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Sample records for cell fate choices

  1. Genetic Circuit Architectures Underlying Cell Fate Choices for Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinner, Aaron

    2009-03-01

    Antigen stimulated B cells follow an unusual developmental trajectory that transiently passes through a germinal center state, which promotes receptor affinity maturation and immunoglobulin class switching, before terminally differentiating into antibody secreting plasma cells. It was found that graded expression of the transcription factor IRF-4 regulates cell fate, but the relationship between antigen receptor signaling, the network of interactions with IRF-4, and cell fate was not known. This talk describes models that link ligand-receptor avidity with cell fate. The models have been validated experimentally by directly varying the levels and kinetics of IRF-4 accumulation. Furthermore, signaling through the antigen receptor is demonstrated to control the expression of IRF-4 and in turn the frequency of B cells that undergo class switching before differentiating into plasma cells. These findings provide an explanation for experiments that measure B cell numbers in transgenic mice. The architecture of our regulatory circuit provides a general mechanism for quantitative variations in a signal to be translated into a binary cell-fate choice involving transient expression of one of the two developmental fates. In collaboration with Aryeh Warmflash, Ying Li, Roger Sciammas, and Harinder Singh, The University of Chicago.

  2. Roles of Notch1 Signaling in Regulating Satellite Cell Fates Choices and Postnatal Skeletal Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Xu, Ziye; Wu, Weiche; Liu, Jiaqi; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-12-12

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, also called satellite cells, are indispensable for the growth, maintenance, and regeneration of the postnatal skeletal muscle. Satellite cells, predominantly quiescent in mature resting muscles, are activated after skeletal muscle injury or degeneration. Notch1 signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays crucial roles in satellite cells homeostasis and postnatal skeletal myogenesis and regeneration. Activation of Notch1 signaling promotes the muscle satellite cells quiescence and proliferation, but inhibits differentiation of muscle satellite cells. Notably, the new roles of Notch1 signaling during late-stage of skeletal myogenesis including in post-differentiation myocytes and post-fusion myotubes have been recently reported. Here, we mainly review and discuss the regulatory roles of Notch1 in regulating satellite cell fates choices and skeletal myogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-cell analysis of mixed-lineage states leading to a binary cell fate choice.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Andre; Venkatasubramanian, Meenakshi; Chaudhri, Viren K; Aronow, Bruce J; Salomonis, Nathan; Singh, Harinder; Grimes, H Leighton

    2016-09-29

    Delineating hierarchical cellular states, including rare intermediates and the networks of regulatory genes that orchestrate cell-type specification, are continuing challenges for developmental biology. Single-cell RNA sequencing is greatly accelerating such research, given its power to provide comprehensive descriptions of genomic states and their presumptive regulators. Haematopoietic multipotential progenitor cells, as well as bipotential intermediates, manifest mixed-lineage patterns of gene expression at a single-cell level. Such mixed-lineage states may reflect the molecular priming of different developmental potentials by co-expressed alternative-lineage determinants, namely transcription factors. Although a bistable gene regulatory network has been proposed to regulate the specification of either neutrophils or macrophages, the nature of the transition states manifested in vivo, and the underlying dynamics of the cell-fate determinants, have remained elusive. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing coupled with a new analytic tool, iterative clustering and guide-gene selection, and clonogenic assays to delineate hierarchical genomic and regulatory states that culminate in neutrophil or macrophage specification in mice. We show that this analysis captured prevalent mixed-lineage intermediates that manifested concurrent expression of haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor and myeloid progenitor cell genes. It also revealed rare metastable intermediates that had collapsed the haematopoietic stem cell/progenitor gene expression programme, instead expressing low levels of the myeloid determinants, Irf8 and Gfi1 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13). Genetic perturbations and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing revealed Irf8 and Gfi1 as key components of counteracting myeloid-gene-regulatory networks. Combined loss of these two determinants 'trapped' the metastable intermediate. We propose that mixed-lineage states are obligatory during cell-fate specification

  4. lin-28 controls the succession of cell fate choices via two distinct activities.

    PubMed

    Vadla, Bhaskar; Kemper, Kevin; Alaimo, Jennifer; Heine, Christian; Moss, Eric G

    2012-01-01

    lin-28 is a conserved regulator of cell fate succession in animals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, it is a component of the heterochronic gene pathway that governs larval developmental timing, while its vertebrate homologs promote pluripotency and control differentiation in diverse tissues. The RNA binding protein encoded by lin-28 can directly inhibit let-7 microRNA processing by a novel mechanism that is conserved from worms to humans. We found that C. elegans LIN-28 protein can interact with four distinct let-7 family pre-microRNAs, but in vivo inhibits the premature accumulation of only let-7. Surprisingly, however, lin-28 does not require let-7 or its relatives for its characteristic promotion of second larval stage cell fates. In other words, we find that the premature accumulation of mature let-7 does not account for lin-28's precocious phenotype. To explain let-7's role in lin-28 activity, we provide evidence that lin-28 acts in two steps: first, the let-7-independent positive regulation of hbl-1 through its 3'UTR to control L2 stage-specific cell fates; and second, a let-7-dependent step that controls subsequent fates via repression of lin-41. Our evidence also indicates that let-7 functions one stage earlier in C. elegans development than previously thought. Importantly, lin-28's two-step mechanism resembles that of the heterochronic gene lin-14, and the overlap of their activities suggests a clockwork mechanism for developmental timing. Furthermore, this model explains the previous observation that mammalian Lin28 has two genetically separable activities. Thus, lin-28's two-step mechanism may be an essential feature of its evolutionarily conserved role in cell fate succession.

  5. p107 is a crucial regulator for determining the adipocyte lineage fate choices of stem cells.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Martina; Porras, Deanna P; Perry, Christopher G R; Seale, Patrick; Scimè, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Thermogenic (beige and brown) adipocytes protect animals against obesity and metabolic disease. However, little is known about the mechanisms that commit stem cells toward different adipocyte lineages. We show here that p107 is a master regulator of adipocyte lineage fates, its suppression required for commitment of stem cells to the brown-type fate. p107 is strictly expressed in the stem cell compartment of white adipose tissue depots and completely absent in brown adipose tissue. Remarkably, p107-deficient stem cells uniformly give rise to brown-type adipocytes in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, brown fat programming of mesenchymal stem cells by PRDM-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain containing 16 (Prdm16) was associated with a dramatic reduction of p107 levels. Indeed, Prdm16 directly suppressed p107 transcription via promoter binding. Notably, the sustained expression of p107 blocked the ability of Prdm16 to induce brown fat genes. These findings demonstrate that p107 expression in stem cells commits cells to the white versus brown adipose lineage.

  6. Mechanism of cell fate choice between neural and mesodermal development during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2013-06-01

    During early embryogenesis, Sox2 expression distinguishes the neural plate from other embryonic domains, suggesting that the mechanism underlying the activation of the Sox2 gene is highly relevant to the development of this tissue. At the earliest stages of neural plate development, the Sox2 enhancer N1 regulates Sox2 expression in the extending posterior end of the neural plate. The N1 enhancer is initially activated in the axial stem cells, bipotential precursors of both neural and mesodermal lineages, therefore the activation does not immediately lead to Sox2 expression. A population of axial stem cells that remains in the superficial layer starts expressing Sox2, whereas another population that migrates through the primitive streak loses the N1 activity and becomes mesoderm. Multiple signaling cascades and transcription factors, including Wnt, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Tbx6, are responsible for the regulation of Sox2 expression in axial stem cells to guide the development of the posterior neural plate and paraxial mesoderm.

  7. The making of a lymphocyte: the choice among disparate cell fates and the IKAROS enigma.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Katia

    2017-03-01

    Lymphocyte differentiation is set to produce myriad immune effector cells with the ability to respond to multitudinous foreign substances. The uniqueness of this developmental system lies in not only the great diversity of cellular functions that it can generate but also the ability of its differentiation intermediates and mature effector cells to expand upon demand, thereby providing lifelong immunity. Surprisingly, the goals of this developmental system are met by a relatively small group of DNA-binding transcription factors that work in concert to control the timing and magnitude of gene expression and fulfill the demands for cellular specialization, expansion, and maintenance. The cellular and molecular mechanisms through which these lineage-promoting transcription factors operate have been a focus of basic research in immunology. The mechanisms of development discerned in this effort are guiding clinical research on disorders with an immune cell base. Here, I focus on IKAROS, one of the earliest regulators of lymphoid lineage identity and a guardian of lymphocyte homeostasis.

  8. Rb regulates fate choice and lineage commitment in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Calo, Eliezer; Quintero-Estades, Jose A.; Danielian, Paul S.; Nedelcu, Simona; Berman, Seth D.; Lees, Jacqueline A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutation of the RB-1 tumour suppressor occurs in one third of all human tumours and is particularly associated with retinoblastoma and osteosarcoma1. Numerous functions have been ascribed to the product of the human RB-1 gene, pRB. The best known is pRB’s ability to promote cell cycle exit through inhibition of the E2F transcription factors and the transcriptional repression of genes encoding cell cycle regulators1. In addition, pRB has been shown in vitro to regulate several transcription factors that are master differentiation inducers2. Depending on the differentiation factor and cellular context, pRB can either suppress or promote their transcriptional activity. For example, pRB binds to Runx2 and potentiates its ability to promote osteogenic differentiation program in vitro3. In contrast, pRB acts together with E2F to suppress PPARγ, the master activator of adipogenesis4,5. Since osteoblasts and adipocytes can both arise from mesenchymal stem cells, these observations suggest that pRB might play a role in the choice between these two fates. However, to date, there is no evidence for this in vivo. Here we use mouse models to address this hypothesis in the context of mesenchymal tissue development and tumorigenesis. Our data show that Rb status plays a key role in establishing fate choice between bone and brown adipose tissue in vivo. PMID:20686481

  9. Cell Fate Decision Making through Oriented Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to dictate cell fate decisions is critical during animal development. Moreover, faithful execution of this process ensures proper tissue homeostasis throughout adulthood, whereas defects in the molecular machinery involved may contribute to disease. Evolutionarily conserved protein complexes control cell fate decisions across diverse tissues. Maintaining proper daughter cell inheritance patterns of these determinants during mitosis is therefore a fundamental step of the cell fate decision-making process. In this review, we will discuss two key aspects of this fate determinant segregation activity, cortical cell polarity and mitotic spindle orientation, and how they operate together to produce oriented cell divisions that ultimately influence daughter cell fate. Our focus will be directed at the principal underlying molecular mechanisms and the specific cell fate decisions they have been shown to control. PMID:26844213

  10. The cell-cycle state of stem cells determines cell fate propensity.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim; Vallier, Ludovic

    2013-09-26

    Self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells are fundamentally associated with cell-cycle progression to enable tissue specification, organ homeostasis, and potentially tumorigenesis. However, technical challenges have impaired the study of the molecular interactions coordinating cell fate choice and cell-cycle progression. Here, we bypass these limitations by using the FUCCI reporter system in human pluripotent stem cells and show that their capacity of differentiation varies during the progression of their cell cycle. These mechanisms are governed by the cell-cycle regulators cyclin D1-3 that control differentiation signals such as the TGF-β-Smad2/3 pathway. Conversely, cell-cycle manipulation using a small molecule directs differentiation of hPSCs and provides an approach to generate cell types with a clinical interest. Our results demonstrate that cell fate decisions are tightly associated with the cell-cycle machinery and reveal insights in the mechanisms synchronizing differentiation and proliferation in developing tissues.

  11. Asymmetric cell division during T cell development controls downstream fate

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Kim; Shimoni, Raz; Charnley, Mirren; Ludford-Menting, Mandy J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Ramsbottom, Kelly; Oliaro, Jane; Izon, David; Ting, Stephen B.; Reynolds, Joseph; Lythe, Grant; Molina-Paris, Carmen; Melichar, Heather; Robey, Ellen; Humbert, Patrick O.; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian T cell development, the requirement for expansion of many individual T cell clones, rather than merely expansion of the entire T cell population, suggests a possible role for asymmetric cell division (ACD). We show that ACD of developing T cells controls cell fate through differential inheritance of cell fate determinants Numb and α-Adaptin. ACD occurs specifically during the β-selection stage of T cell development, and subsequent divisions are predominantly symmetric. ACD is controlled by interaction with stromal cells and chemokine receptor signaling and uses a conserved network of polarity regulators. The disruption of polarity by deletion of the polarity regulator, Scribble, or the altered inheritance of fate determinants impacts subsequent fate decisions to influence the numbers of DN4 cells arising after the β-selection checkpoint. These findings indicate that ACD enables the thymic microenvironment to orchestrate fate decisions related to differentiation and self-renewal. PMID:26370500

  12. Specification of germ cell fate in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Saitou, Mitinori; Payer, Bernhard; Lange, Ulrike C; Erhardt, Sylvia; Barton, Sheila C; Surani, M Azim

    2003-01-01

    An early fundamental event during development is the segregation of germ cells from somatic cells. In many organisms, this is accomplished by the inheritance of preformed germ plasm, which apparently imposes transcriptional repression to prevent somatic cell fate. However, in mammals, pluripotent epiblast cells acquire germ cell fate in response to signalling molecules. We have used single cell analysis to study how epiblast cells acquire germ cell competence and undergo specification. Germ cell competent cells express Fragilis and initially progress towards a somatic mesodermal fate. However, a subset of these cells, the future primordial germ cells (PGCs), then shows rapid upregulation of Fragilis with concomitant transcriptional repression of a number of genes, including Hox and Smad genes. This repression may be a key event associated with germ cell specification. Furthermore, PGCs express Stella and other genes, such as Oct-4 that are associated with pluripotency. While these molecules are also detected in mature oocytes as maternally inherited factors, their early role is to regulate development and maintain pluripotency, and they do not serve the role of classical germline determinants. PMID:14511483

  13. Fateful Choices: Healthy Youth for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hechinger, Fred M.

    This book on the choices faced by adolescents regarding health behavior draws from recent publications of the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development as well as from other recent reports. The book contains eight chapters. Chapter One discusses the risks that adolescents face today, including lack of attention from adults, poverty, suicide, drug…

  14. Stochastic Mechanisms of Cell Fate Specification that Yield Random or Robust Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Robert J.; Desplan, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Although cell fate specification is tightly controlled to yield highly reproducible results and avoid extreme variation, developmental programs often incorporate stochastic mechanisms to diversify cell types. Stochastic specification phenomena are observed in a wide range of species and an assorted set of developmental contexts. In bacteria, stochastic mechanisms are utilized to generate transient subpopulations capable of surviving adverse environmental conditions. In vertebrate, insect, and worm nervous systems, stochastic fate choices are used to increase the repertoire of sensory and motor neuron subtypes. Random fate choices are also integrated into developmental programs controlling organogenesis. Although stochastic decisions can be maintained to produce a mosaic of fates within a population of cells, they can also be compensated for or directed to yield robust and reproducible outcomes. PMID:20590453

  15. On hematopoietic stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2007-06-01

    Multipotential hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood-cell formation throughout life. Here, Metcalf considers the origin and heterogeneity of HSCs, their ability to self-generate, and their commitment to the various hematopoietic lineages.

  16. Cell Fate Decision as High-Dimensional Critical State Transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Joseph; Castaño, Ivan G.; Leong-Quong, Rebecca Y. Y.; Chang, Hannah; Trachana, Kalliopi; Giuliani, Alessandro; Huang, Sui

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate choice and commitment of multipotent progenitor cells to a differentiated lineage requires broad changes of their gene expression profile. But how progenitor cells overcome the stability of their gene expression configuration (attractor) to exit the attractor in one direction remains elusive. Here we show that commitment of blood progenitor cells to the erythroid or myeloid lineage is preceded by the destabilization of their high-dimensional attractor state, such that differentiating cells undergo a critical state transition. Single-cell resolution analysis of gene expression in populations of differentiating cells affords a new quantitative index for predicting critical transitions in a high-dimensional state space based on decrease of correlation between cells and concomitant increase of correlation between genes as cells approach a tipping point. The detection of “rebellious cells” that enter the fate opposite to the one intended corroborates the model of preceding destabilization of a progenitor attractor. Thus, early warning signals associated with critical transitions can be detected in statistical ensembles of high-dimensional systems, offering a formal theory-based approach for analyzing single-cell molecular profiles that goes beyond current computational pattern recognition, does not require knowledge of specific pathways, and could be used to predict impending major shifts in development and disease. PMID:28027308

  17. Cell fate regulation in early mammalian development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oron, Efrat; Ivanova, Natalia

    2012-08-01

    Preimplantation development in mammals encompasses a period from fertilization to implantation and results in formation of a blastocyst composed of three distinct cell lineages: epiblast, trophectoderm and primitive endoderm. The epiblast gives rise to the organism, while the trophectoderm and the primitive endoderm contribute to extraembryonic tissues that support embryo development after implantation. In many vertebrates, such as frog or fish, maternally supplied lineage determinants are partitioned within the egg. Cell cleavage that follows fertilization results in polarization of these factors between the individual blastomeres, which become restricted in their developmental fate. In contrast, the mouse oocyte and zygote lack clear polarity and, until the eight-cell stage, individual blastomeres retain the potential to form all lineages. How are cell lineages specified in the absence of a maternally supplied blueprint? This is a fundamental question in the field of developmental biology. The answer to this question lies in understanding the cell-cell interactions and gene networks involved in embryonic development prior to implantation and using this knowledge to create testable models of the developmental processes that govern cell fates. We provide an overview of classic and contemporary models of early lineage development in the mouse and discuss the emerging body of work that highlights similarities and differences between blastocyst development in the mouse and other mammalian species.

  18. Lysophosphatidylcholine Drives Neuroblast Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Luciana; Domizi, Pablo; Marcucci, Hebe; Montaner, Aneley; Krapf, Dario; Salvador, Gabriela; Banchio, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Neuronal differentiation plays a key role during embryogenesis. However, based on the capacity of neuronal stem cells to either generate or regenerate neurons and because differentiation stops aberrant neuroblasts proliferation, neuronal differentiation is crucial during neuropathological conditions. Although phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) has been proposed as an important molecule for neurite growth and neuronal regeneration, the identity of the molecular target has remained elusive. This study originally describes that lysophosphatidylcholine (LPtdCho), either exogenously supplied or generated by the imbalance of PtdCho metabolism through the enzymatic action of cytosolic phospholipase A2, acts as a neurotrophic-like factor. We demonstrated that LPtdCho induces neuronal differentiation by activation of the small G protein Ras followed by the Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Accordingly, LPtdCho redirects neuroblasts gene expression leading to the generation of functional mature neurons expressing βIII-tubulin and having increased acetylcholinesterase activity and membrane biosynthesis required for neuritogenesis. These findings provide mechanistic details of the role of cytidine-5-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) and PtdCho as neuroprotectors. Furthermore, as LPtdCho recapitulates the effect of the therapeutic agent retinoic acid, these results open new avenues for drug discovery for the treatment of neuropathological conditions.

  19. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-26

    In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage.

  20. Cell fate transitions during stomatal development.

    PubMed

    Serna, Laura

    2009-08-01

    Stomata, the most influential components in gas exchange with the atmosphere, represent a revealing system for studying cell fate determination. Studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have demonstrated that many of the components, functioning in a signaling cascade, guide numerous cell fate transitions that occur during stomatal development. The signaling cascade is initiated at the cell surface through the activation of the membrane receptors TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM) and/or ERECTA (ER) family members by the secretory peptide EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR1 (EPF1) and/or a substrate processed proteolytically by the subtilase STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1 (SDD1) and transduced through cytoplasmic MAP kinases (YODA (YDA), MKK4/MKK5, and MPK3/MPK6) towards the nucleus. In the nucleus, these MAP kinases regulate the activity of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and FAMA, which act in concert with the bHLH-Leu zipper protein SCREAM (SCRM) (and/or its closely related paralog, SCREAM2). This article reviews current insights into the role of this signaling cascade during stomatal development.

  1. DNA asymmetry and cell fate regulation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yennek, Siham; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2013-01-01

    The semi-conservative nature of DNA replication has suggested that identical DNA molecules within chromatids are inherited by daughter cells after cell division. Numerous reports of non-random DNA segregation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes suggest that this is not always the case, and that epigenetic marks on chromatids, if not the individual DNA strands themselves, could have distinct signatures. Their selective distribution to daughter cells provides a novel mechanism for gene and cell fate regulation by segregating chromatids asymmetrically. Here we highlight some examples and potential mechanisms that can regulate this process. We propose that cellular asymmetry is inherently present during each cell division, and that it provides an opportunity during each cell cycle for moderating cell fates.

  2. Reprogramming cell fate: a changing story.

    PubMed

    Chin, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of adult, lineage-determined cells from one cell fate to another has long been an elusive goal in developmental biology. Recent studies have demonstrated that forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors in various differentiated cell types can promote the adoption of different lineages. These seminal findings have the potential to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine by providing replacement cells for various degenerative disorders. Current reprogramming protocols, however, are inefficient in that relatively few cells in a given population can be made to undergo reprogramming and the completeness and extent of reprogramming that occurs has been questioned. At present, the fundamental molecular mechanisms involved are still being elucidated. Although the potential clinical applications are extensive, these issues will need to be addressed before direct reprogramming may be used clinically. This review will give an overview of pioneering studies in the field, will describe what is known about direct reprogramming to specific lineage types, will summarize what is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in reprogramming and will discuss challenges for the future.

  3. Underlying principles of cell fate determination during G1 phase of the mammalian cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; David-Pfeuty, Thérèse; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2008-10-01

    Upon their exit from mitosis, mammalian cells enter a G(1) phase during which they acutely sense all sorts of environmental stimuli. On the basis of these signals that they first need to decipher and integrate, they decide whether to undergo division, differentiation, senescence or apoptosis. We questioned whether, despite the complexity of the G(1) regulatory network, simple organizing principles might be identified that could explain how specific input signals are converted into appropriate cell fates. For this purpose, we formulated a mathematical model of the G(1) regulatory network using a simplified description of activities linked to signal transduction, cell growth, cell division and cell death. Bifurcation analysis of the model revealed the existence of multistability between several attractor states corresponding to G(0)-arrest, G(1)-arrest, S-phase entry and apoptosis cell fates. We further unravelled interlinked feedback and feedforward loops within the G(1) regulatory network that drive the signal-dependent transition between G(0) arrest and the other cell fates. Initially, exit from G(0) and progression in early G(1) entail growth factor-dependent activation of an upstream positive feedback loop that activates the cell-growth machinery. Once ribosome synthesis is restored in G(1), a competition develops between a downstream positive feedback loop, which, upon activation, triggers S phase entry, and stress-activated pathways that promote G(1) arrest. If S phase entry prevails over G(1) arrest, cells are sensitized to apoptosis due to stress-induced activation of pro-apoptotic pathways or repression of pro-survival pathways. Thus, the choice between the four possible cell fates in the G(1) phase relies on the flexibly interlinked growth-activatory and division-activatory modules, certain components of which have antagonistic effects on pathways involved in driving apoptosis and G(1) arrest. The final outcome ultimately depends on the context

  4. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie

    2014-02-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals.

  5. Ductular reaction-on-a-chip: Microfluidic co-cultures to study stem cell fate selection during liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Amranul; Gheibi, Pantea; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Gao, Yandong; Torok, Natalie; Revzin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Liver injury modulates local microenvironment, triggering production of signals that instruct stem cell fate choices. In this study, we employed a microfluidic co-culture system to recreate important interactions in the liver stem cell niche, those between adult hepatocytes and liver progenitor cells (LPCs). We demonstrate that pluripotent stem cell-derived LPCs choose hepatic fate when cultured next to healthy hepatocytes but begin biliary differentiation program when co-cultured with injured hepatocytes. We connect this fate selection to skewing in production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 caused by injury. Significantly, biliary fate selection of LPCs was not observed in the absence of hepatocytes nor did it happen in the presence of TGF-β inhibitors. Our study demonstrates that microfluidic culture systems may offer an interesting new tool for dissecting cellular interactions leading to aberrant stem cell differentiation during injury. PMID:27796316

  6. Epigenetic memory and cell fate reprogramming in plants

    PubMed Central

    Roudier, François

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plants have a high intrinsic capacity to regenerate from adult tissues, with the ability to reprogram adult cell fates. In contrast, epigenetic mechanisms have the potential to stabilize cell identity and maintain tissue organization. The question is whether epigenetic memory creates a barrier to reprogramming that needs to be erased or circumvented in plant regeneration. Early evidence suggests that, while chromatin dynamics impact gene expression in the meristem, a lasting constraint on cell fate is not established until late stages of plant cell differentiation. It is not yet clear whether the plasticity of plant cells arises from the ability of cells to erase identity memory or to deploy cells that may exhibit cellular specialization but still lack an epigenetic restriction on cell fate alteration. PMID:28316791

  7. Epigenetic memory and cell fate reprogramming in plants.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Kenneth D; Roudier, François

    2017-02-01

    Plants have a high intrinsic capacity to regenerate from adult tissues, with the ability to reprogram adult cell fates. In contrast, epigenetic mechanisms have the potential to stabilize cell identity and maintain tissue organization. The question is whether epigenetic memory creates a barrier to reprogramming that needs to be erased or circumvented in plant regeneration. Early evidence suggests that, while chromatin dynamics impact gene expression in the meristem, a lasting constraint on cell fate is not established until late stages of plant cell differentiation. It is not yet clear whether the plasticity of plant cells arises from the ability of cells to erase identity memory or to deploy cells that may exhibit cellular specialization but still lack an epigenetic restriction on cell fate alteration.

  8. Cell biological regulation of division fate in vertebrate neuroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Willardsen, Minde I; Link, Brian A

    2011-08-01

    The developing nervous system derives from neuroepithelial progenitor cells that divide to generate all of the mature neuronal types. For the proper complement of cell types to form, the progenitors must produce postmitotic cells, yet also replenish the progenitor pool. Progenitor divisions can be classified into three general types: symmetric proliferative (producing two progenitors), asymmetric neurogenic (producing one progenitor and one postmitotic cell), and symmetric neurogenic (producing two postmitotic cells). The appropriate ratios for these modes of cell division require intrinsic polarity, which is one of the characteristics that define neuroepithelial progenitor cells. The type of division an individual progenitor undergoes can be influenced by cellular features, or behaviors, which are heterogeneous within the population of progenitors. Here we review three key cellular parameters, asymmetric inheritance, cell cycle kinetics, and interkinetic nuclear migration, and the possible mechanisms for how these features influence progenitor fates.

  9. The Yin and Yang of chromatin dynamics in adult stem cell fate selection

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rene C.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Adult organisms rely on tissue stem cells for maintenance and repair. During homeostasis, the concerted action of local niche signals and epigenetic regulators establish stable gene expression patterns to ensure that stem cells are not lost over time. However, stem cells also provide host tissues with a remarkable plasticity to respond to perturbations. How adult stem cells choose and acquire new fates is unknown, but the genome-wide mapping of epigenetic landscapes suggests a critical role for chromatin remodeling in these processes. Here, we explore the emerging role of chromatin modifiers and pioneer transcription factors in adult stem cell fate decisions and plasticity, which ensure that selective lineage choices are only made when environmentally cued. PMID:26689127

  10. Transcriptional control of cell fate in the stomatal lineage

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Abigail R.; Bergmann, Dominique C.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis stomatal lineage is a microcosm of development; it undergoes selection of precursor cells, asymmetric and stem cell-like divisions, cell commitment and finally, acquisition of terminal cell fates. Recent transcriptomic approaches revealed major shifts in gene expression accompanying each fate transition, and mechanistic analysis of key bHLH transcription factors, along with mathematical modeling, has begun to unravel how these major shifts are coordinated. In addition, stomatal initiation is proving to be a tractable model for defining the genetic and epigenetic basis of stable cell identities and for understanding the integration of environmental responses into developmental programs. PMID:26550955

  11. Multiscale microenvironmental perturbation of pluripotent stem cell fate and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Yoji; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2017-03-01

    The combination of microfluidics with engineered three-dimensional (3D) matrices can bring new insights into the fate regulation of stem cells and their self-organization into organoids. Although there has been progress in 3D stem cell culturing, most existing in vitro methodologies do not allow for mimicking of the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of stimuli that drive morphogenetic processes in vivo. To address this, we present a perfusion-free microchip concept for the in vitro 3D perturbation of stem cell fate. Stem cells are encapsulated in a hydrogel compartment that is flanked by open reservoirs for the diffusion-driven generation of biomolecule gradients. Juxtaposing additional compartments bearing supportive cells enables investigating the influence of long range cell-cell communication. We explore the utility of the microchips in manipulating early fate choices and self-organizing characteristics of 3D-cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) under neural differentiation conditions and exposure to gradients of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). mESCs respond to LIF gradients in a spatially dependent manner. At higher LIF concentrations, multicellular colonies maintain pluripotency in contrast, at lower concentrations, mESCs develop into apicobasally polarized epithelial cysts. This versatile system can help to systematically explore the role of multifactorial microenvironments in promoting self-patterning of various stem cell types.

  12. Multiscale microenvironmental perturbation of pluripotent stem cell fate and self-organization

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Yoji; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of microfluidics with engineered three-dimensional (3D) matrices can bring new insights into the fate regulation of stem cells and their self-organization into organoids. Although there has been progress in 3D stem cell culturing, most existing in vitro methodologies do not allow for mimicking of the spatiotemporal heterogeneity of stimuli that drive morphogenetic processes in vivo. To address this, we present a perfusion-free microchip concept for the in vitro 3D perturbation of stem cell fate. Stem cells are encapsulated in a hydrogel compartment that is flanked by open reservoirs for the diffusion-driven generation of biomolecule gradients. Juxtaposing additional compartments bearing supportive cells enables investigating the influence of long range cell-cell communication. We explore the utility of the microchips in manipulating early fate choices and self-organizing characteristics of 3D-cultured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) under neural differentiation conditions and exposure to gradients of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). mESCs respond to LIF gradients in a spatially dependent manner. At higher LIF concentrations, multicellular colonies maintain pluripotency in contrast, at lower concentrations, mESCs develop into apicobasally polarized epithelial cysts. This versatile system can help to systematically explore the role of multifactorial microenvironments in promoting self-patterning of various stem cell types. PMID:28303935

  13. Hormone signaling requirements for the conversion of non-mammary mouse cells to mammary cell fate(s) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Rosenfield, Sonia M; George, Andrea L; Smith, Gilbert H

    2015-06-01

    Mammotropic hormones and growth factors play a very important role in mammary growth and differentiation. Here, hormones including Estrogen, Progesterone, Prolactin, their cognate receptors, and the growth factor Amphiregulin, are tested with respect to their roles in signaling non-mammary cells from the mouse to redirect to mammary epithelial cell fate(s). This was done in the context of glandular regeneration in pubertal athymic female mice. Our previous studies demonstrated that mammary stem cell niches are recapitulated during gland regeneration in vivo. During this process, cells of exogenous origin cooperate with mammary epithelial cells to form mammary stem cell niches and thus respond to normal developmental signals. In all cases tested with the possible exception of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), hormone signaling is dispensable for non-mammary cells to undertake mammary epithelial cell fate(s), proliferate, and contribute progeny to chimeric mammary outgrowths. Importantly, redirected non-mammary cell progeny, regardless of their source, have the ability to self-renew and contribute offspring to secondary mammary outgrowths derived from transplanted chimeric mammary fragments; thus suggesting that some of these cells are capable of mammary stem cell/progenitor functions.

  14. Dynamics of p53: A Master Decider of Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qingyin; Beaver, Jill M.; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2017-01-01

    Cellular stress-induced temporal alterations—i.e., dynamics—are typically exemplified by the dynamics of p53 that serve as a master to determine cell fate. p53 dynamics were initially identified as the variations of p53 protein levels. However, a growing number of studies have shown that p53 dynamics are also manifested in variations in the activity, spatial location, and posttranslational modifications of p53 proteins, as well as the interplay among all p53 dynamical features. These are essential in determining a specific outcome of cell fate. In this review, we discuss the importance of the multifaceted features of p53 dynamics and their roles in the cell fate decision process, as well as their potential applications in p53-based cancer therapy. The review provides new insights into p53 signaling pathways and their potentials in the development of new strategies in p53-based cancer therapy. PMID:28208785

  15. Diversity of fate outcomes in cell pairs under lateral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara; Martinez-Corral, Rosa; Garcia Ojalvo, Jordi; de Navascués, Joaquín

    2017-02-07

    Cell fate determination by lateral inhibition via Notch/Delta signalling has been extensively studied. Most formalised models consider Notch/Delta interactions in fields of cells, with parameters that typically lead to symmetry breaking of signalling states between neighbouring cells, commonly resulting in salt-and-pepper fate patterns. Here we consider the case of signalling between isolated cell pairs, and find that the bifurcation properties of a standard mathematical model of lateral inhibition can lead to stable symmetric signalling states. We apply this model to the adult intestinal stem cell (ISC) of Drosophila, whose fate is stochastic but dependent on the Notch/Delta pathway. We observe a correlation between signalling state in cell pairs and their contact area. We interpret this behaviour in terms of the properties of our model in the presence of population variability in contact areas, which affects the effective signalling threshold of individual cells. Our results suggest that the dynamics of Notch/Delta signalling can contribute to explain stochasticity in stem cell fate decisions, and that the standard model for lateral inhibition can account for a wider range of developmental outcomes than previously considered.

  16. FY08 LDRD Final Report Stem Cell Fate Decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hiddessen, A

    2009-03-02

    A detailed understanding of the biological control of fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells is needed to harness their full power for tissue repair and/or regeneration. Currently, internal and external factors that regulate stem cell fate are not fully understood. We aim to engineer biocompatible tools to facilitate the measurement and comparison of the roles and significance of immobilized factors such as extracellular matrix and signaling peptides, synergistic and opposing soluble factors and signals, and cell-to-cell communication, in stem cell fate decisions. Our approach is based on the development of cell microarrays to capture viable stem/progenitor cells individually or in small clusters onto substrate-bound signals (e.g. proteins), combined with conventional antibody and customized subcellular markers made in-house, to facilitate tracking of cell behavior during exposure to relevant signals. Below we describe our efforts, including methods to manipulate a model epithelial stem cell system using a custom subcellular reporter to track and measure cell signaling, arrays with surface chemistry that support viable cells and enable controlled presentation of immobilized signals to cells on the array and fluorescence-based measurement of cell response, and successful on-array tests via conventional immunofluorescence assays that indicate correct cell polarity, localization of junctional proteins, and phenotype, properties which are essential to measuring true cell responses.

  17. Direct reprogramming and biomaterials for controlling cell fate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunsol; Tae, Giyoong

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming which changes the fate of matured cell is a very useful technique with a great interest recently. This approach can eliminate the drawbacks of direct usage of stem cells and allow the patient specific treatment in regenerative medicine. Overexpression of diverse factors such as general reprogramming factors or lineage specific transcription factors can change the fate of already differentiated cells. On the other hand, biomaterials can provide physical and topographical cues or biochemical cues on cells, which can dictate or significantly affect the differentiation of stem cells. The role of biomaterials on direct reprogramming has not been elucidated much, but will be potentially significant to improve the efficiency or specificity of direct reprogramming. In this review, the strategies for general direct reprogramming and biomaterials-guided stem cell differentiation are summarized with the addition of the up-to-date progress on biomaterials for direct reprogramming.

  18. Chemicals as the Sole Transformers of Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors in somatic cells can result in the generation of different cell types in a process named direct reprogramming, bypassing the pluripotent state. However, the introduction of transgenes limits the therapeutic applications of the produced cells. Numerous small-molecules have been introduced in the field of stem cell biology capable of governing self-renewal, reprogramming, transdifferentiation and regeneration. These chemical compounds are versatile tools for cell fate conversion toward desired outcomes. Cell fate conversion using small-molecules alone (chemical reprogramming) has superiority over arduous traditional genetic techniques in several aspects. For instance, rapid, transient, and reversible effects in activation and inhibition of functions of specific proteins are of the profits of small-molecules. They are cost-effective, have a long half-life, diversity on structure and function, and allow for temporal and flexible regulation of signaling pathways. Additionally, their effects could be adjusted by fine-tuning concentrations and combinations of different small-molecules. Therefore, chemicals are powerful tools in cell fate conversion and study of stem cell and chemical biology in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, transgene-free and chemical-only transdifferentiation approaches provide alternative strategies for the generation of various cell types, disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. The current review gives an overview of the recent findings concerning transdifferentiation by only small-molecules without the use of transgenes. PMID:27426081

  19. Specification of haematopoietic stem cell fate via modulation of mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Nicola; Girotra, Mukul; Naveiras, Olaia; Nikitin, Gennady; Campos, Vasco; Giger, Sonja; Roch, Aline; Auwerx, Johan; Lutolf, Matthias P.

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differ from their committed progeny by relying primarily on anaerobic glycolysis rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. However, whether this change in the metabolic program is the cause or the consequence of the unique function of HSCs remains unknown. Here we show that enforced modulation of energy metabolism impacts HSC self-renewal. Lowering the mitochondrial activity of HSCs by chemically uncoupling the electron transport chain drives self-renewal under culture conditions that normally induce rapid differentiation. We demonstrate that this metabolic specification of HSC fate occurs through the reversible decrease of mitochondrial mass by autophagy. Our data thus reveal a causal relationship between mitochondrial metabolism and fate choice of HSCs and also provide a valuable tool to expand HSCs outside of their native bone marrow niches. PMID:27731316

  20. Asymmetric cell division in T lymphocyte fate diversification

    PubMed Central

    Arsenio, Janilyn; Metz, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological protection against microbial pathogens is dependent on robust generation of functionally diverse T lymphocyte subsets. Upon microbial infection, naïve CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocytes can give rise to effector- and memory-fated progeny that together mediate a potent immune response. Recent advances in single-cell immunological and genomic profiling technologies have helped elucidate early and late diversification mechanisms that enable the generation of heterogeneity from single T lymphocytes. We discuss these findings here and argue that one such mechanism, asymmetric cell division, creates an early divergence in T lymphocyte fates by giving rise to daughter cells with a propensity towards the terminally differentiated effector or self-renewing memory lineages, with cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic cues from the microenvironment driving the final maturation steps. PMID:26474675

  1. Mechanics Regulates Fate Decisions of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yubing; Villa-Diaz, Luis G.; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Chen, Weiqiang; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Fu, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has attracted much attention given their great potential for tissue regenerative therapy and fundamental developmental biology studies. Yet, there is still limited understanding of how mechanical signals in the local cellular microenvironment of hESCs regulate their fate decisions. Here, we applied a microfabricated micromechanical platform to investigate the mechanoresponsive behaviors of hESCs. We demonstrated that hESCs are mechanosensitive, and they could increase their cytoskeleton contractility with matrix rigidity. Furthermore, rigid substrates supported maintenance of pluripotency of hESCs. Matrix mechanics-mediated cytoskeleton contractility might be functionally correlated with E-cadherin expressions in cell-cell contacts and thus involved in fate decisions of hESCs. Our results highlighted the important functional link between matrix rigidity, cellular mechanics, and pluripotency of hESCs and provided a novel approach to characterize and understand mechanotransduction and its involvement in hESC function. PMID:22615930

  2. Mesenchymal cell fate and phenotypes in the pathogenesis of emphysema.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Martinez, Fernando J; Thannickal, Victor J

    2009-06-01

    Emphysema is characterized by the destruction of alveolar parenchymal tissue and the concordant loss of lung epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and interstitial mesenchymal cells. Key features in the pathobiology of emphysema include inflammation, alveolar epithelial cell injury/apoptosis, and excessive activation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteases. Mesenchymal cells are versatile connective tissue cells that are critical effectors of wound-repair. The excessive loss of connective tissue and the destruction of alveolar septae in emphysema suggest that the mesenchymal cell reparative response to epithelial injury is impaired. Yet, the mechanisms regulating mesenchymal cell (dys)function in emphysema remain poorly understood. We propose that mesenchymal cell fate, modulated by transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta1) and the balance of ECM proteases and antiproteases, is a critical determinant of the emphysema phenotype. We examine emphysema in the context of wound-repair responses, with a focus on the regulation of mesenchymal cell fate and phenotype. We discuss the emerging evidence supporting that genetic factors, inflammation and environmental factors, including cigarette smoke itself, collectively impair mesenchymal cell survival and function, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  3. Competent steps in determination of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R

    1999-06-01

    Competence is an active state that defines the way in which cells respond to an inductive signal. A challenge of developmental biology is to explain not just the nature of the signalling molecules that promote cell specification or differentiation, but also how cells acquire competence to respond to these signals and what that reflects in molecular terms. A recent paper by Carmena et al. has revealed how several signalling mechanisms are used sequentially and in specific combinations to specify two mesodermal lineages in Drosophila.

  4. Foxp1/4 control epithelial cell fate during lung development and regeneration through regulation of anterior gradient 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanru; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yuzhen; Lu, Min Min; DeMayo, Francesco J; Dekker, Joseph D; Tucker, Philip W; Morrisey, Edward E

    2012-07-01

    The molecular pathways regulating cell lineage determination and regeneration in epithelial tissues are poorly understood. The secretory epithelium of the lung is required for production of mucus to help protect the lung against environmental insults, including pathogens and pollution, that can lead to debilitating diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We show that the transcription factors Foxp1 and Foxp4 act cooperatively to regulate lung secretory epithelial cell fate and regeneration by directly restricting the goblet cell lineage program. Loss of Foxp1/4 in the developing lung and in postnatal secretory epithelium leads to ectopic activation of the goblet cell fate program, in part, through de-repression of the protein disulfide isomerase anterior gradient 2 (Agr2). Forced expression of Agr2 is sufficient to promote the goblet cell fate in the developing airway epithelium. Finally, in a model of lung secretory cell injury and regeneration, we show that loss of Foxp1/4 leads to catastrophic loss of airway epithelial regeneration due to default differentiation of secretory cells into the goblet cell lineage. These data demonstrate the importance of Foxp1/4 in restricting cell fate choices during development and regeneration, thereby providing the proper balance of functional epithelial lineages in the lung.

  5. Synthetic RNA Controllers for Programming Mammalian Cell Fate and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-04

    Contractor Address: 443 Via Ortega, Room 240, Stanford, CA 94305 Contract Number: HR0011-11-2-0002 Date of Report: November 4, 2015 Report Title...SUBTITLE Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...course of the DARPA contract we met the described goals of the first two objectives; however, the third objective, to develop an RNA device platform that

  6. fringe and Notch specify polar cell fate during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grammont, M; Irvine, K D

    2001-06-01

    fringe encodes a glycosyltransferase that modulates the ability of the Notch receptor to be activated by its ligands. We describe studies of fringe function during early stages of Drosophila oogenesis. Animals mutant for hypomorphic alleles of fringe contain follicles with an incorrect number of germline cells, which are separated by abnormally long and disorganized stalks. Analysis of clones of somatic cells mutant for a null allele of fringe localizes the requirement for fringe in follicle formation to the polar cells, and demonstrates that fringe is required for polar cell fate. Clones of cells mutant for Notch also lack polar cells and the requirement for Notch in follicle formation appears to map to the polar cells. Ectopic expression of fringe or of an activated form of Notch can generate an extra polar cell. Our results indicate that fringe plays a key role in positioning Notch activation during early oogenesis, and establish a function for the polar cells in separating germline cysts into individual follicles.

  7. Delayed transition to new cell fates during cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xianrui; Lyons, Deirdre C; Socolar, Joshua E S; McClay, David R

    2014-07-15

    In many embryos specification toward one cell fate can be diverted to a different cell fate through a reprogramming process. Understanding how that process works will reveal insights into the developmental regulatory logic that emerged from evolution. In the sea urchin embryo, cells at gastrulation were found to reprogram and replace missing cell types after surgical dissections of the embryo. Non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells reprogrammed to replace missing skeletogenic mesoderm cells and animal caps reprogrammed to replace all endomesoderm. In both cases evidence of reprogramming onset was first observed at the early gastrula stage, even if the cells to be replaced were removed earlier in development. Once started however, the reprogramming occurred with compressed gene expression dynamics. The NSM did not require early contact with the skeletogenic cells to reprogram, but the animal cap cells gained the ability to reprogram early in gastrulation only after extended contact with the vegetal halves prior to that time. If the entire vegetal half was removed at early gastrula, the animal caps reprogrammed and replaced the vegetal half endomesoderm. If the animal caps carried morpholinos to either hox11/13b or foxA (endomesoderm specification genes), the isolated animal caps failed to reprogram. Together these data reveal that the emergence of a reprogramming capability occurs at early gastrulation in the sea urchin embryo and requires activation of early specification components of the target tissues.

  8. Progenitor Cell Fate Decisions in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    luminal progenitors contributing to transformation of ER- luminal and basal cells and development of treatment resistant breast cancer . We previously...proliferate and metastasize. Decreased DNA damage repair or altered epigenetic marks can dramatically affect the cellular composition of these tumors

  9. Numb is not a critical regulator of Notch-mediated cell fate decisions in the developing chick inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Eddison, Mark; Weber, Sara J.; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Lewis, Julian; Daudet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway controls differentiation of hair cells and supporting cells in the vertebrate inner ear. Here, we have investigated whether Numb, a known regulator of Notch activity in Drosophila, is involved in this process in the embryonic chick. The chicken homolog of Numb is expressed throughout the otocyst at early stages of development and is concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. It is asymmetrically allocated at some cell divisions, as in Drosophila, suggesting that it could act as a determinant inherited by one of the two daughter cells and favoring adoption of a hair-cell fate. To test the implication of Numb in hair cell fate decisions and the regulation of Notch signaling, we used different methods to overexpress Numb at different stages of inner ear development. We found that sustained or late Numb overexpression does not promote hair cell differentiation, and Numb does not prevent the reception of Notch signaling. Surprisingly, none of the Numb-overexpressing cells differentiated into hair cells, suggesting that high levels of Numb protein could interfere with intracellular processes essential for hair cell survival. However, when Numb was overexpressed early and more transiently during ear development, no effect on hair cell formation was seen. These results suggest that in the inner ear at least, Numb does not significantly repress Notch activity and that its asymmetric distribution in dividing precursor cells does not govern the choice between hair cell and supporting cell fates. PMID:25814931

  10. Fate restriction and multipotency in retinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Centanin, Lázaro; Hoeckendorf, Burkhard; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2011-12-02

    Stem cells have the capacity to both self-renew and generate postmitotic cells. Long-term tracking of individual clones in their natural environment constitutes the ultimate way to validate postembryonic stem cells. We identify retinal stem cells (RSCs) using the spatiotemporal organization of the fish retina and follow the complete offspring of a single cell during the postnatal life. RSCs generate two tissues of the adult fish retina, the neural retina (NR) and the retinal-pigmented epithelium (RPE). Despite their common embryonic origin and tight coordination during continuous organ growth, we prove that NR and RPE are maintained by dedicated RSCs that contribute in a fate-restricted manner to either one or the other tissue. We show that in the NR, RSCs are multipotent and generate all neuron types and glia. The clonal origin of these different cell types from a multipotent NSC has far-reaching implications for cell type and tissue homeostasis.

  11. Extracellular-matrix tethering regulates stem-cell fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappmann, Britta; Gautrot, Julien E.; Connelly, John T.; Strange, Daniel G. T.; Li, Yuan; Oyen, Michelle L.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Boehm, Heike; Li, Bojun; Vogel, Viola; Spatz, Joachim P.; Watt, Fiona M.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2012-07-01

    To investigate how substrate properties influence stem-cell fate, we cultured single human epidermal stem cells on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel surfaces, 0.1 kPa-2.3 MPa in stiffness, with a covalently attached collagen coating. Cell spreading and differentiation were unaffected by polydimethylsiloxane stiffness. However, cells on polyacrylamide of low elastic modulus (0.5 kPa) could not form stable focal adhesions and differentiated as a result of decreased activation of the extracellular-signal-related kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. The differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells was also unaffected by PDMS stiffness but regulated by the elastic modulus of PAAm. Dextran penetration measurements indicated that polyacrylamide substrates of low elastic modulus were more porous than stiff substrates, suggesting that the collagen anchoring points would be further apart. We then changed collagen crosslink concentration and used hydrogel-nanoparticle substrates to vary anchoring distance at constant substrate stiffness. Lower collagen anchoring density resulted in increased differentiation. We conclude that stem cells exert a mechanical force on collagen fibres and gauge the feedback to make cell-fate decisions.

  12. Germline stem cells are critical for sexual fate decision of germ cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Egg or sperm? The mechanism of sexual fate decision in germ cells has been a long‐standing issue in biology. A recent analysis identified foxl3 as a gene that determines the sexual fate decision of germ cells in the teleost fish, medaka. foxl3/Foxl3 acts in female germline stem cells to repress commitment into male fate (spermatogenesis), indicating that the presence of mitotic germ cells in the female is critical for continuous sexual fate decision of germ cells in medaka gonads. Interestingly, foxl3 is found in most vertebrate genomes except for mammals. This provides the interesting possibility that the sexual fate of germ cells in mammals is determined in a different way compared to foxl3‐possessing vertebrates. Considering the fact that germline stem cells are the cells where foxl3 begins to express and sexual fate decision initiates and mammalian ovary does not have typical germline stem cells, the mechanism in mammals may have been co‐evolved with germline stem cell loss in mammalian ovary. PMID:27699806

  13. SIT and TRIM determine T cell fate in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Uwe; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2008-11-01

    Thymic selection is a tightly regulated developmental process essential for establishing central tolerance. The intensity of TCR-mediated signaling is a key factor for determining cell fate in the thymus. It is widely accepted that low-intensity signals result in positive selection, whereas high-intensity signals induce negative selection. Transmembrane adaptor proteins have been demonstrated to be important regulators of T cell activation. However, little is known about their role during T cell development. Herein, we show that SIT (SHP2 Src homology domain containing tyrosine phosphatase 2-interacting transmembrane adaptor protein) and TRIM (TCR-interacting molecule), two structurally related transmembrane adaptors, cooperatively regulate TCR signaling potential, thereby influencing the outcome of thymic selection. Indeed, loss of both SIT and TRIM resulted in the up-regulation of CD5, CD69, and TCRbeta, strong MAPK activation, and, consequently, enhanced positive selection. Moreover, by crossing SIT/TRIM double-deficient mice onto transgenic mice bearing TCRs with different avidity/affinity, we found profound alterations in T cell development. Indeed, in female HY TCR transgenic mice, positive selection was completely converted into negative selection resulting in small thymi devoided of double-positive thymocytes. More strikingly, in a nonselecting background, SIT/TRIM double-deficient single-positive T cells developed, were functional, and populated the periphery. In summary, we demonstrated that SIT and TRIM regulate cell fate of developing thymocytes, thus identifying them as essential regulators of central tolerance.

  14. Mapping the Pairwise Choices Leading from Pluripotency to Human Bone, Heart, and Other Mesoderm Cell Types.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kyle M; Chen, Angela; Koh, Pang Wei; Deng, Tianda Z; Sinha, Rahul; Tsai, Jonathan M; Barkal, Amira A; Shen, Kimberle Y; Jain, Rajan; Morganti, Rachel M; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Fernhoff, Nathaniel B; George, Benson M; Wernig, Gerlinde; Salomon, Rachel E A; Chen, Zhenghao; Vogel, Hannes; Epstein, Jonathan A; Kundaje, Anshul; Talbot, William S; Beachy, Philip A; Ang, Lay Teng; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-07-14

    Stem-cell differentiation to desired lineages requires navigating alternating developmental paths that often lead to unwanted cell types. Hence, comprehensive developmental roadmaps are crucial to channel stem-cell differentiation toward desired fates. To this end, here, we map bifurcating lineage choices leading from pluripotency to 12 human mesodermal lineages, including bone, muscle, and heart. We defined the extrinsic signals controlling each binary lineage decision, enabling us to logically block differentiation toward unwanted fates and rapidly steer pluripotent stem cells toward 80%-99% pure human mesodermal lineages at most branchpoints. This strategy enabled the generation of human bone and heart progenitors that could engraft in respective in vivo models. Mapping stepwise chromatin and single-cell gene expression changes in mesoderm development uncovered somite segmentation, a previously unobservable human embryonic event transiently marked by HOPX expression. Collectively, this roadmap enables navigation of mesodermal development to produce transplantable human tissue progenitors and uncover developmental processes. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  15. Intracellular GTP level determines cell's fate toward differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkini, Azadeh; Yazdanparast, Razieh Nouri, Kazem

    2011-06-15

    Since the adequate supply of guanine nucleotides is vital for cellular activities, limitation of their syntheses would certainly result in modulation of cellular fate toward differentiation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to set a correlation between the intracellular level of GTP and the induction of relevant signaling pathways involved in the cell's fate toward life or death. In that regard, we measured the GTP level among human leukemia K562 cells exposed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) or 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin (3-HK) as two potent inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Our results supported the maturation of the cells when the intracellular GTP level was reduced by almost 30-40%. Under these conditions, 3-HK and/or MPA caused up-regulation of PKC{alpha} and PI3K/AKT pathways. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with hypoxanthine plus 3-HK or MPA, which caused a reduction of about 60% in the intracellular GTP levels, led to apoptosis and activation of mitochondrial pathways through inverse regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, our results demonstrated that attenuation of GTP by almost 60% augmented the intracellular ROS and nuclear localization of p21 and subsequently led to cell death. These results suggest that two different threshold levels of GTP are needed for induction of differentiation and/or ROS-associated apoptosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  16. Notch signaling acts before cell division to promote asymmetric cleavage and cell fate of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2014-10-21

    Asymmetric cell divisions in the central nervous system generate neurons of diverse fates. In Drosophila melanogaster, the protein Numb localizes asymmetrically to dividing neural precursor cells such that only one daughter cell inherits Numb. Numb inhibits Notch signaling in this daughter cell, resulting in a different cell fate from the Notch-induced fate in the other-Numb-negative-daughter cell. Precursor cells undergo asymmetric cytokinesis generating daughter cells of different sizes. I found that inactivation of Notch in fly embryonic neural precursor cells disrupted the asymmetric positioning of the cleavage furrow and produced daughter cells of the same size and fate. Moreover, inactivation of Notch at different times altered the degree of asymmetric Numb localization, such that earlier inactivation of Notch caused symmetric distribution of Numb and later inactivation produced incomplete asymmetric localization of Numb. The extent of asymmetrically localized Numb positively correlated with the degree of asymmetric cytokinesis and the size disparity in daughter cells. Loss of Numb or expression of constitutively active Notch led to premature specification of the precursor cells into the fate of one of the daughter cells. Thus, in addition to its role in the specification of daughter cell fate after division, Notch controls Numb localization in the precursor cells to determine the size and fate of daughter cells. Numb also inhibits Notch signaling in precursor cells to prevent Notch-induced differentiation of the precursor cell, forming an autoregulatory loop.

  17. Nuclear envelope and genome interactions in cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Talamas, Jessica A.; Capelson, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell nucleus houses an organism’s genome and is the location within the cell where all signaling induced and development-driven gene expression programs are ultimately specified. The genome is enclosed and separated from the cytoplasm by the nuclear envelope (NE), a double-lipid membrane bilayer, which contains a large variety of trans-membrane and associated protein complexes. In recent years, research regarding multiple aspects of the cell nucleus points to a highly dynamic and coordinated concert of efforts between chromatin and the NE in regulation of gene expression. Details of how this concert is orchestrated and how it directs cell differentiation and disease are coming to light at a rapid pace. Here we review existing and emerging concepts of how interactions between the genome and the NE may contribute to tissue specific gene expression programs to determine cell fate. PMID:25852741

  18. To Accept One’s Fate or Be Its Master: Culture, Control, and Workplace Choice

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Charis; Ishii, Keiko; Miyamoto, Yuri; Ma, Xiaoming; Hitokoto, Hidefumi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing three student (Study 1) and non-student samples (Study 2), we examined cultural differences in workplace choice for North Americans, Germans, and Japanese. We focused on the desire for control as a potential mediator (i.e., the underlying mechanism) to explain cultural differences in this important life decision. Given culturally divergent embodiments of independent vs. interdependent models of agency, we expected and found that, compared to North Americans and Germans, Japanese were more likely to prefer a workplace with a payment system that maintains social order rather than one that rewards individual achievement. Furthermore, we found that Japanese tend to give greater consideration to family opinions in their choice of workplace. As predicted, desire for control (i.e., the motivation to have control over various events) was stronger for North Americans and Germans than Japanese, and explained cultural differences in choice of workplace. PMID:27445904

  19. To Accept One's Fate or Be Its Master: Culture, Control, and Workplace Choice.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Charis; Ishii, Keiko; Miyamoto, Yuri; Ma, Xiaoming; Hitokoto, Hidefumi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing three student (Study 1) and non-student samples (Study 2), we examined cultural differences in workplace choice for North Americans, Germans, and Japanese. We focused on the desire for control as a potential mediator (i.e., the underlying mechanism) to explain cultural differences in this important life decision. Given culturally divergent embodiments of independent vs. interdependent models of agency, we expected and found that, compared to North Americans and Germans, Japanese were more likely to prefer a workplace with a payment system that maintains social order rather than one that rewards individual achievement. Furthermore, we found that Japanese tend to give greater consideration to family opinions in their choice of workplace. As predicted, desire for control (i.e., the motivation to have control over various events) was stronger for North Americans and Germans than Japanese, and explained cultural differences in choice of workplace.

  20. Origin and fate of the regenerating cells of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Eymael, Jennifer; Smeets, Bart

    2016-11-05

    The kidney has the capacity to regenerate itself provided that the damage is limited and the structure of the kidney remains intact. Nevertheless, in disease conditions this potential may be compromised, leading to progression to chronic kidney disease. For development of new therapeutic strategies it is a prerequisite to understand the origin and regulation of the kidney regenerating cells and the processes that underlie maladaptive repair. Because of the complexity of the kidney consisting of a high number of different cell types, it is a complex task to unravel the origin and fate of cells responsible for regeneration. This review summarises the recent and most important advances in identifying regenerating cell populations of the kidney, and highlights the existing controversies.

  1. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    DOE PAGES

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; ...

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interactionmore » between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.« less

  2. Cell fate regulation governed by a repurposed bacterial histidine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, W. Seth; Xu, Qingping; Mann, Thomas H.; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Deacon, Ashley M.; Shapiro, Lucy; Stock, Ann M.

    2014-10-28

    One of the simplest organisms to divide asymmetrically is the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The DivL pseudo-histidine kinase, positioned at one cell pole, regulates cell-fate by controlling the activation of the global transcription factor CtrA via an interaction with the response regulator (RR) DivK. DivL uniquely contains a tyrosine at the histidine phosphorylation site, and can achieve these regulatory functions in vivo without kinase activity. Determination of the DivL crystal structure and biochemical analysis of wild-type and site-specific DivL mutants revealed that the DivL PAS domains regulate binding specificity for DivK~P over DivK, which is modulated by an allosteric intramolecular interaction between adjacent domains. We discovered that DivL's catalytic domains have been repurposed as a phosphospecific RR input sensor, thereby reversing the flow of information observed in conventional histidine kinase (HK)-RR systems and coupling a complex network of signaling proteins for cell-fate regulation.

  3. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness.

  4. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  5. Engineering Cell Fate for Tissue Regeneration by In Vivo Transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    de Lázaro, I; Kostarelos, K

    2016-02-01

    Changes in cell identity occur in adult mammalian organisms but are rare and often linked to disease. Research in the last few decades has thrown light on how to manipulate cell fate, but the conversion of a particular cell type into another within a living organism (also termed in vivo transdifferentiation) has only been recently achieved in a limited number of tissues. Although the therapeutic promise of this strategy for tissue regeneration and repair is exciting, important efficacy and safety concerns will need to be addressed before it becomes a reality in the clinical practice. Here, we review the most relevant in vivo transdifferentiation studies in adult mammalian animal models, offering a critical assessment of this potentially powerful strategy for regenerative medicine.

  6. Cell Fate Reprogramming by Control of Intracellular Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zañudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Réka

    2015-01-01

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell’s fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Here we develop a novel network control framework that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our approach drives any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and needs to be applied only transiently for the network to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method’s potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of helper T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. PMID:25849586

  7. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    PubMed

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  8. Sox10 contributes to the balance of fate choice in dorsal root ganglion progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Madelaine, Romain; Busolin, Giorgia; Nikaido, Masataka; Colanesi, Sarah; Camargo-Sosa, Karen; Toppo, Stefano; Blader, Patrick; Tiso, Natascia; Kelsh, Robert N.

    2017-01-01

    The development of functional peripheral ganglia requires a balance of specification of both neuronal and glial components. In the developing dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), these components form from partially-restricted bipotent neuroglial precursors derived from the neural crest. Work in mouse and chick has identified several factors, including Delta/Notch signaling, required for specification of a balance of these components. We have previously shown in zebrafish that the Sry-related HMG domain transcription factor, Sox10, plays an unexpected, but crucial, role in sensory neuron fate specification in vivo. In the same study we described a novel Sox10 mutant allele, sox10baz1, in which sensory neuron numbers are elevated above those of wild-types. Here we investigate the origin of this neurogenic phenotype. We demonstrate that the supernumerary neurons are sensory neurons, and that enteric and sympathetic neurons are almost absent just as in classical sox10 null alleles; peripheral glial development is also severely abrogated in a manner similar to other sox10 mutant alleles. Examination of proliferation and apoptosis in the developing DRG reveals very low levels of both processes in wild-type and sox10baz1, excluding changes in the balance of these as an explanation for the overproduction of sensory neurons. Using chemical inhibition of Delta-Notch-Notch signaling we demonstrate that in embryonic zebrafish, as in mouse and chick, lateral inhibition during the phase of trunk DRG development is required to achieve a balance between glial and neuronal numbers. Importantly, however, we show that this mechanism is insufficient to explain quantitative aspects of the baz1 phenotype. The Sox10(baz1) protein shows a single amino acid substitution in the DNA binding HMG domain; structural analysis indicates that this change is likely to result in reduced flexibility in the HMG domain, consistent with sequence-specific modification of Sox10 binding to DNA. Unlike other Sox10

  9. Tracing the fate of limbal epithelial progenitor cells in the murine cornea.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, N; Bobba, S; Raviraj, V; Delic, N C; Slapetova, I; Nicovich, P R; Halliday, G M; Wakefield, D; Whan, R; Lyons, J G

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell (SC) division, deployment, and differentiation are processes that contribute to corneal epithelial renewal. Until now studying the destiny of these cells in a living mammal has not been possible. However, the advent of inducible multicolor genetic tagging and powerful imaging technologies has rendered this achievable in the translucent and readily accessible murine cornea. K14CreER(T2)-Confetti mice that harbor two copies of the Brainbow 2.1 cassette, yielding up to 10 colors from the stochastic recombination of fluorescent proteins, were used to monitor K-14(+) progenitor cell dynamics within the corneal epithelium in live animals. Multicolored columns of cells emerged from the basal limbal epithelium as they expanded and migrated linearly at a rate of 10.8 µm/day toward the central cornea. Moreover, the permanent expression of fluorophores, passed on from progenitor to progeny, assisted in discriminating individual clones as spectrally distinct streaks containing more than 1,000 cells within the illuminated area. The centripetal clonal expansion is suggestive that a single progenitor cell is responsible for maintaining a narrow corridor of corneal epithelial cells. Our data are in agreement with the limbus as the repository for SC as opposed to SC being distributed throughout the central cornea. This is the first report describing stem/progenitor cell fate determination in the murine cornea using multicolor genetic tracing. This model represents a powerful new resource to monitor SC kinetics and fate choice under homeostatic conditions, and may assist in assessing clonal evolution during corneal development, aging, wound-healing, disease, and following transplantation.

  10. Following the Fate of Bacterial Cells Experiencing Sudden Chromosome Loss

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Maya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromosomal DNA is a constant source of information, essential for any given cell to respond and adapt to changing conditions. Here, we investigated the fate of exponentially growing bacterial cells experiencing a sudden and rapid loss of their entire chromosome. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis cells harboring an inducible copy of the endogenous toxin yqcG, which encodes an endonuclease, we induced the formation of a population of cells that lost their genetic information simultaneously. Surprisingly, these DNA-less cells, termed DLCs, did not lyse immediately and exhibited normal cellular morphology for a period of at least 5 h after DNA loss. This cellular integrity was manifested by their capacity to maintain an intact membrane and membrane potential and cell wall architecture similar to those of wild-type cells. Unlike growing cells that exhibit a dynamic profile of macromolecules, DLCs displayed steady protein and RNA reservoirs. Remarkably, following DLCs by time lapse microscopy revealed that they succeeded in synthesizing proteins, elongating, and dividing, apparently forming de novo Z rings at the midcell position. Taken together, the persistence of key cellular events in DLCs indicates that the information to carry out lengthy processes is harbored within the remaining molecular components. PMID:25922388

  11. Leveling Waddington: the emergence of direct programming and the loss of cell fate hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Ladewig, Julia; Koch, Philipp; Brüstle, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    For decades, Waddington's concept of the 'epigenetic landscape' has served as an educative hierarchical model to illustrate the progressive restriction of cell differentiation potential during normal development. While still being highly valuable in the context of normal development, the Waddington model falls short of accommodating recent breakthroughs in cell programming. The advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and advances in direct cell fate conversion (also known as transdifferentiation) suggest that somatic and pluripotent cell fates can be interconverted without transiting through distinct hierarchies. We propose a non-hierarchical 'epigenetic disc' model to explain such cell fate transitions, which provides an alternative landscape for modelling cell programming and reprogramming.

  12. Power-Law Modeling of Cancer Cell Fates Driven by Signaling Data to Reveal Drug Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Min; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular signals are captured and transmitted by signaling proteins inside a cell. An important type of cellular responses to the signals is the cell fate decision, e.g., apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanisms of cell fate regulation are still unclear, thus comprehensive and detailed kinetic models are not yet available. Alternatively, data-driven models are promising to bridge signaling data with the phenotypic measurements of cell fates. The traditional linear model for data-driven modeling of signaling pathways has its limitations because it assumes that the a cell fate is proportional to the activities of signaling proteins, which is unlikely in the complex biological systems. Therefore, we propose a power-law model to relate the activities of all the measured signaling proteins to the probabilities of cell fates. In our experiments, we compared our nonlinear power-law model with the linear model on three cancer datasets with phosphoproteomics and cell fate measurements, which demonstrated that the nonlinear model has superior performance on cell fates prediction. By in silico simulation of virtual protein knock-down, the proposed model is able to reveal drug effects which can complement traditional approaches such as binding affinity analysis. Moreover, our model is able to capture cell line specific information to distinguish one cell line from another in cell fate prediction. Our results show that the power-law data-driven model is able to perform better in cell fate prediction and provide more insights into the signaling pathways for cancer cell fates than the linear model. PMID:27764199

  13. Multifactorial Optimizations for Directing Endothelial Fate from Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madfis, Nicole; Wong, Lian; Zamora, Jose; White, Nicholas; Reyes, Samuel; Burns, Andrew B.; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive in vitro models of vascular development, therapeutic angiogenesis, and tissue engineering. However, distinct ESC and iPS cell lines respond differentially to the same microenvironmental factors. Developing improved/optimized differentiation methodologies tailored/applicable in a number of distinct iPS and ESC lines remains a challenge in the field. Currently published methods for deriving endothelial cells (EC) robustly generate high numbers of endothlelial progenitor cells (EPC) within a week, but their maturation to definitive EC is much more difficult, taking up to 2 months and requiring additional purification. Therefore, we set out to examine combinations/levels of putative EC induction factors—utilizing our stage-specific chemically-defined derivation methodology in 4 ESC lines including: kinetics, cell seeding density, matrix signaling, as well as medium treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The results indicate that temporal development in both early and late stages is the most significant factor generating the desired cells. The generation of early Flk-1+/KDR+ vascular progenitor cells (VPC) from pluripotent ESC is directed predominantly by high cell seeding density and matrix signaling from fibronectin, while VEGF supplementation was NOT statistically significant in more than one cell line, especially with fibronectin matrix which sequesters autocrine VEGF production by the differentiating stem cells. Although some groups have shown that the GSK3-kinase inhibitor (CHIR) can facilitate EPC fate, it hindered the generation of KDR+ cells in our preoptimized medium formulations. The methods summarized here significantly increased the production of mature vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin+ EC, with up to 93% and 57% purity from mouse and human ESC, respectively, before VE-cadherin+ EC purification. PMID:27907001

  14. Engineering the human pluripotent stem cell microenvironment to direct cell fate.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, Laurie B; Selekman, Joshua A; Palecek, Sean P

    2013-11-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a potential cell source for research, drug screening, and regenerative medicine applications due to their unique ability to self-renew or differentiate to any somatic cell type. Before the full potential of hPSCs can be realized, robust protocols must be developed to direct their fate. Cell fate decisions are based on components of the surrounding microenvironment, including soluble factors, substrate or extracellular matrix, cell-cell interactions, mechanical forces, and 2D or 3D architecture. Depending on their spatio-temporal context, these components can signal hPSCs to either self-renew or differentiate to cell types of the ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm. Researchers working at the interface of engineering and biology have identified various factors which can affect hPSC fate, often based on lessons from embryonic development, and they have utilized this information to design in vitro niches which can reproducibly direct hPSC fate. This review highlights culture systems that have been engineered to promote self-renewal or differentiation of hPSCs, with a focus on studies that have elucidated the contributions of specific microenvironmental cues in the context of those culture systems. We propose the use of microsystem technologies for high-throughput screening of spatial-temporal presentation of cues, as this has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for differentiating hPSCs to desired cell types.

  15. The linear interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic noises ensures a high accuracy of cell fate selection in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongkai; Yi, Ming; Zou, Xiufen

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the mechanisms of cell fate decision in a noisy environment, the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on cell fate are explored at the single cell level. Specifically, we theoretically define the impulse of Cln1/2 as an indication of cell fates. The strong dependence between the impulse of Cln1/2 and cell fates is exhibited. Based on the simulation results, we illustrate that increasing intrinsic fluctuations causes the parallel shift of the separation ratio of Whi5P but that increasing extrinsic fluctuations leads to the mixture of different cell fates. Our quantitative study also suggests that the strengths of intrinsic and extrinsic noises around an approximate linear model can ensure a high accuracy of cell fate selection. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the selection of cell fates is an entropy-decreasing process. In addition, we reveal that cell fates are significantly correlated with the range of entropy decreases. PMID:25042292

  16. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M. Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R.; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A.; Anversa, Piero

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction. PMID:17965233

  17. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A; Anversa, Piero

    2007-11-06

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction.

  18. Time-variant clustering model for understanding cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Cao, Xiaoyi; Biase, Fernando H.; Yu, Pengfei; Zhong, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Both spatial characteristics and temporal features are often the subjects of concern in physical, social, and biological studies. This work tackles the clustering problems for time course data in which the cluster number and clustering structure change with respect to time, dubbed time-variant clustering. We developed a hierarchical model that simultaneously clusters the objects at every time point and describes the relationships of the clusters between time points. The hidden layer of this model is a generalized form of branching processes. A reversible-jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo method was implemented for model inference, and a feature selection procedure was developed. We applied this method to explore an open question in preimplantation embryonic development. Our analyses using single-cell gene expression data suggested that the earliest cell fate decision could start at the 4-cell stage in mice, earlier than the commonly thought 8- to 16-cell stage. These results together with independent experimental data from single-cell RNA-seq provided support against a prevailing hypothesis in mammalian development. PMID:25339442

  19. MicroRNAs in embryonic stem cell function and fate

    PubMed Central

    Tiscornia, Gustavo; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the early 1990s, microRNAs (miRs) have gone from initially being considered an oddity to being recognized as a level of gene expression regulation that is integral to the normal function of cells and organisms. They are implicated in many if not all biological processes in animals, from apoptosis and cell signaling to organogenesis and development. Our understanding of cell regulatory states, as determined primarily by transcription factor (TF) profiles, is incomplete without consideration of the corresponding miR profile. The miR complement of a cell provides robust and redundant control over the output of hundreds of possible targets for each miR. miRs are common components of regulatory pathways, and in some cases can constitute on–off switches that regulate crucial fate decisions. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about the biogenesis and regulation of miRs and describe their involvement in the pathways that regulate cell division, pluripotency, and reprogramming to the pluripotent state. PMID:21159814

  20. Nanomaterials for regulating cancer and stem cell fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Birju P.

    The realm of nanomedicine has grown exponentially over the past few decades. However, there are several obstacles that need to be overcome, prior to the wide-spread clinical applications of these nanoparticles, such as (i) developing well-defined nanoparticles of varying size, morphology and composition to enable various clinical applications; (ii) overcome various physiological barriers encountered in order to deliver the therapeutics to the target location; and (iii) real-time monitoring of the nano-therapeutics within the human body for tracking their uptake, localization and effect. Hence, this dissertation focuses on developing multimodal nanotechnology-based approaches to overcome the above-mentioned challenges and thus enable regulation of cancer and stem cell fate. The initial part of this dissertation describes the development of multimodal magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCNPs), comprised of a highly magnetic core surrounded by a thin gold shell, thus combining magnetic and plasmonic properties. These nanoparticles were utilized for mainly two applications: (i) Magnetically-facilitated delivery of siRNA and plasmid DNA for effective stem cell differentiation and imaging and (ii) Combined hyperthermia and targeted delivery of a mitochondria-targeting peptide for enhancing apoptosis in cancer cells. The following part of this dissertation presents the generation of a multi-functional cyclodextrin-conjugated polymeric delivery platform (known as DexAMs), for co-delivery of anticancer drugs and siRNAs in a target-specific manner to brain tumor cells. This combined delivery of chemotherapeutics and siRNA resulted in a synergistic effect on the apoptosis of brain tumor cells, as compared to the individual treatments. The final part of this thesis presents development of stimuli-responsive uorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mesoporous silica nanoparticles for real-time monitoring of drug release in cells. The stimuli-responsive behavior of

  1. Fate choice of post-natal mesoderm progenitors: skeletal versus cardiac muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Duelen, Robin; Sahakyan, Vardine; Perini, Ilaria; Palazzolo, Giacomo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2014-02-01

    Regenerative medicine for skeletal and cardiac muscles still constitutes a fascinating and ambitious frontier. In this perspective, understanding the possibilities of intrinsic cell plasticity, present in post-natal muscles, is vital to define and improve novel therapeutic strategies for acute and chronic diseases. In addition, many somatic stem cells are now crossing the boundaries of basic/translational research to enter the first clinical trials. However, it is still an open question whether a lineage switch between skeletal and cardiac adult myogenesis is possible. Therefore, this review focuses on resident somatic stem cells of post-natal skeletal and cardiac muscles and their plastic potential toward the two lineages. Furthermore, examples of myogenic lineage switch in adult stem cells are also reported and discussed.

  2. Generation of bivalent chromatin domains during cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In self-renewing, pluripotent cells, bivalent chromatin modification is thought to silence (H3K27me3) lineage control genes while 'poising' (H3K4me3) them for subsequent activation during differentiation, implying an important role for epigenetic modification in directing cell fate decisions. However, rather than representing an equivalently balanced epigenetic mark, the patterns and levels of histone modifications at bivalent genes can vary widely and the criteria for identifying this chromatin signature are poorly defined. Results Here, we initially show how chromatin status alters during lineage commitment and differentiation at a single well characterised bivalent locus. In addition we have determined how chromatin modifications at this locus change with gene expression in both ensemble and single cell analyses. We also show, on a global scale, how mRNA expression may be reflected in the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K27me3. Conclusions While truly 'poised' bivalently modified genes may exist, the original hypothesis that all bivalent genes are epigenetically premarked for subsequent expression might be oversimplistic. In fact, from the data presented in the present work, it is equally possible that many genes that appear to be bivalent in pluripotent and multipotent cells may simply be stochastically expressed at low levels in the process of multilineage priming. Although both situations could be considered to be forms of 'poising', the underlying mechanisms and the associated implications are clearly different. PMID:21645363

  3. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  4. Mitophagy-driven mitochondrial rejuvenation regulates stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Van den Haute, Chris; Cufí, Sílvia; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Lopez-Bonet, Eugeni; Rodriguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Joven, Jorge; Baekelandt, Veerle; Menendez, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding on how selective mitochondrial autophagy, or mitophagy, can sustain the archetypal properties of stem cells is incomplete. PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) plays a key role in the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function and in the selective degradation of damaged mitochondria by mitophagy. Here, using embryonic fibroblasts from PINK1 gene-knockout (KO) mice, we evaluated whether mitophagy is a causal mechanism for the control of cell-fate plasticity and maintenance of pluripotency. Loss of PINK1-dependent mitophagy was sufficient to dramatically decrease the speed and efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming. Mitophagy-deficient iPSC colonies, which were characterized by a mixture of mature and immature mitochondria, seemed unstable, with a strong tendency to spontaneously differentiate and form heterogeneous populations of cells. Although mitophagy-deficient iPSC colonies normally expressed pluripotent markers, functional monitoring of cellular bioenergetics revealed an attenuated glycolysis in mitophagy-deficient iPSC cells. Targeted metabolomics showed a notable alteration in numerous glycolysis- and TCA-related metabolites in mitophagy-deficient iPSC cells, including a significant decrease in the intracellular levels of α-ketoglutarate -a key suppressor of the differentiation path in stem cells. Mitophagy-deficient iPSC colonies exhibited a notably reduced teratoma-initiating capacity, but fully retained their pluripotency and multi-germ layer differentiation capacity in vivo. PINK1-dependent mitophagy pathway is an important mitochondrial switch that determines the efficiency and quality of somatic reprogramming. Mitophagy-driven mitochondrial rejuvenation might contribute to the ability of iPSCs to suppress differentiation by directing bioenergetic transition and metabolome remodeling traits. These findings provide new insights into how mitophagy might influence the stem cell decisions to retain

  5. Fate and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFevre, Gregory Hallett

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the fate of hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention areas and those mechanisms that affect hydrocarbon fate in such systems. Seventy-five samples from 58 bioretention areas were collected and analyzed to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) residual and biodegradation functional genes. TPH residual in bioretention areas was greater than background sites but low overall (<3 µg/kg), and well below either the TPH concentration of concern or the expected concentration, assuming no losses. Bioretention areas with deep-root vegetation contained significantly greater quantites of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and two functional genes involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Field soils were capable of mineralizing naphthalene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) when incubated in the laboratory. In an additional laboratory investigation, a column study was initiated to comprehensively determine naphthalene fate in a simulated bioretention cell using a 14C-labeled tracer. Sorption to soil was the greatest sink of naphthalene in the columns, although biodegradation and vegetative uptake were also important loss mechanisms. Little leaching occurred following the first flush, and volatilization was insignificant. Significant enrichment of naphthalene degrading bacteria occurred over the course of the experiment as a result of naphthalene exposure. This was evident from enhanced naphthalene biodegradation kinetics (measured via batch tests), significant increases in naphthalene dioxygenase gene quantities, and a significant correlation observed between naphthalene residual and biodegradation functional genes. Vegetated columns outperformed the unplanted control column in terms of total naphthalene removal and biodegradation kinetics. As a result of these experiments, a final study focused on why planted systems outperform unplanted systems was conducted. Plant root exudates were harvested from hydroponic setups for three

  6. Notch signal strength controls cell fate in the haemogenic endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Norton, Leonor; Ferrando, Eva; Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Liu, Zenhy; Guiu, Jordi; Islam, Abul B. M. M. K.; Lee, Sung-Uk; Yan, Minhong; Guidos, Cynthia J.; López-Bigas, Nuria; Maeda, Takahiro; Espinosa, Lluis; Kopan, Raphael; Bigas, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of the arterial and haemogenic endothelium fates concurrently occur in the aorta–gonad–mesonephros (AGM) region prior to haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) generation. The arterial programme depends on Dll4 and the haemogenic endothelium/HSC on Jag1-mediated Notch1 signalling. How Notch1 distinguishes and executes these different programmes in response to particular ligands is poorly understood. By using two Notch1 activation trap mouse models with different sensitivity, here we show that arterial endothelial cells and HSCs originate from distinct precursors, characterized by different Notch1 signal strengths. Microarray analysis on AGM subpopulations demonstrates that the Jag1 ligand stimulates low Notch strength, inhibits the endothelial programme and is permissive for HSC specification. In the absence of Jag1, endothelial cells experience high Dll4-induced Notch activity and select the endothelial programme, thus precluding HSC formation. Interference with the Dll4 signal by ligand-specific blocking antibodies is sufficient to inhibit the endothelial programme and favour specification of the haematopoietic lineage. PMID:26465397

  7. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn; Richard, Stéphane

    2017-02-01

    Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7(CreERT2) causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis.

  8. IGFBP-3: a cell fate pivot in cancer and disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael A; Firth, Sue M

    2014-10-01

    One of the hallmarks in the advancement of cancer cells is an ability to overcome and acquire resistance to adverse conditions. There has been a large amount of cancer research on IGFBP-3 as a pro-apoptotic molecule in vitro. These pro-apoptotic properties, however, do not correlate with several studies linking high IGFBP-3 levels in breast cancer tissue to rapid growth and poor prognosis. Evidence is emerging that IGFBP-3 also exhibits pro-survival and growth-promoting properties in vitro. How IGFBP-3 pivots cell fate to either death or survival, it seems, comes down to a complex interplay between cells' microenvironments and the presence of cellular IGFBP-3 binding partners and growth factor receptors. The cytoprotective actions of IGFBP-3 are not restricted to cancer but are also observed in other disease states, such as retinopathy and brain ischaemia. Here we review the literature on this paradoxical nature of IGFBP-3, its pro-apoptotic and growth-inhibitory actions versus its cytoprotective and growth-potentiating properties, and discuss the implications of targeting IGFBP-3 for treatment of disease.

  9. Endothelial cells direct mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle cell fate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cho-Hao; Lilly, Brenda

    2014-11-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms.

  10. Multiple signalling pathways establish cell fate and cell number in Drosophila malpighian tubules.

    PubMed

    Wan, S; Cato, A M; Skaer, H

    2000-01-01

    A unique cell, the tip mother cell, arises in the primordium of each Drosophila Malpighian tubule by lateral inhibition within a cluster of achaete-expressing cells. This cell maintains achaete expression and divides to produce daughters of equivalent potential, of which only one, the tip cell, adopts the primary fate and continues to express achaete, while in the other, the sibling cell, achaete expression is lost (M. Hoch et al., 1994, Development 120, 3439-3450). In this paper we chart the mechanisms by which achaete expression is differentially maintained in the tip cell lineage to stabilise cell fate. First, wingless is required to maintain the expression of achaete in the tubule primordium so that wingless mutants lack tip cells. Conversely, increasing wingless expression results in the persistence of achaete expression in the cell cluster. Second, Notch signalling is restricted by the asymmetric segregation of Numb, as the tip mother cell divides, so that achaete expression is maintained only in the tip cell. In embryos mutant for Notch tip cells segregate at the expense of sibling cells, whereas in numb neither daughter cell adopts the tip cell fate resulting in tubules with two sibling cells. Conversely, when numb is overexpressed two tip cells segregate and tubules have no sibling cells. Analysis of cell proliferation in the developing tubules of embryos lacking Wingless after the critical period for tip cell allocation reveals an additional requirement for wingless for the promotion of cell division. In contrast, alteration in the expression of numb has no effect on the final tubule cell number.

  11. Small molecules, big roles -- the chemical manipulation of stem cell fate and somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Wenlin; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng

    2012-12-01

    Despite the great potential of stem cells for basic research and clinical applications, obstacles - such as their scarce availability and difficulty in controlling their fate - need to be addressed to fully realize their potential. Recent achievements of cellular reprogramming have enabled the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or other lineage-committed cells from more accessible and abundant somatic cell types by defined genetic factors. However, serious concerns remain about the efficiency and safety of current genetic approaches to cell reprogramming and traditional culture systems that are used for stem cell maintenance. As a complementary approach, small molecules that target specific signaling pathways, epigenetic processes and other cellular processes offer powerful tools for manipulating cell fate to a desired outcome. A growing number of small molecules have been identified to maintain the self-renewal potential of stem cells, to induce lineage differentiation and to facilitate reprogramming by increasing the efficiency of reprogramming or by replacing genetic reprogramming factors. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations of the effects of these chemicals also provide new biological insights. Here, we examine recent achievements in the maintenance of stem cells, including pluripotent and lineage-specific stem cells, and in the control of cell fate conversions, including iPSC reprogramming, conversion of primed to naïve pluripotency, and transdifferentiation, with an emphasis on manipulation with small molecules.

  12. Cell–cell interaction networks regulate blood stem and progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Kirouac, Daniel C; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Yu, Mei; Sykes, Edward A; Ito, Caryn; Zandstra, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Communication networks between cells and tissues are necessary for homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Intercellular (between cell) communication networks are particularly relevant in stem cell biology, as stem cell fate decisions (self-renewal, proliferation, lineage specification) are tightly regulated based on physiological demand. We have developed a novel mathematical model of blood stem cell development incorporating cell-level kinetic parameters as functions of secreted molecule-mediated intercellular networks. By relation to quantitative cellular assays, our model is capable of predictively simulating many disparate features of both normal and malignant hematopoiesis, relating internal parameters and microenvironmental variables to measurable cell fate outcomes. Through integrated in silico and experimental analyses, we show that blood stem and progenitor cell fate is regulated by cell–cell feedback, and can be controlled non-cell autonomously by dynamically perturbing intercellular signalling. We extend this concept by demonstrating that variability in the secretion rates of the intercellular regulators is sufficient to explain heterogeneity in culture outputs, and that loss of responsiveness to cell–cell feedback signalling is both necessary and sufficient to induce leukemic transformation in silico. PMID:19638974

  13. Choice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jay

    2008-09-01

    Understanding how and why analysands make the choices they do is central to both the clinical and the theoretical projects of psychoanalysis. And yet we know very little about the process of choice or about the relationship between choices and motives. A striking parallel is to be found between the ways choice is narrated in ancient Greek texts and the experience of analysts as they observe patients making choices in everyday clinical work. Pursuing this convergence of classical and contemporary sensibilities will illuminate crucial elements of the various meanings of choice, and of the way that these meanings change over the course of psychoanalytic treatment.

  14. Myf5 haploinsufficiency reveals distinct cell fate potentials for adult skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Chrétien, Fabrice; Jory, Aurélie; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Negroni, Elisa; Flamant, Patricia; Soubigou, Guillaume; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Di Santo, James; Cumano, Ana; Mouly, Vincent; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2012-04-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cell fate in adult mice is regulated by crucial transcription factors, including the determination genes Myf5 and Myod. The precise role of Myf5 in regulating quiescent muscle stem cells has remained elusive. Here we show that most, but not all, quiescent satellite cells express Myf5 protein, but at varying levels, and that resident Myf5 heterozygous muscle stem cells are more primed for myogenic commitment compared with wild-type satellite cells. Paradoxically however, heterotypic transplantation of Myf5 heterozygous cells into regenerating muscles results in higher self-renewal capacity compared with wild-type stem cells, whereas myofibre regenerative capacity is not altered. By contrast, Pax7 haploinsufficiency does not show major modifications by transcriptome analysis. These observations provide a mechanism linking Myf5 levels to muscle stem cell heterogeneity and fate by exposing two distinct and opposing phenotypes associated with Myf5 haploinsufficiency. These findings have important implications for how stem cell fates can be modulated by crucial transcription factors while generating a pool of responsive heterogeneous cells.

  15. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL2-quenching dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a CD4 T cell subset that is important for supporting plasma cell and germinal center (GC) responses1,2. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days following activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells (DCs), though how DCs promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood1,2. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR51,2, the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the B cell follicle–T zone interface has been unclear3–5. Here we show that the G-protein coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the follicle–T zone interface. In this location they interact with activated DCs and are exposed to Tfh cell-promoting ICOS ligand. IL2 is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation6–10. We demonstrate that activated DCs in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL2 receptor α chain, and quenching T cell-derived IL2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in DCs have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T cell-dependent plasma cell and GC responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for DC-derived CD25 in controlling IL2 availability and T cell differentiation. PMID:27147029

  16. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  17. T Cell Fate at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Veit R; Schumacher, Ton N M; Busch, Dirk H

    2016-05-20

    T cell responses display two key characteristics. First, a small population of epitope-specific naive T cells expands by several orders of magnitude. Second, the T cells within this proliferating population take on diverse functional and phenotypic properties that determine their ability to exert effector functions and contribute to T cell memory. Recent technological advances in lineage tracing allow us for the first time to study these processes in vivo at single-cell resolution. Here, we summarize resulting data demonstrating that although epitope-specific T cell responses are reproducibly similar at the population level, expansion potential and diversification patterns of the offspring derived from individual T cells are highly variable during both primary and recall immune responses. In spite of this stochastic response variation, individual memory T cells can serve as adult stem cells that provide robust regeneration of an epitope-specific tissue through population averaging. We discuss the relevance of these findings for T cell memory formation and clinical immunotherapy.

  18. Multipotent versus differentiated cell fate selection in the developing Drosophila airways

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryo; Hosono, Chie; Samakovlis, Christos; Saigo, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Developmental potentials of cells are tightly controlled at multiple levels. The embryonic Drosophila airway tree is roughly subdivided into two types of cells with distinct developmental potentials: a proximally located group of multipotent adult precursor cells (P-fate) and a distally located population of more differentiated cells (D-fate). We show that the GATA-family transcription factor (TF) Grain promotes the P-fate and the POU-homeobox TF Ventral veinless (Vvl/Drifter/U-turned) stimulates the D-fate. Hedgehog and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling cooperate with Vvl to drive the D-fate at the expense of the P-fate while negative regulators of either of these signaling pathways ensure P-fate specification. Local concentrations of Decapentaplegic/BMP, Wingless/Wnt, and Hedgehog signals differentially regulate the expression of D-factors and P-factors to transform an equipotent primordial field into a concentric pattern of radially different morphogenetic potentials, which gradually gives rise to the distal-proximal organization of distinct cell types in the mature airway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09646.001 PMID:26633813

  19. Control of stem cell fate by engineering their micro and nanoenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle F; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are capable of long-term self-renewal and differentiation into specialised cell types, making them an ideal candidate for a cell source for regenerative medicine. The control of stem cell fate has become a major area of interest in the field of regenerative medicine and therapeutic intervention. Conventional methods of chemically inducing stem cells into specific lineages is being challenged by the advances in biomaterial technology, with evidence highlighting that material properties are capable of driving stem cell fate. Materials are being designed to mimic the clues stem cells receive in their in vivo stem cell niche including topographical and chemical instructions. Nanotopographical clues that mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo have shown to regulate stem cell differentiation. The delivery of ECM components on biomaterials in the form of short peptides sequences has also proved successful in directing stem cell lineage. Growth factors responsible for controlling stem cell fate in vivo have also been delivered via biomaterials to provide clues to determine stem cell differentiation. An alternative approach to guide stem cells fate is to provide genetic clues including delivering DNA plasmids and small interfering RNAs via scaffolds. This review, aims to provide an overview of the topographical, chemical and molecular clues that biomaterials can provide to guide stem cell fate. The promising features and challenges of such approaches will be highlighted, to provide directions for future advancements in this exciting area of stem cell translation for regenerative medicine. PMID:25621104

  20. Nanoscale Assemblies of Small Molecules Control the Fate of Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junfeng; Xu, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Being driven by non-covalent interactions, the formation of functional assemblies (or aggregates) of small molecules at nanoscale is a more common process in water than one would think. While most efforts on self-assembly in cellular environment concentrate on the assemblies of proteins (e.g., microtubules or amyloid fibers), nanoscale assemblies of small molecules are emerging functional entities that exhibit important biological function in cellular environments. This review describes the increasing efforts on the exploration of nanoscale assemblies of small molecules that largely originate from the serendipitous observations in research fields other than nanoscience and technology. Specifically, we describe that nanoscale assemblies of small molecules exhibit unique biological functions in extracellular and intracellular environment, thus inducing various cellular responses, like causing cell death or promoting cell proliferation. We first survey certain common feature of nanoscale molecular assemblies, then discuss several specific examples, such as, nanoscale assemblies of small peptides accumulated in the cells for selectively inhibiting cancer cells via promiscuous interactions with proteins, and nanoscale assemblies of a glycoconjugate for promoting the proliferation of stem cells or for suppressing immune responses. Subsequently, we emphasize the spatiotemporal control of nanoscale assemblies for controlling the cell fate, particularly illustrate a paradigm-shifting approach-enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), that is, the integration of enzymatic reaction and self-assembly-for generating nanoscale assemblies from innocuous monomers for selectively inhibiting cancer cells. Moreover, we introduce a convenient assay for proteomic study of the proteins that interact with nanoscale assemblies of small molecules in cellular environment. Furthermore, we introduce the use of ligand-receptor interaction to catalyze the formation of nanoscale assemblies. By

  1. T cell fate and clonality inference from single cell transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Proserpio, Valentina; Clare, Simon; Speak, Anneliese O.; Dougan, Gordon; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The enormous sequence diversity within T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires allows specific TCR sequences to be used as lineage markers for T cells that derive from a common progenitor. We have developed a computational method, called TraCeR, to reconstruct full-length, paired TCR sequences from T lymphocyte single-cell RNA-seq by combining existing assembly and alignment programs with “combinatorial recombinome” sequences comprising all possible TCR combinations. We validate this method to quantify its accuracy and sensitivity. Inferred TCR sequences reveal clonal relationships between T cells whilst the cells’ complete transcriptional landscapes can be quantified from the remaining RNA-seq data. This provides a powerful tool to link T cell specificity with functional response and we demonstrate this by determining the distribution of members of expanded T cell clonotypes in a mouse Salmonella infection model. Members of the same clonotype span early activated CD4+ T cells, as well as mature effector and memory cells. PMID:26950746

  2. Arginine Methylation by PRMT1 Regulates Muscle Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Roméo Sébastien; Vogel, Gillian; Li, Xing; Yu, Zhenbao; Li, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quiescent muscle stem cells (MSCs) become activated in response to skeletal muscle injury to initiate regeneration. Activated MSCs proliferate and differentiate to repair damaged fibers or self-renew to maintain the pool and ensure future regeneration. The balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation is a tightly regulated process controlled by a genetic cascade involving determinant transcription factors such as Pax7, Myf5, MyoD, and MyoG. Recently, there have been several reports about the role of arginine methylation as a requirement for epigenetically mediated control of muscle regeneration. Here we report that the protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is expressed in MSCs and that conditional ablation of PRMT1 in MSCs using Pax7CreERT2 causes impairment of muscle regeneration. Importantly, PRMT1-deficient MSCs have enhanced cell proliferation after injury but are unable to terminate the myogenic differentiation program, leading to regeneration failure. We identify the coactivator of Six1, Eya1, as a substrate of PRMT1. We show that PRMT1 methylates Eya1 in vitro and that loss of PRMT1 function in vivo prevents Eya1 methylation. Moreover, we observe that PRMT1-deficient MSCs have reduced expression of Eya1/Six1 target MyoD due to disruption of Eya1 recruitment at the MyoD promoter and subsequent Eya1-mediated coactivation. These findings suggest that arginine methylation by PRMT1 regulates muscle stem cell fate through the Eya1/Six1/MyoD axis. PMID:27849571

  3. “The role of T cell receptor signaling thresholds in guiding T cell fate decisions”

    PubMed Central

    Zikherman, Julie; Au-Yeung, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Canonical T cell receptor signal transduction has been extensively studied and dissected in cell lines and primary lymphocytes. However, a static depiction of this signaling cascade fails to capture the complex and dynamic process by which individual T cells discriminate TCR:peptide-MHC affinity, then integrate signals over time to drive discrete cellular behaviors such as thymic selection, proliferation, and cytokine production. Recent technological advances have made it possible to study complex lymphocyte behavior on a single cell level and are revealing how T cells interpret information about affinity and abundance of antigen in order to make life-and-death cell fate decisions individually and collectively. PMID:25660212

  4. Msx2 alters the timing of retinal ganglion cells fate commitment and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wang, Jian-Tao

    2010-05-14

    Timing of cell fate commitment determines distinct retinal cell types, which is believed to be controlled by a tightly coordinated regulatory program of proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation. Although homeobox protein Msx2 could induce apoptosis of optic vesicle, it is unclear whether Msx2 regulates differentiation and cell fate commitment of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In this study, we show that overexpression of Msx2 transiently suppressed the expression of Cyclin D1 and blocked cell proliferation. Meanwhile, overexpression of Msx2 delayed the expression of RGC-specific differentiation markers (Math5 and Brn3b), which showed that Msx2 could affect the timing of RGCs fate commitment and differentiation by delaying the timing of cell cycle exit of retinal progenitors. These results indicate Msx2 possesses dual regulatory functions in controlling cell cycle progression of retinal RPCs and timing of RGCs differentiation.

  5. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor controls cell-fate decisions in B cells.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Yewdell, William T; Angeletti, Davide; Yen, Wei-Feng; Wheatley, Adam K; Bradfield, Christopher A; McDermott, Adrian B; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    Generation of cellular heterogeneity is an essential feature of the adaptive immune system. This is best exemplified during humoral immune response when an expanding B cell clone assumes multiple cell fates, including class-switched B cells, antibody-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. Although each cell type is essential for immunity, their generation must be exquisitely controlled because a class-switched B cell cannot revert back to the parent isotype, and a terminally differentiated plasma cell cannot contribute to the memory pool. In this study, we show that an environmental sensor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is highly induced upon B cell activation and serves a critical role in regulating activation-induced cell fate outcomes. We find that AhR negatively regulates class-switch recombination ex vivo by altering activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression. We further demonstrate that AhR suppresses class switching in vivo after influenza virus infection and immunization with model antigens. In addition, by regulating Blimp-1 expression via Bach2, AhR represses differentiation of B cells into plasmablasts ex vivo and antibody-secreting plasma cells in vivo. These experiments suggest that AhR serves as a molecular rheostat in B cells to brake the effector response, possibly to facilitate optimal recall responses. Thus, AhR might represent a novel molecular target for manipulation of B cell responses during vaccination.

  6. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    PubMed Central

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  7. Notch signaling alters sensory or neuronal cell fate specification of inner ear stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Fujioka, Masato; Kim, Shi-Chan; Edge, Albert S B

    2011-06-08

    Multipotent progenitor cells in the otic placode give rise to the specialized cell types of the inner ear, including neurons, supporting cells, and hair cells. The mechanisms governing acquisition of specific fates by the cells that form the cochleovestibular organs remain poorly characterized. Here we show that whereas blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor increased the conversion of inner ear stem cells to hair cells by a mechanism that involved the upregulation of bHLH transcription factor, Math1 (mouse Atoh1), differentiation to a neuronal lineage was increased by expression of the Notch intracellular domain. The shift to a neuronal lineage could be attributed in part to continued cell proliferation in cells that did not undergo sensory cell differentiation due to the high Notch signaling, but also involved upregulation of Ngn1. The Notch intracellular domain influenced Ngn1 indirectly by upregulation of Sox2, a transcription factor expressed in many neural progenitor cells, and directly by an interaction with an RBP-J binding site in the Ngn1 promoter/enhancer. The induction of Ngn1 was blocked partially by mutation of the RBP-J site and nearly completely when the mutation was combined with inhibition of Sox2 expression. Thus, Notch signaling had a significant role in the fate specification of neurons and hair cells from inner ear stem cells, and decisions about cell fate were mediated in part by a differential effect of combinatorial signaling by Notch and Sox2 on the expression of bHLH transcription factors.

  8. Blastomeres show differential fate changes in 8-cell Xenopus laevis embryos that are rotated 90 degrees before first cleavage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Wang, H. Z.

    1998-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of dorsal axis specification, the alteration in dorsal cell fate of cleavage stage blastomeres in axis-respecified Xenopus laevis embryos was investigated. Fertilized eggs were rotated 90 degrees with the sperm entry point up or down with respect to the gravitational field. At the 8-cell stage, blastomeres were injected with the lineage tracers, Texas Red- or FITC-Dextran Amines. The distribution of the labeled progeny was mapped at the tail-bud stages (stages 35-38) and compared with the fate map of an 8-cell embryo raised in a normal orientation. As in the normal embryos, each blastomere in the rotated embryos has a characteristic and predictable cell fate. After 90 degrees rotation the blastomeres in the 8-cell stage embryo roughly switched their position by 90 degrees, but the fate of the blastomeres did not simply show a 90 degrees switch appropriate for their new location. Four types of fate change were observed: (i) the normal fate of the blastomere is conserved with little change; (ii) the normal fate is completely changed and a new fate is adopted according to the blastomere's new position: (iii) the normal fate is completely changed, but the new fate is not appropriate for its new position; and (4) the blastomere partially changed its fate and the new fate is a combination of its original fate and a fate appropriate to its new location. According to the changed fates, the blastomeres that adopt dorsal fates were identified in rotated embryos. This identification of dorsal blastomeres provides basic important information for further study of dorsal signaling in Xenopus embryos.

  9. Oriented divisions, fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott E.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    During development, the establishment of proper tissue architecture depends upon the coordinated control of cell divisions not only in space and time, but also direction. Execution of an oriented cell division requires establishment of an axis of polarity and alignment of the mitotic spindle along this axis. Frequently, the cleavage plane also segregates fate determinants, either unequally or equally between daughter cells, the outcome of which is either an asymmetric or symmetric division, respectively. The last few years have witnessed tremendous growth in understanding both the extrinsic and intrinsic cues that position the mitotic spindle, the varied mechanisms in which the spindle orientation machinery is controlled in diverse organisms and organ systems, and the manner in which the division axis influences the signaling pathways that direct cell fate choices. PMID:24021274

  10. Memory of cell shape biases stochastic fate decision-making despite mitotic rounding

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Takashi; Chen, Cong; Sato, Tetsuo; Merks, Roeland M. H.; Sato, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Cell shape influences function, and the current model suggests that such shape effect is transient. However, cells dynamically change their shapes, thus, the critical question is whether shape information remains influential on future cell function even after the original shape is lost. We address this question by integrating experimental and computational approaches. Quantitative live imaging of asymmetric cell-fate decision-making and their live shape manipulation demonstrates that cellular eccentricity of progenitor cell indeed biases stochastic fate decisions of daughter cells despite mitotic rounding. Modelling and simulation indicates that polarized localization of Delta protein instructs by the progenitor eccentricity is an origin of the bias. Simulation with varying parameters predicts that diffusion rate and abundance of Delta molecules quantitatively influence the bias. These predictions are experimentally validated by physical and genetic methods, showing that cells exploit a mechanism reported herein to influence their future fates based on their past shape despite dynamic shape changes. PMID:27349214

  11. Metabolism and the Control of Cell Fate Decisions and Stem Cell Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Although the stem cells of various tissues remain in the quiescent state to maintain their undifferentiated state, they also undergo cell divisions as required, and if necessary, even a single stem cell is able to provide for lifelong tissue homeostasis. Stem cell populations are precisely controlled by the balance between their symmetric and asymmetric divisions, with their division patterns determined by whether the daughter cells involved retain their self-renewal capacities. Recent studies have reported that metabolic pathways and the distribution of mitochondria are regulators of the division balance of stem cells and that metabolic defects can shift division balance toward symmetric commitment, which leads to stem cell exhaustion. It has also been observed that in asymmetric division, old mitochondria, which are central metabolic organelles, are segregated to the daughter cell fated to cell differentiation, whereas in symmetric division, young and old mitochondria are equally distributed between both daughter cells. Thus, metabolism and mitochondrial biology play important roles in stem cell fate decisions. As these decisions directly affect tissue homeostasis, understanding their regulatory mechanisms in the context of cellular metabolism is critical. PMID:27482603

  12. Choose your destiny: Make a cell fate decision with COUP-TFII.

    PubMed

    Wu, San-Pin; Yu, Cheng-Tai; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2016-03-01

    Cell fate specification is a critical process to generate cells with a wide range of characteristics from stem and progenitor cells. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the orphan nuclear receptor COUP-TFII serves as a key regulator in determining the cell identity during embryonic development. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on molecular mechanisms by which COUP-TFII employs to define the cell fates, with special emphasis on cardiovascular and renal systems. These novel insights pave the road for future studies of regenerative medicine.

  13. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  14. Engineering of a synthetic quadrastable gene network to approach Waddington landscape and cell fate determination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuqing; Su, Ri-Qi; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xiao

    2017-04-11

    The process of cell fate determination has been depicted intuitively as cells travelling and resting on a rugged landscape, which has been probed by various theoretical studies. However, few studies have experimentally demonstrated how underlying gene regulatory networks shape the landscape and hence orchestrate cellular decision-making in the presence of both signal and noise. Here we tested different topologies and verified a synthetic gene circuit with mutual inhibition and auto-activations to be quadrastable, which enables direct study of quadruple cell fate determination on an engineered landscape. We show that cells indeed gravitate towards local minima and signal inductions dictate cell fates through modulating the shape of the multistable landscape. Experiments, guided by model predictions, reveal that sequential inductions generate distinct cell fates by changing landscape in sequence and hence navigating cells to different final states. This work provides a synthetic biology framework to approach cell fate determination and suggests a landscape-based explanation of fixed induction sequences for targeted differentiation.

  15. Harnessing nanotopography and integrin-matrix interactions to influence stem cell fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O. C.

    2014-06-01

    Stem cells respond to nanoscale surface features, with changes in cell growth and differentiation mediated by alterations in cell adhesion. The interaction of nanotopographical features with integrin receptors in the cells' focal adhesions alters how the cells adhere to materials surfaces, and defines cell fate through changes in both cell biochemistry and cell morphology. In this Review, we discuss how cell adhesions interact with nanotopography, and we provide insight as to how materials scientists can exploit these interactions to direct stem cell fate and to understand how the behaviour of stem cells in their niche can be controlled. We expect knowledge gained from the study of cell-nanotopography interactions to accelerate the development of next-generation stem cell culture materials and implant interfaces, and to fuel discovery of stem cell therapeutics to support regenerative therapies.

  16. Harnessing nanotopography and integrin-matrix interactions to influence stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Matthew J; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-06-01

    Stem cells respond to nanoscale surface features, with changes in cell growth and differentiation mediated by alterations in cell adhesion. The interaction of nanotopographical features with integrin receptors in the cells' focal adhesions alters how the cells adhere to materials surfaces, and defines cell fate through changes in both cell biochemistry and cell morphology. In this Review, we discuss how cell adhesions interact with nanotopography, and we provide insight as to how materials scientists can exploit these interactions to direct stem cell fate and to understand how the behaviour of stem cells in their niche can be controlled. We expect knowledge gained from the study of cell-nanotopography interactions to accelerate the development of next-generation stem cell culture materials and implant interfaces, and to fuel discovery of stem cell therapeutics to support regenerative therapies.

  17. Role of Geminin in cell fate determination of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Ohno, Yoshinori; Shirasu, Naoto; Zhang, Bo; Suzuki-Takedachi, Kyoko; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-09-01

    Geminin exerts two distinct molecular roles. Geminin negatively regulates DNA replication licensing through the direct interaction with Cdt1 to prevent re-replication in proliferating cells. Geminin also regulates chromatin remodeling through the direct interaction with Brahma/Brg1 to maintain undifferentiated states of stem cells. We previously uncovered that Polycomb-group complex 1 and Hoxb4/Hoxa9, well-known intrinsic factors that are essential for maintaining the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, alternatively act as ubiquitin-proteasome systems for Geminin protein to reduce the protein expression level, and sustain the HSC activity. Thus, Geminin is presumed to play an important role in determining cell fate, i.e., turning on and off cellular quiescence and proliferation/differentiation, in HSCs. We recently generated recombinant cell-penetrating Geminin (CP-Geminin), enabling rapid incorporation and withdraw of Geminin protein in cells. CP-Geminin may be useful in regulating the cell cycle and chromatin configuration. In this article, we summarize current information on the molecular functions of Geminin and the regulatory system for Geminin protein expression, and argue for the molecular role of Geminin in cell fate determination of HSCs, and future perspective of a new technology for manipulating the activities of HSCs and cancer stem cells (CSCs).

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate: Applying Biomaterials for Control of Stem Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Hilary J.; Sahoo, Jugal Kishore; Ulijn, Rein V.; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The materials pipeline for biomaterials and tissue engineering applications is under continuous development. Specifically, there is great interest in the use of designed materials in the stem cell arena as materials can be used to manipulate the cells providing control of behavior. This is important as the ability to “engineer” complexity and subsequent in vitro growth of tissues and organs is a key objective for tissue engineers. This review will describe the nature of the materials strategies, both static and dynamic, and their influence specifically on mesenchymal stem cell fate. PMID:27242999

  19. Noninvasive Assessment of Cell Fate and Biology in Transplanted Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Federico; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, molecular imaging has become a conditio sine qua non for cell-based regenerative medicine. Developments in molecular imaging techniques, such as reporter gene technology, have increasingly enabled the noninvasive assessment of the fate and biology of cells after cardiovascular applications. In this context, bioluminescence imaging is the most commonly used imaging modality in small animal models of preclinical studies. Here, we present a detailed protocol of a reporter gene imaging approach for monitoring the viability and biology of Mesenchymal Stem Cells transplanted in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

  20. Regulation of monocyte cell fate by blood vessels mediated by Notch signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Giagnorio, Roberto; Jussofie, Jasmin; Soehnlein, Oliver; Duchene, Johan; Briseño, Carlos G.; Ramasamy, Saravana K.; Krishnasamy, Kashyap; Limbourg, Anne; Kapanadze, Tamar; Ishifune, Chieko; Hinkel, Rabea; Radtke, Freddy; Strobl, Lothar J.; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; Napp, L. Christian; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Yasutomo, Koji; Kupatt, Christian; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Adams, Ralf H.; Weber, Christian; Limbourg, Florian P.

    2016-01-01

    A population of monocytes, known as Ly6Clo monocytes, patrol blood vessels by crawling along the vascular endothelium. Here we show that endothelial cells control their origin through Notch signalling. Using combinations of conditional genetic deletion strategies and cell-fate tracking experiments we show that Notch2 regulates conversion of Ly6Chi monocytes into Ly6Clo monocytes in vivo and in vitro, thereby regulating monocyte cell fate under steady-state conditions. This process is controlled by Notch ligand delta-like 1 (Dll1) expressed by a population of endothelial cells that constitute distinct vascular niches in the bone marrow and spleen in vivo, while culture on recombinant DLL1 induces monocyte conversion in vitro. Thus, blood vessels regulate monocyte conversion, a form of committed myeloid cell fate regulation. PMID:27576369

  1. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-06

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly.

  2. Stem cell decisions: a twist of fate or a niche market?

    PubMed

    Januschke, Jens; Näthke, Inke

    2014-10-01

    Establishing and maintaining cell fate in the right place at the right time is a key requirement for normal tissue maintenance. Stem cells are at the core of this process. Understanding how stem cells balance self-renewal and production of differentiating cells is key for understanding the defects that underpin many diseases. Both, external cues from the environment and cell intrinsic mechanisms can control the outcome of stem cell division. The role of the orientation of stem cell division has emerged as an important mechanism for specifying cell fate decisions. Although, the alignment of cell divisions can dependent on spatial cues from the environment, maintaining stemness is not always linked to positioning of stem cells in a particular microenvironment or `niche'. Alternate mechanisms that could contribute to cellular memory include differential segregation of centrosomes in asymmetrically dividing cells.

  3. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M.

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  4. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  5. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia. PMID:26699486

  6. Human Induced Pluripotent Cell-Derived Sensory Neurons for Fate Commitment of Bone Marrow-Derived Schwann Cells: Implications for Remyelination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sa; Han, Lei; Ao, Qiang; Chan, Ying-Shing; Shum, Daisy Kwok-Yan

    2016-09-14

    : Strategies that exploit induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to derive neurons have relied on cocktails of cytokines and growth factors to bias cell-signaling events in the course of fate choice. These are often costly and inefficient, involving multiple steps. In this study, we took an alternative approach and selected 5 small-molecule inhibitors of key signaling pathways in an 8-day program to induce differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, reaching ≥80% yield in terms of marker proteins. Continuing culture in maintenance medium resulted in neuronal networks immunopositive for synaptic vesicle markers and vesicular glutamate transporters suggestive of excitatory neurotransmission. Subpopulations of the derived neurons were electrically excitable, showing tetrodotoxin-sensitive action potentials in patch-clamp experiments. Coculture of the derived neurons with rat Schwann cells under myelinating conditions resulted in upregulated levels of neuronal neuregulin 1 type III in conjunction with the phosphorylated receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3, consistent with amenability of the neuritic network to myelination. As surrogates of embryonic dorsal root ganglia neurons, the derived sensory neurons provided contact-dependent cues to commit bone marrow-derived Schwann cell-like cells to the Schwann cell fate. Our rapid and efficient induction protocol promises not only controlled differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, but also utility in the translation to a protocol whereby human bone marrow-derived Schwann cells become available for autologous transplantation and remyelination therapy.

  7. "Choice" and destiny: the substrate composition and mechanical stability of settlement structures can mediate coral recruit fate in post-bleached reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Shreya; Rathod, Pooja; Alcoverro, Teresa; Arthur, Rohan

    2016-03-01

    Increasingly frequent and intense ocean warming events seriously test the buffer and recovery capacities of tropical coral reefs. Post-disturbance, available settlement structures on a reef (often dead coral skeletons) vary considerably in their mechanical stability and substrate composition, critically influencing coral recruit settlement choice and fate. In the wake of a coral mass mortality in the Lakshadweep archipelago, we examine (1) the relative availability of recruit settlement structures (from stable to unstable: reef platform, dead massive coral, consolidated rubble, dead corymbose coral, dead tabular coral, and unconsolidated rubble) in 12 recovering reefs across three atolls in the archipelago, (2) the substrate composition [crustose coralline algae (CCA), mixed turf, macroalgae] of these structural forms, and (3) whether the choice and fate of young coral are mediated by the substrate and stability of different structural forms. For this, we measured the abundance and distribution of recruit (<1 cm), juvenile (1-5 cm), and young adult (5-10) corals of 24 common coral genera. Four years after the mass mortality, reefs differed considerably in composition of settlement structures. The structures themselves varied significantly in substrate cover with dead tables largely covered in CCA [60 ± 6.05 % (SE)] and dead corymbose coral dominated by mixed turf (61.83 ± 3.8 %). The youngest visible recruits (<1 cm) clearly preferred CCA-rich structures such as dead massives and tables. However, older size classes were rarely found on unstable structures (strongly "avoiding" tables, Ivlev's electivity index, E = -0.5). Our results indicate that while substrate cover might mediate coral choice, the mechanical stability of settlement structures is critical in determining post-settlement coral survival. The composition and availability of settlement structures on a reef may serve as a characteristic signature of its recovery potential, aiding in assessments of reef

  8. An Atlas of Network Topologies Reveals Design Principles for Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Precursor Cell Fate Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xianfeng; Tang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The vulval precursor cell (VPC) fate patterning in Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic model experimental system for cell fate determination and patterning in development. Despite its apparent simplicity (six neighboring cells arranged in one dimension) and many experimental and computational efforts, the patterning strategy and mechanism remain controversial due to incomplete knowledge of the complex biology. Here, we carry out a comprehensive computational analysis and obtain a reservoir of all possible network topologies that are capable of VPC fate patterning under the simulation of various biological environments and regulatory rules. We identify three patterning strategies: sequential induction, morphogen gradient and lateral antagonism, depending on the features of the signal secreted from the anchor cell. The strategy of lateral antagonism, which has not been reported in previous studies of VPC patterning, employs a mutual inhibition of the 2° cell fate in neighboring cells. Robust topologies are built upon minimal topologies with basic patterning strategies and have more flexible and redundant implementations of modular functions. By simulated mutation, we find that all three strategies can reproduce experimental error patterns of mutants. We show that the topology derived by mapping currently known biochemical pathways to our model matches one of our identified functional topologies. Furthermore, our robustness analysis predicts a possible missing link related to the lateral antagonism strategy. Overall, we provide a theoretical atlas of all possible functional networks in varying environments, which may guide novel discoveries of the biological interactions in vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans and related species.

  9. Logic programming to predict cell fate patterns and retrodict genotypes in organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Benjamin A.; Jackson, Ethan; Hajnal, Alex; Fisher, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development is a paradigm system for understanding cell differentiation in the process of organogenesis. Through temporal and spatial controls, the fate pattern of six cells is determined by the competition of the LET-23 and the Notch signalling pathways. Modelling cell fate determination in vulval development using state-based models, coupled with formal analysis techniques, has been established as a powerful approach in predicting the outcome of combinations of mutations. However, computing the outcomes of complex and highly concurrent models can become prohibitive. Here, we show how logic programs derived from state machines describing the differentiation of C. elegans vulval precursor cells can increase the speed of prediction by four orders of magnitude relative to previous approaches. Moreover, this increase in speed allows us to infer, or ‘retrodict’, compatible genomes from cell fate patterns. We exploit this technique to predict highly variable cell fate patterns resulting from dig-1 reduced-function mutations and let-23 mosaics. In addition to the new insights offered, we propose our technique as a platform for aiding the design and analysis of experimental data. PMID:24966232

  10. The fog-3 gene and regulation of cell fate in the germ line of Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.; Kimble, J.

    1995-02-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, germ cells normally adopt one of three fates: mitosis, spermatogenesis or oogenesis. We have identified and characterized the gene fog-3, which is required for germ cells to differentiate as sperm rather than as oocytes. Analysis of double mutants suggests that fog-3 is absolutely required for spermatogenesis and acts at the end of the regulatory hierarchy controlling sex determination for the germ line. By contrast, mutations in fog-3 do not alter the sexual identity of other tissues. We also have characterized the null phenotype of fog-1, another gene required for spermatogenesis; we demonstrate that it too controls the sexual identity of germ cells but not of other tissues. Finally, we have studied the same interaction of these two fog genes with gld-1, a gene required for germ cells to undergo oogenesis rather than mitosis. On the basis of these results, we propose that germ-cell fate might be controlled by a set of inhibitory interactions among genes that specify one of three fates: mitosis, spermatogenesis or oogenesis. Such a regulatory network would link the adoption of one germ-cell fate to the suppression of the other two. 68 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Logic programming to predict cell fate patterns and retrodict genotypes in organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Benjamin A; Jackson, Ethan; Hajnal, Alex; Fisher, Jasmin

    2014-09-06

    Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development is a paradigm system for understanding cell differentiation in the process of organogenesis. Through temporal and spatial controls, the fate pattern of six cells is determined by the competition of the LET-23 and the Notch signalling pathways. Modelling cell fate determination in vulval development using state-based models, coupled with formal analysis techniques, has been established as a powerful approach in predicting the outcome of combinations of mutations. However, computing the outcomes of complex and highly concurrent models can become prohibitive. Here, we show how logic programs derived from state machines describing the differentiation of C. elegans vulval precursor cells can increase the speed of prediction by four orders of magnitude relative to previous approaches. Moreover, this increase in speed allows us to infer, or 'retrodict', compatible genomes from cell fate patterns. We exploit this technique to predict highly variable cell fate patterns resulting from dig-1 reduced-function mutations and let-23 mosaics. In addition to the new insights offered, we propose our technique as a platform for aiding the design and analysis of experimental data.

  12. The Fog-3 Gene and Regulation of Cell Fate in the Germ Line of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R. E.; Kimble, J.

    1995-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, germ cells normally adopt one of three fates: mitosis, spermatogenesis or oogenesis. We have identified and characterized the gene fog-3, which is required for germ cells to differentiate as sperm rather than as oocytes. Analysis of double mutants suggests that fog-3 is absolutely required for spermatogenesis and acts at the end of the regulatory hierarchy controlling sex determination for the germ line. By contrast, mutations in fog-3 do not alter the sexual identity of other tissues. We also have characterized the null phenotype of fog-1, another gene required for spermatogenesis; we demonstrate that it too controls the sexual identity of germ cells but not of other tissues. Finally, we have studied the interaction of these two fog genes with gld-1, a gene required for germ cells to undergo oogenesis rather than mitosis. On the basis of these results, we propose that germ-cell fate might be controlled by a set of inhibitory interactions among genes that specify one of three fates: mitosis, spermatogenesis or oogenesis. Such a regulatory network would link the adoption of one germ-cell fate to the suppression of the other two. PMID:7713418

  13. An Atlas of Network Topologies Reveals Design Principles for Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Precursor Cell Fate Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Xianfeng; Tang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The vulval precursor cell (VPC) fate patterning in Caenorhabditis elegans is a classic model experimental system for cell fate determination and patterning in development. Despite its apparent simplicity (six neighboring cells arranged in one dimension) and many experimental and computational efforts, the patterning strategy and mechanism remain controversial due to incomplete knowledge of the complex biology. Here, we carry out a comprehensive computational analysis and obtain a reservoir of all possible network topologies that are capable of VPC fate patterning under the simulation of various biological environments and regulatory rules. We identify three patterning strategies: sequential induction, morphogen gradient and lateral antagonism, depending on the features of the signal secreted from the anchor cell. The strategy of lateral antagonism, which has not been reported in previous studies of VPC patterning, employs a mutual inhibition of the 2° cell fate in neighboring cells. Robust topologies are built upon minimal topologies with basic patterning strategies and have more flexible and redundant implementations of modular functions. By simulated mutation, we find that all three strategies can reproduce experimental error patterns of mutants. We show that the topology derived by mapping currently known biochemical pathways to our model matches one of our identified functional topologies. Furthermore, our robustness analysis predicts a possible missing link related to the lateral antagonism strategy. Overall, we provide a theoretical atlas of all possible functional networks in varying environments, which may guide novel discoveries of the biological interactions in vulval development of Caenorhabditis elegans and related species. PMID:26114587

  14. The roles and regulation of Sertoli cells in fate determinations of spermatogonial stem cells and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hai, Yanan; Hou, Jingmei; Liu, Yun; Liu, Yang; Yang, Hao; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process by which spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew and differentiate into spermatozoa under the elaborate coordination of testicular microenvironment, namely, niche. Sertoli cells, which locate around male germ cells, are the most critical component of the niche. Significant progress has recently been made by peers and us on uncovering the effects of Sertoli cells on regulating fate determinations of SSCs. Here we addressed the roles and regulation of Sertoli cells in normal and abnormal spermatogenesis. Specifically, we summarized the biological characteristics of Sertoli cells, and we emphasized the roles of Sertoli cells in mediating the self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, de-differentiation, and trans-differentiation of SSCs. The association between abnormal function of Sertoli cells and impaired spermatogenesis was discussed. Finally, we highlighted several issues to be addressed for further investigation on the effects and mechanisms of Sertoli cells in spermatogenesis. Since Sertoli cells are the key supportive cells for SSCs and they are very receptive to modification, a better understanding of the roles and regulation of Sertoli cells in SSC biology and spermatogenesis would make it feasible to identify novel targets for gene therapy of male infertility as well as seek more efficient and safer strategies for male contraception.

  15. Regulation of Stem Cell Fate by ROS-mediated Alteration of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jung Min; Lee, Hyun Jik; Jung, Young Hyun; Lee, Ki Hoon; Kim, Dah Ihm; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Ko, So Hee; Choi, Gee Euhn; Chai, Ing Ing; Song, Eun Ju; Oh, Ji Young; Lee, Sei-Jung; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have attracted much attention due to their distinct features that support infinite self-renewal and differentiation into the cellular derivatives of three lineages. Recent studies have suggested that many stem cells both embryonic and adult stem cells reside in a specialized niche defined by hypoxic condition. In this respect, distinguishing functional differences arising from the oxygen concentration is important in understanding the nature of stem cells and in controlling stem cell fate for therapeutic purposes. ROS act as cellular signaling molecules involved in the propagation of signaling and the translation of environmental cues into cellular responses to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is mediated by the coordination of various cellular processes, and to adapt cellular activity to available bioenergetic sources. Thus, in this review, we describe the physiological role of ROS in stem cell fate and its effect on the metabolic regulation of stem cells. PMID:26019752

  16. The ETS domain transcriptional repressor Anterior open inhibits MAP kinase and Wingless signaling to couple tracheal cell fate with branch identity.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, Sara; Luschnig, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Cells at the tips of budding branches in the Drosophila tracheal system generate two morphologically different types of seamless tubes. Terminal cells (TCs) form branched lumenized extensions that mediate gas exchange at target tissues, whereas fusion cells (FCs) form ring-like connections between adjacent tracheal metameres. Each tracheal branch contains a specific set of TCs, FCs, or both, but the mechanisms that select between the two tip cell types in a branch-specific fashion are not clear. Here, we show that the ETS domain transcriptional repressor anterior open (aop) is dispensable for directed tracheal cell migration, but plays a key role in tracheal tip cell fate specification. Whereas aop globally inhibits TC and FC specification, MAPK signaling overcomes this inhibition by triggering degradation of Aop in tip cells. Loss of aop function causes excessive FC and TC specification, indicating that without Aop-mediated inhibition, all tracheal cells are competent to adopt a specialized fate. We demonstrate that Aop plays a dual role by inhibiting both MAPK and Wingless signaling, which induce TC and FC fate, respectively. In addition, the branch-specific choice between the two seamless tube types depends on the tracheal branch identity gene spalt major, which is sufficient to inhibit TC specification. Thus, a single repressor, Aop, integrates two different signals to couple tip cell fate selection with branch identity. The switch from a branching towards an anastomosing tip cell type may have evolved with the acquisition of a main tube that connects separate tracheal primordia to generate a tubular network.

  17. Tributyltin affects adipogenic cell fate commitment in mesenchymal stem cells by a PPARγ independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Ronald; Fischer, Bernd; Blüher, Matthias; Navarrete Santos, Anne

    2014-05-05

    The food contaminant tributyltin (TBT) is an endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) promoting adipogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Although prenatal TBT exposure has been shown to induce obesity, the underlying mechanisms and the role of the transcription factor PPARγ are not clarified yet. At different stages of adipogenesis, multipotent murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), C3H10T1/2, were exposed to TBT and analyzed for adipogenic differentiation, PPARγ promoter activation and PPARγ1, PPARγ2, Pref-1 and SOX9 expression. Depending on the exposure window, TBT promoted subsequent adipogenesis independently and dependently from PPARγ. In undifferentiated MSC, TBT exposure induced a transcriptional PPARγ-independent repression of Pref-1 and SOX9, which are both suppressors of adipogenic cell fate commitment. During hormonal induction TBT additionally enhanced adipogenic differentiation by PPARγ signaling. The impact of TBT on early cell fate development documents a novel mechanistic insight in the development of adipocytes derived from MSC and its susceptibility to EDC.

  18. Nanotopographical Surfaces for Stem Cell Fate Control: Engineering Mechanobiology from the Bottom

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Shao, Yue; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Gang; Fu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Summary During embryogenesis and tissue maintenance and repair in an adult organism, a myriad of stem cells are regulated by their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) enriched with tissue/organ-specific nanoscale topographical cues to adopt different fates and functions. Attributed to their capability of self-renewal and differentiation into most types of somatic cells, stem cells also hold tremendous promise for regenerative medicine and drug screening. However, a major challenge remains as to achieve fate control of stem cells in vitro with high specificity and yield. Recent exciting advances in nanotechnology and materials science have enabled versatile, robust, and large-scale stem cell engineering in vitro through developments of synthetic nanotopographical surfaces mimicking topological features of stem cell niches. In addition to generating new insights for stem cell biology and embryonic development, this effort opens up unlimited opportunities for innovations in stem cell-based applications. This review is therefore to provide a summary of recent progress along this research direction, with perspectives focusing on emerging methods for generating nanotopographical surfaces and their applications in stem cell research. Furthermore, we provide a review of classical as well as emerging cellular mechano-sensing and -transduction mechanisms underlying stem cell nanotopography sensitivity and also give some hypotheses in regard to how a multitude of signaling events in cellular mechanotransduction may converge and be integrated into core pathways controlling stem cell fate in response to extracellular nanotopography. PMID:25883674

  19. Xenopus Bsx links daily cell cycle rhythms and pineal photoreceptor fate.

    PubMed

    D'Autilia, Silvia; Broccoli, Vania; Barsacchi, Giuseppina; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano

    2010-04-06

    In the developing central nervous system, the cell cycle clock plays a crucial role in determining cell fate specification. A second clock, the circadian oscillator, generates daily rhythms of cell cycle progression. Although these two clocks interact, the mechanisms linking circadian cell cycle progression and cell fate determination are still poorly understood. A convenient system to address this issue is the pineal organ of lower vertebrates, which contains only two neuronal types, photoreceptors and projection neurons. In particular, photoreceptors constitute the core of the pineal circadian system, being able to transduce daily light inputs into the rhythmical production of melatonin. However, the genetic program leading to photoreceptor fate largely remains to be deciphered. Here, we report a previously undescribed function for the homeobox gene Bsx in controlling pineal proliferation and photoreceptor fate in Xenopus. We show that Xenopus Bsx (Xbsx) is expressed rhythmically in postmitotic photoreceptor precursors, reaching a peak during the night, with a cycle that is complementary to the daily rhythms of S-phase entry displayed by pineal cells. Xbsx knockdown results in increased night levels of pineal proliferation, whereas activation of a GR-Xbsx protein flattens the daily rhythms of S-phase entry to the lowest level. Furthermore, evidence is presented that Xbsx is necessary and sufficient to promote a photoreceptor fate. Altogether, these data indicate that Xbsx plays a dual role in contributing to shape the profile of the circadian cell cycle progression and in the specification of pineal photoreceptors, thus acting as a unique link between these two events.

  20. Molecular circuitry of stem cell fate in skeletal muscle regeneration, ageing, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Almada, Albert E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite cells are adult myogenic stem cells that function to repair damaged muscle. The enduring capacity for muscle regeneration requires efficient satellite cell expansion after injury, differentiation to produce myoblasts that can reconstitute damaged fibers, and self-renewal to replenish the muscle stem cell pool for subsequent rounds of injury and repair. Emerging studies indicate that misregulations of satellite cell fate and function contribute to age-associated muscle dysfunction and influence the severity of muscle diseases, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). It has also become apparent that satellite cell fate during muscle regeneration, aging, and in the context of DMD is governed by an intricate network of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators. Targeted manipulation of this network may offer unique opportunities for muscle regenerative medicine. PMID:26956195

  1. Changes in rRNA transcription influence proliferation and cell fate within a stem cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Shalaby, Nevine A; Buszczak, Michael

    2014-01-17

    Ribosome biogenesis drives cell growth and proliferation, but mechanisms that modulate this process within specific lineages remain poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila RNA polymerase I (Pol I) regulatory complex composed of Under-developed (Udd), TAF1B, and a TAF1C-like factor. Disruption of udd or TAF1B results in reduced ovarian germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation. Female GSCs display high levels of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, and Udd becomes enriched in GSCs relative to their differentiating daughters. Increasing Pol I transcription delays differentiation, whereas reducing rRNA production induces both morphological changes that accompany multicellular cyst formation and specific decreased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway component Mad. These findings demonstrate that modulating rRNA synthesis fosters changes in the cell fate, growth, and proliferation of female Drosophila GSCs and their daughters.

  2. Antigen availability determines CD8+ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P.; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mazo, Irina B.; Haining, William N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary T cells are activated by antigen (Ag) bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in 3 phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8+ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, while higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation, but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12h and 24h. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  3. Engineering Cell Instructive Materials To Control Cell Fate and Functions through Material Cues and Surface Patterning.

    PubMed

    Ventre, Maurizio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-22

    Mastering the interaction between cells and extracellular environment is a fundamental prerequisite in order to engineer functional biomaterial interfaces able to instruct cells with specific commands. Such advanced biomaterials might find relevant application in prosthesis design, tissue engineering, diagnostics and stem cell biology. Because of the highly complex, dynamic, and multifaceted context, a thorough understanding of the cell-material crosstalk has not been achieved yet; however, a variety of material features including biological cues, topography, and mechanical properties have been proved to impact the strength and the nature of the cell-material interaction, eventually affecting cell fate and functions. Although the nature of these three signals may appear very different, they are equated by their participation in the same material-cytoskeleton crosstalk pathway as they regulate cell adhesion events. In this work we present recent and relevant findings on the material-induced cell responses, with a particular emphasis on how the presentation of biochemical/biophysical signals modulates cell behavior. Finally, we summarize and discuss the literature data to draw out unifying elements concerning cell recognition of and reaction to signals displayed by material surfaces.

  4. Sumoylated NHR-25/NR5A Regulates Cell Fate during C. elegans Vulval Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Teresita; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Asahina, Masako; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual metazoan transcription factors (TFs) regulate distinct sets of genes depending on cell type and developmental or physiological context. The precise mechanisms by which regulatory information from ligands, genomic sequence elements, co-factors, and post-translational modifications are integrated by TFs remain challenging questions. Here, we examine how a single regulatory input, sumoylation, differentially modulates the activity of a conserved C. elegans nuclear hormone receptor, NHR-25, in different cell types. Through a combination of yeast two-hybrid analysis and in vitro biochemistry we identified the single C. elegans SUMO (SMO-1) as an NHR-25 interacting protein, and showed that NHR-25 is sumoylated on at least four lysines. Some of the sumoylation acceptor sites are in common with those of the NHR-25 mammalian orthologs SF-1 and LRH-1, demonstrating that sumoylation has been strongly conserved within the NR5A family. We showed that NHR-25 bound canonical SF-1 binding sequences to regulate transcription, and that NHR-25 activity was enhanced in vivo upon loss of sumoylation. Knockdown of smo-1 mimicked NHR-25 overexpression with respect to maintenance of the 3° cell fate in vulval precursor cells (VPCs) during development. Importantly, however, overexpression of unsumoylatable alleles of NHR-25 revealed that NHR-25 sumoylation is critical for maintaining 3° cell fate. Moreover, SUMO also conferred formation of a developmental time-dependent NHR-25 concentration gradient across the VPCs. That is, accumulation of GFP-tagged NHR-25 was uniform across VPCs at the beginning of development, but as cells began dividing, a smo-1-dependent NHR-25 gradient formed with highest levels in 1° fated VPCs, intermediate levels in 2° fated VPCs, and low levels in 3° fated VPCs. We conclude that sumoylation operates at multiple levels to affect NHR-25 activity in a highly coordinated spatial and temporal manner. PMID:24348269

  5. Gcn5 determines the fate of Drosophila germline stem cells through degradation of Cyclin A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqi; Wang, Qi; Li, Wenqing; Mao, Feiyu; Yue, Shanshan; Liu, Sun; Liu, Xiaona; Xiao, Shan; Xia, Laixin

    2017-02-10

    The fluctuating CDK-CYCLIN complex plays a general role in cell-cycle control. Many types of stem cells use unique features of the cell cycle to facilitate asymmetric division. However, the manner in which these features are established remains poorly understood. The cell cycle of Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs) is characterized by short G1 and very long G2 phases, making it an excellent model for the study of cell cycle control in stem cell fate determination. Using a Drosophila female GSCs model, we found Gcn5, the first discovered histone acetyltransferase, to maintain germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries. Results showed that Gcn5 is dispensable for the transcriptional silencing of bam, but interacts with Cyclin A to facilitate proper turnover in GSCs. Results also showed that Gcn5 promotes Cyclin A ubiquitination, which is dependent on its acetylating activity. Finally, results showed that knockdown of Cyclin A rescued the GSC-loss phenotype caused by lack of Gcn5. Collectively, these findings support the conclusion that Gcn5 acts through acetylation to facilitate Cyclin A ubiquitination and proper turnover, thereby determining the fate of GSCs.-Liu, T., Wang, Q., Li, W., Mao, F., Yue, S., Liu, S., Liu, X., Xiao, S., Xia, L. Gcn5 determines the fate of Drosophila germline stem cells through degradation of Cyclin A.

  6. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Mark A; Nelson, Celeste M; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R; Stampfer, Martha R; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-09-19

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell-cell versus cell-ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages.

  7. Drosophila Condensin II subunit Chromosome-associated protein D3 regulates cell fate determination through non-cell-autonomous signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klebanow, Lindsey R.; Peshel, Emanuela C.; Schuster, Andrew T.; De, Kuntal; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lenoir, Jessica J.; Moore, Adrian W.; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of the Drosophila melanogaster adult wing is heavily influenced by the expression of proteins that dictate cell fate decisions between intervein and vein during development. dSRF (Blistered) expression in specific regions of the larval wing disc promotes intervein cell fate, whereas EGFR activity promotes vein cell fate. Here, we report that the chromatin-organizing protein CAP-D3 acts to dampen dSRF levels at the anterior/posterior boundary in the larval wing disc, promoting differentiation of cells into the anterior crossvein. CAP-D3 represses KNOT expression in cells immediately adjacent to the anterior/posterior boundary, thus blocking KNOT-mediated repression of EGFR activity and preventing cell death. Maintenance of EGFR activity in these cells depresses dSRF levels in the neighboring anterior crossvein progenitor cells, allowing them to differentiate into vein cells. These findings uncover a novel transcriptional regulatory network influencing Drosophila wing vein development, and are the first to identify a Condensin II subunit as an important regulator of EGFR activity and cell fate determination in vivo. PMID:27317808

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions are regulated by Wnt antagonists: comparisons and current controversies.

    PubMed

    Cain, Corey J; Manilay, Jennifer O

    2013-01-01

    Wingless and int (Wnt) proteins are secreted proteins that are important for regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the bone marrow microenvironment in mice. The mechanisms by which Wnt signaling regulates these hematopoietic cell fate decisions are not fully understood. Secreted Wnt antagonists, which are expressed in bone and bone marrow stromal cells, either bind to Wnt ligands directly or block Wnt receptors and co-receptors to halt Wnt-mediated signal transduction in both osteolineage and hematopoietic cell types. Secreted frizzled related proteins-1 and -2, Wnt inhibitory factor-1, Dickkopf-1, and Sclerostin are Wnt antagonists that influence hematopoietic cell fate decisions in the bone marrow niche. In this review, we compare and contrast the roles of these Wnt antagonists and their effects on hematopoietic development in mice, and also discuss the clinical significance of targeting Wnt antagonists within the context of hematopoietic disease.

  9. Transcriptional control of stem cell fate by E2Fs and pocket proteins

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Lisa M.; Blais, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    E2F transcription factors and their regulatory partners, the pocket proteins (PPs), have emerged as essential regulators of stem cell fate control in a number of lineages. In mammals, this role extends from both pluripotent stem cells to those encompassing all embryonic germ layers, as well as extra-embryonic lineages. E2F/PP-mediated regulation of stem cell decisions is highly evolutionarily conserved, and is likely a pivotal biological mechanism underlying stem cell homeostasis. This has immense implications for organismal development, tissue maintenance, and regeneration. In this article, we discuss the roles of E2F factors and PPs in stem cell populations, focusing on mammalian systems. We discuss emerging findings that position the E2F and PP families as widespread and dynamic epigenetic regulators of cell fate decisions. Additionally, we focus on the ever expanding landscape of E2F/PP target genes, and explore the possibility that E2Fs are not simply regulators of general ‘multi-purpose’ cell fate genes but can execute tissue- and cell type-specific gene regulatory programs. PMID:25972892

  10. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates in cancer and stem/progenitor cell pedigrees with competing risks analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, J. A.; Hallett, R. M.; der Mauer, S. Auf; Motazedian, A.; Schroeder, T.; Draper, J. S.; Harvey, R. P.; Nordon, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular control of cell fate and behaviour is a central theme in biology. Inherent heterogeneity within cell populations requires that control of cell fate is studied at the single-cell level. Time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking are powerful technologies for acquiring cell lifetime data, allowing quantification of how cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors control single-cell fates over time. However, cell lifetime data contain complex features. Competing cell fates, censoring, and the possible inter-dependence of competing fates, currently present challenges to modelling cell lifetime data. Thus far such features are largely ignored, resulting in loss of data and introducing a source of bias. Here we show that competing risks and concordance statistics, previously applied to clinical data and the study of genetic influences on life events in twins, respectively, can be used to quantify intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates. Using these statistics we demonstrate that 1) breast cancer cell fate after chemotherapy is dependent on p53 genotype; 2) granulocyte macrophage progenitors and their differentiated progeny have concordant fates; and 3) cytokines promote self-renewal of cardiac mesenchymal stem cells by symmetric divisions. Therefore, competing risks and concordance statistics provide a robust and unbiased approach for evaluating hypotheses at the single-cell level. PMID:27250534

  11. Relationship between nanotopographical alignment and stem cell fate with live imaging and shape analysis

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter; Galenano-Niño, Jorge Luis; Graney, Pamela; Razal, Joselito M.; Minett, Andrew I.; Ribas, João; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Biro, Maté; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    The topography of a biomaterial regulates cellular interactions and determine stem cell fate. A complete understanding of how topographical properties affect cell behavior will allow the rational design of material surfaces that elicit specified biological functions once placed in the body. To this end, we fabricate substrates with aligned or randomly organized fibrous nanostructured topographies. Culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), we explore the dynamic relationship between the alignment of topography, cell shape and cell differentiation to osteogenic and myogenic lineages. We show aligned topographies differentiate cells towards a satellite cell muscle progenitor state - a distinct cell myogenic lineage responsible for postnatal growth and repair of muscle. We analyze cell shape between the different topographies, using fluorescent time-lapse imaging over 21 days. In contrast to previous work, this allows the direct measurement of cell shape at a given time rather than defining the morphology of the underlying topography and neglecting cell shape. We report quantitative metrics of the time-based morphological behaviors of cell shape in response to differing topographies. This analysis offers insights into the relationship between topography, cell shape and cell differentiation. Cells differentiating towards a myogenic fate on aligned topographies adopt a characteristic elongated shape as well as the alignment of cells. PMID:27910868

  12. Relationship between nanotopographical alignment and stem cell fate with live imaging and shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Peter; Galenano-Niño, Jorge Luis; Graney, Pamela; Razal, Joselito M.; Minett, Andrew I.; Ribas, João; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Biro, Maté; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-12-01

    The topography of a biomaterial regulates cellular interactions and determine stem cell fate. A complete understanding of how topographical properties affect cell behavior will allow the rational design of material surfaces that elicit specified biological functions once placed in the body. To this end, we fabricate substrates with aligned or randomly organized fibrous nanostructured topographies. Culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), we explore the dynamic relationship between the alignment of topography, cell shape and cell differentiation to osteogenic and myogenic lineages. We show aligned topographies differentiate cells towards a satellite cell muscle progenitor state - a distinct cell myogenic lineage responsible for postnatal growth and repair of muscle. We analyze cell shape between the different topographies, using fluorescent time-lapse imaging over 21 days. In contrast to previous work, this allows the direct measurement of cell shape at a given time rather than defining the morphology of the underlying topography and neglecting cell shape. We report quantitative metrics of the time-based morphological behaviors of cell shape in response to differing topographies. This analysis offers insights into the relationship between topography, cell shape and cell differentiation. Cells differentiating towards a myogenic fate on aligned topographies adopt a characteristic elongated shape as well as the alignment of cells.

  13. Computational cell fate modelling for discovery of rewiring in apoptotic network for enhanced cancer drug sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shital K; Bhowmick, Sourav S; Chua, Huey; Zhang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing cancer research has shown that malignant tumour cells have highly disrupted signalling transduction pathways. In cancer cells, signalling pathways are altered to satisfy the demands of continuous proliferation and survival. The changes in signalling pathways supporting uncontrolled cell growth, termed as rewiring, can lead to dysregulation of cell fates e.g. apoptosis. Hence comparative analysis of normal and oncogenic signal transduction pathways may provide insights into mechanisms of cancer drug-resistance and facilitate the discovery of novel and effective anti-cancer therapies. Here we propose a hybrid modelling approach based on ordinary differential equation (ODE) and machine learning to map network rewiring in the apoptotic pathways that may be responsible for the increase of drug sensitivity of tumour cells in triple-negative breast cancer. Our method employs Genetic Algorithm to search for the most likely network topologies by iteratively generating simulated protein phosphorylation data using ODEs and the rewired network and then fitting the simulated data with real data of cancer signalling and cell fate. Most of our predictions are consistent with experimental evidence from literature. Combining the strengths of knowledge-driven and data-driven approaches, our hybrid model can help uncover molecular mechanisms of cancer cell fate at systems level.

  14. TOO MANY MOUTHS promotes cell fate progression in stomatal development of Arabidopsis stems.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Neela S; Veley, Kira M; Nadeau, Jeanette A; Lucas, Jessica R; Bhave, Sanjay L; Sack, Fred D

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), which encodes a receptor-like protein, cause stomatal patterning defects in Arabidopsis leaves but eliminate stomatal formation in stems. Stomatal development in wild-type and tmm stems was analyzed to define TMM function. Epidermal cells in young tmm stems underwent many asymmetric divisions characteristic of entry into the stomatal pathway. The resulting precursor cells, meristemoids, appropriately expressed cell fate markers such as pTMM:GFP. However, instead of progressing developmentally by forming a guard mother cell, the meristemoids arrested, dedifferentiated, and enlarged. Thus asymmetric divisions are necessary but not sufficient for stomatal formation in stems, and TMM promotes the fate and developmental progression of early precursor cells. Comparable developmental and mature stomatal phenotypes were also found in tmm hypocotyls and in the proximal flower stalk. TMM is also a positive regulator of meristemoid division in leaves suggesting that TMM generally promotes meristemoid activity. Our results are consistent with a model in which TMM interacts with other proteins to modulate precursor cell fate and progression in an organ and domain-specific manner. Finally, the consistent presence of a small number of dedifferentiated meristemoids in mature wild-type stems suggests that precursor cell arrest is a normal feature of Arabidopsis stem development.

  15. Human mammary progenitor cell fate decisions are products of interactions with combinatorial microenvironments†

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Villadsen, Rene; Fridriksdottir, Agla; Ruth, Jason R.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Petersen, Ole W.

    2010-01-01

    In adult tissues, multi-potent progenitor cells are some of the most primitive members of the developmental hierarchies that maintain homeostasis. That progenitors and their more mature progeny share identical genomes, suggests that fate decisions are directed by interactions with extrinsic soluble factors, ECM, and other cells, as well as physical properties of the ECM. To understand regulation of fate decisions, therefore, would require a means of understanding carefully choreographed combinatorial interactions. Here we used microenvironment protein microarrays to functionally identify combinations of cell-extrinsic mammary gland proteins and ECM molecules that imposed specific cell fates on bipotent human mammary progenitor cells. Micropatterned cell culture surfaces were fabricated to distinguish between the instructive effects of cell–cell versus cell–ECM interactions, as well as constellations of signaling molecules; and these were used in conjunction with physiologically relevant 3 dimensional human breast cultures. Both immortalized and primary human breast progenitors were analyzed. We report on the functional ability of those proteins of the mammary gland that maintain quiescence, maintain the progenitor state, and guide progenitor differentiation towards myoepithelial and luminal lineages. PMID:20023793

  16. Computational cell fate modelling for discovery of rewiring in apoptotic network for enhanced cancer drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing cancer research has shown that malignant tumour cells have highly disrupted signalling transduction pathways. In cancer cells, signalling pathways are altered to satisfy the demands of continuous proliferation and survival. The changes in signalling pathways supporting uncontrolled cell growth, termed as rewiring, can lead to dysregulation of cell fates e.g. apoptosis. Hence comparative analysis of normal and oncogenic signal transduction pathways may provide insights into mechanisms of cancer drug-resistance and facilitate the discovery of novel and effective anti-cancer therapies. Here we propose a hybrid modelling approach based on ordinary differential equation (ODE) and machine learning to map network rewiring in the apoptotic pathways that may be responsible for the increase of drug sensitivity of tumour cells in triple-negative breast cancer. Our method employs Genetic Algorithm to search for the most likely network topologies by iteratively generating simulated protein phosphorylation data using ODEs and the rewired network and then fitting the simulated data with real data of cancer signalling and cell fate. Most of our predictions are consistent with experimental evidence from literature. Combining the strengths of knowledge-driven and data-driven approaches, our hybrid model can help uncover molecular mechanisms of cancer cell fate at systems level. PMID:25707537

  17. T-cell stimuli independently sum to regulate an inherited clonal division fate

    PubMed Central

    Marchingo, J. M.; Prevedello, G.; Kan, A.; Heinzel, S.; Hodgkin, P. D.; Duffy, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of antigen and costimulation, T cells undergo a characteristic response of expansion, cessation and contraction. Previous studies have revealed that population-level reproducibility is a consequence of multiple clones exhibiting considerable disparity in burst size, highlighting the requirement for single-cell information in understanding T-cell fate regulation. Here we show that individual T-cell clones resulting from controlled stimulation in vitro are strongly lineage imprinted with highly correlated expansion fates. Progeny from clonal families cease dividing in the same or adjacent generations, with inter-clonal variation producing burst-size diversity. The effects of costimulatory signals on individual clones sum together with stochastic independence; therefore, the net effect across multiple clones produces consistent, but heterogeneous population responses. These data demonstrate that substantial clonal heterogeneity arises through differences in experience of clonal progenitors, either through stochastic antigen interaction or by differences in initial receptor sensitivities. PMID:27869196

  18. Robust In Vitro Induction of Human Germ Cell Fate from Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Yokobayashi, Shihori; Nakamura, Tomonori; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Yabuta, Yukihiro; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Moritoki, Yoshinobu; Iwatani, Chizuru; Tsuchiya, Hideaki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Mori, Takahide; Woltjen, Knut; Nakagawa, Masato; Yamamoto, Takuya; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Yamanaka, Shinya; Saitou, Mitinori

    2015-08-06

    Mechanisms underlying human germ cell development are unclear, partly due to difficulties in studying human embryos and lack of suitable experimental systems. Here, we show that human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) differentiate into incipient mesoderm-like cells (iMeLCs), which robustly generate human primordial germ cell-like cells (hPGCLCs) that can be purified using the surface markers EpCAM and INTEGRINα6. The transcriptomes of hPGCLCs and primordial germ cells (PGCs) isolated from non-human primates are similar, and although specification of hPGCLCs and mouse PGCs rely on similar signaling pathways, hPGCLC specification transcriptionally activates germline fate without transiently inducing eminent somatic programs. This includes genes important for naive pluripotency and repression of key epigenetic modifiers, concomitant with epigenetic reprogramming. Accordingly, BLIMP1, which represses somatic programs in mice, activates and stabilizes a germline transcriptional circuit and represses a default neuronal differentiation program. Together, these findings provide a foundation for understanding and reconstituting human germ cell development in vitro.

  19. Multidimensional nanomaterials for the control of stem cell fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueng, Sy-Tsong Dean; Yang, Letao; Zhang, Yixiao; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-09-01

    Current stem cell therapy suffers low efficiency in giving rise to differentiated cell lineages, which can replace the original damaged cells. Nanomaterials, on the other hand, provide unique physical size, surface chemistry, conductivity, and topographical microenvironment to regulate stem cell differentiation through multidimensional approaches to facilitate gene delivery, cell-cell, and cell-ECM interactions. In this review, nanomaterials are demonstrated to work both alone and synergistically to guide selective stem cell differentiation. From three different nanotechnology families, three approaches are shown: (1) soluble microenvironmental factors; (2) insoluble physical microenvironment; and (3) nano-topographical features. As regenerative medicine is heavily invested in effective stem cell therapy, this review is inspired to generate discussions in the potential clinical applications of multi-dimensional nanomaterials.

  20. Self-Organizing Global Gene Expression Regulated through Criticality: Mechanism of the Cell-Fate Change

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Masa; Giuliani, Alessandro; Hashimoto, Midori; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Background A fundamental issue in bioscience is to understand the mechanism that underlies the dynamic control of genome-wide expression through the complex temporal-spatial self-organization of the genome to regulate the change in cell fate. We address this issue by elucidating a physically motivated mechanism of self-organization. Principal Findings Building upon transcriptome experimental data for seven distinct cell fates, including early embryonic development, we demonstrate that self-organized criticality (SOC) plays an essential role in the dynamic control of global gene expression regulation at both the population and single-cell levels. The novel findings are as follows: i) Mechanism of cell-fate changes: A sandpile-type critical transition self-organizes overall expression into a few transcription response domains (critical states). A cell-fate change occurs by means of a dissipative pulse-like global perturbation in self-organization through the erasure of initial-state critical behaviors (criticality). Most notably, the reprogramming of early embryo cells destroys the zygote SOC control to initiate self-organization in the new embryonal genome, which passes through a stochastic overall expression pattern. ii) Mechanism of perturbation of SOC controls: Global perturbations in self-organization involve the temporal regulation of critical states. Quantitative evaluation of this perturbation in terminal cell fates reveals that dynamic interactions between critical states determine the critical-state coherent regulation. The occurrence of a temporal change in criticality perturbs this between-states interaction, which directly affects the entire genomic system. Surprisingly, a sub-critical state, corresponding to an ensemble of genes that shows only marginal changes in expression and consequently are considered to be devoid of any interest, plays an essential role in generating a global perturbation in self-organization directed toward the cell-fate change

  1. N-myc alters the fate of preneoplastic cells in a mouse model of medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Jessica D.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Brun, Sonja N.; Yang, Zeng-Jie; Dutton, John W.; Wang, Fan; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Studying the early stages of cancer can provide important insight into the molecular basis of the disease. We identified a preneoplastic stage in the patched (ptc) mutant mouse, a model for the brain tumor medulloblastoma. Preneoplastic cells (PNCs) are found in most ptc mutants during early adulthood, but only 15% of these animals develop tumors. Although PNCs are found in mice that develop tumors, the ability of PNCs to give rise to tumors has never been demonstrated directly, and the fate of cells that do not form tumors remains unknown. Using genetic fate mapping and orthotopic transplantation, we provide definitive evidence that PNCs give rise to tumors, and show that the predominant fate of PNCs that do not form tumors is differentiation. Moreover, we show that N-myc, a gene commonly amplified in medulloblastoma, can dramatically alter the fate of PNCs, preventing differentiation and driving progression to tumors. Importantly, N-myc allows PNCs to grow independently of hedgehog signaling, making the resulting tumors resistant to hedgehog antagonists. These studies provide the first direct evidence that PNCs can give rise to tumors, and demonstrate that identification of genetic changes that promote tumor progression is critical for designing effective therapies for cancer. PMID:19171780

  2. Developmental biology: cell fate in the mammary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most breast cancers have their origin in the luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland. Defining how a master regulator controls the development of this cell lineage could provide important hints about why this should be. ...

  3. The Chromatin Modifier MSK1/2 Suppresses Endocrine Cell Fates during Mouse Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Neha; Park, Jeehye; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Type I diabetes is caused by loss of insulin-secreting beta cells. To identify novel, pharmacologically-targetable histone-modifying proteins that enhance beta cell production from pancreatic progenitors, we performed a screen for histone modifications induced by signal transduction pathways at key pancreatic genes. The screen led us to investigate the temporal dynamics of ser-28 phosphorylated histone H3 (H3S28ph) and its upstream kinases, MSK1 and MSK2 (MSK1/2). H3S28ph and MSK1/2 were enriched at the key endocrine and acinar promoters in E12.5 multipotent pancreatic progenitors. Pharmacological inhibition of MSK1/2 in embryonic pancreatic explants promoted the specification of endocrine fates, including the beta-cell lineage, while depleting acinar fates. Germline knockout of both Msk isoforms caused enhancement of alpha cells and a reduction in acinar differentiation, while monoallelic loss of Msk1 promoted beta cell mass. Our screen of chromatin state dynamics can be applied to other developmental contexts to reveal new pathways and approaches to modulate cell fates. PMID:27973548

  4. The Fate of ZnO Nanoparticles Administered to Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Fakra, Sirine C.; Xia, Tian; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    A particular challenge for nanotoxicology is the evaluation of the biological fate and toxicity of nanomaterials that dissolve in aqueous fluids. Zinc oxide nanomaterials are of particular concern because dissolution leads to release of the toxic divalent zinc ion. Although dissolved zinc ions have been implicated in ZnO cytotoxicity, direct identification of the chemical form of zinc taken up by cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles, and its intracellular fate, has not yet been achieved. We combined high resolution X-ray spectromicroscopy and high elemental sensitivity X-ray microprobe analyses to determine the fate of ZnO and less soluble iron-doped ZnO nanoparticles following exposure to cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B. We complemented two-dimensional X-ray imaging methods with atomic force microscopy of cell surfaces to distinguish between nanoparticles that were transported inside the cells from those that adhered to the cell exterior. The data suggest cellular uptake of ZnO nanoparticles is a mechanism of zinc accumulation in cells. Following uptake, ZnO nanoparticles dissolved completely generating intracellular Zn2+ complexed by molecular ligands. These results corroborate a model for ZnO nanoparticle toxicity that is based on nanoparticle uptake followed by intracellular dissolution. PMID:22646753

  5. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Microarray for High-Throughput Studies of Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago G.; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Clark, Douglas S.; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) cellular microarray platform to enable the rapid and efficient tracking of stem cell fate and quantification of specific stem cell markers. This platform consists of a miniaturized 3D cell culture array on a functionalized glass slide for spatially addressable high-throughput screening. A microarray spotter was used to deposit cells onto a modified glass surface to yield an array consisting of cells encapsulated in alginate gel spots with volumes as low as 60 nL. A method based on an immunofluorescence technique scaled down to function on a cellular microarray was also used to quantify specific cell marker protein levels in situ. Our results revealed that this platform is suitable for studying the expansion of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they retain their pluripotent and undifferentiated state. We also examined neural commitment of mouse ES cells on the microarray and observed the generation of neuroectodermal precursor cells characterized by expression of the neural marker Sox-1, whose levels were also measured in situ using a GFP reporter system. In addition, the high-throughput capacity of the platform was tested using a dual-slide system that allowed rapid screening of the effects of tretinoin and fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) on the pluripotency of mouse ES cells. This high-throughput platform is a powerful new tool for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in stem cell expansion and differentiation and provides the basis for rapid identification of signals and conditions that can be used to direct cellular responses. PMID:20069558

  6. Coordinated repression and activation of two transcriptional programs stabilizes cell fate during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ciglar, Lucia; Girardot, Charles; Wilczyński, Bartek; Braun, Martina; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular models of cell fate specification typically focus on the activation of specific lineage programs. However, the concurrent repression of unwanted transcriptional networks is also essential to stabilize certain cellular identities, as shown in a number of diverse systems and phyla. Here, we demonstrate that this dual requirement also holds true in the context of Drosophila myogenesis. By integrating genetics and genomics, we identified a new role for the pleiotropic transcriptional repressor Tramtrack69 in myoblast specification. Drosophila muscles are formed through the fusion of two discrete cell types: founder cells (FCs) and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs). When tramtrack69 is removed, FCMs appear to adopt an alternative muscle FC-like fate. Conversely, ectopic expression of this repressor phenocopies muscle defects seen in loss-of-function lame duck mutants, a transcription factor specific to FCMs. This occurs through Tramtrack69-mediated repression in FCMs, whereas Lame duck activates a largely distinct transcriptional program in the same cells. Lineage-specific factors are therefore not sufficient to maintain FCM identity. Instead, their identity appears more plastic, requiring the combination of instructive repressive and activating programs to stabilize cell fate. PMID:24961800

  7. Notch signaling during cell fate determination in the inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Kiernan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    In the inner ear, Notch signaling has been proposed to specify the sensory regions, as well as regulate the differentiation of hair cells and supporting cell within those regions. In addition, Notch plays an important role in otic neurogenesis, by determining which cells differentiate as neurons, sensory cells and non-sensory cells. Here, I review the evidence for the complex and myriad roles Notch participates in during inner ear development. A particular challenge for those studying ear development and Notch is to decipher how activation of a single pathway can lead to different outcomes within the ear, which may include changes in the intrinsic properties of the cell, Notch modulation, and potential non-canonical pathways. PMID:23578865

  8. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Determines the Vasculogenic Fate of Postnatal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaocheng; Nör, Felipe; Oh, Min; Cucco, Carolina; Shi, Songtao; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-06-01

    Vasculogenesis is the process of de novo blood vessel formation observed primarily during embryonic development. Emerging evidence suggest that postnatal mesenchymal stem cells are capable of recapitulating vasculogenesis when these cells are engaged in tissue regeneration. However, the mechanisms underlining the vasculogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells remain unclear. Here, we used stem cells from human permanent teeth (dental pulp stem cells [DPSC]) or deciduous teeth (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth [SHED]) as models of postnatal primary human mesenchymal stem cells to understand mechanisms regulating their vasculogenic fate. GFP-tagged mesenchymal stem cells seeded in human tooth slice/scaffolds and transplanted into immunodeficient mice differentiate into human blood vessels that anastomize with the mouse vasculature. In vitro, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced the vasculogenic differentiation of DPSC and SHED via potent activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Further, activation of Wnt signaling is sufficient to induce the vasculogenic differentiation of postnatal mesenchymal stem cells, while Wnt inhibition blocked this process. Notably, β-catenin-silenced DPSC no longer differentiate into endothelial cells in vitro, and showed impaired vasculogenesis in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that VEGF signaling through the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway defines the vasculogenic fate of postnatal mesenchymal stem cells. Stem Cells 2016;34:1576-1587.

  9. Evolution of a system sensitive to stochastic noise: P3.p cell fate in Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Pénigault, Jean-Baptiste; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2011-09-15

    The C. elegans cell lineage is overall invariant. One rare instance of variability concerns P3.p, the most anterior vulva precursor cell, which may either fuse with the epidermis without dividing, or remain competent to form vulval tissue and divide. Here we examine the evolutionary properties of this stochastic variation in P3.p fate. In the Caenorhabditis genus, high P3.p competence is ancestral and reduction in P3.p competence and division frequency occurred in C. sp. 14 and in a clade of nine species. Within this clade, the frequency of P3.p division further varies within and among species, being intermediate in C. elegans and low in C. briggsae. P3.p fate frequency is sensitive to random mutation accumulation, suggesting that this trait may evolve rapidly because of its sensitivity to mutational impact. P3.p fate depends on LIN-39/Hox5 expression and we find that the peak of LIN-39/Hox5 protein level is displaced posteriorly in C. briggsae compared to C. elegans. However, P3.p fate specification is most sensitive to the dose of EGL-20 and CWN-1, two Wnts that are secreted in a long-range gradient from the posterior end of C. elegans larvae (accompanying article). A half-dose of either of these Wnts is sufficient to affect division frequency in C. elegans N2 to levels similar to those in C. briggsae. Symmetrically, we show that an increase in Wnt dose rescues anterior competence in C. briggsae. We propose that evolutionary variation in the concentration or interpretation of the long-range Wnt gradient may be involved in the rapid evolution of P3.p fate in Caenorhabditis.

  10. Human Induced Pluripotent Cell-Derived Sensory Neurons for Fate Commitment of Bone Marrow-Derived Schwann Cells: Implications for Remyelination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sa; Han, Lei; Ao, Qiang; Chan, Ying-Shing; Shum, Daisy Kwok-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Strategies that exploit induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to derive neurons have relied on cocktails of cytokines and growth factors to bias cell-signaling events in the course of fate choice. These are often costly and inefficient, involving multiple steps. In this study, we took an alternative approach and selected 5 small-molecule inhibitors of key signaling pathways in an 8-day program to induce differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, reaching ≥80% yield in terms of marker proteins. Continuing culture in maintenance medium resulted in neuronal networks immunopositive for synaptic vesicle markers and vesicular glutamate transporters suggestive of excitatory neurotransmission. Subpopulations of the derived neurons were electrically excitable, showing tetrodotoxin-sensitive action potentials in patch-clamp experiments. Coculture of the derived neurons with rat Schwann cells under myelinating conditions resulted in upregulated levels of neuronal neuregulin 1 type III in conjunction with the phosphorylated receptors ErbB2 and ErbB3, consistent with amenability of the neuritic network to myelination. As surrogates of embryonic dorsal root ganglia neurons, the derived sensory neurons provided contact-dependent cues to commit bone marrow-derived Schwann cell-like cells to the Schwann cell fate. Our rapid and efficient induction protocol promises not only controlled differentiation of human iPSCs into sensory neurons, but also utility in the translation to a protocol whereby human bone marrow-derived Schwann cells become available for autologous transplantation and remyelination therapy. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:369-381.

  11. Tips, Stalks, Tubes: Notch-Mediated Cell Fate Determination and Mechanisms of Tubulogenesis during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jennifer J.; Tattersall, Ian W.; Kitajewski, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of developing vascular sprouts from existing blood vessels. Luminal endothelial cells convert into “tip” cells that contribute to the development of a multicellular stalk, which then undergoes lumen formation. In this review, we consider a variety of cellular and molecular pathways that mediate these transitions. We focus first on Notch signaling in cell fate determination as a mechanism to define tip and stalk cells. We next discuss the current models of lumen formation and describe new players in this process, such as chloride intracellular channel proteins. Finally, we consider the possible medical therapeutic benefits of understanding these processes and acknowledge potential obstacles in drug development. PMID:22355796

  12. FGF/MAPK signaling sets the switching threshold of a bistable circuit controlling cell fate decisions in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröter, Christian; Rué, Pau; Mackenzie, Jonathan Peter; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular transcriptional regulators and extracellular signaling pathways together regulate the allocation of cell fates during development, but how their molecular activities are integrated to establish the correct proportions of cells with particular fates is not known. Here we study this question in the context of the decision between the epiblast (Epi) and the primitive endoderm (PrE) fate that occurs in the mammalian preimplantation embryo. Using an embryonic stem cell (ESC) model, we discover two successive functions of FGF/MAPK signaling in this decision. First, the pathway needs to be inhibited to make the PrE-like gene expression program accessible for activation by GATA transcription factors in ESCs. In a second step, MAPK signaling levels determine the threshold concentration of GATA factors required for PrE-like differentiation, and thereby control the proportion of cells differentiating along this lineage. Our findings can be explained by a simple mutual repression circuit modulated by FGF/MAPK signaling. This might be a general network architecture to integrate the activity of signal transduction pathways and transcriptional regulators, and serve to balance proportions of cell fates in several contexts. PMID:26511924

  13. Matrix mechanics and fluid shear stress control stem cells fate in three dimensional microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Guo, Pan; Lin, Chongwen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Xu, Zhiling

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple mature cell types during early life and growth. Stem cells adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation are affected by biochemical, mechanical and physical surface properties of the surrounding matrix in which stem cells reside and stem cells can sensitively feel and respond to the microenvironment of this matrix. More and more researches have proven that three dimensional (3D) culture can reduce the gap between cell culture and physiological environment where cells always live in vivo. This review summarized recent findings on the studies of matrix mechanics that control stem cells (primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) fate in 3D environment, including matrix stiffness and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness. Considering the exchange of oxygen and nutrients in 3D culture, the effect of fluid shear stress (FSS) on fate decision of stem cells was also discussed in detail. Further, the difference of MSCs response to matrix stiffness between two dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions was compared. Finally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction of stem cells activated by matrix mechanics and FSS in 3D culture was briefly pointed out.

  14. Neural stem cell sex dimorphism in aromatase (CYP19) expression: a basis for differential neural fate

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Jay; McCourty, Althea; Lecanu, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation and pharmacologic activation of endogenous neurogenesis are two approaches that trigger a great deal of interest as brain repair strategies. However, the success rate of clinical attempts using stem cells to restore neurologic functions altered either after traumatic brain injury or as a consequence of neurodegenerative disease remains rather disappointing. This suggests that factors affecting the fate of grafted NSCs are largely understudied and remain to be characterized. We recently reported that aging differentially affects the neurogenic properties of male and female NSCs. Although the sex steroids androgens and estrogens participate in the regulation of neurogenesis, to our knowledge, research on how gender-based differences affect the capacity of NSCs to differentiate and condition their neural fate is lacking. In the present study, we explored further the role of cell sex as a determining factor of the neural fate followed by differentiating NSCs and its relationship with a potential differential expression of aromatase (CYP19), the testosterone-metabolizing enzyme. Results Using NSCs isolated from the subventricular zone of three-month-old male and female Long-Evans rats and maintained as neurospheres, we showed that differentiation triggered by retinoic acid resulted in a neural phenotype that depends on cell sex. Differentiated male NSCs mainly expressed markers of neuronal fate, including βIII-tubulin, microtubule associated protein 2, growth-associated protein 43, and doublecortin. In contrast, female NSCs essentially expressed the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. Quantification of the expression of aromatase showed a very low level of expression in undifferentiated female NSCs, whereas aromatase expression in male NSCs was 14-fold greater than the female level. Conclusion Our results confirm our previous data that the neural phenotype acquired by differentiating NSCs largely depends on

  15. Functionalized scaffolds to control dental pulp stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Evandro; Silva, Adriana F.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging understanding about interactions between stem cells, scaffolds and morphogenic factors has accelerated translational research in the field of dental pulp tissue engineering. Dental pulp stem cells constitute a sub-population of cells endowed with self-renewal and multipotency. Dental pulp stem cells seeded in biodegradable scaffolds and exposed to dentin-derived morphogenic signals give rise to a pulp-like tissue capable of generating new dentin. Notably, dentin-derived proteins are sufficient to induce dental pulp stem cell differentiation into odontoblasts. Ongoing work is focused on developing ways of mobilizing dentin-derived proteins and disinfecting the root canal of necrotic teeth without compromising the morphogenic potential of these signaling molecules. On the other hand, dentin by itself does not appear to be capable of inducing endothelial differentiation of dental pulp stem cells, despite the well known presence of angiogenic factors in dentin. This is particularly relevant in the context of dental pulp tissue engineering in full root canals, where access to blood supply is limited to the apical foramina. To address this challenge, scientists are looking at ways to use the scaffold as a controlled release device for angiogenic factors. The aim of this manuscript is to present and discuss current strategies to functionalize injectable scaffolds and customize them for dental pulp tissue engineering. The long-term goal of this work is to develop stem cell-based therapies that enable the engineering of functional dental pulps capable of generating new tubular dentin in humans. PMID:24698691

  16. Laminins affect T cell trafficking and allograft fate.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kristi J; Iwami, Daiki; Harris, Donald G; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Burrell, Bryna E

    2014-05-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are integral sites for the generation of immune tolerance, migration of CD4⁺ T cells, and induction of Tregs. Despite the importance of LNs in regulation of inflammatory responses, the LN-specific factors that regulate T cell migration and the precise LN structural domains in which differentiation occurs remain undefined. Using intravital and fluorescent microscopy, we found that alloreactive T cells traffic distinctly into the tolerant LN and colocalize in exclusive regions with alloantigen-presenting cells, a process required for Treg induction. Extracellular matrix proteins, including those of the laminin family, formed regions within the LN that were permissive for colocalization of alloantigen-presenting cells, alloreactive T cells, and Tregs. We identified unique expression patterns of laminin proteins in high endothelial venule basement membranes and the cortical ridge that correlated with alloantigen-specific immunity or immune tolerance. The ratio of laminin α4 to laminin α5 was greater in domains within tolerant LNs, compared with immune LNs, and blocking laminin α4 function or inducing laminin α5 overexpression disrupted T cell and DC localization and transmigration through tolerant LNs. Furthermore, reducing α4 laminin circumvented tolerance induction and induced cardiac allograft inflammation and rejection in murine models. This work identifies laminins as potential targets for immune modulation.

  17. Retinoic acid, meiosis and germ cell fate in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Although mammalian sex is determined genetically, the sex-specific development of germ cells as sperm or oocytes is initiated by cues provided by the gonadal environment. During embryogenesis, germ cells in an ovary enter meiosis, thereby committing to oogenesis. By contrast, germ cells in a testicular environment do not enter meiosis until puberty. Recent findings indicate that the key to this sex-specific timing of meiosis entry is the presence or absence of the signaling molecule retinoic acid. Although this knowledge clarifies a long-standing mystery in reproductive biology, it also poses many new questions, which we discuss in this review.

  18. Concentration Sensing by the Moving Nucleus in Cell Fate Determination: A Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Varun; Dickinson, Richard B.; Lele, Tanmay P.

    2016-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate neuroepithelium, the nucleus in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) moves from the apex toward the base and returns to the apex (called interkinetic nuclear migration) at which point the cell divides. The fate of the resulting daughter cells is thought to depend on the sampling by the moving nucleus of a spatial concentration profile of the cytoplasmic Notch intracellular domain (NICD). However, the nucleus executes complex stochastic motions including random waiting and back and forth motions, which can expose the nucleus to randomly varying levels of cytoplasmic NICD. How nuclear position can determine daughter cell fate despite the stochastic nature of nuclear migration is not clear. Here we derived a mathematical model for reaction, diffusion, and nuclear accumulation of NICD in NPCs during interkinetic nuclear migration (INM). Using experimentally measured trajectory-dependent probabilities of nuclear turning, nuclear waiting times and average nuclear speeds in NPCs in the developing zebrafish retina, we performed stochastic simulations to compute the nuclear trajectory-dependent probabilities of NPC differentiation. Comparison with experimentally measured nuclear NICD concentrations and trajectory-dependent probabilities of differentiation allowed estimation of the NICD cytoplasmic gradient. Spatially polarized production of NICD, rapid NICD cytoplasmic consumption and the time-averaging effect of nuclear import/export kinetics are sufficient to explain the experimentally observed differentiation probabilities. Our computational studies lend quantitative support to the feasibility of the nuclear concentration-sensing mechanism for NPC fate determination in zebrafish retina. PMID:26872214

  19. Concentration Sensing by the Moving Nucleus in Cell Fate Determination: A Computational Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Varun; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate neuroepithelium, the nucleus in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) moves from the apex toward the base and returns to the apex (called interkinetic nuclear migration) at which point the cell divides. The fate of the resulting daughter cells is thought to depend on the sampling by the moving nucleus of a spatial concentration profile of the cytoplasmic Notch intracellular domain (NICD). However, the nucleus executes complex stochastic motions including random waiting and back and forth motions, which can expose the nucleus to randomly varying levels of cytoplasmic NICD. How nuclear position can determine daughter cell fate despite the stochastic nature of nuclear migration is not clear. Here we derived a mathematical model for reaction, diffusion, and nuclear accumulation of NICD in NPCs during interkinetic nuclear migration (INM). Using experimentally measured trajectory-dependent probabilities of nuclear turning, nuclear waiting times and average nuclear speeds in NPCs in the developing zebrafish retina, we performed stochastic simulations to compute the nuclear trajectory-dependent probabilities of NPC differentiation. Comparison with experimentally measured nuclear NICD concentrations and trajectory-dependent probabilities of differentiation allowed estimation of the NICD cytoplasmic gradient. Spatially polarized production of NICD, rapid NICD cytoplasmic consumption and the time-averaging effect of nuclear import/export kinetics are sufficient to explain the experimentally observed differentiation probabilities. Our computational studies lend quantitative support to the feasibility of the nuclear concentration-sensing mechanism for NPC fate determination in zebrafish retina.

  20. Cap-independent translation by DAP5 controls cell fate decisions in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoffe, Yael; David, Maya; Kalaora, Rinat; Povodovski, Lital; Friedlander, Gilgi; Feldmesser, Ester; Ainbinder, Elena; Saada, Ann; Bialik, Shani; Kimchi, Adi

    2016-01-01

    Multiple transcriptional and epigenetic changes drive differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). This study unveils an additional level of gene expression regulation involving noncanonical, cap-independent translation of a select group of mRNAs. This is driven by death-associated protein 5 (DAP5/eIF4G2/NAT1), a translation initiation factor mediating IRES-dependent translation. We found that the DAP5 knockdown from human ESCs (hESCs) resulted in persistence of pluripotent gene expression, delayed induction of differentiation-associated genes in different cell lineages, and defective embryoid body formation. The latter involved improper cellular organization, lack of cavitation, and enhanced mislocalized apoptosis. RNA sequencing of polysome-associated mRNAs identified candidates with reduced translation efficiency in DAP5-depleted hESCs. These were enriched in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative respiration, a pathway essential for differentiation, the significance of which was confirmed by the aberrant mitochondrial morphology and decreased oxidative respiratory activity in DAP5 knockdown cells. Further analysis identified the chromatin modifier HMGN3 as a cap-independent DAP5 translation target whose knockdown resulted in defective differentiation. Thus, DAP5-mediated translation of a specific set of proteins is critical for the transition from pluripotency to differentiation, highlighting the importance of cap-independent translation in stem cell fate decisions. PMID:27664238

  1. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  2. Programming cell fate on bio-functionalized silicon.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-04-01

    Controlling the growth of cells on the surface of silicon without an additive layer or topographical modification is unexplored. This research article delineates the discovery of unique properties of a bio-functionalized silicon substrate, programmed to repel or control cells, generated by ultrafast femtosecond pulse interaction with silicon. Remarkably, bio-functionalization in any shape or size without change in topology or morphology is observed indicating only sub-surface phase transformations. Material characterization reveals the presence of a unique mixture of phases of SiO2 and Si. Consequently, these variations in phase alter the physicochemical characteristics on the surface of silicon resulting in its bio-functionalization. The culture of mouse embryonic fibroblasts shows unique adhesion characteristics on these bio-functionalized silicon surfaces that include cell controlling, cell trapping, and cell shaping. Furthermore, the directionality of fibroblasts is restrained parallel to bio-functionalized zones as evidenced by changes in cytoskeleton. The controlling of proliferation, migration and adhesion of cells is attributed to unique phase bio-functionalization. This method presents considerable promise in a myriad of applications such as tissue engineering, MEMS, and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  3. Mitotic retention of gene expression patterns by the cell fate-determining transcription factor Runx2

    PubMed Central

    Young, Daniel W.; Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Galindo, Mario; Javed, Amjad; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Furcinitti, Paul; Lapointe, David; Montecino, Martin; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Gary S.

    2007-01-01

    During cell division, cessation of transcription is coupled with mitotic chromosome condensation. A fundamental biological question is how gene expression patterns are retained during mitosis to ensure the phenotype of progeny cells. We suggest that cell fate-determining transcription factors provide an epigenetic mechanism for the retention of gene expression patterns during cell division. Runx proteins are lineage-specific transcription factors that are essential for hematopoietic, neuronal, gastrointestinal, and osteogenic cell fates. Here we show that Runx2 protein is stable during cell division and remains associated with chromosomes during mitosis through sequence-specific DNA binding. Using siRNA-mediated silencing, mitotic cell synchronization, and expression profiling, we identify Runx2-regulated genes that are modulated postmitotically. Novel target genes involved in cell growth and differentiation were validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Importantly, we find that during mitosis, when transcription is shut down, Runx2 selectively occupies target gene promoters, and Runx2 deficiency alters mitotic histone modifications. We conclude that Runx proteins have an active role in retaining phenotype during cell division to support lineage-specific control of gene expression in progeny cells. PMID:17360627

  4. microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate.

    PubMed

    Meza-Sosa, Karla F; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) requires a precisely coordinated series of events. During embryonic development, different intra- and extracellular signals stimulate neural stem cells to become neural progenitors, which eventually irreversibly exit from the cell cycle to begin the first stage of neurogenesis. However, before this event occurs, the self-renewal and proliferative capacities of neural stem cells and neural progenitors must be tightly regulated. Accordingly, the participation of various evolutionary conserved microRNAs is key in distinct central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes of many organisms including human, mouse, chicken, frog, and zebrafish. microRNAs specifically recognize and regulate the expression of target mRNAs by sequence complementarity within the mRNAs 3' untranslated region and importantly, a single microRNA can have several target mRNAs to regulate a process; likewise, a unique mRNA can be targeted by more than one microRNA. Thus, by regulating different target genes, microRNAs let-7, microRNA-124, and microRNA-9 have been shown to promote the differentiation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors into specific neural cell types while microRNA-134, microRNA-25 and microRNA-137 have been characterized as microRNAs that induce the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors. Here we review the mechanisms of action of these two sets of microRNAs and their functional implications during the transition from neural stem cells and neural progenitors to fully differentiated neurons. The genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of these microRNAs as well as the role of the recently described natural RNA circles which act as natural microRNA sponges regulating post-transcriptional microRNA expression and function during the early stages of neurogenesis is also discussed.

  5. microRNAs: key triggers of neuronal cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Sosa, Karla F.; Pedraza-Alva, Gustavo; Pérez-Martínez, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Development of the central nervous system (CNS) requires a precisely coordinated series of events. During embryonic development, different intra- and extracellular signals stimulate neural stem cells to become neural progenitors, which eventually irreversibly exit from the cell cycle to begin the first stage of neurogenesis. However, before this event occurs, the self-renewal and proliferative capacities of neural stem cells and neural progenitors must be tightly regulated. Accordingly, the participation of various evolutionary conserved microRNAs is key in distinct central nervous system (CNS) developmental processes of many organisms including human, mouse, chicken, frog, and zebrafish. microRNAs specifically recognize and regulate the expression of target mRNAs by sequence complementarity within the mRNAs 3′ untranslated region and importantly, a single microRNA can have several target mRNAs to regulate a process; likewise, a unique mRNA can be targeted by more than one microRNA. Thus, by regulating different target genes, microRNAs let-7, microRNA-124, and microRNA-9 have been shown to promote the differentiation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors into specific neural cell types while microRNA-134, microRNA-25 and microRNA-137 have been characterized as microRNAs that induce the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitors. Here we review the mechanisms of action of these two sets of microRNAs and their functional implications during the transition from neural stem cells and neural progenitors to fully differentiated neurons. The genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of these microRNAs as well as the role of the recently described natural RNA circles which act as natural microRNA sponges regulating post-transcriptional microRNA expression and function during the early stages of neurogenesis is also discussed. PMID:25009466

  6. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Claudia; Oehring, Hartmut; Herrmann, Rudolf; Förster, Martin; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO2 nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO2 nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  7. Dendritic cell fate is determined by BCL11A

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Gregory C.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Lin, Jian; Wall, Jason K.; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Staudt, Louis M.; Liu, Yong-Jun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tucker, Haley O.

    2014-01-01

    The plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) is vital to the coordinated action of innate and adaptive immunity. pDC development has not been unequivocally traced, nor has its transcriptional regulatory network been fully clarified. Here we confirm an essential requirement for the BCL11A transcription factor in fetal pDC development, and demonstrate this lineage-specific requirement in the adult organism. Furthermore, we identify BCL11A gene targets and provide a molecular mechanism for its action in pDC commitment. Embryonic germ-line deletion of Bcl11a revealed an absolute cellular, molecular, and functional absence of pDCs in fetal mice. In adults, deletion of Bcl11a in hematopoietic stem cells resulted in perturbed yet continued generation of progenitors, loss of downstream pDC and B-cell lineages, and persisting myeloid, conventional dendritic, and T-cell lineages. Challenge with virus resulted in a marked reduction of antiviral response in conditionally deleted adults. Genome-wide analyses of BCL11A DNA binding and expression revealed that BCL11A regulates transcription of E2-2 and other pDC differentiation modulators, including ID2 and MTG16. Our results identify BCL11A as an essential, lineage-specific factor that regulates pDC development, supporting a model wherein differentiation into pDCs represents a primed “default” pathway for common dendritic cell progenitors. PMID:24591644

  8. Intracellular fates of cell-penetrating block copolypeptide vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Victor Z; Li, Zhibo; Deming, Timothy J; Kamei, Daniel T

    2011-01-10

    The block copolypeptide poly(l-homoarginine)(60)-b-poly(l-leucine)(20) (R(60)L(20)) was previously found to self-assemble into versatile vesicles with controllable size and encapsulate hydrophilic cargo. These R(60)L(20) vesicles also demonstrated the ability to cross the cell membrane and transport encapsulated cargo into different cell lines. To assess the potential for using the R(60)L(20) vesicles as drug delivery vehicles further, we have investigated their endocytosis and intracellular trafficking behavior. Using drugs that inhibit different endocytosis pathways, we identified macropinocytosis to be a major process by which the R(60)L(20) vesicles enter HeLa cells. Subsequent immunostaining experiments demonstrated that the vesicles entered the early endosomes but not the lysosomes, suggesting that they recycle back to the cell surface. Overall, our studies indicate that the R(60)L(20) vesicles are able to enter cells intact with their cargos, and although some manage to escape from early endosomes, most are trapped within these intracellular compartments.

  9. Putting it all on pigmentation: Heuristics of a bold and stochastic cell fate decision.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jianhua; Lee, Robin E C

    2015-10-06

    Gradients of transmembrane potential coordinate cell-fate decisions and patterning during embryogenesis and wound-healing. Bioelectrical signaling may also be more important for adult pathologies than currently recognized. In this issue of Science Signaling, Lobikin et al. describe a role for bioelectric signals during the development of Xenopus leavis embryos to instruct an organism-level response reminiscent of neoplastic progression in melanoma.

  10. Role of bioinspired polymers in determination of pluripotent stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sheena; Eroshenko, Nikolai; Rao, Raj R

    2009-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, hold enormous potential for the treatment of many diseases, owing to their ability to generate cell types useful for therapeutic applications. Currently, many stem cell culture propagation and differentiation systems incorporate animal-derived components for promoting self-renewal and differentiation. However, use of these components is labor intensive, carries the risk of xenogeneic contamination and yields compromised experimental results that are difficult to duplicate. From a biomaterials perspective, the generation of an animal- and cell-free biomimetic microenvironment that provides the appropriate physical and chemical cues for stem cell self-renewal or differentiation into specialized cell types would be ideal. This review presents the use of natural and synthetic polymers that support propagation and differentiation of stem cells, in an attempt to obtain a clear understanding of the factors responsible for the determination of stem cell fate. PMID:19580405

  11. Energy metabolism and energy-sensing pathways in mammalian embryonic and adult stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Rafalski, Victoria A.; Mancini, Elena; Brunet, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Summary Metabolism is influenced by age, food intake, and conditions such as diabetes and obesity. How do physiological or pathological metabolic changes influence stem cells, which are crucial for tissue homeostasis? This Commentary reviews recent evidence that stem cells have different metabolic demands than differentiated cells, and that the molecular mechanisms that control stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are functionally connected to the metabolic state of the cell and the surrounding stem cell niche. Furthermore, we present how energy-sensing signaling molecules and metabolism regulators are implicated in the regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Finally, we discuss the emerging literature on the metabolism of induced pluripotent stem cells and how manipulating metabolic pathways might aid cellular reprogramming. Determining how energy metabolism regulates stem cell fate should shed light on the decline in tissue regeneration that occurs during aging and facilitate the development of therapies for degenerative or metabolic diseases. PMID:23420198

  12. Epigenetic regulation of neural stem cell fate during corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    MuhChyi, Chai; Juliandi, Berry; Matsuda, Taito; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2013-10-01

    The cerebral cortex comprises over three quarters of the brain, and serves as structural basis for the sophisticated perceptual and cognitive functions. It develops from common multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) that line the neural tube. Development of the NSCs encompasses sequential phases of progenitor expansion, neurogenesis, and gliogenesis along with the progression of developmental stages. Interestingly, NSCs steadfastly march through all of these phases and give rise to specific neural cell types in a temporally defined and highly predictable manner. Herein, we delineate the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that dictate the progression and tempo of NSC differentiation during cerebral cortex development, and how epigenetic modifications contribute to the dynamic properties of NSCs.

  13. Computational properties of mitochondria in T cell activation and fate

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review how mitochondrial Ca2+ transport (mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and Na+/Ca2+ exchange) is involved in T cell biology, including activation and differentiation through shaping cellular Ca2+ signals. Based on recent observations, we propose that the Ca2+ crosstalk between mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm may form a proportional–integral–derivative (PID) controller. This PID mechanism (which is well known in engineering) could be responsible for computing cellular decisions. In addition, we point out the importance of analogue and digital signal processing in T cell life and implication of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in this process. PMID:27852805

  14. Fate of naphthalene in laboratory-scale bioretention cells: implications for sustainable stormwater management.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Gregory H; Novak, Paige J; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2012-01-17

    Bioretention cells are increasingly popular in low-impact development as a means to sustainably mitigate the environmental problems associated with stormwater runoff. Yet, much remains to be known regarding the removal and ultimate fate of pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons in bioretention cells. In this work, laboratory-scale bioretention cells were constructed inside sealed glass columns. The columns were periodically spiked with (14)C-naphthalene over a 5-month period and the fate of this representative hydrocarbon and the influence of vegetation on naphthalene fate was studied. Three column setups were used: one planted with a legume (Purple Prairie Clover, Dalea purpureum), one planted with grass (Blue-Joint Grass, Calamagrostis canadensis), and one unplanted (i.e., control). Overall naphthalene removal efficiency was 93% for the planted columns and 78% for the control column. Adsorption to soil was the dominant naphthalene removal mechanism (56-73% of added naphthalene), although mineralization (12-18%) and plant uptake (2-23%) were also important. Volatilization was negligible (<0.04%). Significant enrichment of naphthalene-degrading bacteria occurred due to contaminant exposure and plant growth as evidenced by increased biodegradation activity and increased naphthalene dioxygenase gene concentrations in the bioretention media. This research suggests that bioretention is a viable solution for sustainable petroleum hydrocarbon removal from stormwater, and that vegetation can enhance overall performance and stimulate biodegradation.

  15. Marrow-inspired matrix cues rapidly affect early fate decisions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the physiological process where hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) continuously generate the body’s complement of blood and immune cells within unique regions of the bone marrow termed niches. Although previous investigations have revealed gradients in cellular and extracellular matrix (ECM) content across the marrow, and matrix elasticity and ligand type are believed to be strong regulators of stem cell fate, the impact of biophysical signals on HSC response is poorly understood. Using marrow-inspired ECM ligand–coated polyacrylamide substrates that present defined stiffness and matrix ligand cues, we demonstrate that the interplay between integrin engagement and myosin II activation processes affects the morphology, proliferation, and myeloid lineage specification of primary murine HSCs within 24 hours ex vivo. Notably, the impact of discrete biophysical signals on HSC fate decisions appears to be correlated to known microenvironmental transitions across the marrow. The combination of fibronectin and marrow matrix-associated stiffness was sufficient to maintain hematopoietic progenitor populations, whereas collagen and laminin enhanced proliferation and myeloid differentiation, respectively. Inhibiting myosin II–mediated contraction or adhesion to fibronectin via specific integrins (α5β1 and ανβ3) selectively abrogated the impact of the matrix environment on HSC fate decisions. Together, these findings indicate that adhesive interactions and matrix biophysical properties are critical design considerations in the development of biomaterials to direct HSC behavior in vitro. PMID:28070554

  16. CDH2 and CDH11 as Regulators of Stem Cell Fate Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Alimperti, Stella; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the mechanical and biochemical signals originating from cell-cell adhesion are critical for stem cell lineage specification. In this review, we focus on the role of cadherin mediated signaling in development and stem cell differentiation, with emphasis on two well-known cadherins, cadherin-2 (CDH2) (N-cadherin) and cadherin-11 (CDH11) (OB-cadherin). We summarize the existing knowledge regarding the role of CDH2 and CDH11 during development and differentiation in vivo and in vitro. We also discuss engineering strategies to control stem cell fate decisions by fine-tuning the extent of cell-cell adhesion through surface chemistry and microtopology. These studies may be greatly facilitated by novel strategies that enable monitoring of stem cell specification in real time. We expect that better understanding of how intercellular adhesion signaling affects lineage specification may impact biomaterial and scaffold design to control stem cell fate decisions in three-dimensional context with potential implications for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25771201

  17. Somatic embryogenesis - Stress-induced remodeling of plant cell fate.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Attila

    2015-04-01

    Plants as sessile organisms have remarkable developmental plasticity ensuring heir continuous adaptation to the environment. An extreme example is somatic embryogenesis, the initiation of autonomous embryo development in somatic cells in response to exogenous and/or endogenous signals. In this review I briefly overview the various pathways that can lead to embryo development in plants in addition to the fertilization of the egg cell and highlight the importance of the interaction of stress- and hormone-regulated pathways during the induction of somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis can be initiated in planta or in vitro, directly or indirectly, and the requirement for dedifferentiation as well as the way to achieve developmental totipotency in the various systems is discussed in light of our present knowledge. The initiation of all forms of the stress/hormone-induced in vitro as well as the genetically provoked in planta somatic embryogenesis requires extensive and coordinated genetic reprogramming that has to take place at the chromatin level, as the embryogenic program is under strong epigenetic repression in vegetative plant cells. Our present knowledge on chromatin-based mechanisms potentially involved in the somatic-to-embryogenic developmental transition is summarized emphasizing the potential role of the chromatin to integrate stress, hormonal, and developmental pathways leading to the activation of the embryogenic program. The role of stress-related chromatin reorganization in the genetic instability of in vitro cultures is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  18. Unraveling the warp and weft of B cell fate.

    PubMed

    Stadanlick, Jason E; Cancro, Michael P

    2006-09-01

    Two recent Immunity articles (Enzler et al., 2006; Sasaki et al., 2006) probe the roles of Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) pathways in survival and differentiation mediated by B cell activation factor of the TNF family (BAFF).

  19. The role of metabolic reprogramming in T cell fate and function

    PubMed Central

    Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Weaver, Jessica; Herbel, Christoph; Seth, Pankaj; Li, Lequn; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes undergo extensive changes in their metabolic properties during their transition through various differentiation states, from naïve to effector to memory or regulatory roles. The cause and effect relationship between metabolism and differentiation is a field of intense investigation. Many recent studies demonstrate the dependency of T cell functional outcomes on metabolic pathways and the possibility of metabolic intervention to modify these functions. In this review, we describe the basic metabolic features of T cells and new findings on how these correlate with various differentiation fates and functions. We also highlight the latest information regarding the main factors that affect T cell metabolic reprogramming. PMID:28356677

  20. A potential regulatory network underlying distinct fate commitment of myogenic and adipogenic cells in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjuan; He, Ting; Qin, Chunfu; Qiu, Kai; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Defa; Yin, Jingdong

    2017-01-01

    Mechanism controlling myo-adipogenic balance in skeletal muscle is of great significance for human skeletal muscle dysfunction and myopathies as well as livestock meat quality. In the present study, two cell subpopulations with particular potency of adipogenic or myogenic differentiation were isolated from neonatal porcine longissimus dorsi using the preplate method to detect mechanisms underlying distinct fate commitment of myogenic and adipogenic cells in skeletal muscle. Both cells share a common surface expression profile of CD29+CD31−CD34−CD90+CD105+, verifying their mesenchymal origin. A total of 448 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (FDR < 0.05 and |log2 FC| ≥ 1) between two distinct cells were identified via RNA-seq, including 358 up-regulated and 90 down-regulated genes in myogenic cells compared with adipogenic cells. The results of functional annotation and enrichment showed that 42 DEGs were implicated in cell differentiation, among them PDGFRα, ITGA3, ITGB6, MLCK and MLC acted as hubs between environment information processing and cellular process, indicating that the interaction of the two categories exerts an important role in distinct fate commitment of myogenic and adipogenic cells. Particularly, we are first to show that up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+-MLCK and Rho-DMPK, and subsequently elevated MLC, may contribute to the distinct commitment of myogenic and adipogenic lineages via mediating cytoskeleton dynamics. PMID:28276486

  1. Skeletal cell fate decisions within periosteum and bone marrow during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Colnot, Céline

    2009-02-01

    Bone repair requires the mobilization of adult skeletal stem cells/progenitors to allow deposition of cartilage and bone at the injury site. These stem cells/progenitors are believed to come from multiple sources including the bone marrow and the periosteum. The goal of this study was to establish the cellular contributions of bone marrow and periosteum to bone healing in vivo and to assess the effect of the tissue environment on cell differentiation within bone marrow and periosteum. Results show that periosteal injuries heal by endochondral ossification, whereas bone marrow injuries heal by intramembranous ossification, indicating that distinct cellular responses occur within these tissues during repair. [corrected] Next, lineage analyses were used to track the fate of cells derived from periosteum, bone marrow, and endosteum, a subcompartment of the bone marrow. Skeletal progenitor cells were found to be recruited locally and concurrently from periosteum and/or bone marrow/endosteum during bone repair. Periosteum and bone marrow/endosteum both gave rise to osteoblasts, whereas the periosteum was the major source of chondrocytes. Finally, results show that intrinsic and environmental signals modulate cell fate decisions within these tissues. In conclusion, this study sheds light into the origins of skeletal stem cells/progenitors during bone regeneration and indicates that periosteum, endosteum, and bone marrow contain pools of stem cells/progenitors with distinct osteogenic and chondrogenic potentials that vary with the tissue environment.

  2. A potential regulatory network underlying distinct fate commitment of myogenic and adipogenic cells in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjuan; He, Ting; Qin, Chunfu; Qiu, Kai; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Defa; Yin, Jingdong

    2017-03-09

    Mechanism controlling myo-adipogenic balance in skeletal muscle is of great significance for human skeletal muscle dysfunction and myopathies as well as livestock meat quality. In the present study, two cell subpopulations with particular potency of adipogenic or myogenic differentiation were isolated from neonatal porcine longissimus dorsi using the preplate method to detect mechanisms underlying distinct fate commitment of myogenic and adipogenic cells in skeletal muscle. Both cells share a common surface expression profile of CD29(+)CD31(-)CD34(-)CD90(+)CD105(+), verifying their mesenchymal origin. A total of 448 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (FDR < 0.05 and |log2 FC| ≥ 1) between two distinct cells were identified via RNA-seq, including 358 up-regulated and 90 down-regulated genes in myogenic cells compared with adipogenic cells. The results of functional annotation and enrichment showed that 42 DEGs were implicated in cell differentiation, among them PDGFRα, ITGA3, ITGB6, MLCK and MLC acted as hubs between environment information processing and cellular process, indicating that the interaction of the two categories exerts an important role in distinct fate commitment of myogenic and adipogenic cells. Particularly, we are first to show that up-regulation of intracellular Ca(2+)-MLCK and Rho-DMPK, and subsequently elevated MLC, may contribute to the distinct commitment of myogenic and adipogenic lineages via mediating cytoskeleton dynamics.

  3. Cell fate-specific regulation of EGF receptor trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    PubMed

    Stetak, Attila; Hoier, Erika Fröhli; Croce, Assunta; Cassata, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Hajnal, Alex

    2006-06-07

    By controlling the subcellular localization of growth factor receptors, cells can modulate the activity of intracellular signal transduction pathways. During Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development, a ternary complex consisting of the LIN-7, LIN-2 and LIN-10 PDZ domain proteins localizes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the basolateral compartment of the vulval precursor cells (VPCs) to allow efficient receptor activation by the inductive EGF signal from the anchor cell. We have identified EGFR substrate protein-8 (EPS-8) as a novel component of the EGFR localization complex that links receptor trafficking to cell fate specification. EPS-8 expression is upregulated in the primary VPCs, where it creates a positive feedback loop in the EGFR/RAS/MAPK pathway. The membrane-associated guanylate kinase LIN-2 recruits EPS-8 into the receptor localization complex to retain the EGFR on the basolateral plasma membrane, and thus allow maximal receptor activation in the primary cell lineage. Low levels of EPS-8 in the neighboring secondary VPCs result in the rapid degradation of the EGFR, allowing these cells to adopt the secondary cell fate. Extracellular signals thus regulate EGFR trafficking in a cell type-specific manner to control pattern formation during organogenesis.

  4. Cell fate-specific regulation of EGF receptor trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development

    PubMed Central

    Stetak, Attila; Hoier, Erika Fröhli; Croce, Assunta; Cassata, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Hajnal, Alex

    2006-01-01

    By controlling the subcellular localization of growth factor receptors, cells can modulate the activity of intracellular signal transduction pathways. During Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development, a ternary complex consisting of the LIN-7, LIN-2 and LIN-10 PDZ domain proteins localizes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to the basolateral compartment of the vulval precursor cells (VPCs) to allow efficient receptor activation by the inductive EGF signal from the anchor cell. We have identified EGFR substrate protein-8 (EPS-8) as a novel component of the EGFR localization complex that links receptor trafficking to cell fate specification. EPS-8 expression is upregulated in the primary VPCs, where it creates a positive feedback loop in the EGFR/RAS/MAPK pathway. The membrane-associated guanylate kinase LIN-2 recruits EPS-8 into the receptor localization complex to retain the EGFR on the basolateral plasma membrane, and thus allow maximal receptor activation in the primary cell lineage. Low levels of EPS-8 in the neighboring secondary VPCs result in the rapid degradation of the EGFR, allowing these cells to adopt the secondary cell fate. Extracellular signals thus regulate EGFR trafficking in a cell type-specific manner to control pattern formation during organogenesis. PMID:16688213

  5. Redox Signaling in Diabetic Nephropathy: Hypertrophy versus Death Choices in Mesangial Cells and Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Manda, Gina; Checherita, Alexandru-Ionel; Comanescu, Maria Victoria; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, acting as trigger, modulator, and linker within the complex network of pathologic events. It highlights key molecular pathways and new hypothesis in diabetic nephropathy, related to the interferences of metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory stresses. Main topics this review is addressing are biomarkers of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy, the sources of reactive oxygen species (mitochondria, NADPH-oxidases, hyperglycemia, and inflammation), and the redox-sensitive signaling networks (protein kinases, transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators). Molecular switches deciding on the renal cells fate in diabetic nephropathy are presented, such as hypertrophy versus death choices in mesangial cells and podocytes. Finally, the antioxidant response of renal cells in diabetic nephropathy is tackled, with emphasis on targeted therapy. An integrative approach is needed for identifying key molecular networks which control cellular responses triggered by the array of stressors in diabetic nephropathy. This will foster the discovery of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis, and will guide the discovery of new therapeutic approaches for personalized medicine in diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Cell Type-specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaochang; Chen, Ming Hui; Wu, Xuebing; Kodani, Andrew; Fan, Jean; Doan, Ryan; Ozawa, Manabu; Ma, Jacqueline; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Reiter, Jeremy F.; Black, Douglas L.; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains—especially in cytoskeletal proteins—and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. While Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1 binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development. PMID:27565344

  7. Cell fate decisions emerge as phages cooperate or compete inside their host

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Jimmy T.; Székely, Tamás; Shao, Qiuyan; Balázsi, Gábor; Zeng, Lanying

    2017-01-01

    The system of the bacterium Escherichia coli and its virus, bacteriophage lambda, is paradigmatic for gene regulation in cell-fate development, yet insight about its mechanisms and complexities are limited due to insufficient resolution of study. Here we develop a 4-colour fluorescence reporter system at the single-virus level, combined with computational models to unravel both the interactions between phages and how individual phages determine cellular fates. We find that phages cooperate during lysogenization, compete among each other during lysis, and that confusion between the two pathways occasionally occurs. Additionally, we observe that phage DNAs have fluctuating cellular arrival times and vie for resources to replicate, enabling the interplay during different developmental paths, where each phage genome may make an individual decision. These varied strategies could separate the selection for replication-optimizing beneficial mutations during lysis from sequence diversification during lysogeny, allowing rapid adaptation of phage populations for various environments. PMID:28165024

  8. Ah, sweet mystery of death! Galectins and control of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Joseph D; Baum, Linda G

    2002-10-01

    Control of cell death is critical in eukaryotic development, immune system homeostasis, and control of tumorigenesis. The galectin family of lectins is implicated in all of these processes. Other families of molecules function as death receptors or death effectors, but galectins are uniquely capable of acting both extracellularly and intracellularly to control cell death. Extracellularly, galectins cross-link glycan ligands to transduce signals that lead directly to death or that influence other signals regulating cell fate. Intracellular expression of galectins can modulate other signals controlling cell viability. Individual galectins can act on multiple cell types, and multiple galectins can act on the same cell. Understanding how galectins regulate cell viability and function will broaden our knowledge of the roles of galectins in basic biological processes and facilitate development of therapeutic applications for galectins in autoimmunity, transplant-related disease, and cancer.

  9. Fate study of water-borne gram positive vegetative bacterial cells with Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Tripathi, Ashish; Minter, Jennifer; Wilcox, Phillip; Christesen, Steven

    2010-04-01

    We present an initial bacterial fate study of Gram positive vegetative cells suspended in water and stored at ambient room temperature via Raman spectroscopy monitoring. Two types of cells were considered for this study: vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis which contain the polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHBA) as an energy storage compound and Bacillus subtlilis cells which do not. The cells were cultured specifically for this project. Immediately following the culturing phase, the bacteria were extracted, cleaned and at the onset of the study were suspended in de-ionized water and stored at room temperature. Aliquots of suspensions were deposited onto aluminum slides at different times and allowed to dry for Raman analysis. Spectra from multiple regions of each dried spot and each deposit time were acquired along with the bright-field and fluorescence images. Results were examined to investigate the effect of suspension time on the spectral signatures as well as the fate behavior of the three types of cells investigated. The cells were monitored daily for over a 14 period during which time the onset of starvation induced sporulation was observed.

  10. Asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila bristle lineage: from the polarization of sensory organ precursor cells to Notch-mediated binary fate decision.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, François

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a simple and evolutionary conserved process whereby a mother divides to generate two daughter cells with distinct developmental potentials. This process can generate cell fate diversity during development. Fate asymmetry may result from the unequal segregation of molecules and/or organelles between the two daughter cells. Here, I will review how fate asymmetry is regulated in the sensory bristle lineage in Drosophila and focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying ACD of the sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs). For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  11. Internalization of multiple cells during C. elegans gastrulation depends on common cytoskeletal mechanisms but different cell polarity and cell fate regulators

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, Jessica R.; Goldstein, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the links between developmental patterning mechanisms and force-producing cytoskeletal mechanisms is a central goal in studies of morphogenesis. Gastrulation is the first morphogenetic event in the development of many organisms. Gastrulation involves the internalization of surface cells, often driven by the contraction of actomyosin networks that are deployed with spatial precision -- both in specific cells and in a polarized manner within each cell. These cytoskeletal mechanisms rely on different cell fate and cell polarity regulators in different organisms. C. elegans gastrulation presents an opportunity to examine the extent to which diverse mechanisms may be used by dozens of cells that are internalized at distinct times within a single organism. We identified 66 cells that are internalized in C. elegans gastrulation, many of which were not known previously to gastrulate. To gain mechanistic insights into how these cells internalize, we genetically manipulated cell fate, cell polarity and cytoskeletal regulators and determined the effects on cell internalization. We found that cells of distinct lineages depend on common actomyosin-based mechanisms to gastrulate, but different cell fate regulators, and, surprisingly, different cell polarity regulators. We conclude that diverse cell fate and cell polarity regulators control common mechanisms of morphogenesis in C. elegans. The results highlight the variety of developmental patterning mechanisms that can be associated with common cytoskeletal mechanisms in the morphogenesis of an animal embryo. PMID:20875815

  12. Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect the Immature Brain in Rats and Modulate Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin; Oppliger, Byron; Joerger-Messerli, Marianne; Reinhart, Ursula; Barnea, Eytan; Paidas, Michael; Kramer, Boris W; Surbek, Daniel V; Schoeberlein, Andreina

    2017-02-15

    The development of a mammalian brain is a complex and long-lasting process. Not surprisingly, preterm birth is the leading cause of death in newborns and children. Advances in perinatal care reduced mortality, but morbidity still represents a major burden. New therapeutic approaches are thus desperately needed. Given that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) emerged as a promising candidate for cell therapy, we transplanted MSCs derived from the Wharton's Jelly (WJ-MSCs) to reduce the burden of immature brain injury in a murine animal model. WJ-MSCs transplantation resulted in protective activity characterized by reduced myelin loss and astroglial activation. WJ-MSCs improved locomotor behavior as well. To address the underlying mechanisms, we tested the key regulators of responses to DNA-damaging agents, such as cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase/calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKA/PKC), cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated/ATM- and Rad3-related (ATM/ATR) substrates, protein kinase B (Akt), and 14-3-3 binding protein partners. We characterized WJ-MSCs using a specific profiler polymerase chain reaction array. We provide evidence that WJ-MSCs target pivotal regulators of the cell fate such as CDK/14-3-3/Akt signaling. We identified leukemia inhibitory factor as a potential candidate of WJ-MSCs' induced modifications as well. We hypothesize that WJ-MSCs may exert adaptive responses depending on the type of injury they are facing, making them prominent candidates for cell therapy in perinatal injuries.

  13. The binding, transport and fate of aluminium in biological cells.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Mold, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust and yet, paradoxically, it has no known biological function. Aluminium is biochemically reactive, it is simply that it is not required for any essential process in extant biota. There is evidence neither of element-specific nor evolutionarily conserved aluminium biochemistry. This means that there are no ligands or chaperones which are specific to its transport, there are no transporters or channels to selectively facilitate its passage across membranes, there are no intracellular storage proteins to aid its cellular homeostasis and there are no pathways which evolved to enable the metabolism and excretion of aluminium. Of course, aluminium is found in every compartment of every cell of every organism, from virus through to Man. Herein we have investigated each of the 'silent' pathways and metabolic events which together constitute a form of aluminium homeostasis in biota, identifying and evaluating as far as is possible what is known and, equally importantly, what is unknown about its uptake, transport, storage and excretion.

  14. [Genetic transformation and fate of heterological DNA in bacterial cells].

    PubMed

    Piechowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    Secretion of a metabolite enabling Streptococci to undergo genetic transformation was discovered. The metabolite combined with an optimization process were applied to increase the transformation yield about 20-fold. It was observed that large amounts of DNA exert a bactericidal effect, indicating the ability of at least 70% of cells to uptake the polymer. While studying the molecular mechanism of transformation of Bacillus subtilis it was shown that the uptaken DNA forms complexes with bacterial proteins, which hinders determination of its structure. A method was found to dissociate these complexes which enabled to determine the single-stranded structure of the uptaken DNA. Donor DNA fragments incorporated into the host DNA were of about 10 Da. Non-transforming DNA can be uptaken similarly but does not undergo incorporation into the host DNA. The selectivity of Bacillus subtilis receptors was determined towards DNA of phages containing modified bases: uracil, putrescinyl-thymine and its acetylated derivative, 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine and its glycosylated derivative and also towards double-stranded RNA of f2 phage. All these modifications were tolerated by the cellular receptors, with the exception of glycosylation and the 2'-OH group in RNA.

  15. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  16. Stencil Micropatterning for Spatial Control of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Fate Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun; Sahni, Geetika; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the intrinsic ability to differentiate and self-organize into distinct tissue patterns, although this requires the presentation of spatial environmental cues, i.e., biochemical and mechanical gradients. Cell micropatterning technologies potentially offer the means to spatially control stem cell microenvironments and organize the resultant differentiation fates. Here, we describe stencil micropatterning as a simple and robust method to generate hPSC micropatterns for controlling hPSC differentiation patterns. hPSC micropatterns are specified by the geometries of the cell stencil through-holes, which physically confine the locations where the underlying extracellular matrix and hPSCs can access and attach to the substrate. This confers the unique capability of stencil micropatterning to work with a variety of culture substrates and extracellular matrices for optimal hPSC culture. We present the detailed steps of stencil micropatterning to successfully generate hPSC micropatterns, which can be used to investigate how spatial polarization of cell adhesion results in cell fate heterogeneity.

  17. A BMP pathway regulates cell fate allocation along the sea urchin animal-vegetal embryonic axis.

    PubMed

    Angerer, L M; Oleksyn, D W; Logan, C Y; McClay, D R; Dale, L; Angerer, R C

    2000-03-01

    To examine whether a BMP signaling pathway functions in specification of cell fates in sea urchin embryos, we have cloned sea urchin BMP2/4, analyzed its expression in time and space in developing embryos and assayed the developmental consequences of changing its concentration through mRNA injection experiments. These studies show that BMP4 mRNAs accumulate transiently during blastula stages, beginning around the 200-cell stage, 14 hours postfertilization. Soon after the hatching blastula stage, BMP2/4 transcripts can be detected in presumptive ectoderm, where they are enriched on the oral side. Injection of BMP2/4 mRNA at the one-cell stage causes a dose-dependent suppression of commitment of cells to vegetal fates and ectoderm differentiates almost exclusively as a squamous epithelial tissue. In contrast, NOGGIN, an antagonist of BMP2/4, enhances differentiation of endoderm, a vegetal tissue, and promotes differentiation of cells characteristic of the ciliated band, which contains neurogenic ectoderm. These findings support a model in which the balance of BMP2/4 signals produced by animal cell progeny and opposing vegetalizing signals sent during cleavage stages regulate the position of the ectoderm/ endoderm boundary. In addition, BMP2/4 levels influence the decision within ectoderm between epidermal and nonepidermal differentiation.

  18. Concise review: harmonies played by microRNAs in cell fate reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Sharif; Asgari, Sassan; Baharvand, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    It is now well-established that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to alternative cell fates by ectopic coexpression of defined factors. Reprogramming technology has uncovered a huge plasticity besides gene regulatory networks (GRNs) of differentiated cell states. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are an integral part of GRNs, have recently emerged as a powerful reprogramming toolbox. They regulate numerous genes, thereby modulating virtually all cellular processes, including somatic cell reprogramming. Not only can miRNAs provide novel opportunities for interrogating mechanisms of induced pluripotency and direct lineage reprogramming but they also offer hope for the efficient creation of safe cell sources for regenerative medicine. In reviewing landmark roles of miRNAs in cell reprogramming, we offer suggestions for evolution of the reprogramming field.

  19. Extracellular matrix of secondary lymphoid organs impacts on B-cell fate and survival

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Nathalie; Ruegg, Markus A.; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Winkler, Thomas H.; Kearney, John F.; Cardell, Susanna; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We describe a unique extracellular matrix (ECM) niche in the spleen, the marginal zone (MZ), characterized by the basement membrane glycoproteins, laminin α5 and agrin, that promotes formation of a specialized population of MZ B lymphocytes that respond rapidly to blood-borne antigens. Mice with reduced laminin α5 expression show reduced MZ B cells and increased numbers of newly formed (NF) transitional B cells that migrate from the bone marrow, without changes in other immune or stromal cell compartments. Transient integrin α6β1-mediated interaction of NF B cells with laminin α5 in the MZ supports the MZ B-cell population, their long-term survival, and antibody response. Data suggest that the unique 3D structure and biochemical composition of the ECM of lymphoid organs impacts on immune cell fate. PMID:23847204

  20. Sr-substituted bone cements direct mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts fate

    PubMed Central

    Panseri, Silvia; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Tampieri, Anna; Sprio, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Strontium-substituted apatitic bone cements enriched with sodium alginate were developed as a potential modulator of bone cells fate. The biological impact of the bone cement were investigated in vitro through the study of the effect of the nanostructured apatitic composition and the doping of strontium on mesenchymal stem cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoclasts behaviours. Up to 14 days of culture the bone cells viability, proliferation, morphology and gene expression profiles were evaluated. The results showed that different concentrations of strontium were able to evoke a cell-specific response, in fact an inductive effect on mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and pre-osteoblasts proliferation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclasts activity were observed. Moreover, the apatitic structure of the cements provided a biomimetic environment suitable for bone cells growth. Therefore, the combination of biological features of this bone cement makes it as promising biomaterials for tissue regeneration. PMID:28196118

  1. In Vivo Fate Imaging of Intracerebral Stem Cell Grafts in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nelles, Melanie; Beyrau, Andreas; Hoehn, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    We generated transgenic human neural stem cells (hNSCs) stably expressing the reporter genes Luciferase for bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and GFP for fluorescence imaging, for multimodal imaging investigations. These transgenic hNSCs were further labeled with a clinically approved perfluoropolyether to perform parallel 19F MRI studies. In vitro validation demonstrated normal cell proliferation and differentiation of the transgenic and additionally labeled hNSCs, closely the same as the wild type cell line, making them suitable for in vivo application. Labeled and unlabeled transgenic hNSCs were implanted into the striatum of mouse brain. The time profile of their cell fate after intracerebral grafting was monitored during nine days following implantation with our multimodal imaging approach, assessing both functional and anatomical condition. The 19F MRI demarcated the graft location and permitted to estimate the cell number in the graft. BLI showed a pronounce cell loss during this monitoring period, indicated by the decrease of the viability signal. The in vivo obtained cell fate results were further validated and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. We could show that the surviving cells of the graft continued to differentiate into early neurons, while the severe cell loss could be explained by an inflammatory reaction to the graft, showing the graft being surrounded by activated microglia and macrophages. These results are different from earlier cell survival studies of our group where we had implanted the identical cells into the same mouse strain but in the cortex and not in the striatum. The cortical transplanted cells did not show any loss in viability but only pronounced and continuous neuronal differentiation. PMID:26641453

  2. Genetic Regulation of Fate Decisions in Therapeutic T Cells to Enhance Tumor Protection and Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Veliça, Pedro; Zech, Mathias; Henson, Sian; Holler, Angelika; Manzo, Teresa; Pike, Rebecca; Santos E Sousa, Pedro; Zhang, Lei; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Pule, Martin; Stauss, Hans; Chakraverty, Ronjon

    2015-07-01

    A key challenge in the field of T-cell immunotherapy for cancer is creating a suitable platform for promoting differentiation of effector cells while at the same time enabling self-renewal needed for long-term memory. Although transfer of less differentiated memory T cells increases efficacy through greater expansion and persistence in vivo, the capacity of such cells to sustain effector functions within immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments may still be limiting. We have therefore directly compared the impact of effector versus memory differentiation of therapeutic T cells in tumor-bearing mice by introducing molecular switches that regulate cell fate decisions via mTOR. Ectopic expression of RAS homolog enriched in brain (RHEB) increased mTORC1 signaling, promoted a switch to aerobic glycolysis, and increased expansion of effector T cells. By rapidly infiltrating tumors, RHEB-transduced T cells significantly reduced the emergence of immunoedited escape variants. In contrast, expression of proline-rich Akt substrate of 40 kDa (PRAS40) inhibited mTORC1, promoted quiescence, and blocked tumor infiltration. Fate mapping studies following transient expression of PRAS40 demonstrated that mTORC1(low) T cells made no contribution to initial tumor control but instead survived to become memory cells proficient in generating recall immunity. Our data support the design of translational strategies for generating heterogeneous T-cell immunity against cancer, with the appropriate balance between promoting effector differentiation and self-renewal. Unlike pharmacologic inhibitors, the genetic approach described here allows for upregulation as well as inhibition of the mTORC1 pathway and is highly selective for the therapeutic T cells without affecting systemic mTORC1 functions.

  3. Long-term fate of neural precursor cells following transplantation into developing and adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Lepore, A C; Neuhuber, B; Connors, T M; Han, S S W; Liu, Y; Daniels, M P; Rao, M S; Fischer, I

    2006-05-12

    Successful strategies for transplantation of neural precursor cells for replacement of lost or dysfunctional CNS cells require long-term survival of grafted cells and integration with the host system, potentially for the life of the recipient. It is also important to demonstrate that transplants do not result in adverse outcomes. Few studies have examined the long-term properties of transplanted neural precursor cells in the CNS, particularly in non-neurogenic regions of the adult. The aim of the present study was to extensively characterize the fate of defined populations of neural precursor cells following transplantation into the developing and adult CNS (brain and spinal cord) for up to 15 months, including integration of graft-derived neurons with the host. Specifically, we employed neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors, which represent neural precursor cells with lineage restrictions for neuronal and glial fate, respectively. Transplanted cells were prepared from embryonic day-13.5 fetal spinal cord of transgenic donor rats that express the marker gene human placental alkaline phosphatase to achieve stable and reliable graft tracking. We found that in both developing and adult CNS grafted cells showed long-term survival, morphological maturation, extensive distribution and differentiation into all mature CNS cell types (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes). Graft-derived neurons also formed synapses, as identified by electron microscopy, suggesting that transplanted neural precursor cells integrated with adult CNS. Furthermore, grafts did not result in any apparent deleterious outcomes. We did not detect tumor formation, cells did not localize to unwanted locations and no pronounced immune response was present at the graft sites. The long-term stability of neuronal-restricted precursors and glial-restricted precursors and the lack of adverse effects suggest that transplantation of lineage-restricted neural precursor cells can

  4. Sex determination. foxl3 is a germ cell-intrinsic factor involved in sperm-egg fate decision in medaka.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Toshiya; Sato, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Watakabe, Ikuko; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Suyama, Mikita; Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Minoru

    2015-07-17

    Sex determination is an essential step in the commitment of a germ cell to a sperm or egg. However, the intrinsic factors that determine the sexual fate of vertebrate germ cells are unknown. Here, we show that foxl3, which is expressed in germ cells but not somatic cells in the gonad, is involved in sperm-egg fate decision in medaka fish. Adult XX medaka with disrupted foxl3 developed functional sperm in the expanded germinal epithelium of a histologically functional ovary. In chimeric medaka, mutant germ cells initiated spermatogenesis in female wild-type gonad. These results indicate that a germ cell-intrinsic cue for the sperm-egg fate decision is present in medaka and that spermatogenesis can proceed in a female gonadal environment.

  5. The fate of cranial neural crest cells in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Rolf; Joss, Jean; Olsson, Lennart

    2008-06-15

    The cranial neural crest has been shown to give rise to a diversity of cells and tissues, including cartilage, bone and connective tissue, in a variety of tetrapods and in the zebrafish. It has been claimed, however, that in the Australian lungfish these tissues are not derived from the cranial neural crest, and even that no migrating cranial neural crest cells exist in this species. We have earlier documented that cranial neural crest cells do migrate, although they emerge late, in the Australian lungfish. Here, we have used the lipophilic fluorescent dye, DiI, to label premigratory cranial neural crest cells and follow their fate until stage 43, when several cranial skeletal elements have started to differentiate. The timing and extent of their migration was investigated, and formation of mandibular, hyoid and branchial streams documented. Cranial neural crest was shown to contribute cells to several parts of the head skeleton, including the trabecula cranii and derivatives of the mandibular arch (e.g., Meckel's cartilage, quadrate), the hyoid arch (e.g., the ceratohyal) and the branchial arches (ceratobranchials I-IV), as well as to the connective tissue surrounding the myofibers in cranial muscles. We conclude that cranial neural crest migration and fate in the Australian lungfish follow the stereotyped pattern documented in other vertebrates.

  6. SOX17 Is a Critical Specifier of Human Primordial Germ Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoko; Weinberger, Leehee; Tang, Walfred W.C.; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Viukov, Sergey; Manor, Yair S.; Dietmann, Sabine; Hanna, Jacob H.; Surani, M. Azim

    2015-01-01

    Summary Specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs) marks the beginning of the totipotent state. However, without a tractable experimental model, the mechanism of human PGC (hPGC) specification remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate specification of hPGC-like cells (hPGCLCs) from germline competent pluripotent stem cells. The characteristics of hPGCLCs are consistent with the embryonic hPGCs and a germline seminoma that share a CD38 cell-surface marker, which collectively defines likely progression of the early human germline. Remarkably, SOX17 is the key regulator of hPGC-like fate, whereas BLIMP1 represses endodermal and other somatic genes during specification of hPGCLCs. Notable mechanistic differences between mouse and human PGC specification could be attributed to their divergent embryonic development and pluripotent states, which might affect other early cell-fate decisions. We have established a foundation for future studies on resetting of the epigenome in hPGCLCs and hPGCs for totipotency and the transmission of genetic and epigenetic information. PMID:25543152

  7. Gastrin: a distinct fate of neurogenin3 positive progenitor cells in the embryonic pancreas.

    PubMed

    Suissa, Yaron; Magenheim, Judith; Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Hija, Ayat; Collombat, Patrick; Mansouri, Ahmed; Sussel, Lori; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz; McCracken, Kyle; Wells, James M; Heller, R Scott; Dor, Yuval; Glaser, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenin3(+) (Ngn3(+)) progenitor cells in the developing pancreas give rise to five endocrine cell types secreting insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. Gastrin is a hormone produced primarily by G-cells in the stomach, where it functions to stimulate acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. Gastrin is expressed in the embryonic pancreas and is common in islet cell tumors, but the lineage and regulators of pancreatic gastrin(+) cells are not known. We report that gastrin is abundantly expressed in the embryonic pancreas and disappears soon after birth. Some gastrin(+) cells in the developing pancreas co-express glucagon, ghrelin or pancreatic polypeptide, but many gastrin(+) cells do not express any other islet hormone. Pancreatic gastrin(+) cells express the transcription factors Nkx6.1, Nkx2.2 and low levels of Pdx1, and derive from Ngn3(+) endocrine progenitor cells as shown by genetic lineage tracing. Using mice deficient for key transcription factors we show that gastrin expression depends on Ngn3, Nkx2.2, NeuroD1 and Arx, but not Pax4 or Pax6. Finally, gastrin expression is induced upon differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to pancreatic endocrine cells expressing insulin. Thus, gastrin(+) cells are a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas and an alternative fate of Ngn3+ cells.

  8. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shaad M; Busser, Brian W; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M

    2014-02-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks.

  9. Machine learning classification of cell-specific cardiac enhancers uncovers developmental subnetworks regulating progenitor cell division and cell fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Busser, Brian W.; Huang, Di; Cozart, Elizabeth J.; Michaud, Sébastien; Zhu, Xianmin; Jeffries, Neal; Aboukhalil, Anton; Bulyk, Martha L.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Michelson, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila heart is composed of two distinct cell types, the contractile cardial cells (CCs) and the surrounding non-muscle pericardial cells (PCs), development of which is regulated by a network of conserved signaling molecules and transcription factors (TFs). Here, we used machine learning with array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data and TF sequence motifs to computationally classify cell type-specific cardiac enhancers. Extensive testing of predicted enhancers at single-cell resolution revealed the added value of ChIP data for modeling cell type-specific activities. Furthermore, clustering the top-scoring classifier sequence features identified novel cardiac and cell type-specific regulatory motifs. For example, we found that the Myb motif learned by the classifier is crucial for CC activity, and the Myb TF acts in concert with two forkhead domain TFs and Polo kinase to regulate cardiac progenitor cell divisions. In addition, differential motif enrichment and cis-trans genetic studies revealed that the Notch signaling pathway TF Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] discriminates PC from CC enhancer activities. Collectively, these studies elucidate molecular pathways used in the regulatory decisions for proliferation and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells, implicate Su(H) in regulating cell fate decisions of these progenitors, and document the utility of enhancer modeling in uncovering developmental regulatory subnetworks. PMID:24496624

  10. The Hippo pathway member YAP enhances human neural crest cell fate and migration.

    PubMed

    Hindley, Christopher J; Condurat, Alexandra Larisa; Menon, Vishal; Thomas, Ria; Azmitia, Luis M; Davis, Jason A; Pruszak, Jan

    2016-03-16

    The Hippo/YAP pathway serves as a major integrator of cell surface-mediated signals and regulates key processes during development and tumorigenesis. The neural crest is an embryonic tissue known to respond to multiple environmental cues in order to acquire appropriate cell fate and migration properties. Using multiple in vitro models of human neural development (pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells; LUHMES, NTERA2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines), we investigated the role of Hippo/YAP signaling in neural differentiation and neural crest development. We report that the activity of YAP promotes an early neural crest phenotype and migration, and provide the first evidence for an interaction between Hippo/YAP and retinoic acid signaling in this system.

  11. Sequoia regulates cell fate decisions in the external sensory organs of adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Hillary K; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Yamamoto, Shinya; Schulze, Karen L; Bellen, Hugo J

    2009-06-01

    The adult Drosophila external sensory organ (ESO), comprising the hair, socket, neuron, sheath and glia cells, arises through the asymmetric division of sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs). In a mosaic screen designed to identify new components in ESO development, we isolated mutations in sequoia, which encodes a putative zinc-finger transcription factor that has previously been shown to have a role in dendritogenesis. Here, we show that adult clones mutant for seq exhibit a loss of hair cells and a gain of socket cells. We propose that the seq mutant phenotype arises, in part, owing to the loss of several crucial transcription factors known to be important in peripheral nervous system development such as D-Pax2, Prospero and Hamlet. Thus, Sequoia is a new upstream regulator of genes that orchestrates cell fate specification during development of the adult ESO lineage.

  12. Emergence of Form from Function - Mechanical Engineering Approaches to Probe the Role of Stem Cell Mechanoadaptation in Sealing Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Knothe Tate, Melissa L; Gunning, Peter W; Sansalone, Vittorio

    2016-10-14

    Stem cell "mechanomics" refers to the effect of mechanical cues on stem cell and matrix biology, where cell shape and fate are intrinsic manifestations of form and function. Before specialization, the stem cell itself serves as a sensor and actuator; its structure emerges from its local mechanical milieu as the cell adapts over time. Coupling of novel spatiotemporal imaging and computational methods allows for linking of the energy of adaptation to the structure, biology and mechanical function of the cell. Cutting edge imaging methods enable probing of mechanisms by which stem cells' emergent anisotropic architecture and fate commitment occurs. A novel cell-scale model provides a mechanistic framework to describe stem cell growth and remodeling through mechanical feedback; making use of a generalized virtual power principle, the model accounts for the rate of doing work or the rate of using energy to effect the work. This coupled approach provides a basis to elucidate mechanisms underlying the stem cell's innate capacity to adapt to mechanical stimuli as well as the role of mechanoadaptation in lineage commitment. An understanding of stem cell mechanoadaptation is key to deciphering lineage commitment, during prenatal development, postnatal wound healing, and engineering of tissues.

  13. Chemokines influence the migration and fate of neural precursor cells from the young adult and middle-aged rat subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R J; Mehrabi, N F; Maucksch, C; Connor, B

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a role for the chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α and GRO-α in directing subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural precursor cell migration towards the site of cell death in the adult rodent brain. However the influence of chemokines such as MCP-1, MIP-1α and GRO-α on the differentiation of adult neural precursor cells has not previously been investigated. Further, as the majority of neurological disorders and injuries occur during ageing, it is important to investigate the effect of chemokines on adult neural precursor cell cultures obtained from the ageing brain. This study therefore examined the effect of MCP-1, MIP-1α and GRO-α on SVZ-derived neural precursor cell differentiation in vitro, and assessed whether precursor cells from the middle-aged rat brain (13 months old) follow the same migratory and differential profile as neural precursor cells obtained from the young adult rat brain (2 months old). We observed that each of the chemokines examined generated differing effects in regards to neuronal or glial differentiation. Further, both MIP-1α and GRO-α increased total cell number, suggesting an effect on precursor cell proliferation and/or survival. In agreement with cultures obtained from young adult brains, SVZ-derived neural precursor cells cultured from the middle-aged brain exhibited chemotactic migration in response to a concentration gradient. These results indicate that the chemokines MCP-1, MIP-1α and GRO-α can influence both the migration and fate choice of SVZ-derived neural precursor cells, as well as promoting cell viability. While a response to each of these chemokines is maintained in the middle-aged brain, a distinct age-related alteration in differential fate can be identified.

  14. Engineering Spatial Control of Multiple Differentiation Fates within a Stem Cell Population

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Dai Fei Elmer; Chu, Bur; Phillippi, Julie A.; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Huard, Johnny; Weiss, Lee E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2011-01-01

    The capability to engineer microenvironmental cues to direct a stem cell population toward multiple fates, simultaneously, in spatially defined regions is important for understanding the maintenance and repair of multi-tissue units. We have previously developed an inkjet-based bioprinter to create patterns of solid-phase growth factors (GFs) immobilized to an extracellular matrix (ECM) substrate, and applied this approach to drive muscle-derived stem cells toward osteoblasts ‘on–pattern’ and myocytes ‘off–pattern’ simultaneously. Here this technology is extended to spatially control osteoblast, tenocyte and myocyte differentiation simultaneously. Utilizing immunofluorescence staining to identify tendon-promoting GFs, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was shown to upregulate the tendon marker Scleraxis (Scx) in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal fibroblasts, C2C12 myoblasts and primary muscle-derived stem cells, while downregulating the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Quantitative PCR studies indicated that FGF-2 may direct stem cells towards a tendon fate via the Ets family members of transcription factors such as pea3 and erm. Neighboring patterns of FGF-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) printed onto a single fibrin-coated coverslip upregulated Scx and the osteoblast marker ALP, respectively, while non-printed regions showed spontaneous myotube differentiation. This work illustrates spatial control of multi-phenotype differentiation and may have potential in the regeneration of multi-tissue units. PMID:21316755

  15. Neuronal cell fate diversification controlled by sub-temporal action of Kruppel

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Johannes; Gabilondo, Hugo; Benito-Sipos, Jonathan; Thor, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    During Drosophila embryonic nervous system development, neuroblasts express a programmed cascade of five temporal transcription factors that govern the identity of cells generated at different time-points. However, these five temporal genes fall short of accounting for the many distinct cell types generated in large lineages. Here, we find that the late temporal gene castor sub-divides its large window in neuroblast 5–6 by simultaneously activating two cell fate determination cascades and a sub-temporal regulatory program. The sub-temporal program acts both upon itself and upon the determination cascades to diversify the castor window. Surprisingly, the early temporal gene Kruppel acts as one of the sub-temporal genes within the late castor window. Intriguingly, while the temporal gene castor activates the two determination cascades and the sub-temporal program, spatial cues controlling cell fate in the latter part of the 5–6 lineage exclusively act upon the determination cascades. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19311.001 PMID:27740908

  16. Stem cell and progenitor fate in the mammalian intestine: Notch and lateral inhibition in homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Rocio; Cremona, Catherine A; Behrens, Axel

    2015-05-01

    The control of cell fate decisions is vital to build functional organs and maintain normal tissue homeostasis, and many pathways and processes cooperate to direct cells to an appropriate final identity. Because of its continuously renewing state and its carefully organised hierarchy, the mammalian intestine has become a powerful model to dissect these pathways in health and disease. One of the signalling pathways that is key to maintaining the balance between proliferation and differentiation in the intestinal epithelium is the Notch pathway, most famous for specifying distinct cell fates in adjacent cells via the evolutionarily conserved process of lateral inhibition. Here, we will review recent discoveries that advance our understanding of how cell fate in the mammalian intestine is decided by Notch and lateral inhibition, focusing on the molecular determinants that regulate protein turnover, transcriptional control and epigenetic regulation.

  17. Asynchronous fate decisions by single cells collectively ensure consistent lineage composition in the mouse blastocyst

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Néstor; Williams, Kiah M.; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular communication is essential to coordinate the behaviour of individual cells during organismal development. The preimplantation mammalian embryo is a paradigm of tissue self-organization and regulative development; however, the cellular basis of these regulative abilities has not been established. Here we use a quantitative image analysis pipeline to undertake a high-resolution, single-cell level analysis of lineage specification in the inner cell mass (ICM) of the mouse blastocyst. We show that a consistent ratio of epiblast and primitive endoderm lineages is achieved through incremental allocation of cells from a common progenitor pool, and that the lineage composition of the ICM is conserved regardless of its size. Furthermore, timed modulation of the FGF-MAPK pathway shows that individual progenitors commit to either fate asynchronously during blastocyst development. These data indicate that such incremental lineage allocation provides the basis for a tissue size control mechanism that ensures the generation of lineages of appropriate size. PMID:27857135

  18. Complex interplays in immune T-cell differentiation and developmental fate determination.

    PubMed

    Duc, Huynh Thien

    2011-08-01

    Aspects relevant to immune T-cell differentiation and fate determination have been examined and discussed in the context of transcription factors, initiating cytokines in association with cognate antigen activation. It appears that the differentiation optional program, in light of recent results related to genetic as well as epigenetic mechanisms, is not predetermined and irreversibly fixed; rather, there is some degree of flexibility allowing the manipulation of remodeling the already differentiated effector cell subsets/lineages. From the progress obtained it will be possible, in the near future, to tailor and obtain various well-defined and efficient immune effector cell subsets/cell lineages for translational applications in autoimmunity, infectious diseases, graft rejection as well as cancer in safe conditions.

  19. Ascl1 and Gsh1/2 control inhibitory and excitatory cell fate in spinal sensory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Rumiko; Kriks, Sonja; Cordes, Ralf; Gossler, Achim; Ma, Qiufu; Goulding, Martyn

    2006-06-01

    Sensory information from the periphery is integrated and transduced by excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal spinal cord. Recent studies have identified a number of postmitotic factors that control the generation of these sensory interneurons. We show that Gsh1/2 and Ascl1 (Mash1), which are expressed in sensory interneuron progenitors, control the choice between excitatory and inhibitory cell fates in the developing mouse spinal cord. During the early phase of neurogenesis, Gsh1/2 and Ascl1 coordinately regulate the expression of Tlx3, which is a critical postmitotic determinant for dorsal glutamatergic sensory interneurons. However, at later developmental times, Ascl1 controls the expression of Ptf1a in dIL(A) progenitors to promote inhibitory neuron differentiation while at the same time upregulating Notch signaling to ensure the proper generation of dIL(B) excitatory neurons. We propose that this switch in Ascl1 function enables the cogeneration of inhibitory and excitatory sensory interneurons from a common pool of dorsal progenitors.

  20. miR-600 Acts as a Bimodal Switch that Regulates Breast Cancer Stem Cell Fate through WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    El Helou, Rita; Pinna, Guillaume; Cabaud, Olivier; Wicinski, Julien; Bhajun, Ricky; Guyon, Laurent; Rioualen, Claire; Finetti, Pascal; Gros, Abigaelle; Mari, Bernard; Barbry, Pascal; Bertucci, Francois; Bidaut, Ghislain; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Ginestier, Christophe

    2017-02-28

    Breast cancer stem cells (bCSCs) have been implicated in tumor progression and therapeutic resistance; however, the molecular mechanisms that define this state are unclear. We have performed two microRNA (miRNA) gain- and loss-of-function screens to identify miRNAs that regulate the choice between bCSC self-renewal and differentiation. We find that micro-RNA (miR)-600 silencing results in bCSC expansion, while its overexpression reduces bCSC self-renewal, leading to decreased in vivo tumorigenicity. miR-600 targets stearoyl desaturase 1 (SCD1), an enzyme required to produce active, lipid-modified WNT proteins. In the absence of miR-600, WNT signaling is active and promotes self-renewal, whereas overexpression of miR-600 inhibits the production of active WNT and promotes bCSC differentiation. In a series of 120 breast tumors, we found that a low level of miR-600 is correlated with active WNT signaling and a poor prognosis. These findings highlight a miR-600-centered signaling network that governs bCSC-fate decisions and influences tumor progression.

  1. Cell fate after mitotic arrest in different tumor cells is determined by the balance between slippage and apoptotic threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Galán-Malo, Patricia; Vela, Laura; Gonzalo, Oscar; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Gracia-Fleta, Lucía; Naval, Javier; Marzo, Isabel

    2012-02-01

    Microtubule poisons and other anti-mitotic drugs induce tumor death but the molecular events linking mitotic arrest to cell death are still not fully understood. We have analyzed cell fate after mitotic arrest produced by the microtubule-destabilizing drug vincristine in a panel of human tumor cell lines showing different response to vincristine. In Jurkat, RPMI 8226 and HeLa cells, apoptosis was triggered shortly after vincristine-induced mitotic arrest. However, A549 cells, which express a great amount of Bcl-x{sub L} and undetectable amounts of Bak, underwent mitotic slippage prior to cell death. However, when Bcl-x{sub L} gene was silenced in A549 cells, vincristine induced apoptosis during mitotic arrest. Another different behavior was found in MiaPaca2 cells, where vincristine caused death by mitotic catastrophe that switched to apoptosis when cyclin B1 degradation was prevented by proteasome inhibition. Overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} or silencing Bax and Bak expression delayed the onset of apoptosis in Jurkat and RPMI 8226 cells, enabling mitotic slippage and endoreduplication. In HeLa cells, overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} switched cell death from apoptosis to mitotic catastrophe. Mcl-1 offered limited protection to vincristine-induced cell death and Mcl-1 degradation was not essential for vincristine-induced death. All these results, taken together, indicate that the Bcl-x{sub L}/Bak ratio and the ability to degrade cyclin B1 determine cell fate after mitotic arrest in the different tumor cell types. Highlights: ► Vincristine induces cell death by apoptosis or mitotic catastrophe. ► Apoptosis-proficient cells die by apoptosis during mitosis upon vincristine treatment. ► p53wt apoptosis-deficient cells undergo apoptosis from a G1-like tetraploid state. ► p53mt apoptosis-deficient cells can survive and divide giving rise to 8N cells.

  2. Emerging roots alter epidermal cell fate through mechanical and reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Bianka; Kovalev, Alexander; Gorb, Stanislav N; Sauter, Margret

    2012-08-01

    A central question in biology is how spatial information is conveyed to locally establish a developmental program. Rice (Oryza sativa) can survive flash floods by the emergence of adventitious roots from the stem. Epidermal cells that overlie adventitious root primordia undergo cell death to facilitate root emergence. Root growth and epidermal cell death are both controlled by ethylene. This study aimed to identify the signal responsible for the spatial control of cell death. Epidermal cell death correlated with the proximity to root primordia in wild-type and ADVENTITIOUS ROOTLESS1 plants, indicating that the root emits a spatial signal. Ethylene-induced root growth generated a mechanical force of ~18 millinewtons within 1 h. Force application to epidermal cells above root primordia caused cell death in a dose-dependent manner and was inhibited by 1-methylcyclopropene or diphenylene iodonium, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. Exposure of epidermal cells not overlying a root to either force and ethylene or force and the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole induced ectopic cell death. Genetic downregulation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger METALLOTHIONEIN2b likewise promoted force-induced ectopic cell death. Hence, reprogramming of epidermal cell fate by the volatile plant hormone ethylene requires two signals: mechanosensing for spatial resolution and ROS for cell death signaling.

  3. p53-regulated autophagy is controlled by glycolysis and determines cell fate.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Perez, Ricardo E; Davaadelger, Batzaya; Dedkova, Elena N; Blatter, Lothar A; Maki, Carl G

    2015-09-15

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates downstream targets that determine cell fate. Canonical p53 functions include inducing apoptosis, growth arrest, and senescence. Non-canonical p53 functions include its ability to promote or inhibit autophagy and its ability to regulate metabolism. The extent to which autophagy and/or metabolic regulation determines cell fate by p53 is unclear. To address this, we compared cells resistant or sensitive to apoptosis by the p53 activator Nutlin-3a. In resistant cells, glycolysis was maintained upon Nutlin-3a treatment, and activated p53 promoted prosurvival autophagy. In contrast, in apoptosis sensitive cells activated p53 increased superoxide levels and inhibited glycolysis through repression of glycolytic pathway genes. Glycolysis inhibition and increased superoxide inhibited autophagy by repressing ATG genes essential for autophagic vesicle maturation. Inhibiting glycolysis increased superoxide and blocked autophagy in apoptosis-resistant cells, causing p62-dependent caspase-8 activation. Finally, treatment with 2-DG or the autophagy inhibitors chloroquine or bafilomycin A1 sensitized resistant cells to Nutlin-3a-induced apoptosis. Together, these findings reveal novel links between glycolysis and autophagy that determine apoptosis-sensitivity in response to p53. Specifically, the findings indicate 1) that glycolysis plays an essential role in autophagy by limiting superoxide levels and maintaining expression of ATG genes required for autophagic vesicle maturation, 2) that p53 can promote or inhibit autophagy depending on the status of glycolysis, and 3) that inhibiting protective autophagy can expand the breadth of cells susceptible to Nutlin-3a induced apoptosis.

  4. RB1 dual role in proliferation and apoptosis: Cell fate control and implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Indovina, Paola; Pentimalli, Francesca; Casini, Nadia; Vocca, Immacolata; Giordano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB1) tumor suppressor is one of the most frequent and early recognized molecular hallmarks of cancer. RB1, although mainly studied for its role in the regulation of cell cycle, emerged as a key regulator of many biological processes. Among these, RB1 has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, the alteration of which underlies both cancer development and resistance to therapy. RB1 role in apoptosis, however, is still controversial because, depending on the context, the apoptotic cues, and its own status, RB1 can act either by inhibiting or promoting apoptosis. Moreover, the mechanisms whereby RB1 controls both proliferation and apoptosis in a coordinated manner are only now beginning to be unraveled. Here, by reviewing the main studies assessing the effect of RB1 status and modulation on these processes, we provide an overview of the possible underlying molecular mechanisms whereby RB1, and its family members, dictate cell fate in various contexts. We also describe the current antitumoral strategies aimed at the use of RB1 as predictive, prognostic and therapeutic target in cancer. A thorough understanding of RB1 function in controlling cell fate determination is crucial for a successful translation of RB1 status assessment in the clinical setting. PMID:26160835

  5. Ectodysplasin/NF-κB Promotes Mammary Cell Fate via Wnt/β-catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voutilainen, Maria; Lönnblad, Darielle; Shirokova, Vera; Elo, Teresa; Rysti, Elisa; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Schneider, Pascal; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland development commences during embryogenesis with the establishment of a species typical number of mammary primordia on each flank of the embryo. It is thought that mammary cell fate can only be induced along the mammary line, a narrow region of the ventro-lateral skin running from the axilla to the groin. Ectodysplasin (Eda) is a tumor necrosis factor family ligand that regulates morphogenesis of several ectodermal appendages. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of Eda (K14-Eda mice) induces formation of supernumerary mammary placodes along the mammary line. Here, we investigate in more detail the role of Eda and its downstream mediator transcription factor NF-κB in mammary cell fate specification. We report that K14-Eda mice harbor accessory mammary glands also in the neck region indicating wider epidermal cell plasticity that previously appreciated. We show that even though NF-κB is not required for formation of endogenous mammary placodes, it is indispensable for the ability of Eda to induce supernumerary placodes. A genome-wide profiling of Eda-induced genes in mammary buds identified several Wnt pathway components as potential transcriptional targets of Eda. Using an ex vivo culture system, we show that suppression of canonical Wnt signalling leads to a dose-dependent inhibition of supernumerary placodes in K14-Eda tissue explants. PMID:26581094

  6. Stencil Micropatterning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Probing Spatial Organization of Differentiation Fates.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Geetika; Yuan, Jun; Toh, Yi-Chin

    2016-06-17

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have the intrinsic ability to differentiate into all three germ layers. This makes them an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine and experimental modeling of normal and diseased organogenesis. However, the differentiation of hPSCs in vitro is heterogeneous and spatially disordered. Cell micropatterning technologies potentially offer the means to spatially control stem cell microenvironments and organize the resultant differentiation fates. Micropatterning hPSCs needs to take into account the stringent requirements for hPSC survival and maintenance. Here, we describe stencil micropatterning as a method that is highly compatible with hPSCs. hPSC micropatterns are specified by the geometries of the cell stencil through-holes, which physically confine the locations where hPSCs can access and attach to the underlying extracellular matrix-coated substrate. Due to this mode of operation, there is greater flexibility to use substrates that can adequately support hPSCs as compared to other cell micropatterning methods. We also highlight critical steps for the successful generation of hPSC micropatterns. As an example, we demonstrate that stencil micropatterning of hPSCs can be used to modulate spatial polarization of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, which in turn determines mesoendoderm differentiation patterns. This simple and robust method to micropattern hPSCs widens the prospects of establishing experimental models to investigate tissue organization and patterning during early embryonic development.

  7. Deficiency of microRNA miR-34a expands cell fate potential in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jin; Lin, Chao-Po; Risso, Davide; Chen, Sean; Kim, Thomas Aquinas; Tan, Meng How; Li, Jin Billy; Wu, Yalei; Chen, Caifu; Xuan, Zhenyu; Macfarlan, Todd; Peng, Weiqun; Lloyd, K C Kent; Kim, Sang Yong; Speed, Terence P; He, Lin

    2017-02-10

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) efficiently generate all embryonic cell lineages but rarely generate extraembryonic cell types. We found that microRNA miR-34a deficiency expands the developmental potential of mouse pluripotent stem cells, yielding both embryonic and extraembryonic lineages and strongly inducing MuERV-L (MERVL) endogenous retroviruses, similar to what is seen with features of totipotent two-cell blastomeres. miR-34a restricts the acquisition of expanded cell fate potential in pluripotent stem cells, and it represses MERVL expression through transcriptional regulation, at least in part by targeting the transcription factor Gata2. Our studies reveal a complex molecular network that defines and restricts pluripotent developmental potential in cultured ESCs and iPSCs.

  8. Cell Fate Determination and the Switch from Diffuse Growth to Planar Polarity in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balcerowicz, Daria; Schoenaers, Sébastjen; Vissenberg, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots fulfill important functions as they serve in water and nutrient uptake, provide anchorage of the plant body in the soil and in some species form the site of symbiotic interactions with soil-living biota. Root hairs, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specific epidermal cells, significantly increase the root’s surface area and aid in these processes. In this review we focus on the molecular mechanisms that determine the hair and non-hair cell fate of epidermal cells and that define the site on the epidermal cell where the root hair will be initiated (=planar polarity determination). In the model plant Arabidopsis, trichoblast and atrichoblast cell fate results from intra- and intercellular position-dependent signaling and from complex feedback loops that ultimately regulate GL2 expressing and non-expressing cells. When epidermal cells reach the end of the root expansion zone, root hair promoting transcription factors dictate the establishment of polarity within epidermal cells followed by the selection of the root hair initiation site at the more basal part of the trichoblast. Molecular players in the abovementioned processes as well as the role of phytohormones are discussed, and open areas for future experiments are identified. PMID:26779192

  9. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-03-15

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells.

  10. A Blueprint for a Synthetic Genetic Feedback Controller to Reprogram Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Abdallah, Hussein; Qian, Yili; Collins, James J

    2017-01-25

    To artificially reprogram cell fate, experimentalists manipulate the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) that maintain a cell's phenotype. In practice, reprogramming is often performed by constant overexpression of specific transcription factors (TFs). This process can be unreliable and inefficient. Here, we address this problem by introducing a new approach to reprogramming based on mathematical analysis. We demonstrate that reprogramming GRNs using constant overexpression may not succeed in general. Instead, we propose an alternative reprogramming strategy: a synthetic genetic feedback controller that dynamically steers the concentration of a GRN's key TFs to any desired value. The controller works by adjusting TF expression based on the discrepancy between desired and actual TF concentrations. Theory predicts that this reprogramming strategy is guaranteed to succeed, and its performance is independent of the GRN's structure and parameters, provided that feedback gain is sufficiently high. As a case study, we apply the controller to a model of induced pluripotency in stem cells.

  11. SCARECROW, SCR-LIKE 23 and SHORT-ROOT control bundle sheath cell fate and function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongchang; Kong, Danyu; Liu, Xiuwen; Hao, Yueling

    2014-04-01

    Bundle sheath (BS) cells form a single cell layer surrounding the vascular tissue in leaves. In C3 plants, photosynthesis occurs in both the BS and mesophyll cells, but the BS cells are the major sites of photosynthesis in C4 plants, whereas the mesophyll cells are only involved in CO2 fixation. Because C4 plants are more efficient photosynthetically, introduction of the C4 mechanism into C3 plants is considered a key strategy to improve crop yield. One prerequisite for such C3-to-C4 engineering is the ability to manipulate the number and physiology of the BS cells, but the molecular basis of BS cell-fate specification remains unclear. Here we report that mutations in three GRAS family transcription factors, SHORT-ROOT (SHR), SCARECROW (SCR) and SCARECROW-LIKE 23 (SCL23), affect BS cell fate in Arabidopsis thaliana. SCR and SCL23 are expressed specifically in the BS cells and act redundantly in BS cell-fate specification, but their expression pattern and function diverge at later stages of leaf development. Using ChIP-chip experiments and sugar assays, we show that SCR is primarily involved in sugar transport whereas SCL23 functions in mineral transport. SHR is also essential for BS cell-fate specification, but it is expressed in the central vascular tissue. However, the SHR protein moves into the BS cells, where it directly regulates SCR and SCL23 expression. SHR, SCR and SCL23 homologs are present in many plant species, suggesting that this developmental pathway for BS cell-fate specification is likely to be evolutionarily conserved.

  12. Nano-scale control of cellular environment to drive embryonic stem cells selfrenewal and fate.

    PubMed

    Blin, Guillaume; Lablack, Nassrine; Louis-Tisserand, Marianne; Nicolas, Claire; Picart, Catherine; Pucéat, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are pluripotent cells capable to give rise to any embryonic cell lineage. In culture, these cells form colonies creating their own niche. Depending upon the molecular and physico-chemical environment, the pluripotent cells oscillate between two metastable states of pluripotency either reminiscent of the inner cell mass of the embryo or the epiblast, a stage of development which give rise to the three embryonic layers, ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm. Herein, we used PLL/HA nanofilms cross-linked to various degrees to modulate the nanoenvironment of ESCs. Adhesion of ESC on nanofilms increased from native films to highly cross-linked films. The adhesion process was associated with cell proliferation. Expression of genes markers of the ICM decreased with adhesion of cells to cross-linked films. In parallel, genes more reminiscent of the epiblast, were turned on. ESC differentiation within embryoid bodies further revealed that cell pluripotency was better retained when cells did not adhere on native films. We further report that both the stiffness and the chemistry of nanofilms play a key role in modulating the niche of ESC and in turn govern their selfrenewal and fate.

  13. A Multistate Toggle Switch Defines Fungal Cell Fates and Is Regulated by Synergistic Genetic Cues.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Matthew Z; Porman, Allison M; Wang, Na; Mancera, Eugenio; Huang, Denis; Cuomo, Christina A; Bennett, Richard J

    2016-10-01

    Heritable epigenetic changes underlie the ability of cells to differentiate into distinct cell types. Here, we demonstrate that the fungal pathogen Candida tropicalis exhibits multipotency, undergoing stochastic and reversible switching between three cellular states. The three cell states exhibit unique cellular morphologies, growth rates, and global gene expression profiles. Genetic analysis identified six transcription factors that play key roles in regulating cell differentiation. In particular, we show that forced expression of Wor1 or Efg1 transcription factors can be used to manipulate transitions between all three cell states. A model for tristability is proposed in which Wor1 and Efg1 are self-activating but mutually antagonistic transcription factors, thereby forming a symmetrical self-activating toggle switch. We explicitly test this model and show that ectopic expression of WOR1 can induce white-to-hybrid-to-opaque switching, whereas ectopic expression of EFG1 drives switching in the opposite direction, from opaque-to-hybrid-to-white cell states. We also address the stability of induced cell states and demonstrate that stable differentiation events require ectopic gene expression in combination with chromatin-based cues. These studies therefore experimentally test a model of multistate stability and demonstrate that transcriptional circuits act synergistically with chromatin-based changes to drive cell state transitions. We also establish close mechanistic parallels between phenotypic switching in unicellular fungi and cell fate decisions during stem cell reprogramming.

  14. A Multistate Toggle Switch Defines Fungal Cell Fates and Is Regulated by Synergistic Genetic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew Z.; Porman, Allison M.; Wang, Na; Mancera, Eugenio; Bennett, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic changes underlie the ability of cells to differentiate into distinct cell types. Here, we demonstrate that the fungal pathogen Candida tropicalis exhibits multipotency, undergoing stochastic and reversible switching between three cellular states. The three cell states exhibit unique cellular morphologies, growth rates, and global gene expression profiles. Genetic analysis identified six transcription factors that play key roles in regulating cell differentiation. In particular, we show that forced expression of Wor1 or Efg1 transcription factors can be used to manipulate transitions between all three cell states. A model for tristability is proposed in which Wor1 and Efg1 are self-activating but mutually antagonistic transcription factors, thereby forming a symmetrical self-activating toggle switch. We explicitly test this model and show that ectopic expression of WOR1 can induce white-to-hybrid-to-opaque switching, whereas ectopic expression of EFG1 drives switching in the opposite direction, from opaque-to-hybrid-to-white cell states. We also address the stability of induced cell states and demonstrate that stable differentiation events require ectopic gene expression in combination with chromatin-based cues. These studies therefore experimentally test a model of multistate stability and demonstrate that transcriptional circuits act synergistically with chromatin-based changes to drive cell state transitions. We also establish close mechanistic parallels between phenotypic switching in unicellular fungi and cell fate decisions during stem cell reprogramming. PMID:27711197

  15. The Fate of Chrysotile-Induced Multipolar Mitosis and Aneuploid Population in Cultured Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Cortez, Beatriz; Quassollo, Gonzalo; Caceres, Alfredo; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2011-01-01

    Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes. PMID:21483691

  16. Thickness sensing of hMSCs on collagen gel directs stem cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Wen Shing; Tay, Chor Yong; Yu, Haiyang; Li, Ang; Wu, Shu Cheng; Duc, Duong-Hong; Lim, Chwee Teck; Tan, Lay Poh

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} hMSCs appeared to sense thin collagen gel (130 {mu}m) with higher effective modulus as compared to thick gel (1440 {mu}m). {yields} Control of collagen gel thickness can modulate cellular behavior, even stem cell fate (neuronal vs. Quiescent). {yields} Distinct cellular behavior of hMSCs on thin and thick collagen gel suggests long range interaction of hMSCs with collagen gel. -- Abstract: Mechanically compliant substrate provides crucial biomechanical cues for multipotent stem cells to regulate cellular fates such as differentiation, proliferation and maintenance of their phenotype. Effective modulus of which cells sense is not only determined by intrinsic mechanical properties of the substrate, but also the thickness of substrate. From our study, it was found that interference from underlying rigid support at hundreds of microns away could induce significant cellular response. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured on compliant biological gel, collagen type I, of different thickness but identical ECM composition and local stiffness. The cells sensed the thin gel (130 {mu}m) as having a higher effective modulus than the thick gel (1440 {mu}m) and this was reflected in their changes in morphology, actin fibers structure, proliferation and tissue specific gene expression. Commitment into neuronal lineage was observed on the thin gel only. Conversely, the thick gel (1440 {mu}m) was found to act like a substrate with lower effective modulus that inhibited actin fiber polymerization. Stem cells on the thick substrate did not express tissue specific genes and remained at their quiescent state. This study highlighted the need to consider not only the local modulus but also the thickness of biopolymer gel coating during modulation of cellular responses.

  17. A gene expression atlas of a bicoid-depleted Drosophila embryo reveals early canalization of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Staller, Max V; Fowlkes, Charless C; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-02-01

    In developing embryos, gene regulatory networks drive cells towards discrete terminal fates, a process called canalization. We studied the behavior of the anterior-posterior segmentation network in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by depleting a key maternal input, bicoid (bcd), and measuring gene expression patterns of the network at cellular resolution. This method results in a gene expression atlas containing the levels of mRNA or protein expression of 13 core patterning genes over six time points for every cell of the blastoderm embryo. This is the first cellular resolution dataset of a genetically perturbed Drosophila embryo that captures all cells in 3D. We describe the technical developments required to build this atlas and how the method can be employed and extended by others. We also analyze this novel dataset to characterize the degree and timing of cell fate canalization in the segmentation network. We find that in two layers of this gene regulatory network, following depletion of bcd, individual cells rapidly canalize towards normal cell fates. This result supports the hypothesis that the segmentation network directly canalizes cell fate, rather than an alternative hypothesis whereby cells are initially mis-specified and later eliminated by apoptosis. Our gene expression atlas provides a high resolution picture of a classic perturbation and will enable further computational modeling of canalization and gene regulation in this transcriptional network.

  18. A gene expression atlas of a bicoid-depleted Drosophila embryo reveals early canalization of cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Staller, Max V.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Bragdon, Meghan D. J.; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H.

    2015-01-01

    In developing embryos, gene regulatory networks drive cells towards discrete terminal fates, a process called canalization. We studied the behavior of the anterior-posterior segmentation network in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by depleting a key maternal input, bicoid (bcd), and measuring gene expression patterns of the network at cellular resolution. This method results in a gene expression atlas containing the levels of mRNA or protein expression of 13 core patterning genes over six time points for every cell of the blastoderm embryo. This is the first cellular resolution dataset of a genetically perturbed Drosophila embryo that captures all cells in 3D. We describe the technical developments required to build this atlas and how the method can be employed and extended by others. We also analyze this novel dataset to characterize the degree and timing of cell fate canalization in the segmentation network. We find that in two layers of this gene regulatory network, following depletion of bcd, individual cells rapidly canalize towards normal cell fates. This result supports the hypothesis that the segmentation network directly canalizes cell fate, rather than an alternative hypothesis whereby cells are initially mis-specified and later eliminated by apoptosis. Our gene expression atlas provides a high resolution picture of a classic perturbation and will enable further computational modeling of canalization and gene regulation in this transcriptional network. PMID:25605785

  19. Conversion of neurons and glia to external-cell fates in the external sensory organs of Drosophila hamlet mutants by a cousin-cousin cell-type respecification.

    PubMed

    Moore, Adrian W; Roegiers, Fabrice; Jan, Lily Y; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2004-03-15

    The Drosophila external sensory organ forms in a lineage elaborating from a single precursor cell via a stereotypical series of asymmetric divisions. HAMLET transcription factor expression demarcates the lineage branch that generates two internal cell types, the external sensory neuron and thecogen. In HAMLET mutant organs, these internal cells are converted to external cells via an unprecedented cousin-cousin cell-fate respecification event. Conversely, ectopic HAMLET expression in the external cell branch leads to internal cell production. The fate-determining signals NOTCH and PAX2 act at multiple stages of lineage elaboration and HAMLET acts to modulate their activity in a branch-specific manner.

  20. Taenia taeniaeformis: fate and proliferation of mucosal cells during gastric hyperplasia in larvae infected rats.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, J T; Oku, Y; Nonaka, N; Kamiya, M

    2008-04-01

    Fate and proliferation of gastric mucosal cells during hyperplasia of Taenia taeniaeformis eggs inoculated Wistar rats were investigated using PCNA immunohistochemistry, BrdU labeling and other histopathologic staining techniques. Results revealed marked cell proliferation in gastric corpus and antral mucosa of infected rats as evidenced by increased lengths of proliferative zones and indices of BrdU labeling. The gastropathy in corpus was characterized by massive accumulation of precursors, neck and intermediate cells following significant decreases in numbers of parietal and zymogenic cells. Gastropathy in antrum was described with significant increases in precursors and mucous cells. Our results suggested that T. taeniaeformis-induced gastric hyperplasia was initiated by depletion of parietal cells presumably due to the cestode's ES products. As a result, there was inhibition of zymogenic cell differentiation due to the disruption of normal development pathways of gastric mucosal lineages. These sequences of events were considered to cause the increase in cell proliferation and accumulation of intermediate cells resulting to the hyperplastic lesions.

  1. Polycomb protein EZH2 regulates cancer cell fate decision in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Lee, S T; Qiao, Y; Li, Z; Lee, P L; Lee, Y J; Jiang, X; Tan, J; Aau, M; Lim, C Z H; Yu, Q

    2011-11-01

    Polycomb protein histone methyltransferase enhancer of Zeste homologe 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in human malignancy and is implicated in cancer cell proliferation and invasion. However, it is largely unknown whether EZH2 has a role in modulating DNA damage response. Here, we show that EZH2 is an important determinant of cell fate decision in response to genotoxic stress. EZH2 depletion results in abrogation of both cell cycle G1 and G2/M checkpoints, directing DNA damage response toward predominant apoptosis in both p53-proficient and p53-deficient cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Mechanistically, EZH2 regulates DNA damage response in p53 wild-type cells mainly through transcriptional repression of FBXO32, which binds to and directs p21 for proteasome-mediated degradation, whereas it affects p53-deficient cells through regulating Chk1 activation by a distinct mechanism. Furthermore, pharmacological depletion of EZH2 phenocopies the effects of EZH2 knockdown on cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis. These data unravel a crucial role of EZH2 in determining the cancer cell outcome following DNA damage and suggest that therapeutic targeting oncogenic EZH2 might serve as a strategy for improving conventional chemotherapy in a given malignancy.

  2. Modulated DISP3/PTCHD2 expression influences neural stem cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Konířová, Jana; Oltová, Jana; Corlett, Alicia; Kopycińska, Justyna; Kolář, Michal; Bartůněk, Petr; Zíková, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are defined by their dual ability to self-renew through mitotic cell division or differentiate into the varied neural cell types of the CNS. DISP3/PTCHD2 is a sterol-sensing domain-containing protein, highly expressed in neural tissues, whose expression is regulated by thyroid hormone. In the present study, we used a mouse NSC line to investigate what effect DISP3 may have on the self-renewal and/or differentiation potential of the cells. We demonstrated that NSC differentiation triggered significant reduction in DISP3 expression in the resulting astrocytes, neurons and oligodendrocytes. Moreover, when DISP3 expression was disrupted, the NSC “stemness” was suppressed, leading to a larger population of cells undergoing spontaneous neuronal differentiation. Conversely, overexpression of DISP3 resulted in increased NSC proliferation. When NSCs were cultured under differentiation conditions, we observed that the lack of DISP3 augmented the number of NSCs differentiating into each of the neural cell lineages and that neuronal morphology was altered. In contrast, DISP3 overexpression resulted in impaired cell differentiation. Taken together, our findings imply that DISP3 may help dictate the NSC cell fate to either undergo self-renewal or switch to the terminal differentiation cell program. PMID:28134287

  3. Fate of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells and Stereocilia after Loss of the Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuping; Yang, Shiming; Guo, Weiwei; He, David Z.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical activity. The site of hair cell transduction is the hair bundle, an array of stereocilia with different height arranged in a staircase. Tip links connect the apex of each stereocilium to the side of its taller neighbor. The hair bundle and tip links of hair cells are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. It has been shown that hair cells in lower vertebrates and in the mammalian vestibular system may survive bundle loss and undergo self-repair of the stereocilia. Our goals were to determine whether cochlear hair cells could survive the trauma and whether the tip link and/or the hair bundle could be regenerated. We simulated the acoustic trauma-induced tip link damage or stereociliary loss by disrupting tip links or ablating the hair bundles in the cultured organ of Corti from neonatal gerbils. Hair-cell fate and stereociliary morphology and function were examined using confocal and scanning electron microscopies and electrophysiology. Most bundleless hair cells survived and developed for about 2 weeks. However, no spontaneous hair-bundle regeneration was observed. When tip links were ruptured, repair of tip links and restoration of mechanotransduction were observed in less than 24 hours. Our study suggests that the dynamic nature of the hair cell's transduction apparatus is retained despite the fact that regeneration of the hair bundle is lost in mammalian cochlear hair cells. PMID:19955380

  4. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E; Barlow, Linda A

    2015-05-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells.

  5. β-Catenin Signaling Biases Multipotent Lingual Epithelial Progenitors to Differentiate and Acquire Specific Taste Cell Fates

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Dany; Xu, Mingang; Liu, Fei; Millar, Sarah E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous taste bud cell renewal is essential to maintain taste function in adults; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate taste cell turnover are unknown. Using inducible Cre-lox technology, we show that activation of β-catenin signaling in multipotent lingual epithelial progenitors outside of taste buds diverts daughter cells from a general epithelial to a taste bud fate. Moreover, while taste buds comprise 3 morphological types, β-catenin activation drives overproduction of primarily glial-like Type I taste cells in both anterior fungiform (FF) and posterior circumvallate (CV) taste buds, with a small increase in Type II receptor cells for sweet, bitter and umami, but does not alter Type III sour detector cells. Beta-catenin activation in post-mitotic taste bud precursors likewise regulates cell differentiation; forced activation of β-catenin in these Shh+ cells promotes Type I cell fate in both FF and CV taste buds, but likely does so non-cell autonomously. Our data are consistent with a model where β-catenin signaling levels within lingual epithelial progenitors dictate cell fate prior to or during entry of new cells into taste buds; high signaling induces Type I cells, intermediate levels drive Type II cell differentiation, while low levels may drive differentiation of Type III cells. PMID:26020789

  6. The neural stem cell fate determinant TRIM32 regulates complex behavioral traits

    PubMed Central

    Hillje, Anna-Lena; Beckmann, Elisabeth; Pavlou, Maria A. S.; Jaeger, Christian; Pacheco, Maria P.; Sauter, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Lewejohann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, new neurons are generated throughout the entire lifespan in two restricted areas of the brain, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ)—olfactory bulb (OB) system. In both regions newborn neurons display unique properties that clearly distinguish them from mature neurons. Enhanced excitability and increased synaptic plasticity enables them to add specific properties to information processing by modulating the existing local circuitry of already established mature neurons. Hippocampal neurogenesis has been suggested to play a role in spatial-navigation learning, spatial memory, and spatial pattern separation. Cumulative evidences implicate that adult-born OB neurons contribute to learning processes and odor memory. We recently demonstrated that the cell fate determinant TRIM32 is upregulated in differentiating neuroblasts of the SVZ-OB system in the adult mouse brain. The absence of TRIM32 leads to increased progenitor cell proliferation and less cell death. Both effects accumulate in an overproduction of adult-generated OB neurons. Here, we present novel data from behavioral studies showing that such an enhancement of OB neurogenesis not necessarily leads to increased olfactory performance but in contrast even results in impaired olfactory capabilities. In addition, we show at the cellular level that TRIM32 protein levels increase during differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs). At the molecular level, several metabolic intermediates that are connected to glycolysis, glycine, or cysteine metabolism are deregulated in TRIM32 knockout mice brain tissue. These metabolomics pathways are directly or indirectly linked to anxiety or depression like behavior. In summary, our study provides comprehensive data on how the impairment of neurogenesis caused by the loss of the cell fate determinant TRIM32 causes a decrease of olfactory performance as well as a deregulation of metabolomic pathways that are linked to mood

  7. Moving epithelia: Tracking the fate of mammalian limbal epithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nick

    2015-09-01

    Lineage tracing allows the destiny of a stem cell (SC) and its progeny to be followed through time. In order to track their long-term fate, SC must be permanently marked to discern their distribution, division, displacement and differentiation. This information is essential for unravelling the mysteries that govern their replenishing activity while they remain anchored within their niche microenvironment. Modern-day lineage tracing uses inducible genetic recombination to illuminate cells within embryonic, newborn and adult tissues, and the advent of powerful high-resolution microscopy has enabled the behaviour of labelled cells to be monitored in real-time in a living organism. The simple structural organization of the mammalian cornea, including its accessibility and transparency, renders it the ideal tissue to study SC fate using lineage tracing assisted by non-invasive intravital microscopy. Despite more than a century of research devoted to understanding how this tissue is maintained and repaired, many limitations and controversies continue to plague the field, including uncertainties about the specificity of current SC markers, the number of SC within the cornea, their mode of division, their location, and importantly the signals that dictate cell migration. This communication will highlight historical discoveries as well as recent developments in the corneal SC field; more specifically how the progeny of these cells are mobilised to replenish this dynamic tissue during steady-state, disease and transplantation. Also discussed is how insights gleaned from animal studies can be used to advance our knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms that govern modelling and remodelling of the human cornea in health and disease.

  8. Expression of an activated rasD gene changes cell fate decisions during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Louis, S A; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1997-02-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that the expression of an activated rasD gene in wild-type Dictyostelium cells results in formation of aggregates with multitips, instead of the normal single tips, and a block in further development. In an attempt to better understand the role of activated RasD development, we examined cell-type-specific gene expression in a strain stably expressing high levels of RasD[G12T]. We found that the expression of prestalk cell-specific genes ecmA and tagB was markedly enhanced, whereas the expression of the prespore cell-specific gene cotC was reduced to very low levels. When the fate of cells in the multitipped aggregate was monitored with an ecmA/lacZ fusion, it appeared that most of the cells eventually adopted prestalk gene expression characteristics. When mixtures of the [G12T]rasD cells and Ax3 cells were induced to differentiate, chimeric pseudoplasmodia were not formed. Thus, although the [G12T]rasD transformant had a marked propensity to form prestalk cells, it could not supply the prestalk cell population when mixed with wild-type cells. Both stalk and spore cell formation occurred in low cell density monolayers of the [G12T]rasD strain, suggesting that at least part of the inhibition of stalk and spore formation during multicellular development involved inhibitory cell interactions within the cell mass. Models for the possible role of rasD in development are discussed.

  9. Phosphorylation of the Polarity Protein BASL Differentiates Asymmetric Cell Fate through MAPKs and SPCH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Guo, Xiaoyu; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-07

    Cell polarization is commonly used for the regulation of stem cell asymmetric division in both animals and plants. Stomatal development in Arabidopsis, a process that produces breathing pores in the epidermis, requires asymmetric cell division to differentiate highly specialized guard cells while maintaining a stem cell population [1, 2]. The BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL) protein exhibits a polarized localization pattern in the cell and is required for differential cell fates resulting from asymmetric cell division [3]. The polarization of BASL is made possible by a positive feedback loop with a canonical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that recruits the MAPKK kinase YODA (YDA) and MAPK 6 (MPK6) to the cortical polarity site [4]. Here, we study BASL intracellular dynamics and show that the membrane-associated BASL is slowly replenished at the cortical polarity site and that the mobility is tightly linked to its phosphorylation status. Because BASL polarity is only exhibited by one daughter cell after an asymmetric cell division, we study how BASL differentially functions in the two daughter cells. The YDA MAPK cascade transduces upstream ligand-receptor signaling [5-13] to the transcription factor SPEECHLESS (SPCH), which controls stomatal initiation and is directly suppressed by MPK3/6-mediated phosphorylation [14, 15]. We show that BASL polarization leads to elevated nuclear MPK6 signaling and lowered SPCH abundance in one of the two daughter cells. Therefore, two daughter cells are differentiated by BASL polarity-mediated differential suppression of SPCH, which may provide developmental plasticity in plant stem cell asymmetric cell division (ACD).

  10. Two transcription factors, Pou4f2 and Isl1, are sufficient to specify the retinal ganglion cell fate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuguo; Kaczynski, Tadeusz J; Sethuramanujam, Santhosh; Li, Renzhong; Jain, Varsha; Slaughter, Malcolm; Mu, Xiuqian

    2015-03-31

    As with other retinal cell types, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) arise from multipotent retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), and their formation is regulated by a hierarchical gene-regulatory network (GRN). Within this GRN, three transcription factors--atonal homolog 7 (Atoh7), POU domain, class 4, transcription factor 2 (Pou4f2), and insulin gene enhancer protein 1 (Isl1)--occupy key node positions at two different stages of RGC development. Atoh7 is upstream and is required for RPCs to gain competence for an RGC fate, whereas Pou4f2 and Isl1 are downstream and regulate RGC differentiation. However, the genetic and molecular basis for the specification of the RGC fate, a key step in RGC development, remains unclear. Here we report that ectopic expression of Pou4f2 and Isl1 in the Atoh7-null retina using a binary knockin-transgenic system is sufficient for the specification of the RGC fate. The RGCs thus formed are largely normal in gene expression, survive to postnatal stages, and are physiologically functional. Our results indicate that Pou4f2 and Isl1 compose a minimally sufficient regulatory core for the RGC fate. We further conclude that during development a core group of limited transcription factors, including Pou4f2 and Isl1, function downstream of Atoh7 to determine the RGC fate and initiate RGC differentiation.

  11. Tracking the Fate of Stem Cell Implants with Fluorine-19 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Ribot, Emeline J.; Chen, Yuhua; Gilbert, Kyle M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study we used cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) labeled with a Fluorine-19 (19F) agent. 19F-MRI offers unambiguous detection and in vivo quantification of labeled cells. Methods We investigated two common stem cell transplant mouse models: an immune competent, syngeneic transplant model and an immune compromised, xenograft transplant model. 19F labelled stem cells were implanted intramuscularly into the hindlimb of healthy mice. The transplant was then monitored for up to 17 days using 19F-MRI, after which the tissue was excised for fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemisty. Results Immediately following transplantation, 19F-MRI quantification correlated very well with the expected cell number in both models. The 19F signal decreased over time in both models, with a more rapid decrease in the syngeneic model. By endpoint, only 2/7 syngeneic mice had any detectable 19F signal. In the xenograft model, all mice had detectable signal at endpoint. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry were used to show that the 19F signal was related to the presence of bystander labeled macrophages, and not original MSC. Conclusions Our results show that 19F-MRI is an excellent tool for verifying the delivery of therapeutic cells early after transplantation. However, in certain circumstances the transfer of cellular label to other bystander cells may confuse interpretation of the long-term fate of the transplanted cells. PMID:25767871

  12. Dynamics and heterogeneity of a fate determinant during transition towards cell differentiation

    DOE PAGES

    Peláez, Nicolás; Gavalda-Miralles, Arnau; Wang, Bao; ...

    2015-11-19

    Yan is an ETS-domain transcription factor responsible for maintaining Drosophila eye cells in a multipotent state. Yan is at the core of a regulatory network that determines the time and place in which cells transit from multipotency to one of several differentiated lineages. Using a fluorescent reporter for Yan expression, we observed a biphasic distribution of Yan in multipotent cells, with a rapid inductive phase and slow decay phase. Transitions to various differentiated states occurred over the course of this dynamic process, suggesting that Yan expression level does not strongly determine cell potential. Consistent with this conclusion, perturbing Yan expressionmore » by varying gene dosage had no effect on cell fate transitions. However, we observed that as cells transited to differentiation, Yan expression became highly heterogeneous and this heterogeneity was transient. Signals received via the EGF Receptor were necessary for the transience in Yan noise since genetic loss caused sustained noise. Since these signals are essential for eye cells to differentiate, we suggest that dynamic heterogeneity of Yan is a necessary element of the transition process, and cell states are stabilized through noise reduction.« less

  13. Dynamics and heterogeneity of a fate determinant during transition towards cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Nicolás; Gavalda-Miralles, Arnau; Wang, Bao; Navarro, Heliodoro Tejedor; Gudjonson, Herman; Rebay, Ilaria; Dinner, Aaron R; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K; Amaral, Luís AN; Carthew, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Yan is an ETS-domain transcription factor responsible for maintaining Drosophila eye cells in a multipotent state. Yan is at the core of a regulatory network that determines the time and place in which cells transit from multipotency to one of several differentiated lineages. Using a fluorescent reporter for Yan expression, we observed a biphasic distribution of Yan in multipotent cells, with a rapid inductive phase and slow decay phase. Transitions to various differentiated states occurred over the course of this dynamic process, suggesting that Yan expression level does not strongly determine cell potential. Consistent with this conclusion, perturbing Yan expression by varying gene dosage had no effect on cell fate transitions. However, we observed that as cells transited to differentiation, Yan expression became highly heterogeneous and this heterogeneity was transient. Signals received via the EGF Receptor were necessary for the transience in Yan noise since genetic loss caused sustained noise. Since these signals are essential for eye cells to differentiate, we suggest that dynamic heterogeneity of Yan is a necessary element of the transition process, and cell states are stabilized through noise reduction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08924.001 PMID:26583752

  14. Dynamics and heterogeneity of a fate determinant during transition towards cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Nicolás; Gavalda-Miralles, Arnau; Wang, Bao; Navarro, Heliodoro Tejedor; Gudjonson, Herman; Rebay, Ilaria; Dinner, Aaron R; Katsaggelos, Aggelos K; Amaral, Luís A N; Carthew, Richard W

    2015-11-19

    Yan is an ETS-domain transcription factor responsible for maintaining Drosophila eye cells in a multipotent state. Yan is at the core of a regulatory network that determines the time and place in which cells transit from multipotency to one of several differentiated lineages. Using a fluorescent reporter for Yan expression, we observed a biphasic distribution of Yan in multipotent cells, with a rapid inductive phase and slow decay phase. Transitions to various differentiated states occurred over the course of this dynamic process, suggesting that Yan expression level does not strongly determine cell potential. Consistent with this conclusion, perturbing Yan expression by varying gene dosage had no effect on cell fate transitions. However, we observed that as cells transited to differentiation, Yan expression became highly heterogeneous and this heterogeneity was transient. Signals received via the EGF Receptor were necessary for the transience in Yan noise since genetic loss caused sustained noise. Since these signals are essential for eye cells to differentiate, we suggest that dynamic heterogeneity of Yan is a necessary element of the transition process, and cell states are stabilized through noise reduction.

  15. A single-cell pedigree analysis of alternative stochastic lymphocyte fates

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, E. D.; Markham, J. F.; McGuinness, L. P.; Hodgkin, P. D.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to most stimulated lymphocytes, B cells exposed to Toll-like receptor 9 ligands are nonself-adherent, allowing individual cells and families to be followed in vitro for up to 5 days. These B cells undergo phases typical of an adaptive response, dividing up to 6 times before losing the impetus for further growth and division and eventually dying by apoptosis. Using long-term microscopic imaging, accurate histories of individual lymphocyte fates were collected. Quantitative analysis of family relationships revealed that times to divide of siblings were strongly related but these correlations were progressively lost through consecutive divisions. A weaker, but significant, correlation was also found for death times among siblings. Division cessation is characterized by a loss of cell growth and the division in which this occurs is strongly inherited from the original founder cell and is related to the size this cell reaches before its first division. Thus, simple division-based dilution of factors synthesized during the first division may control the maximum division reached by stimulated cells. The stochastic distributions of times to divide, times to die, and divisions reached are also measured. Together, these results highlight the internal cellular mechanisms that control immune responses and provide a foundation for the development of new mathematical models that are correct at both single-cell and population levels. PMID:19633185

  16. Protein Kinase B Controls Transcriptional Programs that Direct Cytotoxic T Cell Fate but Is Dispensable for T Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Andrew N.; Finlay, David; Preston, Gavin; Sinclair, Linda V.; Waugh, Caryll M.; Tamas, Peter; Feijoo, Carmen; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In cytotoxic T cells (CTL), Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is activated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2). Akt can control cell metabolism in many cell types but whether this role is important for CTL function has not been determined. Here we have shown that Akt does not mediate IL-2- or TCR-induced cell metabolic responses; rather, this role is assumed by other Akt-related kinases. There is, however, a nonredundant role for sustained and strong activation of Akt in CTL to coordinate the TCR- and IL-2-induced transcriptional programs that control expression of key cytolytic effector molecules, adhesion molecules, and cytokine and chemokine receptors that distinguish effector versus memory and naive T cells. Akt is thus dispensable for metabolism, but the strength and duration of Akt activity dictates the CTL transcriptional program and determines CTL fate. PMID:21295499

  17. Concentration-dependent effect of nerve growth factor on cell fate determination of neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hui; Hu, Zhengqing

    2011-10-01

    Stem cell-based spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) replacement therapy has been proposed to be a promising strategy to restore hearing either via replacing degenerated neurons or by improving the efficacy of cochlear implants which rely on functional neurons. However, lack of suitable donor cells and low survival rate of implanted cells are the major obstacles to successful implementation of therapeutic transplantation. The present study investigated the potential of mouse inner ear statoacoustic ganglion (SAG)-derived neural progenitors (NPs) to differentiate toward SGN-like glutamatergic cells and the influence to cell survival and differentiation when nerve growth factor (NGF) was supplied. We found that SAG-NPs could form neurospheres, proliferate, and differentiate into cells expressing neuronal protein neurofilament and β-III tubulin. NGF affected the cell fate of SAG-NP in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Low concentration of NGF (2-5 ng/mL) promoted cell proliferation. Medium concentration of NGF (20-40 ng/mL) stimulated cells to differentiate into bi-polar SGN-like cells expressing glutamatergic proteins. High concentration of NGF (100 ng/mL) could rescue cells from induced apoptosis. In the in vivo study, NGF (100 ng/mL) dramatically enhanced SAG-NP survival rate after implantation into adult mammalian inner ear. This finding raises the possibility to further induce these NPs to differentiate into SGN-like neurons in future in vivo study. In conclusion, given the capability of proliferation and differentiation into SGN-like cells with the supplement of NGF in vitro, SAG-NPs can serve as donor cells in stem cell-based SGN replacement therapy. NGF improved the survival of SAG-NPs not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  18. Minireview: beta-cell replacement therapy for diabetes in the 21st century: manipulation of cell fate by directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell failure underlies type 1 diabetes; it also contributes in an essential way to type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell replacement is an important component of any cure for diabetes. The current options of islet and pancreas transplantation are not satisfactory as definitive forms of therapy. Here, we review strategies for induced de novo pancreatic beta-cell formation, which depend on the targeted differentiation of cells into pancreatic beta-cells. With this objective in mind, one can manipulate the fate of three different types of cells: 1) from terminally differentiated cells, e.g. exocrine pancreatic cells, into beta-cells; 2) from multipotent adult stem cells, e.g. hepatic oval cells, into pancreatic islets; and 3) from pluripotent stem cells, e.g. embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, into beta-cells. We will examine the pros and cons of each strategy as well as the hurdles that must be overcome before these approaches to generate new beta-cells will be ready for clinical application.

  19. Roles of TGF-β family signals in the fate determination of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Fumiko; Watabe, Tetsuro; Miyazono, Kohei

    2014-08-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family have been implicated in embryogenesis as well as in the determination of the cell fates of mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are characterized by their self-renewal and pluripotency. The cellular responses to TGF-β family signals are divergent depending on the cellular context and local environment. TGF-β family signals play critical roles both in the maintenance of the pluripotent state of ES cells by inducing the expression of Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, and in their differentiation into various cell types by regulating the expression of master regulatory genes. Moreover, multiple lines of evidence have suggested the importance of TGF-β family signals in establishing induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Since ES and iPS cells have great potential for applications in regenerative medicine, it is critical to figure out the mechanisms underlying their self-renewal, pluripotency, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the roles of TGF-β family ligands and their downstream signaling molecules, Smad proteins, in the maintenance of the pluripotency and lineage specification of mouse and human ES and iPS cells.

  20. 3D niche microarrays for systems-level analyses of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Ranga, A; Gobaa, S; Okawa, Y; Mosiewicz, K; Negro, A; Lutolf, M P

    2014-07-14

    The behaviour of mammalian cells in a tissue is governed by the three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment and involves a dynamic interplay between biochemical and mechanical signals provided by the extracellular matrix (ECM), cell-cell interactions and soluble factors. The complexity of the microenvironment and the context-dependent cell responses that arise from these interactions have posed a major challenge to understanding the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Here we develop an experimental paradigm to dissect the role of various interacting factors by simultaneously synthesizing more than 1,000 unique microenvironments with robotic nanolitre liquid-dispensing technology and by probing their effects on cell fate. Using this novel 3D microarray platform, we assess the combined effects of matrix elasticity, proteolytic degradability and three distinct classes of signalling proteins on mouse embryonic stem cells, unveiling a comprehensive map of interactions involved in regulating self-renewal. This approach is broadly applicable to gain a systems-level understanding of multifactorial 3D cell-matrix interactions.

  1. Positive intergenic feedback circuitry, involving EBF1 and FOXO1, orchestrates B-cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Robert; Welinder, Eva; Åhsberg, Josefine; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K.; Lucas, Joseph S.; Sigvardsson, Mikael; Murre, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of transcriptional regulators, including E2A, early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), FOXO1, and paired box gene 5 (PAX5), that promote early B-cell development. However, how this ensemble of regulators mechanistically promotes B-cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that B-cell development in FOXO1-deficient mice is arrested in the common lymphoid progenitor (CLP) LY6D+ cell stage. We demonstrate that this phenotype closely resembles the arrest in B-cell development observed in EBF1-deficient mice. Consistent with these observations, we find that the transcription signatures of FOXO1- and EBF1-deficient LY6D+ progenitors are strikingly similar, indicating a common set of target genes. Furthermore, we found that depletion of EBF1 expression in LY6D+ CLPs severely affects FOXO1 mRNA abundance, whereas depletion of FOXO1 activity in LY6D+ CLPs ablates EBF1 transcript levels. We generated a global regulatory network from EBF1 and FOXO1 genome-wide transcription factor occupancy and transcription signatures derived from EBF1- and FOXO1-deficient CLPs. This analysis reveals that EBF1 and FOXO1 act in a positive feedback circuitry to promote and stabilize specification to the B-cell lineage. PMID:23213261

  2. ER stress regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell fate through TRAIL-R-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Thomas; Kumar, Vinit; Ramachandran, Indu R; Youn, Je-In; Celis, Esteban; Finnberg, Niklas; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Winograd, Rafael; Vonderheide, Robert H; English, Nickolas R; Knight, Stella C; Yagita, Hideo; McCaffrey, Judith C; Antonia, Scott; Hockstein, Neil; Witt, Robert; Masters, Gregory; Bauer, Thomas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2014-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) dampen the immune response thorough inhibition of T cell activation and proliferation and often are expanded in pathological conditions. Here, we studied the fate of MDSCs in cancer. Unexpectedly, MDSCs had lower viability and a shorter half-life in tumor-bearing mice compared with neutrophils and monocytes. The reduction of MDSC viability was due to increased apoptosis, which was mediated by increased expression of TNF-related apoptosis-induced ligand receptors (TRAIL-Rs) in these cells. Targeting TRAIL-Rs in naive mice did not affect myeloid cell populations, but it dramatically reduced the presence of MDSCs and improved immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. Treatment of myeloid cells with proinflammatory cytokines did not affect TRAIL-R expression; however, induction of ER stress in myeloid cells recapitulated changes in TRAIL-R expression observed in tumor-bearing hosts. The ER stress response was detected in MDSCs isolated from cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice, but not in control neutrophils or monocytes, and blockade of ER stress abrogated tumor-associated changes in TRAIL-Rs. Together, these data indicate that MDSC pathophysiology is linked to ER stress, which shortens the lifespan of these cells in the periphery and promotes expansion in BM. Furthermore, TRAIL-Rs can be considered as potential targets for selectively inhibiting MDSCs.

  3. Pigmentation and sporulation are alternative cell fates in Bacillus pumilus SF214.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Nicola; Di Luccia, Blanda; Isticato, Rachele; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; De Felice, Maurilio; Ricca, Ezio

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SF214 is a spore forming bacterium, isolated from a marine sample, able to produce a matrix and a orange-red, water soluble pigment. Pigmentation is strictly regulated and high pigment production was observed during the late stationary growth phase in a minimal medium and at growth temperatures lower than the optimum. Only a subpopulation of stationary phase cells produced the pigment, indicating that the stationary culture contains a heterogeneous cell population and that pigment synthesis is a bimodal phenomenon. The fraction of cells producing the pigment varied in the different growth conditions and occurred only in cells not devoted to sporulation. Only some of the pigmented cells were also able to produce a matrix. Pigment and matrix production in SF214 appear then as two developmental fates both alternative to sporulation. Since the pigment had an essential role in the cell resistance to oxidative stress conditions, we propose that within the heterogeneous population different survival strategies can be followed by the different cells.

  4. Lineage and fate of each blastomere of the eight-cell sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R A; Hough-Evans, B R; Britten, R J; Davidson, E H

    1987-03-01

    A fluoresceinated lineage tracer was injected into individual blastomeres of eight-cell sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos, and the location of the progeny of each blastomere was determined in the fully developed pluteus. Each blastomere gives rise to a unique portion of the advanced embryo. We confirm many of the classical assignments of cell fate along the animal-vegetal axis of the cleavage-stage embryo, and demonstrate that one blastomere of the animal quartet at the eight-cell stage lies nearest the future oral pole and the opposite one nearest the future aboral pole of the embryo. Clones of cells deriving from ectodermal founder cells always remain contiguous, while clones of cells descendant from the vegetal plate (i.e., gut, secondary mesenchyme) do not. The locations of ectodermal clones contributed by specific blastomeres require that the larval plane of bilateral symmetry lie approximately equidistant (i.e., at a 45 degree angle) from each of the first two cleavage planes. These results underscore the conclusion that many of the early spatial patterns of differential gene expression observed at the molecular level are specified in a clonal manner early in embryonic sea urchin development, and are each confined to cell lineages established during cleavage.

  5. Emitter Choice for Epitaxial CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-11-21

    High-quality epitaxial CdTe layers with low defect density and high carrier concentration have been demonstrated by several research groups. Nevertheless, one primary challenge for high-performance epitaxial CdTe solar cells is how to choose a suitable emitter partner for the junction formation. The numerical simulations show that a type I heterojunction with small conduction band offset (0.1 eV = ..delta..Ec = 0.3 eV) is necessary to maintain a good cell efficiency even with large interface recombination. Otherwise, a small 'cliff' can assist interface recombination causing smaller Voc, and a large 'spike' (..delta..Ec = 0.4 eV) can impede the photo current and lead to a reduction of JSC and FF. Among the three possible emitters, CdS, CdMgTe, and MgZnO, CdMgTe (with ~30% Mg) and MgZnO (with ~ 20% Mg) are likely to be a better choice since their type-I junction can tolerate a larger density of interface defects.

  6. Eya1 controls cell polarity, spindle orientation, cell fate and Notch signaling in distal embryonic lung epithelium.

    PubMed

    El-Hashash, Ahmed H K; Turcatel, Gianluca; Al Alam, Denise; Buckley, Sue; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Bellusci, Saverio; Warburton, David

    2011-04-01

    Cell polarity, mitotic spindle orientation and asymmetric division play a crucial role in the self-renewal/differentiation of epithelial cells, yet little is known about these processes and the molecular programs that control them in embryonic lung distal epithelium. Herein, we provide the first evidence that embryonic lung distal epithelium is polarized with characteristic perpendicular cell divisions. Consistent with these findings, spindle orientation-regulatory proteins Insc, LGN (Gpsm2) and NuMA, and the cell fate determinant Numb are asymmetrically localized in embryonic lung distal epithelium. Interfering with the function of these proteins in vitro randomizes spindle orientation and changes cell fate. We further show that Eya1 protein regulates cell polarity, spindle orientation and the localization of Numb, which inhibits Notch signaling. Hence, Eya1 promotes both perpendicular division as well as Numb asymmetric segregation to one daughter in mitotic distal lung epithelium, probably by controlling aPKCζ phosphorylation. Thus, epithelial cell polarity and mitotic spindle orientation are defective after interfering with Eya1 function in vivo or in vitro. In addition, in Eya1(-/-) lungs, perpendicular division is not maintained and Numb is segregated to both daughter cells in mitotic epithelial cells, leading to inactivation of Notch signaling. As Notch signaling promotes progenitor cell identity at the expense of differentiated cell phenotypes, we test whether genetic activation of Notch could rescue the Eya1(-/-) lung phenotype, which is characterized by loss of epithelial progenitors, increased epithelial differentiation but reduced branching. Indeed, genetic activation of Notch partially rescues Eya1(-/-) lung epithelial defects. These findings uncover novel functions for Eya1 as a crucial regulator of the complex behavior of distal embryonic lung epithelium.

  7. Fate of Schwann cells in CMT1A and HNPP: evidence for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, S; Mendell, J R; Sahenk, Z

    1998-06-01

    The fate of Schwann cells in Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies was addressed in this study of nerve biopsies from patients with proven PMP22 duplications and deletions. In frozen sections, apoptotic nuclei were detected using the TUNEL method. In adjacent sections, anti-neurofilament 68kD antibody was used as an axonal marker, while the antibodies to NKH-1 and low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor P75NTR were used as Schwann cell markers. In addition, plastic sections were used to determine the densities of myelinated fibers and Schwann cell nuclei. In all biopsies from CMT1A, TUNEL-positive nuclei appeared in clusters. In adjacent sections, areas of TUNEL-positive nuclei matched with areas devoid of neurofilaments and NKH-1-positive Schwann cell silhouettes, suggesting that the apoptotic nuclei belonged to nonmyelinating Schwann cells. In addition, quantitative studies on plastic-embedded sections showed a significantly reduced number of total Schwann cells compared with controls, strongly favoring a loss of Schwann cell by apoptosis. In HNPP, the number of total Schwann cells was increased and a significant Schwann cell apoptosis was observed in only 2 patients. Examination of plastic sections and teased nerve preparations from these cases suggested that the Schwann cell apoptosis might be related to the regenerative state of the nerve resulting from the process of sprout pruning. No strict correlation between p75NTR expression and apoptosis was found. These studies indicate that factors regulating Schwann cell number in early postnatal development continue to be important for Schwann cell survival throughout life.

  8. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    PubMed

    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  9. Thidiazuron Triggers Morphogenesis in Rosa canina L. Protocorm-Like Bodies by Changing Incipient Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yaping; Yuan, Cunquan; Zhao, Qingcui; Liu, Guoqin; Nie, Jing; Ma, Zhimin; Cheng, Chenxia; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Zhao, Liangjun

    2016-01-01

    Thidiazuron (N-phenyl-N′-1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-ylurea; TDZ) is an artificial plant growth regulator that is widely used in plant tissue culture. Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) induced by TDZ serve as an efficient and rapid in vitro regeneration system in Rosa species. Despite this, the mechanism of PLB induction remains relatively unclear. TDZ, which can affect the level of endogenous auxins and cytokinins, converts the cell fate of rhizoid tips and triggers PLB formation and plantlet regeneration in Rosa canina L. In callus-rhizoids, which are rhizoids that co-develop from callus, auxin and a Z-type cytokinin accumulated after applying TDZ, and transcription of the auxin transporter gene RcPIN1 was repressed. The expression of RcARF4, RcRR1, RcCKX2, RcCKX3, and RcLOG1 increased in callus-rhizoids and rhizoid tips while the transcription of an auxin response factor (RcARF1) and auxin transport proteins (RcPIN2, RcPIN3) decreased in callus-rhizoids but increased in rhizoid tips. In situ hybridization of rhizoids showed that RcWUS and RcSERK1 were highly expressed in columella cells and root stem cells resulting in the conversion of cell fate into shoot apical meristems or embryogenic callus. In addition, transgenic XVE::RcWUS lines showed repressed RcWUS overexpression while RcWUS had no effect on PLB morphogenesis. Furthermore, higher expression of the root stem cell marker RcWOX5 and root stem cell maintenance regulator genes RcPLT1 and RcPLT2 indicated the presence of a dedifferentiation developmental pathway in the stem cell niche of rhizoids. Viewed together, our results indicate that different cells in rhizoid tips acquired regeneration competence after induction by TDZ. A novel developmental pathway containing different cell types during PLB formation was identified by analyzing the endogenous auxin and cytokinin content. This study also provides a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying in vitro regeneration in Rosa. PMID:27200031

  10. Notch regulates cell fate and dendrite morphology of newborn neurons in the postnatal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, Joshua J.; Silbereis, John; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Šestan, Nenad; Rakic, Pasko

    2007-01-01

    The lifelong addition of neurons to the hippocampus is a remarkable form of structural plasticity, yet the molecular controls over proliferation, neuronal fate determination, survival, and maturation are poorly understood. Expression of Notch1 was found to change dynamically depending on the differentiation state of neural precursor cells. Through the use of inducible gain- and loss-of-function of Notch1 mice we show that this membrane receptor is essential to these distinct processes. We found in vivo that activated Notch1 overexpression induces proliferation, whereas γ-secretase inhibition or genetic ablation of Notch1 promotes cell cycle exit, indicating that the level of activated Notch1 regulates the magnitude of neurogenesis from postnatal progenitor cells. Abrogation of Notch signaling in vivo or in vitro leads to a transition from neural stem or precursor cells to transit-amplifying cells or neurons. Further, genetic Notch1 manipulation modulates survival and dendritic morphology of newborn granule cells. These results provide evidence for the expansive prevalence of Notch signaling in hippocampal morphogenesis and plasticity, suggesting that Notch1 could be a target of diverse traumatic and environmental modulators of adult neurogenesis. PMID:18077357

  11. Comprehensive profiling reveals mechanisms of SOX2-mediated cell fate specification in human ESCs and NPCs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenlin; Yang, Xiaoqin; Sun, Yiyang; Yu, Hongyao; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is a key regulator of multiple types of stem cells, especially embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Understanding the mechanism underlying the function of SOX2 is of great importance for realizing the full potential of ESCs and NPCs. Here, through genome-wide comparative studies, we show that SOX2 executes its distinct functions in human ESCs (hESCs) and hESC-derived NPCs (hNPCs) through cell type- and stage-dependent transcription programs. Importantly, SOX2 suppresses non-neural lineages in hESCs and regulates neurogenesis from hNPCs by inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling. In hESCs, SOX2 achieves such inhibition by direct transcriptional regulation of important Wnt signaling modulators, WLS and SFRP2. Moreover, SOX2 ensures pluripotent epigenetic landscapes via interacting with histone variant H2A.Z and recruiting polycomb repressor complex 2 to poise developmental genes in hESCs. Together, our results advance our understanding of the mechanism by which cell type-specific transcription factors control lineage-specific gene expression programs and specify cell fate. PMID:26809499

  12. Cholesterol-derived glucocorticoids control early fate specification in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cabral-Teixeira, Joaquim; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Cai, Wenqing; Terzic, Andre; Mercola, Mark; Willems, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aside from its role in cell membrane integrity, cholesterol is a key component in steroid hormone production. The vital functions of steroid hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, glucocorticoids (Gcrts) and mineralocorticoids (Mnrts) in perinatal and adult life are well understood; however, their role during early embryonic development remains largely unexplored. Here we show that siRNA-mediated perturbation of steroid hormone production during mesoderm formation has important consequences on cardiac differentiation in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC). Both Gcrts and Mnrts are capable of driving cardiac differentiation in mESC. Interestingly, the Gcrt receptor is widely expressed during gastrulation in the mouse, and is exclusively localized in the nuclei - and thus active - in visceral endoderm cells, suggesting that it functions much earlier than previously anticipated. We therefore studied Gcrt signaling in mESC as a model of the gastrulating embryo, and found that Gcrt signaling regulates expression of the transcription factor Hnf4a and the secreted Nodal and BMP inhibitor Cer1 in the early visceral endoderm. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Gcrt function blocked cardiomyocyte differentiation, with limited effects on other cardiovascular cell types including vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Furthermore, the cardiogenic effect of Gcrts required Hnf4a and paracrine Cer1. These results establish a novel function for cholesterol-derived steroid hormones and identify Gcrt signaling in visceral endoderm cells as a regulator of Cer1 and cardiac fate. PMID:26024790

  13. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts

    PubMed Central

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability– even as an adult –to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders. PMID:27640672

  14. Human stem cells from single blastomeres reveal pathways of embryonic or trophoblast fate specification.

    PubMed

    Zdravkovic, Tamara; Nazor, Kristopher L; Larocque, Nicholas; Gormley, Matthew; Donne, Matthew; Hunkapillar, Nathan; Giritharan, Gnanaratnam; Bernstein, Harold S; Wei, Grace; Hebrok, Matthias; Zeng, Xianmin; Genbacev, Olga; Mattis, Aras; McMaster, Michael T; Krtolica, Ana; Valbuena, Diana; Simón, Carlos; Laurent, Louise C; Loring, Jeanne F; Fisher, Susan J

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of initial cell fate decisions differ among species. To gain insights into lineage allocation in humans, we derived ten human embryonic stem cell lines (designated UCSFB1-10) from single blastomeres of four 8-cell embryos and one 12-cell embryo from a single couple. Compared with numerous conventional lines from blastocysts, they had unique gene expression and DNA methylation patterns that were, in part, indicative of trophoblast competence. At a transcriptional level, UCSFB lines from different embryos were often more closely related than those from the same embryo. As predicted by the transcriptomic data, immunolocalization of EOMES, T brachyury, GDF15 and active β-catenin revealed differential expression among blastomeres of 8- to 10-cell human embryos. The UCSFB lines formed derivatives of the three germ layers and CDX2-positive progeny, from which we derived the first human trophoblast stem cell line. Our data suggest heterogeneity among early-stage blastomeres and that the UCSFB lines have unique properties, indicative of a more immature state than conventional lines.

  15. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Skardelly, Marco; Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine; Kamprad, Manja; Meixensberger, Juergen; Milosevic, Javorina

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  16. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  17. Various fates of neuronal progenitor cells observed on several different chemical functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Wang, Ying; He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Xu, Quan-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    Neuronal progenitor cells cultured on gold-coated glass surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including hydroxyl (-OH), carboxyl (-COOH), amino (-NH2), bromo (-Br), mercapto (-SH), - Phenyl and methyl (-CH3), were studied here to investigate the influence of surface chemistry on the cells' adhesion, morphology, proliferation and functional gene expression. Focal adhesion staining indicated in the initial culture stage cells exhibited morphological changes in response to different chemical functional groups. Cells cultured on -NH2 grafted surface displayed focal adhesion plaque and flattened morphology and had the largest contact area. However, their counter parts on -CH3 grafted surface displayed no focal adhesion and rounded morphology and had the smallest contact area. After 6 days culture, the proliferation trend was as follows: -NH2 > -SH> -COOH> - Phenyl > - Br > -OH> -CH3. To determine the neural functional properties of the cells affected by surface chemistry, the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), nerve growth factor (NGF) and brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were characterized. An increase of GAD67 expression was observed on -NH2, -COOH and -SH grafted surfaces, while no increase in NGF and BDNF expression was observed on any chemical surfaces. These results highlight the importance of surface chemistry in the fate determination of neuronal progenitor cells, and suggest that surface chemistry must be considered in the design of biomaterials for neural tissue engineering.

  18. Fate of tetraploid cells in 4n<-->2n chimeric mouse blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Gillian E; West, John D

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that tetraploid (4n) cells rarely contribute to the derivatives of the epiblast lineage of mid-gestation 4n<-->2n mouse chimeras. The aim of the present study was to determine when and how 4n cells were excluded from the epiblast lineage of such chimeras. The contributions of GFP-positive cells to different tissues of 4n<-->2n chimeric blastocysts labelled with tauGFP were analysed at E3.5 and E4.5 using confocal microscopy. More advanced E5.5 and E7.5 chimeric blastocysts were analysed after a period of diapause to allow further growth without implantation. Tetraploid cells were not initially excluded from the epiblast in 4n<-->2n chimeric blastocysts and they contributed to all four blastocyst tissues at all of the blastocyst stages examined. Four steps affected the allocation and fate of 4n cells in chimeras, resulting in their exclusion from the epiblast lineage by mid-gestation. (1) Fewer 4n cells were allocated to the inner cell mass than trophectoderm. (2) The blastocyst cavity tended to form among the 4n cells, causing more 4n cells to be allocated to the hypoblast and mural trophectoderm than the epiblast and polar trophectoderm, respectively. (3) 4n cells were depleted from the hypoblast and mural trophectoderm, where initially they were relatively enriched. (4) After implantation 4n cells must be lost preferentially from the epiblast lineage. Relevance of these results to the aetiology of human confined placental mosaicism and possible implications for the interpretation of mouse tetraploid complementation studies of the site of gene action are discussed.

  19. The CLAVATA signaling pathway mediating stem cell fate in shoot meristems requires Ca(2+) as a secondary cytosolic messenger.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsuan; Zhu, Yingfang; Ma, Yi; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2016-02-01

    CLAVATA1 (CLV1) is a receptor protein expressed in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) that translates perception of a non-cell-autonomous CLAVATA3 (CLV3) peptide signal into altered stem cell fate. CLV3 reduces expression of WUSCHEL (WUS) and FANTASTIC FOUR 2 (FAF2) in the SAM. Expression of WUS and FAF2 leads to maintenance of undifferentiated stem cells in the SAM. CLV3 binding to CLV1 inhibits expression of these genes and controls stem cell fate in the SAM through an unidentified signaling pathway. Cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, cyclic nucleotide (cGMP)-activated Ca(2+) channels, and cGMP have been linked to signaling downstream of receptors similar to CLV1. Hence, we hypothesized that cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation mediates the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor signaling that controls meristem stem cell fate. CLV3 application to Arabidopsis seedlings results in elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) and cGMP. CLV3 control of WUS was prevented in a genotype lacking a functional cGMP-activated Ca(2+) channel. In wild-type plants, CLV3 inhibition of WUS and FAF2 expression was impaired by treatment with either a Ca(2+) channel blocker or a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. When CLV3-dependent repression of WUS is blocked, altered control of stem cell fate leads to an increase in SAM size; we observed a larger SAM size in seedlings treated with the Ca(2+) channel blocker. These results suggest that the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor system initiates a signaling cascade that elevates cytosolic Ca(2+), and that this cytosolic secondary messenger is involved in the signal transduction cascade linking CLV3/CLV1 to control of gene expression and stem cell fate in the SAM.

  20. Duration of culture and sonic hedgehog signaling differentially specify PV versus SST cortical interneuron fates from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Jennifer A; Goldberg, Ethan M; Maroof, Asif M; Xu, Qing; Petros, Timothy J; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-04-01

    Medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived GABAergic cortical interneurons (cINs) consist of multiple subtypes that are involved in many cortical functions. They also have a remarkable capacity to migrate, survive and integrate into cortical circuitry after transplantation into postnatal cortex. These features have engendered considerable interest in generating distinct subgroups of interneurons from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for the study of interneuron fate and function, and for the development of cell-based therapies. Although advances have been made, the capacity to generate highly enriched pools of subgroup fate-committed interneuron progenitors from PSCs has remained elusive. Previous studies have suggested that the two main MGE-derived interneuron subgroups--those expressing somatostatin (SST) and those expressing parvalbumin (PV)--are specified in the MGE from Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors at higher or lower levels of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, respectively. To further explore the role of Shh and other factors in cIN fate determination, we generated a reporter line such that Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors express mCherry and postmitotic Lhx6-expressing MGE-derived interneurons express GFP. Manipulations of Shh exposure and time in culture influenced the subgroup fates of ESC-derived interneurons. Exposure to higher Shh levels, and collecting GFP-expressing precursors at 12 days in culture, resulted in the strongest enrichment for SST interneurons over those expressing PV, whereas the strongest enrichment for PV interneurons was produced by lower Shh and by collecting mCherry-expressing cells after 17 days in culture. These findings confirm that fate determination of cIN subgroups is crucially influenced by Shh signaling, and provide a system for the further study of interneuron fate and function.

  1. Blood stem cell fate regulation by Delta-1–mediated rewiring of IL-6 paracrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Csaszar, Elizabeth; Wang, Weijia; Usenko, Tatiana; Qiao, Wenlian; Delaney, Colleen; Bernstein, Irwin D.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the importance of cell extrinsic regulation in stem cell fate control. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are responsive to local signals from their niche and to systemic feedback from progenitors and mature cells. The Notch ligand Delta-1 (DL1), a key component of the stem cell niche, regulates human hematopoietic lineage development in a dose-dependent manner and has been used clinically for primitive progenitor expansion. How DL1 acts to regulate HSC fate and whether these actions are related to its lineage skewing effects are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that, although DL1 activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling similarly to the gp130-activating cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), it has opposite effects on myeloid cell production. Mechanistically, these different outcomes are attributable to a DL1-mediated reduction in membrane (m)-bound IL-6 receptor (R) expression, converting progenitor cells from being directly IL-6 responsive to requiring both IL-6 and soluble (s) IL-6R for activation. Concomitant reduction of both mIL-6R (by DL1 supplementation) and sIL-6R (using dynamically fed cultures) reduced myeloid cell production and led to enhanced outputs of human HSCs. This work describes a new mode of cytokine action in which DL1 changes cytokine receptor distributions on hematopoietic cells, altering feedback networks and their impact on stem cell fate. PMID:24243972

  2. Connective tissue growth factor causes EMT-like cell fate changes in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sonnylal, Sonali; Xu, Shiwen; Jones, Helen; Tam, Angela; Sreeram, Vivek R; Ponticos, Markella; Norman, Jill; Agrawal, Pankaj; Abraham, David; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2013-05-15

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic fibrotic diseases. However, the mechanism by which paracrine effects of CTGF control the cell fate of neighboring epithelial cells is not known. In this study, we investigated the paracrine effects of CTGF overexpressed in fibroblasts of Col1a2-CTGF transgenic mice on epithelial cells of skin and lung. The skin and lungs of Col1a2-CTGF transgenic mice were examined for phenotypic markers of epithelial activation and differentiation and stimulation of signal transduction pathways. In addition to an expansion of the dermal compartment in Col1a2-CTGF transgenic mice, the epidermis was characterized by focal hyperplasia, and basal cells stained positive for αSMA, Snail, S100A4 and Sox9, indicating that these cells had undergone a change in their genetic program. Activation of phosphorylated p38 and phosphorylated Erk1/2 was observed in the granular and cornified layers of the skin. Lung fibrosis was associated with a marked increase in cells co-expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers in the lesional and unaffected lung tissue of Col1a2-CTGF mice. In epithelial cells treated with TGFβ, CTGF-specific siRNA-mediated knockdown suppressed Snail, Sox9, S100A4 protein levels and restored E-cadherin levels. Both adenoviral expression of CTGF in epithelial cells and treatment with recombinant CTGF induced EMT-like morphological changes and expression of α-SMA. Our in vivo and in vitro data supports the notion that CTGF expression in mesenchymal cells in the skin and lungs can cause changes in the differentiation program of adjacent epithelial cells. We speculate that these changes might contribute to fibrogenesis.

  3. Connective tissue growth factor causes EMT-like cell fate changes in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sonnylal, Sonali; Xu, Shiwen; Jones, Helen; Tam, Angela; Sreeram, Vivek R.; Ponticos, Markella; Norman, Jill; Agrawal, Pankaj; Abraham, David; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Summary Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic fibrotic diseases. However, the mechanism by which paracrine effects of CTGF control the cell fate of neighboring epithelial cells is not known. In this study, we investigated the paracrine effects of CTGF overexpressed in fibroblasts of Col1a2-CTGF transgenic mice on epithelial cells of skin and lung. The skin and lungs of Col1a2-CTGF transgenic mice were examined for phenotypic markers of epithelial activation and differentiation and stimulation of signal transduction pathways. In addition to an expansion of the dermal compartment in Col1a2-CTGF transgenic mice, the epidermis was characterized by focal hyperplasia, and basal cells stained positive for αSMA, Snail, S100A4 and Sox9, indicating that these cells had undergone a change in their genetic program. Activation of phosphorylated p38 and phosphorylated Erk1/2 was observed in the granular and cornified layers of the skin. Lung fibrosis was associated with a marked increase in cells co-expressing epithelial and mesenchymal markers in the lesional and unaffected lung tissue of Col1a2-CTGF mice. In epithelial cells treated with TGFβ, CTGF-specific siRNA-mediated knockdown suppressed Snail, Sox9, S100A4 protein levels and restored E-cadherin levels. Both adenoviral expression of CTGF in epithelial cells and treatment with recombinant CTGF induced EMT-like morphological changes and expression of α-SMA. Our in vivo and in vitro data supports the notion that CTGF expression in mesenchymal cells in the skin and lungs can cause changes in the differentiation program of adjacent epithelial cells. We speculate that these changes might contribute to fibrogenesis. PMID:23525012

  4. Phosphorylated DegU Manipulates Cell Fate Differentiation in the Bacillus subtilis Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Victoria L.; Porter, Michael; Hobley, Laura; Kiley, Taryn B.; Swedlow, Jason R.; Davidson, Fordyce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is ubiquitous and facilitates division of labor and development. Bacteria are capable of multicellular behaviors that benefit the bacterial community as a whole. A striking example of bacterial differentiation occurs throughout the formation of a biofilm. During Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation, a subpopulation of cells differentiates into a specialized population that synthesizes the exopolysaccharide and the TasA amyloid components of the extracellular matrix. The differentiation process is indirectly controlled by the transcription factor Spo0A that facilitates transcription of the eps and tapA (tasA) operons. DegU is a transcription factor involved in regulating biofilm formation. Here, using a combination of genetics and live single-cell cytological techniques, we define the mechanism of biofilm inhibition at high levels of phosphorylated DegU (DegU∼P) by showing that transcription from the eps and tapA promoter regions is inhibited. Data demonstrating that this is not a direct regulatory event are presented. We demonstrate that DegU∼P controls the frequency with which cells activate transcription from the operons needed for matrix biosynthesis in favor of an off state. Subsequent experimental analysis led us to conclude that DegU∼P functions to increase the level of Spo0A∼P, driving cell fate differentiation toward the terminal developmental process of sporulation. PMID:24123822

  5. The aged brain: genesis and fate of residual progenitor cells in the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist in the adult mammalian brain through life. The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest source of stem cells in the nervous system, and continuously generates new neuronal and glial cells involved in brain regeneration. During aging, the germinal potential of the SVZ suffers a widespread decline, but the causes of this turn down are not fully understood. This review provides a compilation of the current knowledge about the age-related changes in the NSC population, as well as the fate of the newly generated cells in the aged brain. It is known that the neurogenic capacity is clearly disrupted during aging, while the production of oligodendroglial cells is not compromised. Interestingly, the human brain seems to primarily preserve the ability to produce new oligodendrocytes instead of neurons, which could be related to the development of neurological disorders. Further studies in this matter are required to improve our understanding and the current strategies for fighting neurological diseases associated with senescence. PMID:26441536

  6. Genetic predisposition directs breast cancer phenotype by dictating progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Theresa A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Gupta, Piyush B.; Klebba, Ina; Jones, Ainsley D.; Sedic, Maja; Gilmore, Hannah; Tung, Nadine; Naber, Stephen P.; Schnitt, Stuart; Lander, Eric S.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Women with inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene have increased risk of developing breast cancer, but also exhibit a predisposition for the development of aggressive basal-like breast tumors. We report here that breast epithelial cells derived from patients harboring deleterious mutations in BRCA1 (BRCA1mut/+) give rise to tumors with increased basal differentiation relative to cells from BRCA1+/+ patients. Molecular analysis of disease-free breast tissues from BRCA1mut/+ patients revealed defects in progenitor cell lineage commitment even before cancer incidence. Moreover, we discovered that the transcriptional repressor Slug is an important functional regulator of human breast progenitor cell lineage commitment and differentiation and that it is aberrantly expressed in BRCA1mut/+ tissues. Slug expression is necessary for increased basal-like phenotypes prior to and following neoplastic transformation. These findings demonstrate that the genetic background of patient populations, in addition to affecting incidence rates, significantly impacts progenitor cell fate commitment and, therefore, tumor phenotype. PMID:21295272

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi: mechanism of entry and intracellular fate in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The mode of entry and intracellular fate of epimastigotes and trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi in cultured cells was studied. Electron microscopic observations indicated the uptake by phagocytosis of both forms into mouse peritoneal macrophages and of trypomastigotes and transition forms into other cultured cell types. In each instance the organisms were initially surrounded by a plasma membrane-derived phagosome. Trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment of the macrophages completely abolished attachment and ingestion of both forms, indicating that protease-sensitive structures on the macrophage plasma membrane mediate ingestion. The macrophage Fc or C3b receptors were not essential for uptake of T. cruzi in the conditions used. Cytochalasin B inhibited ingestion but not the attachment of both forms by macrophages. Epimastigotes were not taken up by HeLa, L cells, and calf embryo fibroblasts. In macrophages, epimastigotes were killed and digested within phagolysosomes. In contrast, trypomastigotes and transition forms escaped from the phagocytic vacuole and then multiplied in the cytoplasmic matrix. Amastigotes released from infected cells exhibited properties similar to those of trypomastigotes and were able to enter all cell types studied and multiply intracellularly. PMID:775012

  8. Coupling prokaryotic cell fate and division control with a bifunctional and oscillating oxidoreductase homolog.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Pritchard, Sean; Viollier, Patrick H

    2010-01-19

    NAD(H)-binding proteins play important roles in cell-cycle and developmental signaling in eukaryotes. We identified a bifunctional NAD(H)-binding regulator (KidO) that integrates cell-fate signaling with cytokinesis in the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. KidO stimulates the DivJ kinase and directly acts on the cytokinetic tubulin, FtsZ, to tune cytokinesis with the cell cycle. At the G1-->S transition, DivJ concomitantly signals the ClpXP-dependent degradation of KidO and CtrA, a cell-cycle transcriptional regulator/DNA replication inhibitor. This proteolytic event directs KidO and CtrA into oscillatory cell-cycle abundance patterns that coordinately license replication and cytokinesis. KidO resembles NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases, and conserved residues in the KidO NAD(H)-binding pocket are critical for regulation of FtsZ, but not for DivJ. Since NADPH-dependent regulation by a KidO-like oxidoreductase also occurs in humans, organisms from two domains of life exploit the enzymatic fold of an ancestral oxidoreductase potentially to coordinate cellular or developmental activities with the availability of the metabolic currency, NAD(P)H.

  9. Prox1 postmitotically defines dentate gyrus cells by specifying granule cell identity over CA3 pyramidal cell fate in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Iwano, Tomohiko; Masuda, Aki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Hideki; Matsuzaki, Fumio

    2012-08-01

    The brain is composed of diverse types of neurons that fulfill distinct roles in neuronal circuits, as manifested by the hippocampus, where pyramidal neurons and granule cells constitute functionally distinct domains: cornu ammonis (CA) and dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. Little is known about how these two types of neuron differentiate during hippocampal development, although a set of transcription factors that is expressed in progenitor cells is known to be required for the survival of granule cells. Here, we demonstrate in mice that Prox1, a transcription factor constitutively expressed in the granule cell lineage, postmitotically functions to specify DG granule cell identity. Postmitotic elimination of Prox1 caused immature DG neurons to lose the granule cell identity and in turn terminally differentiate into the pyramidal cell type manifesting CA3 neuronal identity. By contrast, Prox1 overexpression caused opposing effects on presumptive hippocampal pyramidal cells. These results indicate that the immature DG cell has the potential to become a granule cell or a pyramidal cell, and Prox1 defines the granule cell identity. This bi-potency is lost in mature DG cells, although Prox1 is still required for correct gene expression in DG granule cells. Thus, our data indicate that Prox1 acts as a postmitotic cell fate determinant for DG granule cells over the CA3 pyramidal cell fate and is crucial for maintenance of the granule cell identity throughout the life.

  10. The Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase ZAR1 Is Required for Zygote Asymmetric Division and Its Daughter Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Peng-Fei; Tang, Jun; Li, Hong-Ju; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric division of zygote is critical for pattern formation during early embryogenesis in plants and animals. It requires integration of the intrinsic and extrinsic cues prior to and/or after fertilization. How these cues are translated into developmental signals is poorly understood. Here through genetic screen for mutations affecting early embryogenesis, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zygotic arrest 1 (zar1), in which zygote asymmetric division and the cell fate of its daughter cells were impaired. ZAR1 encodes a member of the RLK/Pelle kinase family. We demonstrated that ZAR1 physically interacts with Calmodulin and the heterotrimeric G protein Gβ, and ZAR1 kinase is activated by their binding as well. ZAR1 is specifically expressed micropylarly in the embryo sac at eight-nucleate stage and then in central cell, egg cell and synergids in the mature embryo sac. After fertilization, ZAR1 is accumulated in zygote and endosperm. The disruption of ZAR1 and AGB1 results in short basal cell and an apical cell with basal cell fate. These data suggest that ZAR1 functions as a membrane integrator for extrinsic cues, Ca2+ signal and G protein signaling to regulate the division of zygote and the cell fate of its daughter cells in Arabidopsis. PMID:27014878

  11. Medial HOXA genes demarcate haematopoietic stem cell fate during human development

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Diana R.; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Sierra, Maria I.; Nguyen, Andrew T.; Minasian, Arazin; Saarikoski, Pamela; Sasidharan, Rajkumar; Ramirez, Christina M.; Zack, Jerome A.; Crooks, Gay M.; Galic, Zoran; Mikkola, Hanna K.A.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSC) may provide a potential source of haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) for transplantation; however, unknown molecular barriers prevent the self-renewal of PSC-HSPCs. Using two-step differentiation, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiated in vitro into multipotent haematopoietic cells that had CD34+CD38−/loCD90+CD45+GPI-80+ foetal liver (FL) HSC immunophenotype, but displayed poor expansion potential and engraftment ability. Transcriptome analysis of immunophenotypic hESC-HSPCs revealed that, despite their molecular resemblance to FL-HSPCs, medial HOXA genes remained suppressed. Knockdown of HOXA7 disrupted FL-HSPC function and caused transcriptome dysregulation that resembled hESC-derived progenitors. Overexpression of medial HOXA genes prolonged FL-HSPC maintenance but was insufficient to confer self-renewal to hESC-HSPCs. Stimulation of retinoic acid signalling during endothelial-to-haematopoietic transition induced the HOXA cluster and other HSC/definitive haemogenic endothelium genes, and prolonged HSPC maintenance in culture. Thus, retinoic acid signalling-induced medial HOXA gene expression marks the establishment of the definitive HSC fate and controls HSC identity and function. PMID:27183470

  12. It's All in Your Mind: Determining Germ Cell Fate by Neuronal IRE-1 in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Levi-Ferber, Mor; Salzberg, Yehuda; Safra, Modi; Haviv-Chesner, Anat; Bülow, Hannes E.; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan

    2014-01-01

    The C. elegans germline is pluripotent and mitotic, similar to self-renewing mammalian tissues. Apoptosis is triggered as part of the normal oogenesis program, and is increased in response to various stresses. Here, we examined the effect of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress on apoptosis in the C. elegans germline. We demonstrate that pharmacological or genetic induction of ER stress enhances germline apoptosis. This process is mediated by the ER stress response sensor IRE-1, but is independent of its canonical downstream target XBP-1. We further demonstrate that ire-1-dependent apoptosis in the germline requires both CEP-1/p53 and the same canonical apoptotic genes as DNA damage-induced germline apoptosis. Strikingly, we find that activation of ire-1, specifically in the ASI neurons, but not in germ cells, is sufficient to induce apoptosis in the germline. This implies that ER stress related germline apoptosis can be determined at the organism level, and is a result of active IRE-1 signaling in neurons. Altogether, our findings uncover ire-1 as a novel cell non-autonomous regulator of germ cell apoptosis, linking ER homeostasis in sensory neurons and germ cell fate. PMID:25340700

  13. New roles for Nanos in neural cell fate determination revealed by studies in a cnidarian.

    PubMed

    Kanska, Justyna; Frank, Uri

    2013-07-15

    Nanos is a pan-metazoan germline marker, important for germ cell development and maintenance. In flies, Nanos also acts in posterior and neural development, but these functions have not been demonstrated experimentally in other animals. Using the cnidarian Hydractinia we have uncovered novel roles for Nanos in neural cell fate determination. Ectopic expression of Nanos2 increased the numbers of embryonic stinging cell progenitors, but decreased the numbers of neurons. Downregulation of Nanos2 had the opposite effect. Furthermore, Nanos2 blocked maturation of committed, post-mitotic nematoblasts. Hence, Nanos2 acts as a switch between two differentiation pathways, increasing the numbers of nematoblasts at the expense of neuroblasts, but preventing nematocyte maturation. Nanos2 ectopic expression also caused patterning defects, but these were not associated with deregulation of Wnt signaling, showing that the basic anterior-posterior polarity remained intact, and suggesting that numerical imbalance between nematocytes and neurons might have caused these defects, affecting axial patterning only indirectly. We propose that the functions of Nanos in germ cells and in neural development are evolutionarily conserved, but its role in posterior patterning is an insect or arthropod innovation.

  14. Signaling regulating inner ear development: cell fate determination, patterning, morphogenesis, and defects.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuji

    2015-02-01

    The membranous labyrinth of the inner ear is a highly complex organ that detects sound and balance. Developmental defects in the inner ear cause congenital hearing loss and balance disorders. The membranous labyrinth consists of three semicircular ducts, the utricle, saccule, and endolymphatic ducts, and the cochlear duct. These complex structures develop from the simple otic placode, which is established in the cranial ectoderm adjacent to the neural crest at the level of the hindbrain at the early neurula stage. During development, the otic placode invaginates to form the otic vesicle, which subsequently gives rise to neurons for the vestibulocochlear ganglion, the non-sensory and sensory epithelia of the membranous labyrinth that includes three ampullary crests, two maculae, and the organ of Corti. Combined paracrine and autocrine signals including fibroblast growth factor, Wnt, retinoic acid, hedgehog, and bone morphogenetic protein regulate fate determination, axis formation, and morphogenesis in the developing inner ear. Juxtacrine signals mediated by Notch pathways play a role in establishing the sensory epithelium, which consists of mechanosensory hair cells and supporting cells. The highly differentiated organ of Corti, which consists of uniformly oriented inner/outer hair cells and specific supporting cells, develops during fetal development. Developmental alterations/arrest causes congenital malformations in the inner ear in a spatiotemporal-restricted manner. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms underlying inner ear development is important not only for the management of patients with congenital inner ear malformations, but also for the development of regenerative therapy for impaired function.

  15. Asymmetric division of contractile domains couples cell positioning and fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Eismann, Björn; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Nédélec, François; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    During pre-implantation development, the mammalian embryo self-organizes into the blastocyst consisting of an epithelial layer encapsulating the inner-cell mass (ICM), which gives rise to all embryonic tissues1. In mice, oriented cell division, apico-basal polarity and acto-myosin contractility are thought to contribute to the formation of the ICM2–5. However, how these processes work in concert remains unclear. Here, we show that asymmetric segregation of the apical domain generates blastomeres with different contractility, which triggers their sorting into inner and outer positions. 3D physical modeling of embryo morphogenesis reveals that cells internalize only when differences in surface contractility exceed a predictable threshold. We validate this prediction using biophysical measurements and successfully re-direct cell sorting within the developing blastocyst using maternal myosin (Myh9) knockout chimeric embryos. Finally, we find that loss of contractility causes blastomeres to show ICM-like markers regardless of their position. In particular, contractility controls Yap sub-cellular localization6, raising the possibility that mechanosensing occurs during blastocyst lineage specification. We conclude that contractility couples the positioning and fate specification of blastomeres. We propose that this ensures the robust self-organization of blastomeres into the blastocyst, which confers remarkable regulative capacities to mammalian embryos. PMID:27487217

  16. Asymmetric division of contractile domains couples cell positioning and fate specification.

    PubMed

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Turlier, Hervé; Illukkumbura, Rukshala; Eismann, Björn; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Nédélec, François; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2016-08-18

    During pre-implantation development, the mammalian embryo self-organizes into the blastocyst, which consists of an epithelial layer encapsulating the inner-cell mass (ICM) giving rise to all embryonic tissues. In mice, oriented cell division, apicobasal polarity and actomyosin contractility are thought to contribute to the formation of the ICM. However, how these processes work together remains unclear. Here we show that asymmetric segregation of the apical domain generates blastomeres with different contractilities, which triggers their sorting into inner and outer positions. Three-dimensional physical modelling of embryo morphogenesis reveals that cells internalize only when differences in surface contractility exceed a predictable threshold. We validate this prediction using biophysical measurements, and successfully redirect cell sorting within the developing blastocyst using maternal myosin (Myh9)-knockout chimaeric embryos. Finally, we find that loss of contractility causes blastomeres to show ICM-like markers, regardless of their position. In particular, contractility controls Yap subcellular localization, raising the possibility that mechanosensing occurs during blastocyst lineage specification. We conclude that contractility couples the positioning and fate specification of blastomeres. We propose that this ensures the robust self-organization of blastomeres into the blastocyst, which confers remarkable regulative capacities to mammalian embryos.

  17. Gene regulatory networks in neural cell fate acquisition from genome-wide chromatin association of Geminin and Zic1.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Savita; Yellajoshyula, Dhananjay; Zhang, Bo; Teets, Bryan; Rockweiler, Nicole; Kroll, Kristen L

    2016-11-24

    Neural cell fate acquisition is mediated by transcription factors expressed in nascent neuroectoderm, including Geminin and members of the Zic transcription factor family. However, regulatory networks through which this occurs are not well defined. Here, we identified Geminin-associated chromatin locations in embryonic stem cells and Geminin- and Zic1-associated locations during neural fate acquisition at a genome-wide level. We determined how Geminin deficiency affected histone acetylation at gene promoters during this process. We integrated these data to demonstrate that Geminin associates with and promotes histone acetylation at neurodevelopmental genes, while Geminin and Zic1 bind a shared gene subset. Geminin- and Zic1-associated genes exhibit embryonic nervous system-enriched expression and encode other regulators of neural development. Both Geminin and Zic1-associated peaks are enriched for Zic1 consensus binding motifs, while Zic1-bound peaks are also enriched for Sox3 motifs, suggesting co-regulatory potential. Accordingly, we found that Geminin and Zic1 could cooperatively activate the expression of several shared targets encoding transcription factors that control neurogenesis, neural plate patterning, and neuronal differentiation. We used these data to construct gene regulatory networks underlying neural fate acquisition. Establishment of this molecular program in nascent neuroectoderm directly links early neural cell fate acquisition with regulatory control of later neurodevelopment.

  18. Gene regulatory networks in neural cell fate acquisition from genome-wide chromatin association of Geminin and Zic1

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Savita; Yellajoshyula, Dhananjay; Zhang, Bo; Teets, Bryan; Rockweiler, Nicole; Kroll, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    Neural cell fate acquisition is mediated by transcription factors expressed in nascent neuroectoderm, including Geminin and members of the Zic transcription factor family. However, regulatory networks through which this occurs are not well defined. Here, we identified Geminin-associated chromatin locations in embryonic stem cells and Geminin- and Zic1-associated locations during neural fate acquisition at a genome-wide level. We determined how Geminin deficiency affected histone acetylation at gene promoters during this process. We integrated these data to demonstrate that Geminin associates with and promotes histone acetylation at neurodevelopmental genes, while Geminin and Zic1 bind a shared gene subset. Geminin- and Zic1-associated genes exhibit embryonic nervous system-enriched expression and encode other regulators of neural development. Both Geminin and Zic1-associated peaks are enriched for Zic1 consensus binding motifs, while Zic1-bound peaks are also enriched for Sox3 motifs, suggesting co-regulatory potential. Accordingly, we found that Geminin and Zic1 could cooperatively activate the expression of several shared targets encoding transcription factors that control neurogenesis, neural plate patterning, and neuronal differentiation. We used these data to construct gene regulatory networks underlying neural fate acquisition. Establishment of this molecular program in nascent neuroectoderm directly links early neural cell fate acquisition with regulatory control of later neurodevelopment. PMID:27881878

  19. Antigen availability determines CD8⁺ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions.

    PubMed

    Henrickson, Sarah E; Perro, Mario; Loughhead, Scott M; Senman, Balimkiz; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R; Mazo, Irina B; Haining, W Nicholas; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2013-09-19

    T cells are activated by antigen (Ag)-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in three phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8⁺ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, whereas higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12 hr and 24 hr. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure, resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics.

  20. Spatial Regulation of lag-2 Transcription During Vulval Precursor Cell Fate Patterning in Caenorhabditis eleganslag-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyong; Greenwald, Iva

    2011-01-01

    lag-2 encodes a ligand for LIN-12/Notch and is a component of the lateral signal that activates LIN-12/Notch during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval precursor cell (VPC) fate patterning. lag-2 is specifically transcribed in one VPC, named P6.p, in response to activation of EGFR/Ras/MAPK by the inductive signal that initiates vulval development. Here, we show that a critical molecular event linking inductive and lateral signaling is the relief of VPC-wide lag-2 repression in P6.p. We find that the lag-2 promoter contains an element, VPCrep, which mediates repression in all VPCs when the inductive signal is absent, and another promoter element, VPCact, which is required for activation when repression is relieved by the inductive signal. We show that repression through VPCrep is mediated by the Elk1 ortholog LIN-1, and that the level and subcellular accumulation of a functional LIN-1::GFP protein is similar in all six VPCs before and after vulval induction, suggesting that relief of LIN-1–mediated repression in P6.p is likely due to the known MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of LIN-1. We also provide evidence that the factor(s) acting through VPCact is present in all VPCs but is not modulated by the inductive signal, and that transcription of lag-2 requires the Hth/Meis ortholog UNC-62 and the Mediator complex component SUR-2. Relief of repression of lag-2 in P6.p offers a plausible mechanistic basis for spatial restriction of lag-2 in generating the precise spatial pattern of VPC fates. PMID:21596897

  1. Feedbacks, Bifurcations, and Cell Fate Decision-Making in the p53 System

    PubMed Central

    Bogdał, Marta N.; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a regulator of key cellular processes including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. In this theoretical study, we investigate how the complex circuitry of the p53 network allows for stochastic yet unambiguous cell fate decision-making. The proposed Markov chain model consists of the regulatory core and two subordinated bistable modules responsible for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The regulatory core is controlled by two negative feedback loops (regulated by Mdm2 and Wip1) responsible for oscillations, and two antagonistic positive feedback loops (regulated by phosphatases Wip1 and PTEN) responsible for bistability. By means of bifurcation analysis of the deterministic approximation we capture the recurrent solutions (i.e., steady states and limit cycles) that delineate temporal responses of the stochastic system. Direct switching from the limit-cycle oscillations to the “apoptotic” steady state is enabled by the existence of a subcritical Neimark—Sacker bifurcation in which the limit cycle loses its stability by merging with an unstable invariant torus. Our analysis provides an explanation why cancer cell lines known to have vastly diverse expression levels of Wip1 and PTEN exhibit a broad spectrum of responses to DNA damage: from a fast transition to a high level of p53 killer (a p53 phosphoform which promotes commitment to apoptosis) in cells characterized by high PTEN and low Wip1 levels to long-lasting p53 level oscillations in cells having PTEN promoter methylated (as in, e.g., MCF-7 cell line). PMID:26928575

  2. Modifiers of muscle and heart cell fate specification identified by gain-of-function screen in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Yannick; Jagla, Teresa; Da Ponte, Jean-Philippe; Dastugue, Bernard; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2003-09-01

    The homeobox genes ladybird in Drosophila and their vertebrate counterparts Lbx1 genes display restricted expression patterns in a subset of muscle precursors and are both implicated in diversification of muscle cell fates. In order to gain new insights into mechanisms controlling conserved aspects of cell fate specification, we have performed a gain-of-function (GOF) screen for modifiers of the mesodermal expression of ladybird genes using a collection of EP element carrying Drosophila lines. Amongst the identified genes, several have been previously implicated in cell fate specification processes, thus validating the strategy of our screen. Observed GOF phenotypes have led us to identification of an important number of candidate genes, whose myogenic and/or cardiogenic functions remain to be investigated. Amongst them, the EP insertions close to rhomboid, yan and rac2 suggest new roles for these genes in diversification of muscle and/or heart cell lineages. The analysis of loss and GOF of rhomboid and yan reveals their new roles in specification of ladybird-expressing precursors of adult muscles (LaPs) and ladybird/tinman-positive pericardial cells. Observed phenotypes strongly suggest that rhomboid and yan act at the level of progenitor and founder cells and contribute to the diversification of mesodermal fates. Our analysis of rac2 phenotypes clearly demonstrates that the altered mesodermal level of Rho-GTPase Rac2 can influence specification of a number of cardiac and muscular cell types including those expressing ladybird. Finding that in rac2 mutants ladybird and even skipped-positive muscle founders are overproduced, indicate a new early function for this gene during segregation of muscle progenitors and/or specification of founder cells. Intriguingly, rhomboid, yan and rac2 act as conserved components of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) signalling pathways, suggesting that RTK signalling constitutes a part of a conserved regulatory network governing

  3. Quantifying Waddington landscapes and paths of non-adiabatic cell fate decisions for differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2013-12-06

    Cellular differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation are determined by underlying gene regulatory networks. Non-adiabatic regulation via slow binding/unbinding to the gene can be important in these cell fate decision-making processes. Based on a stem cell core gene network, we uncovered the stem cell developmental landscape. As the binding/unbinding speed decreases, the landscape topography changes from bistable attractors of stem and differentiated states to more attractors of stem and other different cell states as well as substates. Non-adiabaticity leads to more differentiated cell types and provides a natural explanation for the heterogeneity observed in the experiments. We quantified Waddington landscapes with two possible cell fate decision mechanisms by changing the regulation strength or regulation timescale (non-adiabaticity). Transition rates correlate with landscape topography through barrier heights between different states and quantitatively determine global stability. We found the optimal speeds of these cell fate decision-making processes. We quantified biological paths and predict that differentiation and reprogramming go through an intermediate state (IM1), whereas transdifferentiation goes through another intermediate state (IM2). Some predictions are confirmed by recent experimental studies.

  4. Wasp, the Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Homologue, Is Required for Cell Fate Decisions Mediated by Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yaacov, Sari; Le Borgne, Roland; Abramson, Irit; Schweisguth, Francois; Schejter, Eyal D.

    2001-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome proteins, encoded by the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene family, bridge signal transduction pathways and the microfilament-based cytoskeleton. Mutations in the Drosophila homologue, Wasp (Wsp), reveal an essential requirement for this gene in implementation of cell fate decisions during adult and embryonic sensory organ development. Phenotypic analysis of Wsp mutant animals demonstrates a bias towards neuronal differentiation, at the expense of other cell types, resulting from improper execution of the program of asymmetric cell divisions which underlie sensory organ development. Generation of two similar daughter cells after division of the sensory organ precursor cell constitutes a prominent defect in the Wsp sensory organ lineage. The asymmetric segregation of key elements such as Numb is unaffected during this division, despite the misassignment of cell fates. The requirement for Wsp extends to additional cell fate decisions in lineages of the embryonic central nervous system and mesoderm. The nature of the Wsp mutant phenotypes, coupled with genetic interaction studies, identifies an essential role for Wsp in lineage decisions mediated by the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:11149916

  5. Fate of graft cells: what should be clarified for development of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Ikegame, Yuka; Yamashita, Kentaro; Nakashima, Shigeru; Nomura, Yuichi; Yonezawa, Shingo; Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Hara, Hideaki; Iwama, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are believed to be promising for cell administration therapy after ischemic stroke. Because of their advantageous characteristics, such as ability of differentiation into neurovascular lineages, avoidance of immunological problems, and abundance of graft cells in mesodermal tissues, studies regarding MSC therapy have increased recently. However, several controversies are yet to be resolved before a worldwide consensus regarding a standard protocol is obtained. In particular, the neuroprotective effects, the rate of cell migration to the lesion, and differentiation direction differ depending on preclinical observations. Analyses of these differences and application of recent developments in stem cell biology or engineering in imaging modality may contribute to identification of criteria for optimal stem cell therapy in which reliable protocols, which control cell quality and include safe administration procedures, are defined for each recovery phase after cerebral ischemia. In this mini review, we examine controversies regarding the fate of grafts and the prospects for advanced therapy that could be obtained through recent developments in stem cell research as direct conversion to neural cells.

  6. Insight on the fate of CNS-targeted nanoparticles. Part II: Intercellular neuronal cell-to-cell transport.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Giovanni; Vilella, Antonietta; Chhabra, Resham; Schmeisser, Michael J; Boeckers, Tobias M; Ruozi, Barbara; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio; Zoli, Michele; Grabrucker, Andreas M

    2014-03-10

    The application of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) has a promising future for targeting and delivering drugs into the central nervous system (CNS). However, the fate of NPs once entered in the brain after crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and taken up into neuronal cells is a neglected area of study. Thus, here, we investigate the possible mechanisms of a cell-to-cell transport of poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) NPs modified with a glycopeptide (g7-NPs), already demonstrated to be able to cross the BBB after in vivo administration in rodents. We also tested antibody (Ab) -modified g7-NPs both in vitro and in vivo to investigate the possibility of specific targeting. Our results show that g7-NPs can be transported intra- and inter-cellularly within vesicles after vesicular internalization. Moreover, cell-to-cell transport is mediated by tunneling-nanotube (TNT)-like structures in cell lines and most interestingly in glial as well as neuronal cells in vitro. The transport is dependent on F-actin and can be increased by induction of TNT-like structures overexpressing M-Sec, a central factor and inducer of TNT formation. Moreover, cell-to-cell transport occurs independently from NP surface modification with antibodies. These in vitro findings were in part confirmed by in vivo evidence after i.p. administration of NPs in mice.

  7. Mutant huntingtin regulates EGF receptor fate in non-neuronal cells lacking wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Melone, Mariarosa A B; Calarco, Anna; Petillo, Orsolina; Margarucci, Sabrina; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Galderisi, Umberto; Koverech, Guido; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin (htt) is a scaffold protein localized at the subcellular level and is involved in coordinating the activity of several protein for signaling and intracellular transport. The emerging properties of htt in intracellular trafficking prompted us to study the role of mutant htt (polyQ-htt) in the intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose activity seems to be strictly regulated by htt. In particular, to evaluate whether protein trafficking dysfunction occurs in non-neuronal cells in the absence of functional htt, we monitored the EGFR protein in fibroblasts from homozygotic HD patients and their healthy counterpart. We found that polyQ-htt controls EGFR degradation and recycling. Lack of wild-type htt caused alteration of the ubiquitination cycle, formation of EGFR-incorporating high-molecular weight protein aggregates and abnormal EGFR distribution in endosomes of the degradation and recycling pathways after EGF stimulation. PolyQ-htt-induced alteration of EGFR trafficking affected cell migration and proliferation, at least in part, through inhibition of ERK signaling. To our knowledge the data here reported represent the first signaling and phenotypic characterization of polyQ-htt involvement in the modulation of growth factor stimulation in non-neuronal cells.

  8. Nuclear retention of importin α coordinates cell fate through changes in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Yoshinari; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Yamashiro, Tomoko; Asally, Munehiro; Masui, Ayumi; Wong, Chin; Loveland, Kate L; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Various cellular stresses including oxidative stress induce a collapse of the Ran gradient, which causes accumulation of importin α in the nucleus and a subsequent block of nuclear protein import. However, it is unknown whether accumulated importin α performs roles in the nucleus after its migration in response to stress. In this study, we found that nuclear-retained importin α2 binds with DNase I-sensitive nuclear component(s) and exhibits selective upregulation of mRNA encoding Serine/threonine kinase 35 (STK35) by microarray analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter analysis demonstrated that importin α2 can access to the promoter region of STK35 and accelerate its transcription in response to hydrogen peroxide exposure. Furthermore, constitutive overexpression of STK35 proteins enhances caspase-independent cell death under oxidative stress conditions. These results collectively reveal that nuclear-localized importin α2 influences gene expression and contributes directly to cell fate outcomes including non-apoptotic cell death. PMID:21964068

  9. Specification of osteoblast cell fate by canonical Wnt signaling requires Bmp2.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Valerie S; Ohte, Satoshi; Capelo, Luciane P; Gamer, Laura; Rosen, Vicki

    2016-12-01

    Enhanced BMP or canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling are therapeutic strategies employed to enhance bone formation and fracture repair, but the mechanisms each pathway utilizes to specify cell fate of bone-forming osteoblasts remain poorly understood. Among all BMPs expressed in bone, we find that singular deficiency of Bmp2 blocks the ability of cWnt signaling to specify osteoblasts from limb bud or bone marrow progenitors. When exposed to cWnts, Bmp2-deficient cells fail to progress through the Runx2/Osx1 checkpoint and thus do not upregulate multiple genes controlling mineral metabolism in osteoblasts. Cells lacking Bmp2 after induction of Osx1 differentiate normally in response to cWnts, suggesting that pre-Osx1(+) osteoprogenitors are an essential source and a target of BMP2. Our analysis furthermore reveals Grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) as a transcription factor in the osteoblast gene regulatory network induced during bone development and bone repair, which acts upstream of Osx1 in a BMP2-dependent manner. The Runx2/Osx1 transition therefore receives crucial regulatory inputs from BMP2 that are not compensated for by cWnt signaling, and this is mediated at least in part by induction and activation of Grhl3.

  10. The MADS transcription factor Mef2c is a pivotal modulator of myeloid cell fate.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Andrea; Schwieger, Maike; Engelmann, Afra; Weber, Kristoffer; Horn, Stefan; Müller, Ursula; Arnold, Michael A; Olson, Eric N; Stocking, Carol

    2008-05-01

    Mef2c is a MADS (MCM1-agamous-deficient serum response factor) transcription factor best known for its role in muscle and cardiovascular development. A causal role of up-regulated MEF2C expression in myelomonocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has recently been demonstrated. Due to the pronounced monocytic component observed in Mef2c-induced AML, this study was designed to assess the importance of Mef2c in normal myeloid differentiation. Analysis of bone marrow (BM) cells manipulated to constitutively express Mef2c demonstrated increased monopoiesis at the expense of granulopoiesis, whereas BM isolated from Mef2c(Delta/-) mice showed reduced levels of monocytic differentiation in response to cytokines. Mechanistic studies showed that loss of Mef2c expression correlated with reduced levels of transcripts encoding c-Jun, but not PU.1, C/EBPalpha, or JunB transcription factors. Inhibiting Jun expression by short-interfering RNA impaired Mef2c-mediated inhibition of granulocyte development. Moreover, retroviral expression of c-Jun in BM cells promoted monocytic differentiation. The ability of Mef2c to modulate cell-fate decisions between monocyte and granulocyte differentiation, coupled with its functional sensitivity to extracellular stimuli, demonstrate an important role in immunity--and, consistent with findings of other myeloid transcription factors, a target of oncogenic lesions in AML.

  11. Genome-wide mapping of Polycomb target genes unravels their roles in cell fate transitions

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Adrian P.; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Pasini, Diego; Hansen, Klaus H.; Helin, Kristian

    2006-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find that Polycomb-Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), PRC2, and tri-methylated histone H3K27 co-occupy >1000 silenced genes with a strong functional bias for embryonic development and cell fate decisions. We functionally identify 40 genes derepressed in human embryonic fibroblasts depleted of the PRC2 components (EZH2, EED, SUZ12) and the PRC1 component, BMI-1. Interestingly, several markers of osteogenesis, adipogenesis, and chrondrogenesis are among these genes, consistent with the mesenchymal origin of fibroblasts. Using a neuronal model of differentiation, we delineate two different mechanisms for regulating PcG target genes. For genes activated during differentiation, PcGs are displaced. However, for genes repressed during differentiation, we paradoxically find that they are already bound by the PcGs in nondifferentiated cells despite being actively transcribed. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that PcGs are part of a preprogrammed memory system established during embryogenesis marking certain key genes for repressive signals during subsequent developmental and differentiation processes. PMID:16618801

  12. Three-dimensional nano-biointerface as a new platform for guiding cell fate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueli; Wang, Shutao

    2014-04-21

    Three-dimensional nano-biointerface has been emerging as an important topic for chemistry, nanotechnology, and life sciences in recent years. Understanding the exchanges of materials, signals, and energy at biological interfaces has inspired and helped the serial design of three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces. The intimate interactions between cells and nanostructures bring many novel properties, making three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces a powerful platform to guide cell fate in a controllable and accurate way. These advantages and capabilities endow three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces with an indispensable role in developing advanced biological science and technology. This tutorial review is mainly focused on the recent progress of three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces and highlights the new explorations and unique phenomena of three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces for cell-related fundamental studies and biomedical applications. Some basic bio-inspired principles for the design and creation of three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces are also delivered in this review. Current and further challenges of three-dimensional nano-biointerfaces are finally addressed and proposed.

  13. Engineered extracellular microenvironment with a tunable mechanical property for controlling cell behavior and cardiomyogenic fate of cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min-Young; Kim, Jong-Tae; Lee, Won-Jin; Lee, Yunki; Park, Kyung Min; Yang, Young-Il; Park, Ki Dong

    2017-03-01

    Endogenous cardiac stem cells (CSCs) are known to play a certain role in the myocardial homeostasis of the adult heart. The extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding CSCs provides mechanical signals to regulate a variety of cell behaviors, yet the impact in the adult heart of these mechanical properties of ECM on CSC renewal and fate decisions is mostly unknown. To elucidate CSC mechanoresponses at the individual cell and myocardial level, we used the sol-to-gel transitional gelatin-poly(ethylene glycol)-tyramine (GPT) hydrogel with a tunable mechanical property to construct a three-dimensional (3D) matrix for culturing native myocardium and CSCs. The elastic modulus of the GPT hydrogel was controlled by adjusting cross-linking density using hydrogen peroxide. The GPT hydrogel showed an ability to transduce integrin-mediated signals into the myocardium and to permit myocardial homeostatic processes in vitro, including CSC migration and proliferation into the hydrogel from the myocardium. Decreasing the elastic modulus of the hydrogel resulted in upregulation of phosphorylated integrin-mediated signaling molecules in CSCs, which were associated with significant increases in cell spreading, migration, and proliferation of CSCs in a modulus-dependent manner. However, increasing the elastic modulus of hydrogel induced the arrest of cell growth but led to upregulation of cardiomyocyte-associated mRNAs in CSCs. This work demonstrates that tunable 3D-engineered microenvironments created by GPT hydrogel are able to control CSC behavior and to direct cardiomyogenic fate. Our system may also be appropriate for studying the mechanoresponse of CSCs in a 3D context as well as for developing therapeutic strategies for in situ myocardial regeneration.

  14. Quantifying Cell Fate Decisions for Differentiation and Reprogramming of a Human Stem Cell Network: Landscape and Biological Paths

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming has been recently intensively studied experimentally. We developed a global potential landscape and kinetic path framework to explore a human stem cell developmental network composed of 52 genes. We uncovered the underlying landscape for the stem cell network with two basins of attractions representing stem and differentiated cell states, quantified and exhibited the high dimensional biological paths for the differentiation and reprogramming process, connecting the stem cell state and differentiated cell state. Both the landscape and non-equilibrium curl flux determine the dynamics of cell differentiation jointly. Flux leads the kinetic paths to be deviated from the steepest descent gradient path, and the corresponding differentiation and reprogramming paths are irreversible. Quantification of paths allows us to find out how the differentiation and reprogramming occur and which important states they go through. We show the developmental process proceeds as moving from the stem cell basin of attraction to the differentiation basin of attraction. The landscape topography characterized by the barrier heights and transition rates quantitatively determine the global stability and kinetic speed of cell fate decision process for development. Through the global sensitivity analysis, we provided some specific predictions for the effects of key genes and regulation connections on the cellular differentiation or reprogramming process. Key links from sensitivity analysis and biological paths can be used to guide the differentiation designs or reprogramming tactics. PMID:23935477

  15. Breast tumour initiating cell fate is regulated by microenvironmental cues from an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmistha; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Duan, Xinrui; Chen, Hexin; Wang, Qian

    2012-08-01

    Cancer stem cells, also known as tumour-initiating cells (TICs), are identified as highly tumorigenic population within tumours and hypothesized to be main regulators in tumour growth, metastasis and relapse. Evidence also suggests that a tumour microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of cancer, by constantly modulating cell-matrix interactions. Scientists have tried to characterize and identify the TIC population but the actual combination of extracellular components in deciphering the fate of TICs has not been explored. The basic unanswered question is the phenotypic stability of this TIC population in a tissue extracellular matrix setting. The in vivo complexity makes it difficult to identify parameters in a diverse milieu that affect TICs behaviour. Herein we studied how the TIC population would respond when subjected to a unique microenvironment composed of different extracellular proteins. The TIC-enriched population isolated from a Her2/neu-induced mouse mammary tumour was cultured on collagen, fibronectin and laminin coated substrates for one to two weeks. Our observations indicate that a laminin substrate can maintain the majority of the self-renewing and tumorigenic TIC population, whereas collagen induced a more differentiated phenotype of the cells. Also interestingly, fibronectin substrates dictated an invasive phenotype of TICs as evidenced from the EMT-related gene expression pattern. The results of this study signify that the microenvironmental cues play a considerable role in tumour relapse and progression by altering the cancer stem cell behaviour and thus this knowledge could be used to design novel cancer therapeutics.

  16. Developmental Cell Fate and Virulence Are Linked to Trehalose Homeostasis in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Botts, Michael R.; Huang, Mingwei; Borchardt, Regen K.

    2014-01-01

    Among pathogenic environmental fungi, spores are thought to be infectious particles that germinate in the host to cause disease. The meningoencephalitis-causing yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is found ubiquitously in the environment and sporulates in response to nutrient limitation. While the yeast form has been studied extensively, relatively little is known about spore biogenesis, and spore germination has never been evaluated at the molecular level. Using genome transcript analysis of spores and molecular genetic approaches, we discovered that trehalose homeostasis plays a key role in regulating sporulation of C. neoformans, is required for full spore viability, and influences virulence. Specifically, we found that genes involved in trehalose metabolism, including a previously uncharacterized secreted trehalase (NTH2), are highly overrepresented in dormant spores. Deletion of the two predicted trehalases in the C. neoformans genome, NTH1 and NTH2, resulted in severe defects in spore production, a decrease in spore germination, and an increase in the production of alternative developmental structures. This shift in cell types suggests that trehalose levels modulate cell fate decisions during sexual development. We also discovered that deletion of the NTH2 trehalase results in hypervirulence in a murine model of infection. Taken together, these data show that the metabolic adaptations that allow this fungus to proliferate ubiquitously in the environment play unexpected roles in virulence in the mammalian host and highlight the complex interplay among the processes of metabolism, development, and pathogenesis. PMID:25001408

  17. A transcription factor network controls cell migration and fate decisions in the developing zebrafish pineal complex

    PubMed Central

    Clanton, Joshua A.; Dean, Benjamin J.; Gamse, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    The zebrafish pineal complex consists of four cell types (rod and cone photoreceptors, projection neurons and parapineal neurons) that are derived from a single pineal complex anlage. After specification, parapineal neurons migrate unilaterally away from the rest of the pineal complex whereas rods, cones and projection neurons are non-migratory. The transcription factor Tbx2b is important for both the correct number and migration of parapineal neurons. We find that two additional transcription factors, Flh and Nr2e3, negatively regulate parapineal formation. Flh induces non-migratory neuron fates and limits the extent of parapineal specification, in part by activation of Nr2e3 expression. Tbx2b is positively regulated by Flh, but opposes Flh action during specification of parapineal neurons. Loss of parapineal neuron specification in Tbx2b-deficient embryos can be partially rescued by loss of Nr2e3 or Flh function; however, parapineal migration absolutely requires Tbx2b activity. We conclude that cell specification and migration in the pineal complex are regulated by a network of at least three transcription factors. PMID:27317804

  18. The Glide/Gcm fate determinant controls initiation of collective cell migration by regulating Frazzled

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tripti; Kumar, Arun; Cattenoz, Pierre B.; VijayRaghavan, K; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration is a complex process that contributes to build precise tissue and organ architecture. Several molecules implicated in cell interactions also control collective migration, but their precise role and the finely tuned expression that orchestrates this complex developmental process are poorly understood. Here, we show that the timely and threshold expression of the Netrin receptor Frazzled triggers the initiation of glia migration in the developing Drosophila wing. Frazzled expression is induced by the transcription factor Glide/Gcm in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the glial determinant also regulates the efficiency of collective migration. NetrinB but not NetrinA serves as a chemoattractant and Unc5 contributes as a repellant Netrin receptor for glia migration. Our model includes strict spatial localization of a ligand, a cell autonomously acting receptor and a fate determinant that act coordinately to direct glia toward their final destination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15983.001 PMID:27740455

  19. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  20. Dual role for Drosophila lethal of scute in CNS midline precursor formation and dopaminergic neuron and motoneuron cell fate.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Stephanie B; Guardiola, Amaris R; Crews, Stephen T

    2011-06-01

    Dopaminergic neurons play important behavioral roles in locomotion, reward and aggression. The Drosophila H-cell is a dopaminergic neuron that resides at the midline of the ventral nerve cord. Both the H-cell and the glutamatergic H-cell sib are the asymmetric progeny of the MP3 midline precursor cell. H-cell sib cell fate is dependent on Notch signaling, whereas H-cell fate is Notch independent. Genetic analysis of genes that could potentially regulate H-cell fate revealed that the lethal of scute [l(1)sc], tailup and SoxNeuro transcription factor genes act together to control H-cell gene expression. The l(1)sc bHLH gene is required for all H-cell-specific gene transcription, whereas tailup acts in parallel to l(1)sc and controls genes involved in dopamine metabolism. SoxNeuro functions downstream of l(1)sc and controls expression of a peptide neurotransmitter receptor gene. The role of l(1)sc may be more widespread, as a l(1)sc mutant shows reductions in gene expression in non-midline dopaminergic neurons. In addition, l(1)sc mutant embryos possess defects in the formation of MP4-6 midline precursor and the median neuroblast stem cell, revealing a proneural role for l(1)sc in midline cells. The Notch-dependent progeny of MP4-6 are the mVUM motoneurons, and these cells also require l(1)sc for mVUM-specific gene expression. Thus, l(1)sc plays an important regulatory role in both neurogenesis and specifying dopaminergic neuron and motoneuron identities.

  1. YUCCA-mediated auxin biogenesis is required for cell fate transition occurring during de novo root organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lyuqin; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Ruan, Ying; Liu, Jingchun; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Wang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Many plant organs have the ability to regenerate a new plant after detachment or wounding via de novo organogenesis. During de novo root organogenesis from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants, endogenic auxin is essential for the fate transition of regeneration-competent cells to become root founder cells via activation of WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 11 (WOX11). However, the molecular events from leaf explant detachment to auxin-mediated cell fate transition are poorly understood. In this study, we used an assay to determine the concentration of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to provide direct evidence that auxin is produced after leaf explant detachment, a process that involves YUCCA (YUC)-mediated auxin biogenesis. Inhibition of YUC prevents expression of WOX11 and fate transition of competent cells, resulting in the blocking of rooting. Further analysis showed that YUC1 and YUC4 act quickly (within 4 hours) in response to wounding after detachment in both light and dark conditions and promote auxin biogenesis in both mesophyll and competent cells, whereas YUC5, YUC8, and YUC9 primarily respond in dark conditions. In addition, YUC2 and YUC6 contribute to rooting by providing a basal auxin level in the leaf. Overall, our study indicates that YUC genes exhibit a division of labour during de novo root organogenesis from leaf explants in response to multiple signals.

  2. Protein kinase R-like ER kinase and its role in endoplasmic reticulum stress-decided cell fate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Lv, Y; Zhao, N; Guan, G; Wang, J

    2015-07-30

    Over the past few decades, understandings and evidences concerning the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in deciding the cell fate have been constantly growing. Generally, during ER stress, the signal transductions are mainly conducted by three ER stress transducers: protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Consequently, the harmful stimuli from the ER stress transducers induce apoptosis and autophagy, which share several crosstalks and eventually decide the cell fate. The dominance of apoptosis or autophagy induced by ER stress depends on the type and degree of the stimuli. When ER stress is too severe and prolonged, apoptosis is induced to eliminate the damaged cells; however, when stimuli are mild, cell survival is promoted to maintain normal physiological functions by inducing autophagy. Although all the three pathways participate in ER stress-induced apoptosis and autophagy, PERK shows several unique characteristics by interacting with some specific downstream effectors. Notably, there are some preliminary findings on PERK-dependent mechanisms switching autophagy and apoptosis. In this review, we particularly focused on the novel, intriguing and complicated role of PERK in ER stress-decided cell fate, and also discussed more roles of PERK in restoring cellular homeostasis. However, more in-depth knowledge of PERK in the future would facilitate our understanding about many human diseases and benefit in searching for new molecular therapeutic targets.

  3. Genetic identification of intracellular trafficking regulators involved in Notch-dependent binary cell fate acquisition following asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Le Bras, Stéphanie; Rondanino, Christine; Kriegel-Taki, Géraldine; Dussert, Aurore; Le Borgne, Roland

    2012-10-15

    Notch signalling is involved in numerous cellular processes during development and throughout adult life. Although ligands and receptors are largely expressed in the whole organism, activation of Notch receptors only takes place in a subset of cells and/or tissues and is accurately regulated in time and space. Previous studies have demonstrated that endocytosis and recycling of both ligands and/or receptors are essential for this regulation. However, the precise endocytic routes, compartments and regulators involved in the spatiotemporal regulation are largely unknown. In order to identify intracellular trafficking regulators of Notch signalling, we have undertaken a tissue-specific dsRNA genetic screen of candidates potentially involved in endocytosis and recycling within the endolysosomal pathway. dsRNA against 418 genes was induced in the Drosophila melanogaster sensory organ lineage in which Notch signalling regulates binary cell fate acquisition. Gain or loss of Notch signalling phenotypes were observed in adult sensory organs for 113 of them. Furthermore, 26 genes were found to regulate the steady state localisation of Notch, Sanpodo, a Notch co-factor, and/or Delta in the pupal lineage. In particular, we identified 20 genes with previously unknown function in D. melanogaster intracellular trafficking. Among them, we identified CG2747 and we show that it regulates the localisation of clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex, a negative regulator of Notch signalling. Together, our results further demonstrate the essential function of intracellular trafficking in regulating Notch-signalling-dependent binary cell fate acquisition and constitute an additional step toward the elucidation of the routes followed by Notch receptor and ligands during signalling.

  4. A Pitx2-MicroRNA Pathway Modulates Cell Proliferation in Myoblasts and Skeletal-Muscle Satellite Cells and Promotes Their Commitment to a Myogenic Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía; Vallejo, Daniel; Esteban, Francisco J; Doherty, Chris; Hernández-Torres, Francisco; Franco, Diego; Aránega, Amelia Eva

    2015-09-01

    The acquisition of a proliferating-cell status from a quiescent state as well as the shift between proliferation and differentiation are key developmental steps in skeletal-muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to provide proper muscle regeneration. However, how satellite cell proliferation is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we report that the c-isoform of the transcription factor Pitx2 increases cell proliferation in myoblasts by downregulating microRNA 15b (miR-15b), miR-23b, miR-106b, and miR-503. This Pitx2c-microRNA (miRNA) pathway also regulates cell proliferation in early-activated satellite cells, enhancing Myf5(+) satellite cells and thereby promoting their commitment to a myogenic cell fate. This study reveals unknown functions of several miRNAs in myoblast and satellite cell behavior and thus may have future applications in regenerative medicine.

  5. LIN28 alters cell fate succession and acts independently of the let-7 microRNA during neurogliogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Erica; Heine, Christian; Jiang, Qiang; Lee, Vivian M; Moss, Eric G

    2010-03-01

    LIN28 is an RNA-binding protein that is expressed in many developing tissues. It can block let-7 (Mirlet7) microRNA processing and help promote pluripotency. We have observed LIN28 expression in the developing mouse neural tube, colocalizing with SOX2, suggesting a role in neural development. To better understand its normal developmental function, we investigated LIN28 activity during neurogliogenesis in vitro, where the succession of neuronal to glial cell fates occurs as it does in vivo. LIN28 expression was high in undifferentiated cells, and was downregulated rapidly upon differentiation. Constitutive LIN28 expression caused a complete block of gliogenesis and an increase in neurogenesis. LIN28 expression was compatible with neuronal differentiation and did not increase proliferation. LIN28 caused significant changes in gene expression prior to any effect on let-7, notably on Igf2. Furthermore, a mutant LIN28 that permitted let-7 accumulation was still able to completely block gliogenesis. Thus, at least two biological activities of LIN28 are genetically separable and might involve distinct mechanisms. LIN28 can differentially promote and inhibit specific fates and does not function exclusively by blocking let-7 family microRNAs. Importantly, the role of LIN28 in cell fate succession in vertebrate cells is analogous to its activity as a developmental timing regulator in C. elegans.

  6. Fgf20b is required for the ectomesenchymal fate establishment of cranial neural crest cells in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Hajime; Goto, Mami; Katayama, Mika; Miyake, Ayumi; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} The establishment of the ectomesenchymal lineage within the cranial neural crest is of great significance. {yields} Fgf20b knockdown zebrafish embryos showed dysplasticneurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. {yields} Fgf20b is required for ectomesenchymal fate establishment via the activation of Fgfr1 in zebrafish. -- Abstract: In cranial skeletal development, the establishment of the ectomesenchymal lineage within the cranial neural crest is of great significance. Fgfs are polypeptide growth factors with diverse functions in development and metabolism. Fgf20b knockdown zebrafish embryos showed dysplastic neurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. Ectomesenchymal cells from cranial neural crest cells were significantly decreased in Fgf20b knockdown embryos, but cranial neural crest cells with a non-ectomesnchymal fate were increased. However, the proliferation and apoptosis of cranial neural crest cells were essentially unchanged. Fgfr1 knockdown embryos also showed dysplastic neurocranial and pharyngeal cartilages. The present findings indicate that Fgf20b is required for ectomesenchymal fate establishment via the activation of Fgfr1 in zebrafish.

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans PcG-like gene sop-2 regulates the temporal and sexual specificities of cell fates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qingchun; Sun, Yinyan; Huang, Xinxin; Guo, Cong; Zhang, Yuxia; Zhu, Zuoyan; Zhang, Hong

    2008-03-01

    How spatial, temporal, and sexual specific cues are integrated to specify distinct cell fates during multicellular organism development is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans PcG-like gene sop-2 determines the temporal and sexual specificities of a row of hypodermal seam cells, in addition to specifying their positional identities. Loss-of-function of sop-2 causes premature expression of adult fates at larval stages. sop-2 acts upstream of lin-29 in the heterochronic pathway and genetically interacts with other heterochronic genes in specifying the temporal fates of seam cells at different larval stages. We show that the number of ALG-1-containing P bodies is increased in seam cells in sop-2 mutants. Furthermore, the microRNA-mediated repression of a heterochronic gene reporter is enhanced in sop-2 mutants. Mutations in sop-2 also cause partial hermaphrodite-to-male sexual transformations. The homeotic transformations, heterochronic defects, and sexual transformations can occur concomitantly in sop-2 mutants. In summary, our studies reveal that sop-2 integrates spatial, temporal, and sexual cues during C. elegans development.

  8. Neuronal Cell Fate Specification by the Convergence of Different Spatiotemporal Cues on a Common Terminal Selector Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Ferrera, Irene; Millán-Crespo, Irene; Contero-García, Patricia; Bahrampour, Shahrzad

    2016-01-01

    Specification of the myriad of unique neuronal subtypes found in the nervous system depends upon spatiotemporal cues and terminal selector gene cascades, often acting in sequential combinatorial codes to determine final cell fate. However, a specific neuronal cell subtype can often be generated in different parts of the nervous system and at different stages, indicating that different spatiotemporal cues can converge on the same terminal selectors to thereby generate a similar cell fate. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying such convergence are poorly understood. The Nplp1 neuropeptide neurons in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord can be subdivided into the thoracic-ventral Tv1 neurons and the dorsal-medial dAp neurons. The activation of Nplp1 in Tv1 and dAp neurons depends upon the same terminal selector cascade: col>ap/eya>dimm>Nplp1. However, Tv1 and dAp neurons are generated by different neural progenitors (neuroblasts) with different spatiotemporal appearance. Here, we find that the same terminal selector cascade is triggered by Kr/pdm>grn in dAp neurons, but by Antp/hth/exd/lbe/cas in Tv1 neurons. Hence, two different spatiotemporal combinations can funnel into a common downstream terminal selector cascade to determine a highly related cell fate. PMID:27148744

  9. Specific Preferences in Lineage Choice and Phenotypic Plasticity of Glioma Stem Cells Under BMP4 and Noggin Influence.

    PubMed

    Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustín; Garcia, Carolina Paola; Roisman, Alejandro; Slavutsky, Irma; Fernandez Espinosa, Damián Darío; Romorini, Leonardo; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel; Arakaki, Naomi; Martinetto, Horacio; Scassa, María Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Although BMP4-induced differentiation of glioma stem cells (GSCs) is well recognized, details of the cellular responses triggered by this morphogen are still poorly defined. In this study, we established several GSC-enriched cell lines (GSC-ECLs) from high-grade gliomas. The expansion of these cells as adherent monolayers, and not as floating neurospheres, enabled a thorough study of the phenotypic changes that occurred during their differentiation. Herein, we evaluated GSC-ECLs' behavior toward differentiating conditions by depriving them of growth factors and/or by adding BMP4 at different concentrations. After analyzing cellular morphology, proliferation and lineage marker expression, we determined that GSC-ECLs have distinct preferences in lineage choice, where some of them showed an astrocyte fate commitment and others a neuronal one. We found that this election seems to be dictated by the expression pattern of BMP signaling components present in each GSC-ECL. Additionally, treatment of GSC-ECLs with the BMP antagonist, Noggin, also led to evident phenotypic changes. Interestingly, under certain conditions, some GSC-ECLs adopted an unexpected smooth muscle-like phenotype. As a whole, our findings illustrate the wide differentiation potential of GSCs, highlighting their molecular complexity and paving a way to facilitate personalized differentiating therapies.

  10. Similar environments but diverse fates: Responses of budding yeast to nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Honigberg, Saul M.

    2016-01-01

    Diploid budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) can adopt one of several alternative differentiation fates in response to nutrient limitation, and each of these fates provides distinct biological functions. When different strain backgrounds are taken into account, these various fates occur in response to similar environmental cues, are regulated by the same signal transduction pathways, and share many of the same master regulators. I propose that the relationships between fate choice, environmental cues and signaling pathways are not Boolean, but involve graded levels of signals, pathway activation and master-regulator activity. In the absence of large differences between environmental cues, small differences in the concentration of cues may be reinforced by cell-to-cell signals. These signals are particularly essential for fate determination within communities, such as colonies and biofilms, where fate choice varies dramatically from one region of the community to another. The lack of Boolean relationships between cues, signaling pathways, master regulators and cell fates may allow yeast communities to respond appropriately to the wide range of environments they encounter in nature. PMID:27917388

  11. HIPPO pathway members restrict SOX2 to the inner cell mass where it promotes ICM fates in the mouse blastocyst.

    PubMed

    Wicklow, Eryn; Blij, Stephanie; Frum, Tristan; Hirate, Yoshikazu; Lang, Richard A; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Ralston, Amy

    2014-10-01

    Pluripotent epiblast (EPI) cells, present in the inner cell mass (ICM) of the mouse blastocyst, are progenitors of both embryonic stem (ES) cells and the fetus. Discovering how pluripotency genes regulate cell fate decisions in the blastocyst provides a valuable way to understand how pluripotency is normally established. EPI cells are specified by two consecutive cell fate decisions. The first decision segregates ICM from trophectoderm (TE), an extraembryonic cell type. The second decision subdivides ICM into EPI and primitive endoderm (PE), another extraembryonic cell type. Here, we investigate the roles and regulation of the pluripotency gene Sox2 during blastocyst formation. First, we investigate the regulation of Sox2 patterning and show that SOX2 is restricted to ICM progenitors prior to blastocyst formation by members of the HIPPO pathway, independent of CDX2, the TE transcription factor that restricts Oct4 and Nanog to the ICM. Second, we investigate the requirement for Sox2 in cell fate specification during blastocyst formation. We show that neither maternal (M) nor zygotic (Z) Sox2 is required for blastocyst formation, nor for initial expression of the pluripotency genes Oct4 or Nanog in the ICM. Rather, Z Sox2 initially promotes development of the primitive endoderm (PE) non cell-autonomously via FGF4, and then later maintains expression of pluripotency genes in the ICM. The significance of these observations is that 1) ICM and TE genes are spatially patterned in parallel prior to blastocyst formation and 2) both the roles and regulation of Sox2 in the blastocyst are unique compared to other pluripotency factors such as Oct4 or Nanog.

  12. Dissecting Cell-Fate Determination Through Integrated Mathematical Modeling of the ERK/MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Young; Nguyen, Lan K

    2017-01-01

    The past three decades have witnessed an enormous progress in the elucidation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway and its involvement in various cellular processes. Because of its importance and complex wiring, the ERK pathway has been an intensive subject for mathematical modeling, which facilitates the unraveling of key dynamic properties and behaviors of the pathway. Recently, however, it became evident that the pathway does not act in isolation but closely interacts with many other pathways to coordinate various cellular outcomes under different pathophysiological contexts. This has led to an increasing number of integrated, large-scale models that link the ERK pathway to other functionally important pathways. In this chapter, we first discuss the essential steps in model development and notable models of the ERK pathway. We then use three examples of integrated, multipathway models to investigate how crosstalk of ERK signaling with other pathways regulates cell-fate decision-making in various physiological and disease contexts. Specifically, we focus on ERK interactions with the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling pathways. We conclude that integrated modeling in combination with wet-lab experimentation have been and will be instrumental in gaining an in-depth understanding of ERK signaling in multiple biological contexts.

  13. Advanced imaging approaches for regenerative medicine: Emerging technologies for monitoring stem cell fate in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kupfer, Molly E; Ogle, Brenda M

    2015-10-01

    The future of regenerative medicine relies on our ability to control stem cell fate in order to produce functional tissues. Stem cells are the preferred cell source for tissue engineering endeavors and regenerative medicine therapies due to their high potency and capacity for expansion. However, their potency also makes them very difficult to control, as they are in a constant state of flux. Therefore, in order to advance research in regenerative medicine, it is necessary to be able to monitor cell state and phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. This review will detail the imaging technologies currently in use to monitor stem cell phenotype, migration, and differentiation. In addition to providing examples of the most recent work in this area, we will also discuss the future of imaging technologies for regenerative medicine, and how current imaging modalities might be utilized to image specific cell functionality in order to track stem cell fate. The research area of imaging stem cells is progressing toward identifying mature and differentiating cells not only by phenotypic markers, but also by visualizing cell function. Many of the cutting-edge modalities detailed in this review have the potential to be harnessed toward this goal.

  14. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch—two central cell fate events—take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3–Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2–Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites. PMID:27094800

  15. Whi5 phosphorylation embedded in the G1/S network dynamically controls critical cell size and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Vanoni, Marco; Cusimano, Valerio; Busti, Stefano; Marano, Francesca; Manes, Costanzo; Alberghina, Lilia

    2016-04-20

    In budding yeast, overcoming of a critical size to enter S phase and the mitosis/mating switch--two central cell fate events--take place in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Here we present a mathematical model of the basic molecular mechanism controlling the G1/S transition, whose major regulatory feature is multisite phosphorylation of nuclear Whi5. Cln3-Cdk1, whose nuclear amount is proportional to cell size, and then Cln1,2-Cdk1, randomly phosphorylate both decoy and functional Whi5 sites. Full phosphorylation of functional sites releases Whi5 inhibitory activity, activating G1/S transcription. Simulation analysis shows that this mechanism ensures coherent release of Whi5 inhibitory action and accounts for many experimentally observed properties of mitotically growing or conjugating G1 cells. Cell cycle progression and transcriptional analyses of a Whi5 phosphomimetic mutant verify the model prediction that coherent transcription of the G1/S regulon and ensuing G1/S transition requires full phosphorylation of Whi5 functional sites.

  16. Essential role of Bmp signaling and its positive feedback loop in the early cell fate evolution of chordates.

    PubMed

    Kozmikova, Iryna; Candiani, Simona; Fabian, Peter; Gurska, Daniela; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2013-10-15

    In chordates, early separation of cell fate domains occurs prior to the final specification of ectoderm to neural and non-neural as well as mesoderm to dorsal and ventral during development. Maintaining such division with the establishment of an exact border between the domains is required for the formation of highly differentiated structures such as neural tube and notochord. We hypothesized that the key condition for efficient cell fate separation in a chordate embryo is the presence of a positive feedback loop for Bmp signaling within the gene regulatory network (GRN), underlying early axial patterning. Here, we therefore investigated the role of Bmp signaling in axial cell fate determination in amphioxus, the basal chordate possessing a centralized nervous system. Pharmacological inhibition of Bmp signaling induces dorsalization of amphioxus embryos and expansion of neural plate markers, which is consistent with an ancestral role of Bmp signaling in chordate axial patterning and neural plate formation. Furthermore, we provided evidence for the presence of the positive feedback loop within the Bmp signaling network of amphioxus. Using mRNA microinjections we found that, in contrast to vertebrate Vent genes, which promote the expression of Bmp4, amphioxus Vent1 is likely not responsible for activation of cephalochordate ortholog Bmp2/4. Cis-regulatory analysis of amphioxus Bmp2/4, Admp and Chordin promoters in medaka embryos revealed remarkable conservation of the gene regulatory information between vertebrates and basal chordates. Our data suggest that emergence of a positive feedback loop within the Bmp signaling network may represent a key molecular event in the evolutionary history of the chordate cell fate determination.

  17. Notch-HES1 signaling axis controls hemato-endothelial fate decisions of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Bok; Werbowetski-Ogilvie, Tamra E; Lee, Jong-Hee; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Schnerch, Angelique; Hong, Seok-Ho; Park, In-Hyun; Daley, George Q; Bernstein, Irwin D; Bhatia, Mickie

    2013-08-15

    Notch signaling regulates several cellular processes including cell fate decisions and proliferation in both invertebrates and mice. However, comparatively less is known about the role of Notch during early human development. Here, we examined the function of Notch signaling during hematopoietic lineage specification from human pluripotent stem cells of both embryonic and adult fibroblast origin. Using immobilized Notch ligands and small interfering RNA to Notch receptors we have demonstrated that Notch1, but not Notch2, activation induced hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HES1) expression and generation of committed hematopoietic progenitors. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches, this was shown to be attributed to Notch-signaling regulation through HES1, which dictated cell fate decisions from bipotent precursors either to the endothelial or hematopoietic lineages at the clonal level. Our study reveals a previously unappreciated role for the Notch pathway during early human hematopoiesis, whereby Notch signaling via HES1 represents a toggle switch of hematopoietic vs endothelial fate specification.

  18. In situ lineage tracking of human prostatic epithelial stem cell fate reveals a common clonal origin for basal and luminal cells.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, John K; Williamson, Stuart C; Greaves, Laura C; Wilson, Laura; Rigas, Anastasia C; Sandher, Raveen; Pickard, Robert S; Robson, Craig N; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W; Heer, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    Stem cells accumulate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations resulting in an observable respiratory chain defect in their progeny, allowing the mapping of stem cell fate. There is considerable uncertainty in prostate epithelial biology where both basal and luminal stem cells have been described, and in this study the clonal relationships within the human prostate epithelial cell layers were explored by tracing stem cell fate. Fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed histologically-benign prostate samples from 35 patients were studied using sequential cytochrome c oxidase (COX)/succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enzyme histochemistry and COX subunit I immunofluorescence to identify areas of respiratory chain deficiency; mtDNA mutations were identified by whole mitochondrial genome sequencing of laser-captured areas. We demonstrated that cells with respiratory chain defects due to somatic mtDNA point mutations were present in prostate epithelia and clonally expand in acini. Lineage tracing revealed distinct patterning of stem cell fate with mtDNA mutations spreading throughout the whole acinus or, more commonly, present as mosaic acinar defects. This suggests that individual acini are typically generated from multiple stem cells, and the presence of whole COX-deficient acini suggests that a single stem cell can also generate an entire branching acinar subunit of the gland. Significantly, a common clonal origin for basal, luminal and neuroendocrine cells is demonstrated, helping to resolve a key area of debate in human prostate stem cell biology.

  19. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  20. Defined spatiotemporal features of RAS-ERK signals dictate cell fate in MCF-7 mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Ana; Casar, Berta; Colón-Bolea, Paula; Agudo-Ibáñez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero

    2016-06-15

    Signals conveyed through the RAS-ERK pathway are essential for the determination of cell fate. It is well established that signal variability is achieved in the different microenvironments in which signals unfold. It is also known that signal duration is critical for decisions concerning cell commitment. However, it is unclear how RAS-ERK signals integrate time and space in order to elicit a given biological response. To investigate this, we used MCF-7 cells, in which EGF-induced transient ERK activation triggers proliferation, whereas sustained ERK activation in response to heregulin leads to adipocytic differentiation. We found that both proliferative and differentiating signals emanate exclusively from plasma membrane-disordered microdomains. Of interest, the EGF signal can be transformed into a differentiating stimulus by HRAS overexpression, which prolongs ERK activation, but only if HRAS localizes at disordered membrane. On the other hand, HRAS signals emanating from the Golgi complex induce apoptosis and can prevent heregulin-induced differentiation. Our results indicate that within the same cellular context, RAS can exert different, even antagonistic, effects, depending on its sublocalization. Thus cell destiny is defined by the ability of a stimulus to activate RAS at the appropriate sublocalization for an adequate period while avoiding switching on opposing RAS signals.

  1. Invasive Cell Fate Requires G1 Cell-Cycle Arrest and Histone Deacetylase-Mediated Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Matus, David Q; Lohmer, Lauren L; Kelley, Laura C; Schindler, Adam J; Kohrman, Abraham Q; Barkoulas, Michalis; Zhang, Wan; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R

    2015-10-26

    Despite critical roles in development and cancer, the mechanisms that specify invasive cellular behavior are poorly understood. Through a screen of transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified G1 cell-cycle arrest as a precisely regulated requirement of the anchor cell (AC) invasion program. We show that the nuclear receptor nhr-67/tlx directs the AC into G1 arrest in part through regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor cki-1. Loss of nhr-67 resulted in non-invasive, mitotic ACs that failed to express matrix metalloproteinases or actin regulators and lack invadopodia, F-actin-rich membrane protrusions that facilitate invasion. We further show that G1 arrest is necessary for the histone deacetylase HDA-1, a key regulator of differentiation, to promote pro-invasive gene expression and invadopodia formation. Together, these results suggest that invasive cell fate requires G1 arrest and that strategies targeting both G1-arrested and actively cycling cells may be needed to halt metastatic cancer.

  2. Defined spatiotemporal features of RAS-ERK signals dictate cell fate in MCF-7 mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Ana; Casar, Berta; Colón-Bolea, Paula; Agudo-Ibáñez, Lorena; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Signals conveyed through the RAS-ERK pathway are essential for the determination of cell fate. It is well established that signal variability is achieved in the different microenvironments in which signals unfold. It is also known that signal duration is critical for decisions concerning cell commitment. However, it is unclear how RAS-ERK signals integrate time and space in order to elicit a given biological response. To investigate this, we used MCF-7 cells, in which EGF-induced transient ERK activation triggers proliferation, whereas sustained ERK activation in response to heregulin leads to adipocytic differentiation. We found that both proliferative and differentiating signals emanate exclusively from plasma membrane–disordered microdomains. Of interest, the EGF signal can be transformed into a differentiating stimulus by HRAS overexpression, which prolongs ERK activation, but only if HRAS localizes at disordered membrane. On the other hand, HRAS signals emanating from the Golgi complex induce apoptosis and can prevent heregulin-induced differentiation. Our results indicate that within the same cellular context, RAS can exert different, even antagonistic, effects, depending on its sublocalization. Thus cell destiny is defined by the ability of a stimulus to activate RAS at the appropriate sublocalization for an adequate period while avoiding switching on opposing RAS signals. PMID:27099370

  3. Suspension culture of pluripotent stem cells: effect of shear on stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kevin C; Rodrigues, Beatriz; zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant promise, the routine usage of suspension cell culture to manufacture stem cell-derived differentiated cells has progressed slowly. Suspension culture is an innovative way of either expanding or differentiating cells and sometimes both are combined into a single bioprocess. Its advantages over static 2D culturing include a homogeneous and controllable culture environment and producing a large quantity of cells in a fraction of time. This feature makes suspension cell culture ideal for use in stem cell research and eventually ideal in the large-scale production of differentiated cells for regenerative medicine. Because of their tremendous differentiation capacities and unlimited growth properties, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in particular are considered potential sources for future cell-replacement therapies. Currently, expansion of PSCs is accomplished in 2D, which only permits a limited amount of cell growth per culture flask before cells need to be passaged. However, before stem cells can be applied clinically, several aspects of their expansion, such as directed growth, but also differentiation, need to be better controlled. This review will summarize recent advantages in suspension culture of PSCs, while at the same time highlighting current challenges.

  4. Apc deficiency alters pulmonary epithelial cell fate and inhibits Nkx2.1 via triggering TGF-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Changgong; Li, Aimin; Xing, Yiming; Li, Min; Chan, Belinda; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Kucherlapati, Raju; Borok, Zea; Minoo, Parviz

    2013-06-01

    Wnt signaling is critical for cell fate specification and cell differentiation in many organs, but its function in pulmonary neuroendocrine cell (PNEC) differentiation has not been fully addressed. In this study, we examined the role of canonical Wnt signaling by targeting the gene for Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (Apc), which controls Wnt signaling activity via mediating phosphorylation of beta-catenin (Ctnnb). Targeting the Apc gene in lung epithelial progenitors by Nkx2.1-cre stabilized Ctnnb and activated canonical Wnt signaling. Apc deficiency altered lung epithelial cell fate by inhibiting Clara and ciliated cell differentiation and activating Uchl1, a marker of neuroendocrine cells. Similar to PNEC in normal lung, Uchl1(positive) cells were innervated. In mice with targeted inactivation of Ctnnb by Nkx2.1-cre, PNEC differentiation was not interrupted. These indicate that, after lung primordium formation, Wnt signaling is not essential for PNEC differentiation; however, its over-activation promotes PNEC features. Interestingly, Nkx2.1 was extinguished in Apc deficient epithelial progenitors before activation of Uchl1. Examination of Nkx2.1 null lungs suggested that early deletion of Nkx2.1 inhibits PNEC differentiation, while late repression does not. Nkx2.1 was specifically inhibited in Apc deficient lungs but not in Ctnnb gain-of-function lungs indicating a functional difference between Apc deletion and Ctnnb stabilization, both of which activate Wnt signaling. Further analysis revealed that Apc deficiency led to increased TGF-beta signaling, which inhibited Nkx2.1 in cultured lung endodermal explants. In contrast, TGF-beta activity was not increased in Ctnnb gain-of-function lungs. Therefore, our studies revealed an important mechanism involving Apc and TGF-beta signaling in regulating the key transcriptional factor, Nkx2.1, for lung epithelial progenitor cell fate determination.

  5. Uptake and fate of surface modified silica nanoparticles in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is currently the eighth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The often severe side effects, functional impairments and unfavorable cosmetic outcome of conventional therapies for HNSCC have prompted the quest for novel treatment strategies, including the evaluation of nanotechnology to improve e.g. drug delivery and cancer imaging. Although silica nanoparticles hold great promise for biomedical applications, they have not yet been investigated in the context of HNSCC. In the present in-vitro study we thus analyzed the cytotoxicity, uptake and intracellular fate of 200-300 nm core-shell silica nanoparticles encapsulating fluorescent dye tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) dichloride with hydroxyl-, aminopropyl- or PEGylated surface modifications (Ru@SiO2-OH, Ru@SiO2-NH2, Ru@SiO2-PEG) in the human HNSCC cell line UMB-SCC 745. Results We found that at concentrations of 0.125 mg/ml, none of the nanoparticles used had a statistically significant effect on proliferation rates of UMB-SCC 745. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy showed an intracellular appearance of Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 within 30 min. They were internalized both as single nanoparticles (presumably via clathrin-coated pits) or in clusters and always localized to cytoplasmic membrane-bounded vesicles. Immunocytochemical co-localization studies indicated that only a fraction of these nanoparticles were transferred to early endosomes, while the majority accumulated in large organelles. Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 nanoparticles had never been observed to traffic to the lysosomal compartment and were rather propagated at cell division. Intracellular persistence of Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 was thus traceable over 5 cell passages, but did not result in apparent changes in cell morphology and vitality. In contrast to Ru@SiO2-OH and Ru@SiO2-NH2 uptake of Ru@SiO2-PEG was minimal even after 24 h. Conclusions Our study is the first to provide

  6. Glycobiology of cell death: when glycans and lectins govern cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, R G; Rabinovich, G A

    2013-01-01

    Although one typically thinks of carbohydrates as associated with cell growth and viability, glycosylation also has an integral role in many processes leading to cell death. Glycans, either alone or complexed with glycan-binding proteins, can deliver intracellular signals or control extracellular processes that promote initiation, execution and resolution of cell death programs. Herein, we review the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins as essential components of the cell death machinery during physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:23703323

  7. Multiplex Quantitative Histologic Analysis of Human Breast Cancer Cell Signaling and Cell Fate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    cell signaling, cell proliferation, histology, image analysis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...software (FARSIGHT) for automated multispectral image analysis that (i) segments individual nuclei and cells in images, (ii) classifies the segmented...algorithms for multispectral immunohistological image analysis A software tool named FARSIGHT (Figure 1) has been developed to quantify intrinsic and

  8. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-01-01

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE+ B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE+ germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE+ GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21238.001 PMID:27935477

  9. Regulation of B cell fate by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Robinson, Marcus J; Chen, Xiangjun; Smith, Geoffrey A; Taunton, Jack; Liu, Wanli; Allen, Christopher D C

    2016-12-09

    IgE can trigger potent allergic responses, yet the mechanisms regulating IgE production are poorly understood. Here we reveal that IgE(+) B cells are constrained by chronic activity of the IgE B cell receptor (BCR). In the absence of cognate antigen, the IgE BCR promoted terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells (PCs) under cell culture conditions mimicking T cell help. This antigen-independent PC differentiation involved multiple IgE domains and Syk, CD19, BLNK, Btk, and IRF4. Disruption of BCR signaling in mice led to consistently exaggerated IgE(+) germinal center (GC) B cell but variably increased PC responses. We were unable to confirm reports that the IgE BCR directly promoted intrinsic apoptosis. Instead, IgE(+) GC B cells exhibited poor antigen presentation and prolonged cell cycles, suggesting reduced competition for T cell help. We propose that chronic BCR activity and access to T cell help play critical roles in regulating IgE responses.

  10. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Neural Stem Cells Induces Neuronal Fate Commitment via the Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 2

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xing; Yu, Zhang-Feng; Chen, Fang; Lu, Guang-Xian; Ding, Xin-Yuan; Xie, Lin-Jun; Sun, Jian-Tong

    2017-01-01

    Active adult neurogenesis produces new functional neurons, which replace the lost ones and contribute to brain repair. Promoting neurogenesis may offer a therapeutic strategy for human diseases associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we report that endogenous neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) for neural stem cells (NSCs) or progenitors positively regulates neurogenesis. nNOS repression exhibits significantly decreased neuronal differentiation and nNOS upregulation promotes neurons production from NSCs. Using a quantitative approach, we show that instructive effect, that is instruction of NSCs to adopt a neuronal fate, contributes to the favorable effect of endogenous nNOS on neurogenesis. Furthermore, nNOS-mediated instruction of neuronal fate commitment is predominantly due to the reduction of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression and enzymatic activity. Further investigation will be needed to test whether HDAC2 can serve as a new target for therapeutic intervention of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28326018

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Soybean Leaf Abscission Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Organ Polarity and Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joonyup; Yang, Jinyoung; Yang, Ronghui; Sicher, Richard C.; Chang, Caren; Tucker, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Abscission, organ separation, is a developmental process that is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. To better understand the molecular events underlying the progression of abscission in soybean, an agriculturally important legume, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of RNA isolated from the leaf abscission zones (LAZ) and petioles (Non-AZ, NAZ) after treating stem/petiole explants with ethylene for 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. As expected, expression of several families of cell wall modifying enzymes and many pathogenesis-related (PR) genes specifically increased in the LAZ as abscission progressed. Here, we focus on the 5,206 soybean genes we identified as encoding transcription factors (TFs). Of the 5,206 TFs, 1,088 were differentially up- or down-regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ over time, and, within this group, 188 of the TFs were differentially regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ relative to the NAZ. These 188 abscission-specific TFs include several TFs containing domains for homeobox, MYB, Zinc finger, bHLH, AP2, NAC, WRKY, YABBY, and auxin-related motifs. To discover the connectivity among the TFs and highlight developmental processes that support organ separation, the 188 abscission-specific TFs were then clustered based on a >four-fold up- or down-regulation in two consecutive time points (i.e., 0 and 12 h, 12 and 24 h, 24 and 48 h, or 48 and 72 h). By requiring a sustained change in expression over two consecutive time intervals and not just one or several time intervals, we could better tie changes in TFs to a particular process or phase of abscission. The greatest number of TFs clustered into the 0 and 12 h group. Transcriptional network analysis for these abscission-specific TFs indicated that most of these TFs are known as key determinants in the maintenance of organ polarity, lateral organ growth, and cell fate. The abscission-specific expression of these TFs prior to the onset of abscission and their functional

  12. Transcriptome Analysis of Soybean Leaf Abscission Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Organ Polarity and Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonyup; Yang, Jinyoung; Yang, Ronghui; Sicher, Richard C; Chang, Caren; Tucker, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Abscission, organ separation, is a developmental process that is modulated by endogenous and environmental factors. To better understand the molecular events underlying the progression of abscission in soybean, an agriculturally important legume, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of RNA isolated from the leaf abscission zones (LAZ) and petioles (Non-AZ, NAZ) after treating stem/petiole explants with ethylene for 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. As expected, expression of several families of cell wall modifying enzymes and many pathogenesis-related (PR) genes specifically increased in the LAZ as abscission progressed. Here, we focus on the 5,206 soybean genes we identified as encoding transcription factors (TFs). Of the 5,206 TFs, 1,088 were differentially up- or down-regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ over time, and, within this group, 188 of the TFs were differentially regulated more than eight-fold in the LAZ relative to the NAZ. These 188 abscission-specific TFs include several TFs containing domains for homeobox, MYB, Zinc finger, bHLH, AP2, NAC, WRKY, YABBY, and auxin-related motifs. To discover the connectivity among the TFs and highlight developmental processes that support organ separation, the 188 abscission-specific TFs were then clustered based on a >four-fold up- or down-regulation in two consecutive time points (i.e., 0 and 12 h, 12 and 24 h, 24 and 48 h, or 48 and 72 h). By requiring a sustained change in expression over two consecutive time intervals and not just one or several time intervals, we could better tie changes in TFs to a particular process or phase of abscission. The greatest number of TFs clustered into the 0 and 12 h group. Transcriptional network analysis for these abscission-specific TFs indicated that most of these TFs are known as key determinants in the maintenance of organ polarity, lateral organ growth, and cell fate. The abscission-specific expression of these TFs prior to the onset of abscission and their functional

  13. A Gap Junction Protein, Inx2, Modulates Calcium Flux to Specify Border Cell Fate during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ritabrata; Deshpande, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by gap junction (GJ) proteins is indispensable during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and wound healing. Here we report functional analysis of a gap junction protein, Innexin 2 (Inx2), in cell type specification during Drosophila oogenesis. Our data reveal a novel involvement of Inx2 in the specification of Border Cells (BCs), a migratory cell type, whose identity is determined by the cell autonomous STAT activity. We show that Inx2 influences BC fate specification by modulating STAT activity via Domeless receptor endocytosis. Furthermore, detailed experimental analysis has uncovered that Inx2 also regulates a calcium flux that transmits across the follicle cells. We propose that Inx2 mediated calcium flux in the follicle cells stimulates endocytosis by altering Dynamin (Shibire) distribution which is in turn critical for careful calibration of STAT activation and, thus for BC specification. Together our data provide unprecedented molecular insights into how gap junction proteins can regulate cell-type specification. PMID:28114410

  14. Sequence of neuron origin and neocortical laminar fate: relation to cell cycle of origin in the developing murine cerebral wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, T.; Goto, T.; Miyama, S.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    1999-01-01

    Neurons destined for each region of the neocortex are known to arise approximately in an "inside-to-outside" sequence from a pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE). This sequence is initiated rostrolaterally and propagates caudomedially. Moreover, independently of location in the PVE, the neuronogenetic sequence in mouse is divisible into 11 cell cycles that occur over a 6 d period. Here we use a novel "birth hour" method that identifies small cohorts of neurons born during a single 2 hr period, i.e., 10-20% of a single cell cycle, which corresponds to approximately 1.5% of the 6 d neuronogenetic period. This method shows that neurons arising with the same cycle of the 11 cycle sequence in mouse have common laminar fates even if they arise from widely separated positions on the PVE (neurons of fields 1 and 40) and therefore arise at different embryonic times. Even at this high level of temporal resolution, simultaneously arising cells occupy more than one cortical layer, and there is substantial overlap in the distributions of cells arising with successive cycles. We demonstrate additionally that the laminar representation of cells arising with a given cycle is little if at all modified over the early postnatal interval of histogenetic cell death. We infer from these findings that cell cycle is a neuronogenetic counting mechanism and that this counting mechanism is integral to subsequent processes that determine cortical laminar fate.

  15. The RNA helicase DDX6 regulates cell-fate specification in neural stem cells via miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Sarah; Okawa, Satoshi; Hillje, Anna-Lena; González-Cano, Laura; del Sol, Antonio; Schwamborn, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    In neural stem cells (NSCs), the balance between stem cell maintenance and neuronal differentiation depends on cell-fate determinants such as TRIM32. Previously, we have shown that TRIM32 associates with the RNA-induced silencing complex and increases the activity of microRNAs such as Let-7a. However, the exact mechanism of microRNA regulation by TRIM32 during neuronal differentiation has yet to be elucidated. Here, we used a mass spectrometry approach to identify novel protein–protein interaction partners of TRIM32 during neuronal differentiation. We found that TRIM32 associates with proteins involved in neurogenesis and RNA-related processes, such as the RNA helicase DDX6, which has been implicated in microRNA regulation. We demonstrate, that DDX6 colocalizes with TRIM32 in NSCs and neurons and that it increases the activity of Let-7a. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DDX6 is necessary and sufficient for neuronal differentiation and that it functions in cooperation with TRIM32. PMID:25722370

  16. Planar cell polarity effector gene Intu regulates cell fate-specific differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dai, D; Li, L; Huebner, A; Zeng, H; Guevara, E; Claypool, D J; Liu, A; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Genes involved in the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway are essential for a number of developmental processes in mammals, such as convergent extension and ciliogenesis. Tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway are believed to mediate PCP signals in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. However, how PCP signaling controls the morphogenesis of mammalian tissues remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of inturned (Intu), a tissue-specific PCP effector gene, during hair follicle formation in mice. Tissue-specific disruption of Intu in embryonic epidermis resulted in hair follicle morphogenesis arrest because of the failure of follicular keratinocyte to differentiate. Targeting Intu in the epidermis resulted in almost complete loss of primary cilia in epidermal and follicular keratinocytes, and a suppressed hedgehog signaling pathway. Surprisingly, the epidermal stratification and differentiation programs and barrier function were not affected. These results demonstrate that tissue-specific PCP effector genes of the PCP signaling pathway control the differentiation of keratinocytes through the primary cilia in a cell fate- and context-dependent manner, which may be critical in orchestrating the propagation and interpretation of polarity signals established by the core PCP components.

  17. Influences of LIN-12/Notch and POP-1/TCF on the Robustness of Ventral Uterine Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans Gonadogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sallee, Maria D; Aydin, Taner; Greenwald, Iva

    2015-10-19

    The prospective ventral uterus of the hermaphrodite gonad primordium consists of two pairs of sister cells, with each pair consisting of a proximal "α" cell and a distal "β" cell. All four cells initially are competent to become the anchor cell (AC), a unique cell type that acts as the organizer of subsequent uterine and vulval development. However, the β cells soon lose this competence and always become ventral uterine precursor cells (VUs), whereas the α cells maintain their AC competence longer, until lin-12/Notch-mediated interactions between them specify one as the AC and the other as a VU. Here, we investigate this asymmetry in developmental potential and VU fate specification between the α and β sister cells. We find evidence that lin-12 activity contributes to the robustness of βVU fate at elevated temperature, that the Caenorhabditis elegans Notch paralog glp-1 is not functionally redundant with lin-12 in specifying βVU fate, and that the activity of POP-1, the sole C. elegans TCF ortholog, influences βVU fate. We propose a model for how Wnt and LIN-12/Notch signaling together lead to robust specification of the βVU fate.

  18. Influences of LIN-12/Notch and POP-1/TCF on the Robustness of Ventral Uterine Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans Gonadogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sallee, Maria D.; Aydin, Taner; Greenwald, Iva

    2015-01-01

    The prospective ventral uterus of the hermaphrodite gonad primordium consists of two pairs of sister cells, with each pair consisting of a proximal “α” cell and a distal “β” cell. All four cells initially are competent to become the anchor cell (AC), a unique cell type that acts as the organizer of subsequent uterine and vulval development. However, the β cells soon lose this competence and always become ventral uterine precursor cells (VUs), whereas the α cells maintain their AC competence longer, until lin-12/Notch-mediated interactions between them specify one as the AC and the other as a VU. Here, we investigate this asymmetry in developmental potential and VU fate specification between the α and β sister cells. We find evidence that lin-12 activity contributes to the robustness of βVU fate at elevated temperature, that the Caenorhabditis elegans Notch paralog glp-1 is not functionally redundant with lin-12 in specifying βVU fate, and that the activity of POP-1, the sole C. elegans TCF ortholog, influences βVU fate. We propose a model for how Wnt and LIN-12/Notch signaling together lead to robust specification of the βVU fate. PMID:26483009

  19. Multiplex Quantitative Histologic Analysis of Human Breast Cancer Cell Signaling and Cell Fate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    stains. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, cell signaling, cell proliferation, histology, image analysis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...fluorescence, and these DAPI-stained nuclei are often not counted during subsequent image analysis ). To study two analytes in the same tumor section or...analytes (p-ERK, p-AKT, Ki67) and for epithelial cytokeratin (CK), so that tumor cells may be identified during subsequent automated image analysis (as

  20. Polarity in plant asymmetric cell division: Division orientation and cell fate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wanchen; Dong, Juan

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is universally required for the development of multicellular organisms. Unlike animal cells, plant cells have a rigid cellulosic extracellular matrix, the cell wall, which provides physical support and forms communication routes. This fundamental difference leads to some unique mechanisms in plants for generating asymmetries during cell division. However, plants also utilize intrinsically polarized proteins to regulate asymmetric signaling and cell division, a strategy similar to the differentiation mechanism found in animals. Current progress suggests that common regulatory modes, i.e. protein spontaneous clustering and cytoskeleton reorganization, underlie protein polarization in both animal and plant cells. Despite these commonalities, it is important to note that intrinsic mechanisms in plants are heavily influenced by extrinsic cues. To control physical asymmetry in cell division, although our understanding is fragmentary thus far, plants might have evolved novel polarization strategies to orientate cell division plane. Recent studies also suggest that the phytohormone auxin, one of the most pivotal small molecules in plant development, regulates ACD in plants.

  1. Dermatan Sulfate Interacts with Dead Cells and Regulates CD5+ B-Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julia Y.; Lee, Jongmin; Yan, Ming; Rho, Jung-hyun; Roehrl, Michael H.A.

    2011-01-01

    CD5+ (B-1a) B cells play pivotal roles in autoimmunity through expression of autoreactive B-cell receptors and production of autoantibodies. The mechanism underlying their positive selection and expansion is currently unknown. This study demonstrates that dermatan sulfate (DS) expands the B-1a cell population and augments the specific antibody response to an antigen when it is in complex with DS. DS displays preferential affinity for apoptotic and dead cells, and DS-stimulated cell cultures produce antibodies to various known autoantigens. The companion article further illustrates that autoantigens can be identified by affinity to DS, suggesting that molecules with affinity to DS have a high propensity to become autoantigens. We thus propose that the association of antigens from dead cells with DS is a possible origin of autoantigens and that autoreactive B-1a cells are positively selected and expanded by DS∙autoantigen complexes. This mechanism may also explain the clonal expansion of B-1a cells in certain B-cell malignancies. PMID:21514431

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of the cell fate determining nucleotidyltransferase fold protein MAB21L1

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Mann, Carina C.; Kiefersauer, Reiner; Witte, Gregor; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2016-01-01

    The exceptionally conserved metazoan MAB21 proteins are implicated in cell fate decisions and share considerable sequence homology with the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase. cGAS is the major innate immune sensor for cytosolic DNA and produces the second messenger 2′-5′, 3′-5′ cyclic GMP-AMP. Little is known about the structure and biochemical function of other proteins of the cGAS-MAB21 subfamily, such as MAB21L1, MAB21L2 and MAB21L3. We have determined the crystal structure of human full-length MAB21L1. Our analysis reveals high structural conservation between MAB21L1 and cGAS but also uncovers important differences. Although monomeric in solution, MAB21L1 forms a highly symmetric double-pentameric oligomer in the crystal, raising the possibility that oligomerization could be a feature of MAB21L1. In the crystal, MAB21L1 is in an inactive conformation requiring a conformational change - similar to cGAS - to develop any nucleotidyltransferase activity. Co-crystallization with NTP identified a putative ligand binding site of MAB21 proteins that corresponds to the DNA binding site of cGAS. Finally, we offer a structure-based explanation for the effects of MAB21L2 mutations in patients with eye malformations. The underlying residues participate in fold-stabilizing interaction networks and mutations destabilize the protein. In summary, we provide a first structural framework for MAB21 proteins. PMID:27271801

  3. Transcriptional Control of Early T and B Cell Developmental Choices

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2014-01-01

    T and B cells share a common somatic gene rearrangement mechanism for assembling the genes that code for their antigen receptors and developmental pathways with many parallels. Shared usage of basic helix-loop-helix E proteins as transcriptional drivers underlies these common features. However, the transcription factor networks in which these E proteins are embedded are different both in membership and in architecture for T and B cell gene regulatory programs. These differences permit lineage commitment decisions to be made in different hierarchical orders. Furthermore, in a contrast to B-cell gene networks, the T-cell gene network architecture for effector differentiation is sufficiently modular so that E protein inputs can be removed. Complete “T-cell-like” effector differentiation can proceed without T-cell receptor rearrangement or selection when E proteins are neutralized, yielding natural killer and other innate lymphoid cells. PMID:24471430

  4. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 signaling regulates the switch between autophagy and apoptosis to determine breast cancer cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Roberts, Jessica L.; Cook, Katherine L.; Chen, Chun; Shajahan-Haq, Ayesha N.; Axelrod, Margaret; Wärri, Anni; Riggins, Rebecca B.; Jin, Lu; Haddad, Bassem R.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Baumann, William T.; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is a tumor suppressor that regulates cell fate in several cell types. Here we report an inverse correlation in expression of nuclear IRF1 and the autophagy regulator ATG7 in human breast cancer cells that directly impacts their cell fate. In mice harboring mutant Atg7, nuclear IRF1 was increased in mammary tumors, spleen, and kidney. Mechanistic investigations identified ATG7 and the cell death modulator Beclin-1 (BECN1) as negative regulators of IRF1. Silencing ATG7 or BECN1 caused estrogen receptor-α (ERα) to exit the nucleus at the time when IRF1 nuclear localization occurred. Conversely, silencing IRF1 promoted autophagy by increasing BECN1 and blunting IGF-1 receptor and mTOR survival signaling. Loss of IRF1 promoted resistance to anti-estrogens, whereas combined silencing of ATG7 and IRF1 restored sensitivity to these agents. Using a mathematical model to prompt signaling hypotheses, we developed evidence that ATG7 silencing could resensitize IRF1-attenuated cells to apoptosis through mechanisms that involve other estrogen-regulated genes. Overall, our work shows how inhibiting the autophagy proteins ATG7 and BECN1 can regulate IRF1 dependent and independent signaling pathways in ways that engender a new therapeutic strategy to attack breast cancer. PMID:25576084

  5. DDIT4 regulates mesenchymal stem cell fate by mediating between HIF1α and mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gharibi, Borzo; Ghuman, Mandeep; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell fate decisions to remain quiescent, self-renew or differentiate are largely governed by the interplay between extracellular signals from the niche and the cell intrinsic signal cascades and transcriptional programs. Here we demonstrate that DNA Damage Inducible Transcript 4 (DDIT4) acts as a link between HIF1α and mTOR signalling and regulation of adult stem cell fate. Global gene expression analysis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from single clones and live RNA cell sorting showed a direct correlation between DDIT4 and differentiation potentials of MSC. Loss and gain of function analysis demonstrated that DDIT4 activity is directly linked to regulation of mTOR signalling, expression of pluripotency genes and differentiation. Further we demonstrated that DDIT4 exert these effects down-stream to HIF1α. Our findings provide an insight in regulation of adult stem cells homeostasis by two major pathways with opposing functions to coordinate between states of self-renewal and differentiation. PMID:27876894

  6. Epigenetic profiles signify cell fate plasticity in unipotent spermatogonial stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G.; Wen, Duancheng; Falciatori, Ilaria; Elemento, Olivier; Allis, C. David; Rafii, Shahin; Seandel, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem and progenitor cells (SSCs) generate adult male gametes. During in vitro expansion, these unipotent murine cells spontaneously convert to multipotent adult spermatogonial-derived stem cells (MASCs). Here we investigate this conversion process through integrative transcriptomic and epigenomic analyses. We find in SSCs that promoters essential to maintenance and differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are enriched with histone H3-lysine4 and -lysine 27 trimethylations. These bivalent modifications are maintained at most somatic promoters after conversion, bestowing MASCs an ESC-like promoter chromatin. At enhancers, the core pluripotency circuitry is activated partially in SSCs and completely in MASCs, concomitant with loss of germ cell-specific gene expression and initiation of embryonic-like programs. Furthermore, SSCs in vitro maintain the epigenomic characteristics of germ cells in vivo. Our observations suggest that SSCs encode innate plasticity through the epigenome and that both conversion of promoter chromatin states and activation of cell type-specific enhancers are prominent features of reprogramming. PMID:27117588

  7. ELT-1, a GATA-like transcription factor, is required for epidermal cell fates in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Page, B D; Zhang, W; Steward, K; Blumenthal, T; Priess, J R

    1997-07-01

    Epidermal cells are generated during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis by several distinct lineage patterns. These patterns are controlled by maternal genes that determine the identities of early embryonic blastomeres. We show that the embryonically expressed gene elt-1, which was shown previously to encode a GATA-like transcription factor, is required for the production of epidermal cells by each of these lineages. Depending on their lineage history, cells that become epidermal in wild-type embryos become either neurons or muscle cells in elt-1 mutant embryos. The ELT-1 protein is expressed in epidermal cells and in their precursors. We propose that elt-1 functions at an early step in the specification of epidermal cell fates.

  8. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  9. Stochastic descriptors to study the fate and potential of naive T cell clonotypes in the periphery.

    PubMed

    Artalejo, J R; Gómez-Corral, A; López-García, M; Molina-París, C

    2017-02-01

    The population of naive T cells in the periphery is best described by determining both its T cell receptor diversity, or number of clonotypes, and the sizes of its clonal subsets. In this paper, we make use of a previously introduced mathematical model of naive T cell homeostasis, to study the fate and potential of naive T cell clonotypes in the periphery. This is achieved by the introduction of several new stochastic descriptors for a given naive T cell clonotype, such as its maximum clonal size, the time to reach this maximum, the number of proliferation events required to reach this maximum, the rate of contraction of the clonotype during its way to extinction, as well as the time to a given number of proliferation events. Our results show that two fates can be identified for the dynamics of the clonotype: extinction in the short-term if the clonotype experiences too hostile a peripheral environment, or establishment in the periphery in the long-term. In this second case the probability mass function for the maximum clonal size is bimodal, with one mode near one and the other mode far away from it. Our model also indicates that the fate of a recent thymic emigrant (RTE) during its journey in the periphery has a clear stochastic component, where the probability of extinction cannot be neglected, even in a friendly but competitive environment. On the other hand, a greater deterministic behaviour can be expected in the potential size of the clonotype seeded by the RTE in the long-term, once it escapes extinction.

  10. Expression of activated Ras during Dictyostelium development alters cell localization and changes cell fate.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Z M; Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    2001-03-01

    There is now a body of evidence to indicate that Ras proteins play important roles in development. Dictyostelium expresses several ras genes and each appears to perform a distinct function. Previous data had indicated that the overexpression of an activated form of the major developmentally regulated gene, rasD, caused a major aberration in morphogenesis and cell type determination. We now show that the developmental expression of an activated rasG gene under the control of the rasD promoter causes a similar defect. Our results indicate that the expression of activated rasG in prespore cells results in their transdifferentiation into prestalk cells, whereas activated rasG expression in prestalk causes gross mislocalization of the prestalk cell populations.

  11. E. coli fate and transport in the Happel sphere-in-cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, K. E.; Massoudieh, A.; Ginn, T. R.

    2007-06-01

    Rates of mass and gene transfer reactions involving biotic phases are often expressed as proportional to local number densities of bacteria. When the reactions involve attached bacteria, reaction rates depend on local densities of bacteria attached to surfaces. Such may be the case with microbially-facilitated redox reactions involving mineral electron donors and mineral electron receivers (e.g., Sani RK, Peyton BM, Amonette JE, Dohnalkova A. Reoxidation of uranium in the presence of iron(III)-(hydr)oxides under sulfate reducing conditions. Environ Sci Technol 2005;39:2059-66), biofilm formation induced by quorum sensing (Purevdorj B, Costerton JW, Stoodley P. Influence of hydrodynamics and cell signaling on the structure and behavior of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms. Appl Environ Microbiol 2002;68(9):4457-64) and horizontal gene transfer among attached phase bacteria (Beaudoin DL, Bryers JD, Cunningham AB, Peretti SW. Mobilization of broad host range plasmid from Pseudomonas putida to established biofilm of Bacillus azotoformans. I. Experiments. Biotech Bioeng 1998a;57(3):272-79; Beaudoin DL, Bryers JD, Cunningham AB, Peretti SW. Mobilization of broad host range plasmid from Pseudomonas putida to established biofilm of Bacillus azotoformans. II. Modeling Biotech Bioeng 1998b;57(3):280-86). Here we use the conceptual Happel sphere-in-cell model to determine the microscopic distribution of attached bacteria on idealized spherical grains of porous media, assuming azimuthal symmetry. We extend a Lagrangian model of colloid filtration to investigate the effects of motility of Escherichia coli on attachment rate and on the attachment distribution as a function of location on grain surface. The hydrodynamics of the Happel model is implicitly 3D and represented in 2D polar coordinates under the assumption of axisymmetric flow, while the motility of the E. coli cells is explicitly 3D. The model incorporates the fate and transport processes of colloid filtration theory in

  12. Dynamical Modeling of the Cell Cycle and Cell Fate Emergence in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones-Valles, César; Sánchez-Osorio, Ismael; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino

    2014-01-01

    The division of Caulobacter crescentus, a model organism for studying cell cycle and differentiation in bacteria, generates two cell types: swarmer and stalked. To complete its cycle, C. crescentus must first differentiate from the swarmer to the stalked phenotype. An important regulator involved in this process is CtrA, which operates in a gene regulatory network and coordinates many of the interactions associated to the generation of cellular asymmetry. Gaining insight into how such a differentiation phenomenon arises and how network components interact to bring about cellular behavior and function demands mathematical models and simulations. In this work, we present a dynamical model based on a generalization of the Boolean abstraction of gene expression for a minimal network controlling the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division in C. crescentus. This network was constructed from data obtained from an exhaustive search in the literature. The results of the simulations based on our model show a cyclic attractor whose configurations can be made to correspond with the current knowledge of the activity of the regulators participating in the gene network during the cell cycle. Additionally, we found two point attractors that can be interpreted in terms of the network configurations directing the two cell types. The entire network is shown to be operating close to the critical regime, which means that it is robust enough to perturbations on dynamics of the network, but adaptable to environmental changes. PMID:25369202

  13. The Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway patterns the atonal ortholog lin-32 to diversify cell fate in a C. elegans sensory lineage

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Renee M.; Portman, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Each sensory ray of the C. elegans male tail comprises three distinct neuroglial cell types. These three cells descend from a single progenitor, the ray precursor cell, through several rounds of asymmetric division called the ray sublineage. Ray development requires the conserved atonal-family bHLH gene lin-32, which specifies the ray neuroblast and promotes the differentiation of its progeny. However, the mechanisms that allocate specific cell fates among these progeny is unknown. Here we show that the distribution of LIN-32 during the ray sublineage is markedly asymmetric, localizing to anterior daughter cells in two successive cell divisions. The anterior-posterior patterning of LIN-32 expression and of differentiated ray neuroglial fates is brought about by the Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway, including the Wnt ligand LIN-44, its receptor LIN-17, and downstream components LIT-1 (NLK), SYS-1 (β-catenin) and POP-1 (TCF). LIN-32 asymmetry itself has an important role in patterning ray cell fates, as the failure to silence lin-32 expression in posterior cells disrupts development of this branch of the ray sublineage. Together, our results illustrate a mechanism whereby the regulated function of a proneural-class gene in a single neural lineage can both specify a neural precursor and actively pattern the fates of its progeny. Moreover, they reveal a central role for the Wnt/β-catenin asymmetry pathway in patterning neural and glial fates in a simple sensory lineage. PMID:21917811

  14. Computer-aided 2D and 3D quantification of human stem cell fate from in vitro samples using Volocity high performance image analysis software.

    PubMed

    Piltti, Katja M; Haus, Daniel L; Do, Eileen; Perez, Harvey; Anderson, A J; Cummings, B J

    2011-11-01

    Accurate automated cell fate analysis of immunostained human stem cells from 2- and 3-dimensional (2D-3D) images would improve efficiency in the field of stem cell research. Development of an accurate and precise tool that reduces variability and the time needed for human stem cell fate analysis will improve productivity and interpretability of the data across research groups. In this study, we have created protocols for high performance image analysis software Volocity® to classify and quantify cytoplasmic and nuclear cell fate markers from 2D-3D images of human neural stem cells after in vitro differentiation. To enhance 3D image capture efficiency, we optimized the image acquisition settings of an Olympus FV10i® confocal laser scanning microscope to match our quantification protocols and improve cell fate classification. The methods developed in this study will allow for a more time efficient and accurate software based, operator validated, stem cell fate classification and quantification from 2D and 3D images, and yield the highest ≥94.4% correspondence with human recognized objects.

  15. Tetraploidization or autophagy: The ultimate fate of senescent human endometrial stem cells under ATM or p53 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Borodkina, Aleksandra V; Shatrova, Alla N; Deryabin, Pavel I; Grukova, Anastasiya A; Nikolsky, Nikolay N; Burova, Elena B

    2016-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that endometrium-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMESCs) via activation of the ATM/p53/p21/Rb pathway enter the premature senescence in response to oxidative stress. Down regulation effects of the key components of this signaling pathway, particularly ATM and p53, on a fate of stressed hMESCs have not yet been investigated. In the present study by using the specific inhibitors Ku55933 and Pifithrin-α, we confirmed implication of both ATM and p53 in H(2)O(2)-induced senescence of hMESCs. ATM or p53 down regulation was shown to modulate differently the cellular fate of H(2)O(2)-treated hMESCs. ATM inhibition allowed H(2)O(2)-stimulated hMESCs to escape the permanent cell cycle arrest due to loss of the functional ATM/p53/p21/Rb pathway, and induced bypass of mitosis and re-entry into S phase, resulting in tetraploid cells. On the contrary, suppression of the p53 transcriptional activity caused a pronounced cell death of H(2)O(2)-treated hMESCs via autophagy induction. The obtained data clearly demonstrate that down regulation of ATM or p53 shifts senescence of human endometrial stem cells toward tetraploidization or autophagy.

  16. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  17. C. elegans GATA factors EGL-18 and ELT-6 function downstream of Wnt signaling to maintain the progenitor fate during larval asymmetric divisions of the seam cells.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Lakshmi; Thompson, Kenneth W; Eisenmann, David M

    2013-05-01

    The C. elegans seam cells are lateral epithelial cells arrayed in a single line from anterior to posterior that divide in an asymmetric, stem cell-like manner during larval development. These asymmetric divisions are regulated by Wnt signaling; in most divisions, the posterior daughter in which the Wnt pathway is activated maintains the progenitor seam fate, while the anterior daughter in which the Wnt pathway is not activated adopts a differentiated hypodermal fate. Using mRNA tagging and microarray analysis, we identified the functionally redundant GATA factor genes egl-18 and elt-6 as Wnt pathway targets in the larval seam cells. EGL-18 and ELT-6 have previously been shown to be required for initial seam cell specification in the embryo. We show that in larval seam cell asymmetric divisions, EGL-18 is expressed strongly in the posterior seam-fated daughter. egl-18 and elt-6 are necessary for larval seam cell specification, and for hypodermal to seam cell fate transformations induced by ectopic Wnt pathway overactivation. The TCF homolog POP-1 binds a site in the egl-18 promoter in vitro, and this site is necessary for robust seam cell expression in vivo. Finally, larval overexpression of EGL-18 is sufficient to drive expression of a seam marker in other hypodermal cells in wild-type animals, and in anterior hypodermal-fated daughters in a Wnt pathway-sensitized background. These data suggest that two GATA factors that are required for seam cell specification in the embryo independently of Wnt signaling are reused downstream of Wnt signaling to maintain the progenitor fate during stem cell-like divisions in larval development.

  18. Exploring the soluble proteome of Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells at the switch towards different cell fates in response to heat shocks.

    PubMed

    Marsoni, Milena; Cantara, Carlo; De Pinto, Maria Concetta; Gadaleta, Cosimo; De Gara, Laura; Bracale, Marcella; Vannini, Candida

    2010-07-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cells undergo different fates when exposed for 10 minutes to heat stresses of different severity. A 35 degrees C treatment causes a homeostatic response (HRE) allowing cells to cope with the stress; 55 degrees C triggers processes leading to programmed cell death (PCD), which is complete after 72 h. We have used a proteomic approach to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms defining the fate of TBY-2 cells induced by these two heat stresses. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis revealed little overlap of differentially-accumulated proteins: the different severities of heat treatment induced the modulation of specific proteins, some of which are responsible for different cell fates. When the imposed heat shock is beyond a certain threshold, the overall reduced metabolism may be the result of a series of events involving gene expression and oxidative damage that would lead to PCD. Our data suggest that the down-accumulation of several proteins involved in cellular redox homeostasis could provide, until now, an unappreciated contribution to understanding how many partners are involved in promoting the redox impairment leading to PCD. Moreover post-translational modifications seem to play important regulatory roles in the adaptation of TBY-2 cells to different intensities of heat stress.

  19. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone.

  20. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Merrill, Amy E.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb–/–mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb–/–mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb–/–mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  1. Single-cell RNA-seq and computational analysis using temporal mixture modelling resolves Th1/Tfh fate bifurcation in malaria.

    PubMed

    Lönnberg, Tapio; Svensson, Valentine; James, Kylie R; Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Sebina, Ismail; Montandon, Ruddy; Soon, Megan S F; Fogg, Lily G; Nair, Arya Sheela; Liligeto, Urijah; Stubbington, Michael J T; Ly, Lam-Ha; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Zwiessele, Max; Lawrence, Neil D; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Bunn, Patrick T; Engwerda, Christian R; Heath, William R; Billker, Oliver; Stegle, Oliver; Haque, Ashraful; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2017-03-03

    Differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into functionally distinct T helper subsets is crucial for the orchestration of immune responses. Due to extensive heterogeneity and multiple overlapping transcriptional programs in differentiating T cell populations, this process has remained a challenge for systematic dissection in vivo. By using single-cell transcriptomics and computational analysis using a temporal mixtures of Gaussian processes model, termed GPfates, we reconstructed the developmental trajectories of Th1 and Tfh cells during blood-stage Plasmodium infection in mice. By tracking clonality using endogenous TCR sequences, we first demonstrated that Th1/Tfh bifurcation had occurred at both population and single-clone levels. Next, we identified genes whose expression was associated with Th1 or Tfh fates, and demonstrated a T-cell intrinsic role for Galectin-1 in supporting a Th1 differentiation. We also revealed the close molecular relationship between Th1 and IL-10-producing Tr1 cells in this infection. Th1 and Tfh fates emerged from a highly proliferative precursor that upregulated aerobic glycolysis and accelerated cell cycling as cytokine expression began. Dynamic gene expression of chemokine receptors around bifurcation predicted roles for cell-cell in driving Th1/Tfh fates. In particular, we found that precursor Th cells were coached towards a Th1 but not a Tfh fate by inflammatory monocytes. Thus, by integrating genomic and computational approaches, our study has provided two unique resources, a database www.PlasmoTH.org, which facilitates discovery of novel factors controlling Th1/Tfh fate commitment, and more generally, GPfates, a modelling framework for characterizing cell differentiation towards multiple fates.

  2. Single-cell RNA-seq and computational analysis using temporal mixture modelling resolves Th1/Tfh fate bifurcation in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lönnberg, Tapio; Svensson, Valentine; James, Kylie R.; Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Sebina, Ismail; Montandon, Ruddy; Soon, Megan S. F.; Fogg, Lily G.; Nair, Arya Sheela; Liligeto, Urijah; Stubbington, Michael J. T.; Ly, Lam-Ha; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Zwiessele, Max; Lawrence, Neil D.; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Bunn, Patrick T.; Engwerda, Christian R.; Heath, William R.; Billker, Oliver; Stegle, Oliver; Haque, Ashraful; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into functionally distinct T helper subsets is crucial for the orchestration of immune responses. Due to extensive heterogeneity and multiple overlapping transcriptional programs in differentiating T cell populations, this process has remained a challenge for systematic dissection in vivo. By using single-cell transcriptomics and computational analysis using a temporal mixtures of Gaussian processes model, termed GPfates, we reconstructed the developmental trajectories of Th1 and Tfh cells during blood-stage Plasmodium infection in mice. By tracking clonality using endogenous TCR sequences, we first demonstrated that Th1/Tfh bifurcation had occurred at both population and single-clone levels. Next, we identified genes whose expression was associated with Th1 or Tfh fates, and demonstrated a T-cell intrinsic role for Galectin-1 in supporting a Th1 differentiation. We also revealed the close molecular relationship between Th1 and IL-10-producing Tr1 cells in this infection. Th1 and Tfh fates emerged from a highly proliferative precursor that upregulated aerobic glycolysis and accelerated cell cycling as cytokine expression began. Dynamic gene expression of chemokine receptors around bifurcation predicted roles for cell-cell in driving Th1/Tfh fates. In particular, we found that precursor Th cells were coached towards a Th1 but not a Tfh fate by inflammatory monocytes. Thus, by integrating genomic and computational approaches, our study has provided two unique resources, a database www.PlasmoTH.org, which facilitates discovery of novel factors controlling Th1/Tfh fate commitment, and more generally, GPfates, a modelling framework for characterizing cell differentiation towards multiple fates. PMID:28345074

  3. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  4. HTZ-1/H2A.z and MYS-1/MYST HAT act redundantly to maintain cell fates in somatic gonadal cells through repression of ceh-22 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yukimasa; Sawa, Hitoshi; Nishiwaki, Kiyoji

    2014-01-01

    The stable maintenance of acquired cell fates is important during development and for maintaining tissue homeostasis. Although histone modification is one of the major strategies used by cells to maintain their fates, the mechanisms by which histone variants maintain cell fates are not well understood. In C. elegans, the acetylated-histone-H4 (AcH4)-binding protein BET-1 acts downstream of the MYST family histone acetyltransferases MYS-1 and MYS-2 to establish and maintain cell fates in multiple cell lineages. Here we show that, in the bet-1 pathway, the histone H2A variant HTZ-1/H2A.z and MYS-1 are required for the maintenance of cell fates in a redundant manner. BET-1 controlled the subnuclear localization of HTZ-1. HTZ-1 and MYS-1 maintained the fates of the somatic gonadal cells (SGCs) through the repression of a target, ceh-22/Nkx2.5, which induced the formation of the leader cells of the gonad. H3K27 demethylase, UTX-1, had an antagonistic effect relative to HTZ-1 in the regulation of ceh-22. Nuclear spot assay revealed that HTZ-1 localized to the ceh-22 locus in SGCs in an utx-1-dependent manner. We propose that HTZ-1 and MYS-1 repress ceh-22 when UTX-1 removes its silencing mark, H3K27 methylation on the ceh-22 locus, thereby maintaining the fates of SGCs.

  5. hESC Differentiation toward an Autonomic Neuronal Cell Fate Depends on Distinct Cues from the Co-Patterning Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Lisette M.; Lindquist, Jeffrey N.; Walsh, Breda M.; Sia, Peik; Cimadamore, Flavio; Chen, Connie; Denzel, Martin; Pernia, Cameron D.; Ranscht, Barbara; Terskikh, Alexey; Snyder, Evan Y.; Cheresh, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To gain insight into the cellular and molecular cues that promote neurovascular co-patterning at the earliest stages of human embryogenesis, we developed a human embryonic stem cell model to mimic the developing epiblast. Contact of ectoderm-derived neural cells with mesoderm-derived vasculature is initiated via the neural crest (NC), not the neural tube (NT). Neurovascular co-patterning then ensues with specification of NC toward an autonomic fate requiring vascular endothelial cell (EC)-secreted nitric oxide (NO) and direct contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via T-cadherin-mediated homotypic interactions. Once a neurovascular template has been established, NT-derived central neurons then align themselves with the vasculature. Our findings reveal that, in early human development, the autonomic nervous system forms in response to distinct molecular cues from VSMCs and ECs, providing a model for how other developing lineages might coordinate their co-patterning. PMID:26004631

  6. Selection of cell fate in the organ of Corti involves the integration of Hes/Hey signaling at the Atoh1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Abdolazimi, Yassan; Stojanova, Zlatka; Segil, Neil

    2016-03-01

    Determination of cell fate within the prosensory domain of the developing cochlear duct relies on the temporal and spatial regulation of the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. Auditory hair cells and supporting cells arise in a wave of differentiation that patterns them into discrete rows mediated by Notch-dependent lateral inhibition. However, the mechanism responsible for selecting sensory cells from within the prosensory competence domain remains poorly understood. We show in mice that rather than being upregulated in rows of cells, Atoh1 is subject to transcriptional activation in groups of prosensory cells, and that highly conserved sites for Hes/Hey repressor binding in the Atoh1 promoter are needed to select the hair cell and supporting cell fate. During perinatal supporting cell transdifferentiation, which is a model of hair cell regeneration, we show that derepression is sufficient to induce Atoh1 expression, suggesting a mechanism for priming the 3' Atoh1 autoregulatory enhancer needed for hair cell expression.

  7. Chimeric Protein Template-Induced Shape Control of Bone Mineral Nanoparticles and Its Impact on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Du, Yinying; Liu, Haoming; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-mediated molecular self-assembly has become a powerful strategy to fabricate biomimetic biomaterials with controlled shapes. Here we designed a novel chimeric molecular template made of two proteins, silk fibroin (SF) and albumin (ALB), which serve as a promoter and an inhibitor for hydroxyapatite (HA) formation, respectively, to synthesize HA nanoparticles with controlled shapes. HA nanospheres were produced by the chimeric ALB-SF template, whereas HA nanorods were generated by the SF template alone. The success in controlling the shape of HA nanoparticles allowed us to further study the effect of the shape of HA nanoparticles on the fate of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We found that the nanoparticle shape had a crucial impact on the cellular uptake and HA nanospheres were internalized in MSCs at a faster rate. Both HA nanospheres and nanorods showed no significant influence on cell proliferation and migration. However, HA nanospheres significantly promoted the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs in comparison to HA nanorods. Our work suggests that a chimeric combination of promoter and inhibitor proteins is a promising approach to tuning the shape of nanoparticles. It also sheds new light into the role of the shape of the HA nanoparticles in directing stem cell fate. PMID:26079683

  8. Driving vascular endothelial cell fate of human multipotent Isl1+ heart progenitors with VEGF modified mRNA.

    PubMed

    Lui, Kathy O; Zangi, Lior; Silva, Eduardo A; Bu, Lei; Sahara, Makoto; Li, Ronald A; Mooney, David J; Chien, Kenneth R

    2013-10-01

    Distinct families of multipotent heart progenitors play a central role in the generation of diverse cardiac, smooth muscle and endothelial cell lineages during mammalian cardiogenesis. The identification of precise paracrine signals that drive the cell-fate decision of these multipotent progenitors, and the development of novel approaches to deliver these signals in vivo, are critical steps towards unlocking their regenerative therapeutic potential. Herein, we have identified a family of human cardiac endothelial intermediates located in outflow tract of the early human fetal hearts (OFT-ECs), characterized by coexpression of Isl1 and CD144/vWF. By comparing angiocrine factors expressed by the human OFT-ECs and non-cardiac ECs, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was identified as the most abundantly expressed factor, and clonal assays documented its ability to drive endothelial specification of human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived Isl1+ progenitors in a VEGF receptor-dependent manner. Human Isl1-ECs (endothelial cells differentiated from hESC-derived ISL1+ progenitors) resemble OFT-ECs in terms of expression of the cardiac endothelial progenitor- and endocardial cell-specific genes, confirming their organ specificity. To determine whether VEGF-A might serve as an in vivo cell-fate switch for human ESC-derived Isl1-ECs, we established a novel approach using chemically modified mRNA as a platform for transient, yet highly efficient expression of paracrine factors in cardiovascular progenitors. Overexpression of VEGF-A promotes not only the endothelial specification but also engraftment, proliferation and survival (reduced apoptosis) of the human Isl1+ progenitors in vivo. The large-scale derivation of cardiac-specific human Isl1-ECs from human pluripotent stem cells, coupled with the ability to drive endothelial specification, engraftment, and survival following transplantation, suggest a novel strategy for vascular regeneration in the heart.

  9. Fate Tracing of neurogenin2-Expressing Cells in the Mouse Retina Using CreER™: LacZ

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenxin; Wang, Shu-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Delineating the final fate of progenitor cells that transiently express a regulatory gene may shed light on how the gene participates in regulating retinal development. We describe the steps in tracing final fates of progenitor cells that once transiently express neurogenin2 (ngn2) during mouse retinal development with the binary, conditional Ngn2-CreER™—LacZ reporter system. Ngn2-CreER™ mice (Zirlinger et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 99:8084–8089, 2002), in which ngn2 promoter drives the expression of Cre-estrogen receptor CreER™ (Littlewood et al. Nuc Acid Res 23:1686–1690, 1995; Hayashi and McMahon Dev Biol 244:305–318, 2002), are crossed with Rosa26-LoxP-LacZ reporter mice (Soriano Nat Genet 21:70–71, 1999), in which the expression of lacZ requires the removal of “stop” by Cre recombinase (Wagner et al. Transgenic Res 10:545–553, 2001). 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), a synthetic ligand with high affinity for ER™, is administered to double transgenic embryos and/or neonatal mice. Binding of 4-OHT to Cre-ER™ activates Cre recombinase, which then catalyzes the removal of the “stop” sequence from the LoxP-LacZ transgene, leading to lacZ expression in cells that express ngn2. Retinal tissues are fixed at different time points after 4-OHT treatment and analyzed for LacZ activities by colorimetric reaction. Double-labeling with a cell type-specific marker can be used to define the identity of a LacZ+ cell. Combining persisted lacZ expression through the life of the cell and the short half-life (0.5–2 h) of 4-OHT (Danielian et al. Curr Biol 8:1323–1326, 1998), this system offers the opportunity to track the final fates of cells that have expressed ngn2 during the brief presence of 4-OHT administered during retinal development. PMID:22688703

  10. Recent advances in interactions of designed nanoparticles and cells with respect to cellular uptake, intracellular fate, degradation and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-10-01

    The unique features of nanomaterials have led to their rapid development in the biomedical field. In particular, functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are extensively used in the delivery of drugs and genes, bio-imaging and diagnosis. Hence, the interaction between NPs and cells is one of the most important issues towards understanding the true nature of the NP-mediated biological effects. Moreover, the intracellular safety concern of the NPs as a result of intracellular NP degradation remains to be clarified in detail. This review presents recent advances in the interactions of designed NPs and cells. The focus includes the governing factors on cellular uptake and the intracellular fate of NPs, and the degradation of NPs and its influence on nanotoxicity. Some basic consideration is proposed for optimizing the NP-cell interaction and designing NPs of better biocompatiblity for biomedical application.

  11. CD4+ T Cell Fate in Glomerulonephritis: A Tale of Th1, Th17, and Novel Treg Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified CD4+ T cells as central players of glomerulonephritis (GN). Cells of the Th1 and Th17 responses cause renal tissue damage, while Tregs mediate protection. Recently, a high degree of plasticity among these T cell lineages was proposed. During inflammation, Th17 cells were shown to have the potential of transdifferentiation into Th1, Th2, or alternatively anti-inflammatory Tr1 cells. Currently available data from studies in GN, however, do not indicate relevant Th17 to Th1 or Th2 conversion, leaving the Th17 cell fate enigmatic. Tregs, on the other hand, were speculated to transdifferentiate into Th17 cells. Again, data from GN do not support this concept. Rather, it seems that previously unrecognized subspecialized effector Treg lineages exist. These include Th1 specific Treg1 as well as Th17 directed Treg17 cells. Furthermore, a bifunctional Treg subpopulation was recently identified in GN, which secrets IL-17 and coexpresses Foxp3 together with the Th17 characteristic transcription factor RORγt. Similarities between these different and highly specialized effector Treg subpopulations with the corresponding T helper effector cell lineages might have resulted in previous misinterpretation as Treg transdifferentiation. In summary, Th17 cells have a relatively stable phenotype during GN, while, in the case of Tregs, currently available data suggest lineage heterogeneity rather than plasticity. PMID:27974866

  12. Post implantation fate of adipogenic induced mesenchymal stem cells on Type I collagen scaffold in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Balu; Fernandez, Francis B; Harikrishnan, V S; John, Annie

    2017-02-01

    Regenerative medicine via its application in soft tissue reconstruction through novel methods in adipose tissue engineering (ATE) has gained remarkable attention and investment despite simultaneous reports on clinical incidence of graft resorption and impaired vascularization. The underlying malaise here once identified may play a critical role in optimizing implant function. Our work attempts to determine the fate of donor cells and the implant in recipient micro environment using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) on a type I collagen sponge, an established scaffold for ATE. Cell components within the construct were identified 21 days post implantation to delineate cell survival, proliferation & terminal roles in vivo. ASC's are multipotent, while collagen type I is a natural extra cellular matrix component. Commercially available bovine type I collagen was characterized for its physiochemical properties and cyto-compatibility. Nile red staining of induced ASCs identified red globular structures in cell cytoplasm indicating oil droplet accumulation. Similarly, in vivo implantation of the cell seeded collagen construct in rat model for 21 days in the dorsal muscle, showed genesis of chicken wire network of fat-like cells, which was demonstrated histologically using a variety of staining techniques. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique established the efficiency of transplantation wherein the male donor cells with labeled Y chromosome was identified 21 days post implantation from female rat model. Retrieved samples at 21 days indicated adipogenesis in situ, with donor cells highlighted via FISH. The study provides an insight to stem cells in ATE from genesis to functionalization.

  13. The Hippo pathway member Yap plays a key role in influencing fate decisions in muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Robert N.; Tremblay, Annie M.; Knopp, Paul; White, Robert B.; Urcia, Roby; De Bari, Cosimo; Zammit, Peter S.; Camargo, Fernando D.; Wackerhage, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Summary Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of skeletal muscle. Mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, they can be activated to proliferate and generate myoblasts to supply further myonuclei to hypertrophying or regenerating muscle fibres, or self-renew to maintain the resident stem cell pool. Here, we identify the transcriptional co-factor Yap as a novel regulator of satellite cell fate decisions. Yap expression increases during satellite cell activation and Yap remains highly expressed until after the differentiation versus self-renewal decision is made. Constitutive expression of Yap maintains Pax7+ and MyoD+ satellite cells and satellite cell-derived myoblasts, promotes proliferation but prevents differentiation. In contrast, Yap knockdown reduces the proliferation of satellite cell-derived myoblasts by ≈40%. Consistent with the cellular phenotype, microarrays show that Yap increases expression of genes associated with Yap inhibition, the cell cycle, ribosome biogenesis and that it represses several genes associated with angiotensin signalling. We also identify known regulators of satellite cell function such as BMP4, CD34 and Myf6 (Mrf4) as genes whose expression is dependent on Yap activity. Finally, we confirm in myoblasts that Yap binds to Tead transcription factors and co-activates MCAT elements which are enriched in the proximal promoters of Yap-responsive genes. PMID:23038772

  14. Aging alters bone-fat reciprocity by shifting in vivo mesenchymal precursor cell fate towards an adipogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lakshman; Brennan, Tracy A; Russell, Elizabeth; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Chen, Qijun; Brad Johnson, F; Pignolo, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) play an important role in bone homeostasis. Age-related changes occur in bone resulting in a decrease in bone density and a relative increase in adipocity. Although in vitro studies suggest the existence of an age-related lineage switch between osteogenic and adipogenic fates, stem cell and microenvironmental contributions to this process have not been elucidated in vivo. In order to study the effects of MPC and microenvironmental aging on functional engraftment and lineage switching, transplantation studies were performed under non-myeloablative conditions in old recipients, with donor MPCs derived from young and old green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice. Robust engraftment by young MPCs or their progeny was observed in the marrow, bone-lining region and in the matrix of young recipients; however, significantly lower engraftment was seen at the same sites in old recipients transplanted with old MPCs. Differentiation of transplanted MPCs strongly favored adipogenesis over osteogenesis in old recipients irrespective of MPC donor age, suggesting that microenvironmental alterations that occur with in vivo aging are predominately responsible for MPC lineage switching. These data indicate that aging alters bone-fat reciprocity and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors towards an adipogenic fate.

  15. Gene transcription is coordinated with, but not dependent on, cell divisions during C. elegans embryonic fate specification.

    PubMed

    Nair, Gautham; Walton, Travis; Murray, John Isaac; Raj, Arjun

    2013-08-01

    Cell differentiation and proliferation are coordinated during animal development, but the link between them remains uncharacterized. To examine this relationship, we combined single-molecule RNA imaging with time-lapse microscopy to generate high-resolution measurements of transcriptional dynamics in Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We found that globally slowing the overall development rate of the embryo by altering temperature or by mutation resulted in cell proliferation and transcription slowing, but maintaining, their relative timings, suggesting that cell division may directly control transcription. However, using mutants with specific defects in cell cycle pathways that lead to abnormal lineages, we found that the order between cell divisions and expression onset can switch, showing that expression of developmental regulators is not strictly dependent on cell division. Delaying cell divisions resulted in only slight changes in absolute expression time, suggesting that expression and proliferation are independently entrained to a separate clock-like process. These changes in relative timing can change the number of cells expressing a gene at a given time, suggesting that timing may help determine which cells adopt particular transcriptional patterns. Our results place limits on the types of mechanisms that are used during normal development to ensure that division timing and fate specification occur at appropriate times.

  16. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grants, Jennifer M.; Ying, Lisa T. L.; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C.; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator’s dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals. PMID:26715664

  17. The Mediator Kinase Module Restrains Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling and Represses Vulval Cell Fate Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grants, Jennifer M; Ying, Lisa T L; Yoda, Akinori; You, Charlotte C; Okano, Hideyuki; Sawa, Hitoshi; Taubert, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling pathways that control proliferation and determine cell fates are tightly regulated to prevent developmental anomalies and cancer. Transcription factors and coregulators are important effectors of signaling pathway output, as they regulate downstream gene programs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, several subunits of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex promote or inhibit vulva development, but pertinent mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we show that Mediator's dissociable cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module (CKM), consisting of cdk-8, cic-1/Cyclin C, mdt-12/dpy-22, and mdt-13/let-19, is required to inhibit ectopic vulval cell fates downstream of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. cdk-8 inhibits ectopic vulva formation by acting downstream of mpk-1/ERK, cell autonomously in vulval cells, and in a kinase-dependent manner. We also provide evidence that the CKM acts as a corepressor for the Ets-family transcription factor LIN-1, as cdk-8 promotes transcriptional repression by LIN-1. In addition, we find that CKM mutation alters Mediator subunit requirements in vulva development: the mdt-23/sur-2 subunit, which is required for vulva development in wild-type worms, is dispensable for ectopic vulva formation in CKM mutants, which instead display hallmarks of unrestrained Mediator tail module activity. We propose a model whereby the CKM controls EGFR-Ras-ERK transcriptional output by corepressing LIN-1 and by fine tuning Mediator specificity, thus balancing transcriptional repression vs. activation in a critical developmental signaling pathway. Collectively, these data offer an explanation for CKM repression of EGFR signaling output and ectopic vulva formation and provide the first evidence of Mediator CKM-tail module subunit crosstalk in animals.

  18. Defining a developmental path to neural fate by global expression profiling of mouse embryonic stem cells and adult neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Kazuhiro; Sharov, Alexei A; Carter, Mark G; Foroni, Chiara; Vescovi, Angelo L; Ko, Minoru S H

    2006-04-01

    To understand global features of gene expression changes during in vitro neural differentiation, we carried out the microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), embryonal carcinoma cells, and adult neural stem/progenitor (NS) cells. Expression profiling of ESCs during differentiation in monolayer culture revealed three distinct phases: undifferentiated ESCs, primitive ectoderm-like cells, and neural progenitor cells. Principal component (PC) analysis revealed that these cells were aligned on PC1 over the course of 6 days. This PC1 represents approximately 4,000 genes, the expression of which increased with neural commitment/differentiation. Furthermore, NS cells derived from adult brain and their differentiated cells were positioned along this PC axis further away from undifferentiated ESCs than embryonic stem-derived neural progenitors. We suggest that this PC1 defines a path to neural fate, providing a scale for the degree of commitment/differentiation.

  19. High-definition mapping of retroviral integration sites defines the fate of allogeneic T cells after donor lymphocyte infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattoglio, Claudia; Maruggi, Giulietta; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Malani, Nirav; Pellin, Danilo; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Magnani, Zulma; Ciceri, Fabio; Ambrosi, Alessandro; von Kalle, Christof; Bushman, Frederic D; Bonini, Chiara; Schmidt, Manfred; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2010-12-22

    The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing to build a genome-wide, high-definition map of retroviral integration sites in the genome of peripheral blood T cells from two different donors and used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to associate integration clusters to transcriptional activity and to genetic and epigenetic features of the T cell genome. Comparison with matched random controls and with integrations obtained from CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells showed that integration clusters occur within chromatin regions bearing epigenetic marks associated with active promoters and regulatory elements in a cell-specific fashion. Analysis of integration sites in T cells obtained ex vivo two months after infusion showed no evidence of integration-related clonal expansion or dominance, but rather loss of cells harboring integration events interfering with RNA post-transcriptional processing. The study shows that high-definition maps of retroviral integration sites are a powerful tool to analyze the fate of genetically modified T cells in patients and the biological consequences of retroviral transduction.

  20. Twist-ing cell fate: mechanistic insights into the role of twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cakouros, D; Raices, R M; Gronthos, S; Glackin, C A

    2010-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), are multipotent cells that give rise to multiple lineages including osteoblasts, adipocytes, muscle, and fibroblasts. MSCs are useful for clinical applications such as cell therapy because they can be isolated from an individual and expanded for use in tissue repair, as well as other therapeutic applications, without immune rejection. However, one of the key problems in the use of MSCs for these applications is the efficiency of these cells to engraft and fully regenerate damaged tissues. Therefore, to optimize this process, a comprehensive understanding of the key regulators of MSCs self-renewal and maintenance are critical to the success of future cell therapy as well as other clinical applications. The basic helix loop helix transcription factor, Twist, plays a master regulatory role in all of these processes and, therefore, a thorough understanding of the mechanistic insights in the role of Twist in lineage specification/differentiation and tumorigenesis is vital to the success of future clinical applications for the therapeutic use of MSCs. In this article, we highlight the basic mechanisms and signaling pathways that are important to MSC fate, maintenance, and differentiation, as well as the critical role that Twist plays in these processes. In addition, we review the known literature suggesting a critical role for Twist in the generation of cancer stem cells, as this information may contribute to a broader understanding of stem cell biology and stem-cell-based therapeutics.

  1. Importance of Molecular Features of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer for Choice of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Approximately 85% of lung cancer is categorized as non–small cell lung cancer, and traditionally, non–small cell lung cancer has been treated with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Targeted agents that inhibit the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have been developed and integrated into the treatment regimens in non–small cell lung cancer. Currently, approved epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors include the tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib. Molecular determinants, such as epidermal growth factor receptor–activating mutations, have been associated with response to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and may be used to guide treatment choices in patients with non–small cell lung cancer. Thus, treatment choice for patients with non–small cell lung cancer depends on molecular features of tumors; however, improved techniques are required to increase the specificity and efficiency of molecular profiling so that these methods can be incorporated into routine clinical practice. This review provides an overview of how genetic analysis is currently used to direct treatment choices in non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:21514411

  2. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Cameron R.; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V.; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M.; Wilson, Elizabeth B.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G.; Horwitz, Marcus A.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Smale, Stephen T.; Brooks, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  3. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cameron R; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M; Wilson, Elizabeth B; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G; Horwitz, Marcus A; Bensinger, Steven J; Smale, Stephen T; Brooks, David G

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections.

  4. Fine-tuning of Notch signaling sets the boundary of the organ of Corti and establishes sensory cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Martin L; Brown, Rogers M; Jen, Hsin-I; Semerci, Fatih; Depreux, Frederic; Edlund, Renée K; Zhang, Hongyuan; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas; Cole, Susan E; Doetzlhofer, Angelika; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Segil, Neil; Groves, Andrew K

    2016-01-01

    The signals that induce the organ of Corti and define its boundaries in the cochlea are poorly understood. We show that two Notch modifiers, Lfng and Mfng, are transiently expressed precisely at the neural boundary of the organ of Corti. Cre-Lox fate mapping shows this region gives rise to inner hair cells and their associated inner phalangeal cells. Mutation of Lfng and Mfng disrupts this boundary, producing unexpected duplications of inner hair cells and inner phalangeal cells. This phenotype is mimicked by other mouse mutants or pharmacological treatments that lower but not abolish Notch signaling. However, strong disruption of Notch signaling causes a very different result, generating many ectopic hair cells at the expense of inner phalangeal cells. Our results show that Notch signaling is finely calibrated in the cochlea to produce precisely tuned levels of signaling that first set the boundary of the organ of Corti and later regulate hair cell development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19921.001 PMID:27966429

  5. Fates of Microcystis aeruginosa Cells and Associated Microcystins in Sediment and the Effect of Coagulation Process on Them

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoguo; Xiang, Huiyi; Hu, Yue; Zhang, Yang; Ouyang, Liao; Gao, Meiying

    2013-01-01

    During toxic Microcystis aeruginosa blooms, large amounts of cells can enter sediment through natural settlement, and coagulation treatment used to control water blooms can enhance the accumulation of cells. However, the current understanding of the fates of these cells and associated microcystins (MCs), as well as the effect of coagulation treatment on these factors, is limited. The results of the present study show that Microcystis aeruginosa cells in sediment were steadily decomposed under experimental conditions, and that they completely disappeared within 28 days. The major MCs released from settled cells were immediately degraded in sediment, and microbial degradation may be the main mechanism involved in this process. Coagulation treatment with PAC (polyaluminium chloride) + sepiolite can efficiently remove Microcystis aeruginosa cells from the water column and prevent their re-invasion. Furthermore, coagulation treatment with PAC + sepiolite had no significant effect on the release and decomposition of MCs and, thus, will not enhance the MCs pollution. However, coagulation treatment can accelerate the nutrient cycle by enhancing the settlement of cells. More attention should be paid to the effect on nutrient cycle when coagulation treatment is used for restoration of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24380974

  6. NF-κB signalling and cell fate decisions in response to a short pulse of tumour necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robin E. C.; Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Xia, Xianfang; Juncker, David; Gaudet, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    In tissues and tumours, cell behaviours are regulated by multiple time-varying signals. While in the laboratory cells are often exposed to a stimulus for the duration of the experiment, in vivo exposures may be much shorter. In this study, we monitored NF-κB and caspase signalling in human cancer cells treated with a short pulse of Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF). TNF is an inflammatory cytokine that can induce both the pro-survival NF-κB-driven gene transcription pathway and the pro-apoptotic caspase pathway. We find that a few seconds of exposure to TNF is sufficient to activate the NF-κB pathway in HeLa cells and induce apoptotic cell death in both HeLa and Kym-1 cells. Strikingly, a 1-min pulse of TNF can be more effective at killing than a 1-hour pulse, indicating that in addition to TNF concentration, duration of exposure also coordinates cell fate decisions. PMID:28004761

  7. An essential role for RAX homeoprotein and NOTCH-HES signaling in Otx2 expression in embryonic retinal photoreceptor cell fate determination.

    PubMed

    Muranishi, Yuki; Terada, Koji; Inoue, Tatsuya; Katoh, Kimiko; Tsujii, Toshinori; Sanuki, Rikako; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Aizawa, Shinichi; Tamaki, Yasuhiro; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2011-11-16

    The molecular mechanisms underlying cell fate determination from common progenitors in the vertebrate CNS remain elusive. We previously reported that the OTX2 homeoprotein regulates retinal photoreceptor cell fate determination. While Otx2 transactivation is a pivotal process for photoreceptor cell fate determination, its transactivation mechanism in the retina is unknown. Here, we identified an evolutionarily conserved Otx2 enhancer of ∼500 bp, named embryonic enhancer locus for photoreceptor Otx2 transcription (EELPOT), which can recapitulate initial Otx2 expression in the embryonic mouse retina. We found that the RAX homeoprotein interacts with EELPOT to transactivate Otx2, mainly in the final cell cycle of retinal progenitors. Conditional inactivation of Rax results in downregulation of Otx2 expression in vivo. We also showed that NOTCH-HES signaling negatively regulates EELPOT to suppress Otx2 expression. These results suggest that the integrated activity of cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors on EELPOT underlies the molecular basis of photoreceptor cell fate determination in the embryonic retina.

  8. Role of miR-34a-5p in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Proliferation and Fate Decision: Novel Insights into the Pathogenesis of Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisa; Ruberti, Samantha; Rontauroli, Sebastiano; Guglielmelli, Paola; Salati, Simona; Rossi, Chiara; Zini, Roberta; Tagliafico, Enrico; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Manfredini, Rossella

    2017-01-01

    Primary Myelofibrosis (PMF) is a chronic Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by a skewed megakaryopoiesis and an overproduction of proinflammatory and profibrotic mediators that lead to the development of bone marrow (BM) fibrosis. Since we recently uncovered the upregulation of miR-34a-5p in PMF CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), in order to elucidate its role in PMF pathogenesis here we unravelled the effects of miR-34a-5p overexpression in HPCs. We showed that enforced expression of miR-34a-5p partially constrains proliferation and favours the megakaryocyte and monocyte/macrophage commitment of HPCs. Interestingly, we identified lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) and nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2 (NR4A2) transcripts as miR-34a-5p-targets downregulated after miR-34a-5p overexpression in HPCs as well as in PMF CD34+ cells. Remarkably, the knockdown of NR4A2 in HPCs mimicked the antiproliferative effects of miR-34a-5p overexpression, while the silencing of LEF1 phenocopied the effects of miR-34a-5p overexpression on HPCs lineage choice, by favouring the megakaryocyte and monocyte/macrophage commitment. Collectively our data unravel the role of miR-34a-5p in HPCs fate decision and suggest that the increased expression of miR-34a-5p in PMF HPCs could be important for the skewing of megakaryopoiesis and the production of monocytes, that are key players in BM fibrosis in PMF patients. PMID:28098757

  9. TNF receptor signaling inhibits cardiomyogenic differentiation of cardiac stem cells and promotes a neuroadrenergic-like fate.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Tariq; Xu, Yuanyuan; Ismahil, Mohamed Ameen; Li, Qianhong; Jones, Steven P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Bolli, Roberto; Prabhu, Sumanth D

    2016-11-01

    Despite expansion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs; c-kit(+)Lin(-)) after myocardial infarction, endogenous repair processes are insufficient to prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure (HF). This suggests that the microenvironment in post-ischemic and failing hearts compromises CSC regenerative potential. Inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), are increased after infarction and in HF; whether they modulate CSC function is unknown. As the effects of TNF are specific to its two receptors (TNFRs), we tested the hypothesis that TNF differentially modulates CSC function in a TNFR-specific manner. CSCs were isolated from wild-type (WT), TNFR1-/-, and TNFR2-/- adult mouse hearts, expanded and evaluated for cell competence and differentiation in vitro in the absence and presence of TNF. Our results indicate that TNF signaling in murine CSCs is constitutively related primarily to TNFR1, with TNFR2 inducible after stress. TNFR1 signaling modestly diminished CSC proliferation, but, along with TNFR2, augmented CSC resistance to oxidant stress. Deficiency of either TNFR1 or TNFR2 did not impact CSC telomerase activity. Importantly, TNF, primarily via TNFR1, inhibited cardiomyogenic commitment during CSC differentiation, and instead promoted smooth muscle and endothelial fates. Moreover, TNF, via both TNFR1 and TNFR2, channeled an alternate CSC neuroadrenergic-like fate (capable of catecholamine synthesis) during differentiation. Our results suggest that elevated TNF in the heart restrains cardiomyocyte differentiation of resident CSCs and may enhance adrenergic activation, both effects that would reduce the effectiveness of endogenous cardiac repair and the response to exogenous stem cell therapy, while promoting adverse cardiac remodeling.

  10. Transcription Factor Bcl11b Controls Effector and Memory CD8 T cell Fate Decision and Function during Poxvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Georges; Stanfield, Jessica; Tahiliani, Vikas; Desai, Pritesh; Hutchinson, Tarun E.; Lorentsen, Kyle J.; Cho, Jonathan J.; Avram, Dorina; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play an important role in host resistance to many viral infections, but the underlying transcriptional mechanisms governing their differentiation and functionality remain poorly defined. By using a highly virulent systemic and respiratory poxvirus infection in mice, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11b provides a dual trigger that sustains the clonal expansion of virus-specific effector CD8+ T cells, while simultaneously suppressing the expression of surface markers associated with short-lived effector cell (SLEC) differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrate that Bcl11b supports the acquisition of memory precursor effector cell (MPEC) phenotype and, thus, its absence causes near complete loss of lymphoid and lung-resident memory cells. Interestingly, despite having normal levels of T-bet and Eomesodermin, Bcl11b-deficient CD8+ T cells failed to execute effector differentiation needed for anti-viral cytokine production and degranulation, suggesting a non-redundant role of Bcl11b in regulation of this program. Thus, Bcl11b is a critical player in fate decision of SLECs and MPECs, as well as effector function and memory formation. PMID:27790219

  11. Uptake and intracellular fate of disulfide-bonded polymer hydrogel capsules for Doxorubicin delivery to colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Johnston, Angus P R; Dodds, Sarah J; Kamphuis, Marloes M J; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G; Nice, Edouard C; Heath, Joan K; Caruso, Frank

    2010-05-25

    Understanding the interactions between drug carriers and cells is of importance to enhance the delivery of therapeutics. The release of therapeutics into different intracellular environments, such as the lysosomes or the cell cytoplasm, will impact their pharmacological activity. Herein, we investigate the intracellular fate of layer-by-layer (LbL)-assembled, submicrometer-sized polymer hydrogel capsules in a human colon cancer derived cell line, LIM1899. The cellular uptake of the disulfide-stabilized poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA(SH)) capsules by colon cancer cells is a time-dependent process. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the internalized capsules are deformed in membrane-enclosed compartments, which further mature to late endosomes or lysosomes. We further demonstrate the utility of these redox-responsive PMA(SH) capsules for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to colon cancer cells. The DOX-loaded PMA(SH) capsules demonstrate a 5000-fold enhanced cytotoxicity in cell viability studies compared to free DOX.

  12. Adult interfollicular tumour-initiating cells are reprogrammed into an embryonic hair follicle progenitor-like fate during basal cell carcinoma initiation.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Khalil Kass; Lapouge, Gaëlle; Bouvrée, Karine; Rorive, Sandrine; Brohée, Sylvain; Appelstein, Ornella; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Sukumaran, Vijayakumar; Van de Sande, Bram; Pucci, Doriana; Dekoninck, Sophie; Berthe, Jean-Valery; Aerts, Stein; Salmon, Isabelle; del Marmol, Véronique; Blanpain, Cédric

    2012-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent human skin cancer, arises from activating hedgehog (HH) pathway mutations; however, little is known about the temporal changes that occur in tumour-initiating cells from the first oncogenic hit to the development of invasive cancer. Using an inducible mouse model enabling the expression of a constitutively active Smoothened mutant (SmoM2) in the adult epidermis, we carried out transcriptional profiling of SmoM2-expressing cells at different times during cancer initiation. We found that tumour-initiating cells are massively reprogrammed into a fate resembling that of embryonic hair follicle progenitors (EHFPs). Wnt/ β-catenin signalling was very rapidly activated following SmoM2 expression in adult epidermis and coincided with the expression of EHFP markers. Deletion of β-catenin in adult SmoM2-expressing cells prevents EHFP reprogramming and tumour initiation. Finally, human basal cell carcinomas also express genes of the Wnt signalling and EHFP signatures.

  13. Four and a Half LIM Domains 1b (Fhl1b) Is Essential for Regulating the Liver versus Pancreas Fate Decision and for β-Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Cui, Jiaxi; Del Campo, Aranzazu; Shin, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The liver and pancreas originate from overlapping embryonic regions, and single-cell lineage tracing in zebrafish has shown that Bone morphogenetic protein 2b (Bmp2b) signaling is essential for determining the fate of bipotential hepatopancreatic progenitors towards the liver or pancreas. Despite its pivotal role, the gene regulatory networks functioning downstream of Bmp2b signaling in this process are poorly understood. We have identified four and a half LIM domains 1b (fhl1b), which is primarily expressed in the prospective liver anlage, as a novel target of Bmp2b signaling. fhl1b depletion compromised liver specification and enhanced induction of pancreatic cells from endodermal progenitors. Conversely, overexpression of fhl1b favored liver specification and inhibited induction of pancreatic cells. By single-cell lineage tracing, we showed that fhl1b depletion led lateral endodermal cells, destined to become liver cells, to become pancreatic cells. Reversely, when fhl1b was overexpressed, medially located endodermal cells, fated to differentiate into pancreatic and intestinal cells, contributed to the liver by directly or indirectly modulating the discrete levels of pdx1 expression in endodermal progenitors. Moreover, loss of fhl1b increased the regenerative capacity of β-cells by increasing pdx1 and neurod expression in the hepatopancreatic ductal system. Altogether, these data reveal novel and critical functions of Fhl1b in the hepatic versus pancreatic fate decision and in β-cell regeneration. PMID:26845333

  14. Effects of permeability and living space on cell fate and neo-tissue development in hydrogel-based scaffolds: a study with cartilaginous model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Changjiang; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-04-01

    One bottleneck in tissue regeneration with hydrogel scaffolds is the limited understanding of the crucial factors for controlling hydrogel's physical microenvironments to regulate cell fate. Here, the effects of permeability and living space of hydrogels on encapsulated cells' behavior were evaluated, respectively. Three model hydrogel-based constructs are fabricated by using photo-crosslinkable hyaluronic acid as precursor and chondrocytes as model cell type. The better permeable hydrogels facilitate better cell viability and rapid proliferation, which lead to increased production of extracellular matrix (ECM), e.g. collagen, glycosaminoglycan. By prolonged culture, nano-sized hydrogel networks inhibit neo-tissue development, and the presence of macro-porous living spaces significantly enhance ECM deposition via forming larger cell clusters and eventually induce formation of scaffold-free neo-tissue islets. The results of this work demonstrate that the manipulation and optimization of hydrogel microenvironments, namely permeability and living space, are crucial to direct cell fate and neo-tissue formation.

  15. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  16. Choice of Substrate Material for Epitaxial CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2015-06-14

    Epitaxial CdTe with high quality, low defect density, and high carrier concentration should in principle yield high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, insufficient effort has been given to explore the choice of substrate for high-efficiency epitaxial CdTe solar cells. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to investigate three crystalline substrates: silicon (Si), InSb, and CdTe each substrate material are generally discussed.

  17. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Influences Fate Decision of Human Monocytes Differentiated from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Speidel, Anna; Felk, Sandra; Reinhardt, Peter; Sterneckert, Jared; Gillardon, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with familial Parkinson's disease (PD). High expression levels in immune cells suggest a role of LRRK2 in regulating the immune system. In this study, we investigated the effect of the LRRK2 (G2019S) mutation in monocytes, using a human stem cell-derived model expressing LRRK2 at endogenous levels. We discovered alterations in the differentiation pattern of LRRK2 mutant, compared to non-mutant isogenic controls, leading to accelerated monocyte production and a reduction in the non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocyte subpopulation in the LRRK2 mutant cells. LPS-treatment of the iPSC-derived monocytes significantly increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, demonstrating a functional response without revealing any significant differences between the genotypes. Assessment of the migrational capacity of the differentiated monocytes revealed moderate deficits in LRRK2 mutant cells, compared to their respective controls. Our findings indicate a pivotal role of LRRK2 in hematopoietic fate decision, endorsing the involvement of the immune system in the development of PD.

  18. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Influences Fate Decision of Human Monocytes Differentiated from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Felk, Sandra; Reinhardt, Peter; Sterneckert, Jared; Gillardon, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). High expression levels in immune cells suggest a role of LRRK2 in regulating the immune system. In this study, we investigated the effect of the LRRK2 (G2019S) mutation in monocytes, using a human stem cell-derived model expressing LRRK2 at endogenous levels. We discovered alterations in the differentiation pattern of LRRK2 mutant, compared to non-mutant isogenic controls, leading to accelerated monocyte production and a reduction in the non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocyte subpopulation in the LRRK2 mutant cells. LPS-treatment of the iPSC-derived monocytes significantly increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, demonstrating a functional response without revealing any significant differences between the genotypes. Assessment of the migrational capacity of the differentiated monocytes revealed moderate deficits in LRRK2 mutant cells, compared to their respective controls. Our findings indicate a pivotal role of LRRK2 in hematopoietic fate decision, endorsing the involvement of the immune system in the development of PD. PMID:27812199

  19. Cytochrome c upregulation during capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reaction determines the fate of pig sperm cells: linking proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Uhm, Sang-Jun; Song, Sang-Jin; Song, Hyuk; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Teoan; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2008-02-01

    To identify the mechanisms underlying capacitation, we undertook a high-resolution differential proteomic analysis of pig sperm cells. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analyses led to identification of 56 differentially expressed proteins. After induction of capacitation in vitro, the well-established markers of the capacitation (lactadherin P47, acrosomal protein SP-10 precursor, prohibitin, proteasomes, DJ-1 protein and arylsulfatase-A) and TCA cycle proteins (isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase) were identified. During induction, cytochrome c expression via the p53 pathway increased, however apoptotic executors, such as caspase-3, decreased significantly. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that cytochrome c upregulation in spermatozoa is capable of activating tyrosine phosphorylation for capacitation, rather than apoptosis. Exposure of sperm cells to soluble Na2CrO4 [Cr (VI)], which induces cytochrome c upregulation, caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins in non-capacitating medium. In contrast, supplementation of cyclosporin A, which blocks cytochrome c upregulation, inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins. Furthermore, spermatozoa in capacitation medium or non-capacitation media supplemented with soluble Cr (VI) showed similar levels of capacitation. These findings indicate that differential expression of many of these proteins has previously been unrecognized in sperm cells incubated in capacitation medium also suggest that a gradual increase of cytochrome c during incubation to induce capacitation determines sperm cell fate, i.e., apoptosis or further development for fertilization.

  20. Hyperthermia influences fate determination of neural stem cells with lncRNAs alterations in the early differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Deng, Yujia; Duan, Da; Sun, Shuaiqi; Ge, Lite; Zhuo, Yi; Yuan, Ting; Wu, Pei; Wang, Hao; Lu, Ming; Xia, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background Temperature is an important parameter in the microenvironment of neural stem cells (NSCs); however, little is known about the precise effects of hyperthermia on fate determination in NSCs or the role of long non-coding (lnc)RNAs in this process. This was addressed in the present study using NSCs cultured at two different temperatures. Methods NSCs were divided into 37NSC and 40NSC groups that were cultured at 37°C or 40°C, respectively, for 72 h. Neuronal or glial cell differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry and western blotting. LncRNA expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Results The numbers of cells positive for the neuronal marker Tuj-1 and the glial cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein were higher in the 40NSC than in the 37NSC group. The two groups also showed distinct lncRNA expression profiles. Conclusion Hyperthermia promotes neuronal and glial differentiation in NSCs, which involves specific lncRNAs. PMID:28234910

  1. Metabolic fate of glucose and candidate signaling and excess-fuel detoxification pathways in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Lamontagne, Julien; Al-Mass, Anfal; Peyot, Marie-Line; Corkey, Barbara E; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2017-03-09

    Glucose metabolism promotes insulin secretion in β-cells via metabolic coupling factors that are incompletely defined. Moreover, chronically elevated glucose causes β-cell dysfunction, but little is known about how cells handle excess fuels to avoid toxicity. Here we sought to determine which among the candidate pathways and coupling factors best correlates with glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), define the fate of glucose in the β-cell, and identify pathways possibly involved in excess-fuel detoxification. We exposed isolated rat islets for 1 h to increasing glucose concentrations and measured various pathways and metabolites. Glucose oxidation, oxygen consumption, and ATP production correlated well with GSIS and saturated at 16 mM glucose. However, glucose utilization, glycerol release, triglyceride and glycogen contents, free fatty acid (FFA) content and release, and cholesterol and cholesterol esters increased linearly up to 25 mM glucose. Besides being oxidized, glucose was mainly metabolized via glycerol production and release and lipid synthesis (particularly FFA, triglycerides, and cholesterol), whereas glycogen production was com