Science.gov

Sample records for cell flow systems

  1. Ellipsoidal cell flow system

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Gary C.; Mullaney, Paul F.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a system incorporating an ellipsoidal flow chamber having light reflective walls for low level light detection in practicing cellular analysis. The system increases signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of ten over prior art systems. In operation, laser light passes through the primary focus of the ellipsoid. A controlled flow of cells simultaneously passes through this focus so that the laser light impinges on the cells and is modulated by the cells. The reflective walls of the ellipsoid reflect the cell-modulated light to the secondary focus of the ellipsoid. A tapered light guide at the secondary focus picks up a substantial portion of modulated reflective light and directs it onto a light detector to produce a signal. The signal is processed to obtain the intensity distribution of the modulated light and hence sought after characteristics of the cells. In addition, cells may be dyed so as to fluoresce in response to the laser light and their fluorescence may be processed as cell-modulated light above described. A light discriminating filter would be used to distinguish reflected modulated laser light from reflected fluorescent light.

  2. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  3. Electrochemical cell for rebalancing REDOX flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An electrically rechargeable REDOX cell or battery system including one of more rebalancing cells is described. Each rebalancing cell is divided into two chambers by an ion permeable membrane. The first chamber is fed with gaseous hydrogen and a cathode fluid which is circulated through the cathode chamber of the REDOX cell is also passed through the second chamber of the rebalancing cell. Electrochemical reactions take place on the surface of insert electrodes in the first and second chambers to rebalance the electrochemical capacity of the anode and cathode fluids of the REDOX system.

  4. Breakthrough Flow Battery Cell Stack: Transformative Electrochemical Flow Storage System (TEFSS)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-09

    GRIDS Project: UTRC is developing a flow battery with a unique design that provides significantly more power than today's flow battery systems. A flow battery is a cross between a traditional battery and a fuel cell. Flow batteries store their energy in external tanks instead of inside the cell itself. Flow batteries have traditionally been expensive because the battery cell stack, where the chemical reaction takes place, is costly. In this project, UTRC is developing a new stack design that achieves 10 times higher power than today’s flow batteries. This high power output means the size of the cell stack can be smaller, reducing the amount of expensive materials that are needed. UTRC’s flow battery will reduce the cost of storing electricity for the electric grid, making widespread use feasible.

  5. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  6. A novel in vitro flow system for changing flow direction on endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Lu, Hao; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques localize to regions of flow disturbance, i.e. bifurcations, branch points and regions of high curvature. Shear stress in these regions can be multi-directional due to complex flow patterns such as time-varying vortices. However, commonly used in vitro flow models are incapable of changing flow orientation to any direction other than the reverse. We have developed a novel in vitro flow system to enable changes in flow direction to any angle. When cells were pre-aligned in laminar shear, then rotated 90°, cells re-aligned over 24 hours. Re-alignment involved actin remodeling by gradual rotation of actin stress fibers. This device will enable analysis of how endothelial cells sense changes in flow direction as occur in vivo. PMID:22386042

  7. NASA Non-Flow-Through PEM Fuel Cell System for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araghi, Koorosh R.

    2011-01-01

    NASA is researching passive NFT Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technologies for primary fuel cell power plants in air-independent applications. NFT fuel cell power systems have a higher power density than flow through systems due to both reduced parasitic loads and lower system mass and volume. Reactant storage still dominates system mass/volume considerations. NFT fuel cell stack testing has demonstrated equivalent short term performance to flow through stacks. More testing is required to evaluate long-term performance.

  8. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne, T.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the rover s hotel loads. This work represents the first attempt at a ground demonstration of this new technology aboard a mobile test platform. Development and demonstration were supported by the Office of the Chief Technologist s Space Power Systems Project and the Advanced Exploration System Modular Power Systems Project.

  9. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne; Burke, Kenneth; Jakupca, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This presentation describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the SCARAB rover s hotel loads. The power system, including the non-flow-through fuel cell technology, successfully demonstrated its goal as a range extender by powering hotel loads on the SCARAB rover, making this demonstration the first to use the non-flow-through fuel cell technology on a mobile platform.

  10. Recent advances in redox flow cell storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    Several features which were conceived and incorporated into complete redox systems that greatly enhanced its ability to be kept in proper charge balance, to be capable of internal voltage regulation, and in general be treated as a true multicell electrochemical system rather than an assembly of single cells that were wired together, were discussed. The technology status as it relates to the two application areas of solar photovoltaic/wind and distributed energy storage for electric utility applications was addressed. The cost and life advantages of redox systems were also covered.

  11. The Advantages of Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell Power Systems for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, Mark; Burke, Kenneth; Jakupca, Ian

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been developing proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell power systems for the past decade, as an upgraded technology to the alkaline fuel cells which presently provide power for the Shuttle Orbiter. All fuel cell power systems consist of one or more fuel cell stacks in combination with appropriate balance-of-plant hardware. Traditional PEM fuel cells are characterized as flow-through, in which recirculating reactant streams remove product water from the fuel cell stack. NASA recently embarked on the development of non-flow-through fuel cell systems, in which reactants are dead-ended into the fuel cell stack and product water is removed by internal wicks. This simplifies the fuel cell power system by eliminating the need for pumps to provide reactant circulation, and mechanical water separators to remove the product water from the recirculating reactant streams. By eliminating these mechanical components, the resulting fuel cell power system has lower mass, volume, and parasitic power requirements, along with higher reliability and longer life. These improved non-flow-through fuel cell power systems therefore offer significant advantages for many aerospace applications.

  12. A Surface Acoustic Wave Pumped Lensless Microfluidic Imaging System for Flowing Cell Detection and Counting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiwei; Farooq, Umar; Chen, Jin; Ge, Yakun; Gao, Haijun; Su, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiang; Dong, Shurong; Luo, Ji-Kui

    2017-08-29

    The future point-of-care diagnostics requires miniaturizing the existing bulky and expensive bioanalysis instruments, where lab-on-CMOS-chip-based technology can provide a promising solution. In this paper, we presented a surface acoustic wave (SAW) pumped lensless microfluidic imaging system for flowing cell detection and counting. Different from the previous lensless systems, which employ external bulky syringe pump for cell driven, the developed system directly integrates the SAW pump on the CMOS image sensor chip to drive the cell-containing microfluid. Moreover, an efficient temporal-differencing-based motion detection algorithm is proposed for continuous flowing cell detection and counting. Experimental results show that the SAW pump can drive the cells to flow at different driven powers, and also can keep the channel temperature below 40 °C so as not to harm the cells. The human bone marrow stromal cells flowing in the microfluidic channel can be automatically detected and counted with a low statistical error rate of -6.53%. The developed system thereby is competitive for point-of-care cell detection and counting application.

  13. A compactly integrated flow cell with a chemiluminescent FIA system for determining lactate concentration in serum.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Murakami, Y; Yokoyama, K; Tamiya, E; Karube, I; Suda, M; Uchiyama, S

    2001-01-15

    We have fabricated an integrated flow cell as a total microanalysis system (microTAS). This flow cell (size, 15 x 20 mm; total inner volume, 12.2 microL) was designed for a rational analyzing system of lactate determination for serum. This cell was made by micromachining techniques and consisted of two hollows of a lactate oxidase (LOD) reactor and a mixing cell, a spiral groove, and three penetrated holes. To form the reactor and capillary, these patterns, etched on a silicon wafer, were attached to a glass plate by the anodic bonding method. A photodiode was put under part of the spiral capillary. The compactly accumulated devices were integrated into a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. In the flow cell, lactate was catalyzed to pyruvate and hydrogen peroxide at the LOD reactor; subsequently, hydrogen peroxide reacted with the luminol-ferricyanic reagent at the mixing cell. The resulting chemiluminescent light was detected by the photodiode. Using the miniaturized flow cell, the sample volume for one measurement was greatly reduced to 0.2 microL. The response to lactate was obtained within 30 s and was linear between 0.5 and 5.0 mM (4.5 and 45 mg/dL) lactate with excellent correlative variances of 3.2% (average of three measurements at 5.0 mM). For practical application, the lactate concentration in control human serum was determined using this system. The results showed a good correlation coefficient (r = 0.979) with the results obtained by the spectrophotometric reference method. No difference in sera (normal or pathological) was found. Consequently, this integrated flow cell shows potential as a clinical device for lactate determination in serum. In this article, the effect of the design on the chemiluminescent FIA system is also described.

  14. Setup and Validation of Flow Cell Systems for Biofouling Simulation in Industrial Settings

    PubMed Central

    Teodósio, Joana S.; Simões, Manuel; Alves, Manuel A.; Melo, Luís F.; Mergulhão, Filipe J.

    2012-01-01

    A biofouling simulation system consisting of a flow cell and a recirculation tank was used. The fluid circulates at a flow rate of 350 L· h−1 in a semicircular flow cell with hydraulic diameter of 18.3 mm, corresponding to an average velocity of 0.275 m· s−1. Using computational fluid dynamics for flow simulation, an average wall shear stress of 0.4 Pa was predicted. The validity of the numerical simulations was visually confirmed by inorganic deposit formation (using kaolin particles) and also by direct observation of pathlines of tracer PVC particles using streak photography. Furthermore, the validity of chemostat assumptions was verified by residence time analysis. The system was used to assess the influence of the dilution rate on biofilm formation by Escherichia coli JM109(DE3). Two dilution rates of 0.013 and 0.0043 h−1 were tested and the results show that the planktonic cell concentration is increased at the lower dilution rate and that no significant changes were detected on the amount of biofilm formed in both conditions. PMID:22666110

  15. RhizoFlowCell system reveals early effects of micropollutants on aquatic plant rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mynampati, Kalyan Chakravarthy; Lee, Yong Jian; Wijdeveld, Arjan; Reuben, Sheela; Samavedham, Lakshminarayanan; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Swarup, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    In aquatic systems, one of the non-destructive ways to quantify toxicity of contaminants to plants is to monitor changes in root exudation patterns. In aquatic conditions, monitoring and quantifying such changes are currently challenging because of dilution of root exudates in water phase and lack of suitable instrumentation to measure them. Exposure to pollutants would not only change the plant exudation, but also affect the microbial communities that surround the root zone, thereby changing the metabolic profiles of the rhizosphere. This study aims at developing a device, the RhizoFlowCell, which can quantify metabolic response of plants, as well as changes in the microbial communities, to give an estimate of the stress to which the rhizosphere is exposed. The usefulness of RhizoFlowCell is demonstrated using naphthalene as a test pollutant. Results show that RhizoFlowCell system is useful in quantifying the dynamic metabolic response of aquatic rhizosphere to determine ecosystem health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Steady and disturbed flow effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vascular system: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nurullah; Isik, Sevim; Uykan, Ozge

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is still one of the most important reasons of the death in the world. The endothelium is the membrane of special cells which lines the interior surface of blood vessels forming an interface between circulating blood in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. Endothelial cells (ECs) line the entire circulatory system, from the heart to the smallest capillary. ECs dysfunction has been linked with atherosclerosis through their response to fluid forces. ECs change their morphology when exposed to mechanical stresses. The morphological responses include reorientation, elongation, and rearrangement of adhering molecules. Atherosclerotic lesions are formed in specific arterial regions, where low and oscillatory endothelial shear stress (ESS) occur. In this study, the effects of steady and disturbed flow over human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at different flow rates and periods were determined. Steady flow experiments were performed at flow rate of 1000 cm3/min for twenty four hours. Disturbed flow experiments simulating the flow in branching regions of arterial systems were carried out at flow rates of 250 cm3/min for five hours. The results obtained testified to the morphological changes easily observed. The directional alignment of the cells was determined in the steady flow experiments. Under disturbed flow conditions we observed not only the cell movement at the stagnation point but also the polygonal cell shape downstream the flow field.

  17. Microalgal cell disruption in a high-power ultrasonic flow system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2015-10-01

    A 2-kW continuous ultrasonic flow system (UFS) was found effective in the disruption of two microalgal strains: Scenedesmus dimorphus and Nannochloropsis oculata. Compared to the control, cell debris concentration of UFS treatments increased up to 202% for S. dimorphus and 112% for N. oculata. Similarly, Nile red stained lipid fluorescence density (NRSLD) increased up to 59.5% and 56.3% for S. dimorphus and N. oculata, respectively. It was also found that increasing ultrasound intensity improved cell disruption efficiency indicated by up to 54% increase in NRSLFD of the two strains. Increasing sonication-processing time to 3-min resulted in 33.0% increase for S. dimorphus and 45.7% increase for N. oculata in NRSLFD compared to the control. Cell recirculation was found beneficial to cell disruption, however, higher initial cell concentration significantly reduced cell disruption efficiency, indicated by 98.2% decrease in NRSLFD per cell when initial cell concentration increased from 4.25 × 10(6) to 1.7 × 10(7)cells ml(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a scintillation flow-cell detection system for environmental restoration and waste management applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeVol, T.A.; Branton, S.D.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    A flow-cell detection system was developed utilizing a coincidence circuit and tested with BaF{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2}:Eu and scintillating glass. The coincidence detection system reduced the background from {approximately}200 cps to {approximately}0.5 cps. The detection efficiencies for these cells ranged from 0.38 to 0.66 for {sup 45}Ca beta particles (E{sub max} = 0.257 MeV) and from 0.45 to 0.52 for {sup 233}U alpha particles (E{sub {alpha}} = 4.8 MeV). The minimum detectable activity was calculated for a 30 s count time and determined to be in the range of 1-2 Bq.

  19. A fluid–structure interaction model to characterize bone cell stimulation in parallel-plate flow chamber systems

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, T. J.; Haugh, M. G.; McNamara, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bone continuously adapts its internal structure to accommodate the functional demands of its mechanical environment and strain-induced flow of interstitial fluid is believed to be the primary mediator of mechanical stimuli to bone cells in vivo. In vitro investigations have shown that bone cells produce important biochemical signals in response to fluid flow applied using parallel-plate flow chamber (PPFC) systems. However, the exact mechanical stimulus experienced by the cells within these systems remains unclear. To fully understand this behaviour represents a most challenging multi-physics problem involving the interaction between deformable cellular structures and adjacent fluid flows. In this study, we use a fluid–structure interaction computational approach to investigate the nature of the mechanical stimulus being applied to a single osteoblast cell under fluid flow within a PPFC system. The analysis decouples the contribution of pressure and shear stress on cellular deformation and for the first time highlights that cell strain under flow is dominated by the pressure in the PPFC system rather than the applied shear stress. Furthermore, it was found that strains imparted on the cell membrane were relatively low whereas significant strain amplification occurred at the cell–substrate interface. These results suggest that strain transfer through focal attachments at the base of the cell are the primary mediators of mechanical signals to the cell under flow in a PPFC system. Such information is vital in order to correctly interpret biological responses of bone cells under in vitro stimulation and elucidate the mechanisms associated with mechanotransduction in vivo. PMID:23365189

  20. A Comparison of Flow-Through Versus Non-Flow-Through Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for NASA's Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) under the auspices of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD), NASA is developing both primary fuel cell power systems and regenerative fuel cell (RFC) energy storage systems within the fuel cell portion of the Energy Storage Project. This effort is being led by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in partnership with the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and industrial partners. The development goals are to improve fuel cell and electrolysis stack electrical performance, reduce system mass, volume, and parasitic power requirements, and increase system life and reliability. A major focus of this effort has been the parallel development of both flow-through and non-flow-through proton exchange membrane (PEM) primary fuel cell power systems. The plan has been, at the appropriate time, to select a single primary fuel cell technology for eventual flight hardware development. Ideally, that appropriate time would occur after both technologies have achieved a technology readiness level (TRL) of six, which represents an engineering model fidelity PEM fuel cell system being successfully tested in a relevant environment. Budget constraints in fiscal year 2009 and beyond have prevented NASA from continuing to pursue the parallel development of both primary fuel cell options. Because very limited data exists for either system, a toplevel, qualitative assessment based on engineering judgement was performed expeditiously to provide guidance for a selection. At that time, the non-flow-through technology was selected for continued development because of potentially major advantages in terms of weight, volume, parasitic power, reliability, and life. This author believes that the advantages are significant enough, and the potential benefits great enough, to offset the higher state of technology readiness of flow-through technology. This paper

  1. Diffusion Split-Flow Thin Cell (SPLITT) system for protein separations.

    PubMed

    Merugu, Srinivas; Sant, Himanshu J; Gale, Bruce K

    2012-08-01

    A diffusion Split-Flow Thin Cell (SPLITT) system was used to partially remove small peptides such as β2 microglobulin (β2M) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in a continuous manner from an input flow stream while preserving most (over 97%) of the larger protein in the sample, such as albumin. To help determine the operating conditions for this work, a two-dimensional numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equation and convection-diffusion equations was developed for diffusional SPLITT using COMSOL multiphysics software (COMSOL Inc., MA). These simulations were used to obtain the relationship between important operational parameters and the purification efficiency for proteins of interest. The diffusion-based SPLITT system was fabricated using xurography and was used to demonstrate protein purification based on the differences in size or diffusion coefficient of the sample. The results obtained from the experiments are compared with the mathematical model and show good agreement, while the variations between these results are discussed. The results show that significant portions of small peptides (>25%) can be removed while preserving larger proteins (up to 95%) in the carrier stream. A potential application of this technique is to be used as an additional step in kidney dialysis to remove toxins that are not effectively removed by current dialysis protocols.

  2. Detection of early changes in lung cell cytology by flow-systems analysis techniques. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Wilson, J.S.; Svitra, Z.V.

    1980-03-01

    Ongoing experiments designed to develop automated flow-analysis methods for assaying damage to pulmonary lavage cells in experimental animals exposed by inhalation to environmental pollutants are summarized. Pulmonary macrophages were characterized on their ability to phagocytize polystyrene latex fluorescent spheres. Lung cells consisting primarily of macrophages and leukocytes were analyzed for fluorescence (phagocytosis of spheres) and size using flow cytometric methods. Studies also concentrated on combining phagocytosis with other cellular parameters (DNA content, cell viability, and B-glucuronidase activity). As baseline studies are completed in normal animals, experimental animals will be exposed to gaseous and particulate environmental pollutants. (ERB

  3. A whole-cell electrochemical biosensing system based on bacterial inward electron flow for fumarate quantification.

    PubMed

    Si, Rong-Wei; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Liao, Zhi-Hong; Gao, Lu; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2015-06-15

    Fumarate is of great importance as it is an oncometabolite as well as food spoilage indicator. However, cost-effective and fast quantification method for fumarate is lacking although it is urgently required. This work developed an electrochemical whole-cell biosensing system for fumarate quantification. A sensitive inwards electric output (electron flow from electrode into bacteria) responded to fumarate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was characterized, and an electrochemical fumarate biosensing system was developed without genetic engineering. The biosensing system delivered symmetric current peak immediately upon fumarate addition, where the peak area increased in proportion to the increasing fumarate concentration with a wide range of 2 μM-10 mM (R(2)=0.9997). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.83 μM and 1.2 μM, respectively. This biosensing system displayed remarkable specificity to fumarate against other possible interferences. It was also successfully applied to samples of apple juice and kidney tissue. This study added new dimension to electrochemical biosensor design, and provide a simple, cost-effective, fast and robust tool for fumarate quantification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Red blood cell flow in the cardiovascular system: a fluid dynamics perspective.

    PubMed

    AlMomani, Thakir D; Vigmostad, Sarah C; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Al-zube, Loay; Smadi, Othman; BaniHani, Suleiman

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) is one of the major aspects of the cardiovascular system that has been studied intensively in the past few decades. The dynamics of biconcave RBCs are thought to have major influences in cardiovascular diseases, the problems associated with cardiovascular assistive devices, and the determination of blood rheology and properties. This article provides an overview of the works that have been accomplished in the past few decades and aim to study the dynamics of RBCs under different flow conditions. While significant progress has been made in both experimental and numerical studies, a detailed understanding of the behavior of RBCs is still faced with many challenges. Experimentally, the size of RBCs is considered to be a major limitation that allows measurements to be performed under conditions similar to physiological conditions. In numerical computations, researchers still are working to develop a model that can cover the details of the RBC mechanics as it deforms and moves in the bloodstream. Moreover, most of reported computational models have been confined to the behavior of a single RBC in 2-dimensional domains. Advanced models are yet to be developed for accurate description of RBC dynamics under physiological flow conditions in 3-dimensional regimes.

  5. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOEpatents

    Gomm, Tyler J.; Kraft, Nancy C.; Mauseth, Jason A.; Phelps, Larry D.; Taylor, Steven C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  6. Redesigned Gas Mass Flow Sensors for Space Shuttle Pressure Control System and Fuel Cell System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if a state of the art micro-machined silicon solid state flow sensor could be used to replace the existing space shuttle orbiter flow sensors. The rather aggressive goal was to obtain a new sensor which would also be a multi-gas sensor and operate over a much wider flow range and with a higher degree of accuracy than the existing sensors. Two types of sensors were tested. The first type was a venturi throat design and the second was a bypass design. The accuracy of venturi design was found to be marginally acceptable. The bypass sensor was much better although it still did not fully reach the accuracy goal. Two main problems were identified which would require further work.

  7. Critical flow rate of anode fuel exhaust in a PEM fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenhua H.; Payne, Robert U.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    A manual purge line was added into the exterior fuel exhaust stream of a Ballard PEM stack in a Nexa™ power module. With the addition of manual exhaust purge, high levels of inert gases were intentionally added to the anode feed without changing normal operational procedures. A new method of determining the critical minimum flow rate in the anode exhaust stream was given by an anode mass balance. This type of operation makes dual use of membranes in the MEAs as both gas purifiers and as solid electrolytes. The PEM stack was successfully operated with up to ca. 7% nitrogen or carbon dioxide in the absence of a palladium-based hydrogen separator at ca. 200 W power level. Nitrogen in the anode stream was concentrated from 7.5% to 91.6%. The system maintained a fuel efficiency of 99% at a manual purge rate of 2.22 ml s -1 and no auto purge. The fuel cell stack efficiency was 64% and the stack output efficiency was 75%. The overall system efficiency was 39%. After troublesome CO and H 2S poisons were removed, a hydrocarbon reformate containing high levels of CO 2 and H 2O was further used in the Nexa™ stack. The size and complexity of the fuel processing system may be reduced at a specified power level by using this operational method.

  8. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  9. Electrocapturing flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor [Manassas, VA

    2011-04-05

    A flow cell for electrophoretically-assisted capturing analytes from a flow. The flow cell includes a specimen chamber, a first membrane, a second membrane, a first electrode chamber, and a second electrode chamber. The specimen chamber may have a sample inlet and a sample outlet. A first portion of the first membrane may be coupled to a first portion of the specimen chamber. A first portion of the second membrane may be coupled to a second portion of the specimen chamber. The first electrode chamber may be configured to accept a charge. A portion of the first electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the first membrane. A second electrode chamber may be configured to accept an opposite charge. A portion of the second electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the second membrane.

  10. Cell adhesion under flow.

    PubMed

    Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion under flow is a central function of the microcirculation during inflammation, hemostasis, and immune regulation. This special issue of Microcirculation explores the common and distinct mechanisms that myeloid cells, lymphocytes, platelets, and sickle erythrocytes use to adhere to microvascular endothelium and the underlying basement membrane structures. A common theme in these processes is the need for rapid integrin activation, often initiated by binding of ligands to their cognate G protein-coupled receptors, followed by adhesion strengthening associated with integrin redistribution and outside-in signaling. These elements have been identified for all cells tested except sickle erythrocytes.

  11. A microfluidic flow-cell for the study of the ultrafast dynamics of biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien Chergui, Majed; Tibiletti, Tania; Caffarri, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    The study of biochemical dynamics by ultrafast spectroscopic methods is often restricted by the limited amount of liquid sample available, while the high repetition rate of light sources can induce photodamage. In order to overcome these limitations, we designed a high flux, sub-ml, capillary flow-cell. While the 0.1 mm thin window of the 0.5 mm cross-section capillary ensures an optimal temporal resolution and a steady beam deviation, the cell-pump generates flows up to ~0.35 ml/s that are suitable to pump laser repetition rates up to ~14 kHz, assuming a focal spot-diameter of 100 μm. In addition, a decantation chamber efficiently removes bubbles and allows, via septum, for the addition of chemicals while preserving the closed atmosphere. The minimal useable amount of sample is ~250 μl.

  12. Flow-through immunomagnetic separation system for waterborne pathogen isolation and detection: application to Giardia and Cryptosporidium cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Qasem; Christophe, Lay; Teo, William; Li, ShuJun; Feng, Han Hua

    2010-07-12

    Simultaneous sample washing and concentration of two waterborne pathogen samples were demonstrated using a rotational magnetic system under continuous flow conditions. The rotation of periodically arranged small permanent magnets close to a fluidic channel carrying magnetic particle suspension allows the trapping and release of particles along the fluidic channel in a periodic manner. Each trapping and release event resembles one washing cycle. The performance of the magnetic separation system (MSS) was evaluated in order to test its functionality to isolate magnetic-labelled protozoan cells from filtered, concentrated tap water, secondary effluent water, and purified water. Experimental protocols described in US Environmental Protection Agency method 1623 which rely on the use of a magnetic particle concentrator, were applied to test and compare our continuous flow cell separation system to the standard magnetic bead-based isolation instruments. The recovery efficiencies for Giardia cysts using the magnetic tube holder and our magnetic separation system were 90.5% and 90.1%, respectively, from a tap water matrix and about 31% and 18.5%, respectively, from a spiked secondary effluent matrix. The recovery efficiencies for Cryptosporidium cells using the magnetic tube holder and our magnetic separation system were 90% and 83.3%, respectively, from a tap water matrix and about 38% and 36%, respectively, from a spiked secondary effluent matrix. Recoveries from all matrices with the continuous flow system were typically higher in glass tubing conduits than in molded plastic conduits.

  13. Chemostat flow cell system: an in vitro model for the evaluation of antiplaque agents.

    PubMed

    Herles, S; Olsen, S; Afflitto, J; Gaffar, A

    1994-11-01

    We developed an experimental in vitro model of dental plaque to assess the potential efficacy of antiplaque agents. The model used a chemostat, which provided a continuous source of 5 species of oral bacteria grown in an artificial "saliva-like" medium. This mixture was pumped through six flow cells, each containing two types of surfaces on which plaque formed and was subsequently measured. Formation of bacterial plaque on hydroxyapatite surfaces was assessed by measurement of the DNA and protein content of the plaque film. The amount of bacterial plaque formed on germanium surfaces was measured by attenuated total reflectance (ATR/FT-IR) spectroscopy. Plaque viability was also assessed by a fluorescent staining technique. The quantity of plaque formed on both types of surfaces gradually increased with the duration of flow (from 24 to 72 h) through the cells during a 72-hour experimental period. The flow cells were then pulsed with experimental treatment solutions for 30 s, twice daily. Parallel to results of human clinical studies, the model was capable of discriminating among water, a placebo mouthrinse, and an active antimicrobial mouthrinse formulation containing 0.03% triclosan. It therefore offers a valuable alternative to animal model testing and allows for more rapid evaluations under well-controlled experimental conditions.

  14. Flow through, immunomagnetic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J J; Zborowski, M; Sun, L; Moore, L

    1998-01-01

    A brief, process-oriented overview of immunologically based cell separation technology is presented. In addition, the design and preliminary experimental data of two unique flow-through immunomagnetic cell separation devices are presented. The first design is based on a dipole magnetic field, while the second design is basis on a quadrupole magnetic field. The dipole design can "fractionate" an inlet, magnetically labeled, cell stream into different outlet streams on the basis of the degree to which the cell is immunomagnetically labeled. The quadrupole separator splits an inlet, immunomagnetically labeled, cell stream into two outlet streams in which the purity, recovery, and potentially the degree to which the cells are immunomagnetically labeled is controlled by the flow rates in the inlet and outlet flows. A 99% purity and 86% recovery have been achieved with this system. Some distinct advantages of these two systems are the potential of high purity, recovery, and throughput at a cost which is potentially significantly lower than current, comparable technologies.

  15. Development Status of PEM Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Technology for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Today s widespread development of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for commercial users owes its existence to NASA, where fuel cell technology saw its first applications. Beginning with the early Gemini and Apollo programs, and continuing to this day with the Shuttle Orbiter program, fuel cells have been a primary source of electrical power for many NASA missions. This is particularly true for manned missions, where astronauts are able to make use of the by-product of the fuel cell reaction, potable water. But fuel cells also offer advantages for unmanned missions, specifically when power requirements exceed several hundred watts and primary batteries are not a viable alternative. In recent years, NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) funded the development of fuel cell technology for applications that provide both primary power and regenerative fuel cell energy storage for planned Exploration missions that involved a return to the moon. Under this program, the Altair Lunar Lander was a mission requiring fuel cell primary power. There were also various Lunar Surface System applications requiring regenerative fuel cell energy storage, in which a fuel cell and electrolyzer combine to form an energy storage system with hydrogen, oxygen, and water as common reactants. Examples of these systems include habitat modules and large rovers. In FY11, the ETDP has been replaced by the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration Program (ETDDP), with many of the same technology goals and requirements applied against NASA s revised Exploration portfolio.

  16. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  17. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  18. Gas Flow Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Slack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This system provides a portable means to detect gas flow through a thin-walled tube without breaking into the tubing system. The flow detection system was specifically designed to detect flow through two parallel branches of a manifold with only one inlet and outlet, and is a means for verifying a space shuttle program requirement that saves time and reduces the risk of flight hardware damage compared to the current means of requirement verification. The prototype Purge Vent and Drain Window Cavity Conditioning System (PVD WCCS) Flow Detection System consists of a heater and a temperature-sensing thermistor attached to a piece of Velcro to be attached to each branch of a WCCS manifold for the duration of the requirement verification test. The heaters and thermistors are connected to a shielded cable and then to an electronics enclosure, which contains the power supplies, relays, and circuit board to provide power, signal conditioning, and control. The electronics enclosure is then connected to a commercial data acquisition box to provide analog to digital conversion as well as digital control. This data acquisition box is then connected to a commercial laptop running a custom application created using National Instruments LabVIEW. The operation of the PVD WCCS Flow Detection System consists of first attaching a heater/thermistor assembly to each of the two branches of one manifold while there is no flow through the manifold. Next, the software application running on the laptop is used to turn on the heaters and to monitor the manifold branch temperatures. When the system has reached thermal equilibrium, the software application s graphical user interface (GUI) will indicate that the branch temperatures are stable. The operator can then physically open the flow control valve to initiate the test flow of gaseous nitrogen (GN2) through the manifold. Next, the software user interface will be monitored for stable temperature indications when the system is again at

  19. Pressure Regulator With Internal Ejector Circulation Pump, Flow and Pressure Measurement Porting, and Fuel Cell System Integration Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    An advanced reactant pressure regulator with an internal ejector reactant circulation pump has been developed to support NASA's future fuel cell power systems needs. These needs include reliable and safe operation in variable-gravity environments, and for exploration activities with both manned and un manned vehicles. This product was developed for use in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) power plant reactant circulation systems, but the design could also be applied to other fuel cell system types, (e.g., solid-oxide or alkaline) or for other gas pressure regulation and circulation needs. The regulator design includes porting for measurement of flow and pressure at key points in the system, and also includes several fuel cell system integration options. NASA has recognized ejectors as a viable alternative to mechanical pumps for use in spacecraft fuel cell power systems. The ejector motive force is provided by a variable, high-pressure supply gas that travels through the ejector s jet nozzle, whereby the pressure energy of the fluid stream is converted to kinetic energy in the gas jet. The ejector can produce circulation-to-consumption-flow ratios that are relatively high (2-3 times), and this phenomenon can potentially (with proper consideration of the remainder of the fuel cell system s design) be used to provide completely for reactant pre-humidification and product water removal in a fuel cell system. Specifically, a custom pressure regulator has been developed that includes: (1) an ejector reactant circulation pump (with interchangeable jet nozzles and mixer sections, gas-tight sliding and static seals in required locations, and internal fluid porting for pressure-sensing at the regulator's control elements) and (2) internal fluid porting to allow for flow rate and system pressure measurements. The fluid porting also allows for inclusion of purge, relief, and vacuum-breaker check valves on the regulator assembly. In addition, this regulator could also

  20. FLOCK cluster analysis of mast cell event clustering by high-sensitivity flow cytometry predicts systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, David M; LaPlante, Charlotte D; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Li, Betty

    2015-11-01

    In our high-sensitivity flow cytometric approach for systemic mastocytosis (SM), we identified mast cell event clustering as a new diagnostic criterion for the disease. To objectively characterize mast cell gated event distributions, we performed cluster analysis using FLOCK, a computational approach to identify cell subsets in multidimensional flow cytometry data in an unbiased, automated fashion. FLOCK identified discrete mast cell populations in most cases of SM (56/75 [75%]) but only a minority of non-SM cases (17/124 [14%]). FLOCK-identified mast cell populations accounted for 2.46% of total cells on average in SM cases and 0.09% of total cells on average in non-SM cases (P < .0001) and were predictive of SM, with a sensitivity of 75%, a specificity of 86%, a positive predictive value of 76%, and a negative predictive value of 85%. FLOCK analysis provides useful diagnostic information for evaluating patients with suspected SM, and may be useful for the analysis of other hematopoietic neoplasms. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  1. The effect of corrosion inhibitors on microbial communities associated with corrosion in a model flow cell system.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Kathleen E; Perez-Ibarra, Beatriz Monica; Jenneman, Gary; Harris, Jennifer Busch; Webb, Robert; Sublette, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    A model flow cell system was designed to investigate pitting corrosion in pipelines associated with microbial communities. A microbial inoculum producing copious amounts of H₂S was enriched from an oil pipeline biofilm sample. Reservoirs containing a nutrient solution and the microbial inoculum were pumped continuously through six flow cells containing mild steel corrosion coupons. Two cells received corrosion inhibitor "A", two received corrosion inhibitor "B", and two ("untreated") received no additional chemicals. Coupons were removed after 1 month and analyzed for corrosion profiles and biofilm microbial communities. Coupons from replicate cells showed a high degree of similarity in pitting parameters and in microbial community profiles, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence libraries but differed with treatment regimen, suggesting that the corrosion inhibitors differentially affected microbial species. Viable microbial biomass values were more than 10-fold higher for coupons from flow cells treated with corrosion inhibitors than for coupons from untreated flow cells. The total number of pits >10 mils diameter and maximum pitting rate were significantly correlated with each other and the total number of pits with the estimated abundance of sequences classified as Desulfomicrobium. The maximum pitting rate was significantly correlated with the sum of the estimated abundance of Desulfomicrobium plus Clostridiales, and with the sum of the estimated abundance of Desulfomicrobium plus Betaproteobacteria. The lack of significant correlation with the estimated abundance of Deltaproteobacteria suggests not all Deltaproteobacteria species contribute equally to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and that it is not sufficient to target one bacterial group when monitoring for MIC.

  2. Artificial fish skin of self-powered micro-electromechanical systems hair cells for sensing hydrodynamic flow phenomena.

    PubMed

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2015-10-06

    Using biological sensors, aquatic animals like fishes are capable of performing impressive behaviours such as super-manoeuvrability, hydrodynamic flow 'vision' and object localization with a success unmatched by human-engineered technologies. Inspired by the multiple functionalities of the ubiquitous lateral-line sensors of fishes, we developed flexible and surface-mountable arrays of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) artificial hair cell flow sensors. This paper reports the development of the MEMS artificial versions of superficial and canal neuromasts and experimental characterization of their unique flow-sensing roles. Our MEMS flow sensors feature a stereolithographically fabricated polymer hair cell mounted on Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 micro-diaphragm with floating bottom electrode. Canal-inspired versions are developed by mounting a polymer canal with pores that guide external flows to the hair cells embedded in the canal. Experimental results conducted employing our MEMS artificial superficial neuromasts (SNs) demonstrated a high sensitivity and very low threshold detection limit of 22 mV/(mm s(-1)) and 8.2 µm s(-1), respectively, for an oscillating dipole stimulus vibrating at 35 Hz. Flexible arrays of such superficial sensors were demonstrated to localize an underwater dipole stimulus. Comparative experimental studies revealed a high-pass filtering nature of the canal encapsulated sensors with a cut-off frequency of 10 Hz and a flat frequency response of artificial SNs. Flexible arrays of self-powered, miniaturized, light-weight, low-cost and robust artificial lateral-line systems could enhance the capabilities of underwater vehicles. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Artificial fish skin of self-powered micro-electromechanical systems hair cells for sensing hydrodynamic flow phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Using biological sensors, aquatic animals like fishes are capable of performing impressive behaviours such as super-manoeuvrability, hydrodynamic flow ‘vision’ and object localization with a success unmatched by human-engineered technologies. Inspired by the multiple functionalities of the ubiquitous lateral-line sensors of fishes, we developed flexible and surface-mountable arrays of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) artificial hair cell flow sensors. This paper reports the development of the MEMS artificial versions of superficial and canal neuromasts and experimental characterization of their unique flow-sensing roles. Our MEMS flow sensors feature a stereolithographically fabricated polymer hair cell mounted on Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 micro-diaphragm with floating bottom electrode. Canal-inspired versions are developed by mounting a polymer canal with pores that guide external flows to the hair cells embedded in the canal. Experimental results conducted employing our MEMS artificial superficial neuromasts (SNs) demonstrated a high sensitivity and very low threshold detection limit of 22 mV/(mm s−1) and 8.2 µm s−1, respectively, for an oscillating dipole stimulus vibrating at 35 Hz. Flexible arrays of such superficial sensors were demonstrated to localize an underwater dipole stimulus. Comparative experimental studies revealed a high-pass filtering nature of the canal encapsulated sensors with a cut-off frequency of 10 Hz and a flat frequency response of artificial SNs. Flexible arrays of self-powered, miniaturized, light-weight, low-cost and robust artificial lateral-line systems could enhance the capabilities of underwater vehicles. PMID:26423435

  4. Fibrin monomer increases platelet adherence to tumor cells in a flowing system: a possible role in metastasis?

    PubMed

    Biggerstaff, J P; Seth, N B; Meyer, T V; Amirkhosravi, A; Francis, J L

    1998-12-15

    Considerable evidence exists linking hemostasis and malignancy. Platelet adhesion to tumor cells has been implicated in the metastatic process. Plasma fibrinogen (Fg) and fibrin (Fn) monomer, increased in cancer, may play a role in tumor biology. Binding of Fn monomer to tumor cells and its effect on platelet-tumor cell adhesion in a flowing system were studied. Fn monomer was produced by adding thrombin (1 micro/mL) to FXIII- and plasminogen-free Fg in the presence of Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) amide. Fn monomer binding to live A375 cells was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Adherent cells were perfused for 1h with Fn monomer, washed and stained in situ with anti-human Fn (American Biogenetic Sciences, Inc.) followed by goat anti-mouse IgG(FITC). Platelet adherence to Fn monomer treated A375 cells was performed under flow conditions by passing platelets (5x10(4)/microl 0.25 mL/min; labeled with the carbocyanine dye DiI) over the tumor cells for 30 min. CLSM images were obtained after washing. There was considerable binding of Fn monomer, but not Fg alone. Platelets adhered relatively weakly to untreated A375 cells and this was not significantly affected by pre-treatment of the tumor cells with fibrinogen or thrombin. However, pre-treatment with Fn monomer resulted in extensive platelet binding to tumor cells, suggesting that coagulation activation and the subsequent increase in circulating Fn monomer may enhance platelet adhesion to circulating tumor cells and thereby facilitate metastatic spread.

  5. A flow injection analysis system with encapsulated high-density Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells for rapid determination of biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyo Seong; Choo, Kwang Ho; Chang, Ho Nam; Park, Joong Kon

    2009-05-01

    The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) determination was studied using a novel flow injection analysis (FIA) system with encapsulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and an oxygen electrode and was compared with conventional 5-day BOD tests. S. cerevisiae cells were packed in a calcium alginate capsule at a dry cell weight of 250 g/l of capsule core. The level of dissolved oxygen (DO) was reduced due to the enhanced respiratory activity of the microbial cells when the injected nutrient passed through the bioreactor. The decrease in DO (DeltaDO) was intensified with the amount of microbial cells packed in the bioreactor. However, the specific DeltaDO decreased as the amount of cells loaded in the bioreactor increased. The DeltaDO value was dependent on the pH and temperature of the mobile phase and reached its maximum value at 35 degrees C and pH 7-8. Also, DeltaDO became larger at longer response times as the flow rate of the mobile phase decreased. The measurement of DeltaDO was repeated more than six times consecutively using a 20-ppm standard glucose and glutamic acid solution, which confirmed the reproducibility with a standard deviation of 0.95%. A strong linear correlation between DeltaDO and BOD was also observed. The 5-day BOD values of actual water and wastewater samples were in accordance with the BOD values obtained by this FIA method using encapsulated S. cerevisiae cells. Unlike the cell-immobilized bead system, there was no contamination of the bioreactor resulting from any leak of yeast cells from the sensor capsules during BOD measurements.

  6. Micro reactor integrated μ-PEM fuel cell system: a feed connector and flow field free approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2013-12-01

    A system level microreactor concept for hydrogen generation with Sodium Borohydride (NaBH4) is demonstrated. The uniqueness of the system is the transport and distribution feature of fuel (hydrogen) to the anode of the fuel cell without any external feed connectors and flow fields. The approach here is to use palladium film instead of feed connectors and the flow fields; palladium's property to adsorb and desorb the hydrogen at ambient and elevated condition. The proof of concept is demonstrated with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based complete system integration which includes microreactor, palladium transport layer and the self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The hydrolysis of NaBH4 was carried out in the presence of platinum supported by nickel (NiPt). The prototype functionality is tested with NaBH4 chemical hydride. The characterization of the integrated palladium layer and fuel cell is tested with constant and switching load. The presented integrated fuel cell is observed to have a maximum power output and current of 60 mW and 280 mA respectively.

  7. Cell adhesion under hydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, P K; Jones, D A; McIntire, L V; Smith, C W

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes a hydrodynamic assay to study the relative importance of various receptor/ligand interactions in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion and to quantitate the strength of their binding. The basic protocol describes how to assemble the single-chamber flow system with the substrate, add the cells in suspension, and record the experiment on videotape. Alternate protocols present assays to determine how monoclonal antibodies and stimulating and inhibiting agents affect the substrate and the perfusing cells in suspension. Another alternate protocol details the use of the double-chamber flow system. Support protocols describe how to construct the single- and double-chamber flow systems and how to analyze the data from an experiment. Recording and analyzing the flow experiment requires the use of video equipment and, optionally, a computer and imaging software.

  8. A New Electrochemical System Based on a Flow-Field Shaped Solid Electrode and 3D-Printed Thin-Layer Flow Cell: Detection of Pb(2+) Ions by Continuous Flow Accumulation Square-Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianwen; Wang, Jikui; Tang, Meihua; Huang, Liming; Zhang, Zhiyi; Liu, Chang; Lu, Xiaohua; Hunter, Kenneth W; Chen, Guosong

    2017-05-02

    Here we describe a new and sensitive flow electrochemical detection system that employs a novel flow-field shaped solid electrode (FFSSE). The system was constructed with a 3D-printed thin-layer flow cell (TLFC) and a flat screen-printed FFSSE with USB connection. This interface facilitates continuous flow accumulation square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). The flow distribution in the working space of TLFC was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the shape and configuration of electrodes were optimized accordingly. We demonstrated the electrochemical determination of Pb(2+) using this newly designed TLFC-FFSSE detection system without removal of oxygen from samples. This TLFC-FFSSE based system showed an attractive stripping voltammetric performance compared to a traditional ASV based method. A linear range for detection of Pb(2+) was found to be 0.5-100 μg/L (0.5 to 100 ppb) and a detection limit of 0.2 μg/L (0.2 ppb) was achieved in the presence of bismuth as codeposition metal. The system was further applied to detect Pb(2+) in biological broths of methane fermentation. The electrochemical detection results were consistent with that obtained from atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (AFS) analysis and the average recovery was found to be 95.5-106.5% using a standard addition method. This new flow electrochemical detection system showed better sensitivity and reproducibility compared to a traditional ASV based method. Such a system offers great potential for on-site and real-time detection of heavy metals where compact, inexpensive, robust, and low-volume analysis is required.

  9. Overhead Projection Cell for Streamline Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Harold M.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of an overhead projection apparatus designed to demonstrate streamline flow of a liquid. The apparatus consists of a Plexiglass tank containing water in which plates forming the cell are submerged, a constant level reservoir, an overflow device and a system for marking the flow lines with a dye. (LC)

  10. Performance Mapping Studies in Redox Flow Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.; Thaller, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Pumping power requirements in any flow battery system constitute a direct parasitic energy loss. It is therefore useful to determine the practical lower limit for reactant flow rates. Through the use of a theoretical framework based on electrochemical first principles, two different experimental flow mapping techniques were developed to evaluate and compare electrodes as a function of flow rate. For the carbon felt electrodes presently used in NASA-Lewis Redox cells, a flow rate 1.5 times greater than the stoichiometric rate seems to be the required minimum.

  11. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Delivery System Modulates Ischemic Cardiac Remodeling With an Increase of Coronary Artery Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sook; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-04-01

    Ways for extending the longevity of stem cells are imperative to attain diverse expected therapeutic effects. Here, we constructed a three-dimentional (3D) scaffold system for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. Intramyocardial injections of porous PEI1.8k blended with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PLGA/PEI1.8k) (PPP) microparticles by physical electrostatic conjugation and structural entrapment of hMSCs demonstrated enhanced functional and geometric improvements on post-infarct cardiac remodeling in rats. In the hMSC-loaded PPP delivery, increases of coronary artery blood flow rate and in vivo engraftment rate as well as time-dependent functional, geometric, and pathologic findings reversing post-infarct cardiac remodeling account for improved left ventricular (LV) systolic function up to the level of sham thoracotomy group. This study expands our understanding by proving that increase of coronary artery blood flow augmented functional recovery of hMSC-loaded PPP delivery system after myocardial infarction (MI).

  12. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Delivery System Modulates Ischemic Cardiac Remodeling With an Increase of Coronary Artery Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Sook; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-01-01

    Ways for extending the longevity of stem cells are imperative to attain diverse expected therapeutic effects. Here, we constructed a three-dimentional (3D) scaffold system for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. Intramyocardial injections of porous PEI1.8k blended with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PLGA/PEI1.8k) (PPP) microparticles by physical electrostatic conjugation and structural entrapment of hMSCs demonstrated enhanced functional and geometric improvements on post-infarct cardiac remodeling in rats. In the hMSC-loaded PPP delivery, increases of coronary artery blood flow rate and in vivo engraftment rate as well as time-dependent functional, geometric, and pathologic findings reversing post-infarct cardiac remodeling account for improved left ventricular (LV) systolic function up to the level of sham thoracotomy group. This study expands our understanding by proving that increase of coronary artery blood flow augmented functional recovery of hMSC-loaded PPP delivery system after myocardial infarction (MI). PMID:26782638

  13. In situ monitoring of atmospheric nitrous acid based on multi-pumping flow system and liquid waveguide capillary cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhan; Lu, Keding; Dong, Huabin; Li, Xin; Cheng, Peng; Zou, Qi; Wu, Yusheng; Liu, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-05-01

    In the last four decades, various techniques including spectroscopic, wet chemical and mass spectrometric methods, have been developed and applied for the detection of ambient nitrous acid (HONO). We developed a HONO detection system based on long path photometry which consists of three independent modules i.e., sampling module, fluid propulsion module and detection module. In the propulsion module, solenoid pumps are applied. With solenoid pumps the pulsed flow can be computer controlled both in terms of pump stroke volume and pulse frequency, which enables the attainment of a very stable flow rate. In the detection module, a customized Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell (LWCC) is used. The customized LWCC pre-sets the optical fiber in-coupling with the liquid wave guide, providing the option of fast startup and easy maintenance of the absorption photometry. In summer 2014, our system was deployed in a comprehensive campaign at a rural site in the North China Plain. More than one month of high quality HONO data spanning from the limit of detection to 5ppb were collected. Intercomparison of our system with another established system from Forschungszentrum Juelich is presented and discussed. In conclusion, our instrument achieved a detection limit of 10pptV within 2min and a measurement uncertainty of 7%, which is well suited for investigation of the HONO budget from urban to rural conditions in China.

  14. Fluid flow in monolayers: Cells under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Kyle; Zehnder, Steven; Sawyer, Greg; Angelini, Thomas

    Number density fluctuations are intimately tied to collective behavior in particulate soft matter and active matter systems, including tissue cell monolayers. In cell monolayers, there is no free space between cells, so density fluctuations must involve either out of plane motion, or cell volume fluctuations. Recent work has shown that cells fluctuate in volume to accommodate collective density fluctuations, and that fluid moves between cells in this process. However, measurements of the resistance to this flow with controlled applied pressures have never been performed. Here we apply pressure to local regions in cell monolayers with an indentation instrument mounted on an inverted microscope. While simultaneously measuring contact area, indentation depth, and applied force as a function of time we determine a compression modulus and a permeability of cells. We find that cells are highly permeable, and that cytoskeleton-generated stresses are large enough to drive fluid from cell to cell as they spontaneously fluctuate in volume.

  15. Flow Cytometry Total Cell Counts: A Field Study Assessing Microbiological Water Quality and Growth in Unchlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Van der Mark, E. J.; Verberk, J. Q. J. C.; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R 2 = 0.63). Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP. PMID:23819117

  16. Flow cytometry total cell counts: a field study assessing microbiological water quality and growth in unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Van der Mark, E J; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of flow cytometry total cell counts (TCCs) as a parameter to assess microbial growth in drinking water distribution systems and to determine the relationships between different parameters describing the biostability of treated water. A one-year sampling program was carried out in two distribution systems in The Netherlands. Results demonstrated that, in both systems, the biomass differences measured by ATP were not significant. TCC differences were also not significant in treatment plant 1, but decreased slightly in treatment plant 2. TCC values were found to be higher at temperatures above 15°C than at temperatures below 15°C. The correlation study of parameters describing biostability found no relationship among TCC, heterotrophic plate counts, and Aeromonas. Also no relationship was found between TCC and ATP. Some correlation was found between the subgroup of high nucleic acid content bacteria and ATP (R (2) = 0.63). Overall, the results demonstrated that TCC is a valuable parameter to assess the drinking water biological quality and regrowth; it can directly and sensitively quantify biomass, detect small changes, and can be used to determine the subgroup of active HNA bacteria that are related to ATP.

  17. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Computer simulation of atmospheric flow corresponds well to imges taken during the second Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (BFFC) mission. The top shows a view from the pole, while the bottom shows a view from the equator. Red corresponds to hot fluid rising while blue shows cold fluid falling. This simulation was developed by Anil Deane of the University of Maryland, College Park and Paul Fischer of Argorne National Laboratory. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  18. Deterministic Aperiodic Sickle Cell Blood Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsaves, Louis; Harris, Wesley

    2013-11-01

    In this paper sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries is modeled as a hydrodynamical system. The hydrodynamical system consists of the axisymmetric unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and a set of constitutive equations for oxygen transport. Blood cell deformation is not considered in this paper. The hydrodynamical system is reduced to a system of non-linear partial differential equations that are then transformed into a system of three autonomous non-linear ordinary differential equations and a set of algebraic equations. We examine the hydrodynamical system to discern stable/unstable, periodic/nonperiodic, reversible/irreversible properties of the system. The properties of the solutions are driven in large part by the coefficients of the governing system of equations. These coefficients depend on the physiological properties of the sickle cell blood. The chaotic nature of the onset of crisis in sickle cell patients is identified. Research Assistant.

  19. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay. PMID:26861328

  20. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications.

    PubMed

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-02-04

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay.

  1. Endovascular blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khe, A. K.; Cherevko, A. A.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Krivoshapkin, A. L.; Orlov, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an endovascular measurement system used for intraoperative cerebral blood flow monitoring is described. The system is based on a Volcano ComboMap Pressure and Flow System extended with analogue-to-digital converter and PC laptop. A series of measurements performed in patients with cerebrovascular pathologies allows us to introduce “velocity-pressure” and “flow rate-energy flow rate” diagrams as important characteristics of the blood flow. The measurement system presented here can be used as an additional instrument in neurosurgery for assessment and monitoring of the operation procedure. Clinical data obtained with the system are used for construction of mathematical models and patient-specific simulations. The monitoring of the blood flow parameters during endovascular interventions was approved by the Ethics Committee at the Meshalkin Novosibirsk Research Institute of Circulation Pathology and included in certain surgical protocols for pre-, intra- and postoperative examinations.

  2. Rebalancing electrolytes in redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Chang, On Kok; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2014-12-23

    Embodiments of redox flow battery rebalancing systems include a system for reacting an unbalanced flow battery electrolyte with a rebalance electrolyte in a first reaction cell. In some embodiments, the rebalance electrolyte may contain ferrous iron (Fe.sup.2+) which may be oxidized to ferric iron (Fe.sup.3+) in the first reaction cell. The reducing ability of the rebalance reactant may be restored in a second rebalance cell that is configured to reduce the ferric iron in the rebalance electrolyte back into ferrous iron through a reaction with metallic iron.

  3. Diagnosis of leptomeningeal disease in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the central nervous system by flow cytometry and cytopathology.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Roland; Baraniskin, Alexander; Heute, Christoph; Vorgerd, Matthias; Brunn, Anna; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Kowoll, Annika; Alekseyev, Andriy; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schlegel, Uwe; Deckert, Martina; Pels, Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    Reliable detection of leptomeningeal disease has the potential of facilitating the diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and is important for therapeutic considerations. Currently, the standard diagnostic procedure for the detection of lymphoma in the cerebrospinal fluid is cytopathology. To improve the limited specificity and sensitivity of cytopathology, flow cytometry has been suggested as an alternative. Here, we evaluated multi-parameter flow cytometry in combination with conventional cytopathology in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 30 patients with primary CNS lymphoma and seven patients with secondary CNS lymphoma. Overall, in 11 of 37 (29.7%) patients with CNS lymphoma, lymphoma cells were detected in CSF by flow cytometry, while cytopathology was less sensitive displaying unequivocally malignant CSF cells in only seven of all 37 (18.9%) patients. Six (16.2%) patients showed cytopathological results suspicious of lymphoma; however, in only one of these patients, the diagnosis of CSF lymphoma cells could be confirmed by flow cytometry. In primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSL), seven of 30 (23.3%) patients were positive for CSF lymphoma cells in flow cytometry, in contrast to four (13.3%) patients with PCNSL with definitely positive cytopathology. In summary, our results suggest that multi-parameter flow cytometry increases the sensitivity and specificity of leptomeningeal disease detection in CNS lymphomas. Both methods should be applied concurrently for complementary diagnostic assessment in patients with CNS lymphoma. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. A radio-high-performance liquid chromatography dual-flow cell gamma-detection system for on-line radiochemical purity and labeling efficiency determination.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Jacobsson, L

    2014-04-11

    In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit into the well of a NaI(Tl) detector. The radio-HPLC flow was directed from the injector to the reference cell allowing on-line detection of the total injected sample activity prior to entering the HPLC column. The radioactivity eluted from the column was then detected in the analytical cell. In this way, the sample will act as its own standard, a feature enabling on-line quantification of the processed radioactivity passing through the system. All data were acquired on-line via an analog signal from a rate meter using chromatographic software. The radiochemical yield and recovery could be simply and accurately determined by integration of the peak areas in the chromatogram obtained from the reference and analytical cells using an experimentally determined volume factor to correct for the effect of different cell volumes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole cell quenched flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ya-Yu; Haeri, Sina; Gizewski, Carsten; Stewart, Joanna D; Ehrhard, Peter; Shrimpton, John; Janasek, Dirk; West, Jonathan

    2013-12-03

    This paper describes a microfluidic quenched flow platform for the investigation of ligand-mediated cell surface processes with unprecedented temporal resolution. A roll-slip behavior caused by cell-wall-fluid coupling was documented and acts to minimize the compression and shear stresses experienced by the cell. This feature enables high-velocity (100-400 mm/s) operation without impacting the integrity of the cell membrane. In addition, rotation generates localized convection paths. This cell-driven micromixing effect causes the cell to become rapidly enveloped with ligands to saturate the surface receptors. High-speed imaging of the transport of a Janus particle and fictitious domain numerical simulations were used to predict millisecond-scale biochemical switching times. Dispersion in the incubation channel was characterized by microparticle image velocimetry and minimized by using a horizontal Hele-Shaw velocity profile in combination with vertical hydrodynamic focusing to achieve highly reproducible incubation times (CV = 3.6%). Microfluidic quenched flow was used to investigate the pY1131 autophosphorylation transition in the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R). This predimerized receptor undergoes autophosphorylation within 100 ms of stimulation. Beyond this demonstration, the extreme temporal resolution can be used to gain new insights into the mechanisms underpinning a tremendous variety of important cell surface events.

  6. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  7. Duct Flow Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is ejected under pressure tangentially of local duct surfaces through Coanda affected slots at the trailing edge of the duct from which only the...channel passages in order to modify the flow stream through the duct so as to perform certain functions such as thrust control and steerage control effects enhancing vehicle maneuverability.

  8. Towards optical cell transfection inside a micro flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-03-01

    For optical transfection, cells are shortly subjected to intense, focused laser radiation which leads to a temporary opening in the cell membrane. Although the method is very efficient and ensures high cell viability, the targeting of single cells with laser pulses is a tedious and slow approach. We present first measurements aiming at an experimental setup which is suitable for high throughput and automated optical cell transfection. In our setup, cells flow through a micro flow cell where they are spatially confined. The laser radiation is focused into the cell in a way that an elongated focal region is realized. This makes the time consuming aiming of the laser beam at individual cells unnecessary and opens the possibility to develop a completely automated system. The elongated laser focal region is realized by a quasi-Bessel beam which is generated by an axicon lens setup and continuously scanned from side to side of the cell. We present test measurements of the newly employed setup and discuss its suitability to be fully integrated into a flow cell sequencing system.

  9. FLOW SYSTEM FOR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1963-06-11

    A reactor is designed with means for terminating the reaction when returning coolant is below a predetermined temperature. Coolant flowing from the reactor passes through a heat exchanger to a lower reservoir, and then circulates between the lower reservoir and an upper reservoir before being returned to the reactor. Means responsive to the temperature of the coolant in the return conduit terminate the chain reaction when the temperature reaches a predetermined minimum value. (AEC)

  10. Du Pont Information Flow System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Warren S.

    1972-01-01

    The Information Flow System is a large-scale information retrieval system developed for processing of Du Pont information files. As currently implemented, the system stores and retrieves information on company technical reports. Extensions of the system for handling chemical structure information and on-line processing are also discussed. (3…

  11. Direct flow crystal growth system

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, K.E.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1989-10-30

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperatue, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank. 2 figs.

  12. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  13. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  14. Free flow cell electrophoresis using zwitterionic buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodkey, R. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Studies of a zwitterionic buffer formulated for cell electrophoresis were done using the McDonnell-Douglas Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Standard buffers were analyzed for their stability in the electrical field and the results showed that both buffers tested were inherently unstable. Further, titration studies showed that the standards buffers buffered poorly at the pH employed for electrophoresis. The zwitterionic buffer buffered well at its nominal pH and was shown to be stable in the electrical field. Comparative studies of the buffer with standard cell separation buffers using formalin fixed rabbit and goose red blood cells showed that the zwitterionic buffer gave better resolution of the fixed cells. Studies with viable hybridoma cells showed that buffer Q supported cell viability equal to Hank's Balanced Salt Solution and that hybridoma cells in different stages of the growth cycle demonstrated reproducible differences in electrophoretic mobility.

  15. A negative dielectrophoresis and gravity-driven flow-based high-throughput and high-efficiency cell-sorting system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Dowon; Kim, Youngwoong; Park, Ki-Hyun; Oh, Eun-Jee; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Byungkyu

    2014-02-01

    We present a negative dielectrophoresis (n-DEP)-based cell separation system for high-throughput and high-efficiency cell separation. To achieve a high throughput, the proposed system comprises macro-sized channel and cantilever-type electrode (CE) arrays (L × W × H = 150 µm × 500 µm × 50 µm) to generate n-DEP force. For high efficiency, double separation modules, which have macro-sized channels and CE arrays in each separation module, are employed. In addition, flow regulators to precisely control the hydrodynamic force are allocated for each outlet. Because the hydrodynamic force and the n-DEP force acting on the target cell are the main determinants of the separation efficiency, we evaluate the theoretical amount of hydrodynamic force and n-DEP force acting on each target cell. Based on theoretical results, separation conditions are experimentally investigated. Finally, to demonstrate the separation performance, we performed the separation of target cells (live K562) from nontarget cells (dead K562) under conditions of low voltage (7Vp-p with 100 kHz) and a flow rate of 15 µL•min⁻¹, 6 µL•min⁻¹, and 8 µL•min⁻¹ in outlets 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The system can separate target cells with 95% separation efficiency in the case of the ratio of 5:1 (live K562:dead K562).

  16. Flow analysis system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Wayne S. (Inventor); Barck, Bruce N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A non-invasive flow analysis system and method wherein a sensor, such as an acoustic sensor, is coupled to a conduit for transmitting a signal which varies depending on the characteristics of the flow in the conduit. The signal is amplified and there is a filter, responsive to the sensor signal, and tuned to pass a narrow band of frequencies proximate the resonant frequency of the sensor. A demodulator generates an amplitude envelope of the filtered signal and a number of flow indicator quantities are calculated based on variations in amplitude of the amplitude envelope. A neural network, or its equivalent, is then used to determine the flow rate of the flow in the conduit based on the flow indicator quantities.

  17. Improving Power Production in Acetate-Fed Microbial Fuel Cells via Enrichment of Exoelectrogenic Organisms in Flow-Through Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Leak, David; Andras, Calin

    2009-01-01

    An exoelectrogenic, biofilm-forming microbial consortium was enriched in an acetate-fed microbial fuel cell (MFC) using a flow-through anode coupled to an air-cathode. Multiple parameters known to improve MFC performance were integrated in one design including electrode spacing, specific electrode surface area, flow-through design, minimization of dead volume within anode chamber, and control of external resistance. In addition, continuous feeding of carbon source was employed and the MFC was operated at intermittent high flows to enable removal of non-biofilm forming organisms over a period of six months. The consortium enriched using the modified design and operating conditions resulted in a power density of 345 W m-3 of net anode volume (3650 mW m-2), when coupled to a ferricyanide cathode. The enriched consortium included -, -, -Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Members of the order Rhodocyclaceae and Burkholderiaceae (Azospira spp. (49%), Acidovorax spp. (11%) and Comamonas spp. (7%)), dominated the microbial consortium. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis based on primers selective for Archaea suggested a very low abundance of methanogens. Limiting the delivery of the carbon source via continuous feeding corresponding to the maximum cathodic oxidation rates permitted in the flow-through, air-cathode MFC resulted in coulombic efficiencies reaching 88 5.7%.

  18. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  19. Glucose Dependency of the Metabolic Pathway of HEK 293 Cells Measured by a Flow-through Type pH/CO2 Sensor System Using ISFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Akira; Mohri, Satoshi; Nakamura, Michihiro; Naruse, Keiji

    Our group previously reported the application of a flow-through type pH/CO2 sensor system designed to evaluate the metabolic activity of cultured cells. The sensor system consists of two ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), an ISFET to measure the total pH change and an ISFET enclosed within a gas-permeable silicone tube to measure the pH change attributable to CO2. In that study, we used the system to quantitatively analyze metabolic switching induced by glucose concentration changes in three cultured cell types (bovine arterial endothelium cell (BAEC), human umbilical vein endothelium cell (HUVEC), and rat cardiomuscle cell (RCMC)), and to measure the production rates of total carbonate and free lactic acid in the cultured cells. In every cell type examined, a decrease in the glucose concentration led to an increase in total carbonate, a product of cellular respiration, and a decrease of free lactic acid, a product of glycolysis. There were very significant differences among the cell types, however, in the glucose concentrations at the metabolic switching points. We postulated that the cell has a unique switching point on the metabolic pathway from glycolysis to respiration. In this paper we use our sensor system to evaluate the metabolic switching of human embryonic kidney 293 cells triggered by glucose concentration changes. The superior metabolic pathway switched from glycolysis to respiration when the glucose concentration decreased to about 2 mM. This result was very similar to that obtained in our earlier experiments on HUVECs, but far different from our results on the other two cells types, BAECs and RCMCs. This sensor system will be useful for analyzing cellular metabolism for many applications and will yield novel information on different cell types.

  20. Generalized radial flow in synthetic flow systems.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Dale O; Roberts, Randall M; Holt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Traditional analysis methods used to determine hydraulic properties from pumping tests work well in many porous media aquifers, but they often do not work in heterogeneous and fractured-rock aquifers, producing non-plausible and erroneous results. The generalized radial flow model developed by Barker (1988) can reveal information about heterogeneity characteristics and aquifer geometry from pumping test data by way of a flow dimension parameter. The physical meaning of non-integer flow dimensions has long been a subject of debate and research. We focus on understanding and interpreting non-radial flow through high permeability conduits within fractured aquifers. We develop and simulate flow within idealized non-radial flow conduits and expand on this concept by simulating pumping in non-fractal random fields with specific properties that mimic persistent sub-radial flow responses. Our results demonstrate that non-integer flow dimensions can arise from non-fractal geometries within aquifers. We expand on these geometric concepts and successfully simulate pumping in random fields that mimic well-test responses seen in the Culebra Dolomite above the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  1. Moat flow system around sunspots in shallow subsurface layers

    SciTech Connect

    Švanda, Michal; Sobotka, Michal; Bárta, Tomáš

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the subsurface moat flow system around McIntosh H-type symmetrical sunspots and compare it to the flow system within supergranular cells. Representatives of both types of flows are constructed by means of the statistical averaging of flow maps obtained by time-distance helioseismic inversions. We find that moat flows around H-type sunspots replace supergranular flows but there are two principal differences between the two phenomena: the moat flow is asymmetrical, probably due to the proper motion of sunspots with respect to the local frame of rest, while the flow in the supergranular cell is highly symmetrical. Furthermore, the whole moat is a downflow region, while the supergranule contains the upflow in the center, which turns into the downflow at about 60% of the cell radius from its center. We estimate that the mass downflow rate in the moat region is at least two times larger than the mass circulation rate within the supergranular cell.

  2. Enhanced-Solubilization of a Multi-Component Immiscible Liquid Source Zone within an Intermediate-scale Flow Cell System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvell, J. R.; Tick, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Complex multi-component immiscible liquid mixtures can significantly limit the effectiveness of groundwater remediation. The use of enhanced-flushing technologies has emerged as a promising technique for the remediation of sites contaminated with immiscible liquids. A series of two dimensional (2-D) flow cell experiments was conducted to quantify the effectiveness of two different flushing agents on the removal of a uniformly distributed multi-component immiscible liquid source zone. A 39.5 x 20.2 cm flow-cell was packed with 20/30-mesh sand and emplaced with a 15 x 3 cm rectangular source zone within the center of the flow cell. The source zone was established with a 10% NAPL saturation (Sn) consisting of equal 1:1:1 mole mixture of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE). The solubilization agents investigated included 5 wt% solution of a complexing sugar, hydroxypropyl-$betacyclodextrin (HPCD), and a 5 wt% solution of a surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The results of these experiments indicate that the addition of a chemical flushing agent greatly reduces the time needed to remove each component compared to flushing with water alone (i.e. pump and treat). Elution curve (concentration-time) analysis from both total extraction and at the down-gradient end of the source zone showed that SDS removed all three components from the source zone approximately 10 times faster than HPCD. For the extraction port SDS showed slightly more ideal removal in terms of mass flux behavior, removing more mass initially before a significant reduction in mass flux was observed. Although SDS was superior when evaluated on a recovery basis, HPCD outperformed SDS for all components when compared based on contaminant-mass to reagent-mass and moles of contaminant to moles of reagent removed for the source zone port. These findings suggest that the selection of a particular flushing agent should be evaluated carefully prior to remediation as

  3. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  4. Advanced flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood in a defined model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients. Since leukemic stem cells are also resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens, new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial targeting studies we utilized a bioinformatics approach to design an antibodyfluorescent nanoparticle conjugate for targeting to these leukemic stem cells and to minimize targeting to normal stemprogenitor cells. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD133+/CD24+/-, CD34+/-, CD38+, CD10-/Flt3+) was spiked into normal hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells obtained from a "buffy coat" prep (with putative immunophenotype CD133- /CD34+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) to be used as a model human leukemia patient. To analyze the model system, digital data mixtures of the two cell types were first created and assigned classifiers in order to create truth sets. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and multidimensional cluster analyses were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the immunophenotyping panel and for automated cell population identification, respectively. Costs of misclassification (false targeting) were also accounted for by this analysis scheme. Ultimately, this analysis scheme will be applied to use of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates at therapeutic doses for targeted killing of leukemia stem cells preferentially to normal stem -progenitor cells.

  5. Pulse-Flow Microencapsulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2006-01-01

    The pulse-flow microencapsulation system (PFMS) is an automated system that continuously produces a stream of liquid-filled microcapsules for delivery of therapeutic agents to target tissues. Prior microencapsulation systems have relied on batch processes that involve transfer of batches between different apparatuses for different stages of production followed by sampling for acquisition of quality-control data, including measurements of size. In contrast, the PFMS is a single, microprocessor-controlled system that performs all processing steps, including acquisition of quality-control data. The quality-control data can be used as real-time feedback to ensure the production of large quantities of uniform microcapsules.

  6. Intracellular fluid flow in rapidly moving cells.

    PubMed

    Keren, Kinneret; Yam, Patricia T; Kinkhabwala, Anika; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A

    2009-10-01

    Cytosolic fluid dynamics have been implicated in cell motility because of the hydrodynamic forces they induce and because of their influence on transport of components of the actin machinery to the leading edge. To investigate the existence and the direction of fluid flow in rapidly moving cells, we introduced inert quantum dots into the lamellipodia of fish epithelial keratocytes and analysed their distribution and motion. Our results indicate that fluid flow is directed from the cell body towards the leading edge in the cell frame of reference, at about 40% of cell speed. We propose that this forward-directed flow is driven by increased hydrostatic pressure generated at the rear of the cell by myosin contraction, and show that inhibition of myosin II activity by blebbistatin reverses the direction of fluid flow and leads to a decrease in keratocyte speed. We present a physical model for fluid pressure and flow in moving cells that quantitatively accounts for our experimental data.

  7. Electrically rechargeable REDOX flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A bulk energy storage system is designed with an electrically rechargeable reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cell divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing an electrode. An anode fluid is directed through the first compartment at the same time that a cathode fluid is directed through the second compartment. Means are provided for circulating the anode and cathode fluids, and the electrodes are connected to an intermittent or non-continuous electrical source, which when operating, supplies current to a load as well as to the cell to recharge it. Ancillary circuitry is provided for disconnecting the intermittent source from the cell at prescribed times and for circulating the anode and cathode fluids according to desired parameters and conditions.

  8. Wireless sap flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Davis, T. W.; Tseng, C.; Cheng, C.; Liang, X.; Yu, P.

    2010-12-01

    This study exhibits a measurement system for wireless sensor networks to measure sap flow in multiple locations simultaneously. Transpiration is a major component of the land-surface system because it is indicative of the water movement between the soil and the air. Sap flow can be used to approximate transpiration. In forests, transpiration cannot be represented by the sap flow from a single tree. Multi-location sap flow measurements are required to show the heterogeneity caused by different trees or soil conditions. Traditional multi-location measurements require manpower and capital for data collection and instrument maintenance. Fortunately, multi-location measurements can be achieved by using the new technology of wireless sensor networks. With multi-hop communication protocol, data can be forwarded to the base station via multiple sensor nodes. This communication protocol can provide reliable data collection with the least power consumption. This study encountered two major problems. The first problem was signal amplification. The Crossbow IRIS mote was selected as the sensor node that receives the temperature data of the sap flow probe (thermocouple) through a MDA300 data acquisition board. However, the wireless sensor node could not directly receive any data from the thermocouples since the least significant bit value of the MDA300, 0.6 mV, is much higher than the voltage signal generated. Thus, the signal from the thermocouple must be amplified to exceed this threshold. The second problem is power management. A specific heat differential is required for the thermal dissipation method of measuring sap flow. Thus, an adjustable DC power supply is necessary for calibrating the heater's temperature settings. A circuit was designed to combine the signal amplifier and power regulator. The regulator has been designed to also provide power to the IRIS mote to extend battery life. This design enables wireless sap flow measurements in the forest. With the

  9. Electrohydrodynamic Flows in Electrochemical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have established a new class of assembly processes with colloidal suspensions. Particles are driven together to form large crystalline structures in both dc and ac fields. The current work centers on this new class of flows in ac fields. In the research carried out under the current award, it was established that: (i) Small colloidal particles crystallize near an electrode due to electrohydrodynamic flows induced by an sinusoidally varying applied potential. (ii) These flows originate due to disturbances in the electrode polarization layer arising from the presence of the particles. Inasmuch as the charge and the field strength both scale on the applied field, the flows are proportional to the square of the applied voltage. (iii) Suspensions of two different sorts of particles can be crystallized and will form well-ordered binary crystals. (iv) At high frequencies the EHD flows die out. Thus, with a homogeneous system the particles become widely spaced due to dipolar repulsion. With a binary suspension, however, the particles may become attractive due to dipolar attraction arising from differences in electrokinetic dipoles. Consequently binary crystals form at both high and low frequencies.

  10. Fuel cell with internal flow control

    DOEpatents

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Venkiteswaran, Arun [Karnataka, IN

    2012-06-12

    A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

  11. Comparative in vitro dissolution study of carbamazepine immediate-release products using the USP paddles method and the flow-through cell system

    PubMed Central

    Medina, José Raúl; Salazar, Dulce Karina; Hurtado, Marcela; Cortés, Alma Rosa; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution profiles of four carbamazepine immediate-release generic products (200 mg tablets) and the reference product Tegretol® were evaluated using the USP paddles method and an alternative method with the flow-through cell system, USP Apparatus 4. Under official conditions all products met the Q specification, dissolution profiles of generic products were similar to the dissolution profile of the reference product (f2 > 50) and model-independent parameters showed non significant differences to the reference product except mean dissolution time for product A (p < 0.05). On the other hand, when the flow-through cell system was used, none of the products met the pharmacopeial specification at 15 min and product A did not reach dissolution criteria at 60 min, dissolution profiles of all generic products were not similar to the reference product profile (f2 < 50) and all model-independent parameters showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05). Weibull’s model was more useful for adjusting the dissolution data of all products in both USP apparatuses and Td values showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05) when USP Apparatus 4 was used. These results indicate that the proposed method, using the flow-through cell system, is more discriminative in evaluating both, rate and extent of carbamazepine dissolution process from immediate-release generic products. PMID:24648826

  12. Information-Systems Data-Flow Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosiu, J. O.

    1983-01-01

    Single form presents clear picture of entire system. Form giving relational review of data flow well suited to information system planning, analysis, engineering, and management. Used to review data flow for developing system or one already in use.

  13. Information-Systems Data-Flow Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosiu, J. O.

    1983-01-01

    Single form presents clear picture of entire system. Form giving relational review of data flow well suited to information system planning, analysis, engineering, and management. Used to review data flow for developing system or one already in use.

  14. Blood Cell Interactions and Segregation in Flow

    PubMed Central

    Munn, Lance L.; Dupin, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    For more than a century, pioneering researchers have been using novel experimental and computational approaches to probe the mysteries of blood flow. Thanks to their efforts, we know that blood cells generally prefer to migrate to the axis of flow, that red and white cells segregate in flow, and that cell deformability and their tendency to reversibly aggregate contribute to the non-Newtonian nature of this unique fluid. All of these properties have beneficial physiological consequences, allowing blood to perform a variety of critical functions. Our current understanding of these unusual flow properties of blood have been made possible by the ingenuity and diligence of a number of researchers, including Harry Goldsmith, who developed novel technologies to visualize and quantify the flow of blood at the level of individual cells. Here we summarize efforts in our lab to continue this tradition and to further our understanding of how blood cells interact with each other and with the blood vessel wall. PMID:18188702

  15. Geophysical fluid flow cell experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The primary purpose of the geophysical flow experiments is to simulate large-scale baroclinic (density-stratified) flows which occur naturally in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars and to gain insights and obtain answers to crucial questions concerning the large-scale nonlinear mechanics of the global geophysical flows. Those external conditions related to fluid viscosity, rotation, gravity are identified, which allow qualitatively different modes of instability or waves in the model.

  16. Fuel cell system combustor

    DOEpatents

    Pettit, William Henry

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode and cathode effluents. The combustor includes a turbulator section at its input end for intimately mixing the anode and cathode effluents before they contact the combustors primary catalyst bed. The turbulator comprises at least one porous bed of mixing media that provides a tortuous path therethrough for creating turbulent flow and intimate mixing of the anode and cathode effluents therein.

  17. Flow field design development using the segmented cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, G.; Ramsey, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fuel cell flow-field development employing two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (2-D CFD). Simulation of the flow distribution of a parallel channel flow-field, with a simple one-channel manifold, predicted inhomogeneous performance distribution within the cell. Further modeling, focusing on modification of the inlet and outlet flow fields, was used to predict a more homogeneous flow distribution in the flow-field. Attempts were made to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally by application of the segmented cell system. Measurements of the current distribution and CO transient response supported the 2-D CFD predictions. However, the margin of error between predicted and experimental results was considered insufficient to be of practical use. Future work will involve the evaluation of 3-D CFD to achieve the appropriate level of accuracy.

  18. Flow pumping system for physiological waveforms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, William; Savaş, Omer

    2010-02-01

    A pulsatile flow pumping system is developed to replicate flow waveforms with reasonable accuracy for experiments simulating physiological blood flows at numerous points in the body. The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component. The system is driven by two programmable servo controllers. The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation. The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

  19. Streak Imaging Flow Cytometer for Rare Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Ossandon, Miguel; Prickril, Ben; Rasooly, Avraham

    2017-01-01

    There is a need for simple and affordable techniques for cytology for clinical applications, especially for point-of-care (POC) medical diagnostics in resource-poor settings. However, this often requires adapting expensive and complex laboratory-based techniques that often require significant power and are too massive to transport easily. One such technique is flow cytometry, which has great potential for modification due to the simplicity of the principle of optical tracking of cells. However, it is limited in that regard due to the flow focusing technique used to isolate cells for optical detection. This technique inherently reduces the flow rate and is therefore unsuitable for rapid detection of rare cells which require large volume for analysis.To address these limitations, we developed a low-cost, mobile flow cytometer based on streak imaging. In our new configuration we utilize a simple webcam for optical detection over a large area associated with a wide-field flow cell. The new flow cell is capable of larger volume and higher throughput fluorescence detection of rare cells than the flow cells with hydrodynamic focusing used in conventional flow cytometry. The webcam is an inexpensive, commercially available system, and for fluorescence analysis we use a 1 W 450 nm blue laser to excite Syto-9 stained cells with emission at 535 nm. We were able to detect low concentrations of stained cells at high flow rates of 10 mL/min, which is suitable for rapidly analyzing larger specimen volumes to detect rare cells at appropriate concentration levels. The new rapid detection capabilities, combined with the simplicity and low cost of this device, suggest a potential for clinical POC flow cytometry in resource-poor settings associated with global health.

  20. Bistability of cell adhesion in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Artem; Cao, Jianshu

    2011-09-07

    Cell adhesion plays a central role in multicellular organisms helping to maintain their integrity and homeostasis. This complex process involves many different types of adhesion proteins, and synergetic behavior of these proteins during cell adhesion is frequently observed in experiments. A well-known example is the cooperation of rolling and stationary adhesion proteins during the leukocytes extravasation. Despite the fact that such cooperation is vital for proper functioning of the immune system, its origin is not fully understood. In this study we constructed a simple analytic model of the interaction between a leukocyte and the blood vessel wall in shear flow. The model predicts existence of cell adhesion bistability, which results from a tug-of-war between two kinetic processes taking place in the cell-wall contact area-bond formation and rupture. Based on the model results, we suggest an interpretation of several cytoadhesion experiments and propose a simple explanation of the existing synergy between rolling and stationary adhesion proteins, which is vital for effective cell adherence to the blood vessel walls in living organisms.

  1. Schlieren System For Flow Studies In Round Glass Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1990-01-01

    In schlieren system for studying flow of gas in transparent pipe of circular cross section, cylindrical lenses placed on opposite sides of pipe compensate for refraction caused by wall of pipe. Enables direct visualization of such phenomena as laminar or turbulent flow, shock waves, vortexes, and flow separations in systems having inherently cylindrical geometry; potentially unreliable extrapolations from results in flat-sided test cells no longer necessary.

  2. Application of Light Reflection Visualization for Measuring Organic-Liquid Saturation for Two-Phase Systems in Two-Dimensional Flow Cells

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Erica L.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A simple, noninvasive imaging technique was used to obtain in situ measurements of organic-liquid saturation in a two-phase system under dynamic conditions. Efficacy of the light reflection visualization (LRV) imaging method was tested through comparison of measured and known volumes of organic liquid for experiments conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell. Two sets of experiments were conducted, with source-zone configurations representing two archetypical residual-and-pool architectures. LRV measurements were collected during the injection of organic liquid and during a dissolution phase induced by water flushing. There was a strong correlation between measured and known organic-liquid volumes, with the LRV-measured values generally somewhat lower than the known volumes. Errors were greater for the system wherein organic liquid was present in multiple zones comprised of porous media of different permeabilities, and for conditions of multiphase flow. This method proved effective at determining organic-liquid distribution in a two-phase system using minimal specialized equipment. PMID:26457050

  3. Application of Light Reflection Visualization for Measuring Organic-Liquid Saturation for Two-Phase Systems in Two-Dimensional Flow Cells.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Erica L; Brusseau, Mark L

    2011-11-01

    A simple, noninvasive imaging technique was used to obtain in situ measurements of organic-liquid saturation in a two-phase system under dynamic conditions. Efficacy of the light reflection visualization (LRV) imaging method was tested through comparison of measured and known volumes of organic liquid for experiments conducted with a two-dimensional flow cell. Two sets of experiments were conducted, with source-zone configurations representing two archetypical residual-and-pool architectures. LRV measurements were collected during the injection of organic liquid and during a dissolution phase induced by water flushing. There was a strong correlation between measured and known organic-liquid volumes, with the LRV-measured values generally somewhat lower than the known volumes. Errors were greater for the system wherein organic liquid was present in multiple zones comprised of porous media of different permeabilities, and for conditions of multiphase flow. This method proved effective at determining organic-liquid distribution in a two-phase system using minimal specialized equipment.

  4. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Sickle Cell Blood Flow in the Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Carlson, Brian E.

    2001-11-01

    A numerical simulation of normal and sickle cell blood flow through the transverse arteriole-capillary microcirculation is carried out to model the dominant mechanisms involved in the onset of vascular stasis in sickle cell disease. The transverse arteriole-capillary network is described by Strahler's network branching method, and the oxygen and blood transport in the capillaries is modeled by a Krogh cylinder analysis utilizing Lighthill's lubrication theory, as developed by Berger and King. Poiseuille's law is used to represent blood flow in the arterioles. Applying this flow and transport model and utilizing volumetric flow continuity at each network bifurcation, a nonlinear system of equations is obtained, which is solved iteratively using a steepest descent algorithm coupled with a Newton solver. Ten different networks are generated and flow results are calculated for normal blood and sickle cell blood without and with precapillary oxygen loss. We find that total volumetric blood flow through the network is greater in the two sickle cell blood simulations than for normal blood owing to the anemia associated with sickle cell disease. The percentage of capillary blockage in the network increases dramatically with decreasing pressure drop across the network in the sickle cell cases while there is no blockage when normal blood flows through simulated networks. It is concluded that, in sickle cell disease, without any vasomotor dilation response to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the blood, capillary blockage will occur in the microvasculature even at average pressure drops across the transverse arteriole-capillary networks.

  6. Spatial response variations within biosensor flow cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cant, Nicola; Harrison, Sarah

    2012-02-01

    Biosensors are currently being developed for the detection of a wide range of analytes in a variety of scenarios. One such area is that of environmental monitoring for the presence of biological threats, from toxins through to viruses and bacteria. The varying nature, and in particular disparate size, of such a variety of analytes poses a significant challenge in the development of effective high confidence instruments. Many existing biosensors employ functionalised flow cells in which spatially defined arrays of surface immobilised recognition elements are present to specifically capture their analyte of interest. Experimental data obtained using a grating coupled SPR instrument, the BIAcore Flexchip, has revealed spatial dependency differences in response behaviours between proteinaceous and particulate analytes. In particular, the magnitude of responses seen with Bacillus anthracis spores across the instruments flow cell appear to be influenced by shear and gravitational effects whilst those from soluble proteins are more uniform. We have explored this dependence to understand its fundamental impact on the successful implementation of multi-analyte environmental biological detection systems.

  7. A laboratory scale supersonic combustive flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, E.C.; Zerkle, D.K.; Fry, H.A.; Wantuck, P.J.

    1995-02-01

    A laboratory scale supersonic flow system [Combustive Flow System (CFS)] which utilizes the gaseous products of methane-air and/or liquid fuel-air combustion has been assembled to provide a propulsion type exhaust flow field for various applications. Such applications include providing a testbed for the study of planar two-dimensional nozzle flow fields with chemistry, three-dimensional flow field mixing near the exit of rectangular nozzles, benchmarking the predictive capability of various computational fluid dynamic codes, and the development and testing of advanced diagnostic techniques. This paper will provide a detailed description of the flow system and data related to its operation.

  8. Evolution of Unsteady Groundwater Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xing; Jin, Menggui; Niu, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Natural groundwater flow is usually transient, especially in long time scale. A theoretical approach on unsteady groundwater flow systems was adopted to highlight some of the knowledge gaps in the evolution of groundwater flow systems. The specific consideration was focused on evolution of groundwater flow systems from unsteady to steady under natural and mining conditions. Two analytical solutions were developed, using segregation variable method to calculate the hydraulic head under steady and unsteady flow conditions. The impact of anisotropy ratio, hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific yield (μs) on the flow patterns were analyzed. The results showed that the area of the equal velocity region increased and the penetrating depth of the flow system decreased while the anisotropy ratio (ɛ = °Kx-/Kz--) increased. Stagnant zones were found in the flow field where the directions of streamlines were opposite. These stagnant zones moved up when the horizontal hydraulic conductivity increased. The results of the study on transient flow indicated a positive impact on hydraulic head with an increase of hydraulic conductivity, while a negative effect on hydraulic head was observed when the specific yield was enhanced. An unsteady numerical model of groundwater flow systems with annual periodic recharge was developed using MODFLOW. It was observed that the transient groundwater flow patterns were different from that developed in the steady flow under the same recharge intensity. The water table fluctuated when the recharge intensity altered. The monitoring of hydraulic head and concentration migration revealed that the unsteady recharge affected the shallow local flow system more than the deep regional flow system. The groundwater flow systems fluctuated with the action of one or more pumping wells. The comparison of steady and unsteady groundwater flow observation indicated that the unsteady flow patterns cannot be simulated by the steady model when the condition

  9. Optimized flow cytometric analysis of central nervous system tissue reveals novel functional relationships among cells expressing CD133, CD15, and CD24.

    PubMed

    Panchision, David M; Chen, Hui-Ling; Pistollato, Francesca; Papini, Daniela; Ni, Hsiao-Tzu; Hawley, Teresa S

    2007-06-01

    Although flow cytometry is useful for studying neural lineage relationships, the method of dissociation can potentially bias cell analysis. We compared dissociation methods on viability and antigen recognition of mouse central nervous system (CNS) tissue and human CNS tumor tissue. Although nonenzymatic dissociation yielded poor viability, papain, purified trypsin replacement (TrypLE), and two purified collagenase/neutral protease cocktails (Liberase-1 or Accutase) each efficiently dissociated fetal tissue and postnatal tissue. Mouse cells dissociated with Liberase-1 were titrated with antibodies identifying distinct CNS precursor subtypes, including CD133, CD15, CD24, A2B5, and PSA-NCAM. Of the enzymes tested, papain most aggressively reduced antigenicity for mouse and human CD24. On human CNS tumor cells, CD133 expression remained highest after Liberase-1 and was lowest after papain or Accutase treatment; Liberase-1 digestion allowed magnetic sorting for CD133 without the need for an antigen re-expression recovery period. We conclude that Liberase-1 and TrypLE provide the best balance of dissociation efficiency, viability, and antigen retention. One implication of this comparison was confirmed by dissociating E13.5 mouse cortical cells and performing prospective isolation and clonal analysis on the basis of CD133/CD24 or CD15/CD24 expression. Highest fetal expression of CD133 or CD15 occurred in a CD24(hi) population that was enriched in neuronal progenitors. Multipotent cells expressed CD133 and CD15 at lower levels than did these neuronal progenitors. We conclude that CD133 and CD15 can be used similarly as selectable markers, but CD24 coexpression helps to distinguish fetal mouse multipotent stem cells from neuronal progenitors and postmitotic neurons. This particular discrimination is not possible after papain treatment. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  10. Immobilized cell cross-flow reactor. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chotani, G.K.; Constantinides, A.

    1984-01-01

    A cross-current flow reactor was operated using sodium alginate gel entrapped yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) under growth conditions. Micron-sized silica, incorporated into the biocatalyst particles (1 mm mean diameter) improved mechanical strength and internal surface adhesion. The process showed decreased productivity and stability at 35/sup 0/C compared to the normal study done at 30/sup 0/C. The increased number of cross flows diminish the product inhibition effect. The residence time distribution shows that the cross-flow bioreactor system can be approximated to either a train of backmixed fermentors in series or a plug flow fermentor with moderate axial dispersion.

  11. Measuring sickle cell morphology during blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Shabad, Eveline L; Dann, Eldad J; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-03-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage, and possibly organ failure. Measuring the structural and morphological changes in sickle cells is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and for developing an effective treatment. In this work, we image blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients using spectrally encoded flow cytometry, and analyze the interference patterns between reflections from the cell membranes. Using a numerical simulation for calculating the interference pattern obtained from a model of a red blood cell, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of characteristic sickle cells and compare our results to a previously suggested model. Our imaging approach offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells, and could be useful for studying their unique physiological and biomechanical properties.

  12. Framework for morphometric classification of cells in imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gopakumar, G; Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Gorthi, Sai Siva; Subrahmanyam, Gorthi R K Sai

    2016-03-01

    Imaging flow cytometry is an emerging technology that combines the statistical power of flow cytometry with spatial and quantitative morphology of digital microscopy. It allows high-throughput imaging of cells with good spatial resolution, while they are in flow. This paper proposes a general framework for the processing/classification of cells imaged using imaging flow cytometer. Each cell is localized by finding an accurate cell contour. Then, features reflecting cell size, circularity and complexity are extracted for the classification using SVM. Unlike the conventional iterative, semi-automatic segmentation algorithms such as active contour, we propose a noniterative, fully automatic graph-based cell localization. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed framework, we have successfully classified unstained label-free leukaemia cell-lines MOLT, K562 and HL60 from video streams captured using custom fabricated cost-effective microfluidics-based imaging flow cytometer. The proposed system is a significant development in the direction of building a cost-effective cell analysis platform that would facilitate affordable mass screening camps looking cellular morphology for disease diagnosis.

  13. Bioinspired Sensory Systems for Shear Flow Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Chen, Kevin K.; Kanso, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Aquatic organisms such as copepods exhibit remarkable responses to changes in ambient flows, especially shear gradients, when foraging, mating and escaping. To accomplish these tasks, the sensory system of the organism must decode the local sensory measurements to detect the flow properties. Evidence suggests that organisms sense differences in the hydrodynamic signal rather than absolute values of the ambient flow. In this paper, we develop a mathematical framework for shear flow detection using a bioinspired sensory system that measures only differences in velocity. We show that the sensory system is capable of reconstructing the properties of the ambient shear flow under certain conditions on the flow sensors. We discuss these conditions and provide explicit expressions for processing the sensory measurements and extracting the flow properties. These findings suggest that by combining suitable velocity sensors and physics-based methods for decoding sensory measurements, we obtain a powerful approach for understanding and developing underwater sensory systems.

  14. Bioinspired Sensory Systems for Shear Flow Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Chen, Kevin K.; Kanso, Eva

    2017-08-01

    Aquatic organisms such as copepods exhibit remarkable responses to changes in ambient flows, especially shear gradients, when foraging, mating and escaping. To accomplish these tasks, the sensory system of the organism must decode the local sensory measurements to detect the flow properties. Evidence suggests that organisms sense differences in the hydrodynamic signal rather than absolute values of the ambient flow. In this paper, we develop a mathematical framework for shear flow detection using a bioinspired sensory system that measures only differences in velocity. We show that the sensory system is capable of reconstructing the properties of the ambient shear flow under certain conditions on the flow sensors. We discuss these conditions and provide explicit expressions for processing the sensory measurements and extracting the flow properties. These findings suggest that by combining suitable velocity sensors and physics-based methods for decoding sensory measurements, we obtain a powerful approach for understanding and developing underwater sensory systems.

  15. Microsphere reference flow samples during systemic flow adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Geffin, G.A.; O'Keefe, D.; Denenberg, A.G.; Daggett, W.M.

    1987-04-01

    Regional myocardial blood flow measurements in the right heart bypass preparation can be particularly valuable, since this preparation provides control of the main hemodynamic determinants of coronary blood flow. The authors examined the validity of aortic reference flow samples in relation to coronary samples during continuous systemic flow adjustment for aortic pressure control in six dogs on right heart bypass, anesthetized with chloralose and urethan. Radioactively-labelled microsphere concentrations were compared in paired reference flow samples drawn from the aortic arch and from a coronary artery for 119 left atrial microsphere injections. During left subclavian artery infusion and during femoral artery infusion at rates above 2000 ml/min, there were high percentage errors in microsphere concentration between paired samples, consistent with aortic sample dilution by systemically infused blood. In 52 injections during withdrawal or femoral infusion below 2000 ml/min, at cardiac outputs of 390-4800 ml/min. Linear regression related these coronary to aortic microsphere concentrations by the equation Y = 1.005X - 1.64, r = 0.997, S/sub y-x/ = 13.2 (5.9%). These data indicate that valid aortic reference flow samples can be obtained within specific hemodynamic conditions during systemic flow adjustment in the right heart bypass preparation.

  16. Coded illumination for motion-blur free imaging of cells on cell-phone based imaging flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Manish; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2014-10-01

    Cell-phone based imaging flow cytometry can be realized by flowing cells through the microfluidic devices, and capturing their images with an optically enhanced camera of the cell-phone. Throughput in flow cytometers is usually enhanced by increasing the flow rate of cells. However, maximum frame rate of camera system limits the achievable flow rate. Beyond this, the images become highly blurred due to motion-smear. We propose to address this issue with coded illumination, which enables recovery of high-fidelity images of cells far beyond their motion-blur limit. This paper presents simulation results of deblurring the synthetically generated cell/bead images under such coded illumination.

  17. Automated flow-chart system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, W.

    1980-01-01

    Program produces flow chart of any program written in FORTRAN. Each FORTRAN statement is printed with symbol representing actions required during execution. Flow chart is generated on line-printer. This program is in COBOL for batch execution on IBM 370-series computer.

  18. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-10-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  19. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  20. Flow field measurements in the cell culture unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Stephen; Wilder, Mike; Dimanlig, Arsenio; Jagger, Justin; Searby, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    The cell culture unit (CCU) is being designed to support cell growth for long-duration life science experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). The CCU is a perfused loop system that provides a fluid environment for controlled cell growth experiments within cell specimen chambers (CSCs), and is intended to accommodate diverse cell specimen types. Many of the functional requirements depend on the fluid flow field within the CSC (e.g., feeding and gas management). A design goal of the CCU is to match, within experimental limits, all environmental conditions, other than the effects of gravity on the cells, whether the hardware is in microgravity ( micro g), normal Earth gravity, or up to 2g on the ISS centrifuge. In order to achieve this goal, two steps are being taken. The first step is to characterize the environmental conditions of current 1g cell biology experiments being performed in laboratories using ground-based hardware. The second step is to ensure that the design of the CCU allows the fluid flow conditions found in 1g to be replicated from microgravity up to 2g. The techniques that are being used to take these steps include flow visualization, particle image velocimetry (PIV), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Flow visualization using the injection of dye has been used to gain a global perspective of the characteristics of the CSC flow field. To characterize laboratory cell culture conditions, PIV is being used to determine the flow field parameters of cell suspension cultures grown in Erlenmeyer flasks on orbital shakers. These measured parameters will be compared to PIV measurements in the CSCs to ensure that the flow field that cells encounter in CSCs is within the bounds determined for typical laboratory experiments. Using CFD, a detailed simulation is being developed to predict the flow field within the CSC for a wide variety of flow conditions, including microgravity environments. Results from all these measurements and analyses of the

  1. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking.

  2. Microfluidic impedance flow cytometry enabling high-throughput single-cell electrical property characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-04-29

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications.

  3. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  4. Flow Interactions with Cells and Tissues: Cardiovascular Flows and Fluid–Structure Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Morton H.; Krams, Rob; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between flow and biological cells and tissues are intrinsic to the circulatory, respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. In the circulatory system, an understanding of the complex interaction between the arterial wall (a living multi-component organ with anisotropic, nonlinear material properties) and blood (a shear-thinning fluid with 45% by volume consisting of red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells) is vital to our understanding of the physiology of the human circulation and the etiology and development of arterial diseases, and to the design and development of prosthetic implants and tissue-engineered substitutes. Similarly, an understanding of the complex dynamics of flow past native human heart valves and the effect of that flow on the valvular tissue is necessary to elucidate the etiology of valvular diseases and in the design and development of valve replacements. In this paper we address the influence of biomechanical factors on the arterial circulation. The first part presents our current understanding of the impact of blood flow on the arterial wall at the cellular level and the relationship between flow-induced stresses and the etiology of atherosclerosis. The second part describes recent advances in the application of fluid–structure interaction analysis to arterial flows and the dynamics of heart valves. PMID:20336826

  5. Systems and methods for rebalancing redox flow battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Chang, On Kok

    2015-03-17

    Various methods of rebalancing electrolytes in a redox flow battery system include various systems using a catalyzed hydrogen rebalance cell configured to minimize the risk of dissolved catalyst negatively affecting flow battery performance. Some systems described herein reduce the chance of catalyst contamination of RFB electrolytes by employing a mediator solution to eliminate direct contact between the catalyzed membrane and the RFB electrolyte. Other methods use a rebalance cell chemistry that maintains the catalyzed electrode at a potential low enough to prevent the catalyst from dissolving.

  6. New optical configuration for flow cytometric sorting of aspherical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, John C.; Schaare, Peter N.; Kuennemeyer, Rainer

    1997-05-01

    The orthogonal axes of illumination, flow, and detection in conventional sorting flow cytometers can limit accuracy or throughput when making fluorescence measurements on a spherical cells. A new radially symmetric optical configuration has been designed to overcome these problems. Both illumination and fluorescence collection are performed by a single optical element which encircles the sample stream flow axis. Unlike existing epi-illumination flow cytometer designs, these optics are compatible with electrostatic sorting. The resolution of this system is currently being evaluated for DNA chromosome content measurement with an ultimate goal of separation of X- and Y- chromosome-bearing mammalian spermatozoa. We describe the new optical configuration and present preliminary results of instrument performance. Comparison with a conventional orthogonal optical geometry is made using fluorescent microspheres, chicken red blood cells and chinchilla sperm.

  7. The Redox Flow System for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.; Pfeiffer, W.

    1976-01-01

    The interfacing of a Solar Photovoltaic System and a Redox Flow System for storage was workable. The Redox Flow System, which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two redox couples, in this case iron and titanium, for its storage capacity, gave a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity so that a load could be run continually day and night utilizing the sun's energy. One portion of the system was connected to a bank of solar cells to electrochemically charge the solutions, while a separate part of the system was used to electrochemically discharge the stored energy.

  8. Gravitational field-flow fractionation of human hemopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Alviano, Francesco; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Bagnara, Gian Paolo; Ricci, Francesca; Buzzi, Marina; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Michelini, Elisa; Roda, Aldo

    2009-12-25

    New cell sorting methodologies, which are simple, fast, non-invasive, and able to isolate homogeneous cell populations, are needed for applications ranging from gene expression analysis to cell-based therapy. In particular, in the forefront of stem cell isolation, progenitor cells have to be separated under mild experimental conditions from complex heterogeneous mixtures prepared from human tissues. Most of the methodologies now employed make use of immunological markers. However, it is widely acknowledged that specific markers for pluripotent stem cells are not as yet available, and cell labelling may interfere with the differentiation process. This work presents for the first time gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF), as a tool for tag-less, direct selection of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from cell samples obtained by peripheral blood aphaeresis. These cells are responsible to repopulate the hemopoietic system and they are used in transplantation therapies. Blood aphaeresis sample were injected into a GrFFF system and collected fractions were characterized by flow cytometry for CD34 and CD45 expression, and then tested for viability and multi-differentiation potential. The developed GrFFF method allowed obtaining high enrichment levels of viable, multi-potent hematopoietic stem cells in specific fraction and it showed to fulfil major requirements of analytical performance, such as selectivity and reproducibility of the fractionation process and high sample recovery.

  9. Electrochemical cell operation and system

    DOEpatents

    Maru, Hansraj C.

    1980-03-11

    Thermal control in fuel cell operation is affected through sensible heat of process gas by providing common input manifolding of the cell gas flow passage in communication with the cell electrolyte and an additional gas flow passage which is isolated from the cell electrolyte and in thermal communication with a heat-generating surface of the cell. Flow level in the cell gas flow passage is selected based on desired output electrical energy and flow level in the additional gas flow passage is selected in accordance with desired cell operating temperature.

  10. Biofilm responses to smooth flow fields and chemical gradients in novel microfluidic flow cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jisun L.; Au, Kelly H.; Huynh, Kimberly T.

    2013-01-01

    We present two novel microfluidic flow cells developed to provide reliable control of flow distributions and chemical gradients in biofilm studies. We developed a single-inlet microfluidic flow cell to support biofilm growth under a uniform velocity field, and a double-inlet flow cell to provide a very smooth transverse concentration gradient. Both flow cells consist of a layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bonded to glass cover slips and were fabricated using the replica molding technique. We demonstrate the capabilities of the flow cells by quantifying flow patterns before and after growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms through particle imaging velocimetry, and by evaluating concentration gradients within the double-inlet microfluidic flow cell. Biofilm growth substantially increased flow complexity by diverting flow around biomass, creating high- and low-velocity regions and surface friction. Under a glucose gradient in the double-inlet flow cell, P. aeruginosa biofilms grew in proportion to the local glucose concentration, producing distinct spatial patterns in biofilm biomass relative to the imposed glucose gradient. When biofilms were subjected to a ciprofloxacin gradient, spatial patterns of fractions of dead cells were also in proportion to the local antibiotic concentration. These results demonstrate that the microfluidic flow cells are suitable for quantifying flow complexities resulting from flow-biofilm interactions and investigating spatial patterns of biofilm growth under chemical gradients. These novel microfluidic flow cells will facilitate biofilm research that requires flow control and in situ imaging, particularly investigations of biofilm-environment interactions. PMID:24038055

  11. Artificial Hair Cells for Sensing Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present additional information about the flow-velocity sensors described briefly in the immediately preceding article. As noted therein, these sensors can be characterized as artificial hair cells that implement an approximation of the sensory principle of flow-sensing cilia of fish: A cilium is bent by an amount proportional to the flow to which it is exposed. A nerve cell at the base of the cilium senses the flow by sensing the bending of the cilium. In an artificial hair cell, the artificial cilium is a microscopic cantilever beam, and the bending of an artificial cilium is measured by means of a strain gauge at its base (see Figure 1). Figure 2 presents cross sections of a representative sensor of this type at two different stages of its fabrication process. The process consists of relatively- low-temperature metallization, polymer-deposition, microfabrication, and surface-micromachining subprocesses, including plastic-deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA), which is described below. These subprocesses are suitable for a variety of substrate materials, including silicon, some glasses, and some polymers. Moreover, because it incorporates a polymeric supporting structure, this sensor is more robust, relative to its silicon-based counterparts.

  12. An automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter incorporating nuclear electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1983-02-01

    A computer-automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter is under development for the Medical Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The device will be capable of analyzing and sorting samples of biological cells based on measurements of laser-induced fluorescence and cell volume. The system incorporates the laser optics and droplet generation mechanics of a standard Becton-Dickinson FACS II cell sorter. The capabilities of the FACS II device are being upgraded, chiefly in the areas of data display and recording and, to a lesser extent, on-line data analysis.

  13. Automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter incorporating nuclear electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1982-10-01

    A computer-automated flow microfluorometer and cell sorter are under development for the Medical Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The device will be capable of analyzing and sorting samples of biological cells based on measurements of laser-induced fluorescence and cell volume. The system incorporates the laser optics and droplet generation mechanics of a standard Becton-Dickinson FACS II cell sorter. The capabilities of the FACS II device are being upgraded, chiefly in the areas of data display and recording and, to a lesser extent, on-line data analysis.

  14. A novel planar flow cell for studies of biofilm heterogeneity and flow-biofilm interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas S; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Lee, Jisun; Packman, Aaron I

    2011-11-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities growing on surfaces, and are ubiquitous in nature, in bioreactors, and in human infection. Coupling between physical, chemical, and biological processes is known to regulate the development of biofilms; however, current experimental systems do not provide sufficient control of environmental conditions to enable detailed investigations of these complex interactions. We developed a novel planar flow cell that supports biofilm growth under complex two-dimensional fluid flow conditions. This device provides precise control of flow conditions and can be used to create well-defined physical and chemical gradients that significantly affect biofilm heterogeneity. Moreover, the top and bottom of the flow chamber are transparent, so biofilm growth and flow conditions are fully observable using non-invasive confocal microscopy and high-resolution video imaging. To demonstrate the capability of the device, we observed the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under imposed flow gradients. We found a positive relationship between patterns of fluid velocity and biofilm biomass due to faster microbial growth under conditions of greater local nutrient influx, but this relationship eventually reversed because high hydrodynamic shear leads to the detachment of cells from the surface. These results reveal that flow gradients play a critical role in the development of biofilm communities. By providing new capability for observing biofilm growth, solute and particle transport, and net chemical transformations under user-specified environmental gradients, this new planar flow cell system has broad utility for studies of environmental biotechnology and basic biofilm microbiology, as well as applications in bioreactor design, environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and biomedical research. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A novel planar flow cell for studies of biofilm heterogeneity and flow-biofilm interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas S.; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Lee, Jisun; Packman, Aaron I.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities growing on surfaces, and are ubiquitous in nature, in bioreactors, and in human infection. Coupling between physical, chemical, and biological processes is known to regulate the development of biofilms; however, current experimental systems do not provide sufficient control of environmental conditions to enable detailed investigations of these complex interactions. We developed a novel planar flow cell that supports biofilm growth under complex two-dimensional fluid flow conditions. This device provides precise control of flow conditions and can be used to create well-defined physical and chemical gradients that significantly affect biofilm heterogeneity. Moreover, the top and bottom of the flow chamber are transparent, so biofilm growth and flow conditions are fully observable using non-invasive confocal microscopy and high-resolution video imaging. To demonstrate the capability of the device, we observed the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms under imposed flow gradients. We found a positive relationship between patterns of fluid velocity and biofilm biomass because of faster microbial growth under conditions of greater local nutrient influx, but this relationship eventually reversed because high hydrodynamic shear leads to the detachment of cells from the surface. These results reveal that flow gradients play a critical role in the development of biofilm communities. By providing new capability for observing biofilm growth, solute and particle transport, and net chemical transformations under user-specified environmental gradients, this new planar flow cell system has broad utility for studies of environmental biotechnology and basic biofilm microbiology, as well as applications in bioreactor design, environmental engineering, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and biomedical research. PMID:21656713

  16. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  17. Flow properties of particles in a model annular shear cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.

    2012-05-01

    In order to quantitatively investigate the mechanical and rheological properties of solid flow in a shear cell under conditions relevant to those in an annular cell, we performed a series of discrete particle simulations of slightly polydispersed spheres from quasi-static to intermediate flow regimes. It is shown that the average values of stress tensor components are uniformly distributed in the cell space away from the stationary walls; however, some degree of inhomogeneity in their spatial distributions does exist. A linear relationship between the (internal/external) shear and normal stresses prevails in the shear cell and the internal and external friction coefficients can compare well with each other. It is confirmed that annular shear cells are reasonably effective as a method of measuring particle flow properties. The so-called I-rheology proposed by Jop et al. [Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] is rigorously tested in this cell system. The results unambiguously display that the I-rheology can effectively describe the intermediate flow regime with a high correlation coefficient. However, significant deviations take place when it is applied to the quasi-static regime, which corresponds to very small values of inertial number.

  18. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  19. Pumping power considerations in the designs of NASA-Redox flow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Pressure drop data for six different cell geometries of various flow port, manifold, and cavity dimensions are presented. The redox/energy/storage system uses two fully soluble redox couples as anode and cathode fluids. Both fluids are pumped through a redox cell, or stack of cells, where the electrochemical reactions take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. Pressure drop losses are therefore associated with this system due to the continuous flow of reactant solutions. The exact pressure drop within a redox flow cell is directly dependent on the flow rate as well as the various cell dimensions. Pumping power requirements for a specific set of cell operating conditions are found for various cell geometries once the flow rate and pressure drop are determined. These pumping power requirements contribute to the overall system parasitic energy losses which must be minimized, the choice of cell geometry becomes critical.

  20. Redox flow cell development and demonstration project, calendar year 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Research and development on the redox flow cell conducted from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1977, are described in this report. The major focus of the effort during 1977 was the key technology issues that directly influence the fundamental feasibility of the overall redox concept. These issues were the development of a suitable ion exchange membrane for the system, the screening and study of candidate redox couples to achieve optimum cell performance, and the carrying out of systems analysis and modeling to develop system performance goals and cost estimates.

  1. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Dennis T.; Van den Engh, Gerrit J.; Buckie, Anne-Marie

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  2. High speed flow cytometric separation of viable cells

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, D.T.; Van den Engh, G.J.; Buckie, A.M.

    1995-11-14

    Hematopoietic cell populations are separated to provide cell sets and subsets as viable cells with high purity and high yields, based on the number of original cells present in the mixture. High-speed flow cytometry is employed using light characteristics of the cells to separate the cells, where high flow speeds are used to reduce the sorting time.

  3. Flow cytometer acquisition and detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Casstevens, Martin K.; Burzynski, Ryszard; Weibel, John; Kachynski, Alexander

    2010-05-04

    A flow cytometer has a flow cell through which a sample flows and at least one laser emitting an excitation beam for illuminating a corresponding interrogation region in the flow cell. Scattered and fluorescence light from each interrogation region is collected by one or more input fibers for that region, and the input fiber(s) are fed to a dispersion module for that interrogation region that disperses the incoming light into different spectral regions. The dispersed light is conveyed, such as by a plurality of output fibers, to one or more photosensitive detectors. Thus, time multiplexed light signals may be delivered to a detector whereby several unique light signals can be measured by a single detector.

  4. A dynamic plug flow reactor model for a vanadium redox flow battery cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifeng; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria; Bao, Jie

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic plug flow reactor model for a single cell VRB system is developed based on material balance, and the Nernst equation is employed to calculate cell voltage with consideration of activation and concentration overpotentials. Simulation studies were conducted under various conditions to investigate the effects of several key operation variables including electrolyte flow rate, upper SOC limit and input current magnitude on the cell charging performance. The results show that all three variables have a great impact on performance, particularly on the possibility of gassing during charging at high SOCs or inadequate flow rates. Simulations were also carried out to study the effects of electrolyte imbalance during long term charging and discharging cycling. The results show the minimum electrolyte flow rate needed for operation within a particular SOC range in order to avoid gassing side reactions during charging. The model also allows scheduling of partial electrolyte remixing operations to restore capacity and also avoid possible gassing side reactions during charging. Simulation results also suggest the proper placement for cell voltage monitoring and highlight potential problems associated with setting the upper charging cut-off limit based on the inlet SOC calculated from the open-circuit cell voltage measurement.

  5. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This drawing shows a cross-section view of the test cell at the heart of the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) that flew on two Spacelab missions. The middle and lower drawings depict the volume of the silicone oil layer that served as the atmosphere as the steel ball rotated and an electrostatic field pulled the oil inward to mimic gravity's effects during the experiments. The GFFC thus produced flow patterns that simulated conditions inside the atmospheres of Jupiter and the Sun and other stars. The principal investigator was John Hart of the University of Colorado at Boulder. It was managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). An Acrobat PDF copy of this drawing is available at http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery. (Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center)

  6. 3D-printed and CNC milled flow-cells for chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Spilstead, Kara B; Learey, Jessica J; Doeven, Egan H; Barbante, Gregory J; Mohr, Stephan; Barnett, Neil W; Terry, Jessica M; Hall, Robynne M; Francis, Paul S

    2014-08-01

    Herein we explore modern fabrication techniques for the development of chemiluminescence detection flow-cells with features not attainable using the traditional coiled tubing approach. This includes the first 3D-printed chemiluminescence flow-cells, and a milled flow-cell designed to split the analyte stream into two separate detection zones within the same polymer chip. The flow-cells are compared to conventional detection systems using flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), with the fast chemiluminescence reactions of an acidic potassium permanganate reagent with morphine and a series of adrenergic phenolic amines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Continuous cell sorting in a flow based on single cell resonance Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    McIlvenna, David; Huang, Wei E; Davison, Paul; Glidle, Andrew; Cooper, Jon; Yin, Huabing

    2016-04-21

    Single cell Raman spectroscopy measures a spectral fingerprint of the biochemistry of cells, and provides a powerful method for label-free detection of living cells without the involvement of a chemical labelling strategy. However, as the intrinsic Raman signals of cells are inherently weak, there is a significant challenge in discriminating and isolating cells in a flowing stream. Here we report an integrated Raman-microfluidic system for continuous sorting of a stream of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. These carotenoid-containing microorganisms provide an elegant model system enabling us to determine the sorting accuracy using the subtly different resonance Raman spectra of microorganism cultured in a (12)C or (13)C carbon source. Central to the implementation of continuous flow sorting is the use of "pressure dividers" that eliminate fluctuations in flow in the detection region. This has enabled us to stabilise the flow profile sufficiently to allow automated operation with synchronisation of Raman acquisition, real-time classification and sorting at flow rates of ca. <100 μm s(-1), without the need to "trap" the cells. We demonstrate the flexibility of this approach in sorting mixed cell populations with the ability to achieve 96.3% purity of the selected cells at a speed of 0.5 Hz.

  8. Monitoring electrolyte concentrations in redox flow battery systems

    DOEpatents

    Chang, On Kok; Sopchak, David Andrew; Pham, Ai Quoc; Kinoshita, Kimio

    2015-03-17

    Methods, systems and structures for monitoring, managing electrolyte concentrations in redox flow batteries are provided by introducing a first quantity of a liquid electrolyte into a first chamber of a test cell and introducing a second quantity of the liquid electrolyte into a second chamber of the test cell. The method further provides for measuring a voltage of the test cell, measuring an elapsed time from the test cell reaching a first voltage until the test cell reaches a second voltage; and determining a degree of imbalance of the liquid electrolyte based on the elapsed time.

  9. A spectral boundary integral method for flowing blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Olson, Luke N.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2010-05-01

    A spectral boundary integral method for simulating large numbers of blood cells flowing in complex geometries is developed and demonstrated. The blood cells are modeled as finite-deformation elastic membranes containing a higher viscosity fluid than the surrounding plasma, but the solver itself is independent of the particular constitutive model employed for the cell membranes. The surface integrals developed for solving the viscous flow, and thereby the motion of the massless membrane, are evaluated using an O(NlogN) particle-mesh Ewald (PME) approach. The cell shapes, which can become highly distorted under physiologic conditions, are discretized with spherical harmonics. The resolution of these global basis functions is, of course, excellent, but more importantly they facilitate an approximate de-aliasing procedure that stabilizes the simulations without adding any numerical dissipation or further restricting the permissible numerical time step. Complex geometry no-slip boundaries are included using a constraint method that is coupled into an implicit system that is solved as part of the time advancement routine. The implementation is verified against solutions for axisymmetric flows reported in the literature, and its accuracy is demonstrated by comparison against exact solutions for relaxing surface deformations. It is also used to simulate flow of blood cells at 30% volume fraction in tubes between 4.9 and 16.9 μm in diameter. For these, it is shown to reproduce the well-known non-monotonic dependence of the effective viscosity on the tube diameter.

  10. Flow Battery System Design for Manufacturability.

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Tracy Louise; Meacham, Paul Gregory; Perry, David; Broyles, Robin S.; Hickey, Steven; Hernandez, Jacquelynne

    2014-10-01

    Flow battery energy storage systems can support renewable energy generation and increase energy efficiency. But, presently, the costs of flow battery energy storage systems can be a significant barrier for large-scale market penetration. For cost- effective systems to be produced, it is critical to optimize the selection of materials and components simultaneously with the adherence to requirements and manufacturing processes to allow these batteries and their manufacturers to succeed in the market by reducing costs to consumers. This report analyzes performance, safety, and testing requirements derived from applicable regulations as well as commercial and military standards that would apply to a flow battery energy storage system. System components of a zinc-bromine flow battery energy storage system, including the batteries, inverters, and control and monitoring system, are discussed relative to manufacturing. The issues addressed include costs and component availability and lead times. A service and support model including setup, maintenance and transportation is outlined, along with a description of the safety-related features of the example flow battery energy storage system to promote regulatory and environmental, safety, and health compliance in anticipation of scale manufacturing.

  11. The Importance of Nucleated Red Blood Cells in Patients with Beta Thalassemia Major and Comparison of Two Automated Systems with Manual Microscopy and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Karakukcu, Musa; Karakukcu, Cigdem; Unal, Ekrem; Ozturk, Ahmet; Ciraci, Zahid; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif

    2015-01-01

    Nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) can be used as a marker of erythropoietic stress and help optimize transfusion therapy in patients with beta thalassemia major. The aim of this study was to determine this correlation; and compare two automated systems (Sysmex XE-2100, and Advia 2120i) with manual microscopy and flow cytometry (FCM). Absolute NRBC counts and percentages (NRBC%) from 51 patients were analyzed with both automated and reference methods. The results were compared with levels of pre-transfusion hemoglobin and ferritin levels. The mean age of the included patients (31 female, 20 male) were 12.9 ± 7.5 years. Mean levels of hemoglobin and ferritin were 9.5 ± 1.2 g/dL and 1896 ± 1194 ng/mL respectively. The NRBC% of two instruments did not significantly differ and correlated well (p < 0.0001, r2 = 0.984). NRBC% obtained with the XE-2100 and Advia 2120i versus manual microscopy also yielded high correlations (r2 = 0.951 and r2 0.981, respectively); however, absolute NRBC counts versus FCM yielded lower coefficients (r2 = 0.723 and r2 = 0.694, respectively). High serum ferritin levels were correlated with both NRBC% and counts with both instruments (p < 0.001) and hemoglobin levels lower than 9.0 g/dL had a negative correlation with NRBC% and NRBC counts with the Advia 2120i (p < 0.05, r = -0.495) but not with the XE-2100. Monitoring of NRBC% with both instruments can help optimize transfusion therapy for patients with beta thalassemia major. Following the NRBC% is more efficient than absolute counts.

  12. Bioinspired sensory systems for local flow characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Chen, Kevin; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that many aquatic organisms sense differential hydrodynamic signals.This sensory information is decoded to extract relevant flow properties. This task is challenging because it relies on local and partial measurements, whereas classical flow characterization methods depend on an external observer to reconstruct global flow fields. Here, we introduce a mathematical model in which a bioinspired sensory array measuring differences in local flow velocities characterizes the flow type and intensity. We linearize the flow field around the sensory array and express the velocity gradient tensor in terms of frame-independent parameters. We develop decoding algorithms that allow the sensory system to characterize the local flow and discuss the conditions under which this is possible. We apply this framework to the canonical problem of a circular cylinder in uniform flow, finding excellent agreement between sensed and actual properties. Our results imply that combining suitable velocity sensors with physics-based methods for decoding sensory measurements leads to a powerful approach for understanding and developing underwater sensory systems.

  13. Neural network system for traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Elibiary, Khalid J.; Petersson, L. E. Rickard

    1992-09-01

    Atlanta will be the home of several special events during the next five years ranging from the 1996 Olympics to the 1994 Super Bowl. When combined with the existing special events (Braves, Falcons, and Hawks games, concerts, festivals, etc.), the need to effectively manage traffic flow from surface streets to interstate highways is apparent. This paper describes a system for traffic event response and management for intelligent navigation utilizing signals (TERMINUS) developed at Georgia Tech for adaptively managing special event traffic flows in the Atlanta, Georgia area. TERMINUS (the original name given Atlanta, Georgia based upon its role as a rail line terminating center) is an intelligent surface street signal control system designed to manage traffic flow in Metro Atlanta. The system consists of three components. The first is a traffic simulation of the downtown Atlanta area around Fulton County Stadium that models the flow of traffic when a stadium event lets out. Parameters for the surrounding area include modeling for events during various times of day (such as rush hour). The second component is a computer graphics interface with the simulation that shows the traffic flows achieved based upon intelligent control system execution. The final component is the intelligent control system that manages surface street light signals based upon feedback from control sensors that dynamically adapt the intelligent controller's decision making process. The intelligent controller is a neural network model that allows TERMINUS to control the configuration of surface street signals to optimize the flow of traffic away from special events.

  14. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Jayat, C; Ratinaud, M H

    1993-01-01

    Numerous flow cytometric analyses are based on DNA content studies. We have considered firstly monoparametric cell cycle analyses, which only take DNA content into account, but are sometimes of limited interest. Then, we have presented multiparametric analyses, which can be used to improve cycle phase identification by taking simultaneously into account DNA and other cellular components, or by considering some events occurring during cell cycle. Finally, we have discussed monoparametric and multiparametric cell cycle analysis interest in various application fields, particularly in pharmacology, toxicology, tumoral pathology and higher plant system studies.

  15. Flow-cell fibre-optic enzyme sensor for phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Papkovsky, D.B.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Kurochkin, I.N. )

    1993-07-01

    A solid-state fibre-optic luminescent oxygen sensor was used for flow-through measurements. It acts as a transducer in a new flow-cell enzyme sensor arrangement. This arrangement comprises a flow path, sample injector, microcolumn with the immobilized enzyme, oxygen membrane and fibre-optic connector joined together to form an integral unit. Laccase enzyme was used as a recognition system which provided specific oxidation of the substrates with the dissolved oxygen being monitored. The assay procedure was optimized and performance of the new system studied. The sensor was applied to the determination polyphenol content in tea, brandy, etc. (quality control test). The sensitivity to some important phenolic compounds was tested with the view of industrial wastewater control applications. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  17. Models of flow-induced loading on blood cells in laminar and turbulent flow, with application to cardiovascular device flow.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Nathan J; Dooley, Patrick N

    2007-08-01

    Viscous shear stress and Reynolds stress are often used to predict hemolysis and thrombosis due to flow-induced stress on blood elements in cardiovascular devices. These macroscopic stresses are distinct from the true stress on an individual cell, which is determined by the local microscale flow field. In this paper the flow-induced stress on blood cells is calculated for laminar and turbulent flow, using simplified models for cells and for turbulent eddies. The model is applied to estimate shear stress on red blood cells in flow through a prosthetic heart valve, using the energy spectral density measured by Liu et al. [J. Biomech. Eng. 122:118-124, 2000]. Results show that in laminar flow, the maximum stress on a cell is approximately equal to the macroscopic viscous shear stress. In turbulent flow through a prosthetic heart valve, the estimated root mean square of flow-induced stress on a cell is at least an order of magnitude less than the Reynolds stress. The results support the hypothesis that smaller turbulent eddies cause higher stress on cells. However, the stress due to an eddy depends on the velocity scale of the eddy as well as its length scale. For the heart valve flow investigated, turbulence contributes to flow-induced stress on cells almost equally across a broad range of the frequency spectrum. The model suggests that Reynolds stress alone is not an adequate predictor of cell damage in turbulent flow, and highlights the importance of the energy spectral density.

  18. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1997-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

  19. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.

    1997-06-24

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers. 9 figs.

  20. A CLIPS expert system for clinical flow cytometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, G. C.; Duque, R. E.; Braylan, R. C.; Stewart, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed using CLIPS to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data from cancer patients. Cluster analysis is used to find subpopulations representing various cell types in multiple datasets each consisting of four to five measurements on each of 5000 cells. CLIPS facts are derived from results of the clustering. CLIPS rules are based on the expertise of Drs. Stewart, Duque, and Braylan. The rules incorporate certainty factors based on case histories.

  1. A CLIPS expert system for clinical flow cytometry data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, G. C.; Duque, R. E.; Braylan, R. C.; Stewart, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed using CLIPS to assist clinicians in the analysis of multivariate flow cytometry data from cancer patients. Cluster analysis is used to find subpopulations representing various cell types in multiple datasets each consisting of four to five measurements on each of 5000 cells. CLIPS facts are derived from results of the clustering. CLIPS rules are based on the expertise of Drs. Stewart, Duque, and Braylan. The rules incorporate certainty factors based on case histories.

  2. Investigation of propellant flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebman, A. A.

    1973-01-01

    Mechanical, electromechanical, and fluidic concepts were studied as propellant flow control system for oxygen/hydrogen attitude control thrusters. A mechanical flow controller was designed, fabricated, and tested with hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen over a range of inlet pressures and temperatures. Results of these tests are presented along with a discussion of a flight-weight design. Also presented are recommendations for further design and development. A detailed coverage of the fluidics investigation is included.

  3. Estimating flow heterogeneity in natural fracture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckenby, Robert J.; Sanderson, David J.; Lonergan, Lidia

    2005-10-01

    Examples of small to medium scale fault systems have been mapped in Jurassic sedimentary rocks in north Somerset, England. These examples include contractional and dilational strike-slip oversteps as well as normal faults. These maps form the basis of calculations performed to investigate heterogeneity in natural fracture systems with the aim of predicting fluid flow localisation in different fault styles. As there is no way to measure fracture aperture directly, we use vein thickness to represent an integrated flow path or 'palaeo-aperture' from which we derive a representation of the flow distribution. Three different methods are used to estimate flow heterogeneity based on: (1) fracture density (the ratio of fracture length to area), (2) fracture aperture (fracture porosity) and (3) hydraulic conductance (fracture permeability normalised to the pressure gradient and fluid properties). Our results show that fracture density and hydraulic conductance are poorly correlated and that fracture density does not fully represent the natural heterogeneity of fracture systems. Fracture aperture and hydraulic conductance indicate stronger degrees of flow localisation. Different types of structures also seem to display characteristic and predictable patterns of heterogeneity. Normal fault systems show the highest magnitude of localisation along the faults rather than in the relay ramps, while contractional and dilational strike-slip systems show very strong localisation in the faults and oversteps, respectively. In all cases the amount of damage in the oversteps can modify such patterns of heterogeneity.

  4. CellTracks: Cell analysis system for rare cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Michael T.; Trainer, Michael N.; Bendele, Teresa; Rao, Chandra; Horton, Allen; Tibbe, Arjan G.; Greve, Jan; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2002-06-01

    The CellTracks system is a Compact Disk-based cell analyzer that, similar to flow cytometry, differentiates cells that are aligned while passing through focused laser beams. In CellTracks, only immuno-magnetically labeled cells are aligned and remain in position for further analysis. This feature is important in those cases were the cells are relatively infrequent. Epithelium derived tumor cells in peripheral blood are extremely rare but can be present in the blood of cancer patients. The certainty that an event present in a gate is, indeed, an epithelial cell with the assumed characteristics diminishes with the number of events in the analysis gate. Additional and preferably independent information on the individual events aids in the correct classification of the event as an epithelium derived tumor cell. Epithelial cells are immuno-magnetically selected from 7.5 mL of blood and magnetically aligned in the sample chamber between a series of parallel thin film nickel lines. The CD head scans along all nickel lines and captures the fluorescence signals of the objects between the lines. Objects that immuno-phenotypically classify as epithelial tumor cells are revisited for imaging to determine if the identified objects indeed classify as epithelial tumors cells or as debris derived from epithelial cells.

  5. A Mechanical System to Reproduce Cardiovascular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Thomas; Valsecchi, Pietro

    2010-11-01

    Within the framework of the "Pumps&Pipes" collaboration between ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company and The DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center in Houston, a hydraulic control system was developed to accurately simulate general cardiovascular flows. The final goal of the development of the apparatus was the reproduction of the periodic flow of blood through the heart cavity with the capability of varying frequency and amplitude, as well as designing the systolic/diastolic volumetric profile over one period. The system consists of a computer-controlled linear actuator that drives hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to a secondary hydraulic cylinder. The test section of the apparatus is located inside a MRI machine, and the closed loop serves to physically separate all metal moving parts (control system and actuator cylinder) from the MRI-compatible pieces. The secondary cylinder is composed of nonmetallic elements and directly drives the test section circulatory flow loop. The circulatory loop consists of nonmetallic parts and several types of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, which model the behavior of blood. This design allows for a periodic flow of blood-like fluid pushed through a modeled heart cavity capable of replicating any healthy heart condition as well as simulating anomalous conditions. The behavior of the flow inside the heart can thus be visualized by MRI techniques.

  6. Resource Prospector Propulsion System Cold Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Addona, Brad; Trinh, Huu

    2015-01-01

    Resource Prospector (RP) is a NASA mission being led by NASA Ames Research Center with current plans to deliver a scientific payload package aboard a rover to the lunar surface. As part of an early risk reduction activity, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) have jointly developed a government-version concept of a lunar lander for the mission. The spacecraft consists of two parts, the lander and the rover which carries the scientific instruments. The lander holds the rover during launch, cruise, and landing on the surface. Following terminal descent and landing the lander portion of the spacecraft become dormant after the rover embarks on the science mission. The lander will be equipped with a propulsion system for lunar descent and landing, as well as trajectory correction and attitude control maneuvers during transit to the moon. Hypergolic propellants monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide will be used to fuel sixteen 70-lbf descent thrusters and twelve 5-lbf attitude control thrusters. A total of four metal-diaphragm tanks, two per propellant, will be used along with a high-pressure composite-overwrapped pressure vessel for the helium pressurant gas. Many of the major propulsion system components are heritage missile hardware obtained by NASA from the Air Force. In parallel with the flight system design activities, a simulated propulsion system based on flight drawings was built for conducting a series of water flow tests to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. The primary objective of the cold flow testing was to simulate the RP propulsion system fluid flow operation through water flow testing and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. All design and

  7. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDRAE, R. W.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  8. Information flow in heterogeneously interacting systems.

    PubMed

    Yamaguti, Yutaka; Tsuda, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yoichiro

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by studies on the dynamics of heterogeneously interacting systems in neocortical neural networks, we studied heterogeneously-coupled chaotic systems. We used information-theoretic measures to investigate directions of information flow in heterogeneously coupled Rössler systems, which we selected as a typical chaotic system. In bi-directionally coupled systems, spontaneous and irregular switchings of the phase difference between two chaotic oscillators were observed. The direction of information transmission spontaneously switched in an intermittent manner, depending on the phase difference between the two systems. When two further oscillatory inputs are added to the coupled systems, this system dynamically selects one of the two inputs by synchronizing, selection depending on the internal phase differences between the two systems. These results indicate that the effective direction of information transmission dynamically changes, induced by a switching of phase differences between the two systems.

  9. Click Chemistry for Analysis of Cell Proliferation in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Scott T; Calderon, Veronica; Bradford, Jolene A

    2017-10-02

    The measurement of cellular proliferation is fundamental to the assessment of cellular health, genotoxicity, and the evaluation of drug efficacy. Labeling, detection, and quantification of cells in the synthesis phase of cell cycle progression are not only important for characterizing basic biology, but also in defining cellular responses to drug treatments. Changes in DNA replication during S-phase can provide valuable insights into mechanisms of cell growth, cell cycle kinetics, and cytotoxicity. A common method for detection of cell proliferation is the incorporation of a thymidine analog during DNA synthesis. This chapter presents a pulse labeling method using the thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), with subsequent detection by click chemistry. EdU detection using click chemistry is bio-orthogonal to most living systems and does not non-specifically label other biomolecules. Live cells are first pulsed with EdU. After antibody labeling cell surface markers, fixation, and permeabilization, the incorporated EdU is covalently labeled using click chemistry thereby identifying proliferating cells. Improvements in click chemistry allow for labeling in the presence of fluorescent proteins and phycobiliproteins without quenching due to copper. Measuring DNA replication during cell cycle progression has cell health applications in flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and high content imaging. This protocol has been developed and optimized for research use only and is not suitable for use in diagnostic procedures. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. 1987 Seagull Shoreline System flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    The American Gas Association (AGA) employed Pipeline Hydraulics Engineering, Inc. (PHE) to conduct a flow test of the Seagull Shoreline System (SSS) and Enron's associated gas gathering system. The purpose of the flow test was to obtain field pressure drop and holdup data from a large diameter gas condensate pipeline. The validity of various two-phase correlations either proposed in the open literature or under development is generally established based upon comparison with field and/or laboratory measurements. Since accessible large diameter data is limited, most of these comparisons have been made with small diameter pipes. The application of the resulting correlations to actual large diameter pipelines has proven less than satisfactory in many cases particularly as regards holdup prediction. PHE carried out the flow test of the SSS/Enron system on November 3--4, 1987. Actually, PHE was allowed only to observe and record data during a normal SSS operation, i.e. pigging of the system. This report presents the data along with its interpretation. In addition, comparisons are made with calculated results using PHE's two-phase flow computer program and associated correlations.

  11. Cancer Cell Glycocalyx Mediates Mechanostransduction and Flow-Regulated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Henry; Palomino, Rocio; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Munn, Lance L.; Tarbell, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells are covered by a surface proteoglycan (glycocalyx) layer, and it is known that blood vessel-lining endothelial cells use the glycocalyx to sense and transduce the shearing forces of blood flow into intracellular signals. Tumor cells in vivo are exposed to forces from interstitial fluid flow that may affect metastatic potential but are not reproduced by most in vitro cell motility assays. We hypothesized that glycocalyx-mediated mechanotransduction of interstitial flow shear stress is an un-recognized factor that can significantly enhance metastatic cell motility and play a role in augmentation of invasion. Involvement of MMP levels, cell adhesion molecules (CD44, α3 integrin), and glycocalyx components (heparan sulfate and hyaluronan) were investigated in a cell/collagen gel suspension model designed to mimic the interstitial flow microenvironment. Physiologic levels of flow upregulated MMP levels and enhanced the motility of metastatic cells. Blocking the flow-enhanced expression of MMP actvity or adhesion molecules (CD44 and integrins) resulted in blocking the flow-enhanced migratory activity. The presence of a glycocalyx-like layer was verified around tumor cells, and the degradation of this layer by hyaluronidase and heparinase blocked the flow-regulated invasion. This study shows for the first time that interstitial flow enhancement of metastatic cell motility can be mediated by the cell surface glycocalyx – a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24077103

  12. Automated cell viability assessment using a microfluidics based portable imaging flow analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Adhikari, Jayesh Vasudeva; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report a system-level integration of portable microscopy and microfluidics for the realization of optofluidic imaging flow analyzer with a throughput of 450 cells/s. With the use of a cellphone augmented with off-the-shelf optical components and custom designed microfluidics, we demonstrate a portable optofluidic imaging flow analyzer. A multiple microfluidic channel geometry was employed to demonstrate the enhancement of throughput in the context of low frame-rate imaging systems. Using the cell-phone based digital imaging flow analyzer, we have imaged yeast cells present in a suspension. By digitally processing the recorded videos of the flow stream on the cellphone, we demonstrated an automated cell viability assessment of the yeast cell population. In addition, we also demonstrate the suitability of the system for blood cell counting. PMID:26015835

  13. A laminar flow electroporation system for efficient DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zewen; Zhao, Deyao; Li, Xueming; Wu, Mengxi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Huang; Wang, Xiaoxia; Du, Quan; Liang, Zicai; Li, Zhihong

    2011-08-01

    By introducing a hydrodynamic mechanism into a microfluidics-based electroporation system, we developed a novel laminar flow electroporation system with high performance. The laminar buffer flow implemented in the system separated the cell suspension flow from the electrodes, thereby excluding many unfavorable effects due to electrode reaction during electroporation, such as hydrolysis, bubble formation, pH change, and heating. Compared to conventional microfluidic electroporation systems, these improvements significantly enhanced transfection efficiency and cell viability. Furthermore, successful electrotransfection of plasmid DNA and, more importantly, synthetic siRNA, was demonstrated in several hard-to-transfect cell types using this system.

  14. Mimicking the Interfacial Dynamics of Flowing White Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santore, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The rolling of particles on surfaces, facilitated by hydrodynamic forces combined with localized surface interactions of the appropriate strengths, spatial arrangements, and ranges, is a technologically useful means of transporting and manipulating particles. One's intuition for the rolling of a marble or a car tire cannot be extrapolated down to microparticle length scales because the microparticle interactions are dominated by electrostatic, van der Waals, and hydrogen bonding interactions rather than a friction that depends on an imposed normal force. Indeed, our microparticle rolling systems are inspired by the rolling of white blood cells on the inner walls of venules as part of the innate immune response: Selectin molecules engage with their counterparts on the opposing surfaces to slow cell motion relative to that for freely flowing cells. In the resulting rolling signature, ligand-receptor binding and crack closing on the front of the cell are balanced with molecular dis-bonding and crack opening at the rear. The contact region is relatively static, allowing other interactions (for instance signaling) to occur for a finite duration. Thus, achieving particle rolling in synthetic systems is important because it facilitates particle-surface interactions in a continuous nonfouling fashion where the contact surface is continually renewed. In developing a synthetic model for this system, we employ polymers to modify flowing particles and /or planar collectors, producing heterogeneous interfaces which can support rolling or produce other motion signatures such as skipping, arrest, or free flow. We identify, in the synthetic system, combinations of variables that produce rolling and demonstrate how the distinction between rolling and arrest is not a simple matter of the adhesion strength between the particles and the collector. Rolling is a cooperative process and the coordination of binding in one location with dis-bonding in another requires appropriate length

  15. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  16. Designing and commissioning variable flow hydronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, G. )

    1993-07-01

    Direct return variable flow hydronic systems (VFHS) must (in this author's opinion) be designed to be self-balancing. However, in practice, many design engineers will use customary pipe sizing routines, piping detail drawings and specifications that apply to more familiar constant flow systems. Substituting a two-way valve in place of a three-way valve and bypass pipe, while retaining the balancing valve and balancing specification, ultimately creates control problems and wastes energy. The use of balancing valves on VFHS is detrimental to the system's performance because it reduces the authority of the control valve and adds a permanent restriction in every branch. This restriction increases the pumping costs for the life of the building. Specifications for VFHS must stress the importance of the valve actuator and the need for high quality valve bodies to withstand the additional dynamic forces and static pressures that are present in these systems. The working pressures for VFHS are always higher than for equivalent constant flow hydronic systems (CFHS). On many VFHS, the use of conventional HVAC control valves may not be suitable. This article addresses these problems and the important role the balancing contractor has in testing and commissioning these systems.

  17. Photometric detection in flow analysis systems using integrated PEDDs.

    PubMed

    O' Toole, Martina; Lau, King Tong; Diamond, Dermot

    2005-06-15

    A novel inexpensive optical-sensing technique has been developed for colorimetric flow analysis. This sensing system employs two LEDs whereby one is used as the light source and the other as a light detector. The LED used as light detector is reverse biased with a 5-V supply so that the photocurrent generated by the incident light discharges the capacitance. Direct digital output is provided by a simple timer circuit that measures the time taken for this discharge process from 5V (logic 1) to 1.7V (logic 0). This sensing concept has been applied in flow analysis by constructing an optical flow cell with a pair of LEDs. Calibration of the integrated optical flow cell using a dye resulted in a linear response that obeys the Beer-Lambert law. The flow rate, dynamic range, sensitivity and limits of detection were investigated. The system was also used for pH determination in the range of pH 2.5-6.8 using bromocresol green (BCG). The pK(a) of BCG was successfully determined by this technique.

  18. Design Flexibility of Redox Flow Systems. [for energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics inherent in Redox flow systems permit considerable latitude in designing systems for specific storage applications. The first of these characteristics is the absence of plating/deplating reactions with their attendant morphology changes at the electrodes. This permits a given Redox system to operate over a wide range of depths of discharge and charge/discharge rates. The second characteristic is the separation of power generating components (stacks) from the energy storage components (tanks). This results in cost effective system design, ease of system growth via modularization, and freedom from sizing restraints so that the whole spectrum of applications, from utilities down to single residence can be considered. The final characteristic is the commonality of the reactant fluids which assures that all cells at all times are receiving reactants at the same state of charge. Since no cell can be out of balance with respect to any other cell, it is possible for some cells to be charged while others are discharging, in effect creating a DC to DC transformer. It is also possible for various groups of cells to be connected to separate loads, thus supplying a range of output voltages. Also, trim cells can be used to maintain constant bus voltage as the load is changed or as the depth of discharge increases. The commonality of reactant fluids also permits any corrective measures such as rebalancing to occur at the system level instead of at the single cell level.

  19. Bursting the bubble on bacterial biofilms: a flow cell methodology

    PubMed Central

    Crusz, Shanika A.; Popat, Roman; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Cámara, Miguel; Givskov, Michael; Diggle, Stephen P.; Williams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The flow cell biofilm system is an important and widely used tool for the in vitro cultivation and evaluation of bacterial biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions of flow. This paper provides an introduction to the background and use of such systems, accompanied by a detailed guide to the assembly of the apparatus including the description of new modifications which enhance its performance. As such, this is an essential guide for the novice biofilm researcher as well as providing valuable trouble-shooting techniques for even the most experienced laboratories. The adoption of a common and reliable methodology amongst researchers would enable findings to be shared and replicated amongst the biofilm research community, with the overall aim of advancing understanding and management of these complex and widespread bacterial communities. PMID:22877233

  20. Vesicles, capsules and red blood cells under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-12-01

    Blood flow is dictated by the dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs), which constitute by far the major component. RBCs are made of a a two dimensional fluid bilayer of phospholipids, having underneath a network of proteins conferring to them shear elasticity, and they possess many membrane and transmembrane proteins (like ion channels). Simplified systems, like vesicles (made of a pure bilayer of phospholipid) and capsules (made of an extensible polymer shell) are used as models for RBCs. Both systems reproduce several features known for RBCs under flow. Their interest lies, besides some simplicity, in the fact that they can be fabricated in the laboratory, and their properties (size, stiffness, internal content....) can be varied in a wide range allowing thus to explore a quite significant parameter space that is essential to test predictions and discriminate between different models. We shall review the main recent achievement in this field, both for a single entity, collective effects and the impact on rheology.

  1. Accurate Assessment of Cell Death by Imaging Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    The number of investigators using cell death analysis applications has greatly expanded since the introduction of flow cytometry. The Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) method is among the most commonly used procedures and allows users to determine if cells are viable, apoptotic, or necrotic, based on changes in membrane lipid composition, integrity, and permeability. Unfortunately, PI can intercalate into RNA, in addition to DNA, which contributes to a large number of events showing PI staining within the cytoplasmic compartment. We show that this occurs across a broad range of animal primary cells and commonly used cell lines, and is most prevalent in large cells (nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio <0.5). Any cellular system where RNA levels change throughout an experiment will be particularly affected, such as those that utilize virally infected cells. As two examples, we highlight our recent work on cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), an RNA virus, and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), a DNA virus. Similarly, these issues are relevant to experimental systems where cells have increased RNA content such as during genotoxic stress, following exposure to cell cycle arrest drugs such as thymidine or hydroxyurea, or where developmental progression promotes discrete changes in cellular RNA synthesis. This chapter outlines a modified Annexin V/PI method that addresses cytoplasmic RNA staining issues to allow for accurate assessment of cell death. This protocol takes advantage of an additional cellular permeability caused by fixation to promote RNase A entry into the cell. Based on our observations, cell morphological parameters are well maintained and less than 5 % of total cellular events exhibit cytoplasmic PI staining under this protocol.

  2. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  3. Mass flow in close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The manner of mass flow in close binary systems is examined with a special view to the role of the so-called critical Roche (or Jacobian) lobe, taking into consideration relevant physical conditions such as radiation pressure that may affect the restricted three-body problem treatment. The mass does not necessarily flow from component one to component two through the L1 point to form a gaseous ring surrounding the latter. These considerations are applied to X-ray binaries with early-type optical components, such as Cyg X-1 (HDE 226868) and 3U 1700 - 37 (HD 153919). In the two bright close binary systems Beta Lyr and UW CMa, which are believed to be undergoing dynamic mass transfer, recent Copernicus observations show that the gas giving rise to the prominent ultraviolet emission lines surrounds the entire binary system rather than merely component two. Implications of these observations are also discussed.

  4. Fuel cell system configurations

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Cyphers, Joseph A.

    1981-01-01

    Fuel cell stack configurations having elongated polygonal cross-sectional shapes and gaskets at the peripheral faces to which flow manifolds are sealingly affixed. Process channels convey a fuel and an oxidant through longer channels, and a cooling fluid is conveyed through relatively shorter cooling passages. The polygonal structure preferably includes at least two right angles, and the faces of the stack are arranged in opposite parallel pairs.

  5. Radionuclides in groundwater flow system understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erőss, Anita; Csondor, Katalin; Horváth, Ákos; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Surbeck, Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Using radionuclides is a novel approach to characterize fluids of groundwater flow systems and understand their mixing. Particularly, in regional discharge areas, where different order flow systems convey waters with different temperature, composition and redox-state to the discharge zone. Radium and uranium are redox-sensitive parameters, which causes fractionation along groundwater flow paths. Discharging waters of regional flow systems are characterized by elevated total dissolved solid content (TDS), temperature and by reducing conditions, and therefore with negligible uranium content, whereas local flow systems have lower TDS and temperature and represent oxidizing environments, and therefore their radium content is low. Due to the short transit time, radon may appear in local systems' discharge, where its source is the soil zone. However, our studies revealed the importance of FeOOH precipitates as local radon sources throughout the adsorption of radium transported by the thermal waters of regional flow systems. These precipitates can form either by direct oxidizing of thermal waters at discharge, or by mixing of waters with different redox state. Therefore elevated radon content often occurs in regional discharge areas as well. This study compares the results of geochemical studies in three thermal karst areas in Hungary, focusing on radionuclides as natural tracers. In the Buda Thermal Karst, the waters of the distinct discharge areas are characterized by different temperature and chemical composition. In the central discharge area both lukewarm (20-35°C, 770-980 mg/l TDS) and thermal waters (40-65°C, 800-1350 mg/l TDS), in the South only thermal water discharge (33-43°C, 1450-1700 mg/l TDS) occur. Radionuclides helped to identify mixing of fluids and to infer the temperature and chemical composition of the end members for the central discharge area. For the southern discharge zone mixing components could not be identified, which suggests different cave

  6. Mechanical response of tumor cells flowing through a microfluidic capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zeina S.; Kamyabi, Nabiollah; Hussain, Fazle; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells, the primary cause of cancer metastasis, are transported throughout the body to distant organs by blood flow. Despite the importance of cell transport and deformability in the vasculature for cancer metastasis, quantitative understanding of the hydrodynamic interactions between the cells and the blood vessel walls is lacking. Using a model microfluidic capillary of rectangular cross-section with an on-chip manometer coupled with high speed video imaging, we quantitatively investigate the hydrodynamic behavior via the cell excess pressure drop. By characterizing our device with simple model systems including viscous drops and soft elastic particles, we find that the excess pressure drop shows no apparent dependence on elastic modulus or interfacial tension, but depends significantly on internal viscosity for moderate confinements and shear stresses within the physiological range of 1-10 Pa. This suggests that the metastatic potential of circulating cells can be characterized by the effective viscosity. We test this hypothesis with several tumor cell lines and find that the effective cell viscosity determined from excess pressure drop measurements can be used to differentiate highly from lowly invasive cells.

  7. Patterning of cell-instructive hydrogels by hydrodynamic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Steffen; Allazetta, Simone; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2013-06-07

    Microfluidic gradient systems offer a very precise means to probe the response of cells to graded biomolecular signals in vitro, for example to model how morphogen proteins affect cell fate during developmental processes. However, existing gradient makers are designed for non-physiological plastic or glass cell culture substrates that are often limited in maintaining the phenotype and function of difficult-to-culture mammalian cell types, such as stem cells. To address this bottleneck, we combine hydrogel engineering and microfluidics to generate tethered protein gradients on the surface of biomimetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Here we used software-assisted hydrodynamic flow focusing for exposing and rapidly capturing tagged proteins to gels in a step-wise fashion, resulting in immobilized gradients of virtually any desired shape and composition. To render our strategy amenable for high-throughput screening of multifactorial artificial cellular microenvironments, a dedicated microfluidic chip was devised for parallelization and multiplexing, yielding arrays of orthogonally overlapping gradients of up to 4 × 4 proteins. To illustrate the power of the platform for stem cell biology, we assessed how gradients of tethered leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) influence embryonic stem cell (ESC) behavior. ESC responded to LIF gradients in a binary manner, maintaining the pluripotency marker Rex1/Zfp42 and forming self-renewing colonies above a threshold concentration of 85 ng cm(-2). Our concept should be broadly applicable to probe how complex signaling microenvironments influence stem cell fate in culture.

  8. High-throughput continuous flow femtosecond laser-assisted cell optoporation and transfection.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2014-12-01

    We present a femtosecond-laser based nanoprocessing system for transient optical cell membrane poration to allow the introduction of foreign molecules into the interior of a cell with very high throughput. In the setup, cells flow through a micro-flow tube for spatial confinement and are simultaneously targeted by fs laser radiation. Beam-shaping generates a focal geometry along a line which is scanned across the micro-flow cell to increase the number of reachable cells. Successful cell membrane poration was observed indirectly by cell transfection even with cell-light interaction times in the millisecond range. The system was characterized by experiments with Chinese hamster ovary cells regarding cell viability, the uptake of extrinsic molecules and cell transfection efficiency. The continuous flow of cells enables a tremendous increase of cell throughput compared to previous nonflow approaches by treating millions of cells, although with only limited efficiency. The setup opens the possibility to realize a completely automated high-throughput laser-assisted cell-poration system which could be integrated in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  9. Parallel-plate Flow Chamber and Continuous Flow Circuit to Evaluate Endothelial Progenitor Cells under Laminar Flow Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Whitney O.; Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Carlon, Tim A.; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Grenet, Justin E.; Ley, Melissa M.; Haseltine, Justin M.; Galinat, Lauren J.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Allen, Jason D.; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this method is to describe a technique to subject adherent cells to laminar flow conditions and evaluate their response to well quantifiable fluid shear stresses1. Our flow chamber design and flow circuit (Fig. 1) contains a transparent viewing region that enables testing of cell adhesion and imaging of cell morphology immediately before flow (Fig. 11A, B), at various time points during flow (Fig. 11C), and after flow (Fig. 11D). These experiments are illustrated with human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and porcine EPCs2,3. This method is also applicable to other adherent cell types, e.g. smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or fibroblasts. The chamber and all parts of the circuit are easily sterilized with steam autoclaving. In contrast to other chambers, e.g. microfluidic chambers, large numbers of cells (> 1 million depending on cell size) can be recovered after the flow experiment under sterile conditions for cell culture or other experiments, e.g. DNA or RNA extraction, or immunohistochemistry (Fig. 11E), or scanning electron microscopy5. The shear stress can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of the perfusate, the fluid viscosity, or the channel height and width. The latter can reduce fluid volume or cell needs while ensuring that one-dimensional flow is maintained. It is not necessary to measure chamber height between experiments, since the chamber height does not depend on the use of gaskets, which greatly increases the ease of multiple experiments. Furthermore, the circuit design easily enables the collection of perfusate samples for analysis and/or quantification of metabolites secreted by cells under fluid shear stress exposure, e.g. nitric oxide (Fig. 12)6. PMID:22297325

  10. Parallel-plate flow chamber and continuous flow circuit to evaluate endothelial progenitor cells under laminar flow shear stress.

    PubMed

    Lane, Whitney O; Jantzen, Alexandra E; Carlon, Tim A; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Grenet, Justin E; Ley, Melissa M; Haseltine, Justin M; Galinat, Lauren J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Allen, Jason D; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2012-01-17

    The overall goal of this method is to describe a technique to subject adherent cells to laminar flow conditions and evaluate their response to well quantifiable fluid shear stresses. Our flow chamber design and flow circuit (Fig. 1) contains a transparent viewing region that enables testing of cell adhesion and imaging of cell morphology immediately before flow (Fig. 11A, B), at various time points during flow (Fig. 11C), and after flow (Fig. 11D). These experiments are illustrated with human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and porcine EPCs. This method is also applicable to other adherent cell types, e.g. smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or fibroblasts. The chamber and all parts of the circuit are easily sterilized with steam autoclaving. In contrast to other chambers, e.g. microfluidic chambers, large numbers of cells (> 1 million depending on cell size) can be recovered after the flow experiment under sterile conditions for cell culture or other experiments, e.g. DNA or RNA extraction, or immunohistochemistry (Fig. 11E), or scanning electron microscopy. The shear stress can be adjusted by varying the flow rate of the perfusate, the fluid viscosity, or the channel height and width. The latter can reduce fluid volume or cell needs while ensuring that one-dimensional flow is maintained. It is not necessary to measure chamber height between experiments, since the chamber height does not depend on the use of gaskets, which greatly increases the ease of multiple experiments. Furthermore, the circuit design easily enables the collection of perfusate samples for analysis and/or quantification of metabolites secreted by cells under fluid shear stress exposure, e.g. nitric oxide (Fig. 12).

  11. Aerodynamic Flow Field Measurements for Automotive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, Timothy E.

    1999-01-01

    The design of a modern automotive air handling system is a complex task. The system is required to bring the interior of the vehicle to a comfortable level in as short a time as possible. A goal of the automotive industry is to predict the interior climate of an automobile using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods. The development of these advanced prediction tools will enable better selection of engine and accessory components. The goal of this investigation was to predict methods used by the automotive industry. To accomplish this task three separate experiments were performed. The first was a laboratory setup where laser velocimeter (LV) flow field measurements were made in the heating and air conditioning unit of a Ford Windstar. The second involved flow field measurements in the engine compartment of a Ford Explorer, with the engine running idle. The third mapped the flow field exiting the center dashboard panel vent inside the Explorer, while the circulating fan operated at 14 volts. All three experiments utilized full-coincidence three-component LV systems. This enabled the mean and fluctuating velocities to be measured along with the Reynolds stress terms.

  12. Systems cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Fred D.; Ratushny, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology. PMID:25225336

  13. High-throughput magnetic flow sorting of human cells selected on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Lisa M.; Sanders, Lehanna; Kennedy, David; Guernsey, Byron; Todd, Paul; Leary, James F.

    2010-02-01

    We have shown the potential of a new method for optimizing the separation of human stem cell subsets from peripheral blood based on a novel cell labeling technique that leverages the capabilities of a new commercially available high speed magnetic cell sorting system (IKOTECH LLC, New Albany, IN). This new system sorts cells in a continuously flowing manner using a Quadrupole Magnetic cell Sorter (QMS). The sorting mechanism is based upon the magnetophoretic mobility of the cells, a property related to the relative binding distributions of magnetic particles per cell, as determined by the utilization of a Magnetic Cell Tracking Velocimeter (MCTV). KG-1 cells were competitively labeled with anti-CD34 magnetic beads and anti-CD34 FITC to obtain an optimal level of magnetophoretic mobility as visualized by the MCTV for high throughput sort recovery in the QMS. In QMS sorting, the concept of split-flow thin channel (SPLITT) separation technology is applied by having a sample stream enter a vertical annular flow channel near the channel's interior wall followed by another sheath flow entering near the exterior wall. The two flows are initially separated by a flow splitter. They pass through the bore of a Halbach permanent quadrupole magnet assembly, which draws magnetized cells outward and deflects them into a positive outflow, while negative cells continue straight out via the inner flow lamina. QMS sorts cells based upon their magnetophoretic mobility, or the velocity of a cell per unit ponderomotive force, the counterpart of fluorescence intensity in flow cytometry. The magnetophoretic mobility distribution of a cell population, measured by automated MCTV, is used as input data for the algorithmic control of sample, sheath, and outlet flow velocities of the QMS. In this study, the relative binding distributions of magnetic particles per cell were determined by MCTV using novel sorting and sizing algorithms. The resulting mobility histograms were used to set the QMS

  14. A microfluidic system for automatic cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Wei; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-07-01

    This study presents a new chip capable of automating the cell culture process by using microfluidic technology. This microfluidic cell culture system comprising microheaters, a micro temperature sensor, micropumps, microvalves, microchannels, a cell culture area and several reservoirs was fabricated by using micro-electro-mechanical-systems' fabrication processes. Traditional manual cell culture processes can be performed on this chip. A uni-directional pneumatic micropump was developed to transport the culture reagents and constraint the solutions to flow only in one direction, safeguarding the entire culture process from contamination. A new micro check valve was also used to prevent the culture solutions from flowing back into the microchannels. The microheaters and the micro temperature sensor were used to maintain a constant temperature during the cell culturing process. The pH value suitable for cell growth was also regulated during the cell culture process. A typical cell culturing process for human lung cancer cells (A549) was successfully performed to demonstrate the capability of the developed microfluidic system. This automatic cell culturing system can be eventually integrated with subsequent microfluidic modules for cell purification, collection, counting and lysis to form a cell-based micro-total-analysis system. Preliminary results have been presented in The Asia-Pacific Conference of Transducers and Micro-Nano Technology (APCOT), 25-28 June 2006

  15. Bio-cathode materials evaluation and configuration optimization for power output of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland - microbial fuel cell systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shentan; Song, Hailiang; Wei, Size; Yang, Fei; Li, Xianning

    2014-08-01

    To optimize the performance of a vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell (CW-MFC), studies of bio-cathode materials and reactor configurations were carried out. Three commonly used bio-cathode materials including stainless steel mesh (SSM), carbon cloth (CC) and granular activated carbon (GAC) were compared and evaluated. GAC-SSM bio-cathode achieved the highest maximum power density of 55.05 mWm(-2), and it was most suitable for CW-MFCs application because of its large surface area and helpful capillary water absorption. Two types of CW-MFCs with roots were constructed, one was placed in the anode and the other was placed in the cathode. Both planted CW-MFCs obtained higher power output than non-planted CW-MFC. Periodic voltage fluctuations of planted CW-MFCs were caused by light/dark cycles, and the influent substrate concentration significantly affected the amplitude of oscillation. The coulombic efficiencies of CW-MFCs decreased greatly with the increase of the influent substrate concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  17. Alternative flow cytometry strategies to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Peiris, Tanuja Harshani; García‐Ojeda, Marcos E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Planarians possess remarkable stem cell populations that continuously support cellular turnover and are instrumental in the regeneration of tissues upon injury. Cellular turnover and tissue regeneration in planarians rely on the proper integration of local and systemic signals that regulate cell proliferation and cell death. Thus, understanding the signals controlling cellular proliferation and cell death in planarians could provide valuable insights for maintenance of adult body homeostasis and the biology of regeneration. Flow cytometry techniques have been utilized widely to identify, isolate, and characterize planarian stem cell populations. We developed alternative flow cytometry strategies that reduce the number of reagents and the time of sample preparation to analyze stem cells and cell death in planarians. The sensitivity of these methods is validated with functional studies using RNA interference and treatment with  γ irradiation or stressful conditions that are known to trigger cell death. Altogether, we provide a community resource intended to minimize adverse effects during ex vivo studies of stem cells and cell death in planarians. PMID:27307993

  18. Recovery modeling of tangential flow systems.

    PubMed

    Rao, Suma; Gefroh, Eva; Kaltenbrunner, Oliver

    2012-12-01

    The demand for increased formulation concentrations for protein therapeutics puts a significant strain on already existing tangential flow filtration (TFF) systems that were constructed with lower protein concentration targets as part of their design criteria. TFF is commonly used to buffer exchange and concentrate the product to the appropriate drug substance concentration. Analyzing the ability of an existing TFF system to process under conditions outside its original design specifications can be challenging. In this analysis, we present a systematic approach to assess the operational limits of a TFF process with consideration of system performance parameters for changing process targets. In two new engineering diagrams, the recovery efficiency diagram and the operating space plot, all relevant operational constraints and parameters are related to allow rapid process fit evaluation. The engineering assessment of TFF systems presented in this article allows a rational review of system limitations during process fit evaluations of existing TFF systems. It also provides a rational basis for targeted system upgrades and setting system design specifications for the design of new systems if existing systems are found inadequate. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3 mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67 kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3 mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7 mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  20. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In vivo cell characteristic extraction and identification by photoacoustic flow cytography

    PubMed Central

    He, Guo; Xu, Dong; Qin, Huan; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    We present a photoacoustic flow cytography with fast cross-sectional (B-scan) imaging to precisely identify specific cells in vivo. The B-scan imaging speed of the system is up to 200 frame/s with a lateral resolution of 1.5 μm, which allows to dynamically image the flowing cells within the microvascular. The shape, size and photoacoustic intensity of the target cells are extracted from streaming images and integrated into a standard pattern to distinguish cell types. Circulating red blood cells and melanoma cells in blood vessels are simultaneously identified on melanoma-bearing mouse model. The results demonstrate that in vivo photoacoustic flow cytography can provide cells characteristics analysis and cell type’s visual identification, which will be applied for noninvasively monitoring circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and analyzing hematologic diseases. PMID:26504626

  2. Method for Studying Microbial Biofilms in Flowing-Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Karsten

    1982-01-01

    A method for the study of microbial biofilms in flowing-water systems was developed with special reference to the flow conditions in electrochemical concentration cells. Seawater was circulated in a semiclosed flow system through biofilm reactors (3 cm s−1) with microscope cover slips arranged in lamellar piles parallel with the flow. At fixed time intervals cover slips with their biofilm were removed from the pile, stained with crystal violet, and mounted on microscope slides. The absorbances of the slides were measured at 590 nm and plotted against time to give microbial biofilm development. From calibration experiments a staining time of 1 min and a rinse time of 10 min in a tap water flow (3 cm s−1) were considered sufficient. When an analysis of variance was performed on biofilm development data, 78% of the total variance was found to be due to random natural effects; the rest could be explained by experimental effects. The absorbance values correlated well with protein N, dry weight, and organic weight in two biofilm experiments, one with a biofilm with a high (75%) and one with a low (∼25%, normal) inorganic content. Comparisons of regression lines revealed that the absorbance of the stained biofilms was an estimate closely related to biofilm dry weight. PMID:16345929

  3. Flow Induced Electrification of Liquid Insulated Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washabaugh, Andrew Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The transport or motion of semi-insulating liquids has led to flow induced static electrification and catastrophic failures in several industries. While techniques for reducing the hazard have been developed, the roles of seemingly important parameters are poorly understood. The objective of this thesis was to measure and understand the fundamental parameters of the flow electrification process that, together with the laws of electroquasistatics and physicochemical hydrodynamics, can be used to predict the performance of complex flow systems, with particular attention to transformer applications. A rotating cylindrical electrode apparatus, which provided cylindrical Couette flow, was used to simulate flow electrification in an electric power transformer. The apparatus had Shell Diala A transformer oil filling the annulus between coaxial cylindrical stainless steel electrodes that were either bare metal, or covered by a thin copper sheet and/or EHV-Weidmann HiVal pressboard insulation. Extensive experiments characterized the time transient and steady state behavior of the electrification through measurements of the volume charge density, the terminal voltage, and the terminal current as the system was driven out of equilibrium by changes in the flow rate (inner cylinder rotation rates of 100-1400 rpm, Reynolds numbers of 5 times 10^3-5 times 10^5), temperature (15-70 ^circ), insulation moisture content (0.5-20 ppm in the oil), applied voltage (0-2 kV DC), and concentration of the non-ionizable anti-static additive 1,2,3 benzotriazole (BTA, 0-60 ppm). Generally, the electrification increased with flow rate and temperature but the BTA appeared to cause competing effects: it decreased the volume charge density on the liquid side of the interface (by a factor of 4), which reduces the electrification, but also decreased the oil conductivity (by a factor of 10), which enhances the electrification. A critical oil BTA concentration of 5 -8 ppm minimized the electrification

  4. Carbon Nanotube Based Flow-Through Electrochemical Cell for Electroanalysis.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Andrea; Erel, Yigal; Mandler, Daniel

    2016-11-15

    A flow-through electrode made of a carbon nanotubes (CNT) film deposited on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane was assembled and employed for the determination of low concentration of copper as a model system by linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry (LSASV). CNT films with areal mass ranging from 0.12 to 0.72 mg cm(-2) were characterized by measurement of sheet resistance, water permeation flux and capacitance. Moreover, CNT with two different sizes and PTFE membrane with two different pore diameters (0.45 and 5.0 μm) were evaluated during the optimization of the electrode. Thick layers made of small CNT exhibited the lowest sheet resistance and the greatest analytical response, whereas thin layers of large CNT had the lowest capacitance and the highest permeation flux. Electrodes made of 0.12 mg cm(-2) of large CNT deposited on 5.0 μm PTFE enabled sufficiently high mass transfer and collection efficiency for detecting 64 ppt of Cu(II) within 5 min of deposition and 4.0 mL min(-1) flow rate. The analytical response was linear over 4 orders of magnitude (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) of Cu(II). The excellent performance of the flow-through CNT membrane integrated in a flow cell makes it an appealing approach not only for electroanalysis, but also for the electrochemical treatment of waters, such as the removal of low concentrations of heavy metals and organics.

  5. Lymphatic vessel development: fluid flow and valve-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kume, Tsutomu

    2015-08-03

    Hemodynamic forces regulate many aspects of blood vessel disease and development, including susceptibility to atherosclerosis and remodeling of primary blood vessels into a mature vascular network. Vessels of the lymphatic circulatory system are also subjected to fluid flow-associated forces, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these forces regulate the formation and maintenance of lymphatic vessels remain largely uncharacterized. This issue of the JCI includes two articles that begin to address how fluid flow influences lymphatic vessel development and function. Sweet et al. demonstrate that lymph flow is essential for the remodeling of primary lymphatic vessels, for ensuring the proper distribution of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and for the development and maturation of lymphatic valves. Kazenwadel et al. show that flow-induced lymphatic valve development is initiated by the upregulation of GATA2, which has been linked to lymphedema in patients with Emberger syndrome. Together, these observations and future studies inspired by these results have potential to lead to the development of strategies for the treatment of lymphatic disorders.

  6. Collection of in vivo-like liver cell secretome with alternative sample enrichment method using a hollow fiber bioreactor culture system combined with tangential flow filtration for secretomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Chang, Yu-Chen; Lin, Lung-Cheng; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2011-01-17

    A hollow fiber bioreactor (HFB) culture system coupled with a tangential flow filtration (TFF) device was used for HepG2 cell secretome analysis. In order to reduce the loss of low-molecular-weight proteins, two new features, the hollow fiber with 0.1 μm pore size and a TFF device with a membrane of 1kDa molecular weight cutoff, were added to the system described previously. The HFB culture system and the conventional dish culture method for secretome collection were compared side by side. It was observed that only a small fraction of cells (<0.01%) were lysed in the HFB culture system, in contrast to the 2.73% in the conventional dish culture. A total of 111 proteins were identified in the collected conditioned medium (CM) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with this improved collection procedure. Many of these proteins reported to be biomarkers for liver-related diseases. About 16% of the identified proteins were smaller than 20kDa, demonstrating that the modified collection system had the ability to reduce the loss of low-molecular-weight proteins, in contrast to our previous collection system. The percentage increase of proteins classified as extracellular space or plasma membrane between the conventional dish culture and the HFB culture system was 40-60%. We believed that in vivo-like culture environments could support liver cells to improve protein secretion than conventional dish cultures. We suggest that the combination of the HFB culture system, TFF device, and LC-MS/MS analysis, would be an efficient procedure for the collection and characterization of in vivo-like cell secretome. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell Maintenance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Living human cells require attachment to a suitable surface and special culture conditions in order to grow. These requirements are modified and amplified when cells are taken into a weightless environment. Special handling and maintenance systems are required for routine laboratory procedures conducted in the Orbiter and in the Spacelab. Methods were developed to maintain cells in special incubators designed for the Orbiter middeck, however, electrophoresis and other experiments require cells to be harvested off of the culture substrate before they can be processed or used. The cell transport assembly (CTA) was flown on STS-8, and results show that improvements are required to maintain adequate numbers of cells in this device longer than 48 hours. The life sciences middeck centrifuge probably can be used, but modifications will be required to transfer cells from the CTA and keep the cells sterile. Automated systems such as the Skylab SO-15 flight hardware and crew operated systems are being evaluated for use on the Space Shuttle, Spacelab, and Space Station research modules.

  8. A bio-inspired aquatic flow sensor using an artificial cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Preston A.; Garrison, Kevin; Leo, Donald J.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2012-04-01

    Receptors known as hair cells give many animals this ability to sense a wide range of stimuli, such as sound, orientation, vibration, and flow. Previous researchers have mimicked natural hair cells by building electromechanical sensor systems that produce an electric response due to the bending of artificial hairs. Inspired by the roles of sensory hairs in fish, this work builds on previous research by investigating the flow dependent electrical response of a 'skin'-encapsulated artificial hair cell in an aqueous flow. This study presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a flow sensor that will help close the loop between the sensing mechanisms and control strategies that aquatic organisms employ for functions such as locomotion regulation, prey capture, and particulate capture. The system is fabricated with a durable, artificial bilayer that forms at the interface between lipid-encased aqueous volumes contained in a flexible encapsulated polyurethane substrate. Flow experiments are conducted by placing the bio-inspired sensor in a flow chamber and subjecting it to pulse-like flows. Specifically, through temporal responses of the measured current and power spectral density (PSD) analysis, our results show that the amplitude and frequency of the current response are related to the flow over the hair. This preliminary study demonstrates that the encapsulated artificial hair cell flow sensor is capable of sensing changes in flow through a mechanoelectrical response and that its sensing capabilities may be altered by varying its surface morphology.

  9. Development of advanced fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gitlow, B.; Meyer, A. P.; Bell, W. F.; Martin, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted continuing the development effort to improve the weight, life, and performance characteristics of hydrogen-oxygen alkaline fuel cells for advanced power systems. These advanced technology cells operate with passive water removal which contributes to a lower system weight and extended operating life. Endurance evaluation of two single cells and two, two-cell plaques was continued. Three new test articles were fabricated and tested. A single cell completed 7038 hours of endurance testing. This cell incorporated a Fybex matrix, hybrid-frame, PPF anode, and a 90 Au/10 Pt cathode. This configuration was developed to extend cell life. Two cell plaques with dedicated flow fields and manifolds for all fluids did not exhibit the cell-to-cell electrolyte transfer that limited the operating life of earlier multicell plaques.

  10. Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance system

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.; Abston, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Traffic management can be thought of as a stochastic queuing process where the serving time at one of its control points is dynamically linked to the global traffic pattern, which is, in turn, dynamically linked to the control point. For this closed-loop system to be effective, the traffic management system must sense and interpret a large spatial projection of data originating from multiple sensor suites. This concept is the basis for the development of a Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) system. This paper presents the results of a study by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to define the operational specifications and characteristics, to determine the constraints, and to examine the state of technology of a TFWAS system in terms of traffic management and control. In doing so, the functions and attributes of a TFWAS system are mapped into an operational structure consistent with the Intelligent Vehicle Highway System (IVHS) concept and the existing highway infrastructure. This mapping includes identifying candidate sensor suites and establishing criteria, requirements, and performance measures by which these systems can be graded in their ability and practicality to meet the operational requirements of a TFWAS system. In light of this, issues such as system integration, applicable technologies, impact on traffic management and control, and public acceptance are addressed.

  11. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Chen, Zongzheng; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Xie, Handi; Qin, Kairong

    2016-06-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the relationship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the traditional ones, which have been only based upon either stagnation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addition, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and conveniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  12. Measuring Cell Viscoelastic Properties Using a Microfluidic Extensional Flow Device.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Lionel; Dahl, Joanna B; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Barakat, AbduI I; Husson, Julien; Muller, Susan J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of cellular mechanical properties is of tremendous interest in biology and medicine. Recent microfluidic technologies that infer cellular mechanical properties based on analysis of cellular deformations during microchannel traversal have dramatically improved throughput over traditional single-cell rheological tools, yet the extraction of material parameters from these measurements remains quite complex due to challenges such as confinement by channel walls and the domination of complex inertial forces. Here, we describe a simple microfluidic platform that uses hydrodynamic forces at low Reynolds number and low confinement to elongate single cells near the stagnation point of a planar extensional flow. In tandem, we present, to our knowledge, a novel analytical framework that enables determination of cellular viscoelastic properties (stiffness and fluidity) from these measurements. We validated our system and analysis by measuring the stiffness of cross-linked dextran microparticles, which yielded reasonable agreement with previously reported values and our micropipette aspiration measurements. We then measured viscoelastic properties of 3T3 fibroblasts and glioblastoma tumor initiating cells. Our system captures the expected changes in elastic modulus induced in 3T3 fibroblasts and tumor initiating cells in response to agents that soften (cytochalasin D) or stiffen (paraformaldehyde) the cytoskeleton. The simplicity of the device coupled with our analytical model allows straightforward measurement of the viscoelastic properties of cells and soft, spherical objects.

  13. Modeling of a thermally integrated 10 kWe planar solid oxide fuel cell system with anode offgas recycling and internal reforming by discretization in flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Stefanie; Segarra, Ana Gallet; Horstmann, Peter; Carré, Maxime; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Lapicque, François; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power production (CHP) based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is a very promising technology to achieve high electrical efficiency to cover power demand by decentralized production. This paper presents a dynamic quasi 2D model of an SOFC system which consists of stack and balance of plant and includes thermal coupling between the single components. The model is implemented in Modelica® and validated with experimental data for the stack UI-characteristic and the thermal behavior. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results demonstrates the validity of the model. Different operating conditions and system configurations are tested, increasing the net electrical efficiency to 57% by implementing an anode offgas recycle rate of 65%. A sensitivity analysis of characteristic values of the system like fuel utilization, oxygen-to-carbon ratio and electrical efficiency for different natural gas compositions is carried out. The result shows that a control strategy adapted to variable natural gas composition and its energy content should be developed in order to optimize the operation of the system.

  14. Complete degradation of the azo dye Acid Orange-7 and bioelectricity generation in an integrated microbial fuel cell, aerobic two-stage bioreactor system in continuous flow mode at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Eustace; Keshavarz, Taj; Kyazze, Godfrey

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the commercially used model azo dye Acid Orange-7 (AO-7) was fully degraded into less toxic intermediates using an integrated microbial fuel cell (MFC) and aerobic bioreactor system. The integrated bioreactor system was operated at ambient temperature and continuous-flow mode. AO-7 loading rate was varied during experiments from 70gm(-3)day(-1) to 210gm(-3)day(-1). Colour and soluble COD removal rates reached>90% under all AO-7 loading rates. The MFC treatment stage prompted AO-7 to undergo reductive degradation into its constituent aromatic amines. HPLC-MS analysis of metabolite extracts from the aerobic stage of the bioreactor system indicated further oxidative degradation of the resulting aromatic amines into simpler compounds. Bioluminescence based Vibrio fischeri ecotoxicity testing demonstrated that aerobic stage effluent exhibited toxicity reductions of approximately fivefold and ten-fold respectively compared to the dye wastewater influent and MFC-stage effluent.

  15. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  16. A biofilm model for flowing systems in the food industry.

    PubMed

    den Aantrekker, Esther D; Vernooij, Wouter W; Reij, Martine W; Zwietering, Marcel H; Beumer, Rijkelt R; van Schothorst, Mick; Boom, Remko M

    2003-08-01

    When bacteria attach to the walls of pipelines, they can form biofilms, which can cause the recontamination of food products. In order to quantify such recontamination, a one-dimensional biofilm model was developed taking into account adsorption, desorption, and the growth of cells. The model consisted of two mass balances describing increases in biofilm formation at the wall and the accumulation of cells in the liquid phase. The necessary parameters for the model were obtained in laboratory biofilm experiments. These experiments involved a flowing system and the use of Staphylococcus aureus as a model pathogen and silicon tubing as a testing material. S. aureus was inoculated into the system for 2 h, and then the system was changed to a sterile medium. Both biofilm formation and the release of cells into the flowing liquid were measured until steady-state conditions were reached (for up to 9 days). The experiments were performed in duplicate for different flow conditions (i.e., for Reynolds numbers of 3.2, 32, and 170). It was shown that at higher Reynolds numbers, the biofilm developed faster, probably owing to an increase in the transfer of nutrients to the surface. The proposed biofilm model was capable of describing the data obtained for the three different flow conditions with the use of the specific growth rate in the biofilm and the desorption coefficient as fit parameters. The specific growth rates were 0.16, 0.27, and 0.49 h(-1) for Reynolds numbers of 3.2, 32, and 170, respectively, and the desorption coefficients were about 1% of these values.

  17. The Redox flow system for solar photovoltaic energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, P.; Gahn, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of storage was applied to a solar photovoltaic system. The storage method is a redox flow system which utilizes the oxidation-reduction capability of two soluble electrochemical redox couples for its storage capacity. The particular variant described separates the charging and discharging function of the system such that the electrochemical couples are simultaneously charged and discharged in separate parts of the system. The solar array had 12 solar cells; wired in order to give a range of voltages and currents. The system stored the solar energy so that a load could be run continually day and night. The main advantages of the redox system are that it can accept a charge in the low voltage range and produce a relatively constant output regardless of solar activity.

  18. Red blood cell tracking using optical flow methods.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongmin; van de Ven, Anne L; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of microcirculation is an important task in biomedical and physiological research because the microcirculation information, such as flow velocity and vessel density, is critical to monitor human conditions and develop effective therapies of some diseases. As one of the tasks of the microcirculation study, red blood cell (RBC) tracking presents an effective approach to estimate some parameters in microcirculation. The common method for RBC tracking is based on spatiotemporal image analysis, which requires the image to have high qualification and cells should have fixed velocity. Besides, for in vivo cell tracking, cells may disappear in some frames, image series may have spatial and temporal distortions, and vessel distribution can be complex, which increase the difficulties of RBC tracking. In this paper, we propose an optical flow method to track RBCs. It attempts to describe the local motion for each visible point in the frames using a local displacement vector field. We utilize it to calculate the displacement of a cell in two adjacent frames. Additionally, another optical flow-based method, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) flow, is also presented. The experimental results show that optical flow is quite robust to the case where the velocity of cell is unstable, while SIFT flow works well when there is a large displacement of the cell between two adjacent frames. Our proposed methods outperform other methods when doing in vivo cell tracking, which can be used to estimate the blood flow directly and help to evaluate other parameters in microcirculation.

  19. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  20. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kurt W.; Head, W. Steve

    2013-01-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36−/−). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36+/− and Cx36−/− mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology. PMID:24326425

  1. Connexin 36 mediates blood cell flow in mouse pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Short, Kurt W; Head, W Steve; Piston, David W

    2014-02-01

    The insulin-secreting β-cells are contained within islets of Langerhans, which are highly vascularized. Blood cell flow rates through islets are glucose-dependent, even though there are no changes in blood cell flow within in the surrounding exocrine pancreas. This suggests a specific mechanism of glucose-regulated blood flow in the islet. Pancreatic islets respond to elevated glucose with synchronous pulses of electrical activity and insulin secretion across all β-cells in the islet. Connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions between islet β-cells mediate this synchronization, which is lost in Cx36 knockout mice (Cx36(-/-)). This leads to glucose intolerance in these mice, despite normal plasma insulin levels and insulin sensitivity. Thus, we sought to investigate whether the glucose-dependent changes in intraislet blood cell flow are also dependent on coordinated pulsatile electrical activity. We visualized and quantified blood cell flow using high-speed in vivo fluorescence imaging of labeled red blood cells and plasma. With the use of a live animal glucose clamp, blood cell flow was measured during either hypoglycemia (∼50 mg/dl) or hyperglycemia (∼300 mg/dl). In contrast to the large glucose-dependent islet blood velocity changes observed in wild-type mice, only minimal differences are observed in both Cx36(+/-) and Cx36(-/-) mice. This observation supports a novel model where intraislet blood cell flow is regulated by the coordinated electrical activity in the islet β-cells. Because Cx36 expression and function is reduced in type 2 diabetes, the resulting defect in intraislet blood cell flow regulation may also play a significant role in diabetic pathology.

  2. A Multichannel Dampened Flow System for Studies on Shear Stress-Mediated Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Voyvodic, Peter L.; Min, Daniel; Baker, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    Shear stresses are powerful regulators of cellular function and potent mediators of the development of vascular disease. We have designed and optimized a system allowing the application of flow to cultured cells in a multichannel format. By using a multichannel peristaltic pump, flow can be driven continuously in the system for long-term studies in multiple isolated flow loops. A key component of the system is a dual-chamber pulse dampener that removes the pulsatility of the flow without the need for having an open system or elevated reservoir. We optimized the design parameters of the pulse dampening chambers for the maximum reduction in flow pulsation while minimizing the fluid needed for each isolated flow channel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to steady and pulsatile shear stress using the system. We found that cells under steady flow had a marked increased production of eNOS and formation of actin stress fibers in comparison to those under pulsatile flow conditions. Overall, the results confirm the utility of the device as a practical means to apply shear stress to cultured cells in the multichannel format and provide steady, long term flow to microfluidic devices. PMID:22836694

  3. Gyrotactic cells subject to imposed 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas; Richardson, Scott; Baggaley, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    We examine the effect of imposed 3-dimensional test flows, specifically a Taylor-Green Vortex flow and an ABC flow, on the patterns and mixing of suspensions of gyrotactic swimming cells. Numerically solving the deterministic swimming trajectory equations for individual cells with random starting positions, we explore how the surrounding flow and the cell shape determine the long-time patterns. For certain parameter ranges these patterns often take the form of braided ``plume-lie'' structures, even when using the chaotic ABC flow. For various pattern configurations, analysis of the governing equations of motion reveals why they are formed, as analytical solutions of the equations for the swimming cell trajectories can be obtained. These patterns persist when small random perturbations (noise) are added to individual trajectories.

  4. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any vent...

  5. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any vent...

  6. 46 CFR 153.358 - Venting system flow capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Venting system flow capacity. 153.358 Section 153.358 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Venting Systems § 153.358 Venting system flow capacity. (a) The cross-sectional flow area of any vent...

  7. Cell Radiation Experiment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    The cell radiation experiment system (CRES) is a perfused-cell culture apparatus, within which cells from humans or other animals can (1) be maintained in homeostasis while (2) being exposed to ionizing radiation during controlled intervals and (3) being monitored to determine the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage. The CRES can be used, for example, to determine effects of drug, radiation, and combined drug and radiation treatments on both normal and tumor cells. The CRES can also be used to analyze the effects of radiosensitive or radioprotectant drugs on cells subjected to radiation. The knowledge gained by use of the CRES is expected to contribute to the development of better cancer treatments and of better protection for astronauts, medical-equipment operators, and nuclear-power-plant workers, and others exposed frequently to ionizing radiation.

  8. Fuel cell system

    DOEpatents

    Early, Jack; Kaufman, Arthur; Stawsky, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell system is comprised of a fuel cell module including sub-stacks of series-connected fuel cells, the sub-stacks being held together in a stacked arrangement with cold plates of a cooling means located between the sub-stacks to function as electrical terminals. The anode and cathode terminals of the sub-stacks are connected in parallel by means of the coolant manifolds which electrically connect selected cold plates. The system may comprise a plurality of the fuel cell modules connected in series. The sub-stacks are designed to provide a voltage output equivalent to the desired voltage demand of a low voltage, high current DC load such as an electrolytic cell to be driven by the fuel cell system. This arrangement in conjunction with switching means can be used to drive a DC electrical load with a total voltage output selected to match that of the load being driven. This arrangement eliminates the need for expensive voltage regulation equipment.

  9. Systems cell biology.

    PubMed

    Mast, Fred D; Ratushny, Alexander V; Aitchison, John D

    2014-09-15

    Systems cell biology melds high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modeling to understand many critical processes that contribute to cellular organization and dynamics. Recently, there have been several advances in technology and in the application of modeling approaches that enable the exploration of the dynamic properties of cells. Merging technology and computation offers an opportunity to objectively address unsolved cellular mechanisms, and has revealed emergent properties and helped to gain a more comprehensive and fundamental understanding of cell biology. © 2014 Mast et al.

  10. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  11. Single chamber fuel cells: Flow geometry, rate and composition considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Ionel C.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2003-11-17

    Four different single chamber fuel cell designs were compared using propane-air gas mixtures. Gas flow around the electrodes has a significant influence on the open circuit voltage and the power density of the cell. The strong influence of flow geometry is likely due to its effect on gas composition, particularly on the oxygen chemical potential at the two electrodes as a result of gas mixing. The chamber design which exposes the cathode first to the inlet gas was found to yield the best performance at lower flow rates, while the open tube design with the electrodes equally exposed to the inlet gas worked best at higher flow rates.

  12. Refinement Of Hexahedral Cells In Euler Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    Topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement (TIGER) computer program solves Euler equations of three-dimensional, unsteady flow of inviscid, compressible fluid by numerical integration on unstructured hexahedral coordinate grid refined where necessary to resolve shocks and other details. Hexahedral cells subdivided, each into eight smaller cells, as needed to refine computational grid in regions of high flow gradients. Grid Interactive Refinement and Flow-Field Examination (GIRAFFE) computer program written in conjunction with TIGER program to display computed flow-field data and to assist researcher in verifying specified boundary conditions and refining grid.

  13. VLT Data Flow System Begins Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    Building a Terabyte Archive at the ESO Headquarters The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the sum of many sophisticated parts. The site at Cerro Paranal in the dry Atacama desert in Northern Chile is one of the best locations for astronomical observations from the surface of the Earth. Each of the four 8.2-m telescopes is a technological marvel with self-adjusting optics placed in a gigantic mechanical structure of the utmost precision, continuously controlled by advanced soft- and hardware. A multitude of extremely complex instruments with sensitive detectors capture the faint light from distant objects in the Universe and record the digital data fast and efficiently as images and spectra, with a minimum of induced noise. And now the next crucial link in this chain is in place. A few nights ago, following an extended test period, the VLT Data Flow System began providing the astronomers with a steady stream of high-quality, calibrated image and spectral data, ready to be interpreted. The VLT project has entered into a new phase with a larger degree of automation. Indeed, the first 8.2-m Unit Telescope, ANTU, with the FORS1 and ISAAC instruments, has now become a true astronomy machine . A smooth flow of data through the entire system ESO PR Photo 25a/99 ESO PR Photo 25a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 292 pix - 104k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 584 pix - 264k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 2189 pix - 1.5M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 25a/99 : Simplified flow diagramme for the VLT Data Flow System . It is a closed-loop software system which incorporates various subsystems that track the flow of data all the way from the submission of proposals to storage of the acquired data in the VLT Science Archive Facility. The DFS main components are: Program Handling, Observation Handling, Telescope Control System, Science Archive, Pipeline and Quality Control. Arrows indicate lines of feedback. Already from the start of this project more than ten years ago, the ESO Very Large Telescope was

  14. Continuous flow magnetic cell fractionation based on antigen expression level.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas; Moore, Lee R; Jing, Ying; Haam, Seungjoo; Williams, P Stephen; Fleischman, Aaron J; Roy, Shuvo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2006-07-31

    Cell separation is important in medical and biological research and plays an increasingly important role in clinical therapy and diagnostics, such as rare cancer cell detection in blood. The immunomagnetic labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanospheres gives rise to a proportional relationship between the number of magnetic nanospheres attached to the cell and the cell surface marker number. This enables the potential fractionation of cell populations by magnetophoretic mobility (MM). We exploit this feature with our apparatus, the Dipole Magnet Flow Fractionator (DMFF), which consists of an isodynamic magnetic field, an orthogonally-oriented thin ribbon of cell suspension in continuous sheath flow, and ten outlet flows. From a sample containing a 1:1 mixture of immunomagnetically labeled (label+) and unlabeled (label-) cells, we achieved an increase in enrichment of the label+ cell fraction with increasing outlet numbers in the direction of the magnetic field gradient (up to 10-fold). The total recovery of the ten outlet fractions was 90.0+/-7.7%. The mean MM of label+ cells increased with increasing outlet number by up to a factor of 2.3. The postulated proportionality between the number of attached magnetic beads and the number of cell surface markers was validated by comparison of MM measured by cell tracking velocimetry (CTV) with cell florescence intensity measured by flow cytometry.

  15. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  16. Laser rastering flow cytometry: fast cell counting and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacca, G.; Junnarkar, M. R.; Goldblatt, N. R.; Yee, M. W.; Van Slyke, B. M.; Briese, T. C.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the concept of laser rastering flow cytometry, where a rapidly scanning laser beam allows counting and classification of cells at much higher rates than currently possible. Modifications to existing flow cytometers to implement the concept include an acousto-optic deflector, fast analog-to-digital conversion, and a two-step digital-signal-processing scheme that handles the high data rates and provides key assay information. Results are shown that prove the concept, demonstrating the ability to resolve closely spaced cells and to measure cells at rates more than an order of magnitude faster than on conventional flow-cytometer-based hematology analyzers.

  17. Microfluidic flow cell for sequential digestion of immobilized proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Erik T; Trkulja, Carolina L; Olofsson, Jessica; Millingen, Maria; Wikström, Jennie; Jesorka, Aldo; Karlsson, Anders; Karlsson, Roger; Davidson, Max; Orwar, Owe

    2012-07-03

    We have developed a microfluidic flow cell where stepwise enzymatic digestion is performed on immobilized proteoliposomes and the resulting cleaved peptides are analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The flow cell channels consist of two parallel gold surfaces mounted face to face with a thin spacer and feature an inlet and an outlet port. Proteoliposomes (50-150 nm in diameter) obtained from red blood cells (RBC), or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, were immobilized on the inside of the flow cell channel, thus forming a stationary phase of proteoliposomes. The rate of proteoliposome immobilization was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) which showed that 95% of the proteoliposomes bind within 5 min. The flow cell was found to bind a maximum of 1 μg proteoliposomes/cm(2), and a minimum proteoliposome concentration required for saturation of the flow cell was determined to be 500 μg/mL. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies showed an even distribution of immobilized proteoliposomes on the surface. The liquid encapsulated between the surfaces has a large surface-to-volume ratio, providing rapid material transfer rates between the liquid phase and the stationary phase. We characterized the hydrodynamic properties of the flow cell, and the force acting on the proteoliposomes during flow cell operation was estimated to be in the range of 0.1-1 pN, too small to cause any proteoliposome deformation or rupture. A sequential proteolytic protocol, repeatedly exposing proteoliposomes to a digestive enzyme, trypsin, was developed and compared with a single-digest protocol. The sequential protocol was found to detect ~65% more unique membrane-associated protein (p < 0.001, n = 6) based on peptide analysis with LC-MS/MS, compared to a single-digest protocol. Thus, the flow cell described herein is a suitable tool for shotgun proteomics on proteoliposomes, enabling more detailed characterization

  18. Study of planarian stem cell proliferation by means of flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Ermakov, Artem M; Ermakova, Olga N; Kudravtsev, Andrei A; Kreshchenko, Natalia D

    2012-03-01

    The stem cells in freshwater flatworms (planarian) are called neoblasts. Neoblasts are capable of proliferation and differentiation into every cell type, including the gametes. For the investigation of the mechanisms of stem cells proliferation and differentiation the proper evaluation of changes in the cell cycle of neoblasts in different physiological conditions of planarian is necessary. In the present study the possibility of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the neoblasts population were investigated using flow cytometry. In the cell suspension prepared from planarian tissue proliferating neoblasts have been observed in heterogenic cell population. Quantitative estimation of the cell cycle related changes of planarian stem cells system have been performed in various physiological conditions (intact and regenerating animals) and under the influence of physical (ionizing radiation) and chemical (melatonin and colchicine) factors. The modified protocol for planarian stem cells isolation proved to be effective and reproducible and can be recommended for flow cytometry analyses of human and animal proliferating cells.

  19. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  20. Design of flow chamber with electronic cell volume capability and light detection optics for multilaser flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schuette, W H; Shackney, S E; Plowman, F A; Tipton, H W; Smith, C A; MacCollum, M A

    1984-11-01

    A multibeam optical detection system has been developed with a high optical efficiency, achieved through a reduction in the number of optical interfaces employed in the system. This reduction is made possible by a combination of employing simple lenses, gluing the objective lens directly upon the face of the flow cuvette and the extraction of only one fluorescence signal from each laser beam. A modified flow chamber is also described that includes fluidic resistance elements for the elimination of most of the electric shielding normally associated with electronic cell volume measurements.

  1. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  2. Viscoplastic flow in a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, Neil; Hewitt, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the flow of viscoplastic fluid through a Hele-Shaw cell that contains various kinds of obstructions. Circular and elliptical blockages of the cell are considered together with step-wise contractions or expansions in slot width, all within the simplifying approximation of a narrow gap. Specific attention is paid to the flow patterns that develop around the obstacles, particularly any stagnant plugged regions, and the asymptotic limits of relatively small or large yield stress. Periodic arrays of circular contractions or expansions are studied to explore the interference between obstructions. Finally, viscoplastic flow through a cell with randomly roughened walls is examined, and it is shown that constructive interferences of local contractions and expansions leads to a pronounced channelization of the flow. An optimization algorithm based on minimisation of the pressure drop is derived to construct the path of the channels in the limit of relatively large yield stress or, equivalently, relatively slow flow.

  3. Plug flow cytometry extends analytical capabilities in cell adhesion and receptor pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B S; Kuckuck, F W; Prossnitz, E R; Okun, A; Ransom, J T; Sklar, L A

    2001-03-01

    Plug flow cytometry is a recently developed system for the automated delivery of multiple small boluses or "plugs" of cells or particles to the flow cytometer for analysis. Important system features are that sample plugs are of precisely defined volume and that the sample vessel need not be pressurized. We describe how these features enable direct cell concentration determinations and novel ways to integrate flow cytometers with other analytical instruments. Adhesion assays employed human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) loaded with Fura Red and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cotransfected with genes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human P-selectin. U937 cells expressing the human 7-transmembrane formyl peptide receptor were loaded with the fluorescent probe indo-1 for intracellular ionized calcium determinations. A computer-controlled syringe or peristaltic pump loaded the sample into a sample loop of the plug flow coupler, a reciprocating eight-port valve. When the valve position was switched, the plug of sample in the sample loop was transported to the flow cytometer by a pressure-driven fluid line. In stirred mixtures of PMNs and CHO cells, we used plug flow cytometry to directly quantify changes in concentrations of nonadherent singlet PMNs. This approach enabled accurate quantification of adherent PMNs in multicell aggregates. We constructed a novel plug flow interface between the flow cytometer and a cone-plate viscometer to enable real-time flow cytometric analysis of cell-cell adhesion under conditions of uniform shear. The High Throughput Pharmacology System (HTPS) is an instrument used for automated programming of complex pharmacological cell treatment protocols. It was interfaced via the plug flow coupling device to enable rapid (< 5 min) flow cytometric characterization of the intracellular calcium dose-response profile of U937 cells to formyl peptide. By facilitating the coupling of flow cytometers to other fluidics-based analytical

  4. A pumpless perfusion cell culture cap with two parallel channel layers keeping the flow rate constant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woo; Yi, Sang Hyun; Ku, Bosung; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel pumpless perfusion cell culture cap, the gravity-driven flow rate of which is kept constant by the height difference of two parallel channel layers. Previous pumpless perfusion cell culture systems create a gravity-driven flow by means of the hydraulic head difference (Δh) between the source reservoir and the drain reservoir. As more media passes from the source reservoir to the drain reservoir, the source media level decreases and the drain media level increases. Thus, previous works based on a gravity-driven flow were unable to supply a constant flow rate for the perfusion cell culture. However, the proposed perfusion cell culture cap can supply a constant flow rate, because the media level remains unchanged as the media moves laterally through each channel having same media level. In experiments, using the different fluidic resistances, the perfusion cap generated constant flow rates of 871 ± 27 μL h(-1) and 446 ± 11 μL h(-1) . The 871 and 446 μL h(-1) flow rates replace the whole 20 mL medium in the petri dish with a fresh medium for days 1 and 2, respectively. In the perfusion cell (A549 cell line) culture with the 871 μL h(-1) flow rate, the proposed cap can maintain a lactate concentration of about 2200 nmol mL(-1) and an ammonia concentration of about 3200 nmol mL(-1) . Moreover, although the static cell culture maintains cell viability for 5 days, the perfusion cell culture with the 871 μL h(-1) flow rate can maintain cell viability for 9 days. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  5. Mechanical Control of Cell flow in Multicellular Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delarue, Morgan; Montel, Fabien; Caen, Ouriel; Elgeti, Jens; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François; Cappello, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Collective cell motion is observed in a wide range of biological processes. In tumors, physiological gradients of nutrients, growth factors, or even oxygen give rise to gradients of proliferation. We show using fluorescently labeled particles that these gradients drive a velocity field resulting in a cellular flow in multicellular spheroids. Under mechanical stress, the cellular flow is drastically reduced. We describe the results with a hydrodynamic model that considers only convection of the particles by the cellular flow.

  6. Chaotic dynamics of red blood cells in oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Cordasco, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A 3D computational study of deformable red blood cells in dilute suspension and subject to sinusoidally oscillating shear flow is considered. It is observed that the cell exhibits either a periodic motion or a chaotic motion. In the periodic motion, the cell reverses its orientation either about the flow direction or about the flow gradient, depending on the initial conditions. In certain parameter range, the initial conditions are forgotten and the cells become entrained in the same sequence of horizontal reversals. The chaotic dynamics is characterized by a nonperiodic sequence of horizontal and vertical reversals, and swings. The study provides the first conclusive evidence of the chaotic dynamics of fully deformable cells in oscillating flow using a deterministic numerical model without the introduction of any stochastic noise. An analysis of the chaotic dynamics shows that chaos is only possible in certain frequency bands when the cell membrane can rotate by a certain amount allowing the cells to swing near the maximum shear rate. We make a novel observation that the occurrence of the vertical or horizontal reversal depends only on whether a critical angle, that is independent of the flow frequency, is exceeded at the instant of flow reversal.

  7. Continuous, flow-through immunomagnetic cell sorting in a quadrupole field.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Zborowski, M; Moore, L R; Chalmers, J J

    1998-12-01

    A flow-through quadrupole magnetic cell separator has been designed, built, and evaluated by using a cell model system of human peripheral T lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, and CD45+ cells). The immunomagnetic labeling was accomplished by using a sandwich of mouse anti-human monoclonal antibody conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate and rat anti-mouse polyclonal antibody conjugated to a colloidal magnetic nanoparticle. The feed and sorted fractions were analyzed by FACScan flow cytometry. The magnetically labeled cells were separated from nonlabeled ones in a flow-through cylindrical column within a quadrupole field, which exerted a radial, outward force on the magnetic cells. The flow rate of the cell samples was 0.1-0.75 ml/min, and the flow rate of sheath fluid was 1.5-33.3 times that of the sample flow rate. The maximum shear stress exerted on the cell was less than 1 dyne/cm2, which was well below the level that would threaten cell integrity and membrane disruption. The maximum magnetic field was 0.765 T at the channel wall, and the gradient was 0.174 T/mm. The highest purity of selected cells was 99.6% (CD8 cells, initial purity of 26%), and the highest recovery of selected cells was 79% (CD4 cells, initial purity of 20%). The maximum throughput of the quadrupole magnetic cell separator was 7,040 cells/s (CD45 cells, initial purity of 5%). Theoretical calculations showed that the throughput can be increased to 10(6) cells/s by a scale-up of the current prototype.

  8. Stochastic uncertainty analysis for unconfined flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Gaisheng; Zhang, Dongxiao; Lu, Zhiming

    2006-01-01

    A new stochastic approach proposed by Zhang and Lu (2004), called the Karhunen-Loeve decomposition-based moment equation (KLME), has been extended to solving nonlinear, unconfined flow problems in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. This approach is on the basis of an innovative combination of Karhunen-Loeve decomposition, polynomial expansion, and perturbation methods. The random log-transformed hydraulic conductivity field (InKS) is first expanded into a series in terms of orthogonal Gaussian standard random variables with their coefficients obtained as the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the covariance function of InKS- Next, head h is decomposed as a perturbation expansion series ??A(m), where A(m) represents the mth-order head term with respect to the standard deviation of InKS. Then A(m) is further expanded into a polynomial series of m products of orthogonal Gaussian standard random variables whose coefficients Ai1,i2(m)...,im are deterministic and solved sequentially from low to high expansion orders using MODFLOW-2000. Finally, the statistics of head and flux are computed using simple algebraic operations on Ai1,i2(m)...,im. A series of numerical test results in 2-D and 3-D unconfined flow systems indicated that the KLME approach is effective in estimating the mean and (co)variance of both heads and fluxes and requires much less computational effort as compared to the traditional Monte Carlo simulation technique. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. Recent advances in energy based modeling of combustion instabilities require accurate determination of acoustic frequencies and mode shapes. Of particular interest is the acoustic mean flow interactions within the converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients of pressure, density, and velocity become large. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The present study aims to implement the French model within the COMSOL Multiphysiscs framework and analyzes one of the author's presented test cases.

  10. Cell exclusion in couette flow: evaluation through flow visualization and mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laura J; Marshall, Lindsay J; Devitt, Andrew; Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff D

    2013-03-01

    Cell exclusion is the phenomenon whereby the hematocrit and viscosity of blood decrease in areas of high stress. While this is well known in naturally occurring Poiseuille flow in the human body, it has never previously been shown in Couette flow, which occurs in implantable devices including blood pumps. The high-shear stresses that occur in the gap between the boundaries in Couette flow are known to cause hemolysis in erythrocytes. We propose to mitigate this damage by initiating cell exclusion through the use of a spiral-groove bearing (SGB) that will provide escape routes by which the cells may separate themselves from the plasma and the high stresses in the gap. The force between two bearings (one being the SGB) in Couette flow was measured. Stained erythrocytes, along with silver spheres of similar diameter to erythrocytes, were visualized across a transparent SGB at various gap heights. A reduction in the force across the bearing for human blood, compared with fluids of comparable viscosity, was found. This indicates a reduction in the viscosity of the fluid across the bearing due to a lowered hematocrit because of cell exclusion. The corresponding images clearly show both cells and spheres being excluded from the gap by entering the grooves. This is the first time the phenomenon of cell exclusion has been shown in Couette flow. It not only furthers our understanding of how blood responds to different flows but could also lead to improvements in the future design of medical devices.

  11. Piezoelectric Microvalve for Flow Control in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, B.A.; Vipperman, J.S.; Clark, W.; Hensel, J.P.; Thornton, J.D.; Kim. S.

    2006-11-01

    Maldistribution of fuel across the cells of a fuel cell stack is an issue that can contribute to poor cell performance and possible cell failure. It has been proposed that an array of microvalves could promote even distribution of fuel across a fuel cell stack. A piezoelectric microvalve has been developed for this purpose. This valve can be tuned to a nominal flow rate (and failure position) from which the actuator would either increase or decrease the flow rate and fuel. The valve can successfully regulate the flow of fuel from 0.7 to 1.1 slpm of hydrogen in the range of temperatures from 80° to 100°C and has been tested over pressure drops from 0.5 to 1 psi. A bank of these valves is currently being tested in a four-cell stack at the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  12. Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel; Jenkins, James

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a microgravity flow cell in which to study the interaction of a flowing gas with relatively massive particles that collide with each other and with the moving boundaries of the cell. The absence of gravity makes possible the independent control of the relative motion of the boundaries and the flow of the gas. The cell will permit gas-particle interactions to be studied over the entire range of flow conditions over which the mixture is not turbulent. Within this range, we shall characterize the viscous dissipation of the energy of the particle fluctuations, measure the influence of particle-phase viscosity on the pressure drop along the cell, and observe the development of localized inhomogeneities that are likely to be associated with the onset of clusters. These measurements and observations should contribute to an understanding of the essential physics of pneumatic transport.

  13. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory motion in solid rocket motors and liquid engines has long been a subject of concern. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. The customary approach to modeling acoustic waves inside a rocket chamber is to apply the classical inhomogeneous wave equation to the combustion gas. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while the acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The converging section of a rocket nozzle, where gradients in pressure, density, and velocity become large, is a notable region where this approach is not applicable. The expulsion of unsteady energy through the nozzle of a rocket is identified as the predominate source of acoustic damping for most rocket systems. An accurate model of the acoustic behavior within this region where acoustic modes are influenced by the presence of a steady mean flow is required for reliable stability predictions. Recently, an approach to address nozzle damping with mean flow effects was implemented by French [1]. This new approach extends the work originated by Sigman and Zinn [2] by solving the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) formulated by perturbing the Euler equations [3]. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, (del squared)(psi) - (lambda/c)(exp 2)(psi) - M(dot)[M(dot)(del)(del(psi))] - 2(lambda(M/c) + (M(dot)del(M))(dot)del(psi)-2(lambda)(psi)[M(dot)del(1/c)]=0 (1) with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and lambda as the complex eigenvalue. French apply the finite volume method to solve the steady flow field within the combustion chamber and nozzle with inviscid walls. The complex eigenvalues and eigenvector are determined with the use of the ARPACK eigensolver. The

  14. FLOCK cluster analysis of plasma cell flow cytometry data predicts bone marrow involvement by plasma cell neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, David M; LaPlante, Charlotte D; Li, Betty

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed plasma cell populations in bone marrow samples from 353 patients with possible bone marrow involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm, using FLOCK (FLOw Clustering without K), an unbiased, automated, computational approach to identify cell subsets in multidimensional flow cytometry data. FLOCK identified discrete plasma cell populations in the majority of bone marrow specimens found by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria to be involved by a plasma cell neoplasm (202/208 cases; 97%), including 34 cases that were negative by standard flow cytometric analysis that included clonality assessment. FLOCK identified discrete plasma cell populations in only a minority of cases negative for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria (38/145 cases; 26%). Interestingly, 55% of the cases negative by standard analysis, but containing a FLOCK-identified discrete plasma cell population, were positive for monoclonal gammopathy by serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation. FLOCK-identified and quantitated plasma cell populations accounted for 3.05% of total cells on average in cases positive for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria, and 0.27% of total cells on average in cases negative for involvement by a plasma cell neoplasm by standard histologic and immunophenotypic criteria (p<0.0001; area under the curve by ROC analysis=0.96). The presence of a FLOCK-identified discrete plasma cell population was predictive of the presence of plasma cell neoplasia with a sensitivity of 97%, compared with only 81% for standard flow cytometric analysis, and had specificity of 74%, PPV of 84% and NPV of 95%. FLOCK analysis, which has been shown to provide useful diagnostic information for evaluating patients with suspected systemic mastocytosis, is able to identify neoplastic plasma cell populations analyzed by flow cytometry, and may be helpful in the diagnostic

  15. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  16. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  17. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    PubMed Central

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance. PMID:28303921

  18. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  19. Mentat: An object-oriented macro data flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimshaw, Andrew S.; Liu, Jane W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Mentat, an object-oriented macro data flow system designed to facilitate parallelism in distributed systems, is presented. The macro data flow model is a model of computation similar to the data flow model with two principal differences: the computational complexity of the actors is much greater than in traditional data flow systems, and there are persistent actors that maintain state information between executions. Mentat is a system that combines the object-oriented programming paradigm and the macro data flow model of computation. Mentat programs use a dynamic structure called a future list to represent the future of computations.

  20. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den

    1997-02-11

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  1. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  2. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  3. Rapid cell isolation by magnetic flow sorting for applications in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, M; Sun, L; Moore, L R; Chalmers, J J

    1999-01-01

    Rapid and efficient cell sorting methods are important for tissue progenitor cell isolation. We built and evaluated a laboratory prototype of a continuous flow, quadrupole magnetic cell sorter. The sorter was tested on a model cell system of human peripheral lymphocytes. The helper T cell subpopulation was targeted by primary, mouse anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody conjugated to a fluorochrome (FITC), and magnetized by secondary, anti-FITC antibody magnetic colloid. The purities and recoveries of the cell fractions were measured by flow cytometry and an automated cell counter. Cells were spread across the flow according to their magnetophoretic mobilities. The purity of the CD4 cell enriched fraction was 99.6%, and the purity of the CD4 cell depleted fraction was 2% for an initial CD4 cell purity of 36%; the corresponding recovery of the enriched CD4 cell fraction was 59% at a sorting speed of 4,200 cells/s (four experiments). The recovery could be increased to 90% with a concomitant decrease in the purity of CD4 cell enriched fraction to 66%. This type of sorting should be applicable to any cells in suspension for which a suitable antibody exists, in particular, to large, fragile cells.

  4. Flow-Through Electroporation of HL-60 White Blood Cell Suspensions using Nanoporous Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Akenhead, Michael A; Sun, Xinghua; Sapper, Harrison; Shin, Hainsworth Y; Hinds, Bruce J

    2016-08-01

    A flow-through electroporation system, based on a novel nanoporous membrane/electrode design, for the delivery of cell wall-impermeant molecules into model leukocytes, HL-60 promyelocytes, was demonstrated. The ability to apply low voltages to cell populations, with nm-scale concentrated electric field in a periodic array, contributes to high cell viability. With applied biases of 1-4V, delivery of target molecules was achieved with 90% viability and up to 65% transfection efficiency. More importantly, the system allowed electrophoretic pumping of molecules from a microscale reservoir across the membrane/electrode system into a microfluidic flow channel for transfection of cells, a design that can reduce reagent amount by eightfold compared to current strategies. The flow-through system, which forces intimate membrane/electrode contact by using a 10μm channel height, can be easily scaled-up by adjusting the microfluidic channel geometry and/or the applied voltage pulse frequency to control cell residence times at the cell membrane/electrode interface. The demonstrated system shows promise in clinical applications where low-cost, high cell viability and high volume transfection methods are needed without the risk of viral vectors. In particular genetic modification of freely mobile white blood cells to either target disease cells or to express desired protein/enzyme biomolecules is an important target platform enabled by this device system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Adhesion of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells on peptide-linked polymers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cooper, Stuart

    2013-05-01

    The initial adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cord blood endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), and human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (HBOECs) was studied under radial flow conditions. The surface of a variable shear-rate device was either coated with polymer films or covered by synthetic fibers. Spin-coating was applied to produce smooth polymer films, while fibrous scaffolds were generated by electrospinning. The polymer was composed of hexyl methacrylate, methyl methacrylate, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA), and CGRGDS peptide. The peptide was incorporated into the polymer system by coupling to an acrylate-PEG-N-hydroxysuccinimide comonomer. A shear-rate-dependent increase of the attached cells with time was observed with all cell types. The adhesion of ECs increased on RGD-linked polymer surfaces compared to polymers without adhesive peptides. The number of attached ECFCs and HBOECs are significantly higher than that of HUVECs within the entire shear-rate range and surfaces examined, especially on RGD-linked polymers at low shear rates. Their superior adhesion ability of endothelial progenitor cells under flow conditions suggests they are a promising source for in vivo seeding of vascular grafts and shows the potential to be used for self-endothelialized implants.

  6. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  7. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  8. Design of a miniature flow cell for in situ x-ray imaging of redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, Rhodri; Brown, Leon D.; Neville, Tobias P.; Millichamp, Jason; Finegan, Donal P.; Heenan, Thomas M. M.; Brett, Dan J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2016-11-01

    Flow batteries represent a possible grid-scale energy storage solution, having many advantages such as scalability, separation of power and energy capabilities, and simple operation. However, they can suffer from degradation during operation and the characteristics of the felt electrodes are little understood in terms of wetting, compression and pressure drops. Presented here is the design of a miniature flow cell that allows the use of x-ray computed tomography (CT) to study carbon felt materials in situ and operando, in both lab-based and synchrotron CT. Through application of the bespoke cell it is possible to observe felt fibres, electrolyte and pore phases and therefore enables non-destructive characterisation of an array of microstructural parameters during the operation of flow batteries. Furthermore, we expect this design can be readily adapted to the study of other electrochemical systems.

  9. Cell flow analysis with a two-photon fluorescence fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ye, Jing Yong; Thomas, Thommey P.; Baker, James R., Jr.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2010-11-01

    We report the use of a sensitive double-clad fiber (DCF) probe for in situ cell flow velocity measurements and cell analysis by means of two-photon excited fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). We have demonstrated the feasibility to use this fiber probe for in vivo two-photon flow cytometry previously. However, because of the viscosity of blood and the non-uniform flow nature in vivo, it is problematic to use the detected cell numbers to estimate the sampled blood volume. To precisely calibrate the sampled blood volume, it is necessary to conduct real time flow velocity measurement. We propose to use FCS technique to measure the flow velocity. The ability to measure the flow velocities of labeled cells in whole blood has been demonstrated. Our two-photon fluorescence fiber probe has the ability to monitor multiple fluorescent biomarkers simultaneously. We demonstrate that we can distinguish differently labeled cells by their distinct features on the correlation curves. The ability to conduct in situ cell flow analysis using the fiber probe may be useful in disease diagnosis or further comprehension of the circulation system.

  10. Upward swimming of a sperm cell in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian sperm cells are required to swim over long distances, typically around 1000-fold their own length. They must orient themselves and maintain a swimming motion to reach the ovum, or egg cell. Although the mechanism of long-distance navigation is still unclear, one possible mechanism, rheotaxis, was reported recently. This work investigates the mechanism of the rheotaxis in detail by simulating the motions of a sperm cell in shear flow adjacent to a flat surface. A phase diagram was developed to show the sperm's swimming motion under different shear rates, and for varying flagellum waveform conditions. The results showed that, under shear flow, the sperm is able to hydrodynamically change its swimming direction, allowing it to swim upwards against the flow, which suggests that the upward swimming of sperm cells can be explained using fluid mechanics, and this can then be used to further understand physiology of sperm cell navigation.

  11. Measuring sickle cell morphology in flow using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviatkovsky, Inna; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Dann, Eldad J.; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-02-01

    During a sickle cell crisis in sickle cell anemia patients, deoxygenated red blood cells may change their mechanical properties and block small blood vessels, causing pain, local tissue damage and even organ failure. Measuring these cellular structural and morphological changes is important for understanding the factors contributing to vessel blockage and developing an effective treatment. In this work, we use spectrally encoded flow cytometry for confocal, high-resolution imaging of flowing blood cells from sickle cell anemia patients. A wide variety of cell morphologies were observed by analyzing the interference patterns resulting from reflections from the front and back faces of the cells' membrane. Using numerical simulation for calculating the two-dimensional reflection pattern from the cells, we propose an analytical expression for the three-dimensional shape of a characteristic sickle cell and compare it to a previous from the literature. In vitro spectrally encoded flow cytometry offers new means for analyzing the morphology of sickle cells in stress-free environment, and could provide an effective tool for studying the unique physiological properties of these cells.

  12. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  13. Water injected fuel cell system compressor

    DOEpatents

    Siepierski, James S.; Moore, Barbara S.; Hoch, Martin Monroe

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

  14. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  15. Personal Computer System for Automatic Coronary Venous Flow Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Dew, Robert B.

    1985-01-01

    We developed an automated system based on an IBM PC/XT Personal computer to measure coronary venous blood flow during cardiac catheterization. Flow is determined by a thermodilution technique in which a cold saline solution is infused through a catheter into the coronary venous system. Regional temperature fluctuations sensed by the catheter are used to determine great cardiac vein and coronary sinus blood flow. The computer system replaces manual methods of acquiring and analyzing temperature data related to flow measurement, thereby increasing the speed and accuracy with which repetitive flow determinations can be made.

  16. Microtopography and flow modulate the direction of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Uttayarat, P; Chen, M; Li, M; Allen, F D; Composto, R J; Lelkes, P I

    2008-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells under flow can be modulated by the addition of chemical or mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate how topographic cues derived from a substrate containing three-dimensional microtopography interact with fluid shear stress in directing endothelial cell migration. Subconfluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates patterned with a combinatorial array of parallel and orthogonal microgrooves ranging from 2 to 5 microm in width at a constant depth of 1 microm. During a 4-h time-lapse observation in the absence of flow, the majority of the prealigned cells migrated parallel to the grooves with the distribution of their focal adhesions (FAs) depending on the groove width. No change in this migratory pattern was observed after the cells were exposed to moderate shear stress (13.5 dyn/cm(2)), irrespective of groove direction with respect to flow. After 4-h exposure to high shear stress (58 dyn/cm(2)) parallel to the grooves, the cells continued to migrate in the direction of both grooves and flow. By contrast, when microgrooves were oriented perpendicular to flow, most cells migrated orthogonal to the grooves and downstream with flow. Despite the change in the migration direction of the cells under high shear stress, most FAs and actin microfilaments maintained their original alignment parallel to the grooves, suggesting that topographic cues were more effective than those derived from shear stress in guiding the orientation of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins during the initial exposure to flow.

  17. Review of hybrid laminar flow control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, K. S. G.; Bertram, O.; Seibel, O.

    2017-08-01

    The aeronautic community always strived for fuel efficient aircraft and presently, the need for ecofriendly aircraft is even more, especially with the tremendous growth of air traffic and growing environmental concerns. Some of the important drivers for such interests include high fuel prices, less emissions requirements, need for more environment friendly aircraft to lessen the global warming effects. Hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) technology is promising and offers possibility to achieve these goals. This technology was researched for decades for its application in transport aircraft, and it has achieved a new level of maturity towards integration and safety and maintenance aspects. This paper aims to give an overview of HLFC systems research and associated flight tests in the past years both in the US and in Europe. The review makes it possible to distinguish between the successful approaches and the less successful or outdated approaches in HLFC research. Furthermore, the technology status shall try to produce first estimations regarding the mass, power consumption and performance of HLFC systems as well as estimations regarding maintenance requirements and possible subsystem definitions.

  18. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  19. Liquid flow cells having graphene on nitride for microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Adiga, Vivekananda P.; Dunn, Gabriel; Zettl, Alexander K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to liquid flow cells for microscopy. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate having a first and a second oxide layer disposed on surfaces of the substrate. A first and a second nitride layer are disposed on the first and second oxide layers, respectively. A cavity is defined in the first oxide layer, the first nitride layer, and the substrate, with the cavity including a third nitride layer disposed on walls of the substrate and the second oxide layer that define the cavity. A channel is defined in the second oxide layer. An inlet port and an outlet port are defined in the second nitride layer and in fluid communication with the channel. A plurality of viewports is defined in the second nitride layer. A first graphene sheet is disposed on the second nitride layer covering the plurality of viewports.

  20. Selecting MODFLOW cell sizes for accurate flow fields.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H; Kelson, V; de Lange, W

    2001-01-01

    Contaminant transport models often use a velocity field derived from a MODFLOW flow field. Consequently, the accuracy of MODFLOW in representing a ground water flow field determines in part the accuracy of the transport predictions, particularly when advective transport is dominant. We compared MODFLOW ground water flow rates and MODPATH particle traces (advective transport) for a variety of conceptual models and different grid spacings to exact or approximate analytic solutions. All of our numerical experiments concerned flow in a single confined or semiconfined aquifer. While MODFLOW appeared robust in terms of both local and global water balance, we found that ground water flow rates, particle traces, and associated ground water travel times are accurate only when sufficiently small cells are used. For instance, a minimum of four or five cells are required to accurately model total ground water inflow in tributaries or other narrow surface water bodies that end inside the model domain. Also, about 50 cells are needed to represent zones of differing transmissivities or an incorrect flow field and (locally) inaccurate ground water travel times may result. Finally, to adequately represent leakage through aquitards or through the bottom of surface water bodies it was found that the maximum allowable cell dimensions should not exceed a characteristic leakage length lambda, which is defined as the square root of the aquifer transmissivity times the resistance of the aquitard or stream bottom. In some cases a cell size of one-tenth of lambda is necessary to obtain accurate results.

  1. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    1998-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  2. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  3. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

    1998-08-25

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

  4. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  5. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling.

  6. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    PubMed

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data.

  7. Understanding and modeling alternating tangential flow filtration for perfusion cell culture.

    PubMed

    Kelly, William; Scully, Jennifer; Zhang, Di; Feng, Gang; Lavengood, Mathew; Condon, Jason; Knighton, John; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Alternating tangential flow (ATF) filtration has been used with success in the Biopharmaceutical industry as a lower shear technology for cell retention with perfusion cultures. The ATF system is different than tangential flow filtration; however, in that reverse flow is used once per cycle as a means to minimize fouling. Few studies have been reported in the literature that evaluates ATF and how key system variables affect the rate at which ATF filters foul. In this study, an experimental setup was devised that allowed for determination of the time it took for fouling to occur for given mammalian (PER.C6) cell culture cell densities and viabilities as permeate flow rate and antifoam concentration was varied. The experimental results indicate, in accordance with D'Arcy's law, that the average resistance to permeate flow (across a cycle of operation) increases as biological material deposits on the membrane. Scanning electron microscope images of the post-run filtration surface indicated that both cells and antifoam micelles deposit on the membrane. A unique mathematical model, based on the assumption that fouling was due to pore blockage from the cells and micelles in combination, was devised that allowed for estimation of sticking factors for the cells and the micelles on the membrane. This model was then used to accurately predict the increase in transmembane pressure during constant flux operation for an ATF cartridge used for perfusion cell culture.

  8. Pockels-effect cell for gas-flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weimer, D.

    1982-01-01

    A Pockels effect cell using a 75 cu cm DK*P crystal was developed and used as a gas flow simulator. Index of refraction gradients were produced in the cell by the fringing fields of parallel plate electrodes. Calibration curves for the device were obtained for index of refraction gradients in excess of .00025 m.

  9. Stimulated migration and penetration of vascular endothelial cells into poly (L-lactic acid) scaffolds under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Koo, Min-Ah; Kang, Jae Kyeong; Lee, Mi Hee; Seo, Hyok Jin; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; You, Kyung Eun; Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Dohyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    The initial procedure of the development of engineered tissues is cell seeding into three-dimensional polymer scaffolds. However, it is hard to make the cells invade into scaffold due to the characteristic of pore and material. Electrospun poly (L-lactic acid) scaffold and flow perfusion system were used to overcome these seeding problems. Before starting the experiment, we set up the parallel plate chamber system to observe endothelial cell migration under flow condition. In individual cell migration model, human umbilical endothelial cells started to migrate in the direction of flow at 8 dyne/cm(2) and we observed the cytoskeleton alignment at 8 dyne/cm(2). This study has demonstrated the possibility to evaluate and analyze cell migration using the parallel plate chamber system and we may predict in vivo cell migration under flow condition based on these results. Also the flow perfusion system was established for the effective cell seeding into at three dimensional scaffolds. Moreover, shear stress induced by flow can enhance cell migration into PLLA scaffold that is in the form of cotton. Result indicated that cell penetration was achieved under flow condition better and more than under static condition throughout the matrix.

  10. Ordered and chaotic flow of red blood cells flowing in a narrow tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beams, Natalie N.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2013-11-01

    Red blood cells are well known to line up in an orderly arrangement when forced to flow through a narrow capillary-scale round tube (diameter <= 8 μ m). However, in slightly larger tubes, small perturbations from the center of the tube can cause this order to break down, resulting in apparently chaotic flow. Investigating this breakdown using a high-fidelity boundary integral solver for flowing blood cells, we show the existence of a bifurcation point for the appearance of this non-orderly behavior. The bifurcation point is found to be dependent on the diameter of the tube and the density of the cells, with more cells required to instigate chaotic behavior in smaller tubes (e.g., 27.5% cells by volume for a 11.28 μ m diameter tube, but only 5.63% for similar behavior in a tube twice that width). Increasing the cell interior viscosity is also observed to increase the amplification of perturbations. Additionally, as a counterpoint, we show that cells flowing chaotically in D = 12 μ m tubes, apparently indefinitely, will slowly organize into a regular single file if D is decreased to D = 10 μ m. Supported by NSF.

  11. Polymer-based micro flow sensor for dynamical flow measurements in hydraulic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, R.; Festa, M.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a micro flow sensor from a polymer for dynamical flow measurements in hydraulic systems. The flow sensor is based on the thermal anemometric principle and consists of two micro-structured housing shells from polysulfone (PSU) which form a small fluidic channel with a cross-section of 580 µm × 400 µm. In between there is a thin polyimide membrane supporting three gold track structures forming an electrical heater and two resistive thermometers which allows the detection of the flow direction, too. The complete sensor is inserted into the hydraulic system, but only a small bypass flow is directed through the fluidic channel by means of a special splitting system. Due to its small heat capacity, the sensor is suitable to detect flow pulsations up to about 1200 Hz which allows the sensor to be used for the condition monitoring or preventive maintenance of hydraulic systems.

  12. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Williams, P. Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation. PMID:24141316

  13. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures, require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation.

  14. Paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation. The paper fluidic system consisting of a straight channel connected with expansion regions can generate a fluid flow with a constant flow rate for 10 min without any external pumping devices. The flow bifurcates with a fraction ratio of up to 30 depending on the control parameters of the channel geometry. Utilizing this simple paper-based bifurcation system, we developed a continuous-flow preconcentrator and a field-flow fractionator on a paper platform. Our experimental results show that the continuous-flow preconcentrator can produce a 33-fold enrichment of the ion concentration and that the flow fractionation system successfully separates the charged dyes. Our study suggests simple, cheap ways to construct preconcentration and field-flow fractionation systems for paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (NRF-2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  15. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B

    2016-01-27

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis.

  16. Chaos in an Eulerian Based Model of Sickle Cell Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apori, Akwasi; Harris, Wesley

    2001-11-01

    A novel Eulerian model describing the manifestation of sickle cell blood flow in the capillaries has been formulated to study the apparently chaotic onset of sickle cell crises. This Eulerian model was based on extending previous models of sickle cell blood flow which were limited due to their Lagrangian formulation. Oxygen concentration, red blood cell velocity, cell stiffness, and plasma viscosity were modeled as system state variables. The governing equations of the system were expressed in canonical form. The non-linear coupling of velocity-viscosity and viscosity- stiffness proved to be the origin of chaos in the system. The system was solved with respect to a control parameter representing the unique rheology of the sickle cell erythrocytes. Results of chaos tests proved positive for various ranges of the control parameter. The results included con-tinuous patterns found in the Poincare section, spectral broadening of the Fourier power spectrum, and positive Lyapunov exponent values. The onset of chaos predicted by this sickle cell flow model as the control parameter was varied appeared to coincide with the change from a healthy state to a crisis state in a sickle cell patient. This finding that sickle cell crises may be caused from the well understood change of a solution from a steady state to chaotic could point to new ways in preventing and treating crises and should be validated in clinical trials.

  17. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis. PMID:26816215

  18. Margination of White Blood Cells in Microcapillary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Fornleitner, Julia; Gompper, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Margination of white blood cells (WBCs) towards vessel walls is an essential precondition for their efficient adhesion to the vascular endothelium. We perform numerical simulations with a two-dimensional blood flow model to investigate the dependence of WBC margination on hydrodynamic interactions of blood cells with the vessel walls, as well as on their collective behavior and deformability. We find WBC margination to be optimal in intermediate ranges of red blood cell (RBC) volume fractions and flow rates, while, beyond these ranges, it is substantially attenuated. RBC aggregation enhances WBC margination, while WBC deformability reduces it. These results are combined in state diagrams, which identify WBC margination for a wide range of flow and cell suspension conditions.

  19. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2016-12-20

    The present invention includes an integrated planar, series connected fuel cell system having electrochemical cells electrically connected via interconnects, wherein the anodes of the electrochemical cells are protected against Ni loss and migration via an engineered porous anode barrier layer.

  20. New flow cytometric assays for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zaritskaya, Liubov; Shurin, Michael R; Sayers, Thomas J; Malyguine, Anatoli M

    2010-01-01

    The exact immunologic responses after vaccination that result in effective antitumor immunity have not yet been fully elucidated and the data from ex vivo T-cell assays have not yet defined adequate surrogate markers for clinical efficacy. A more detailed knowledge of the specific immune responses that correlate with positive clinical outcomes should help to develop better or novel strategies to effectively activate the immune system against tumors. Furthermore, clinically relevant material is often limited and, thus, precludes the ability to perform multiple assays. The two main assays currently used to monitor lymphocyte-mediated cytoxicity in cancer patients are the 51Cr-release assay and IFN-γ ELISpot assay. The former has a number of disadvantages, including low sensitivity, poor labeling and high spontaneous release of isotope from some tumor target cells. Additional problems with the 51Cr-release assay include difficulty in obtaining autologous tumor targets, and biohazard and disposal problems for the isotope. The ELISpot assays do not directly measure cytotoxic activity and are, therefore, a surrogate marker of cyotoxic capacity of effector T cells. Furthermore, they do not assess cytotoxicity mediated by the production of the TNF family of death ligands by the cytotoxic cells. Therefore, assays that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several parameters may be more advantageous for clinical monitoring. In this respect, multifactor flow cytometry-based assays are a valid addition to the currently available immunologic monitoring assays. Use of these assays will enable detection and enumeration of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their specific effector functions and any correlations with clinical responses. Comprehensive, multifactor analysis of effector cell responses after vaccination may help to detect factors that determine the success or failure of a vaccine and its immunological potency. PMID:20518716

  1. New flow cytometric assays for monitoring cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zaritskaya, Liubov; Shurin, Michael R; Sayers, Thomas J; Malyguine, Anatoli M

    2010-06-01

    The exact immunologic responses after vaccination that result in effective antitumor immunity have not yet been fully elucidated and the data from ex vivo T-cell assays have not yet defined adequate surrogate markers for clinical efficacy. A more detailed knowledge of the specific immune responses that correlate with positive clinical outcomes should help to develop better or novel strategies to effectively activate the immune system against tumors. Furthermore, clinically relevant material is often limited and, thus, precludes the ability to perform multiple assays. The two main assays currently used to monitor lymphocyte-mediated cytoxicity in cancer patients are the (51)Cr-release assay and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The former has a number of disadvantages, including low sensitivity, poor labeling and high spontaneous release of isotope from some tumor target cells. Additional problems with the (51)Cr-release assay include difficulty in obtaining autologous tumor targets, and biohazard and disposal problems for the isotope. The ELISpot assays do not directly measure cytotoxic activity and are, therefore, a surrogate marker of cyotoxic capacity of effector T cells. Furthermore, they do not assess cytotoxicity mediated by the production of the TNF family of death ligands by the cytotoxic cells. Therefore, assays that allow for the simultaneous measurement of several parameters may be more advantageous for clinical monitoring. In this respect, multifactor flow cytometry-based assays are a valid addition to the currently available immunologic monitoring assays. Use of these assays will enable detection and enumeration of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their specific effector functions and any correlations with clinical responses. Comprehensive, multifactor analysis of effector cell responses after vaccination may help to detect factors that determine the success or failure of a vaccine and its immunological potency.

  2. Design, evaluation, and application of continuous-flow cells for organic electrochemical synthesis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nobe, K.

    1982-09-30

    Two examples of the oxidation and reduction of aldehydes as a paired synthesis have been studied. These are model systems for potential energy savings in organic electrochemical synthesis. Both are indirect processes; the reduction via alkali metal amalgam and the oxidation via hypobromite. One, using furfural as the substrate, has proved unsuccessful due to the oxidation of its reduction products with the electrogenerated oxidant, bromine. The other paired synthesis, using glucose, has been operated successfully in two types of parallel plate flow cells and two types of porous, packed bed flow cells. To date, the optimum electrode materials and operating conditions for the glucose paired reaction, as determined by product yields and current efficiencies, are an amalgamated zinc cathode, a graphite anode, an initial glucose concentration of 0.8M, a 0.8M NaBr supporting electrolyte and an electrolyte flow rate of 0.8 1/min. Both constant current (10 mA/cm/sup 2/) and constant cathode potential (-2.10V vs SCE) electrolyses were performed under the above conditions. Electrolyses carried out in the parallel plate flow cell and the packed bed flow cell in which the current and electrolyte flow are parallel to one another gave comparable results. Lower current efficiencies were obtained in the porous, packed bed flow cell with perpendicular current and flow. The reasons for the poorer results in the perpendicular configuration cell are not known at this time and further experimentation is required with this system. The current efficiencies and yields of both the oxidation reaction (the production of gluconic acid) and the reduction reaction (the formation of sorbitol) in the packed bed cells were found to be dependent on solution pH.

  3. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  4. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  5. Input/Output operations for hybrid data-flow/control-flow systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evripidou, P.; Gaudiot, J.L.

    1991-12-31

    Hybrid data-flow/control-flow system combine the advantages of the data-flow model: functionality and tolerance to communication and memory latencies with the efficient instruction scheduling of the control-flow model. The absence of global state in such hybrid multiprocessors and multiprocessors in general renders the implementation of state tasks such as Input/Output operations very difficult to implement. A distributed file-pointer scheme for incorporations I/O operations onto the data-flow model has been developed. A dependency detection algorithm detects and classify cases of potential access conflicts. A conflict resolution data-flow graph is then created which at execution time safely distributes file-pointers to the I/O actors. This scheme has also been implemented on a hybrid a data-flow control-flow multiprocessor: the Decoupled Data-Driven Multiprocessor with Variable Resolution Actors.

  6. SIGNAL FLOW GRAPH ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CONTROL SYSTEMS, *MECHANICS, *STRUCTURES, *THERMODYNAMICS, *TOPOLOGY, BEAMS(ELECTROMAGNETIC), BEAMS(STRUCTURAL), GAS FLOW, GEARS, HEAT EXCHANGERS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, MATHEMATICS, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING , RAMJET ENGINES.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of transport phenomena in fuel cells and flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ao; Shyy, Wei; Zhao, Tianshou

    2017-06-01

    Fuel cells and flow batteries are promising technologies to address climate change and air pollution problems. An understanding of the complex multiscale and multiphysics transport phenomena occurring in these electrochemical systems requires powerful numerical tools. Over the past decades, the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method has attracted broad interest in the computational fluid dynamics and the numerical heat transfer communities, primarily due to its kinetic nature making it appropriate for modeling complex multiphase transport phenomena. More importantly, the LB method fits well with parallel computing due to its locality feature, which is required for large-scale engineering applications. In this article, we review the LB method for gas-liquid two-phase flows, coupled fluid flow and mass transport in porous media, and particulate flows. Examples of applications are provided in fuel cells and flow batteries. Further developments of the LB method are also outlined.

  8. Enhancing cell viability with pulsating flow in a hollow fiber bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diem T; Brotherton, John D; Chau, Pao C

    2005-10-01

    A pulsating flow of medium was used to alleviate diffusion and transport limitations in a hollow fiber bioreactor containing a human hepatoblastoma cell line. The strategy is easy to implement but effective. The pulsating flow is introduced by a solenoid pinch valve at the outlet of the bioreactor and regulated by a timing circuit. In a permeability test, the system with pulsating flow had much less membrane fouling as compared to the control, a conventional hollow fiber unit. In hepatocyte culture test runs, the pulsating-flow bioreactor demonstrated the ability to maintain a higher cell viability. Histological sections indicated significantly smaller necrotic regions in the pulsating-flow bioreactor as compared to the conventional unit.

  9. How cells flow in the spreading of cellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Beaune, Grégory; Stirbat, Tomita Vasilica; Khalifat, Nada; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Garcia, Simon; Gurchenkov, Vasily Valérïévitch; Murrell, Michael P; Dufour, Sylvie; Cuvelier, Damien; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2014-06-03

    Like liquid droplets, cellular aggregates, also called "living droplets," spread onto adhesive surfaces. When deposited onto fibronectin-coated glass or polyacrylamide gels, they adhere and spread by protruding a cellular monolayer (precursor film) that expands around the droplet. The dynamics of spreading results from a balance between the pulling forces exerted by the highly motile cells at the periphery of the film, and friction forces associated with two types of cellular flows: (i) permeation, corresponding to the entry of the cells from the aggregates into the film; and (ii) slippage as the film expands. We characterize these flow fields within a spreading aggregate by using fluorescent tracking of individual cells and particle imaging velocimetry of cell populations. We find that permeation is limited to a narrow ring of width ξ (approximately a few cells) at the edge of the aggregate and regulates the dynamics of spreading. Furthermore, we find that the subsequent spreading of the monolayer depends heavily on the substrate rigidity. On rigid substrates, the migration of the cells in the monolayer is similar to the flow of a viscous liquid. By contrast, as the substrate gets softer, the film under tension becomes unstable with nucleation and growth of holes, flows are irregular, and cohesion decreases. Our results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of the environment influence the balance of forces that modulate collective cell migration, and therefore have important implications for the spreading behavior of tissues in both early development and cancer.

  10. Endothelial colony forming cells and mesenchymal progenitor cells form blood vessels and increase blood flow in ischemic muscle.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Kuppermann, David; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Bischoff, Joyce

    2017-04-10

    Here we investigated whether endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) and mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPC) form vascular networks and restore blood flow in ischemic skeletal muscle, and whether host myeloid cells play a role. ECFC + MPC, ECFC alone, MPC alone, or vehicle alone were injected into the hind limb ischemic muscle one day after ligation of femoral artery and vein. At day 5, hind limbs injected with ECFC + MPC showed greater blood flow recovery compared with ECFC, MPC, or vehicle. Tail vein injection of human endothelial specific Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I demonstrated an increased number of perfused human vessels in ECFC + MPC compared with ECFC. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed ECFC persisted for 14 days in ECFC + MPC-injected hind limbs. Flow cytometric analysis of ischemic muscles at day 2 revealed increased myeloid lineage cells in ECFC + MPC-injected muscles compared to vehicle-injected muscles. Neutrophils declined by day 7, while the number of myeloid cells, macrophages, and monocytes did not. Systemic myeloid cell depletion with anti-Gr-1 antibody blocked the improved blood flow observed with ECFC + MPC and reduced ECFC and MPC retention. Our data suggest that ECFC + MPC delivery could be used to reestablish blood flow in ischemic tissues, and this may be enhanced by coordinated recruitment of host myeloid cells.

  11. FlowSim/FlowRisk: A code system for studying risk associated with material process flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    The need to study and assess life-cycle risks of Pu release by nuclear warheads during peace time lead to the development of a code suite which could model day to day operations involving nuclear weapons and calculate the associated risk involved in these proceedings. The life-cycle study called LIONSHARE is described in Reference 1. The code that models the flow is called FlowSim. The code that evaluates the associated risk is called FlowRisk. We shall concentrate here on the methodology used by FlowSim in modeling material flows. FlowRisk, mainly a postprocessor of FlowSim runs, will be dealt with in less detail.

  12. Cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells, cross-flow reactors, and use of cross-flow reactors for oxidation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Poeppel, Roger B.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Udovich, Carl A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention discloses cross-flow electrochemical reactor cells containing oxygen permeable materials which have both electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity, cross-flow reactors, and electrochemical processes using cross-flow reactor cells having oxygen permeable monolithic cores to control and facilitate transport of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas stream to oxidation reactions of organic compounds in another gas stream. These cross-flow electrochemical reactors comprise a hollow ceramic blade positioned across a gas stream flow or a stack of crossed hollow ceramic blades containing a channel or channels for flow of gas streams. Each channel has at least one channel wall disposed between a channel and a portion of an outer surface of the ceramic blade, or a common wall with adjacent blades in a stack comprising a gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material of a perovskite structure having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. The invention includes reactors comprising first and second zones seprated by gas-impervious mixed metal oxide material material having electron conductivity and oxygen ion conductivity. Prefered gas-impervious materials comprise at least one mixed metal oxide having a perovskite structure or perovskite-like structure. The invention includes, also, oxidation processes controlled by using these electrochemical reactors, and these reactions do not require an external source of electrical potential or any external electric circuit for oxidation to proceed.

  13. A comparative flow visualization study of thermocapillary flow in drops in liquid-liquid systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are performed to visualize thermocapillary flow in drops in an immiscible host liquid. The host liquid used is silicone oil. Drops of three different liquids are used, viz, vegetable oil, water-methanol mixture anad pure methanol. Clear evidence of thermocapillary flow is seen in vegetable oil drops. For a mixture of water and methanol (approximately 50-50 by weight), natural convection is seen to dominate the flow outside the drop. Pure methanol drops exhibit thermocapillary flow, but dissolve in silicone oil. A small amount of water added to pure methanol significantly reduces the dissolution. Flow oscillations occur in this system for both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

  14. Flow dependent performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, Daniele; Al-Housseiny, Talal T; Shen, Yi; Akinlawon, Fiyinfoluwa O; Al-Housseiny, Saif T; Hobson, Ronald K; Sahu, Amaresh; Bedkowski, Katherine I; DiChristina, Thomas J; Stone, Howard A

    2014-06-28

    The integration of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) in a microfluidic geometry can significantly enhance the power density of these cells, which would have more active bacteria per unit volume. Moreover, microfluidic MFCs can be operated in a continuous mode as opposed to the traditional batch-fed mode. Here we investigate the effect of fluid flow on the performance of microfluidic MFCs. The growth and the structure of the bacterial biofilm depend to a large extent on the shear stress of the flow. We report the existence of a range of flow rates for which MFCs can achieve maximum voltage output. When operated under these optimal conditions, the power density of our microfluidic MFC is about 15 times that of a similar-size batch MFC. Furthermore, this optimum suggests a correlation between the behaviour of bacteria and fluid flow.

  15. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    culture raceway for biofuel production. According to the proposed flow field design of ARID-HV algal raceway, experiments and numerical simulation have been conducted to understand the enhancement of flow mixing in the flow field of ARID-HV raceway by cutting slots on top of the dam near the dead zones. A new method was proposed to quantitatively evaluate the flow mixing by using the statistics of temporal and spatial distribution of the massless fluid particles (centered in each cell at the inlet surface) in the raceway collecting the data of path-lines of fluid particles from CFD results. It is hoped that this method can be applied to assist the algal raceway flow field design as well as other engineering applications. The third part introduces the details about the construction work of a high temperature molten salt test loop. Because of the limited operating temperature of conventional synthetic oils, in order to obtain higher energy conversion efficiency, higher operating temperature is always desirable in a CSP plant which leads to the requirement of new generation of HTF. Currently, a halide salt eutectic mixture (NaCl-KCl-ZnCl2) as a potential HTF for future CSP applications has been proposed by a multi-institute research team, led by University of Arizona. The thermophysical properties of the halide eutectic salt have been measured. However, this new developed halide eutectic salt has not been tested in a circulating loop at a high operating temperature for the measurement of heat transfer coefficient. It is a significant effort to build such a test system due to extremely high operating temperature. As a consequence, in the third part of this dissertation, details about the design of the lab-scale test system and all the equipment items will be introduced. The investigations included in this dissertation for the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems are of particular interest to the renewable energy engineering community. It is expected

  16. Red blood cells flows in rectilinear microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Anandan, P; Ortiz, D; Intaglietta, M; Cabrales, P J; Bucolo, M

    2015-01-01

    The red blood cells flow in a controlled environment as a microfluidic chip with a rectilinear geometry was investigated. The optical monitoring performed by an automatic Particle Image Velocimetry procedure has allowed a quantitative analysis on flow features. Various parameters such as velocity, shear rate, strain rate, vorticity, divergence were extracted. The comparisons of the results obtained from the different experiments was used for the overall understanding of the RBC movements in different conditions and the establishment of the analysis procedure.

  17. Flow cytometric analysis of inflammatory cells in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Marilena; Sciorati, Clara; Tarozzo, Glauco; Beltramo, Massimiliano

    2002-02-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in cerebral ischemia through activation of microglia and infiltration by leukocytes. Flow cytometry is a well-established method for quantitative and qualitative analysis of inflammatory cells. However, this technique has not been applied to the study of cerebral ischemia inflammation. The aim of this study was to establish a flow cytometric method to measure inflammatory cells in ischemic brain. To perform flow cytometry on brain tissue, we developed 2 cell-isolation methods based on different mechanical dissociation and Percoll gradient separation techniques. The methods were tested on a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Morphological and immunophenotypic analyses, with the use of anti-CD11b, anti-CD45, and alphabeta T-cell receptor antibodies, were employed to identify and quantify inflammatory cells. Both methods gave consistent results in terms of yield and reproducibility. The cell suspension contained granulocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, and neural cells. Morphological and immunophenotypic analyses enabled the identification of a cell-scatter gate (R1a) enriched in inflammatory cells. With both methods, a higher number of events in R1a were recorded in the ischemic hemisphere than in the nonischemic hemisphere (P< or =0.001). CD11b, CD45, and alphabeta T-cell receptor staining confirmed that this augmentation was a reflection of the increase in the number of granulocytes, cells of the monocytic lineage, and lymphocytes. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of ischemic rat brain is feasible and provides a reliable and rapid assay to assess neuroinflammation in experimental models of brain ischemia.

  18. Convective vigour and heat flow in chemically differentiated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Thienen, P.

    2007-05-01

    Parametric models of planets used to study their thermal evolution are generally based on scaling laws for purely thermal convection. However, planetary mantles may be chemically highly differentiated due to partial melting, which may form thick layers of depleted and dehydrated melting residue (e.g. continental roots). This results in inhomogeneity of density, which affects the driving force of convection, and viscosity (through the water content), which directly influences the dynamics of the system. This work investigates the applicability of scaling laws developed for purely thermally convecting systems to chemically differentiated systems representative of planetary mantles. The effects of depletion related buoyancy and melting related dehydration, and particularly the stratified convection patterns which may result from these, are considered. Two different strategies are applied to this end. First, a large number of numerical thermochemical convection experiments are performed, of which the dynamics and heat flow characteristics are studied. Secondly, theoretical approximations are developed from existing scaling laws to describe the heat flow of chemically stratified systems with separately convecting layers. These are tested using numerical simulations. The results show that the presence of a chemical stratification in the mantle may significantly alter heat flow patterns relative to a purely thermally convecting system by either influencing the thickness of the thermal boundary layer or dividing the convecting part of the system in vertically separate cells. This is consistent with recent petrological findings. Although the chemical stratification may be inherently instable against remixing, the present results suggest that the timescales of remixing may be much larger than those of thermal equilibration. Therefore, it is important to consider chemical stratification in thermal evolution models. For present-day Earth conditions and realistic rheological

  19. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, William D.

    1999-01-01

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions.

  20. Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, W.D.

    1999-06-15

    Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

  1. Cortical Flow-Driven Shapes of Nonadherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Heisenberg, C. P.; Voituriez, R.

    2016-01-01

    Nonadherent polarized cells have been observed to have a pearlike, elongated shape. Using a minimal model that describes the cell cortex as a thin layer of contractile active gel, we show that the anisotropy of active stresses, controlled by cortical viscosity and filament ordering, can account for this morphology. The predicted shapes can be determined from the flow pattern only; they prove to be independent of the mechanism at the origin of the cortical flow, and are only weakly sensitive to the cytoplasmic rheology. In the case of actin flows resulting from a contractile instability, we propose a phase diagram of three-dimensional cell shapes that encompasses nonpolarized spherical, elongated, as well as oblate shapes, all of which have been observed in experiment.

  2. Impact of standardization on clinical cell analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Keeney, M; Barnett, D; Gratama, J W

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of flow cytometry from a research tool to a pivotal technology for clinical diagnostic purposes has required significant efforts to standardize methods. The great advantage of flow cytometry is that it's applications are highly amenable to standardization. Here, we review the efforts that have been made for flow cytometric applications in four major fields of clinical cell analysis: CD4+ T-cell enumeration, CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell enumeration, screening for the HLA-B27 antigen and leukemia/lymphoma immunophenotyping. These standardization efforts have been parallelled by the establishment of external quality assessment (EQA) schemes in many countries worldwide. The goal of these EQA exercises has been primarily educa-tional, but their results will increasingly serve as a basis for laboratory accreditation. This important development requires that the EQA schemes, in particular the quality of the distributed samples and the procedures for evaluating the results, meet the highest standards.

  3. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  4. Statistical mixture modeling for cell subtype identification in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cliburn; Feng, Feng; Ottinger, Janet; Foster, David; West, Mike; Kepler, Thomas B

    2008-08-01

    Statistical mixture modeling provides an opportunity for automated identification and resolution of cell subtypes in flow cytometric data. The configuration of cells as represented by multiple markers simultaneously can be modeled arbitrarily well as a mixture of Gaussian distributions in the dimension of the number of markers. Cellular subtypes may be related to one or multiple components of such mixtures, and fitted mixture models can be evaluated in the full set of markers as an alternative, or adjunct, to traditional subjective gating methods that rely on choosing one or two dimensions. Four color flow data from human blood cells labeled with FITC-conjugated anti-CD3, PE-conjugated anti-CD8, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD4, and APC-conjugated anti-CD19 Abs was acquired on a FACSCalibur. Cells from four murine cell lines, JAWS II, RAW 264.7, CTLL-2, and A20, were also stained with FITC-conjugated anti-CD11c, PE-conjugated anti-CD11b, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD8a, and PE-Cy7-conjugated-CD45R/B220 Abs, respectively, and single color flow data were collected on an LSRII. The data were fitted with a mixture of multivariate Gaussians using standard Bayesian statistical approaches and Markov chain Monte Carlo computations. Statistical mixture models were able to identify and purify major cell subsets in human peripheral blood, using an automated process that can be generalized to an arbitrary number of markers. Validation against both traditional expert gating and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines with known mixing proportions was also performed. This article describes the studies of statistical mixture modeling of flow cytometric data, and demonstrates their utility in examples with four-color flow data from human peripheral blood samples and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines.

  5. Identification of inflammatory cells in bovine milk by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Redelman, D; Butler, S; Robison, J; Garner, D

    1988-09-01

    Cells recovered from normal or mastitic bovine milk were examined by flow cytometry. All milk samples contained particulate material that was heterogeneous in size and that produced a right-angle light-scatter signal equal to or greater than that produced by human or bovine neutrophils. Although this material labeled with Hoechst 33342, it produced fluorescence intensities below that of intact bovine cells, suggesting that it consisted of cell fragments. Mastitic milk additionally contained other populations of cells that were poorly resolved from the normal particulate material by size (electronic volume sensor) and right-angle light scatter. In order to improve this resolution, the milk cells were incubated with carboxydimethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) to label intact cells. When milk samples labeled with CMFDA were examined by dual-parameter analysis using green fluorescence and right-angle light scatter, five or more populations of cells could be identified in mastitic milk. These populations included intact and degenerate neutrophils, lymphocytes, including both small and activated cells, monocytes, and large activated macrophages containing many vacuoles and phagocytosed particles. Using this procedure, all the animals in the University of Nevada-Reno Holstein dairy herd were tested once a month for 6 months. In addition, individual animals with mastitis were examined one or more times each day during the course of the inflammatory process. In the routine screening, the flow cytometric examination detected mastitis before overt symptoms developed. In cows identified to have mastitis, the flow cytometric examination provided prognostic information regarding the success of treatments.

  6. Circulation times of cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. Hepatocellular carcinoma may metastasize to lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor: the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines, high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells, which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly, the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison, <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  7. Design, modeling and characterization of microfluidic architectures for high flow rate, small footprint microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Saias, Laure; Autebert, Julien; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-07

    We propose a strategy for optimizing distribution of flow in a microfluidic chamber for microreactor, lateral flow assay and immunocapture applications. It is aimed at maximizing flow throughput, while keeping footprint, cell thickness, and shear stress in the distribution channels at a minimum, and offering a uniform flow field along the whole analysis chamber. In order to minimize footprint, the traditional tree-like or "rhombus" design, in which distribution microchannels undergo a series of splittings into two subchannels with equal lengths and widths, was replaced by a design in which subchannel lengths are unequal, and widths are analytically adapted within the Hele-Shaw approximation, in order to keep the flow resistance uniform along all flow paths. The design was validated by hydrodynamic flow simulation using COMSOL finite element software. Simulations show that, if the channel is too narrow, the Hele-Shaw approximation loses accuracy, and the flow velocity in the chamber can fluctuate by up to 20%. We thus used COMSOL simulation to fine-tune the channel parameters, and obtained a fluctuation of flow velocity across the whole chamber below 10%. The design was then implemented into a PDMS device, and flow profiles were measured experimentally using particle tracking. Finally, we show that this system can be applied to cell sorting in self-assembling magnetic arrays, increasing flow throughput by a factor 100 as compared to earlier reported designs.

  8. A three-dimensional flow control concept for single-cell experiments on a microchip. 1. Cell selection, cell retention, cell culture, cell balancing, and cell scanning.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xing Yue; Li, Paul C H

    2004-09-15

    An ideal microchip for single-cell experiments should be able to allow us to culture cells, to select any desired single cell from a group, to retain the cell for convenient cellular signal detection, and to deliver any buffer or reagent directly to the cell at any time during continual detection and observation. Most importantly, any negative impact on the live cell should be minimized. To accomplish all these functions, we developed a three-dimensional liquid flow control concept and employed special liquid flow fields to manipulate and retain a single yeast cell freely in the chip. A zero-speed point was controlled to retain the cell for three-dimensional cell balancing and cell scanning. A dispersive flow delivered reagents at a high speed to very near the cell and provided them to the cell at a low speed. No force stronger than its gravitational force was exerted on the cell, which could be balanced on different positions on an arc-sloping wall, thus minimizing any negative impact on the cell due to strong liquid flows. Specifically, we demonstrate on-chip single-cell culture, cell wall removal, and reagent delivery. Subsequently, single-cell fluorescence detection was performed, and noise filtering and background correction were applied for data processing.

  9. Multiscale Systems Biology and Physics of Thrombosis under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Blood clotting under hemodynamic conditions involves numerous multiscale interactions from the molecular scale to macroscopic vessel and systemic circulation scales. Transmission of shear forces to platelet receptors such as GPIbα, P-selectin, α2β1, and α2bβ3 controls adhesion dynamics. These forces also drive membrane tether formation, cellular deformation, and mechanosignaling in blood cells. Blood flow results in red blood cell (RBC) drift towards the center of the vessel along with a near-wall plasma layer enriched with platelets. RBC motions also dramatically enhance platelet dispersion. Trajectories of individual platelets near a thrombotic deposit dictate capture-activation-arrest dynamics as these newly arriving platelets are exposed to chemical gradients of ADP, thromboxane, and thrombin within a micron-scale boundary layer formed around the deposit. If shear forces are sufficiently elevated (> 50 dyne/cm2), the largest polymers of von Willebrand Factor may elongate with concomitant shear-induced platelet activation. Finally, thrombin generation enhances platelet recruitment and clot strength via fibrin polymerization. By combination of coarse-graining, continuum, and stochastic algorithms, the numerical simulation of the growth rate, composition, and occlusive/embolic potential of a thrombus now spans multiscale phenomena. These simulations accommodate particular flow geometries, blood phenotype, pharmacological regimen, and reactive surfaces to help predict disease risk or response to therapy. PMID:22460075

  10. Biology and Flow Cytometry of Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Progenitors Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jonathan A.; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    During development hematopoiesis and neovascularization are closely linked to each other via a common bipotent stem cell called the hemangioblast that gives rise to both hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. In postnatal life this functional connection between the vasculature and hematopoiesis is maintained by a subset of hematopoietic progenitor cells endowed with the capacity to differentiate into potent proangiogenic cells. These proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitors comprise a specific subset of bone marrow-derived cells that homes to sites of neovascularization and possess potent paracrine angiogenic activity. There is emerging evidence that this subpopulation of hematopoietic progenitors plays a critical role in vascular health and disease. Their angiogenic activity is distinct from putative “endothelial progenitor cells” that become structural cells of the endothelium by differentiation into endothelial cells. Proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell research requires multi-disciplinary expertise in flow cytometry, hematology and vascular biology. This review provides a comprehensive overview of proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell biology and flow cytometric methods to detect these cells in the peripheral blood circulation and bone marrow. PMID:25418030

  11. Continuous flow two-dimensional acoustic orientation of nonspherical cells.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Ola; Antfolk, Maria; Laurell, Thomas

    2014-06-17

    Flow cytometry is a frequently used method when it comes to cell sorting and analysis. Nonspherical cells, such as red blood cells or sperm cells, however, pose a challenge as they reduce the precision of light scatter measurements which interfere with the analysis of these and other cell populations in the same sample. Here, we present a microfluidic chip for acoustophoresis utilizing ultrasonic standing waves to focus and orient red blood cells in two dimensions in the channel center. The cells can be oriented to show either their flat or up-ended side toward the optical axis and the observer. In an acoustic standing wave field the cells will be rotated until the direction of the smallest dimension is parallel with the direction where the acoustic energy is strongest. While keeping the cells focused in the channel center utilizing acoustic resonances in two dimensions, the orientation can be controlled by increasing the acoustic energy in either the horizontal or vertical resonance mode. It was shown that 87.8 ± 3.8% of the red blood cells could be horizontally oriented while 98.7 ± 0.3% could be vertically oriented. The ability to control the orientation of nonspherical cells with high accuracy is a beneficial feature and potential contribution to the rapidly growing field of flow and image cytometry.

  12. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood.

  13. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood. PMID:22734751

  14. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle D; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; Mosley, Jeffrey D; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastatic melanoma cells in blood.

  15. Flow cytometry methods for the study of cell-cycle parameters of planarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hara; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2009-05-01

    Due to their characteristic inaccessibility and low numbers, little is known about the cell-cycle dynamics of most stem cells in vivo. A powerful, established methodology to study cell-cycle dynamics is flow cytometry, which is used routinely to study the cell-cycle dynamics of proliferating cells in vitro. Its use in heterogeneous mixtures of cells obtained from whole animals, however, is complicated by the relatively low abundance of cycling to non-cycling cells. We report on flow cytometric methods that take advantage of the abundance of proliferating stem cells in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. The optimized protocols allow us to measure cell-cycle dynamics and follow BrdU-labeled cells specifically in complex mixtures of cells. These methods expand on the growing toolkit being developed to study stem cell biology in planarians, and open the door to detailed cytometric studies of a collectively totipotent population of adult stem cells in vivo.

  16. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  17. Classification of biological cells using a sound wave based flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gnyawali, Vaskar; Van De Vondervoort, Mia; Daghighi, Yasaman; Tsai, Scott S. H.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    A flow cytometer that uses sound waves to determine the size of biological cells is presented. In this system, a microfluidic device made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was developed to hydrodynamically flow focus cells in a single file through a target area. Integrated into the microfluidic device was an ultrasound transducer with a 375 MHz center frequency, aligned opposite the transducer was a pulsed 532 nm laser focused into the device by a 10x objective. Each passing cell was insonfied with a high frequency ultrasound pulse, and irradiated with the laser. The resulting ultrasound and photoacoustic waves from each cell were analyzed using signal processing methods, where features in the power spectra were compared to theoretical models to calculate the cell size. Two cell lines with different size distributions were used to test the system: acute myeloid leukemia cells (AML) and melanoma cells. Over 200 cells were measured using this system. The average calculated diameter of the AML cells was 10.4 +/- 2.5 μm using ultrasound, and 11.4 +/- 2.3 μm using photoacoustics. The average diameter of the melanoma cells was 16.2 +/- 2.9 μm using ultrasound, and 18.9 +/- 3.5 μm using photoacoustics. The cell sizes calculated using ultrasound and photoacoustic methods agreed with measurements using a Coulter Counter, where the AML cells were 9.8 +/- 1.8 μm and the melanoma cells were 16.0 +/- 2.5 μm. These results demonstrate a high speed method of assessing cell size using sound waves, which is an alternative method to traditional flow cytometry techniques.

  18. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  19. Cell-cell interaction in blood flow in patients with coronary heart disease (in vitro study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions are one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. We have chosen the method of reconstruction of pulsative blood flow in vitro in the experimental set. Blood flow structure was studied by PC integrated video camera with following slide by slide analysis. Studied flow was of constant volumetric blood flow velocity (1 ml/h). Diameter of tube in use was comparable with coronary arteries diameter. Glucose solution and unfractured heparin were used as the nonspecial irritants of studied flow. Erythrocytes space structure in flow differs in all groups of patients in our study (men with stable angina pectoris (SAP), myocardial infarction (MI) and practically healthy men (PHM). Intensity of erythrocytes aggregate formation was maximal in patients with SAP, but time of their "construction/deconstruction" at glucose injection was minimal. Phenomena of primary clotting formation in patients with SAP of high function class was reconstructed under experimental conditions. Heparin injection (10 000 ED) increased linear blood flow velocity both in patients with SAP, MI and PHP but modulated the cell profile in the flow. Received data correspond with results of animal model studies and noninvasive blood flow studies in human. Results of our study reveal differences in blood flow structure in patients with coronary heart disease and PHP under irritating conditions as the possible framework of metabolic model of coronary blood flow destabilization.

  20. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Shaw, Leo; Wang, Cheng; Park, Steve; Guo, Yikun; Reinspach, Julia A.; Gu, Kevin; Gu, Xiaodan; Tee, Benjamin C. K.; Pang, Changhyun; Yan, Hongping; Zhao, Dahui; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-08-12

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a similar to 90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhanced all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. However, we expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility.

  1. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Shaw, Leo; Wang, Cheng; Park, Steve; Guo, Yikun; Reinspach, Julia A.; Gu, Kevin; Gu, Xiaodan; Tee, Benjamin C. K.; Pang, Changhyun; Yan, Hongping; Zhao, Dahui; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a ∼90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhanced all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. We expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility. PMID:26264528

  2. Flow-enhanced solution printing of all-polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Zhou, Yan; Kurosawa, Tadanori; Shaw, Leo; Wang, Cheng; Park, Steve; Guo, Yikun; Reinspach, Julia A; Gu, Kevin; Gu, Xiaodan; Tee, Benjamin C K; Pang, Changhyun; Yan, Hongping; Zhao, Dahui; Toney, Michael F; Mannsfeld, Stefan C B; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-08-12

    Morphology control of solution coated solar cell materials presents a key challenge limiting their device performance and commercial viability. Here we present a new concept for controlling phase separation during solution printing using an all-polymer bulk heterojunction solar cell as a model system. The key aspect of our method lies in the design of fluid flow using a microstructured printing blade, on the basis of the hypothesis of flow-induced polymer crystallization. Our flow design resulted in a ∼90% increase in the donor thin film crystallinity and reduced microphase separated donor and acceptor domain sizes. The improved morphology enhanced all metrics of solar cell device performance across various printing conditions, specifically leading to higher short-circuit current, fill factor, open circuit voltage and significantly reduced device-to-device variation. We expect our design concept to have broad applications beyond all-polymer solar cells because of its simplicity and versatility.

  3. INNOVATIVE URBAN WET-WEATHER FLOW MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes innovative methods to improve wet weather flow (WWF) management systems, that provide drainage services at the same time as decreasing stormwater pollutant discharges, for urban developments of the 21st century. Traditionally, wet-weather collection systems...

  4. INNOVATIVE URBAN WET-WEATHER FLOW MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes innovative methods to improve wet weather flow (WWF) management systems, that provide drainage services at the same time as decreasing stormwater pollutant discharges, for urban developments of the 21st century. Traditionally, wet-weather collection systems...

  5. Lymphocyte fractionation using immunomagnetic colloid and a dipole magnet flow cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Moore, L R; Zborowski, M; Sun, L; Chalmers, J J

    1998-09-24

    The relationship between cell function and surface marker expression is a subject of active investigation in biology and medicine. These investigations require separating cells of a homogeneous subset into multiple fractions of varying marker expression. We have developed a novel cell sorter, the dipole magnet flow sorter (DMFS), which separates selected T lymphocyte subpopulations, targeted by immunomagnetic colloid, into multiple fractions according to cell surface marker expression, as determined by flow cytometry. A narrow stream of cells is introduced into a sheath of carrier fluid in a rectangular channel while subjected to a perpendicular magnetic force. The special design of the pole pieces ensures a constant magnetic force acting on the magnetically labeled cells in the separation area. Cells are spread across the flow in relation to their magnetophoretic mobility. Separation is achieved by control of the positions of the effluent stream boundaries, which separate fluid volumes with cells of different magnetophoretic mobility. CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes labeled with primary antibody-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugate and anti-FITC-magnetic colloid are the chosen cell systems. Flow cytometry analysis shows that, for CD4 cells, a three-fold increase in total marker number per cell is observed when comparing the highest to the lowest fluorescence fractions. Similarly, a four-fold increase in total marker number is observed for CD8 cells. We also observed the separation of two dissimilar cell types that differed in expression of the CD4 marker, monocytes and T helper lymphocytes. We believe that this type of separation is applicable to any cells in suspension for which a suitable antibody exists and, due to the comparatively gentle nature of the process, is particularly suitable for the sorting of fragile cells.

  6. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Y; Matsuyama, Y; Little, J A; Gurkan, U A

    2016-06-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell's aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events.

  7. The flow of sickle-cell blood in the capillaries.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, S A; King, W S

    1980-01-01

    Oxygen tension levels and red cell velocities for the flow of sickle-cell blood in the capillaries are determined by using the Krogh model for oxygen transport and lubrication theory for the cell motion. The coupling and interaction between these arises from the red cell compliance, which is assumed to vary with the oxygen concentration. Microsieving data is used to establish an upper bound for this relationship. Calculations are carried out for a range of capillary sizes, taking into account the rightward shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve and the reduced hematocrit of sickle-cell blood, and are compared to, as a base case, the flow of normal blood under normal pressure gradient. The results indicate that under normal pressure gradients the oxygen tensions and cell velocities for sickle blood are considerably higher than for normal blood, thus acting against the tendency for cells to sickle, or significantly change their rheological properties, in the capillaries. Under reduced pressure gradients, however, the concentrations and velocities drop dramatically, adding to the likelihood of such shape or flow property changes. PMID:7260242

  8. Influence of Flow Behavior of Alginate-Cell Suspensions on Cell Viability and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liqun; Guillemot, Arthur; Zhao, Jingxuan; Kipouros, Georges; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2016-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds with living cells fabricated by three-dimensional bioprinting/plotting techniques are becoming more prevalent in tissue repair and regeneration. In the bioprinting process, cells are subject to process-induced forces (such as shear force) that can result in cell damage and loss of cell function. The flow behavior of the biomaterial solutions that encapsulate living cells in this process plays an important role. This study used a rheometer to examine the flow behavior of alginate solution and alginate-Schwann cell (RSC96), alginate-fibroblast cell (NIH-3T3), and alginate-skeletal muscle cell (L8) suspensions during shearing with respect to effects on cell viability and proliferation. The flow behavior of all the alginate-cell suspensions varied with alginate concentration and cell density and had a significant influence on the viability and proliferation of the cells once sheared as well as on the recovery of the sheared cells. These findings provide a mean to preserve cell viability and/or retain cell proliferation function in the bioprinting process by regulating the flow behavior of cell-biomaterial suspensions and process parameters.

  9. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    provided by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional ground-water flow system. Ground-water flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex ground-water flow systems. Ground-water flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional ground-water flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and evapotranspiration (ET) are the dominant natural ground-water discharge processes. Ground water also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Ground-water flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, a 3D finite-difference modular ground-water flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 m on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins, also simulated by drains. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient model gener

  10. Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional groundwater flow system. Groundwater flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex groundwater flow systems. Groundwater flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional groundwater flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and ET are the dominant natural groundwater discharge processes. Groundwater also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Groundwater flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey 3D finitedifference modular groundwater flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 meters (m) on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins simulated by constant-head boundaries. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient mode

  11. Reduction of Europium in a Redox Flow Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Daluh; Horng, Jiin-Shiung; Tung, Chia-Pao

    1988-05-01

    An electrolytic cell similar to the iron I chromium redox flow cell was used to investigate the reduction of europium. The cell contains two compartments partitioned by an anion exchange membrane, which is permeable to chloride ions. The anolyte is ferrous chloride which is oxidized to ferric form at the anode. Rare-earth chloride prepared from Taiwan black monazite is fed as the catholyte. The reduction of europium was tested in two connected cells at 20 and 45°C. All of Eu3+ can be reduced at 45°C, and 72% of the europium can be recovered in sulfate form. In oxide form, purity is about 84%.

  12. Aerothermodynamics of nozzle flows for advanced hypersonic propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, C.; Hartmann, G.; Menne, S.

    1992-02-01

    One of the major tasks for the development of novel airbreathing space transportation systems, operating from usual airports by horizontal take off and landing, is the integration of an advanced propulsion system in the cell of that spacecraft. The air intake and in particular the free expansion nozzle affect not only the efficiency of the engine but also the forces and moments, and with that, the control of the complete spacecraft. Therefore, it is necessary to know in detail the flow fields through such nozzles and its interaction with the external airflow. Another project deals with conventional rocket motor nozzles whereby injection of turbine exhaust gases in the expansion part of the nozzle the wall of the nozzle is cooled (filmcooling concept) and the thrust is slightly increased. Theoretical investigation of these and other nozzles is the objective of this paper. Euler and boundary layer methods will be applied to predict the flow fields of the nozzles where special emphasis is laid on the consideration of real gas effects. The theory of the Euler method will be described in detail while for the second order boundary layer method the governing equations are presented and the range of its applicability is shortly discussed. Finally results for a variety of nozzles will be given.

  13. Cell tracking and mitosis detection using splitting flow networks in phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Massoudi, Amir; Semenovich, Dimitri; Sowmya, Arcot

    2012-01-01

    Cell tracking is a crucial component of many biomedical image analysis applications. Many available cell tracking systems assume high precision of the cell detection module. Therefore low performance in cell detection can heavily affect the tracking results. Unfortunately cell segmentation modules often have significant errors, especially in the case of phase-contrast imaging. In this paper we propose a tracking method that does not rely on perfect cell segmentation and can deal with uncertainties by exploiting temporal information and aggregating the results of many frames. Our tracking algorithm is fully automated and can handle common challenges of tracking such as cells entering/exiting the screen and mitosis events. To handle the latter, we modify the standard flow network and introduce the concept of a splitting node into it. Experiment results show that adding temporal information from the video microscopy improves the cell/mitosis detection and results in a better tracking system.

  14. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOEpatents

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur

    2000-01-11

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  15. Performance on ETL 1 kW redox flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, K.; Kaneko, H.; Negishi, A.; Ozawa, T.

    A 1 kW - 3 kWh redox flow cell, in which 96 bipolar cells with the apparent electrode area of 432 sq cm are involved, has been developed and tested in Electrotechnical Laboratory. The rated output current and voltage are 26 A and 43 V. To elucidate fundamental aspects of the anolyte, polarography and spectroscopy were applied as well as observations with a miniaturized redox flow cell, and influence of the complex species in the anolyte on the cell performance has been recognized. During the charge and discharge cycles the anolyte was continuously monitored by the spectroscopy or controlled potential coulometry, while a voltammetric detector was applied for monitoring the catholyte. Further screening of carbon fiber electrode materials has been continued after the previous presentation, and among more than 70 varieties were found a few kinds of carbon fiber, with which the target performance can be achieved.

  16. Maximizing the power density of aqueous electrochemical flow cells with in operando deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Ibrahim, Omar A.; Kim, Will H. J.; Kjeang, Erik

    2017-01-01

    To transition toward sustainable energy systems, next generation power sources must provide high power density at minimum cost. Using inexpensive and environmentally friendly fabrication methods, this work describes a room temperature electrochemical flow cell with a maximum power density of 2.01 W cm-2 or 13.4 W cm-3. In part, this is achieved by minimizing ohmic resistance through decreased electrode spacing, implementation of current collectors and improvement of electrolyte conductivity. The majority of the performance gain is provided by a novel in operando dynamic flowing deposition method for which the cell design has been optimized. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are deposited dynamically at the entrance of and within the carbon paper electrodes during operation of the cell. A natural equilibrium is reached between deposition and detachment of CNTs at which the electrochemical surface area and pore size distribution of the flow-through porous electrodes are greatly enhanced. In this way, the novel deposition method more than doubles the power density of the cell and sets a new performance benchmark for what is practically attainable with aqueous electrochemical flow cells. Overall, it is expected that the design and operation methods illustrated here will enable a wide range of electrochemical flow cell technologies to achieve optimal performance.

  17. Long waves in parallel flow in Hele-Shaw cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeybek, M.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1991-04-01

    During the past several years the flow of immiscible flow in Hele-Shaw cells and porous media has been investigated extensively. Of particular interest to most studies has been frontal displacement, specifically viscous fingering instabilities and finger growth. The practical ramifications regarding oil recovery, as well as many other industrial processes in porous media, have served as the primary driving force for most of these investigations. By contrast, little attention has been paid to the motion of lateral fluid interface, which are parallel to the main flow direction. Parallel flow is an often encountered, although much overlooked regime. The evolution of fluid interfaces in parallel flow in Hele-Shaw cells is studied both theoretically and experimentally in the large capillary number limit. It is shown that such interfaces support wave motion, the amplitude of which for long waves is governed by the KdV equation. Experiments are conducted in a long Hele-Shaw cell that validate the theory in the symmetric case. 35 refs., 16 figs.

  18. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

    2003-01-08

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  19. Cell confluency analysis on microcarriers by micro-flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher J; Cicalese, Stephanie M; Davis, Harrison B; Dogdas, Belma; Shah, Tosha; Culp, Tim; Hoang, Van M

    2016-12-01

    The productivity of cell culture-derived vaccines grown in anchorage-dependent animal cells is limited by bioreactor surface area. One way to increase the available surface area is by growing cells as monolayers on small spheres called microcarriers, which are approximately 100-250 μm in diameter. In order for microcarrier-based cell culture to be a success, it is important to understand the kinetics of cell growth on the microcarriers. Micro-flow imaging (MFI) is a simple and powerful technique that captures images and analyzes samples as they are drawn through a precision flow cell. In addition to providing size distribution and defect frequency data to compare microcarrier lots, MFI was used to generate hundreds of images to determine cell coverage and confluency on microcarriers. Same-day manual classification of these images provided upstream cell culture teams with actionable data that informed in-process decision making (e.g. time of infection). Additionally, an automated cell coverage algorithm was developed to increase the speed and throughput of the analyses.

  20. Cell-cycle analysis of fission yeast cells by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Jon Halvor Jonsrud; Rein, Idun Dale; Rothe, Christiane; Stokke, Trond; Grallert, Beáta; Boye, Erik

    2011-02-28

    The cell cycle of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, does not easily lend itself to analysis by flow cytometry, mainly because cells in G(1) and G(2) phase contain the same amount of DNA. This occurs because fission yeast cells under standard growth conditions do not complete cytokinesis until after G(1) phase. We have devised a flow cytometric method exploiting the fact that cells in G(1) phase contain two nuclei, whereas cells in G(2) are mononuclear. Measurements of the width as well as the total area of the DNA-associated fluorescence signal allows the discrimination between cells in G(1) and in G(2) phase and the cell-cycle progression of fission yeast can be followed in detail by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we show how this method can be used to monitor the timing of cell entry into anaphase. Fission yeast cells tend to form multimers, which represents another problem of flow cytometry-based cell-cycle analysis. Here we present a method employing light-scatter measurements to enable the exclusion of cell doublets, thereby further improving the analysis of fission yeast cells by flow cytometry.

  1. Numerical investigation of granular flow in a shear cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhu, H. P.; Yu, A. B.; Luding, S.

    2013-06-01

    Granular flow in a shear cell under conditions relevant to those in an annular cell is investigated based on the results obtained by using the Discrete Element Method. The distributions of porosity and coordination number are studied, and the relationship of these variables is established. The so-called I-rheology proposed by Jop et al. [Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] is tested. The results display that the I-rheology can effectively describe the intermediate flow regime, whereas significant deviations take place when it is applied to the quasi-static regime. The correlations between stresses and packing fraction are examined and the packing fraction values for the quasi-static/intermediate and intermediate/inertial regime transitions are identified. The force networks/structures for different scaled stiffness are analyzed to further understand the regime-transitions for the granular flow.

  2. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md. Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm3 and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm2 using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time. PMID:28120875

  3. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md. Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm3 and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm2 using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time.

  4. Integrated Microfluidic Flow-Through Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Ali, Md Azahar; Xu, Zhen; Halverson, Larry J; Dong, Liang

    2017-01-25

    This paper reports on a miniaturized microbial fuel cell with a microfluidic flow-through configuration: a porous anolyte chamber is formed by filling a microfluidic chamber with three-dimensional graphene foam as anode, allowing nutritional medium to flow through the chamber to intimately interact with the colonized microbes on the scaffolds of the anode. No nutritional media flow over the anode. This allows sustaining high levels of nutrient utilization, minimizing consumption of nutritional substrates, and reducing response time of electricity generation owing to fast mass transport through pressure-driven flow and rapid diffusion of nutrients within the anode. The device provides a volume power density of 745 μW/cm(3) and a surface power density of 89.4 μW/cm(2) using Shewanella oneidensis as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The medium consumption and the response time of the flow-through device are reduced by 16.4 times and 4.2 times, respectively, compared to the non-flow-through counterpart with its freeway space volume six times the volume of graphene foam anode. The graphene foam enabled microfluidic flow-through approach will allow efficient microbial conversion of carbon-containing bioconvertible substrates to electricity with smaller space, less medium consumption, and shorter start-up time.

  5. Sensing photosynthetic herbicides in an electrochemical flow cell.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Tibor; Csekő, Richárd; Hajdu, Kata; Nagy, Krisztina; Sipos, Orsolya; Galajda, Péter; Garab, Győző; Nagy, László

    2017-05-01

    Specific inhibitory reactions of herbicides with photosynthetic reaction centers bound to working electrodes were monitored in a conventional electrochemical cell and a newly designed microfluidic electrochemical flow cell. In both cases, the bacterial reaction centers were bound to a transparent conductive metal oxide, indium-tin-oxide, electrode through carbon nanotubes. In the conventional cell, photocurrent densities of up to a few μA/cm(2) could be measured routinely. The photocurrent could be blocked by the photosynthetic inhibitor terbutryn (I 50 = 0.38 ± 0.14 μM) and o-phenanthroline (I 50 = 63.9 ± 12.2 μM). The microfluidic flow cell device enabled us to reduce the sample volume and to simplify the electrode arrangement. The useful area of the electrodes remained the same (ca. 2 cm(2)), similar to the classical electrochemical cell; however, the size of the cell was reduced considerably. The microfluidic flow control enabled us monitoring in real time the binding/unbinding of the inhibitor and cofactor molecules at the secondary quinone site.

  6. Axial dispersion in flowing red blood cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Losserand, Sylvain; Coupier, Gwennou

    2016-11-01

    A key parameter in blood microcirculation is the transit time of red blood cells (RBCs) through an organ, which can influence the efficiency of gas exchange and oxygen availability. A large dispersion of this transit time is observed in vivo and is partly due to the axial dispersion in the flowing suspension. In the classic Taylor-Aris example of a solute flowing in a tube, the combination of molecular diffusion and parabolic velocity profile leads to enhanced axial dispersion. In suspensions of non-Brownian deformable bodies such as RBCs, axial dispersion is governed by a combination of shear induced migration and shear-induced diffusion arising from hydrodynamic interactions. We revisit this problem in the case of RBC pulses flowing in a microchannel and show that the axial dispersion of the pulse eventually saturates with a final extension that depends directly on RBC mechanical properties. The result is especially interesting in the dilute limit since the final pulse length depends only on the channel width, exponent of the migration law and dimensionless migration velocity. In continuous flow, the dispersion of transit times is the result of complex cell-cell and cell-wall interactions and is strongy influenced by the polydispersity of the blood sample. The authors acknowledge support from LabEx TEC21 and CNES.

  7. Modelling the damage potential of fluid flows for animal cells undergoing cultivation in bioreactors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford Keen, Giles

    1996-11-01

    Mechanical disruption and injury sustained by animal cells undergoing cultivation in bioreactors is an important problem in biotechnology. Damage to cells is thought to be caused primarily by bubbles bursting at the free surface of the culture medium. Here we present computational studies applying a mathematical model for the cell damage rates experienced by cells in laminar flow. Two fluid dynamical systems are considered - namely a converging channel and a single bursting bubble. The flows are calculated using a fourth-order finite difference technique on a stretched grid, and a boundary integral method respectively. It is possible to obtain an estimate for the number of cells in a particular population which are likely to be disrupted by the forces they experience in the flow. This is done by calculating the maximum rate of strain experienced by fluid particles, and combining this with experimental data on the strength and size of cells, obtained by micromanipulation techniques. The resulting information is then used together with the cell damage model to produce a cell damage prediction. The computational results are compared with experimental measurements of cell death, to validate the model for cell damage.

  8. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  9. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-08-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis-the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems-significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  10. A laminar flow-based single stack of flow-over planar microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Hwan; Ahn, Yoomin

    2017-05-01

    Power densities of microfluidic fuel cells are still not high enough for power source applications. In this study, we propose a novel planar stack to increase the total power of a microfluidic fuel cell. Electrical connections in serial or parallel are made within one channel by using multiple laminar flow. A planar structure with flow-over electrodes of platinum are adopted for easy integration with other planar micro devices. These structures are made by micromachining with a thin film process. Fuel cell performance and total ohmic resistances are measured experimentally with a formic acid-based fuel. The results show that the proposed single stacks provide more power density with a comparatively small total ohmic resistance and require less space than that of the fuel cell arrays. The peak volumetric power density improves by 97.5% and 39.3% using parallel and serial electrical connections, respectively, at a 300 μL min-1 flow rate. Utilizing this single stack, we believe that microfluidic fuel cells can be integrated into a compact planar configuration to achieve a power high enough for energy source applications.

  11. Blood Flow and the Vascular System: An Interface of Fluid Mechanics with Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, Robert

    1998-11-01

    The cardiovascular system has as its primary function the delivery of blood to the tissues of the body. Important in the regulation of this function is the monolayer of endothelial cells positioned as the inner lining of a blood vessel. This endothelium represents the interface with flowing blood, and over the past two decades much has been learned about the response of endothelial cells to flow and the associated shear stress. The nature of this response is dependent on the detailed characteristics of the flow, with there as an example being significant differences in the response to steady flow as compared to oscillatory flow. The response to flow also is an active process, one involving structural and shape changes as well as alterations in the cell's ability to synthesize and secrete biologically active molecules. A critical question is how does the endothelial cell sense its fluid mechanical environment? Having sensed this environment, how is this signal transduced into the types of cellular changes that have been observed? These questions are beginning to be answered, and with this knowledge one can begin to develop computational models of the response of an endothelial cell to flow. The model described here focuses on intracellular calcium, an important second messenger in the transduction of a flow signal. As mechanisms for the recognition of flow, the model includes effects due to both convection diffusion coupling of the transport of small molecules to the cell's surface and mechanically-gated ion channels in the cell's membrane. It also includes a variety of intracellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of calcium dynamics. Although the model is only an initial step in quantifying our understanding of endothelial biology, approximate agreement with experimental results has been obtained. Even so, there still is much to be done if the model is to be further improved.

  12. Microbes Characteristics in Groundwater Flow System in Mountainous Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Chisato; Tsujimura, Maki; Kato, Kenji; Sakakibara, Koichi; Ogawa, Mahiro; Sugiyama, Ayumi; Nagaosa, Kazuyo

    2017-04-01

    We focus on a possibility of microbes as a tracer for groundwater flow investigation. Some previous papers showed that the total number of prokaryotes in groundwater has correlation with depth and geology (Parkes et al., 1994; Griebler et al., 2009; Kato et al., 2012). However, there are few studies investigating both microbe characteristics and groundwater flow system. Therefore, we investigated a relationship between the total number of prokaryotes and age of spring water and groundwater. Intensive field survey was conducted at four mountainous areas, namely Mt. Fuji (volcano), a headwater at Mt. Setohachi, a headwater at River Oi and a headwater at River Nagano underlain by volcanic lava at Mt. Fuji, granite at Mt. Setohachi and sedimentary rock at River Oi and River Nagano. We collected totally 40 spring water/ groundwater samples in these mountainous areas in October 2015, August, October and November 2016 and analyzed concentration of inorganic ions, the stable isotopes of oxygen - 18, deuterium, CFCs and SF6. Also, we counted prokaryotic cells under the epifluorescence microscopy after fixation and filteration. The total number of prokaryotes in the spring water/ groundwater ranged from 1.0×102 to 7.0×103cells mL-1 at the Mt. Fuji, 1.3×104 to 2.7×105cells mL-1 at Mt. Setohachi, 3.1×104cells mL-1 at River Oi and 1.8×105 to 3.2×106cells mL-1 at River Nagano. The SF6 age of the spring water/ groundwater ranged from 8 to 64 years at Mt. Fuji, 2 to 32.5 years at Mt. Setohachi, 2.5 years at River Oi and 15 to 16 years at River Nagano. The total number of prokaryotes showed a clear negative correlation with residence time of spring water/ groundwater in all regions. Especially the prokaryotes number increased in the order of 102 cells mL-1 with decreasing of residence time in approximately 10 years in the groundwater and spring water with the age less than 15 years.

  13. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-09-29

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  14. Process simulation of a PEM fuel cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Ledjeff-Hey, K.; Roes, J.; Formanski, V.; Gieshoff, J.; Vogel, B.

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system for producing electrical power from natural gas is investigated by considering the flows of energy and energy through the various steps of the whole system. The flows of energy are evaluated using a computer code for energy and energy analyses. The fuel cell system is designed to produce a hydrogen volumetric flow of nearly 5.0 m{sup 3} {sub NTP}/h, provided to the fuel cell at an absolute pressure of 2.9 bar. The fuel cell itself is working with an efficiency of about 60 % at an operating temperature of 65 - 75{degrees} C with an air ratio of four and provides a maximum electric power of 9 kW. Taking into consideration only the produced electric power as useful output of the fuel cell system a total efficiency of 42.2 % is calculated using the simulation results.

  15. Injectable Solid Peptide Hydrogel as Cell Carrier: Effects of Shear Flow on Hydrogel and Cell Payload

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Congqi; Mackay, Michael E.; Czymmek, Kirk; Nagarkar, Radhika P.; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.

    2012-01-01

    β-hairpin peptide-based hydrogels are a class of injectable solid hydrogels that can deliver encapsulated cells or molecular therapies to a target site via syringe or catheter injection as a carrier material. These physical hydrogels can shear-thin and consequently flow as a low-viscosity material under a sufficient shear stress but immediately recover back into a solid upon removal of the stress, allowing them to be injected as preformed gel solids. Hydrogel behavior during flow was studied in a cylindrical capillary geometry that mimicked the actual situation of injection through a syringe needle in order to quantify effects of shear-thin injection delivery on hydrogel flow behavior and encapsulated cell payloads. It was observed that all β-hairpin peptide hydrogels investigated displayed a promising flow profile for injectable cell delivery: a central wide plug flow region where gel material and cell payloads experienced little or no shear rate and a narrow shear zone close to the capillary wall where gel and cells were subject to shear deformation. The width of the plug flow region was found to be weakly dependent on hydrogel rigidity and flow rate. Live-dead assays were performed on encapsulated MG63 cells three hours after injection flow and revealed that shear-thin delivery through the capillary had little impact on cell viability and the spatial distribution of encapsulated cell payloads. These observations help us to fundamentally understand how the gels flow during injection through a thin catheter and how they immediately restore mechanically and morphologically relative to pre-flow, static gels. PMID:22390812

  16. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  17. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  18. Hyperbolic contraction measuring systems for extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, M.; Tamaddon Jahromi, H. R.; Stading, M.; Webster, M. F.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper an experimental method for extensional measurements on medium viscosity fluids in contraction flow is evaluated through numerical simulations and experimental measurements. This measuring technique measures the pressure drop over a hyperbolic contraction, caused by fluid extension and fluid shear, where the extensional component is assumed to dominate. The present evaluative work advances our previous studies on this experimental method by introducing several contraction ratios and addressing different constitutive models of varying shear and extensional response. The constitutive models included are those of the constant viscosity Oldroyd-B and FENE-CR models, and the shear-thinning LPTT model. Examining the results, the impact of shear and first normal stress difference on the measured pressure drop are studied through numerical pressure drop predictions. In addition, stream function patterns are investigated to detect vortex development and influence of contraction ratio. The numerical predictions are further related to experimental measurements for the flow through a 15:1 contraction ratio with three different test fluids. The measured pressure drops are observed to exhibit the same trends as predicted in the numerical simulations, offering close correlation and tight predictive windows for experimental data capture. This result has demonstrated that the hyperbolic contraction flow is well able to detect such elastic fluid properties and that this is matched by numerical predictions in evaluation of their flow response. The hyperbolical contraction flow technique is commended for its distinct benefits: it is straightforward and simple to perform, the Hencky strain can be set by changing contraction ratio, non-homogeneous fluids can be tested, and one can directly determine the degree of elastic fluid behaviour. Based on matching of viscometric extensional viscosity response for FENE-CR and LPTT models, a decline is predicted in pressure drop for

  19. Hyperbolic contraction measuring systems for extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, M.; Tamaddon Jahromi, H. R.; Stading, M.; Webster, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper an experimental method for extensional measurements on medium viscosity fluids in contraction flow is evaluated through numerical simulations and experimental measurements. This measuring technique measures the pressure drop over a hyperbolic contraction, caused by fluid extension and fluid shear, where the extensional component is assumed to dominate. The present evaluative work advances our previous studies on this experimental method by introducing several contraction ratios and addressing different constitutive models of varying shear and extensional response. The constitutive models included are those of the constant viscosity Oldroyd-B and FENE-CR models, and the shear-thinning LPTT model. Examining the results, the impact of shear and first normal stress difference on the measured pressure drop are studied through numerical pressure drop predictions. In addition, stream function patterns are investigated to detect vortex development and influence of contraction ratio. The numerical predictions are further related to experimental measurements for the flow through a 15:1 contraction ratio with three different test fluids. The measured pressure drops are observed to exhibit the same trends as predicted in the numerical simulations, offering close correlation and tight predictive windows for experimental data capture. This result has demonstrated that the hyperbolic contraction flow is well able to detect such elastic fluid properties and that this is matched by numerical predictions in evaluation of their flow response. The hyperbolical contraction flow technique is commended for its distinct benefits: it is straightforward and simple to perform, the Hencky strain can be set by changing contraction ratio, non-homogeneous fluids can be tested, and one can directly determine the degree of elastic fluid behaviour. Based on matching of viscometric extensional viscosity response for FENE-CR and LPTT models, a decline is predicted in pressure drop for

  20. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning.

    PubMed

    Arattano, Massimo; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2008-04-04

    Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows), their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and nonstructural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall) and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche pendulums, photocells

  1. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning

    PubMed Central

    Arattano, Massimo; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows), their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and non-structural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall) and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche pendulums

  2. Performance evaluation of a flow-down collecting solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.J.; Kanayama, Kimio; Baba, Hiromu; Endo, Noboru

    1999-07-01

    The authors carried out experimental studies on a solar system of solar heat pump/PV system. From the experiments during March and April 1997, the authors obtained only results much lower than their goals. As one of their goals, coefficient of performance of collecting system should be 50 or more. Investigating the reasons on the above, they found that the capacity of a collecting pump was excessive, and the pipelines were too long. Even if these faults were corrected, however, it would be difficult to consider that the performance of the system could be markedly improved. In order to increase the performance of the system, a drastic improvement including the system flow was done. That is, to common knowledge, the forced circulating-type solar system was greatly changed, i.e., circulating direction of working fluid (water) in the system was reversed, and the water collected solar energy during flow down by its own gravity. Changing the system flow and the system control, reducing capacity of the collecting pump and shortening length of the pipelines, the original solar system was remade drastically into a flow-down collecting solar system, so that the electric power consumption was decreased by 64%, and the coefficient of performance of the collecting system was greatly increased from 29 to 65 without changing collector efficiency. This paper discussed mainly the system performance on the basis of the correlation between the collector efficiency and the flow rate of working fluid (water), the correlation between the coefficient of performance of the collecting system, and the flow rate, as well as the correlation between the merit factor and the flow rate.

  3. Design flow factors for sewerage systems in small arid communities.

    PubMed

    Imam, Emad H; Elnakar, Haitham Y

    2014-09-01

    Reliable estimation of sewage flow rates is essential for the proper design of sewers, pumping stations, and treatment plants. The design of the various components of the sewerage system should be based on the most critical flow rates with a focus on extremely low and peak flow rates that would be sustained for a duration related to the acceptable limits of behavior of the components under consideration. The extreme flow conditions and to what extent they differ from the average values are closely related to the size of the community or network, and the socioeconomic conditions. A single pumping station is usually sufficient to pump flow from small community in either flat or non-undulating topography. Therefore, the hydraulic loading on the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) results from the pumped flow from the pumping station rather than the trunk sewer flow. The intermittent operation of the pumping units further accentuates the sewage hydrograph in the final trunk sewer. Accordingly, the design flow for the various components of the WWTP should be determined based on their relevant flow factors. In this study, analysis of one representative small community out of five monitored small communities in Egypt and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is presented. Pumped sewage flow rates were measured and the sewer incoming flows were hydraulically derived. The hourly and daily sewer and pumped flow records were analyzed to derive the relationship between the flow factors that would be sustained for various durations (instantaneously, 1 h, 2 h, etc.) and their probability of non-exceedance. The resulting peaking factors with a consideration for their sustained flow duration and specified probability would permit the design of the various components of the treatment plant using more accurate critical flows.

  4. Design flow factors for sewerage systems in small arid communities

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Emad H.; Elnakar, Haitham Y.

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimation of sewage flow rates is essential for the proper design of sewers, pumping stations, and treatment plants. The design of the various components of the sewerage system should be based on the most critical flow rates with a focus on extremely low and peak flow rates that would be sustained for a duration related to the acceptable limits of behavior of the components under consideration. The extreme flow conditions and to what extent they differ from the average values are closely related to the size of the community or network, and the socioeconomic conditions. A single pumping station is usually sufficient to pump flow from small community in either flat or non-undulating topography. Therefore, the hydraulic loading on the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) results from the pumped flow from the pumping station rather than the trunk sewer flow. The intermittent operation of the pumping units further accentuates the sewage hydrograph in the final trunk sewer. Accordingly, the design flow for the various components of the WWTP should be determined based on their relevant flow factors. In this study, analysis of one representative small community out of five monitored small communities in Egypt and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is presented. Pumped sewage flow rates were measured and the sewer incoming flows were hydraulically derived. The hourly and daily sewer and pumped flow records were analyzed to derive the relationship between the flow factors that would be sustained for various durations (instantaneously, 1 h, 2 h, etc.) and their probability of non-exceedance. The resulting peaking factors with a consideration for their sustained flow duration and specified probability would permit the design of the various components of the treatment plant using more accurate critical flows. PMID:25685521

  5. Comparative testing of various flow-cell detectors fabricated using CaF{sub 2} solid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Ohashi, H.; Hamada, Y.; Jamsranjav, E.

    2015-03-15

    A monitoring system based on a flow-cell detector was developed for measuring the tritium concentration in water. The flow-cell detector was fabricated using a granular CaF{sub 2} solid scintillator. This system does not use a liquid scintillation counting system and does not generate radioactive organic liquid waste. Moreover, continuous real-time measurements are possible, in contrast to a liquid scintillation counting system, which requires batch measurements. For further development of the system, four flow-cell detectors were fabricated. They included a single 3-mm-diameter cell, three 3-mm-diameter cells in series, a single 5-mm-diameter cell, and three 5-mm-diameter cells in series. Continuously flowing water containing tritium at various concentrations was passed through the flow cells, and tritium count were measured for 600 and 10000 s. Investigating the relation between the count rate and concentration, the three 5-mm-diameter cells were most sensitive, with a linear relation maintained down to approximately 2 Bq/ml and 10 Bq/ml for 10000- and 600-s measurements, respectively. (authors)

  6. Experimental analysis of internal gas flow configurations for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, A.; Fraser, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. R.; Hacker, V.

    The internal gas distribution system utilised for supplying fresh reactants and removing reaction products from the individual cells of a fuel cell stack can be designed in a parallel, a serial or a mixture of parallel and serial gas flow configuration. In order to investigate the interdependence between the internal stack gas distribution configuration and single cell as well as overall stack performance, a small laboratory-scale fuel cell stack consisting of identical unit cells was subject to operation with different gas distribution configurations and different operating parameters. The current/voltage characteristics measured with the different gas distribution configurations are analysed and compared on unit cell- as well as on stack-level. The results show the significant impact of the internal stack gas distribution system on operation and performance of the individual unit cells and the overall stack.

  7. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging with a handheld system.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Pim J; Daoudi, Khalid; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-02-01

    Flow imaging is an important technique in a range of disease areas, but estimating low flow speeds, especially near the walls of blood vessels, remains challenging. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging can be an alternative since there is little signal contamination from background tissue with photoacoustic imaging. We propose flow imaging using a clinical photoacoustic system that is both handheld and portable. The system integrates a linear array with 7.5 MHz central frequency in combination with a high-repetition-rate diode laser to allow high-speed photoacoustic imaging--ideal for this application. This work shows the flow imaging performance of the system in vitro using microparticles. Both two-dimensional (2-D) flow images and quantitative flow velocities from 12 to 75  mm/s were obtained. In a transparent bulk medium, flow estimation showed standard errors of ∼7% the estimated speed; in the presence of tissue-realistic optical scattering, the error increased to 40% due to limited signal-to-noise ratio. In the future, photoacoustic flow imaging can potentially be performed in vivo using fluorophore-filled vesicles or with an improved setup on whole blood.

  8. Stress distributions and cell flows in a growing cell aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Delarue, Morgan; Joanny, Jean-François; Jülicher, Frank; Prost, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the short-time response of a multicellular spheroid to an external pressure jump. Our experiments show that 5 min after the pressure jump, the cell density increases in the centre of the spheroid but does not change appreciably close to the surface of the spheroid. This result can be explained if the cells are polarized which we show to be the case. Motivated by the experimental results, we develop a theory for polarized spheroids where the cell polarity is radial (except in a thin shell close to the spheroid surface). The theory takes into account the dependence of cell division and apoptosis rates on the local stress, the cell polarity and active stress generated by the cells and the dependence of active stress on the local pressure. We find a short-time increase of the cell density after a pressure jump that decays as a power law from the spheroid centre, which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. By comparing our theory to experiments, we can estimate the isotropic compression modulus of the tissue. PMID:25485084

  9. Flow visualization in capillary pumped loop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kolos, K.R.; Herold, K.E.; Kroliczek, E.J.; Swanson, T.D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes on-going efforts to better understand capillary pumped loop (CPL) physics using flow visualization as the primary tool. Design issues include vapor bubble dynamics on the liquid side of the wick and pressure fluctuations. Significant progress has been made in understanding these issues through flow visualization. Recent efforts revolve around design and testing of a water CPL running at an evaporator temperature of approximately 313 to 323 K. Ground testing confirmed the ability to run a CPL at sub-atmospheric pressure. However, the low pressure introduces several design and operational aspects that are unique as compared to ammonia CPL practice. These aspects are summarized and described. Current focus is on a water CPL flight experiment called VIEW-CPL, which is expected to fly on the Shuttle Middeck around November 1996. The design and proposed test objectives for VIEW-CPL are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. The application of flow cytophotometry in measurements of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, K; Watson, J V; Barnard, P J; Barnard, E A; Thomas, K; Freedman, L; de Stavola, B

    1986-01-01

    A common approach to the study of cell substrate interactions is the measurement of the attachment of cells to different substrates or to cultured cell layers. The evaluation of attachment is made either by scintillation counting of previously labelled adhering cells, or by light microscopy using the criterion of cell shape, sometimes refined by automatic image analysis. These methods have many drawbacks. This paper suggests the use of fluorescence-activated flow cytophotometry, (FC) which yields direct counts of the non-adhering cells. These "free" cells are removed after completion of the adhesion experiment from the microtitre plate wells. An internal standard, in the form of fluorescent polystyrene beads is added, allowing evaluation of the percentage of cells adhering to the well walls. Flow cytophotometry then produces data based on the analysis of large populations of cells. Unequivocal discrimination is obtained between the counted cells and counted fluorescent beads eliminating counting errors. The results can be processed on line by computer. A suspension of mouse splenocytes was used for the evaluation of the overall error of the method arising from inaccuracies in pipetting, interference of glutaraldehyde with ethidium bromide (EB) staining and instrumental error. Each adhesion experiment was terminated by staining and post-fixation and it was established that this introduces no change in cell counting, in comparison with the original unfixed cells. Prefixation, however, quenches the EB staining and would interfere with the counting procedure. The overall standard error of the technique was found to be 5%-10%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Cell-cooling in flow cytometry by Peltier elements.

    PubMed

    Göttlinger, C; Meyer, K L; Weichel, W; Müller, W; Raftery, B; Radbruch, A

    1986-05-01

    We have built a cooling device for cell suspensions in flow cytometry that makes use of the Peltier effect (Barnard RD, Thermo electricity in Metals and Alloys, Taylor and Francis, London; Siemens-Z 34:383-88, 1963). The prototype described here is used for cooling collection tubes during long-duration cell sorting and is capable of maintaining a temperature of 2-5 degrees C in a cell suspension of up to 3 ml. In general, Peltier element-based cooling is useful for equilibrating the temperature of small volumes of fluids. Furthermore, Peltier element-based cooling devices are easy to build and handle.

  12. Evaluation of coloured materials in microfluidic flow-cells for chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Spilstead, Kara B; Alexander, Richard; Doeven, Egan H; Haswell, Stephen J; Barnett, Neil W; Francis, Paul S

    2017-05-22

    Recent advances in the construction of chemiluminescence flow-cells has included high precision milling of channels into a range of different polymer materials, in efforts to maximise the transfer of light from the chemical reaction to the photodetector. However, little is known of the extent that the colour of polymer materials will influence this transfer. This may become increasingly important as chemiluminescence detection zones are integrated with other operations within microfluidic devices or micro total analysis systems (μTAS). Herein, we compare microfluidic flow-cells fabricated from five polymer sheets (clear, white, black, red, blue), using two flow-cell designs (spiral and serpentine), two modes of photodetection, and four chemiluminescence reactions that provide a range of different emission colours. The direct transfer of light from the reaction within the white flow-cell channel to the photodetector made only minor contributions (10%-20%) to the measured intensity, with the majority of the measured light first interacting with the polymer material into which the channels were machined. The extent that the emitted light was absorbed or reflected by the coloured polymer materials was dependent on not only the properties of the polymer, but also the spectral distribution of the chemiluminescence. The changes in chemiluminescence intensities from absorption of light by the flow-cell materials can be accompanied by distortion of the spectral distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Closed Circuit And The Low Flow Systems

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, S

    2013-01-01

    A breathing system is defined as an assembly of components, which delivers gases from the anesthesia machine to the patients’ airways. When the components are arranged as a circle, it is termed a circle system. The flow of exhaled gases is unidirectional in the system. The system contains a component (absorber), which absorbs exhaled carbon dioxide and it is not necessary to give high fresh gas flows as in Mapleson systems. When the adjustable pressure limiting (APL) valve is closed and all the exhaled gases without carbon dioxide are returned to the patient, the system becomes a totally closed one. Such a circle system can be used with flows as low as 250 to 500 mL and clinically can be termed as low-flow systems. The components of the circle system can be arranged in different ways with adherence to basic rules: (1) Unidirectional valve must be present between the reservoir bag and the patient on both inspiratory and expiratory sides; (2) fresh gas must not enter the system between the expiratory unidirectional valve and the patient; and (3) the APL valve must not be placed between the patient and the inspiratory unidirectional valve. The functional analysis is explained in detail. During the function, the arrangement of components is significant only at higher fresh gas flows. With the introduction of low resistance valves, improved soda lime canisters and low dead space connectors, the use of less complicated pediatric circle systems is gaining popularity to anesthetize children. There are bidirectional flow systems with carbon dioxide absorption. The Waters to and fro system, a classic example of bidirectional flow systems with a canister to absorb carbon dioxide, is valveless and portable. It was widely used in the past and now is only of historical importance. PMID:24249885

  14. A real time interferometry system for unsteady flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, N. J.; Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.

    1991-01-01

    A simple real-time interferometer system was developed for use in dynamic stall and other unsteady flow research at compressible flow speeds. A conventional schlieren system was modified to operate as a point diffraction interferometer. The implementation of this interferometer is discussed, and results of trials with different point diffractors are presented in this paper. The performance of the interferometer under various flow conditions was investigated. Results are presented which show the effects of the interferometer parameters such as pinhole size and pinhole-plate optical density on the performance of the system.

  15. Reversible logic gates based on enzyme-biocatalyzed reactions and realized in flow cells: a modular approach.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Brian E; Katz, Evgeny

    2015-05-18

    Reversible logic gates, such as the double Feynman gate, Toffoli gate and Peres gate, with 3-input/3-output channels are realized using reactions biocatalyzed with enzymes and performed in flow systems. The flow devices are constructed using a modular approach, where each flow cell is modified with one enzyme that biocatalyzes one chemical reaction. The multi-step processes mimicking the reversible logic gates are organized by combining the biocatalytic cells in different networks. This work emphasizes logical but not physical reversibility of the constructed systems. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and potential use in biosensing systems, rather than in computing devices, is suggested.

  16. Circulation system for flowing uranium hexafluoride cavity reactor experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaminet, J. F.; Kendall, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Research related to determining the feasibility of producing continuous power from fissile fuel in the gaseous state is presented. The development of three laboratory-scale flow systems for handling gaseous UF6 at temperatures up to 500 K, pressure up to approximately 40 atm, and continuous flow rates up to approximately 50g/s is presented. A UF6 handling system fabricated for static critical tests currently being conducted is described. The system was designed to supply UF6 to a double-walled aluminum core canister assembly at temperatures between 300 K and 400 K and pressure up to 4 atm. A second UF6 handling system designed to provide a circulating flow of up to 50g/s of gaseous UF6 in a closed-loop through a double-walled aluminum core canister with controlled temperature and pressure is described. Data from flow tests using UF6 and UF6/He mixtures with this system at flow rates up to approximately 12g/s and pressure up to 4 atm are presented. A third UF6 handling system fabricated to provide a continuous flow of UF6 at flow rates up to 5g/s and at pressures up to 40 atm for use in rf-heated, uranium plasma confinement experiments is described.

  17. Circulation system for flowing uranium hexafluoride cavity reactor experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaminet, J. F.; Kendall, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    Research related to determining the feasibility of producing continuous power from fissile fuel in the gaseous state is presented. The development of three laboratory-scale flow systems for handling gaseous UF6 at temperatures up to 500 K, pressure up to approximately 40 atm, and continuous flow rates up to approximately 50g/s is presented. A UF6 handling system fabricated for static critical tests currently being conducted is described. The system was designed to supply UF6 to a double-walled aluminum core canister assembly at temperatures between 300 K and 400 K and pressure up to 4 atm. A second UF6 handling system designed to provide a circulating flow of up to 50g/s of gaseous UF6 in a closed-loop through a double-walled aluminum core canister with controlled temperature and pressure is described. Data from flow tests using UF6 and UF6/He mixtures with this system at flow rates up to approximately 12g/s and pressure up to 4 atm are presented. A third UF6 handling system fabricated to provide a continuous flow of UF6 at flow rates up to 5g/s and at pressures up to 40 atm for use in rf-heated, uranium plasma confinement experiments is described.

  18. Dynamics of model blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Callens, Natacha; Minetti, Christophe; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Misbah, Chaouqi

    The dynamics of a vesicle suspension in shear flow was investigated by digital holographic microscopy [1] in parabolic flights and in the MASER 11 sounding rocket. Vesicles are lipid membranes which mimic the mechanical behaviour of cells, such as red blood cells in flow. In a simple shear flow between parallel walls, a lift force of purely viscous origin pushes vesicles away from walls. Our parabolic flight experiments [2] reveal that the lift velocity in a dilute suspen-sion is well described by theoretical predictions by Olla. As vesicles gather near the center of the flow chamber due to lift forces from both walls, one expects hydrodynamic interactions of pairs of vesicles to result in shear induced diffusion in the suspension. The BIOMICS experi-ment in the MASER 11 sounding rocket revealed a complex spatial structure of a polydisperse vesicle suspension due to the interplay between lift forces from the walls and hydrodynamic interactions. These phenomena have a strong impact on the structure and rheology of blood in small vessels, and a precise knowledge of the dynamics of migration and diffusion of soft particles in flow can lead to alternative ways to separate and sort blood cells. 1. Dubois, F., Schockaert, C., Callens, N., Yourrassowsky, C., "Focus plane detection criteria in digital holography microscopy by amplitude analysis", Opt. Express, Vol. 14, pp 5895-5908, 2006 2. Callens, N., Minetti, C., Coupier, G., Mader, M.-A., Dubois, F., Misbah, C., Podgorski, T., "Hydrodynamics lift of vesicles under shear flow in microgravity", Europhys. Lett., Vol. 83, p. 24002, 2008

  19. A Review of Hydrogen/Halogen Flow Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Kyu Taek; Tucker, Michael C.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2016-05-17

    Flow batteries provide an energy-storage solution for various grid-related stability and service issues that arise as renewable-energy-generation technologies are adopted. Among the most promising flow-battery systems are those using hydrogen/halogen redox couples, which promise the possibility of meeting the cost target of the US Department of Energy (DOE), due to their fast and reversible kinetics and low materials cost. However, significant critical issues and barriers for their adoption remain. In this review of halogen/hydrogen systems, technical and performance issues, and research and development progress are reviewed. The information in this review can be used as a technical guide for researchmore » and development of related redox-flow-battery systems and other electrochemical technologies.« less

  20. A Review of Hydrogen/Halogen Flow Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyu Taek; Tucker, Michael C.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2016-05-17

    Flow batteries provide an energy-storage solution for various grid-related stability and service issues that arise as renewable-energy-generation technologies are adopted. Among the most promising flow-battery systems are those using hydrogen/halogen redox couples, which promise the possibility of meeting the cost target of the US Department of Energy (DOE), due to their fast and reversible kinetics and low materials cost. However, significant critical issues and barriers for their adoption remain. In this review of halogen/hydrogen systems, technical and performance issues, and research and development progress are reviewed. The information in this review can be used as a technical guide for research and development of related redox-flow-battery systems and other electrochemical technologies.

  1. System proportions fluid-flow in response to demand signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Control system provides proportioned fluid flow rates in response to demand signals. It compares a digital signal, representing a flow demand, with a reference signal to yield a control voltage to one or more solenoid valves connected to orifices of a predetermined size.

  2. Detection of artificial water flows by the lateral line system of a benthic feeding cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Margot A B; Sevey, Benjamin J; Webb, Jacqueline F

    2016-04-01

    The mechanosensory lateral line system of fishes detects water motions within a few body lengths of the source. Several types of artificial stimuli have been used to probe lateral line function in the laboratory, but few studies have investigated the role of flow sensing in benthic feeding teleosts. In this study, we used artificial flows emerging from a sandy substrate to assess the contribution of flow sensing to prey detection in the peacock cichlid, Aulonocara stuartgranti, which feeds on benthic invertebrates in Lake Malawi. Using a positive reinforcement protocol, we trained fish to respond to flows lacking the visual and chemical cues generated by tethered prey in prior studies with A. stuartgranti Fish successfully responded to artificial flows at all five rates presented (characterized using digital particle image velocimetry), and showed a range of flow-sensing behaviors, including an unconditioned bite response. Immediately after lateral line inactivation, fish rarely responded to flows and the loss of vital fluorescent staining of hair cells (with 4-di-2-ASP) verified lateral line inactivation. Within 2 days post-treatment, some aspects of flow-sensing behavior returned and after 7 days, flow-sensing behavior and hair cell fluorescence both returned to pre-treatment levels, which is consistent with the reported timing of hair cell regeneration in other vertebrates. The presentation of ecologically relevant water flows to assess flow-sensing behaviors and the use of a positive reinforcement protocol are methods that present new opportunities to study the role of flow sensing in the feeding ecology of benthic feeding fishes.

  3. Non-Flow Through Fuel Cell Power Module Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakupca, Ian; Guzik, Monica; Bennett, William R.; Edwards, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    NASA demonstrated the Advanced Product Water Removal (APWR) Non-Flow-Through (NFT) PEM fuel cell technology by powering the Scarab rover over three-(3) days of field operations. The latest generation APWR NFT fuel cell stackwas packaged by the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Modular Power Systems (AMPS) team into a nominallyrated 1-kW fuel cell power module. This power module was functionally verified in a laboratory prior to field operations on the Scarab rover, which concluded on 2 September 2015. During this demonstration, the power module satisfied all required success criteria by supporting all electrical loads as the Scarab navigated the NASA Glenn Research Center.

  4. Multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    George, Thomas J.; Smith, William C.

    2000-01-01

    A high efficiency, multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus is provided. The fuel cell system is comprised of multiple fuel cell stages, whereby the temperatures of the fuel and oxidant gas streams and the percentage of fuel consumed in each stage are controlled to optimize fuel cell system efficiency. The stages are connected in a serial, flow-through arrangement such that the oxidant gas and fuel gas flowing through an upstream stage is conducted directly into the next adjacent downstream stage. The fuel cell stages are further arranged such that unspent fuel and oxidant laden gases too hot to continue within an upstream stage because of material constraints are conducted into a subsequent downstream stage which comprises a similar cell configuration, however, which is constructed from materials having a higher heat tolerance and designed to meet higher thermal demands. In addition, fuel is underutilized in each stage, resulting in a higher overall fuel cell system efficiency.

  5. Multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    George, Thomas J.; Smith, William C.

    1997-12-01

    A high efficiency, multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus is provided. The fuel cell system is comprised of multiple fuel cell stages, whereby the temperatures of the fuel and oxidant gas streams and the percentage of fuel consumed in each stage are controlled to optimize fuel cell system efficiency. The stages are connected in a serial, flow-through arrangement such that the oxidant gas and fuel gas flowing through an upstream stage is conducted directly into the next adjacent downstream stage. The fuel cell stages are further arranged such that unspent fuel and oxidant laden gases too hot to continue within an upstream stage because of material constraints are conducted into a subsequent downstream stage which comprises a similar cell configuration, however, which is constructed from materials having a higher heat tolerance and designed to meet higher thermal demands. In addition, fuel is underutilized in each stage, resulting in a higher overall fuel cell system efficiency.

  6. [Cell polarity in the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Haller, C; Kübler, W

    1999-05-01

    The importance of cell polarity as a fundamental biological principle is increasingly recognized in the cardiovascular system. Polar cell mechanisms underlie not only the development of the heart and blood vessels, but also play a major role in the adult organism for polarized endothelial functions such as the separation of the intra- and extravascular compartment and the vectorial exchange of substances between these compartments. Endothelial cells are connected through intercellular junctions which separate the functionally and structurally distinct luminal and abluminal cell surfaces. The luminal plasma membrane is in contact with the blood and takes part in the regulation of hemostasis. The abluminal cell membrane connects the endothelial cell with the basement membrane and modulates blood flow through the release of vasoactive substances. Results from epithelial model systems have shown that the polarized cell phenotype is generated by specific protein sorting and regulated protein trafficking between the trans-Golgi network and the cell surface. The polarized distribution of cell membrane proteins is maintained by anchorage with the cytoskeleton and limitation of lateral diffusion by tight junctions. Disturbances of cell polarity may contribute to the pathogenesis of disease states, including ischemic and radiocontrast-induced acute renal failure and carcinomas. Recent results have demonstrated the importance of cholesterol for protein traffic from the trans-Golgi network to the apical cell membrane. This novel intracellular function of cholesterol could point to a connection between cell polarity and the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. The polarity of the endothelium also has to be taken into account when developing gene-therapeutic strategies, since therapeutic success will not only depend on the efficient expression of the desired gene product, but also on its correct cellular location or secretion into the correct extracellular compartment. These

  7. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    PubMed

    Boric, Katica; Orio, Patricio; Viéville, Thierry; Whitlock, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP) in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  8. Characterizing blood cells by biophysical measurements in flow.

    PubMed

    Groner, W; Tycko, D

    1980-01-01

    One effect of automation in the hematology laboratory has been to introduce new characterizations of blood cells. Resistive pulse sensing (Coulter) and light scatter measurements in flow provide rapid and reproducible cell counts. They also provide information about red cell size, shape, and deformability. Thus, they have provided new characterization of these cells in terms of their biophysical properties. Leukocytes have been classified by optical scatter and absorption measurements in flow after being stained cytochemically. This provides rapid and precise WBC differential counts. However, here again, additional information about relative cell-enzyme content or activity is also accessible to provide a new characterization of the leukocytes. The ultimate range of utility of this expanding technology in the automated hematology laboratory of the future will, of course, depend upon establishing relations between the biophysical parameters and the functions of the cells. This, in turn, must depend upon the use of the technology by researchers and clinicians in studying cell function and the aberrations of these functions which define disease.

  9. Unstructured Euler flow solutions using hexahedral cell refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Thomas, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to extend grid refinement into three dimensions by using unstructured hexahedral grids. The flow solver is developed using the TIGER (topologically Independent Grid, Euler Refinement) as the starting point. The program uses an unstructured hexahedral mesh and a modified version of the Jameson four-stage, finite-volume Runge-Kutta algorithm for integration of the Euler equations. The unstructured mesh allows for local refinement appropriate for each freestream condition, thereby concentrating mesh cells in the regions of greatest interest. This increases the computational efficiency because the refinement is not required to extend throughout the entire flow field.

  10. Hydrodynamic modeling of granular flows in a modified Couette cell.

    PubMed

    Jop, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    We present simulations of granular flows in a modified Couette cell, using a continuum model recently proposed for dense granular flows. Based on a friction coefficient, which depends on an inertial number, the model captures the positions of the wide shear bands. We show that a smooth transition in velocity-profile shape occurs when the height of the granular material is increased, leading to a differential rotation of the central part close to the surface. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results. The model provides predictions for the increase of the shear band width when the rotation rate is increased.

  11. Compact Fuel-Cell System Would Consume Neat Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Kindler, Andrew; Valdez, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed direct methanol fuel-cell electric-power-generating system, the fuel cells would consume neat methanol, in contradistinction to the dilute aqueous methanol solutions consumed in prior direct methanol fuel-cell systems. The design concept of the proposed fuel-cell system takes advantage of (1) electro-osmotic drag and diffusion processes to manage the flows of hydrogen and water between the anode and the cathode and (2) evaporative cooling for regulating temperature. The design concept provides for supplying enough water to the anodes to enable the use of neat methanol while ensuring conservation of water for the whole fuel-cell system.

  12. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Sengupta, Shramik; Viator, John A.

    2011-03-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are inadequately sensitive. Patients must wait until secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and flow through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring cancer. Our group utilizes the photoacoustic effect to detect metastatic melanoma cells, which contain the pigmented granule melanin. As a rapid laser pulse irradiates melanoma, the melanin undergoes thermo-elastic expansion and ultimately creates a photoacoustic wave. Thus, melanoma patient's blood samples can be enriched, leaving the melanoma in a white blood cell (WBC) suspension. Irradiated melanoma cells produce photoacoustic waves, which are detected with a piezoelectric transducer, while the optically transparent WBCs create no signals. Here we report an isolation scheme utilizing two-phase flow to separate detected melanoma from the suspension. By introducing two immiscible fluids through a t-junction into one flow path, the analytes are compartmentalized. Therefore, the slug in which the melanoma cell is located can be identified and extracted from the system. Two-phase immiscible flow is a label free technique, and could be used for other types of pathological analytes.

  13. Development of Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) for a Quantitative Characterization of Microbial Mass in Flow Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saripalli, Prasad; Brown, Christopher F.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2005-03-16

    We report on a new Cellular Absorptive Tracers (CATs) method, for a simple, non-destructive characterization of bacterial mass in flow systems. Results show that adsorption of a CAT molecule into the cellular mass results in its retardation during flow, which is a good, quantitative measure of the biomass quantity and distribution. No such methods are currently available for a quantitative characterization of cell mass.

  14. Computational analysis of fluid flow within a device for applying biaxial strain to cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason; Baker, Aaron B

    2015-05-01

    In vitro systems for applying mechanical strain to cultured cells are commonly used to investigate cellular mechanotransduction pathways in a variety of cell types. These systems often apply mechanical forces to a flexible membrane on which cells are cultured. A consequence of the motion of the membrane in these systems is the generation of flow and the unintended application of shear stress to the cells. We recently described a flexible system for applying mechanical strain to cultured cells, which uses a linear motor to drive a piston array to create biaxial strain within multiwell culture plates. To better understand the fluidic stresses generated by this system and other systems of this type, we created a computational fluid dynamics model to simulate the flow during the mechanical loading cycle. Alterations in the frequency or maximal strain magnitude led to a linear increase in the average fluid velocity within the well and a nonlinear increase in the shear stress at the culture surface over the ranges tested (0.5-2.0 Hz and 1-10% maximal strain). For all cases, the applied shear stresses were relatively low and on the order of millipascal with a dynamic waveform having a primary and secondary peak in the shear stress over a single mechanical strain cycle. These findings should be considered when interpreting experimental results using these devices, particularly in the case when the cell type used is sensitive to low magnitude, oscillatory shear stresses.

  15. Photothermal imaging of moving cells in lymph and blood flow in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2004-07-01

    The in vivo capabilities of a new, integrated optical system for studying lymph and blood flow were explored, including imaging of moving red and white blood cells. This system combined transmission microscopy with different dual-beam photothermal (PT) techniques, such as PT imaging, PT thermolens method, and PT deflection velocimetry. All of these PT techniques are based on irradiation of rat mesenteric microvessels with a short laser pulse and on detection of temperature-dependent variations of the refractive index with a second, probe laser beam. In general, the concept of in vivo PT flow cytometry was developed, with a focus on real-time monitoring of moving blood cells in their natural states without labeling (e.g., fluorescent), including obtaining PT images of the cells and determining their flow velocity and response to different interventions. Preliminary experiments revealed many potential applications of this integrated system: (1) quantitation of lymph and blood flow without probes; (2) imaging of moving red and white blood cells; (3) visualization and tracking of PT nanoprobes and sensitizers; (4) comparison of laser-tissue interactions in vivo and in vitro, especially optimization of laser treatment of vascular lesions (port-wine stains, lymphatic malformations, etc.); and (5) determination of the link between in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity studies.

  16. In Vitro Model of Physiological and Pathological Blood Flow with Application to Investigations of Vascular Cell Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Winston; Scott-Drechsel, Devon; Tan, Wei

    2015-11-03

    Vascular disease is a common cause of death within the United States. Herein, we present a method to examine the contribution of flow dynamics towards vascular disease pathologies. Unhealthy arteries often present with wall stiffening, scarring, or partial stenosis which may all affect fluid flow rates, and the magnitude of pulsatile flow, or pulsatility index. Replication of various flow conditions is the result of tuning a flow pressure damping chamber downstream of a blood pump. Introduction of air within a closed flow system allows for a compressible medium to absorb pulsatile pressure from the pump, and therefore vary the pulsatility index. The method described herein is simply reproduced, with highly controllable input, and easily measurable results. Some limitations are recreation of the complex physiological pulse waveform, which is only approximated by the system. Endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts are affected by the blood flow through the artery. The dynamic component of blood flow is determined by the cardiac output and arterial wall compliance. Vascular cell mechano-transduction of flow dynamics may trigger cytokine release and cross-talk between cell types within the artery. Co-culture of vascular cells is a more accurate picture reflecting cell-cell interaction on the blood vessel wall and vascular response to mechanical signaling. Contribution of flow dynamics, including the cell response to the dynamic and mean (or steady) components of flow, is therefore an important metric in determining disease pathology and treatment efficacy. Through introducing an in vitro co-culture model and pressure damping downstream of blood pump which produces simulated cardiac output, various arterial disease pathologies may be investigated.

  17. Guide to Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Jason D.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Snyder, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In electric propulsion (EP) systems, accurate measurement of the propellant mass flow rate of gas or liquid to the thruster and external cathode is a key input in the calculation of thruster efficiency and specific impulse. Although such measurements are often achieved with commercial mass flow controllers and meters integrated into propellant feed systems, the variability in potential propellant options and flow requirements amongst the spectrum of EP power regimes and devices complicates meter selection, integration, and operation. At the direction of the Committee on Standards for Electric Propulsion Testing, a guide was jointly developed by members of the electric propulsion community to establish a unified document that contains the working principles, methods of implementation and analysis, and calibration techniques and recommendations on the use of mass flow meters in laboratory and spacecraft electric propulsion systems. The guide is applicable to EP devices of all types and power levels ranging from microthrusters to high-power ion engines and Hall effect thrusters. The establishment of a community standard on mass flow metering will help ensure the selection of the proper meter for each application. It will also improve the quality of system performance estimates by providing comprehensive information on the physical phenomena and systematic errors that must be accounted for during the analysis of flow measurement data. This paper will outline the standard methods and recommended practices described in the guide titled "Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems."

  18. Guide to Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieman, Jason D.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Snyder, Steve

    2013-01-01

    In electric propulsion (EP) systems, accurate measurement of the propellant mass flow rate of gas or liquid to the thruster and external cathode is a key input in the calculation of thruster efficiency and specific impulse. Although such measurements are often achieved with commercial mass flow controllers and meters integrated into propellant feed systems, the variability in potential propellant options and flow requirements amongst the spectrum of EP power regimes and devices complicates meter selection, integration, and operation. At the direction of the Committee on Standards for Electric Propulsion Testing, a guide was jointly developed by members of the electric propulsion community to establish a unified document that contains the working principles, methods of implementation and analysis, and calibration techniques and recommendations on the use of mass flow meters in laboratory and spacecraft electric propulsion systems. The guide is applicable to EP devices of all types and power levels ranging from microthrusters to high-power ion engines and Hall effect thrusters. The establishment of a community standard on mass flow metering will help ensure the selection of the proper meter for each application. It will also improve the quality of system performance estimates by providing comprehensive information on the physical phenomena and systematic errors that must be accounted for during the analysis of flow measurement data. This paper will outline the standard methods and recommended practices described in the guide titled "Flow Measurement for Electric Propulsion Systems."

  19. Boundary-layer-ingesting inlet flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R. (Inventor); Allan, Brian G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for reducing distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of a boundary-layer-ingesting inlet using a combination of active and passive flow control devices is disclosed. Active flow control jets and vortex generating vanes are used in combination to reduce distortion across a range of inlet operating conditions. Together, the vortex generating vanes can reduce most of the inlet distortion and the active flow control jets can be used at a significantly reduced control jet mass flow rate to make sure the inlet distortion stays low as the inlet mass flow rate varies. Overall inlet distortion, measured and described as average SAE circumferential distortion descriptor, was maintained at a value of 0.02 or less. Advantageous arrangements and orientations of the active flow control jets and the vortex generating vanes were developed using computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel experimentations.

  20. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  1. Heat recovery subsystem and overall system integration of fuel cell on-site integrated energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, L. J.

    1983-07-01

    The best HVAC (heating, ventilating and air conditioning) subsystem to interface with the Engelhard fuel cell system for application in commercial buildings was determined. To accomplish this objective, the effects of several system and site specific parameters on the economic feasibility of fuel cell/HVAC systems were investigated. An energy flow diagram of a fuel cell/HVAC system is shown. The fuel cell system provides electricity for an electric water chiller and for domestic electric needs. Supplemental electricity is purchased from the utility if needed. An excess of electricity generated by the fuel cell system can be sold to the utility. The fuel cell system also provides thermal energy which can be used for absorption cooling, space heating and domestic hot water. Thermal storage can be incorporated into the system. Thermal energy is also provided by an auxiliary boiler if needed to supplement the fuel cell system output. Fuel cell/HVAC systems were analyzed with the TRACE computer program.

  2. Numerical analysis of cell adhesion in capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulation of cell adhesion was performed for capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. Despite a lot of works about leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, cell motion in capillaries has remained unclear. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram is obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. According to our numerical results, bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between PSGL-1 and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. This research was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25000008, 26107703, 14J03967. We also acknowledge support from the Tohoku University Division for International Advanced Research and Education Organization.

  3. Effect of Flow on Gene Regulation in Smooth Muscle Cells and Macromolecular Transport Across Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Larry V.; Wagner, John E.; Papadaki, Maria; Whitson, Peggy A.; Eskin, Suzanne G.

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cells line all of the vessels of the circulatory system, providing a non-thrombogenic conduit for blood flow; they regulate many complex functions in the vasculature, such as coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet aggregation, vessel tone and growth, and leukocyte traffic; and they form the principal barrier to transport of substances between the blood and the surrounding tissue space. The permeability of endothelial cell changes with environmental stimuli; shear stress, in particular, applied either in vivo, or in vitro, induces changes in protein expression and secretion of vasoactive factors by endothelial cells. The ability to study the effects of shear on the macromolecular permeability of the cerebral vasculature is particularly important, since in no other place is the barrier function of the endothelium more important than in the brain. The endothelial cells of this organ have developed special barrier properties that keep the cerebral system from experiencing any drastic change in composition; together with glial cells, they form the blood brain barrier (BBB). We have studied the effect of flow on bovine BBB using flow chambers and tissue culture systems.

  4. Effect of Flow on Gene Regulation in Smooth Muscle Cells and Macromolecular Transport Across Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Larry V.; Wagner, John E.; Papadaki, Maria; Whitson, Peggy A.; Eskin, Suzanne G.

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cells line all of the vessels of the circulatory system, providing a non-thrombogenic conduit for blood flow; they regulate many complex functions in the vasculature, such as coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet aggregation, vessel tone and growth, and leukocyte traffic; and they form the principal barrier to transport of substances between the blood and the surrounding tissue space. The permeability of endothelial cell changes with environmental stimuli; shear stress, in particular, applied either in vivo, or in vitro, induces changes in protein expression and secretion of vasoactive factors by endothelial cells. The ability to study the effects of shear on the macromolecular permeability of the cerebral vasculature is particularly important, since in no other place is the barrier function of the endothelium more important than in the brain. The endothelial cells of this organ have developed special barrier properties that keep the cerebral system from experiencing any drastic change in composition; together with glial cells, they form the blood brain barrier (BBB). We have studied the effect of flow on bovine BBB using flow chambers and tissue culture systems.

  5. A simple microfluidic device for the deformability assessment of blood cells in a continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Raquel O; Pinho, Diana; Faustino, Vera; Lima, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Blood flow presents several interesting phenomena in microcirculation that can be used to develop microfluidic devices capable to promote blood cells separation and analysis in continuous flow. In the last decade there have been numerous microfluidic studies focused on the deformation of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through geometries mimicking microvessels. In contrast, studies focusing on the deformation of white blood cells (WBCs) are scarce despite this phenomenon often happens in the microcirculation. In this work, we present a novel integrative microfluidic device able to perform continuous separation of a desired amount of blood cells, without clogging or jamming, and at the same time, capable to assess the deformation index (DI) of both WBCs and RBCs. To determine the DI of both WBCs and RBCs, a hyperbolic converging microchannel was used, as well as a suitable image analysis technique to measure the DIs of these blood cells along the regions of interest. The results show that the WBCs have a much lower deformability than RBCs when subjected to the same in vitro flow conditions, which is directly related to their cytoskeleton and nucleus contents. The proposed strategy can be easily transformed into a simple and inexpensive diagnostic microfluidic system to simultaneously separate and assess blood cells deformability.

  6. Miniature battery-operated electromagnetic system for blood flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, T. B.

    1971-01-01

    System consisting of solid state electronics package and a pair of standard flow-transducer cuffs is useful in cardiovascular studies. Device shows good zero stability and calibrations, and low noise levels.

  7. Fluid Flow Induced Calcium Response in Bone Cell Network

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Bo; Lu, Xin L.; Hung, Clark T.; Costa, Kevin D.; Xu, Qiaobing; Whitesides, George M.; Guo, X. Edward

    2010-01-01

    In our previous work, bone cell networks with controlled spacing and functional intercellular gap junctions had been successfully established by using microcontact printing and self assembled monolayers technologies [Guo, X. E., E. Takai, X. Jiang, Q. Xu, G. M. Whitesides, J. T. Yardley, C. T. Hung, E. M. Chow, T. Hantschel, and K. D. Costa. Mol. Cell. Biomech. 3:95–107, 2006]. The present study investigated the calcium response and the underlying signaling pathways in patterned bone cell networks exposed to a steady fluid flow. The glass slides with cell networks were separated into eight groups for treatment with specific pharmacological agents that inhibit pathways significant in bone cell calcium signaling. The calcium transients of the network were recorded and quantitatively evaluated with a set of network parameters. The results showed that 18α-GA (gap junction blocker), suramin (ATP inhibitor), and thapsigargin (depleting intracellular calcium stores) significantly reduced the occurrence of multiple calcium peaks, which were visually obvious in the untreated group. The number of responsive peaks also decreased slightly yet significantly when either the COX-2/PGE2 or the NOS/nitric oxide pathway was disrupted. Different from all other groups, cells treated with 18α-GA maintained a high concentration of intracellular calcium following the first peak. In the absence of calcium in the culture medium, the intracellular calcium concentration decreased slowly with fluid flow without any calcium transients observed. These findings have identified important factors in the flow mediated calcium signaling of bone cells within a patterned network. PMID:20852730

  8. Energy flow for electric power system deregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hung

    Over the past few years, the electric power utility industry in North America and other countries has experienced a strong drive towards deregulation. People have considered the necessity of deregulation of electric utilities for higher energy efficiency and energy saving. The vertically integrated monopolistic industry is being transferred into a horizontally integrated competitive structure in some countries. Wheeling charges are a current high priority problem throughout the power industry, for independent power producers, as well as regulators. Nevertheless the present transmission pricing mechanism fails to be adjusted by a customer loading condition. Customer loading is dynamic, but the present wheeling charge method is fixed, not real-time. A real-time wheeling charge method is developed in this dissertation. This dissertation introduces a concept of a power flow network which can be used for the calculation of power contribution factors in a network. The contribution factor is defined as the ratio of the power contributed by a particular source to a line flow or bus load to the total output of the source. Generation, transmission, and distribution companies can employ contribution factors for the calculation of energy cost, wheeling charges, and loss compensation. Based on the concept of contribution factors, a proposed loss allocation method is developed in this dissertation. Besides, counterflow condition will be given a credit in the proposed loss allocation method. A simple 22-bus example was used for evaluating the contribution factors, proposed wheeling charge method, and loss allocation method.

  9. Analysis of cell flux in the parallel plate flow chamber: implications for cell capture studies.

    PubMed

    Munn, L L; Melder, R J; Jain, R K

    1994-08-01

    The parallel plate flow chamber provides a controlled environment for determinations of the shear stress at which cells in suspension can bind to endothelial cell monolayers. By decreasing the flow rate of cell-containing media over the monolayer and assessing the number of cells bound at each wall shear stress, the relationship between shear force and binding efficiency can be determined. The rate of binding should depend on the delivery of cells to the surface as well as the intrinsic cell-surface interactions; thus, only if the cell flux to the surface is known can the resulting binding curves be interpreted correctly. We present the development and validation of a mathematical model based on the sedimentation rate and velocity profile in the chamber for the delivery of cells from a flowing suspension to the chamber surface. Our results show that the flux depends on the bulk cell concentration, the distance from the entrance point, and the flow rate of the cell-containing medium. The model was then used in a normalization procedure for experiments in which T cells attach to TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC monolayers, showing that a threshold for adhesion occurs at a shear stress of about 3 dyn/cm2.

  10. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  11. Micro-PIV Measurements of Pulsatile Flow Over Endothelial Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Chiamin; Nackman, Gary; Wei, Timothy

    2007-11-01

    In both humans and mammals, endothelial cells remodel themselves according to mechanical loading by changing shape and orientation. Subsequently, these mechanical forces are transduced into chemical signals, mechanotransduction, involving changes in gene and protein expression. Alterations in mechanotransduction by endothelial cells to underlying smooth muscle cells is a key factor in human arterial disease. The goal of this study is to determine the importance of spatially and temporally varying mechanical loading and examine biological response under different flow conditions. In-vitro micro-PIV measurements are made in pulsatile flow over cultured endothelial cells flush mounted in a small rectangular channel. Cells are subjected to peak shear stress of 20 dynes/cm^2 corresponding to peak Re of 1000 and Womersley number of 1.4. Using multiple measurement planes, local surface height, surface pressure, and wall shear stress are extracted from the measurements. Simultaneous Raman spectroscopy is also being explored to investigate the bio-chemical response of live cultured human and bovine cells.

  12. Convective flows of colloidal suspension in an inclined closed cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorodin, Boris; Cherepanov, Ivan; Ishutov, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear spatiotemporal evolution of convective flows is numerically investigated in the case of colloidal suspension filling an inclined closed cell heated from below. The bifurcation diagram (the dependency of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number) is obtained. The characteristics of the wave and steady patterns are investigated depending on heat intensity. The travelling wave changing travel direction and the non-regular oscillatory flow are found to be stable solutions within a certain interval of the Rayleigh number. Temporal Fourier decomposition is used together with other diagnostic tools to analyse the complex bifurcation and spatiotemporal properties caused by the interplay of the gravity-induced gradient of concentration and convective mixing of the fluid. It is shown that a more complex flow structure exists at a lower heating intensity (Rayleigh number).

  13. Simulation of red blood cell aggregation in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lim, B; Bascom, P A; Cobbold, R S

    1997-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear flow. It is based on a description of the collision rates of RBC, the probability of particles sticking together, and the breakage of aggregates by shear forces. The influence of shear rate, hematocrit, aggregate fractal dimension, and binding strength on aggregation kinetics were investigated and compared to other theoretical and experimental results. The model was used to simulate blood flow in a long large diameter tube under steady flow conditions at low Reynolds numbers. The time and spatial distribution of the state of aggregation are shown to be in qualitative agreement with previous B-mode ultrasound studies in which a central region of low echogenicity was noted. It is suggested that the model can provide a basis for interpreting prior measurements of ultrasound echogenicity and may help relate them to the local state of aggregation.

  14. A Novel Counter Sheet-flow Sandwich Cell Culture Device for Mammalian Cell Growth in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shujin; Gao, Yuxin; Shu, Nanjiang; Tang, Zemei; Tao, Zulai; Long, Mian

    2008-08-01

    Cell culture and growth in space is crucial to understand the cellular responses under microgravity. The effects of microgravity were coupled with such environment restrictions as medium perfusion, in which the underlying mechanism has been poorly understood. In the present work, a customer-made counter sheet-flow sandwich cell culture device was developed upon a biomechanical concept from fish gill breathing. The sandwich culture unit consists of two side chambers where the medium flow is counter-directional, a central chamber where the cells are cultured, and two porous polycarbonate membranes between side and central chambers. Flow dynamics analysis revealed the symmetrical velocity profile and uniform low shear rate distribution of flowing medium inside the central culture chamber, which promotes sufficient mass transport and nutrient supply for mammalian cell growth. An on-orbit experiment performed on a recovery satellite was used to validate the availability of the device.

  15. The Importance of Considering Turbulent Flow when Modelling Adit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Yebra, A.; Hugues, A.; Butler, A. P.; Peach, D.; Jackson, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal shafts, or adits, have historically been dug outward from pumping boreholes in a number of aquifers in the UK to increase yields. Such adit systems are common in the Chalk aquifer, which is a major source of public water supply for south-east England. Adit systems can be complex, individual adits can be kilometres long, and many adits are located beneath river valleys. To understand how these adited sources perform during drought, what impacts they could have on ecologically sensitive rivers, and what pumping yields can be sustained, a modelling approach is required that can represent the physical complexities of these systems and a range of flow processes, including the influence of turbulent flow on drawdown. Despite their size (diameter 2 m), high abstraction rates can mean that flow within adited systems are turbulent and, therefore, Darcian flow equations will underestimate head losses. This, in turn, can affect the estimation of yield during drought conditions. Adit systems have been investigated in the past but turbulence has not been included when modelling them. To investigate the effect of turbulence, modifications to both the numerical discrete-continuum model MODFLOW-2005 Conduit Flow Process and the Connected Linear Network Process implementation in MODFLOW-USG are applied to an idealized adit-aquifer system. Different abstraction rates (0.01 to 1.0 m3s-1) are applied to the model for both turbulent and laminar flow. Results show that head losses are significant for turbulent flow and, therefore, the inclusion of this is necessary to assess and model adit systems. The differences from Darcian flow are greater for higher abstraction rates, corresponding to higher velocities. This behaviour has also been assessed for a vertical shaft or more complex scenarios such as horizontal adits connected to vertical shafts common in adited systems. This approach will be particularly important when climate change scenarios are examined as the frequency

  16. Calcium Ion Flow Permeates Cells through SOCs to Promote Cathode-Directed Galvanotaxis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Dong; Zheng, Xiulan; Tang, Jiebing; Bu, Jingyi; Sun, Hui; Yang, Zhengkai; Sun, Wenjing; Yu, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    Sensing and responding to endogenous electrical fields are important abilities for cells engaged in processes such as embryogenesis, regeneration and wound healing. Many types of cultured cells have been induced to migrate directionally within electrical fields in vitro using a process known as galvanotaxis. The underlying mechanism by which cells sense electrical fields is unknown. In this study, we assembled a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) galvanotaxis system and found that mouse fibroblasts and human prostate cancer PC3 cells migrated to the cathode. By comparing the effects of a pulsed direct current, a constant direct current and an anion-exchange membrane on the directed migration of mouse fibroblasts, we found that these cells responded to the ionic flow in the electrical fields. Taken together, the observed effects of the calcium content of the medium, the function of the store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) and the intracellular calcium content on galvanotaxis indicated that calcium ionic flow from the anode to the cathode within the culture medium permeated the cells through SOCs at the drift velocity, promoting migration toward the cathode. The RTK-PI3K pathway was involved in this process, but the ROCK and MAPK pathways were not. PC3 cells and mouse fibroblasts utilized the same mechanism of galvanotaxis. Together, these results indicated that the signaling pathway responsible for cathode-directed cellular galvanotaxis involved calcium ionic flow from the anode to the cathode within the culture medium, which permeated the cells through SOCs, causing cytoskeletal reorganization via PI3K signaling.

  17. Calcium Ion Flow Permeates Cells through SOCs to Promote Cathode-Directed Galvanotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Xu, Chunyan; Li, Dong; Zheng, Xiulan; Tang, Jiebing; Bu, Jingyi; Sun, Hui; Yang, Zhengkai; Sun, Wenjing; Yu, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    Sensing and responding to endogenous electrical fields are important abilities for cells engaged in processes such as embryogenesis, regeneration and wound healing. Many types of cultured cells have been induced to migrate directionally within electrical fields in vitro using a process known as galvanotaxis. The underlying mechanism by which cells sense electrical fields is unknown. In this study, we assembled a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) galvanotaxis system and found that mouse fibroblasts and human prostate cancer PC3 cells migrated to the cathode. By comparing the effects of a pulsed direct current, a constant direct current and an anion-exchange membrane on the directed migration of mouse fibroblasts, we found that these cells responded to the ionic flow in the electrical fields. Taken together, the observed effects of the calcium content of the medium, the function of the store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) and the intracellular calcium content on galvanotaxis indicated that calcium ionic flow from the anode to the cathode within the culture medium permeated the cells through SOCs at the drift velocity, promoting migration toward the cathode. The RTK-PI3K pathway was involved in this process, but the ROCK and MAPK pathways were not. PC3 cells and mouse fibroblasts utilized the same mechanism of galvanotaxis. Together, these results indicated that the signaling pathway responsible for cathode-directed cellular galvanotaxis involved calcium ionic flow from the anode to the cathode within the culture medium, which permeated the cells through SOCs, causing cytoskeletal reorganization via PI3K signaling. PMID:26447479

  18. A smart flow measurement system for flow evaluation with multiple signals in different operation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltsas, G.; Katsikogiannis, P.; Asimakopoulos, P.; Nassiopoulou, A. G.

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of a smart flow measurement system based on an integrated thermal flow sensor that implements a heater and two pairs of thermopiles, symmetrically situated on both sides of the heater. A specially designed interface circuit monitors and controls sensor operation, allowing three different operational modes: constant voltage (CV), constant power (CP) and constant temperature (CT). It also simultaneously monitors the heater resistance and the thermopile signal. Communication with a PC is implemented through a USB connection, and a developed Java program controls the system and data representation and storage. Transfer rates in the order of 20 000 sps are achieved, which allow detailed flow monitoring. For system evaluation, flow measurements were performed in both the calorimetric and hot-wire principles with the three different modes of operation and the corresponding results are presented comparatively. Flow velocity was determined by different sensor signals (heater resistance and power, thermopile signal) and the related sensitivities were extracted. Furthermore, it was verified that the system could detect the flow direction as well as the transition point from laminar to turbulent region.

  19. NOAA-USGS Debris-Flow Warning System - Final Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Landslides and debris flows cause loss of life and millions of dollars in property damage annually in the United States (National Research Council, 2004). In an effort to reduce loss of life by debris flows, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operated an experimental debris-flow prediction and warning system in the San Francisco Bay area from 1986 to 1995 that relied on forecasts and measurements of precipitation linked to empirical precipitation thresholds to predict the onset of rainfall-triggered debris flows. Since 1995, there have been substantial improvements in quantifying precipitation estimates and forecasts, development of better models for delineating landslide hazards, and advancements in geographic information technology that allow stronger spatial and temporal linkage between precipitation forecasts and hazard models. Unfortunately, there have also been several debris flows that have caused loss of life and property across the United States. Establishment of debris-flow warning systems in areas where linkages between rainfall amounts and debris-flow occurrence have been identified can help mitigate the hazards posed by these types of landslides. Development of a national warning system can help support the NOAA-USGS goal of issuing timely Warnings of potential debris flows to the affected populace and civil authorities on a broader scale. This document presents the findings and recommendations of a joint NOAA-USGS Task Force that assessed the current state-of-the-art in precipitation forecasting and debris-flow hazard-assessment techniques. This report includes an assessment of the science and resources needed to establish a demonstration debris-flow warning project in recently burned areas of southern California and the necessary scientific advancements and resources associated with expanding such a warning system to unburned areas and, possibly, to a

  20. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  1. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  2. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells. PMID:26082788

  3. Measuring information flow in cellular networks by the systems biology method through microarray data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    In general, it is very difficult to measure the information flow in a cellular network directly. In this study, based on an information flow model and microarray data, we measured the information flow in cellular networks indirectly by using a systems biology method. First, we used a recursive least square parameter estimation algorithm to identify the system parameters of coupling signal transduction pathways and the cellular gene regulatory network (GRN). Then, based on the identified parameters and systems theory, we estimated the signal transductivities of the coupling signal transduction pathways from the extracellular signals to each downstream protein and the information transductivities of the GRN between transcription factors in response to environmental events. According to the proposed method, the information flow, which is characterized by signal transductivity in coupling signaling pathways and information transductivity in the GRN, can be estimated by microarray temporal data or microarray sample data. It can also be estimated by other high-throughput data such as next-generation sequencing or proteomic data. Finally, the information flows of the signal transduction pathways and the GRN in leukemia cancer cells and non-leukemia normal cells were also measured to analyze the systematic dysfunction in this cancer from microarray sample data. The results show that the signal transductivities of signal transduction pathways change substantially from normal cells to leukemia cancer cells.

  4. Human red blood cell behavior under homogeneous extensional flow in a hyperbolic-shaped microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Yaginuma, T.; Oliveira, M. S. N.; Lima, R.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that certain pathological conditions result in a decrease of red blood cells (RBCs) deformability and subsequently can significantly alter the blood flow in microcirculation, which may block capillaries and cause ischemia in the tissues. Microfluidic systems able to obtain reliable quantitative measurements of RBC deformability hold the key to understand and diagnose RBC related diseases. In this work, a microfluidic system composed of a microchannel with a hyperbolic-shaped contraction followed by a sudden expansion is presented. We provide a detailed quantitative description of the degree of deformation of human RBCs under a controlled homogeneous extensional flow field. We measured the deformation index (DI) as well as the velocity of the RBCs travelling along the centerline of the channel for four different flow rates and analyze the impact of the particle Reynolds number. The results show that human RBC deformation tends to reach a plateau value in the region of constant extensional rate, the value of which depends on the extension rate. Additionally, we observe that the presence of a sudden expansion downstream of the hyperbolic contraction modifies the spatial distribution of cells and substantially increases the cell free layer (CFL) downstream of the expansion plane similarly to what is seen in other expansion flows. Beyond a certain value of flow rate, there is only a weak effect of inlet flow rates on the enhancement of the downstream CFL. These in vitro experiments show the potential of using microfluidic systems with hyperbolic-shaped microchannels both for the separation of the RBCs from plasma and to assess changes in RBC deformability in physiological and pathological situations for clinical purposes. However, the selection of the geometry and the identification of the most suitable region to evaluate the changes on the RBC deformability under extensional flows are crucial if microfluidics is to be used as an in vitro clinical

  5. Human red blood cell behavior under homogeneous extensional flow in a hyperbolic-shaped microchannel.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma, T; Oliveira, M S N; Lima, R; Ishikawa, T; Yamaguchi, T

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that certain pathological conditions result in a decrease of red blood cells (RBCs) deformability and subsequently can significantly alter the blood flow in microcirculation, which may block capillaries and cause ischemia in the tissues. Microfluidic systems able to obtain reliable quantitative measurements of RBC deformability hold the key to understand and diagnose RBC related diseases. In this work, a microfluidic system composed of a microchannel with a hyperbolic-shaped contraction followed by a sudden expansion is presented. We provide a detailed quantitative description of the degree of deformation of human RBCs under a controlled homogeneous extensional flow field. We measured the deformation index (DI) as well as the velocity of the RBCs travelling along the centerline of the channel for four different flow rates and analyze the impact of the particle Reynolds number. The results show that human RBC deformation tends to reach a plateau value in the region of constant extensional rate, the value of which depends on the extension rate. Additionally, we observe that the presence of a sudden expansion downstream of the hyperbolic contraction modifies the spatial distribution of cells and substantially increases the cell free layer (CFL) downstream of the expansion plane similarly to what is seen in other expansion flows. Beyond a certain value of flow rate, there is only a weak effect of inlet flow rates on the enhancement of the downstream CFL. These in vitro experiments show the potential of using microfluidic systems with hyperbolic-shaped microchannels both for the separation of the RBCs from plasma and to assess changes in RBC deformability in physiological and pathological situations for clinical purposes. However, the selection of the geometry and the identification of the most suitable region to evaluate the changes on the RBC deformability under extensional flows are crucial if microfluidics is to be used as an in vitro clinical

  6. Synchronization trigger control system for flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The use of cinematography or holographic interferometry for dynamic flow visualization in an internal combustion engine requires a control device that globally synchronizes camera and light source timing at a predefined shaft encoder angle. The device is capable of 0.35 deg resolution for rotational speeds of up to 73 240 rpm. This was achieved by implementing the shaft encoder signal addressed look-up table (LUT) and appropriate latches. The developed digital signal processing technique achieves 25 nsec of high speed triggering angle detection by using direct parallel bit comparison of the shaft encoder digital code with a simulated angle reference code, instead of using angle value comparison which involves more complicated computation steps. In order to establish synchronization to an AC reference signal whose magnitude is variant with the rotating speed, a dynamic peak followup synchronization technique has been devised. This method scrutinizes the reference signal and provides the right timing within 40 nsec. Two application examples are described.

  7. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Blood flow quantification using optical flow methods in a body fitted coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maday, Peter; Brosig, Richard; Endres, Jurgen; Kowarschik, Markus; Navab, Nassir

    2014-03-01

    In this paper a blood flow quantification method that is based on a physically motivated dense 2D flow estimation algorithm is outlined. It yields accurate time varying volumetric flow rate measurements based on digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences, with robustness to significant inter-frame displacements. Time varying volumetric flow rates are estimated for individual non-branching vascular segments based on the estimated 2D flow fields and a 3D vessel segmentation from a 3D Rotational Angiography (3DRA) acquisition. The novelty of the approach lies in the use of a vessel aligned coordinate system for the problem formulation. The coordinate functions are generated using the Schwarz-Christoffel1(SC) map that yields a solution with coordinate lines aligned with the vessel boundaries. The use of vessel aligned coordinates enables the easy and accurate handling of boundary conditions in the irregular domain of a vessel lumen while only requiring slight modifications to the used finite difference approach. Unlike traditional coarse to fine methods we use an anisotropic scaling strategy that enables the estimation of flows with larger inter frame displacements. The evaluation of our method is based on highly realistic synthetic DSA datasets for a number of cases. Ground truth volumetric flow rate values are compared against the measurements and a high degree of fidelity is observed. Performance measures are obtained with varying flow velocities and acquisition rates.

  9. A bulk flow model of a brush seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Schlumberger, S.; Braun, M. J.; Choy, F.; Mullen, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers can be readily fabricated into a variety of seal configurations that are compliant and responsive to high speed or lightly loaded systems. A linear, circular, or contoured brush seal system is a contact seal consisting of the bristle pattern and hardened interface. When compared to a labyrinth seal, the brush seal system is superior and features low leakage, dynamic stability, and permits compliant structures. But in turn, the system usually requires a hardened smooth interface and permits only limited pressure drops. Wear life and wear debris for operations with static or dynamic excitation are largely undetermined. A seal system involves control of fluid within specific boundaries. The brush and rub ring (or rub surface) form a seal system. Design similitudes, a bulk flow model, and rub ring (interface) coatings are discussed. The bulk flow model calculations are based on flows in porous media and filters. The coatings work is based on experience and expanded to include current practice.

  10. Endothelial Cell Capture of Heparin-Binding Growth Factors under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Zhang, Jun; Fannon, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Circulation is an important delivery method for both natural and synthetic molecules, but microenvironment interactions, regulated by endothelial cells and critical to the molecule's fate, are difficult to interpret using traditional approaches. In this work, we analyzed and predicted growth factor capture under flow using computer modeling and a three-dimensional experimental approach that includes pertinent circulation characteristics such as pulsatile flow, competing binding interactions, and limited bioavailability. An understanding of the controlling features of this process was desired. The experimental module consisted of a bioreactor with synthetic endothelial-lined hollow fibers under flow. The physical design of the system was incorporated into the model parameters. The heparin-binding growth factor fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was used for both the experiments and simulations. Our computational model was composed of three parts: (1) media flow equations, (2) mass transport equations and (3) cell surface reaction equations. The model is based on the flow and reactions within a single hollow fiber and was scaled linearly by the total number of fibers for comparison with experimental results. Our model predicted, and experiments confirmed, that removal of heparan sulfate (HS) from the system would result in a dramatic loss of binding by heparin-binding proteins, but not by proteins that do not bind heparin. The model further predicted a significant loss of bound protein at flow rates only slightly higher than average capillary flow rates, corroborated experimentally, suggesting that the probability of capture in a single pass at high flow rates is extremely low. Several other key parameters were investigated with the coupling between receptors and proteoglycans shown to have a critical impact on successful capture. The combined system offers opportunities to examine circulation capture in a straightforward quantitative manner that should prove

  11. Alternative experiments using the geophysical fluid flow cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    This study addresses the possibility of doing large scale dynamics experiments using the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell. In particular, cases where the forcing generates a statically stable stratification almost everywhere in the spherical shell are evaluated. This situation is typical of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. By calculating the strongest meridional circulation expected in the spacelab experiments, and testing its stability using quasi-geostrophic stability theory, it is shown that strongly nonlinear baroclinic waves on a zonally symmetric modified thermal wind will not occur. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell does not have a deep enough fluid layer to permit useful studies of large scale planetary wave processes arising from instability. It is argued, however, that by introducing suitable meridional barriers, a significant contribution to the understanding of the oceanic thermocline problem could be made.

  12. The stellate cell system (vitamin A-storing cell system).

    PubMed

    Senoo, Haruki; Mezaki, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Mutsunori

    2017-03-15

    Past, present, and future research into hepatic stellate cells (HSCs, also called vitamin A-storing cells, lipocytes, interstitial cells, fat-storing cells, or Ito cells) are summarized and discussed in this review. Kupffer discovered black-stained cells in the liver using the gold chloride method and named them stellate cells (Sternzellen in German) in 1876. Wake rediscovered the cells in 1971 using the same gold chloride method and various modern histological techniques including electron microscopy. Between their discovery and rediscovery, HSCs disappeared from the research history. Their identification, the establishment of cell isolation and culture methods, and the development of cellular and molecular biological techniques promoted HSC research after their rediscovery. In mammals, HSCs exist in the space between liver parenchymal cells (PCs) or hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) of the hepatic lobule, and store 50-80% of all vitamin A in the body as retinyl ester in lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. SCs also exist in extrahepatic organs such as pancreas, lung, and kidney. Hepatic (HSCs) and extrahepatic stellate cells (EHSCs) form the stellate cell (SC) system or SC family; the main storage site of vitamin A in the body is HSCs in the liver. In pathological conditions such as liver fibrosis, HSCs lose vitamin A, and synthesize a large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen, proteoglycan, glycosaminoglycan, and adhesive glycoproteins. The morphology of these cells also changes from the star-shaped HSCs to that of fibroblasts or myofibroblasts.

  13. Stem cells and fluid flow drive cyst formation in an invertebrate excretory organ.

    PubMed

    Thi-Kim Vu, Hanh; Rink, Jochen C; McKinney, Sean A; McClain, Melainia; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Alexander, Richard; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-06-09

    Cystic kidney diseases (CKDs) affect millions of people worldwide. The defining pathological features are fluid-filled cysts developing from nephric tubules due to defective flow sensing, cell proliferation and differentiation. The underlying molecular mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood, and the derived excretory systems of established invertebrate models (Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster) are unsuitable to model CKDs. Systematic structure/function comparisons revealed that the combination of ultrafiltration and flow-associated filtrate modification that is central to CKD etiology is remarkably conserved between the planarian excretory system and the vertebrate nephron. Consistently, both RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) of planarian orthologues of human CKD genes and inhibition of tubule flow led to tubular cystogenesis that share many features with vertebrate CKDs, suggesting deep mechanistic conservation. Our results demonstrate a common evolutionary origin of animal excretory systems and establish planarians as a novel and experimentally accessible invertebrate model for the study of human kidney pathologies.

  14. Compliant fuel cell system

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Richard Scott; Gudlavalleti, Sauri

    2009-12-15

    A fuel cell assembly comprising at least one metallic component, at least one ceramic component and a structure disposed between the metallic component and the ceramic component. The structure is configured to have a lower stiffness compared to at least one of the metallic component and the ceramic component, to accommodate a difference in strain between the metallic component and the ceramic component of the fuel cell assembly.

  15. Permafrost thaw in a nested groundwater-flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Jeffery M.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater flow in cold regions containing permafrost accelerates climate-warming-driven thaw and changes thaw patterns. Simulation analyses of groundwater flow and heat transport with freeze/thaw in typical cold-regions terrain with nested flow indicate that early thaw rate is particularly enhanced by flow, the time when adverse environmental impacts of climate-warming-induced permafrost loss may be severest. For the slowest climate-warming rate predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), once significant groundwater flow begins, thick permafrost layers can vanish in several hundred years, but survive over 1,000 years where flow is minimal. Large-scale thaw depends mostly on the balance of heat advection and conduction in the supra-permafrost zone. Surface-water bodies underlain by open taliks allow slow sub-permafrost flow, with lesser influence on regional thaw. Advection dominance over conduction depends on permeability and topography. Groundwater flow around permafrost and flow through permafrost impact thaw differently; the latter enhances early thaw rate. Air-temperature seasonality also increases early thaw. Hydrogeologic heterogeneity and topography strongly affect thaw rates/patterns. Permafrost controls the groundwater/surface-water-geomorphology system; hence, prediction and mitigation of impacts of thaw on ecology, chemical exports and infrastructure require improved hydrogeology/permafrost characterization and understanding

  16. Relation of streams, lakes, and wetlands to groundwater flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    1999-01-01

    Surface-water bodies are integral parts of groundwater flow systems. Groundwater interacts with surface water in nearly all landscapes, ranging from small streams, lakes, and wetlands in headwater areas to major river valleys and seacoasts. Although it generally is assumed that topographically high areas are groundwater recharge areas and topographically low areas are groundwater discharge areas, this is true primarily for regional flow systems. The superposition of local flow systems associated with surface-water bodies on this regional framework results in complex interactions between groundwater and surface water in all landscapes, regardless of regional topographic position. Hydrologic processes associated with the surface-water bodies themselves, such as seasonally high surface-water levels and evaporation and transpiration of groundwater from around the perimeter of surfacewater bodies, are a major cause of the complex and seasonally dynamic groundwater flow fields associated with surface water. These processes have been documented at research sites in glacial, dune, coastal, mantled karst, and riverine terrains.

  17. Enhanced sensitivity in flow injection analysis using a long pathlength liquid waveguide capillary flow cell for spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Incorporation of a liquid waveguide capillary flow cell into a flow injection instrument enhances the sensitivity of flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection by two orders of magnitude. Nitrite determination at nM levels has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of this novel technique for trace analysis. Combining the long pathlength spectrophotometry with flow injection analysis, this technique has advantages of low detection limit, good precision and high sample throughput.

  18. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujillo, Romen; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2014-09-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes in electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electrical impedance spectroscopy in order to perform a theoretical study to clarify our results. This study focuses on investigating the changes in the electrical properties of the cell membrane caused by the effect of paclitaxel. We observe good agreement between the model and the obtained results. This establishes the proof-of-concept for the application in cell drug therapy.

  19. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujillo, Romen; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes in electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electrical impedance spectroscopy in order to perform a theoretical study to clarify our results. This study focuses on investigating the changes in the electrical properties of the cell membrane caused by the effect of paclitaxel. We observe good agreement between the model and the obtained results. This establishes the proof-of-concept for the application in cell drug therapy. PMID:25587422

  20. Structural analysis of red blood cell aggregates under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2010-03-01

    A set of measures of red blood cell (RBC) aggregates are developed and applied to examine the aggregate structure under plane shear and channel flows. Some of these measures are based on averages over the set of red blood cells which are in contact with each other at a given time. Other measures are developed by first fitting an ellipse to the planar projection of the aggregate, and then examining the area and aspect ratio of the fit ellipse as well as the orientations of constituent RBCs with respect to the fit ellipse axes. The aggregate structural measures are illustrated using a new mesoscale computational model for blood cell transport, collision and adhesion. The sensitivity of this model to change in adhesive surface energy density and shear rate on the aggregate structure is examined. It is found that the mesoscale model predictions exhibit reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical data for blood flow in plane shear and channel flows. The new structural measures are used to examine the differences between predictions of two- and three-dimensional computations of the aggregate formation, showing that two-dimensional computations retain some of the important aspects of three-dimensional computations.

  1. Detection of Apoptotic Versus Autophagic Cell Death by Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Sica, Valentina; Maiuri, M Chiara; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Different modes of regulated cell death (RCD) can be initiated by distinct molecular machineries and their morphological manifestations can be difficult to discriminate. Moreover, cells responding to stress often activate an adaptive response centered around autophagy, and whether such a response is cytoprotective or cytotoxic cannot be predicted based on morphological parameters only. Molecular definitions are therefore important to understand various RCD subroutines from a mechanistic perspective. In vitro, various forms of RCD including apoptosis and autophagic cell death can be easily discriminated from each other with assays that involve chemical or pharmacological interventions targeting key components of either pathway. Here, we detail a straightforward method to discriminate apoptosis from autophagic cell death by flow cytometry, based on the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the genetic inhibition of ATG5.

  2. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  3. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  4. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Feng, Yundi; Tan, Wenchang; Liu, Huaijun

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6). The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2). This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27467755

  5. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Michael J.; Johnson, Stanley N.; Yu, Yong; Perraud, Veronique; Bruns, Emily; Alexander, M. L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Dabdub, Donald; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-05-01

    For studying the formation and photochemical/thermal reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere, a unique, high-volume, slow-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system equipped with 5 UV lamps has been constructed and characterized experimentally. The total flow system length 6 is 8.5 m and includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing, a 6.1 m reaction section and a 1.2 m 7 transition cone at the end. The 45.7 cm diameter results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and thus reduces the potential contribution from wall reactions. The latter are also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is made feasible by the ease of disassembly. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. This flow system allows continuous sampling under stable conditions, thus increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. The residence time is of the order of an hour, and sampling ports located along the length of the flow tube allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The system was characterized using both an inert gas (CO2) and particles (atomized NaNO3). Instruments interfaced directly to this flow system include a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer, a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, an integrating nephelometer, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer equipped with a long path (64 m) cell. Particles collected with impactors and filters at the various sampling ports can be analyzed subsequently by a variety of techniques. Formation of secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene reactions (NOx photooxidation and ozonolysis) are used to demonstrate the capabilities of this new system.

  6. Automated microscopy system for peripheral blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boev, Sergei F.; Sazonov, Vladimir V.; Kozinets, Gennady I.; Pogorelov, Valery M.; Gusev, Alexander A.; Korobova, Farida V.; Vinogradov, Alexander G.; Verdenskaya, Natalya V.; Ivanova, Irina A.

    2000-11-01

    The report describes the instrument ASPBS (Automated Screening of Peripheral Blood Cells) designed for an automated analysis of dry blood smears. The instrument is based on computer microscopy and uses dry blood smears prepared according to the standard Romanovskii-Giemza procedure. In comparison with the well-known flow cytometry systems, our instrument provides more detailed information and offers an opporunity of visualizing final results. The basic performances of the instrument are given. Software of this instrument is based on digital image processing and image recognition procedures. It is pointed out that the instrument can be used as a fairly universal tool in scientific research, public demonstrations, in medical treatment, and in medical education. The principle used as the basis of the instrument appeared adequate for creating an instrument version serviceable even during space flights where standard manual procedures and flow cytometry systems fail. The benefit of the use of the instrument in clinical laboratories is described.

  7. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  8. [Immunophenotype in multiple myeloma cells detected by multiparameter flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Cao, Fang-Fang; Chen, Fang; Hu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Ji-Hong

    2012-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the immunophenotypic characteristics in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and their significance. Thirty three cases of MM and 12 cases of reactive plasmacytosis (as control group) were enrolled in the study. The expressions of surface antigens in MM cells were detected with flow cytometry by using direct immunofluorescent technique and gating method of CD38/SSC and were confirmed with morphologic observation of myeloma cells. The results indicated that the proportion of myeloma cells detected by morphologic examination was 6.0% - 76.0%. With CD38/SSC gating method, a cluster of CD38 bright positive cells could be detected in their scatter plot, the proportion ranged from 0.99% to 57.54%. Most phenotype of MM was 38(st+)CD138(+)CD19(-)CD56(+) (78.8%). While the expressions of CD20, CD33, CD117, HLA-DR were seen in some MM patients, the positive rates were 12.1%, 15.2%, 30.3%, 9.1%, respectively; the expression of other antigens was negative. cκ or cλ monoclonal restriction was detected in 27 cases (81.8%) of MM, both cκ and cλ in the remaining cases of MM was negative. It is concluded that detecting the immunophenotype of MM patients by flow cytometry with CD38/SSC gating method and basing on the heterogeneity of cell antigens can discriminate myeloma cells from normal plasma cells, which provides evidence for targeted therapy and prognosis evaluation.

  9. Flow Control Opportunities for Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutley, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The advancement of technology in gas turbine engines used for aerospace propulsion has been focused on achieving significant performance improvements. At the system level, these improvements are expressed in metrics such as engine thrust-to-weight ratio and system and component efficiencies. The overall goals are directed at reducing engine weight, fuel burn, emissions, and noise. At a component level, these goals translate into aggressive designs of each engine component well beyond the state of the art.

  10. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis.

  11. Magnetic fingerprints of rolling cells for quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood

    PubMed Central

    Reisbeck, Mathias; Helou, Michael Johannes; Richter, Lukas; Kappes, Barbara; Friedrich, Oliver; Hayden, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, flow cytometry has had a profound impact on preclinical and clinical applications requiring single cell function information for counting, sub-typing and quantification of epitope expression. At the same time, the workflow complexity and high costs of such optical systems still limit flow cytometry applications to specialized laboratories. Here, we present a quantitative magnetic flow cytometer that incorporates in situ magnetophoretic cell focusing for highly accurate and reproducible rolling of the cellular targets over giant magnetoresistance sensing elements. Time-of-flight analysis is used to unveil quantitative single cell information contained in its magnetic fingerprint. Furthermore, we used erythrocytes as a biological model to validate our methodology with respect to precise analysis of the hydrodynamic cell diameter, quantification of binding capacity of immunomagnetic labels, and discrimination of cell morphology. The extracted time-of-flight information should enable point-of-care quantitative flow cytometry in whole blood for clinical applications, such as immunology and primary hemostasis. PMID:27596736

  12. Tracking Immune Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxic Potential Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Tario, Joseph D.; Muirhead, Katharine A.; Pan, Dalin; Munson, Mark E.; Wallace, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    In the second edition of this series, we described the use of cell tracking dyes in combination with tetramer reagents and traditional phenotyping protocols to monitor levels of proliferation and cytokine production in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. In particular, we illustrated how tracking dye fluorescence profiles could be used to ascertain the precursor frequencies of different subsets in the T-cell pool that are able to bind tetramer, synthesize cytokines, undergo antigen-driven proliferation, and/or carry out various combinations of these functional responses. Analysis of antigen-specific proliferative responses represents just one of many functions that can be monitored using cell tracking dyes and flow cytometry. In this third edition, we address issues to be considered when combining two different tracking dyes with other phenotypic and viability probes for the assessment of cytotoxic effector activity and regulatory T-cell functions. We summarize key characteristics of and differences between general protein- and membrane-labeling dyes, discuss determination of optimal staining concentrations, and provide detailed labeling protocols for both dye types. Examples of the advantages of two-color cell tracking are provided in the form of protocols for (a) independent enumeration of viable effector and target cells in a direct cytotoxicity assay and (b) simultaneous monitoring of proliferative responses in effector and regulatory T cells. PMID:21116982

  13. Monitoring circulating apoptotic cells by in-vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Li, Yan; Liu, Guangda; Wu, Bin; Wang, Chen

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapies currently constitute one main venue of cancer treatment. For a large number of adult and elderly patients, however, treatment options are poor. These patients may suffer from disease that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy or may not be candidates for curative therapies because of advanced age or poor medical conditions. To control disease in these patients, new therapies must be developed that are selectively targeted to unique characteristics of tumor cell growth and metastasis. A reliable early evaluation and prediction of response to the chemotherapy is critical to its success. Chemotherapies induce apoptosis in tumor cells and a portion of such apoptotic cancer cells may be present in the circulation. However, the fate of circulating tumor cells is difficult to assess with conventional methods that require blood sampling. We report the in situ measurement of circulating apoptotic cells in live animals using in vivo flow cytometry, a novel method that enables real-time detection and quantification of circulating cells without blood extraction. Apoptotic cells are rapidly cleared from the circulation with a half-life of ~10 minutes. Real-time monitoring of circulating apoptotic cells can be useful for detecting early changes in disease processes, as well as for monitoring response to therapeutic int