% specificity, 94.55% sensitivity and 96.00% accuracy. Comparison with T. cruzi-infected humans and dogs suggests that the identified epitope is specific to Leishmania parasites, which minimizes the likelihood of cross-reactions. PMID:25569432

  8. Sequence Variation in the T-Cell Epitopes of the Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein among Field Isolates Is Temporally Stable: a 5-Year Longitudinal Study in Southern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Jalloh, Amadu; van Thien, Huynh; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Ohashi, Jun; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kanbe, Toshio; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kawamoto, Fumihiko

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to decipher the nature and extent of antigen polymorphisms of malaria parasites in a setting where malaria is hypomesoendemic, we conducted a 5-year longitudinal study (1998 to 2003) by sequencing the Th2R and Th3R epitopes of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of 142 Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Bao Loc, Vietnam. Samples were collected during the high-transmission season, September through December 1998 (n = 43), as well as from July 2000 to August 2001 (n = 34), September 2001 to July 2002 (n = 33), and August 2002 to July 2003 (n = 32). Marked sequence diversity was noted during the high-transmission season in 1998, but no significant variation in allele frequencies was observed over the years (χ2 = 70.003, degrees of freedom = 57, P = 0.116). The apparent temporal stability in allele frequency observed in this Bao Loc malaria setting may suggest that polymorphism in the Th2R and Th3R epitopes is not maintained by frequency-dependent immune selection. By including 36 isolates from Flores Island, Indonesia, and 19 isolates from Thaton, Myanmar, we investigated geographical patterns of sequence polymorphism for these epitopes in Southeast Asia; among the characterized isolates, a globally distributed variant appears to be predominant in Vietnam (75 of 142 isolates, or 52.8%) as well as in Myanmar (15 of 19 isolates, or 78.9%) and Indonesia (31 of 36 isolates, or 86.1%). Further analyses involving worldwide CSP sequences revealed distinct regional patterns, a finding which, together with the unique mutations observed here, may suggest a possible role for host or local factors in the generation of sequence diversity in the T-cell epitopes of CSP. PMID:16597843

  9. A new Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein and its non-described specific B cell conformational epitope applied in the serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Duarte, Mariana C; Costa, Lourena E; Garde, Esther; Dimer, Laura M; Kursancew, Amanda C S; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Roatt, Bruno M; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-04-01

    The serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) presents problems related to its sensitivity and/or specificity. In the present study, a new Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein, LiHyD, was produced as a recombinant protein (rLiHyD) and evaluated in ELISA experiments for the CVL serodiagnosis. LiHyD was characterized as antigenic in a recent immunoproteomic search performed with Leishmania infantum proteins and the sera of dogs developing visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Aiming to compare the efficacy between whole proteins and synthetic peptides, two linear and one conformational B cell epitopes of LiHyD were synthesized and also evaluated as diagnostic markers. The four antigens were recognized by the sera of dogs suffering VL. On the contrary, low reactivity was observed when they were assayed with sera from non-infected healthy dogs living in endemic or non-endemic areas of leishmaniasis. In addition, no reactivity was found against them using sera from dogs experimentally infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, Babesia canis, or Ehrlichia canis, or sera from animals vaccinated with the Leish-Tec® vaccine, a prophylactic preparation commercially available for CVL prevention in Brazil. As comparative diagnostic tools, a recombinant version of the amastigote-specific A2 protein and a soluble crude Leishmania extract were studied. Both antigens presented lower sensitivity and/or specificity values than the LiHyD-based products. The rLiHyD presented better results for the CVL serodiagnosis than its linear epitopes, although the peptide recreating the conformational epitope resulted also appropriate as a diagnostic marker of CVL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the use of a conformational epitope derived from a Leishmania protein for serodiagnosis of CVL.

  10. Modular multiantigen T cell epitope-enriched DNA vaccine against human leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Das, Shantanabha; Freier, Anja; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Das, Sushmita; Oswald, Detlef; Losch, Florian O; Selka, Melanie; Sacerdoti-Sierra, Nina; Schönian, Gabriele; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Seifert, Karin; Schroff, Matthias; Juhls, Christiane; Jaffe, Charles L; Roy, Syamal; Das, Pradeep; Louzir, Hechmi; Croft, Simon L; Modabber, Farrokh; Walden, Peter

    2014-04-30

    The leishmaniases are protozoal diseases that severely affect large populations in tropical and subtropical regions. There are only limited treatment options and preventative measures. Vaccines will be important for prevention, control and elimination of leishmaniasis, and could reduce the transmission and burden of disease in endemic populations. We report the development of a DNA vaccine against leishmaniasis that induced T cell-based immunity and is a candidate for clinical trials. The vaccine antigens were selected as conserved in various Leishmania species, different endemic regions, and over time. They were tested with T cells from individuals cured of leishmaniasis, and shown to be immunogenic and to induce CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in genetically diverse human populations of different endemic regions. The vaccine proved protective in a rodent model of infection. Thus, the immunogenicity of candidate vaccine antigens in human populations of endemic regions, as well as proof of principle for induction of specific immune responses and protection against Leishmania infection in mice, provides a viable strategy for T cell vaccine development.

  11. Identification of a conserved JEV serocomplex B-cell epitope by screening a phage-display peptide library with a mAb generated against West Nile virus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein is one of the three viral structural proteins, encapsidates the viral RNA to form the nucleocapsid, and is necessary for nuclear and nucleolar localization. The antigenic sites on C protein that are targeted by humoral immune responses have not been studied thoroughly, and well-defined B-cell epitopes on the WNV C protein have not been reported. Results In this study, we generated a WNV C protein-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) and defined the linear epitope recognized by the mAb by screening a 12-mer peptide library using phage-display technology. The mAb, designated as 6D3, recognized the phages displaying a consensus motif consisting of the amino acid sequence KKPGGPG, which is identical to an amino acid sequence present in WNV C protein. Further fine mapping was conducted using truncated peptides expressed as MBP-fusion proteins. We found that the KKPGGPG motif is the minimal determinant of the linear epitope recognized by the mAb 6D3. Western blot (WB) analysis demonstrated that the KKPGGPG epitope could be recognized by antibodies contained in WNV- and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-positive equine serum, but was not recognized by Dengue virus 1-4 (DENV1-4)-positive mice serum. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 6D3 is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex of the Family Flaviviridae. Conclusion The KKPGGPG epitope is a JEV serocomplex-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the 6D3 mAb generated in this study. The 6D3 mAb may serve as a novel reagent in development of diagnostic tests for JEV serocomplex infection. Further, the identification of the B-cell epitope that is highly conserved among the JEV serocomplex may support the rationale design of vaccines against viruses of the JEV serocomplex. PMID:21375771

  12. T cell participation in autoreactivity to NC16a epitopes in bullous pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Pickford, W J; Gudi, V; Haggart, A M; Lewis, B J; Herriot, R; Barker, R N; Ormerod, A D

    2015-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is a blistering skin disease characterized by autoantibodies against the NC16a domain of bullous pemphigoid 180. This study was performed to characterize and map the fine specificity of T cell responses to NC16a. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a total of 28 bullous pemphigoid patients and 14 matched controls were tested for proliferative and cytokine responses to recombinant NC16a and a complete panel of 21 overlapping peptides spanning this region of BP180. Proliferative responses to NC16A and the peptide panel in the patients with active disease were similar in frequency and magnitude to those in healthy donors, and included late responses typical of naive cells in approximately 60% of each group. Interleukin (IL)-4 responses were slightly stronger for six peptides, and significantly stronger for Nc16a, in patients than in controls. Factor analysis identified factors that separate responses to the peptide panel discretely into IL-4, T helper type 2 (Th2) pattern, interferon (IFN)-γ, Th1 pattern and IL-10 or transforming growth factor [TGF-β, regulatory T cell (Treg)] pattern. Factors segregating IL-10 versus IFN-γ were predicted by active blistering or remission, and TGF-β or IL-10 versus IFN-γ by age. Finally, we confirmed a significant up-regulation of IgE responses to BP180 in the patients with pemphigoid. This shows the complexity of T cell phenotype and fine autoreactive specificity in responses to NC16A, in patients and in normal controls. Important disease-associated factors determine the balance of cytokine responses. Of these, specific IL-4 and IgE responses show the strongest associations with pemphigoid, pointing to an important contribution by Th2 cytokines to pathogenesis. PMID:25472480

  13. Structural Basis for Clonal Diversity of the Public T Cell Response to a Dominant Human Cytomegalovirus Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinbo; Gao, Mingming; Chen, Guobing; Pierce, Brian G.; Lu, Jinghua; Weng, Nan-ping; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous and persistent human pathogen that is kept in check by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Individuals expressing the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A2 produce cytotoxic T lymphocytes bearing T cell receptors (TCRs) that recognize the immunodominant CMV epitope NLVPMVATV (NLV). The NLV-specific T cell repertoire is characterized by a high prevalence of TCRs that are frequently observed in multiple unrelated individuals. These public TCRs feature identical, or nearly identical, complementarity-determining region 3α (CDR3α) and/or CDR3β sequences. The TCRs may express public CDR3α motifs alone, public CDR3β motifs alone, or dual public CDR3αβ motifs. In addition, the same public CDR3α motif may pair with different CDR3β motifs (and the reverse), giving rise to highly diverse NLV-specific TCR repertoires. To investigate the structural underpinnings of this clonal diversity, we determined crystal structures of two public TCRs (C7 and C25) in complex with NLV·HLA-A2. These TCRs utilize completely different CDR3α and CDR3β motifs that, in addition, can associate with multiple variable α and variable β regions in NLV-specific T cell repertoires. The C7·NLV·HLA-A2 and C25·NLV·HLA-A2 complexes exhibit divergent TCR footprints on peptide-MHC such that C25 is more focused on the central portion of the NLV peptide than is C7. These structures combined with molecular modeling show how the public CDR3α motif of C25 may associate with different variable α regions and how the public CDR3α motif of C7 may pair with different CDR3β motifs. This interchangeability of TCR V regions and CDR3 motifs permits multiple structural solutions to binding an identical peptide-MHC ligand and thereby the generation of a clonally diverse public T cell response to CMV. PMID:26429912

  14. CD4+ T cell autoimmunity to hypocretin/orexin and cross-reactivity to a 2009 H1N1 influenza A epitope in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Mahlios, Josh; Jiang, Wei; Lin, Ling; Hou, Tieying; Macaubas, Claudia; Einen, Mali; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Crowe, Catherine; Newell, Evan W; Davis, Mark M; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-12-18

    Narcolepsy, a disorder strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA1*01:02/DQB1*06:02 (DQ0602), is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities. It is caused by the loss of ~70,000 posterior hypothalamic neurons that produce the wake-promoting neuropeptide hypocretin (HCRT) (orexin). We identified two DQ0602-binding HCRT epitopes, HCRT56-68 and HCRT87-99, that activated a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells in narcolepsy patients but not in DQ0602-positive healthy control subjects. Because of the established association of narcolepsy with the 2009 H1N1 influenza A strain (pH1N1), we administered a seasonal influenza vaccine (containing pH1N1) to patients with narcolepsy and found an increased frequency of circulating HCRT56-68- and HCRT87-99-reactive T cells. We also identified a hemagglutinin (HA) pHA1 epitope specific to the 2009 H1N1 strain, pHA1275-287, with homology to HCRT56-68 and HCRT87-99. In vitro stimulation of narcolepsy CD4(+) T cells with pH1N1 proteins or pHA1275-287 increased the frequency of HCRT56-68- and HCRT87-99-reactive T cells. Our data indicate the presence of CD4(+) T cells that are reactive to HCRT in narcolepsy patients and possible molecular mimicry between HCRT and a similar epitope in influenza pH1N1, pHA1275-287.

  15. A Chimera Containing CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of the Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase (NH36) Optimizes Cross-Protection against Leishmania amazonesis Infection.

    PubMed

    Alves-Silva, Marcus Vinícius; Nico, Dirlei; Morrot, Alexandre; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2017-01-01

    The Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase (NH36) and NH A34480 of Leishmania amazonensis share 93% of sequence identity. In mice, the NH36 induced protection against visceral leishmaniasis is mediated by a CD4+ T cell response against its C-terminal domain (F3). Besides this CD4+ Th1 response, prevention and cure of L. amazonensis infection require also additional CD8+ and regulatory T-cell responses to the NH36 N-terminal (F1 domain). We investigated if mice vaccination with F1 and F3 domains cloned in tandem, in a recombinant chimera, with saponin, optimizes the vaccine efficacy against L. amazonensis infection above the levels promoted by the two admixed domains or by each domain independently. The chimera induced the highest IgA, IgG, and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibody, IDR, IFN-γ, and IL-10 responses, while TNF-α was more secreted by mice vaccinated with F3 or all F3-contaning vaccines. Additionally, the chimera and the F1 vaccine also induced the highest proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IL-2, TNF-α, or IFN-γ alone, TNF-α in combination with IL-2 or IFN-γ, and of CD4+ multifunctional cells secreting IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Correlating with the immunological results, the strongest reductions of skin lesions sizes were determined by the admixed domains (80%) and by the chimera (84%), which also promoted the most pronounced and significant reduction of the parasite load (99.8%). Thus, the epitope presentation in a recombinant chimera optimizes immunogenicity and efficacy above the levels induced by the independent or admixed F1 and F3 domains. The multiparameter analysis disclosed that the Th1-CD4+ T helper response induced by the chimera is mainly directed against its FRYPRPKHCHTQVA epitope. Additionally, the YPPEFKTKL epitope of F1 induced the second most important CD4+ T cell response, and, followed by the DVAGIVGVPVAAGCT, FMLQILDFYTKVYE, and ELLAITTVVGNQ sequences, also the most potent CD8+ T cell responses and IL-10 secretion. Remarkably

  16. A Chimera Containing CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of the Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase (NH36) Optimizes Cross-Protection against Leishmania amazonesis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Silva, Marcus Vinícius; Nico, Dirlei; Morrot, Alexandre; Palatnik, Marcos; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2017-01-01

    The Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase (NH36) and NH A34480 of Leishmania amazonensis share 93% of sequence identity. In mice, the NH36 induced protection against visceral leishmaniasis is mediated by a CD4+ T cell response against its C-terminal domain (F3). Besides this CD4+ Th1 response, prevention and cure of L. amazonensis infection require also additional CD8+ and regulatory T-cell responses to the NH36 N-terminal (F1 domain). We investigated if mice vaccination with F1 and F3 domains cloned in tandem, in a recombinant chimera, with saponin, optimizes the vaccine efficacy against L. amazonensis infection above the levels promoted by the two admixed domains or by each domain independently. The chimera induced the highest IgA, IgG, and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibody, IDR, IFN-γ, and IL-10 responses, while TNF-α was more secreted by mice vaccinated with F3 or all F3-contaning vaccines. Additionally, the chimera and the F1 vaccine also induced the highest proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting IL-2, TNF-α, or IFN-γ alone, TNF-α in combination with IL-2 or IFN-γ, and of CD4+ multifunctional cells secreting IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Correlating with the immunological results, the strongest reductions of skin lesions sizes were determined by the admixed domains (80%) and by the chimera (84%), which also promoted the most pronounced and significant reduction of the parasite load (99.8%). Thus, the epitope presentation in a recombinant chimera optimizes immunogenicity and efficacy above the levels induced by the independent or admixed F1 and F3 domains. The multiparameter analysis disclosed that the Th1-CD4+ T helper response induced by the chimera is mainly directed against its FRYPRPKHCHTQVA epitope. Additionally, the YPPEFKTKL epitope of F1 induced the second most important CD4+ T cell response, and, followed by the DVAGIVGVPVAAGCT, FMLQILDFYTKVYE, and ELLAITTVVGNQ sequences, also the most potent CD8+ T cell responses and IL-10 secretion. Remarkably

  17. Cell-delivered magnetic nanoparticles caused hyperthermia-mediated increased survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Wang, Hongwang; Shrestha, Tej B; Seo, Gwi Moon; Pyle, Marla; Abayaweera, Gayani; Dani, Raj; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-01-01

    Using magnetic nanoparticles to absorb alternating magnetic field energy as a method of generating localized hyperthermia has been shown to be a potential cancer treatment. This report demonstrates a system that uses tumor homing cells to actively carry iron/iron oxide nanoparticles into tumor tissue for alternating magnetic field treatment. Paramagnetic iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded into RAW264.7 cells (mouse monocyte/ macrophage-like cells), which have been shown to be tumor homing cells. A murine model of disseminated peritoneal pancreatic cancer was then generated by intraperitoneal injection of Pan02 cells. After tumor development, monocyte/macrophage-like cells loaded with iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were injected intraperitoneally and allowed to migrate into the tumor. Three days after injection, mice were exposed to an alternating magnetic field for 20 minutes to cause the cell-delivered nanoparticles to generate heat. This treatment regimen was repeated three times. A survival study demonstrated that this system can significantly increase survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model, with an average post-tumor insertion life expectancy increase of 31%. This system has the potential to become a useful method for specifically and actively delivering nanoparticles for local hyperthermia treatment of cancer.

  18. Cell-delivered magnetic nanoparticles caused hyperthermia-mediated increased survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Wang, Hongwang; Shrestha, Tej B; Seo, Gwi Moon; Pyle, Marla; Abayaweera, Gayani; Dani, Raj; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-01-01

    Using magnetic nanoparticles to absorb alternating magnetic field energy as a method of generating localized hyperthermia has been shown to be a potential cancer treatment. This report demonstrates a system that uses tumor homing cells to actively carry iron/iron oxide nanoparticles into tumor tissue for alternating magnetic field treatment. Paramagnetic iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded into RAW264.7 cells (mouse monocyte/ macrophage-like cells), which have been shown to be tumor homing cells. A murine model of disseminated peritoneal pancreatic cancer was then generated by intraperitoneal injection of Pan02 cells. After tumor development, monocyte/macrophage-like cells loaded with iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were injected intraperitoneally and allowed to migrate into the tumor. Three days after injection, mice were exposed to an alternating magnetic field for 20 minutes to cause the cell-delivered nanoparticles to generate heat. This treatment regimen was repeated three times. A survival study demonstrated that this system can significantly increase survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model, with an average post-tumor insertion life expectancy increase of 31%. This system has the potential to become a useful method for specifically and actively delivering nanoparticles for local hyperthermia treatment of cancer. PMID:22287840

  19. Myristoylation increases the CD8+T-cell response to a GFP prototype antigen delivered by modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Marr, Lisa; Lülf, Anna-Theresa; Freudenstein, Astrid; Sutter, Gerd; Volz, Asisa

    2016-04-01

    Activation of CD8(+)T-cells is an essential part of immune responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA). Strategies to enhance T-cell responses to antigens may be particularly necessary for broadly protective immunization against influenza A virus infections or for candidate vaccines targeting chronic infections and cancer. Here, we tested recombinant MVAs that targeted a model antigen, GFP, to different localizations in infected cells. In vitro characterization demonstrated that GFP accumulated in the nucleus (MVA-nls-GFP), associated with cellular membranes (MVA-myr-GFP) or was equally distributed throughout the cell (MVA-GFP). On vaccination, we found significantly higher levels of GFP-specific CD8(+)T-cells in MVA-myr-GFP-vaccinated BALB/c mice than in those immunized with MVA-GFP or MVA-nls-GFP. Thus, myristoyl modification may be a useful strategy to enhance CD8(+)T-cell responses to MVA-delivered target antigens.

  20. Sterile Immunity to Malaria after DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Immunization Is Associated with Effector Memory CD8+T Cells Targeting AMA1 Class I Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Kim, Yohan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Huang, Jun; McGrath, Shannon; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Shi, Meng; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E.; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad) expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad). Four volunteers (27%) demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA) did not develop sterile protection. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches

  1. Epitope mapping of B-cell determinants on the 15-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15) with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, R E; Demecs, M; Taber, L H; Musher, D M

    1996-01-01

    The antigenicity of the 15-kDa lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum (Tpp15 or TpN15) was comprehensively evaluated in epitope-scanning studies with overlapping deca- and octapeptides and polygonal rabbit and human infant immunoglobulins (Igs) and antisera. This approach enabled us to identify potentially important regions and to determine the optimal dilutions of Igs or antisera for use in further studies. IgM and IgG from both species were capable of recognizing multiple, continuous epitopes. A total of 13 peptides, principally clustered in the central regions of the protein, were recognized by all syphilitic sera and Ig fractions. On the basis of window analyses, frequency profiles, and alanine substitution studies, five heptapeptides were selected for mimetic studies. Two of these five immunodominant, continuous epitopes initially appeared to be species specific; however, antisera elicited against mimetics of all five epitopes were polyspecific, recognizing similar motifs on several other treponemal proteins, including those of avirulent organisms. The only mimetic which yielded positive reactions with infant IgM and syphilitic sera in the absence of cross-reactions with rabbit antisera to avirulent treponemes was the variant of the VMYASSG motif. These findings are relevant to the development of simple, inexpensive assays for the serodiagnosis of active syphilis. PMID:8698467

  2. 76 FR 51374 - Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... will provide the regulatory science to facilitate development and evaluation of direct discovery of HLA... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes... University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The goal of the FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and...

  3. Elucidating the immunological effects of 5-azacytidine treatment in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and identifying new conditional ligands and T-cell epitopes of relevance in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Frøsig, Thomas Mørch

    2015-08-01

    This review is focused on research within three different areas of tumor immunology: discovery of new T-cell epitopes and a new immunological antigen (reported in Paper I and II), elucidation of the immunological effects of treatment with a hypomethylating drug (reported in Paper III) and discovery of new conditional ligands (reported in Paper IV). Many melanoma-associated T-cell epitopes have been described, but 45% of these are restricted to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2, leaving the remaining 36 different HLA molecules with only a few described T-cell epitopes each. Therefore we wanted to expand the number of T-cell epitopes restricted to HLA-A1, -A3, -A11 and -B7, all HLA molecules frequently expressed in Caucasians in Western Europe and Northern America. In Paper I we focused on the proteins gp100, Mart1, MAGE-A3, NY-ESO-1, tyrosinase and TRP-2, all melanoma-associated antigens frequently recognized by T cells from HLA-A2 patients. On contrary, in Paper II we wanted to investigate the protein Nodal as a novel immunological target. We took advantage of a T-cell epitope mapping platform in which HLA ligands are predicted by computer-based algorithms, further tested in the laboratory by an ELISA-based method and used for flow cytometry-based detection of specific T-cell responses by use of combinatorial encoded major histocompatibility (MHC) class I multimers. This procedure resulted in 127 (Paper I) and 32 (Paper II) confirmed HLA ligands, respectively, which we used for screening of the T-cell recognition within peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from melanoma patients. As spontaneous tumor-specific T-cell responses tend to be of very low frequency and probably below the detection threshold of the method, we incorporated a T-cell enrichment step prior to the detection of these responses. Our screening of 39 melanoma patients resulted in 26 (17 different) T-cell responses against the common melanoma-associated antigens and 10 (8 different) T-cell

  4. Decellularization of bovine anterior cruciate ligament tissues minimizes immunogenic reactions to alpha-gal epitopes by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryu; Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2012-10-01

    Rupture of ACL is a common injury. While the current surgical treatments are effective, many patients still suffer from precocious osteoarthritis, and there is an increasing interest in bioengineering approaches to improve ACL repair. Bovine collagen is a material currently in use for tissue engineering of ligaments. The alpha-gal epitopes found on bovine cells are a source of immunogenic stimulus for human cells. In this study, we wished to determine if those epitopes could be removed sufficiently to mitigate an immunogenic response using either a decellularization protocol or decellularization followed by alpha-galactosidase treatment. Bovine ACLs were treated with Triton-X, sodium deoxycholate, ribonuclease, and deoxyribonuclease to remove cells. A subset of the decellularized tissues was further treated with alpha-galactosidase. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to untreated, decellularized, and alpha-galactosidase-treated tissues, and PBMC migration and IL-6 release were measured. PBMCs were significantly more attracted to untreated ACL compared to decellularized or alpha-galactosidase-treated tissue, but no difference was seen between the two treatment groups. PBMCs also released significantly more IL-6 when exposed to untreated tissue compared to decellularized ACL or alpha-galactosidase-treated ACL, but no difference was seen between the two treatment groups. Immunohistochemistry using anti-alpha-gal antibody detected the epitopes throughout the untreated ACL, but similar areas of reaction were not seen on decellularized or alpha-galactosidase-treated ACL. These results suggest that our decellularization protocol minimizes the immunogenic reactions of human PBMCs to bovine ACL tissue. Therefore, decellularized bovine ACL tissue may be a safe, effective biomaterial for ACL injury treatments.

  5. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8(+)T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    PubMed

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-05-04

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing.

  6. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8+T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing. PMID:27143649

  7. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  8. Immune-driven adaptation of hepatitis B virus genotype D involves preferential alteration in B-cell epitopes and replicative attenuation--an insight from human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis B virus coinfection.

    PubMed

    Mondal, R K; Khatun, M; Ghosh, S; Banerjee, P; Datta, S; Sarkar, S; Saha, B; Santra, A; Banerjee, S; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2015-07-01

    An important driving force behind the sequence diversity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is viral adaptation to host immune responses. To gain an insight into the impact of host immunity on genetic diversification and properties of HBV, we characterized HBV of genotype D from treatment-naive hepatitis B e antigen-positive (EP) and hepatitis B e antigen-negative (EN) patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), where HBV is under stronger immune pressure, with that of HBV derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HBV-coinfected individuals, where HIV infection has significantly weakened the immune system. Full-length sequence analysis showed that HBV heterogeneity was most extensive in EN-CHB followed by EP-CHB and HIV/HBV coinfection. The relative magnitude of non-synonymous changes within B-cell epitopes was greater than that in T-cell epitopes of HBV open reading frames (ORFs) in both EP-CHB and EN-CHB. Nine amino acid substitutions were identified in B-cell epitopes and one in a T-cell epitope of HBV in EN-CHB, most of which resulted in altered hydrophobicities, as determined using the Kyte and Doolittle method, relative to wild-type residues found in HBV from the HIV-positive group. Additionally, 19 substitutions occurred at significantly higher frequencies in non-epitope regions of HBV ORF-P in EN-CHB than HIV/HBV-coinfected patients. In vitro replication assay demonstrated that the substitutions, particularly in reverse transcriptase and RNaseH domains of ORF-P, resulted in a decline in replication capacity of HBV. Hence, our results indicate that HBV adapts to increasing immune pressure through preferential mutations in B-cell epitopes and by replicative attenuation. The viral epitopes linked to immune response identified in this study bear important implications for future HBV vaccine studies.

  9. Epitope mapping: the first step in developing epitope-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Jonathan M; Roitburd-Berman, Anna; Siman-Tov, Dror D; Tarnovitski Freund, Natalia; Weiss, Yael

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies are an effective line of defense in preventing infectious diseases. Highly potent neutralizing antibodies can intercept a virus before it attaches to its target cell and, thus, inactivate it. This ability is based on the antibodies' specific recognition of epitopes, the sites of the antigen to which antibodies bind. Thus, understanding the antibody/epitope interaction provides a basis for the rational design of preventive vaccines. It is assumed that immunization with the precise epitope, corresponding to an effective neutralizing antibody, would elicit the generation of similarly potent antibodies in the vaccinee. Such a vaccine would be a 'B-cell epitope-based vaccine', the implementation of which requires the ability to backtrack from a desired antibody to its corresponding epitope. In this article we discuss a range of methods that enable epitope discovery based on a specific antibody. Such a reversed immunological approach is the first step in the rational design of an epitope-based vaccine. Undoubtedly, the gold standard for epitope definition is x-ray analyses of crystals of antigen:antibody complexes. This method provides atomic resolution of the epitope; however, it is not readily applicable to many antigens and antibodies, and requires a very high degree of sophistication and expertise. Most other methods rely on the ability to monitor the binding of the antibody to antigen fragments or mutated variations. In mutagenesis of the antigen, loss of binding due to point modification of an amino acid residue is often considered an indication of an epitope component. In addition, computational combinatorial methods for epitope mapping are also useful. These methods rely on the ability of the antibody of interest to affinity isolate specific short peptides from combinatorial phage display peptide libraries. The peptides are then regarded as leads for the definition of the epitope corresponding to the antibody used to screen the peptide library. For

  10. The presence of T cell epitopes is important for induction of antibody responses against antigens directed to DEC205+ dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Kelly N. S.; Rampazo, Eline V.; Antonialli, Renan; Yamamoto, Marcio M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Soares, Irene S.; Boscardin, Silvia B.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo antigen targeting to dendritic cells (DCs) has been used as a way to improve immune responses. Targeting is accomplished with the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to receptors present on the DC surface fused with the antigen of interest. An anti-DEC205 mAb has been successfully used to target antigens to the DEC205+CD8α+ DC subset. The administration of low doses of the hybrid mAb together with DC maturation stimuli is able to activate specific T cells and induce production of high antibody titres for a number of different antigens. However, it is still not known if this approach would work with any fused protein. Here we genetically fused the αDEC205 mAb with two fragments (42-kDa and 19-kDa) derived from the ~200 kDa Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1), known as MSP142 and MSP119, respectively. The administration of two doses of αDEC-MSP142, but not of αDEC-MSP119 mAb, together with an adjuvant to two mouse strains induced high anti-MSP119 antibody titres that were dependent on CD4+ T cells elicited by peptides present in the MSP133 sequence, indicating that the presence of T cell epitopes in antigens targeted to DEC205+ DCs increases antibody responses. PMID:28000705

  11. Morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by low doses of fission neutrons delivered at different dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.A.; Sedita, B.A. ); Hill, C.K. . Cancer Research Lab.); Elkind, M.M. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1991-01-01

    Both induction of cell transformation and killing were examined with Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts exposed to low doses of JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons delivered at high (10.3 cGy/min) and low (0.43 and 0.086 cGy/min) dose rates. Second-passage cells were irradiated in mass cultures, then cloned over feeder cells. Morphologically transformed colonies were identified 8-10 days later. Cell killing was independent of dose rate, but the yield of transformation was greater after low-dose-rate irradiations. Decreasing the neutron dose-rate from 10.3 to 0.086 cGy/min resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the yield of transformation for neutron exposures below 50 cGy, and enhancement which was consistently observed in repetitive experiments in different radiosensitive SHE cell preparations. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. BIITE: A Tool to Determine HLA Class II Epitopes from T Cell ELISpot Data.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Lies; O'Neill, Patrick K; Quigley, Kathryn J; Reynolds, Catherine J; Maillere, Bernard; Robinson, John H; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Altmann, Daniel M; Boyton, Rosemary J; Asquith, Becca

    2016-03-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells requires the recognition of peptides that are presented by HLA class II molecules and can be assessed experimentally using the ELISpot assay. However, even given an individual's HLA class II genotype, identifying which class II molecule is responsible for a positive ELISpot response to a given peptide is not trivial. The two main difficulties are the number of HLA class II molecules that can potentially be formed in a single individual (3-14) and the lack of clear peptide binding motifs for class II molecules. Here, we present a Bayesian framework to interpret ELISpot data (BIITE: Bayesian Immunogenicity Inference Tool for ELISpot); specifically BIITE identifies which HLA-II:peptide combination(s) are immunogenic based on cohort ELISpot data. We apply BIITE to two ELISpot datasets and explore the expected performance using simulations. We show this method can reach high accuracies, depending on the cohort size and the success rate of the ELISpot assay within the cohort.

  13. BIITE: A Tool to Determine HLA Class II Epitopes from T Cell ELISpot Data

    PubMed Central

    Boelen, Lies; O’Neill, Patrick K.; Quigley, Kathryn J.; Reynolds, Catherine J.; Maillere, Bernard; Robinson, John H.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Altmann, Daniel M.; Boyton, Rosemary J.; Asquith, Becca

    2016-01-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells requires the recognition of peptides that are presented by HLA class II molecules and can be assessed experimentally using the ELISpot assay. However, even given an individual’s HLA class II genotype, identifying which class II molecule is responsible for a positive ELISpot response to a given peptide is not trivial. The two main difficulties are the number of HLA class II molecules that can potentially be formed in a single individual (3–14) and the lack of clear peptide binding motifs for class II molecules. Here, we present a Bayesian framework to interpret ELISpot data (BIITE: Bayesian Immunogenicity Inference Tool for ELISpot); specifically BIITE identifies which HLA-II:peptide combination(s) are immunogenic based on cohort ELISpot data. We apply BIITE to two ELISpot datasets and explore the expected performance using simulations. We show this method can reach high accuracies, depending on the cohort size and the success rate of the ELISpot assay within the cohort. PMID:26953935

  14. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Randi; Zarebski, Laura; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Emami, Hussein; Hoof, Ilka; Salimi, Nima; Damle, Rohini; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course of 4 years, the data from 180 978 experiments were curated manually from the literature, which covers ∼99% of all publicly available information on peptide epitopes mapped in infectious agents (excluding HIV) and 93% of those mapped in allergens. In addition, data that would otherwise be unavailable to the public from 129 186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009. PMID:19906713

  15. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA+ tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy PMID:26954374

  16. Targeting the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway in the Retina With a Gene-Delivered Secretable and Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J.; Jaime, Henrique; Brown, Emily E.; Iwata, Ryo L.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Massengill, Michael T.; Biswal, Manas R.; Boye, Shannon E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ash, John D.; Li, Qiuhong; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress has been linked to several ocular diseases, initiating an inflammatory response that increases tissue injury. The Nrf2 transcription factor regulates expression of antioxidant genes and is tightly regulated by Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (Keap-1). We evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector delivering an Nrf2-derived peptide that binds Keap-1. Methods The sequence of the Nrf2 peptide was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (Tat-peptide) sequence (TatNrf2mer). The effects of lentiviral-delivered TatNrf2mer were studied in vitro. Transcript (quantitative [q] RT-PCR) and protein levels (ELISA and immunofluorescence) were quantified. Cell viability was measured by MTT and Cell Titer assays. The AAV vectors were packaged with the TatNrf2mer fused to secretable green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the small chicken β actin promoter. The protective effects of this vector were evaluated in a model of RPE oxidative injury and in a mouse model of uveitis after intravitreal injection. Results Expression of TatNrf2mer peptide induced antioxidant gene expression, blocked IL-1β secretion, and protected cells from oxidative injury. In mice, TatNrf2mer expression partially protected photoreceptor function based on ERG responses and optical coherence tomography measurements in the sodium iodate (NaIO3) model. Furthermore, sGFP-TatNrf2mer expression decreased IL-1β and IL-6 in the NaIO3-treated mice, and resulted in a 54% decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in the vitreous body of the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model. Conclusions The intravitreally delivered AAV-TatNrf2mer has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in widely-used models of ocular injury, suggesting it also could be useful in ocular diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammasome activation. PMID:26842755

  17. Secondary cell wall polysaccharides of Bacillus anthracis are antigens that contain specific epitopes which cross-react with three pathogenic Bacillus cereus strains that caused severe disease, and other epitopes common to all the Bacillus cereus strains tested.

    PubMed

    Leoff, Christine; Saile, Elke; Rauvolfova, Jana; Quinn, Conrad P; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Zhong, Wei; Mehta, Alok S; Boons, Geert-Jan; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L

    2009-06-01

    The immunoreactivities of hydrogen fluoride (HF)-released cell wall polysaccharides (HF-PSs) from selected Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus strains were compared using antisera against live and killed B. anthracis spores. These antisera bound to the HF-PSs from B. anthracis and from three clinical B. cereus isolates (G9241, 03BB87, and 03BB102) obtained from cases of severe or fatal human pneumonia but did not bind to the HF-PSs from the closely related B. cereus ATCC 10987 or from B. cereus type strain ATCC 14579. Antiserum against a keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate of the B. anthracis HF-PS (HF-PS-KLH) also bound to HF-PSs and cell walls from B. anthracis and the three clinical B. cereus isolates, and B. anthracis spores. These results indicate that the B. anthracis HF-PS is an antigen in both B. anthracis cell walls and spores, and that it shares cross-reactive, and possibly pathogenicity-related, epitopes with three clinical B. cereus isolates that caused severe disease. The anti-HF-PS-KLH antiserum cross-reacted with the bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugates of all B. anthracis and all B. cereus HF-PSs tested, including those from nonclinical B. cereus ATCC 10987 and ATCC 14579 strains. Finally, the serum of vaccinated (anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA)) Rhesus macaques that survived inhalation anthrax contained IgG antibodies that bound the B. anthracis HF-PS-KLH conjugate. These data indicate that HF-PSs from the cell walls of the bacilli tested here are (i) antigens that contain (ii) a potentially virulence-associated carbohydrate antigen motif, and (iii) another antigenic determinant that is common to B. cereus strains.

  18. An optimized electroporation method for delivering nanoparticles into living cells for surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun; Wang, Jing; Lin, Juqiang; Lin, Duo; Chen, Weiwei; Feng, Shangyuan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Yongzeng; Huang, Hao; Shi, Hong; Chen, Rong

    2016-04-01

    The existing electroporation method can rapidly deliver nanoparticles (NPs) into living cells for intracellular surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging. Unfortunately, the cellular SERS signals are major from molecules located near the two poles of the cell facing toward to the electrodes because most NPs enter cells through these two poles and easily happen to aggregate there. Here, we present an optimized electroporation method for transferring NPs into living cells to obtain a uniform NPs distribution. The distribution of intracellular NPs was monitored by the SERS signal of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, which is sandwiched between the Au-Ag core-shell and validated by TEM images. In addition, based on this uniform distribution of NPs, we then detected the distribution of cellular molecules like phenylalanine and lipid via SERS imaging. Results demonstrate the great potential for the optimized electroporation-based SERS imaging in cellular study.

  19. Equine arteritis virus is delivered to an acidic compartment of host cells via clathrin-dependent endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, Matthias; Korte, Thomas; Ter-Avetisyan, Gohar; Tuennemann, Gisela; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Veit, Michael Herrmann, Andreas

    2008-08-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is an enveloped, positive-stranded RNA virus belonging to the family Arteriviridae. Infection by EAV requires the release of the viral genome by fusion with the respective target membrane of the host cell. We have investigated the entry pathway of EAV into Baby Hamster Kindey cells (BHK). Infection of cells assessed by the plaque reduction assay was strongly inhibited by substances which interfere with clathrin-dependent endocytosis and by lysosomotropic compounds. Furthermore, infection of BHK cells was suppressed when clathrin-dependent endocytosis was inhibited by expression of antisense RNA of the clathrin-heavy chain before infection. These results strongly suggest that EAV is taken up via clathrin-dependent endocytosis and is delivered to acidic endosomal compartments.

  20. Mapping B-cell epitopes for the peroxidoxin of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis and its potential for the clinical diagnosis of tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Santos, Thaís Teodoro de Oliveira; Silva, Ana Luíza Teixeira; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; de Carvalho, Silvio Fernando Guimarães; Coelho, Eduardo Antônio Ferraz; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The search toward the establishment of novel serological tests for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis and proper differential diagnosis may represent one alternative to the invasive parasitological methods currently used to identify infected individuals. In the present work, we investigated the potential use of recombinant peroxidoxin (rPeroxidoxin) of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis as a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of human tegumentary (TL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL). Linear B-cell epitope mapping was performed to identify polymorphic epitopes when comparing orthologous sequences present in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent for Chagas disease (CD), and the Homo sapiens and Canis familiaris hosts. The serological assay (ELISA) demonstrated that TL, VL and CVL individuals showed high levels of antibodies against rPeroxidoxin, allowing identification of infected ones with considerable sensitivity and great ability to discriminate (specificity) between non-infected and CD individuals (98.46% and 100%; 98.18% and 95.71%; 95.79% and 100%, respectively). An rPeroxidoxin ELISA also showed a greater ability to discriminate between vaccinated and infected animals, which is an important requirement for the public campaign control of CVL. A depletion ELISA assay using soluble peptides of this B-cell epitope confirmed the recognition of these sites only by Leishmania-infected individuals. Moreover, this work identifies two antigenic polymorphic linear B-cell epitopes of L. braziliensis. Specific recognition of TL and VL patients was confirmed by significantly decreased IgG reactivity against rPeroxidoxin after depletion of peptide-1- and peptide-2-specific antibodies (peptide 1: reduced by 32%, 42% and 5% for CL, ML and VL, respectively; peptide-2: reduced by 24%, 22% and 13% for CL, ML and VL, respectively) and only peptide-2 for CVL (reduced 9%). Overall, rPeroxidoxin may be a potential antigen for the immunodiagnosis of TL

  1. A DNA vaccine encoding foot-and-mouth disease virus B and T-cell epitopes targeted to class II swine leukocyte antigens protects pigs against viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Argilaguet, Jordi M; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Dominguez, Javier; Pérez-Filgueira, Mariano; Escribano, José M; Sobrino, Francisco; Rodriguez, Fernando

    2011-11-01

    Development of efficient and safer vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a must. Previous results obtained in our laboratory have demonstrated that DNA vaccines encoding B and T cell epitopes from type C FMDV, efficiently controlled virus replication in mice, while they did not protect against FMDV challenge in pigs, one of the FMDV natural hosts. The main finding of this work is the ability to improve the protection afforded in swine using a new DNA-vaccine prototype (pCMV-APCH1BTT), encoding FMDV B and T-cell epitopes fused to the single-chain variable fragment of the 1F12 mouse monoclonal antibody that recognizes Class-II Swine Leukocyte antigens. Half of the DNA-immunized pigs were fully protected upon viral challenge, while the remaining animals were partially protected, showing a delayed, shorter and milder disease than control pigs. Full protection in a given vaccinated-pig correlated with the induction of specific IFNγ-secreting T-cells, detectable prior to FMDV-challenge, together with a rapid development of neutralizing antibodies after viral challenge, pointing towards the relevance that both arms of the immune response can play in protection. Our results open new avenues for developing future FMDV subunit vaccines.

  2. Brief behavioral self-regulation counseling for HIV treatment adherence delivered by cell phone: an initial test of concept trial.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kalichman, Moira O; Cherry, Chauncey; Swetzes, Connie; Amaral, Christina M; White, Denise; Jones, Mich'l; Grebler, Tamar; Eaton, Lisa

    2011-05-01

    Affordable and effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence interventions are needed for many patients to promote positive treatment outcomes and prevent viral resistance. We conducted a two-arm randomized trial (n = 40 men and women receiving and less than 95% adherent to ART) to test a single office session followed by four biweekly cell phone counseling sessions that were grounded in behavioral self-management model of medication adherence using data from phone-based unannounced pill counts to provide feedback-guided adherence strategies. The control condition received usual care and matched office and cell phone/pill count contacts. Participants were baseline assessed and followed with biweekly unannounced pill counts and 4-month from baseline computerized interviews (39/40 retained). Results showed that the self-regulation counseling delivered by cell phone demonstrated significant improvements in adherence compared to the control condition; adherence improved from 87% of pills taken at baseline to 94% adherence 4 months after baseline, p < 0.01. The observed effect sizes ranged from moderate (d = 0.45) to large (d = 0.80). Gains in adherence were paralleled with increased self-efficacy (p < 0.05) and use of behavioral strategies for ART adherence (p < 0.05). We conclude that the outcomes from this test of concept trial warrant further research on cell phone-delivered self-regulation counseling in a larger and more rigorous trial.

  3. Chitin oligosaccharides can induce cortical cell division in roots of Vicia sativa when delivered by ballistic microtargeting.

    PubMed

    Schlaman, H R; Gisel, A A; Quaedvlieg, N E; Bloemberg, G V; Lugtenberg, B J; Kijne, J W; Potrykus, I; Spaink, H P; Sautter, C

    1997-12-01

    Rhizobia, bacterial symbionts of leguminous plants, produce lipo-chitin oligosaccharide (LCO) signal molecules that can induce nodule organogenesis in the cortex of legume roots in a host-specific way. The multi-unsaturated fatty acyl and the O-acetyl moieties of the LCOs of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae were shown to be essential for obtaining root nodule induction in Vicia sativa plants. We have used ballistic microtargeting as a novel approach to deliver derivatives of the nodulation signal molecules inside the roots of V. sativa. This method offers the unique ability to introduce soluble compounds into the tissue at a small area. The mitogenic effect of microtargeting of chitin oligosaccharides, including an analysis of the influence of the chain length and modifications, was tested in a qualitative assay. The role of a cell division factor from the root stele, uridine, has also been examined in these experiments. The results show that O-acetylated chitin oligosaccharides can induce root cortical cell divisions when delivered by microtargeting. For this effect it is essential that uridine is co-targeted. The foci of cortical cell division were often similar to root nodule primordia. Anatomical examination also revealed chimeric structures that share characteristics with lateral root and nodule primordia. Our data favour a model in which the oligosaccharide moiety of the rhizobial LCO induces cortical cell division and the fatty acyl moiety plays a role in transport of the LCO into the plant tissue.

  4. In Vivo MR Imaging of Intraarterially Delivered Magnetically Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Canine Stroke Model

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Qing-quan; Xu, Xiao-quan; Yu, Jing; Wang, Jian-wei; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Hai-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of intraarterial (IA) delivery and in vivo MR imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a canine stroke model. Methodology MSCs harvested from beagles’ bone marrow were labeled with home-synthesized SPIO. Adult beagle dogs (n = 12) were subjected to left proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion by autologous thrombus, followed by two-hour left internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion with 5 French vertebral catheter. One week later, dogs were classified as three groups before transplantation: group A: complete MCA recanalization, group B: incomplete MCA recanalization, group C: no MCA recanalization. 3×106 labeled-MSCs were delivered through left ICA. Series in vivo MRI images were obtained before cell grafting, one and 24 hours after transplantation and weekly thereafter until four weeks. MRI findings were compared with histological studies at the time point of 24 hours and four weeks. Principal Findings Home-synthesized SPIO was useful to label MSCs without cell viability compromise. MSCs scattered widely in the left cerebral hemisphere in group A, while fewer grafted cells were observed in group B and no cell was detected in group C at one hour after transplantation. A larger infarction on the day of cell transplantation was associated with more grafted cells in the brain. Grafted MSCs could be tracked effectively by MRI within four weeks and were found in peri-infarction area by Prussian blue staining. Conclusion It is feasible of IA MSCs transplantation in a canine stroke model. Both the ipsilateral MCA condition and infarction volume before transplantation may affect the amount of grafted cells in target brain. In vivo MR imaging is useful for tracking IA delivered MSCs after SPIO labeling. PMID:23408953

  5. Characterization of cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell recognition of HLA-A2-restricted HIV-Gag (SLYNTVATL) and HCV-NS5b (ALYDVVSKL) epitopes in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C viruses.

    PubMed

    Vali, Bahareh; Tohn, Robert; Cohen, Michael J; Sakhdari, Ali; Sheth, Prameet M; Yue, Feng Yun; Wong, David; Kovacs, Colin; Kaul, Rupert; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2011-01-01

    The immunologic mechanisms underlying the faster progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection are not clearly understood. T-cell cross-reactivity between HCV and influenza virus-specific epitopes has been associated with rapid progression of HCV disease (S. Urbani, B. Amadei, P. Fisicaro, M. Pilli, G. Missale, A. Bertoletti, and C. Ferrari, J. Exp. Med. 201:675-680, 2005). We asked whether T-cell cross-reactivity between HCV and HIV could exist during HCV/HIV coinfection and affect pathogenesis. Our search for amino acid sequence homology between the HCV and HIV proteomes revealed two similar HLA-A2-restricted epitopes, HIV-Gag (SLYNTVATL [HIV-SL9]) and HCV-NS5b (ALYDVVSKL [HCV-AL9]). We found that 4 out of 20 HLA-A2-positive (HLA-A2(+)) HIV-infected individuals had CD8(+) T cells that recognized both the HIV-SL9 and HCV-AL9 epitopes. However, the AL9 epitope was generally shown to be a weak agonist. Although HCV-monoinfected individuals in our study did not show AL9-specific responses, we found that about half of HCV/HIV-coinfected individuals had dual responses to both epitopes. High dual T-cell recognition among coinfected subjects was usually due to separate T-cell populations targeting each epitope, as determined by pentamer staining. The one individual demonstrating cross-reactive T cells to both epitopes showed the most advanced degree of liver disease. In coinfected individuals, we observed a positive correlation between the magnitudes of T-cell responses to both the SL9 and the AL9 epitopes, which was also positively associated with the clinical parameter of liver damage. Thus, we find that HIV infection induces T cells that can cross-react to heterologous viruses or prime for T cells that are closely related in sequence. However, the induction of cross-reactive T cells may not be associated with control of disease caused by the heterologous virus. This demonstrates that degeneracy of HIV

  6. A B Cell Epitope Peptide Derived from the Major Grass Pollen Allergen Phl p 1 Boosts Allergen-Specific Secondary Antibody Responses without Allergen-Specific T Cell Help

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Meena; Freidl, Raphaela; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Baranyi, Ulrike; Wekerle, Thomas; Valenta, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    More than 40% of allergic patients suffer from grass pollen allergy. Phl p 1, the major timothy grass pollen allergen, belongs to the cross-reactive group 1 grass pollen allergens that are thought to initiate allergic sensitization to grass pollen. Repeated allergen encounter boosts allergen-specific IgE production and enhances clinical sensitivity in patients. To investigate immunological mechanisms underlying the boosting of allergen-specific secondary IgE Ab responses and the allergen epitopes involved, a murine model for Phl p 1 was established. A B cell epitope–derived peptide of Phl p 1 devoid of allergen-specific T cell epitopes, as recognized by BALB/c mice, was fused to an allergen-unrelated carrier in the form of a recombinant fusion protein and used for sensitization. This fusion protein allowed the induction of allergen-specific IgE Ab responses without allergen-specific T cell help. Allergen-specific Ab responses were subsequently boosted with molecules containing the B cell epitope–derived peptide without carrier or linked to other allergen-unrelated carriers. Oligomeric peptide bound to a carrier different from that which had been used for sensitization boosted allergen-specific secondary IgE responses without a detectable allergen-specific T cell response. Our results indicate that allergen-specific secondary IgE Ab responses can be boosted by repetitive B cell epitopes without allergen-specific T cell help by cross-linking of the B cell epitope receptor. This finding has important implications for the design of new allergy vaccines. PMID:28093528

  7. A novel peptide delivers plasmids across blood-brain barrier into neuronal cells as a single-component transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ailing; Zhang, Miaomiao; Gao, Feiyan; Xu, Xingran; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    There is no data up to now to show that peptide can deliver plasmid into brain as a single-component transfer vector. Here we show that a novel peptide, RDP (consisted of 39 amino acids), can be exploited as an efficient plasmid vector for brain-targeting delivery. The plasmids containing Lac Z reporter gene (pVAX-Lac Z) and BDNF gene (pVAX-BDNF) are complexed with RDP and intravenously injected into mice. The results of gel retardation assay show that RDP enables to bind DNA in a dose-dependent manner, and the X-Gal staining identity that Lac Z is specifically expressed in the brain. Also, the results of Western blot and immunofluorescence staining of BDNF indicate that pVAX-BDNF complexed with RDP can be delivered into brain, and show neuroprotective properties in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) model. The results demonstrate that RDP enables to bind and deliver DNA into the brain, resulting in specific gene expression in the neuronal cells. This strategy provides a novel, simple and effective approach for non-viral gene therapy of brain diseases.

  8. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  9. HLA-DQ tetramers identify epitope-specific T cells in peripheral blood of herpes simplex virus type 2-infected individuals: direct detection of immunodominant antigen-responsive cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, W W; Liu, A W; Novak, E J; Gebe, J A; Ettinger, R A; Nepom, G T; Reymond, S N; Koelle, D M

    2000-04-15

    Ag-specific CD4+ T cells are present in peripheral blood in low frequency, where they undergo recruitment and expansion during immune responses and in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases. MHC tetramers, which constitute a labeled MHC-peptide ligand suitable for binding to the Ag-specific receptor on T cells, provide a novel approach for the detection and characterization of such rare cells. In this study, we utilized this technology to identify HLA DQ-restricted Ag-specific T cells in the peripheral blood of human subjects and to identify immunodominant epitopes associated with viral infection. Peptides representing potential epitope regions of the VP16 protein from HSV-2 were loaded onto recombinant DQ0602 molecules to generate a panel of Ag-specific DQ0602 tetramers. VP16 Ag-specific DQ-restricted T cells were identified and expanded from the peripheral blood of HSV-2-infected individuals, representing two predominant epitope specificities. Although the VP16 369-380 peptide has a lower binding affinity for DQ0602 molecules than the VP16 33-52 peptide, T cells that recognized the VP16 369-380 peptide occurred at a much higher frequency than those that were specific for the VP16 33-52 peptide.