Science.gov

Sample records for cell fusion induced

  1. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-02-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, “virtual” electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  Vpp, suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells.

  2. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, “virtual” electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  Vpp, suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells. PMID:26912054

  3. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong; Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk; Kong, Chi-Wing; Li, Ronald A.

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  4. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  5. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide-induced multinuclear cells: Increased internalization of polystyrene beads and possible signals for cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi Yano, Shio; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. •Large beads are internalized by cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. •The multinuclear cell formation is inhibited by anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. •Signal transduction for cell fusion is different from that for inflammation. -- Abstract: A murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, becomes multinuclear on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria. These multinuclear cells internalized more polystyrene beads than mononuclear cells or osteoclasts (Nakanishi-Matsui, M., Yano, S., Matsumoto, N., and Futai, M., 2012). In this study, we analyzed the time courses of cell fusion in the presence of large beads. They were internalized into cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. However, the multinuclear cells once formed showed only low phagocytosis activity. These results suggest that formation of the multinuclear cells and bead internalization took place simultaneously. The formation of multinuclear cells was blocked by inhibitors for phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C, calcineurin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, interleukin 6 and 10 also exhibited inhibitory effects. These signaling molecules and cytokines may play a crucial role in the LPS-induced multinuclear cell formation.

  7. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  8. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  9. Functional analysis of the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene in cisplatin‑induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junqi; Chi, Linfeng; Chen, Zhanghui; Lu, Xianghong; Xiao, Suping; Zhang, Guanglin; Luo, Jindan; Chen, Ge-Ming; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The TMPRSS2:E‑twenty‑six (ETS) gene fusion occurs frequently in a high proportion of patients with prostate cancer (PCa) in Western countries, and the aberrant expression of TMPRSS2: v‑ETS avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG), the most common form of the corresponding protein, can regulate cell migration and contribute to tumor invasion and metastasis. However, its association with other cellular events, and in particular, cell death, remain unknown. To examine the function of such fusion genes, an expression plasmid containing the TMPRSS2:ERG (T1/E5) sequence (ΔERG) from a patient sample was constructed and transiently transfected into DU145 cells, which do not express the fusion gene. It was found that the overexpression of ΔERG significantly inhibited the ability of cisplatin to induce apoptosis in DU145 cells. By contrast, VCaP cells, which do contain TMPRSS2:ERG, were sensitized to cisplatin‑induced apoptosis through siRNA inhibition of the fusion gene. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, a stable cell line expressing the ΔERG gene was constructed. Expression of ΔERG did not affect cell migration, but did protect cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, knockdown of ΔERG by short interfering RNA resulted in cells regaining their sensitivity to cisplatin. Finally, the gene coding for activating transcription factor 5, which is important for cell survival, may be upregulated by ΔERG. Taken together, these data point to a new function of the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene in regulating the apoptotic pathway. PMID:26935606

  10. A Double-Switch Cell Fusion-Inducible Transgene Expression System for Neural Stem Cell-Based Antiglioma Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yumei; Lam, Dang Hoang; Huang, Juan; Tang, Yi; Luo, Xitu; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in neural stem cell- (NSC-) based tumor-targeted gene therapy showed that NSC vectors expressing an artificially engineered viral fusogenic protein, VSV-G H162R, could cause tumor cell death specifically under acidic tumor microenvironment by syncytia formation; however, the killing efficiency still had much room to improve. In the view that coexpression of another antitumoral gene with VSV-G can augment the bystander effect, a synthetic regulatory system that triggers transgene expression in a cell fusion-inducible manner has been proposed. Here we have developed a double-switch cell fusion-inducible transgene expression system (DoFIT) to drive transgene expression upon VSV-G-mediated NSC-glioma cell fusion. In this binary system, transgene expression is coregulated by a glioma-specific promoter and targeting sequences of a microRNA (miR) that is highly expressed in NSCs but lowly expressed in glioma cells. Thus, transgene expression is “switched off” by the miR in NSC vectors, but after cell fusion with glioma cells, the miR is diluted and loses its suppressive effect. Meanwhile, in the syncytia, transgene expression is “switched on” by the glioma-specific promoter. Our in vitro and in vivo experimental data show that DoFIT successfully abolishes luciferase reporter gene expression in NSC vectors but activates it specifically after VSV-G-mediated NSC-glioma cell fusion. PMID:26074975

  11. Clustering and Mobility of HIV-1 Env at Viral Assembly Sites Predict Its Propensity To Induce Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Chan, Jany; Lambelé, Marie

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates virus attachment to and fusion with target cell membranes, and yet, while Env is still situated at the plasma membrane of the producer cell and before its incorporation into newly formed particles, Env already interacts with the viral receptor CD4 on target cells, thus enabling the formation of transient cell contacts that facilitate the transmission of viral particles. During this first encounter with the receptor, Env must not induce membrane fusion, as this would prevent the producer cell and the target cell from separating upon virus transmission, but how Env's fusion activity is controlled remains unclear. To gain a better understanding of the Env regulation that precedes viral transmission, we examined the nanoscale organization of Env at the surface of producer cells. Utilizing superresolution microscopy (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy [STORM]) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we quantitatively assessed the clustering and dynamics of Env upon its arrival at the plasma membrane. We found that Gag assembly induced the aggregation of small Env clusters into larger domains and that these domains were completely immobile. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env abrogated Gag's ability to induce Env clustering and restored Env mobility at assembly sites, both of which correlated with increased Env-induced fusion of infected and uninfected cells. Hence, while Env trapping by Gag secures Env incorporation into viral particles, Env clustering and its sequestration at assembly sites likely also leads to the repression of its fusion function, and thus, by preventing the formation of syncytia, Gag helps to secure efficient transfer of viral particles to target cells. PMID:23637402

  12. Unraveling a Three-Step Spatiotemporal Mechanism of Triggering of Receptor-Induced Nipah Virus Fusion and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Stone, Jacquelyn A.; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Dabundo, Jeffrey; Benavides Montano, Javier A.; Santos-Montanez, Jennifer; Biering, Scott B.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Lu, Xiaonan; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for entry of the biomedically-important paramyxoviruses into their host cells (viral-cell fusion), and for syncytia formation (cell-cell fusion), often induced by paramyxoviral infections [e.g. those of the deadly Nipah virus (NiV)]. For most paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion requires two viral glycoproteins. Upon receptor binding, the attachment glycoprotein (HN/H/G) triggers the fusion glycoprotein (F) to undergo conformational changes that merge viral and/or cell membranes. However, a significant knowledge gap remains on how HN/H/G couples cell receptor binding to F-triggering. Via interdisciplinary approaches we report the first comprehensive mechanism of NiV membrane fusion triggering, involving three spatiotemporally sequential cell receptor-induced conformational steps in NiV-G: two in the head and one in the stalk. Interestingly, a headless NiV-G mutant was able to trigger NiV-F, and the two head conformational steps were required for the exposure of the stalk domain. Moreover, the headless NiV-G prematurely triggered NiV-F on virions, indicating that the NiV-G head prevents premature triggering of NiV-F on virions by concealing a F-triggering stalk domain until the correct time and place: receptor-binding. Based on these and recent paramyxovirus findings, we present a comprehensive and fundamentally conserved mechanistic model of paramyxovirus membrane fusion triggering and cell entry. PMID:24278018

  13. Human Perivascular Stem Cell-Based Bone Graft Substitute Induces Rat Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Choon G.; James, Aaron W.; Asatrian, Greg; Chang, Le; Nguyen, Alan; Le, Khoi; Bayani, Georgina; Lee, Robert; Stoker, David; Zhang, Xinli

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of its abundance and accessibility. We have previously defined a population of native MSCs termed perivascular stem cells (PSCs), purified from diverse human tissues, including adipose tissue. Human PSCs (hPSCs) are a bipartite cell population composed of pericytes (CD146+CD34−CD45−) and adventitial cells (CD146−CD34+CD45−), isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and with properties identical to those of culture identified MSCs. Our previous studies showed that hPSCs exhibit improved bone formation compared with a sample-matched unpurified population (termed stromal vascular fraction); however, it is not known whether hPSCs would be efficacious in a spinal fusion model. To investigate, we evaluated the osteogenic potential of freshly sorted hPSCs without culture expansion and differentiation in a rat model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. We compared increasing dosages of implanted hPSCs to assess for dose-dependent efficacy. All hPSC treatment groups induced successful spinal fusion, assessed by manual palpation and microcomputed tomography. Computerized biomechanical simulation (finite element analysis) further demonstrated bone fusion with hPSC treatment. Histological analyses showed robust endochondral ossification in hPSC-treated samples. Finally, we confirmed that implanted hPSCs indeed differentiated into osteoblasts and osteocytes; however, the majority of the new bone formation was of host origin. These results suggest that implanted hPSCs positively regulate bone formation via direct and paracrine mechanisms. In summary, hPSCs are a readily available MSC population that effectively forms bone without requirements for culture or predifferentiation. Thus, hPSC-based products show promise for future efforts in clinical bone regeneration and repair. PMID:25154782

  14. A generic screening platform for inhibitors of virus induced cell fusion using cellular electrical impedance

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Daniel; Robinson, Jodie; Chappell, Keith J.; Butler, Mark S.; Edwards, David J.; Fry, Scott R.; Bermingham, Imogen M.; Cooper, Matthew A.; Young, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membranes is an essential step in the life cycle of all enveloped viruses. Despite such a clear target for antiviral drug development, few anti-fusion drugs have progressed to market. One significant hurdle is the absence of a generic, high-throughput, reproducible fusion assay. Here we report that real time, label-free measurement of cellular electrical impedance can quantify cell-cell fusion mediated by either individually expressed recombinant viral fusion proteins, or native virus infection. We validated this approach for all three classes of viral fusion and demonstrated utility in quantifying fusion inhibition using antibodies and small molecule inhibitors specific for dengue virus and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26976324

  15. Antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells induced by the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Takashi; Duan Xuefeng; Hisaeda, Hajime; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2008-01-25

    We have developed a DNA vaccine encoding a fusion protein of ubiquitin (Ub) and target proteins at the N-terminus for effective induction of antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells. A series of expression plasmids encoding a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), fused with mutated Ub, was constructed. Western blotting analyses using COS7 cells transfected with these plasmids revealed that there were three types of amino acid causing different binding capacities between Ub and OVA. Natural Ub with a C-terminal glycine readily dissociated from OVA; on the other hand, artificially mutated Ub, the C-terminal amino acid of which had been exchanged to valine or arginine, stably united with the polypeptide, while Ub with a C-terminal alanine partially dissociated. The ability of DNA vaccination to induce OVA-specific CD8{sup +} T cells closely correlated with the stability of Ub fusion to OVA. Our strategy could be used to optimize the effect of genetic vaccines on the induction of CD8{sup +} T cells.

  16. Dual split protein-based fusion assay reveals that mutations to herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein gB alter the kinetics of cell-cell fusion induced by HSV entry glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Gallagher, John R; Hannah, Brian P; Matsuda, Zene; Whitbeck, J Charles; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. We propose that receptor-activated changes to gD cause it to activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB into an active form. We employed a dual split-protein (DSP) assay to monitor the kinetics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell-cell fusion. This assay measures content mixing between two cells, i.e., fusion, within the same cell population in real time (minutes to hours). Titration experiments suggest that both gD and gH/gL act in a catalytic fashion to trigger gB. In fact, fusion rates are governed by the amount of gB on the cell surface. We then used the DSP assay to focus on mutants in two functional regions (FRs) of gB, FR1 and FR3. FR1 contains the fusion loops (FL1 and FL2), and FR3 encompasses the crown at the trimer top. All FL mutants initiated fusion very slowly, if at all. However, the fusion rates caused by some FL2 mutants increased over time, so that total fusion by 8 h looked much like that of the WT. Two distinct kinetic patterns, "slow and fast," emerged for mutants in the crown of gB (FR3), again showing differences in initiation and ongoing fusion. Of note are the fusion kinetics of the gB syn mutant (LL871/872AA). Although this mutant was originally included as an ongoing high-rate-of-fusion control, its initiation of fusion is so rapid that it appears to be on a "hair trigger." Thus, the DSP assay affords a unique way to examine the dynamics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell fusion.

  17. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  18. Reprogramming of somatic cells induced by fusion of embryonic stem cells using hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E)

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Xiao-shan; Fujishiro, Masako; Toyoda, Masashi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-16

    In this research, hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) was used to reprogram somatic cells by fusion with mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Neomycin-resistant mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were used as somatic cells. Nanog-overexpressing puromycin-resistant EB3 cells were used as mouse ES cells. These two cells were fused by exposing to HVJ-E and the generated fusion cells were selected by puromycin and G418 to get the stable fusion cell line. The fusion cells form colonies in feeder-free culture system. Microsatellite analysis of the fusion cells showed that they possessed genes from both ES cells and fibroblasts. The fusion cells were tetraploid, had alkali phosphatase activity, and expressed stem cell marker genes such as Pou5f1, Nanog, and Sox2, but not the fibroblast cell marker genes such as Col1a1 and Col1a2. The pluripotency of fusion cells was confirmed by their expression of marker genes for all the three germ layers after differentiation induction, and by their ability to form teratoma which contained all the three primary layers. Our results show that HVJ-E can be used as a fusion reagent for reprogramming of somatic cells.

  19. Alteration of the pH dependence of coronavirus-induced cell fusion: effect of mutations in the spike glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, T M; Escarmis, C; Buchmeier, M J

    1991-01-01

    Infection of susceptible murine cells with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus type 4 (MHV4) results in extensive cell-cell fusion at pHs from 5.5 to 8.5. The endosomotropic weak bases chloroquine and ammonium chloride do not prevent MHV4 infection. In marked contrast, we have selected variants from a neural cell line persistently infected with MHV4 which are entirely dependent on acid pH to fuse host cells and are strongly inhibited by endosomotropic weak bases. Wild-type and variant viruses were compared at the level of the fusion-active surface (S) glycoprotein gene. Cloning and sequencing of each 4,131-base open reading frame predicted a total of eight amino acid differences which fell into three distinct clusters. Each S glycoprotein, when expressed from cDNA, was synthesized in equivalent amounts, and similar proportions were transported to the cell surface. Wild-type S induced cell-cell fusion at neutral pH, whereas variant S required prolonged exposure to acidic pH to induce fusion. Expression of hybrid S genes prepared by exchange of restriction fragments between wild-type and variant cDNAs revealed that elimination of neutral pH fusion was solely dependent on amino acid alterations at positions 1067 (Q to H), 1094 (Q to H), and 1114 (L to R). These changes lie within a predicted heptad repeat region of the transmembrane cleavage fragment of S (S2). These findings demonstrate that the pH dependence of coronavirus fusion is highly variable and that this variability can be determined by as few as three amino acid residues. Images PMID:1848311

  20. A gold nanoparticle pentapeptide: gene fusion to induce therapeutic gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Morgan, Thomas J; Levenson, Cathy W; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-22

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified as having great potential as autologous cell therapeutics to treat traumatic brain injury and spinal injury as well as neuronal and cardiac ischemic events. All future clinical applications of MSC cell therapies must allow the MSC to be harvested, transfected, and induced to express a desired protein or selection of proteins to have medical benefit. For the full potential of MSC cell therapy to be realized, it is desirable to systematically alter the protein expression of therapeutically beneficial biomolecules in harvested MSC cells with high fidelity in a single transfection event. We have developed a delivery platform on the basis of the use of a solid gold nanoparticle that has been surface modified to produce a fusion containing a zwitterionic, pentapeptide designed from Bax inhibiting peptide (Ku70) to enhance cellular uptake and a linearized expression vector to induce enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat-derived MSCs. Ku70 is observed to effect >80% transfection following a single treatment of femur bone marrow isolated rat MSCs with efficiencies for the delivery of a 6.6 kbp gene on either a Au nanoparticle (NP) or CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD). Gene expression is observed within 4 d by optical measurements, and secretion is observed within 10 d by Western Blot analysis. The combination of being able to selectively engineer the NP, to colocalize biological agents, and to enhance the stability of those agents has provided the strong impetus to utilize this novel class of materials to engineer primary MSCs. PMID:25198921

  1. Membrane fusion induced by the membrane mobility agent, A2C. Differentiation between fusible and non-fusible cells. Transfer of fusibility.

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Kosower, N S; Halverson, C; Aoki, M; Kosower, E M

    1980-10-01

    Red cells of different species respond differently to the treatment with the membrane mobility agent, A2C, with respect to both the A2C interaction and the subsequent cell-cell interaction. Depending on whether both, one or neither of the processes are effective, some red cells (e.g., nucleated Leghorn hen red cells, rat red cells) fuse easily, some (human red cells) show morphological changes but do not fuse, and others (nucleated Rock hen red cells) show little or no response. Mixed fusion (i.e., between fusible cells of different species) is readily obtained, indicating that no species-specific recognition sites are required for A2C-induced fusion. the potential for fusion is a transferable characteristic. In the presence of fusible cells, A2C induces both heterologous and homologous fusion of otherwise 'non-fusible' cells. Electron micrographs of fusing cells after treatment with A2C reveal 'onion-ring' structures ('whorls'), free of intramembranous protein particles but different from the smooth appearance of A(2)C particles. Whorls are considered to arise from fusion-potent membrane areas. Fusion is apparent at multiple sites along the contact line between apposed membranes. The postulated appearance of vesicle-like structures along the fusion line (Kosower, E.M., Kosower, N.S. and Wegman, P. (1977) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 471, 311-329) is confirmed by micrographs. The mechanism of this fusion process is duscussed and compared to other types of fusion process. PMID:7417438

  2. Regulation of cell-cell fusion by nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Augelli, Michael J.; Cheung, Bettina; Kinser, Emily R.; Cleary, Barnett; Kumar, Priyanka; Wang, Renhao; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Li, Rui; Schwarz, Udo D.; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2016-09-01

    Cell-cell fusion is fundamental to a multitude of biological processes ranging from cell differentiation and embryogenesis to cancer metastasis and biomaterial-tissue interactions. Fusogenic cells are exposed to biochemical and biophysical factors, which could potentially alter cell behavior. While biochemical inducers of fusion such as cytokines and kinases have been identified, little is known about the biophysical regulation of cell-cell fusion. Here, we designed experiments to examine cell-cell fusion using bulk metallic glass (BMG) nanorod arrays with varying biophysical cues, i.e. nanotopography and stiffness. Through independent variation of stiffness and topography, we found that nanotopography constitutes the primary biophysical cue that can override biochemical signals to attenuate fusion. Specifically, nanotopography restricts cytoskeletal remodeling-associated signaling, which leads to reduced fusion. This finding expands our fundamental understanding of the nanoscale biophysical regulation of cell fusion and can be exploited in biomaterials design to induce desirable biomaterial-tissue interactions.

  3. Regulation of cell-cell fusion by nanotopography

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Augelli, Michael J.; Cheung, Bettina; Kinser, Emily R.; Cleary, Barnett; Kumar, Priyanka; Wang, Renhao; Sawyer, Andrew J.; Li, Rui; Schwarz, Udo D.; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion is fundamental to a multitude of biological processes ranging from cell differentiation and embryogenesis to cancer metastasis and biomaterial-tissue interactions. Fusogenic cells are exposed to biochemical and biophysical factors, which could potentially alter cell behavior. While biochemical inducers of fusion such as cytokines and kinases have been identified, little is known about the biophysical regulation of cell-cell fusion. Here, we designed experiments to examine cell-cell fusion using bulk metallic glass (BMG) nanorod arrays with varying biophysical cues, i.e. nanotopography and stiffness. Through independent variation of stiffness and topography, we found that nanotopography constitutes the primary biophysical cue that can override biochemical signals to attenuate fusion. Specifically, nanotopography restricts cytoskeletal remodeling-associated signaling, which leads to reduced fusion. This finding expands our fundamental understanding of the nanoscale biophysical regulation of cell fusion and can be exploited in biomaterials design to induce desirable biomaterial-tissue interactions. PMID:27615159

  4. Regulation of cell-cell fusion by nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Augelli, Michael J; Cheung, Bettina; Kinser, Emily R; Cleary, Barnett; Kumar, Priyanka; Wang, Renhao; Sawyer, Andrew J; Li, Rui; Schwarz, Udo D; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion is fundamental to a multitude of biological processes ranging from cell differentiation and embryogenesis to cancer metastasis and biomaterial-tissue interactions. Fusogenic cells are exposed to biochemical and biophysical factors, which could potentially alter cell behavior. While biochemical inducers of fusion such as cytokines and kinases have been identified, little is known about the biophysical regulation of cell-cell fusion. Here, we designed experiments to examine cell-cell fusion using bulk metallic glass (BMG) nanorod arrays with varying biophysical cues, i.e. nanotopography and stiffness. Through independent variation of stiffness and topography, we found that nanotopography constitutes the primary biophysical cue that can override biochemical signals to attenuate fusion. Specifically, nanotopography restricts cytoskeletal remodeling-associated signaling, which leads to reduced fusion. This finding expands our fundamental understanding of the nanoscale biophysical regulation of cell fusion and can be exploited in biomaterials design to induce desirable biomaterial-tissue interactions. PMID:27615159

  5. Changes in the distribution of intramembranous particles in hen erythrocytes during cell fusion induced by the bivalent-cation ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, J; Ahkong, Q F; Botham, G M; Quirk, S J; Lucy, J A

    1976-01-01

    Incubation of hen erythrocytes with Ca2+ and the bivalent-cation ionophore A23187 induced slight cell fusion in 1 h at 37 degrees C, and extensive fusion during a subsequent 15 min at 47 degrees C. Redistributions of intramembranous particles were observed, possibly involving interactions between Ca2+ and phospholipids, which are discussed in relation to molecular mechanimss of cell fusion. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:791273

  6. Asymmetric constriction of dividing Escherichia coli cells induced by expression of a fusion between two min proteins.

    PubMed

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells; Margolin, William

    2014-06-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  7. Asymmetric Constriction of Dividing Escherichia coli Cells Induced by Expression of a Fusion between Two Min Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells

    2014-01-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion. PMID:24682325

  8. A virus causes cancer by inducing massive chromosomal instability through cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Duelli, Dominik M; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Berman, David; Murphy, Kathleen M; Ried, Thomas; Lazebnik, Yuri

    2007-03-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) underlies malignant properties of many solid cancers and their ability to escape therapy, and it might itself cause cancer [1, 2]. CIN is sustained by deficiencies in proteins, such as the tumor suppressor p53 [3-5], that police genome integrity, but the primary cause of CIN in sporadic cancers remains uncertain [6, 7]. The primary suspects are mutations that deregulate telomere maintenance, or mitosis, yet such mutations have not been identified in the majority of sporadic cancers [6]. Alternatively, CIN could be caused by a transient event that destabilizes the genome without permanently affecting mechanisms of mitosis or proliferation [5, 8]. Here, we show that an otherwise harmless virus rapidly causes massive chromosomal instability by fusing cells whose cell cycle is deregulated by oncogenes. This synergy between fusion and oncogenes "randomizes" normal diploid human fibroblasts so extensively that each analyzed cell has a unique karyotype, and some produce aggressive, highly aneuploid, heterogeneous, and transplantable epithelial cancers in mice. Because many viruses are fusogenic, this study suggests that viruses, including those that have not been linked to carcinogenesis, can cause chromosomal instability and, consequently, cancer by fusing cells. PMID:17320392

  9. Blockade of CD26-mediated T cell costimulation with soluble caveolin-1-Ig fusion protein induces anergy in CD4{sup +}T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Kei; Uchiyama, Masahiko; Hatano, Ryo; Takasawa, Wataru; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-08-21

    CD26 binds to caveolin-1 in antigen-presenting cells (APC), and that ligation of CD26 by caveolin-1 induces T cell proliferation in a TCR/CD3-dependent manner. We report herein the effects of CD26-caveolin-1 costimulatory blockade by fusion protein caveolin-1-Ig (Cav-Ig). Soluble Cav-Ig inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production in response to recall antigen, or allogeneic APC. Our data hence suggest that blocking of CD26-associated signaling by soluble Cav-Ig may be an effective approach as immunosuppressive therapy.

  10. Force-induced globule-coil transition in laminin binding protein and its role for viral-cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris N; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Mikhaylov, Andrey G; Korneev, Denis V; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Karakouz, Tanya; Belavin, Pavel A; Netesova, Nina A; Protopopova, Elena V; Konovalova, Svetlana N; Dietler, Giovanni; Loktev, Valery B

    2014-12-01

    The specific interactions of the pairs laminin binding protein (LBP)-purified tick-borne encephalitis viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of this protein, as well as West Nile viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of that protein, are studied by combined methods of single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy (SMDFS), enzyme immunoassay and optical surface waves-based biosensor measurements. The experiments were performed at neutral pH (7.4) and acid pH (5.3) conditions. The data obtained confirm the role of LBP as a cell receptor for two typical viral species of the Flavivirus genus. A comparison of these data with similar data obtained for another cell receptor of this family, namely human αVβ3 integrin, reveals that both these receptors are very important. Studying the specific interaction between the cell receptors in question and specially prepared monoclonal antibodies against them, we could show that both interaction sites involved in the process of virus-cell interaction remain intact at pH 5.3. At the same time, for these acid conditions characteristic for an endosome during flavivirus-cell membrane fusion, SMDFS data reveal the existence of a force-induced (effective already for forces as small as 30-70 pN) sharp globule-coil transition for LBP and LBP-fragments of protein E complexes. We argue that this conformational transformation, being an analog of abrupt first-order phase transition and having similarity with the famous Rayleigh hydrodynamic instability, might be indispensable for the flavivirus-cell membrane fusion process. PMID:25319621

  11. Copper deficiency alters cell bioenergetics and induces mitochondrial fusion through up-regulation of MFN2 and OPA1 in erythropoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bustos, Rodrigo I.; Jensen, Erik L.; Ruiz, Lina M.; Rivera, Salvador; Ruiz, Sebastián; Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia; Ferrick, David; Elorza, Alvaro A.

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •In copper deficiency, cell proliferation is not affected. In turn, cell differentiation is impaired. •Enlarged mitochondria are due to up-regulation of MNF2 and OPA1. •Mitochondria turn off respiratory chain and ROS production. •Energy metabolism switch from mitochondria to glycolysis. -- Abstract: Copper is essential in cell physiology, participating in numerous enzyme reactions. In mitochondria, copper is a cofactor for respiratory complex IV, the cytochrome c oxidase. Low copper content is associated with anemia and the appearance of enlarged mitochondria in erythropoietic cells. These findings suggest a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis, which has not been explored so far. Here, we describe that bathocuproine disulfonate-induced copper deficiency does not alter erythropoietic cell proliferation nor induce apoptosis. However it does impair erythroid differentiation, which is associated with a metabolic switch between the two main energy-generating pathways. That is, from mitochondrial function to glycolysis. Switching off mitochondria implies a reduction in oxygen consumption and ROS generation along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial fusion proteins MFN2 and OPA1 were up-regulated along with the ability of mitochondria to fuse. Morphometric analysis of mitochondria did not show changes in total mitochondrial biomass but rather bigger mitochondria because of increased fusion. Similar results were also obtained with human CD34+, which were induced to differentiate into red blood cells. In all, we have shown that adequate copper levels are important for maintaining proper mitochondrial function and for erythroid differentiation where the energy metabolic switch plus the up-regulation of fusion proteins define an adaptive response to copper deprivation to keep cells alive.

  12. Reprogramming of Somatic Cells Towards Pluripotency by Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Andrzej R; Fisher, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent reprogramming can be dominantly induced in a somatic nucleus upon fusion with a pluripotent cell such as embryonic stem (ES) cell. Cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells results in the formation of heterokaryons, in which the somatic nuclei begin to acquire features of the pluripotent partner. The generation of interspecies heterokaryons between mouse ES- and human somatic cells allows an experimenter to distinguish the nuclear events occurring specifically within the reprogrammed nucleus. Therefore, cell fusion provides a simple and rapid approach to look at the early nuclear events underlying pluripotent reprogramming. Here, we describe a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated cell fusion protocol to generate interspecies heterokaryons and intraspecies hybrids between ES cells and B lymphocytes or fibroblasts. PMID:27659994

  13. Reprogramming of Somatic Cells Towards Pluripotency by Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Andrzej R; Fisher, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent reprogramming can be dominantly induced in a somatic nucleus upon fusion with a pluripotent cell such as embryonic stem (ES) cell. Cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells results in the formation of heterokaryons, in which the somatic nuclei begin to acquire features of the pluripotent partner. The generation of interspecies heterokaryons between mouse ES- and human somatic cells allows an experimenter to distinguish the nuclear events occurring specifically within the reprogrammed nucleus. Therefore, cell fusion provides a simple and rapid approach to look at the early nuclear events underlying pluripotent reprogramming. Here, we describe a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated cell fusion protocol to generate interspecies heterokaryons and intraspecies hybrids between ES cells and B lymphocytes or fibroblasts.

  14. Comparison of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against pancreatic cancer induced by dendritic cells transfected with total tumor RNA and fusion hybrided with tumor cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang; Li, Hong-Yu; Wang, Di; Shao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a deadly human malignancy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy with whole tumor antigens demonstrates potential efficiency in cancer treatment. Tumor RNA and tumor fusion hybrid cells are sources of whole tumor antigens for preparing DC tumor vaccines. However, the efficacy of these sources in eliciting immune responses against PC has not yet to be directly compared. In the present study, patient-derived PC cells and DCs were fused (DC–tumor hybrids) and primary cultured PC cell-derived total RNA was electroporated into autologous DCs (DC–tumor RNA). The antitumor immune responses induced by DC–tumor hybrids and DC–tumor RNA were compared directly. The results showed that both RNA and hybrid methodologies could induce tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, but pulsing DCs with total tumor RNA could induce a higher frequency of activated CTLs and T-helper cells than fusing DCs with autologous tumor cells. In addition, DC–tumor RNA triggered stronger autologous tumor cell lysis than DC–tumor hybrids. It could be concluded that DCs pulsed with whole tumor RNA are superior to those fused with tumor cells in priming anti-PC CTL responses. Electroporation with total tumor RNA may be more suitable for DC-based PC vaccination. PMID:25736302

  15. Herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein M and the membrane-associated protein UL11 are required for virus-induced cell fusion and efficient virus entry.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Joong; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Walker, Jason D; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) facilitates virus entry into cells and cell-to-cell spread by mediating fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes and fusion of adjacent cellular membranes. Although virus strains isolated from herpetic lesions cause limited cell fusion in cell culture, clinical herpetic lesions typically contain large syncytia, underscoring the importance of cell-to-cell fusion in virus spread in infected tissues. Certain mutations in glycoprotein B (gB), gK, UL20, and other viral genes drastically enhance virus-induced cell fusion in vitro and in vivo. Recent work has suggested that gB is the sole fusogenic glycoprotein, regulated by interactions with the viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gK, membrane protein UL20, and cellular receptors. Recombinant viruses were constructed to abolish either gM or UL11 expression in the presence of strong syncytial mutations in either gB or gK. Virus-induced cell fusion caused by deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB or the dominant syncytial mutation in gK (Ala to Val at amino acid 40) was drastically reduced in the absence of gM. Similarly, syncytial mutations in either gB or gK did not cause cell fusion in the absence of UL11. Neither the gM nor UL11 gene deletion substantially affected gB, gC, gD, gE, and gH glycoprotein synthesis and expression on infected cell surfaces. Two-way immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that the membrane protein UL20, which is found as a protein complex with gK, interacted with gM while gM did not interact with other viral glycoproteins. Viruses produced in the absence of gM or UL11 entered into cells more slowly than their parental wild-type virus strain. Collectively, these results indicate that gM and UL11 are required for efficient membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus spread.

  16. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion.

  17. Fusion of HCV Nonstructural Antigen to MHC Class II–associated Invariant Chain Enhances T-cell Responses Induced by Vectored Vaccines in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Stefania; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Abbate, Adele; Grazioli, Fabiana; Del Gaudio, Annunziata; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Ammendola, Virginia; Perretta, Gemma; Taglioni, Alessandra; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Despite viral vectors being potent inducers of antigen-specific T cells, strategies to further improve their immunogenicity are actively pursued. Of the numerous approaches investigated, fusion of the encoded antigen to major histocompatibility complex class II–associated invariant chain (Ii) has been reported to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. We have previously shown that adenovirus vaccine encoding nonstructural (NS) hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins induces potent T-cell responses in humans. However, even higher T-cell responses might be required to achieve efficacy against different HCV genotypes or therapeutic effect in chronically infected HCV patients. In this study, we assessed fusion of the HCV NS antigen to murine and human Ii expressed by the chimpanzee adenovirus vector ChAd3 or recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). A dramatic increase was observed in outbred mice in which vaccination with ChAd3 expressing the fusion antigen resulted in a 10-fold increase in interferon-γ+ CD8+ T cells. In NHPs, CD8+ T-cell responses were enhanced and accelerated with vectors encoding the Ii-fused antigen. These data show for the first time that the enhancement induced by vector vaccines encoding li-fused antigen was not species specific and can be translated from mice to NHPs, opening the way for testing in humans. PMID:24476798

  18. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  19. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  20. Differential Roles of Cell Death-inducing DNA Fragmentation Factor-α-like Effector (CIDE) Proteins in Promoting Lipid Droplet Fusion and Growth in Subpopulations of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenyi; Wu, Lizhen; Yu, Miao; Chen, Feng-Jung; Arshad, Muhammad; Xia, Xiayu; Ren, Hao; Yu, Jinhai; Xu, Li; Xu, Dijin; Li, John Zhong; Li, Peng; Zhou, Linkang

    2016-02-26

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic subcellular organelles whose growth is closely linked to obesity and hepatic steatosis. Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector (CIDE) proteins, including Cidea, Cideb, and Cidec (also called Fsp27), play important roles in lipid metabolism. Cidea and Cidec are LD-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes. Here, we find that CIDE proteins are all localized to LD-LD contact sites (LDCSs) and promote lipid transfer, LD fusion, and growth in hepatocytes. We have identified two types of hepatocytes, one with small LDs (small LD-containing hepatocytes, SLHs) and one with large LDs (large LD-containing hepatocytes, LLHs) in the liver. Cideb is localized to LDCSs and promotes lipid exchange and LD fusion in both SLHs and LLHs, whereas Cidea and Cidec are specifically localized to the LDCSs and promote lipid exchange and LD fusion in LLHs. Cideb-deficient SLHs have reduced LD sizes and lower lipid exchange activities. Fasting dramatically induces the expression of Cidea/Cidec and increases the percentage of LLHs in the liver. The majority of the hepatocytes from the liver of obese mice are Cidea/Cidec-positive LLHs. Knocking down Cidea or Cidec significantly reduced lipid storage in the livers of obese animals. Our data reveal that CIDE proteins play differential roles in promoting LD fusion and lipid storage; Cideb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions, whereas Cidea and Cidec are responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions. PMID:26733203

  1. Differential Roles of Cell Death-inducing DNA Fragmentation Factor-α-like Effector (CIDE) Proteins in Promoting Lipid Droplet Fusion and Growth in Subpopulations of Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenyi; Wu, Lizhen; Yu, Miao; Chen, Feng-Jung; Arshad, Muhammad; Xia, Xiayu; Ren, Hao; Yu, Jinhai; Xu, Li; Xu, Dijin; Li, John Zhong; Li, Peng; Zhou, Linkang

    2016-02-26

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic subcellular organelles whose growth is closely linked to obesity and hepatic steatosis. Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector (CIDE) proteins, including Cidea, Cideb, and Cidec (also called Fsp27), play important roles in lipid metabolism. Cidea and Cidec are LD-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes. Here, we find that CIDE proteins are all localized to LD-LD contact sites (LDCSs) and promote lipid transfer, LD fusion, and growth in hepatocytes. We have identified two types of hepatocytes, one with small LDs (small LD-containing hepatocytes, SLHs) and one with large LDs (large LD-containing hepatocytes, LLHs) in the liver. Cideb is localized to LDCSs and promotes lipid exchange and LD fusion in both SLHs and LLHs, whereas Cidea and Cidec are specifically localized to the LDCSs and promote lipid exchange and LD fusion in LLHs. Cideb-deficient SLHs have reduced LD sizes and lower lipid exchange activities. Fasting dramatically induces the expression of Cidea/Cidec and increases the percentage of LLHs in the liver. The majority of the hepatocytes from the liver of obese mice are Cidea/Cidec-positive LLHs. Knocking down Cidea or Cidec significantly reduced lipid storage in the livers of obese animals. Our data reveal that CIDE proteins play differential roles in promoting LD fusion and lipid storage; Cideb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions, whereas Cidea and Cidec are responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions.

  2. Retroviral delivery of GAD-IgG fusion construct induces tolerance and modulates diabetes: a role for CD4+ regulatory T cells and TGF-beta?

    PubMed

    Song, L; Wang, J; Wang, R; Yu, M; Sun, Y; Han, G; Li, Y; Qian, J; Scott, D W; Kang, Y; Soukhareva, N; Shen, B

    2004-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigen-specific tolerance could be induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated B cells retrovirally transduced with an immunoglobulin-antigen (or epitope-containing peptide) fusion construct. To investigate the mechanism of this gene therapy system, we now adapted this approach to immunotherapy of spontaneous diabetes in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease triggered, in part, by a pathogenic response to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 65. We demonstrate that LPS-stimulated splenocytes, retrovirally transfected with GAD-IgG fusion construct, induce a significant antigen-specific hyporesponsiveness at both cellular and humoral levels and reduce the incidence of diabetes in female NOD mice. Parallel with disease protection, we observed a prolonged increase of the numbers of CD4+CD25+ T cells in the periphery of GAD-IgG-treated mice, compared to those treated with a control IgG vector, both in the prediabetic period and persisting even 8 months after gene therapy. This increase appeared to be induced by the repeated stimulation of the antigen in the periphery instead of a result of differentiation of T-cell precursor in the thymus. Moreover, CD4+CD25+ T cells induced by GAD-IgG fusion construct were capable of suppressing the proliferative response of CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro; and ablation of the activity of CD4+CD25+ T cells by blocking antibody against CD25 could reverse GAD-specific T-cell hyporesponsiveness. These results suggested that CD4+CD25+ T-cell subset induced in GAD-IgG-treated NOD mice represented the regulatory or suppressive CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) and might play an important role in the induction and maintenance of tolerance in NOD mice. Furthermore, the numbers of splenic CD4+CD62L+ regulatory T cells in GAD-IgG-treated mice during the prediabetic period and serum TGF-beta levels in 34-38-week-old GAD-IgG-protected mice were also increased, compared to control IgG-treated ones

  3. Involvement of PKC{alpha} in PMA-induced facilitation of exocytosis and vesicle fusion in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Renhao; Zhao Yanying; Chen Peng

    2009-03-06

    Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, a stable analog of the important signaling membrane lipid diacylglycerol (DAG), is known to potentiate exocytosis and modulate vesicle fusion kinetics in neurons and endocrine cells. The exact mechanisms underlying the actions of PMA, however, is often not clear, largely because of the diversity of the DAG/PMA receptors involved in the exocytotic process, which include, most notably, various isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, the roles of PKC{alpha} in PMA-mediated regulation of exocytosis were investigated by over-expressing wild-type PKC{alpha} (wt-PKC{alpha}) or dominant negative PKC{alpha} (dn-PKC{alpha}). Amperometric measurements based on carbon fiber microelectrodes demonstrated that PKC{alpha} has a key role in the PMA-mediated facilitation of exocytosis and vesicle fusion in neuroendocrine PC12 cells.

  4. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Stéphane G; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leόn, Alberto J; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S H; Farooqui, Amber; Kelvin, David J; Kelvin, Alyson A

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus-epithelial cell interaction.

  5. [La(3+)-induced fusion of plant protoplasts].

    PubMed

    Sheremet'ev, Iu A; Smirnova, D V; Sheremet'eva, A V

    2009-01-01

    The effect of La(3+) on the fusion of plant protoplasts has been studied. It was shown that La(3+) induced the aggregation of plant protoplasts. The incubation of a suspension of aggregated protoplasts at 42 degrees C for 30 min resulted in their fusion.

  6. Transient domains induced by influenza haemagglutinin during membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, R; Pak, C C; Raviv, Y; Krumbiegel, M; Bergelson, L D; Morris, S J; Lowy, R J

    1995-01-01

    During low pH-induced fusion of influenza virus with erythrocytes we have observed differential dispersion of viral lipid and haemagglutinin (HA) into the erythrocyte membrane, and viral RNA into the erythrocyte using fluorescence video microscopy. The movement of both viral lipid and HA from virus to cell was restricted during the initial stages of fusion relative to free diffusion. This indicates the existence of relatively long-lived barriers to diffusion subsequent to fusion pore formation. Fluorescence anisotropy of phospholipid analogues incorporated into the viral membrane decreased when the pH was lowered to levels required for optimum fusion. This indicates that the restricted motion of viral membrane components was not due to rigidification of membrane lipids. The movement of HA from the fusion site was also assessed by photosensitized labelling by means of a fluorescent substrate (NBD-taurine) passing through the band 3 sialoglycoprotein (the erythrocyte anion transporter). We also examined the flow of lipid and aqueous markers during fusion of HA-expressing cells with labelled erythrocytes. During this cell-cell fusion, movement of lipid between fusing membranes begins before the fusion pore is wide enough to allow diffusion of aqueous molecules (M(r) > 500). The data indicate that HA is capable of creating domains in the membrane and controlling continuity of aqueous compartments which are bounded by such domains.

  7. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, Stéphane G.; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leon, Alberto J.; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S.H.; Farooqui, Amber; and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  8. The Dark Side of Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Ruiz, Daniel; Van Hoesen, Kylie; Cohen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a physiological cellular process essential for fertilization, viral entry, muscle differentiation and placental development, among others. In this review, we will highlight the different cancer cell-cell fusions and the advantages obtained by these fusions. We will specially focus on the acquisition of metastatic features by cancer cells after fusion with bone marrow-derived cells. The mechanism by which cancer cells fuse with other cells has been poorly studied thus far, but the presence in several cancer cells of syncytin, a trophoblastic fusogen, leads us to a cancer cell fusion mechanism similar to the one used by the trophoblasts. The mechanism by which cancer cells perform the cell fusion could be an interesting target for cancer therapy. PMID:27136533

  9. C/EBPβ regulates sensitivity to bortezomib in prostate cancer cells by inducing REDD1 and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Barakat, David J; Mendonca, Janet; Barberi, Theresa; Zhang, Jing; Kachhap, Sushant K; Paz-Priel, Ido; Friedman, Alan D

    2016-05-28

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the mechanisms by which advanced prostate cancer cells resist bortezomib therapy. Several independent studies have shown that cells are protected from proteasome inhibition by increased autophagic activity. We investigated whether C/EBPβ, a transcription factor involved in the control of autophagic gene expression, regulates resistance to proteasome inhibition. In PC3 cells over-expressing C/EBPβ, turnover of autophagic substrates and expression of core autophagy genes were increased. Conversely, C/EBPβ knockdown suppressed autophagosome-lysosome fusion. We also found that C/EBPβ knockdown suppressed REDD1 expression to delay early autophagy, an effect rescued by exogenous REDD1. Cells with suppressed C/EBPβ levels showed delayed autophagy activation upon bortezomib treatment. Knockdown of C/EBPβ sensitized PC3 cells to bortezomib, and blockade of autophagy by chloroquine did not further increase cell death in cells expressing shRNA targeting C/EBPβ. Lastly, we observed a decreased growth of PC3 cells and xenografts with C/EBPβ knockdown and such xenografts were sensitized to bortezomib treatment. Our results demonstrate that C/EBPβ is a critical effector of autophagy via regulation of autolysosome formation and promotes resistance to proteasome inhibitor treatment by increasing autophagy.

  10. Gene therapy with a single chain interleukin 12 fusion protein induces T cell-dependent protective immunity in a syngeneic model of murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lode, H N; Dreier, T; Xiang, R; Varki, N M; Kang, A S; Reisfeld, R A

    1998-03-01

    A major goal of tumor immunotherapy is the effective eradication of established metastases associated with the induction of a T cell-mediated protective immunity. We achieved this in a poorly immunogenic murine neuroblastoma model by gene therapy with a single chain interleukin 12 (scIL-12) fusion protein that assures equal expression of its p35 and p40 subunits. Thus, NXS2 hybrid neuroblastoma cells (C1300 x dorsal root ganglion cells), which form experimental bone marrow and liver metastases in syngeneic A/J mice, were transduced with a gene encoding murine interleukin 12, monomerized by introduction of a protein linker between the p35 and p40 protein chains of this heterodimeric cytokine. We demonstrate for the first time that subcutaneous vaccination with these transduced cells induces a protective immunity, as indicated by the complete absence of liver and bone marrow metastasis after challenge with NXS2 wild-type tumor cells. Furthermore, vaccination of animals with established liver and bone marrow metastases completely eradicated liver metastases and suppressed bone marrow metastases. The local and systemic immune response against scIL-12-transduced NXS2 cells is largely dependent on CD8(+) T cells. This was demonstrated in vivo by depletion of immunocompetent A/J mice with monoclonal anti-CD4 and anti-CD8 antibodies and in vitro by specific major histocompatibility complex, class I-restricted CD8(+) T cell-mediated killing of NXS2 and their parental C1300 neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate successful anti-tumor immunotherapy with an scIL-12 fusion protein that could facilitate clinical application of interleukin 12 gene therapy.

  11. Visualization of radiation-induced cell cycle-associated events in tumor cells expressing the fusion protein of Azami Green and the destruction box of human Geminin

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Mayuko; Ogihara, Yusuke; Miura, Masahiko

    2009-11-20

    Ionizing radiation (IR) influences cell cycle-associated events in tumor cells. We expressed the fusion protein of Azami Green (AG) and the destruction box plus nuclear localization signal of human Geminin, an inhibitor of DNA replication licensing factor, in oral tumor cells. This approach allowed us to visualize G2 arrest in living cells following irradiation. The combination of time-lapse imaging analysis allowed us to observe the nuclear envelope break down (NEBD) at early M phase, and disappearance of fluorescence (DF) at the end of M phase. The duration from NEBD to DF was not much affected in irradiated cells; however, most of daughter cells harbored double-strand breaks. Complete DF was also observed in cells exhibiting abnormal mitosis or cytokinesis. We conclude that the fluorescent Geminin probe could function as a stable cell cycle indicator irrespective of genome integrity.

  12. Cell secretion and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2005-07-01

    Secretion occurs in all cells of multicellular organisms and involves the delivery of secretory products packaged in membrane-bound vesicles to the cell exterior. Specialized cells for neurotransmission, enzyme secretion or hormone release utilize a highly regulated secretory process. Secretory vesicles are transported to specific sites at the plasma membrane, where they dock and fuse to release their contents. Similar to other cellular processes, cell secretion is found to be highly regulated and a precisely orchestrated event. It has been demonstrated that membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and fuse at porosomes, which are specialized supramolecular structures at the cell plasma membrane. Swelling of secretory vesicles results in a build-up of pressure, allowing expulsion of intravesicular contents. The extent of secretory vesicle swelling dictates the amount of intravesicular contents expelled during secretion. The discovery of the porosome, its isolation, its structure and dynamics at nm resolution and in real time, its biochemical composition and functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane, have been determined. The molecular mechanism of secretory vesicle fusion at the base of porosomes, and vesicle swelling, has also been resolved. These findings reveal the molecular mechanism of cell secretion.

  13. Cancer Cell Fusion: Mechanisms Slowly Unravel

    PubMed Central

    Noubissi, Felicite K.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Although molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways driving invasion and metastasis have been studied for many years, the origin of the population of metastatic cells within the primary tumor is still not well understood. About a century ago, Aichel proposed that cancer cell fusion was a mechanism of cancer metastasis. This hypothesis gained some support over the years, and recently became the focus of many studies that revealed increasing evidence pointing to the possibility that cancer cell fusion probably gives rise to the metastatic phenotype by generating widespread genetic and epigenetic diversity, leading to the emergence of critical populations needed to evolve resistance to the treatment and development of metastasis. In this review, we will discuss the clinical relevance of cancer cell fusion, describe emerging mechanisms of cancer cell fusion, address why inhibiting cancer cell fusion could represent a critical line of attack to limit drug resistance and to prevent metastasis, and suggest one new modality for doing so. PMID:27657058

  14. Biochemical studies on cell fusion. II. Control of fusion response by lipid alteration

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The preceding communication (Roos, D.S. and P.W. Choppin, 1985, J. Cell Biol. 101:1578-1590) described the lipid composition of a series of mouse fibroblast cell lines which vary in susceptibility to the fusogenic effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two alterations in lipid content were found to be directly correlated with resistance to PEG-induced cell fusion: increases in fatty acyl chain saturation, and the elevation of neutral glycerides, including an unusual ether-linked compound. In this study, we have probed the association between lipid composition and cell fusion through the use of fatty acid supplements to the cellular growth medium, and show that the fusibility of cells can be controlled by altering their acyl chain composition. The parental Clone 1D cells contain moderately unsaturated fatty acids with a ratio of saturates to polyunsaturates (S/P) approximately 1 and fuse virtually to completion following a standard PEG treatment. By contrast, the lipids of a highly fusion-resistant mutant cell line, F40, are highly saturated (S/P approximately 4). When the S/P ratio of Clone 1D cells was increased to approximate that normally found in F40 cells by growth in the presence of high concentrations of saturated fatty acids, they became highly resistant to PEG. Reduction of the S/P ratio of F40 cells by growth in cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids rendered them susceptible to fusion. Cell lines F8, F16, etc., which are normally intermediate between Clone 1D and F40 in both lipid composition and fusion response, can be altered in either direction (towards either increased or decreased susceptibility to fusion) by the addition of appropriate fatty acids to the growth medium. Although trans-unsaturated fatty acids have phase-transition temperatures roughly similar to saturated compounds, and might therefore be expected to affect membrane fluidity in a similar manner, trans-unsaturated fatty acids exerted the same effect as cis-unsaturates on the control of PEG-induced

  15. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. PMID:26343487

  16. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR.

  17. Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Lamadrid Boada, A I; Romero Aguilera, I; Terzoudi, G I; González Mesa, J E; Pantelias, G; García, O

    2013-09-18

    Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were γ-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy at a dose rate of 0.5Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37°C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 8-24-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y=(0.088±0.005)×D. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

  18. Critical components of a DNA fusion vaccine able to induce protective cytotoxic T cells against a single epitope of a tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Rice, Jason; Buchan, Sarah; Stevenson, Freda K

    2002-10-01

    DNA vaccines can activate immunity against tumor Ags expressed as MHC class I-associated peptides. However, priming of CD8(+) CTL against weak tumor Ags may require adjuvant molecules. We have used a pathogen-derived sequence from tetanus toxin (fragment C (FrC)) fused to tumor Ag sequences to promote Ab and CD4(+) T cell responses. For induction of CD8(+) T cell responses, the FrC sequence has been engineered to remove potentially competitive MHC class I-binding epitopes and to improve presentation of tumor epitopes. The colon carcinoma CT26 expresses an endogenous retroviral gene product, gp70, containing a known H2-L(d)-restricted epitope (AH1). A DNA vaccine encoding gp70 alone was a poor inducer of CTL, and performance was not significantly improved by fusion of full-length FrC. However, use of a minimized domain of FrC, with the AH1 sequence fused to the 3' position, led to rapid induction of high levels of CTL. IFN-gamma-producing epitope-specific CTL were detectable ex vivo and these killed CT26 targets in vitro. The single epitope vaccine was more effective than GM-CSF-transfected CT26 tumor cells in inducing an AH1-specific CTL response and equally effective in providing protection against tumor challenge. Levels of AH1-specific CTL in vivo were increased following injection of tumor cells, and CTL expanded in vitro were able to kill CT26 cells in tumor bearers. Pre-existing immunity to tetanus toxoid had no effect on the induction of AH1-specific CTL. These data demonstrate the power of epitope-specific CTL against tumor cells and illustrate a strategy for priming immunity via a dual component DNA vaccine.

  19. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-07-05

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.

  20. The conserved Cockayne syndrome B-piggyBac fusion protein (CSB-PGBD3) affects DNA repair and induces both interferon-like and innate antiviral responses in CSB-null cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Arnold D; Gray, Lucas T; Pavelitz, Thomas; Newman, John C; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Weiner, Alan M

    2012-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a segmental progeria most often caused by mutations in the CSB gene encoding a SWI/SNF-like ATPase required for transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Over 43Mya before marmosets diverged from humans, a piggyBac3 (PGBD3) transposable element integrated into intron 5 of the CSB gene. As a result, primate CSB genes now generate both CSB protein and a conserved CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in which the first 5 exons of CSB are alternatively spliced to the PGBD3 transposase. Using a host cell reactivation assay, we show that the fusion protein inhibits TCR of oxidative damage but facilitates TCR of UV damage. We also show by microarray analysis that expression of the fusion protein alone in CSB-null UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) cells induces an interferon-like response that resembles both the innate antiviral response and the prolonged interferon response normally maintained by unphosphorylated STAT1 (U-STAT1); moreover, as might be expected based on conservation of the fusion protein, this potentially cytotoxic interferon-like response is largely reversed by coexpression of functional CSB protein. Interestingly, expression of CSB and the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein together, but neither alone, upregulates the insulin growth factor binding protein IGFBP5 and downregulates IGFBP7, suggesting that the fusion protein may also confer a metabolic advantage, perhaps in the presence of DNA damage. Finally, we show that the fusion protein binds in vitro to members of a dispersed family of 900 internally deleted piggyBac elements known as MER85s, providing a potential mechanism by which the fusion protein could exert widespread effects on gene expression. Our data suggest that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein is important in both health and disease, and could play a role in Cockayne syndrome. PMID:22483866

  1. Localization of a Region in the Fusion Protein of Avian Metapneumovirus That Modulates Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented. PMID:22915815

  2. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an "all-or-none" manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  3. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  4. Methodologies in the study of cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F S; Melikyan, G B

    1998-10-01

    The process of membrane fusion has been profitably studied by fusing cells that express fusion proteins on their surfaces to the membranes of target cells. Primary methods for monitoring the occurrence of fusion between cells are measurement of formation of heterokaryons, measurement of activation of reporter genes, measurement of transfer of lipidic and aqueous fluorescent dyes, and electrophysiological recording of fusion pores. Fluorescence and electrical methods have been well developed for fusion of a nucleated cell expressing viral fusion proteins to red blood cell targets. These techniques are now being extended to the study of fusion between two nucleated cells. Microscopic observation of spread of fluorescent dyes from one cell to another is a sensitive and convenient means of detecting fusion on the level of single events. In such studies, both the membrane and the aqueous continuities that occur as a result of fusion can be measured in the same experiment. By following spread of aqueous dyes of different sizes from one cell to another, the growth of a fusion pore can also be followed. By labeling cells with fluorescent probes, a state of hemifusion can be identified if probes in outer membrane leaflets transfer but probes in inner leaflets or aqueous spaces do not. Electrical measurements-both capacitance and double-whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques-are the most sensitive methods yet developed for detecting the formation of pores and for quantifying their growth. These powerful single-event methodologies should be directly applicable to further advances in expressing nonviral fusion proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:9790869

  5. Cell fusion through a microslit between adhered cells and observation of their nuclear behavior.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ken-Ichi; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Eitaro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a novel cell fusion method which induces cell fusion between adhered cells through a microslit for preventing nuclear mixing. For this purpose, a microfluidic device which had ∼ 100 cell pairing structures (CPSs) making cell pairs through microslits with 2.1 ± 0.3 µm width was fabricated. After trapping NIH3T3 cells with hydrodynamic forces at the CPSs, the cells were fused through the microslit by the Sendai virus envelope method. With following timelapse observation, we discovered that the spread cells were much less susceptible to nuclear migration passing through the microslit compared with round cells, and that cytoplasmic fraction containing mitochondria was transferred through the microslit without nuclear mixing. These findings will provide an effective method for cell fusion without nuclear mixing, and will lead to an efficient method for reprograming and transdifferentiation of target cells toward regenerative medicine.

  6. Prolonged interval between fusion and activation impairs embryonic development by inducing chromosome scattering and nuclear aneuploidy in pig somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Song, Kilyoung; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of various intervals between electrofusion and activation (FA interval) on the nuclear remodelling and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in pigs. Reconstructed oocytes were activated at 0 (simultaneous fusion and activation; SFA), 1, 2 and 3 h (delayed activation) after electrofusion; these groups were designated as DA1, DA2 and DA3, respectively. When oocyte nuclear status was examined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h after electrofusion, the incidence of chromosome scattering was increased (P < 0.01) as the FA interval was extended (0.0%, 12.0%, 77.3% and 78.0%, respectively). Extending the FA interval led to an increase (P < 0.01) in the percentage of oocytes containing multiple (>or=3) pseudopronuclei (PPN) (0.0% of SFA; 5.3% of DA1; 21.7% of DA2; and 33.5% of DA3). The development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was decreased (P < 0.05) in DA2 (5.7%) and DA3 (5.0%) compared with SFA (18.1%) and DA1 (19.5%). Our results demonstrate that extending the FA interval impairs the development of SCNT pig embryos by inducing chromosome scattering and the formation of multiple PPN, which may result in increased nuclear aneuploidy.

  7. Khz (fusion product of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) induces apoptosis in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species, activation of caspase 3, and increased intracellular Ca²⁺.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Ju Sung; Kim, Zoo Haye; Huang, Ren Bin; Chae, Young Lye; Wang, Ren Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Khz (a fusion mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) is isolated from ganoderic acid and P. umbellatus and it exerts antiproliferative effects against malignant cells. However, no previous study has reported the inhibitory effects of Khz on the growth of human colon cancer cells. In the present study, we found that Khz suppressed cell division and induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Khz cytotoxicity was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Khz reduced cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential levels and it also induced disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and increased calcium concentration and reactive oxygen species generation. Khz increased caspase 3, PARP, caspase 7, and caspase 9 levels, but reduced Bcl-2 protein levels. Flow cytometry showed that the percentage of HCT116 cells in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle increased in response to Khz treatment.

  8. Reciprocal Regulation of AKT and MAP Kinase Dictates Virus-Host Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nishi R.; Mani, Prashant; Nandwani, Neha; Mishra, Rajakishore; Rana, Ajay; Sarkar, Debi P.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family bind to their host cells by using hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), which enhances fusion protein (F)-mediated membrane fusion. Although respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 5 of this family are suggested to trigger host cell signaling during infection, the virus-induced intracellular signals dictating virus-cell fusion await elucidation. Using an F- or HN-F-containing reconstituted envelope of Sendai virus, another paramyxovirus, we revealed the role and regulation of AKT1 and Raf/MEK/ERK cascades during viral fusion with liver cells. Our observation that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation promotes viral fusion via ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, whereas AKT1 attenuates fusion by promoting phosphorylation of F protein, indicates a counteractive regulation of viral fusion by reciprocal activation of AKT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, establishing a novel conceptual framework for a therapeutic strategy. PMID:20164223

  9. Reorganization of cytoplasmic structures during cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q A; Chang, D C

    1991-11-01

    In order to provide a better understanding of the dynamic process of cell fusion, we studied the reorganization of cytoplasmic structures in electro-fused CV-1 cells. Using fluorescence microscopy and double staining methods, we examined correlations between the structural patterns of the major cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules, actin and vimentin intermediate filaments) and the distribution of various organelles (endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclei) at different stages of cell fusion. Our results suggest that microtubules appear to play a primary role in the process of cytoplasmic reorganization. At the early stage of cell fusion, microtubules were observed to infiltrate rapidly into the newly formed cytoplasmic bridges and establish a connection between the cytoskeletal networks of fusing cells. The reorganization of microtubules was found to be correlated with the redistribution of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), vimentin intermediate filaments, mitochondria, and the aggregation of nuclei. The F-actin system, on the other hand, appeared to be independent of the reorganization of the other cytoplasmic structures. The principal function of F-actin during cell fusion is probably to widen the cytoplasmic bridges by lamellipodial extension.

  10. Premature activation of the paramyxovirus fusion protein before target cell attachment with corruption of the viral fusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Palermo, Laura M; Yokoyama, Christine C; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents.

  11. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  12. Effects of ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 on cell fusion through a microslit.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ken-Ichi; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Ito, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-11-01

    We previously reported a direct cytoplasmic transfer method using a microfluidic device, in which cell fusion was induced through a microslit (slit-through-fusion) by the Sendai virus envelope (HVJ-E) to prevent nuclear mixing. However, the method was impractical due to low efficiency of slit-through-fusion formation and insufficient prevention of nuclear mixing. The purpose of this study was to establish an efficient method for inducing slit-through-fusion without nuclear mixing. We hypothesized that modulation of cytoskeletal component can decrease nuclear migration through the microslit considering its functions. Here we report that supplementation with Y-27632, a specific ROCK inhibitor, significantly enhances cell fusion induction and prevention of nuclear mixing. Supplementation with Y-27632 increased the formation of slit-through-fusion efficiency by more than twofold. Disruption of F-actin by Y-27632 prevented nuclear migration between fused cells through the microslit. These two effects of Y-27632 led to promotion of the slit-through-fusion without nuclear mixing with a 16.5-fold higher frequency compared to our previous method (i.e., cell fusion induction by HVJ-E without supplementation with Y-27632). We also confirmed that mitochondria were successfully transferred to the fusion partner under conditions of Y-27632 supplementation. These findings demonstrate the practicality of our cell fusion system in producing direct cytoplasmic transfer between live cells.

  13. Cell fusion assay by expression of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein to analyze the mutation of palivizumab-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yosuke; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Akihito; Ito, Takashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) consists of fusion (F), glyco (G), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins as envelope proteins, and infects through cell fusion. F protein is expressed on the surface of infected cells, and induces cell fusion. In the present report, expression plasmids of the F, G and SH proteins were constructed and cell fusion activity was investigated under T7 RNA polymerase. F protein alone induced cell fusion at a lower concentration than previously reported, and co-expression of F and SH proteins induced cell fusion more efficiently than F protein alone. Palivizumab is the only prophylactic agent against RSV infection. Palivizumab-resistant strains having mutations of the F protein of K272E and S275F were reported. These mutations were introduced into an F-expression plasmid, and exhibited no inhibition of cell fusion with palivizumab. Among the RSV F protein mutants, N276S has been reported to have partial resistance against palivizumab, but the F expression plasmid with the N276S mutation showed a reduction in cell fusion in the presence of palivizumab, showing no resistance to palivizumab. The present expression system was useful for investigating the mechanisms of RSV cell fusion. PMID:26794681

  14. Paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability in cells with dysfunctional telomeres: Implication in multinucleation and chemosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Woo, Seon Rang; Kang, Chang-Mo; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun Ran; Park, In-chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kim, Hae Kwon; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Paclitaxel serves as a stimulator of chromosomal fusion in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. {yields} Typical fusions involve p-arms, but paclitaxel-induced fusions occur between both q- and p-arms. {yields} Paclitaxel-stimulated fusions in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional evoke prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest and delay multinucleation. {yields} Upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel promotes chromosomal instability and subsequent apoptosis. {yields} Chromosomal fusion enhances paclitaxel chemosensitivity under telomere dysfunction. -- Abstract: The anticancer effect of paclitaxel is attributable principally to irreversible promotion of microtubule stabilization and is hampered upon development of chemoresistance by tumor cells. Telomere shortening, and eventual telomere erosion, evoke chromosomal instability, resulting in particular cellular responses. Using telomerase-deficient cells derived from mTREC-/-p53-/- mice, here we show that, upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel propagates chromosomal instability by stimulating chromosomal end-to-end fusions and delaying the development of multinucleation. The end-to-end fusions involve both the p- and q-arms in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. Paclitaxel-induced chromosomal fusions were accompanied by prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest, delayed multinucleation, and apoptosis. Telomere dysfunctional cells with mutlinucleation eventually underwent apoptosis. Thus, as telomere erosion proceeds, paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability, and both apoptosis and chemosensitization eventually develop.

  15. Calpastatin overexpression reduces oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial impairment and cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by decreasing calpain and calcineurin activation, induction of mitochondrial fission and destruction of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Tangmansakulchai, Kulvadee; Abubakar, Zuroida; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-09-01

    Calpain is an intracellular Ca(2+)-dependent protease, and the activation of calpain has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Calpain activity can be regulated by calpastatin, an endogenous specific calpain inhibitor. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated a potential role of calpastatin in preventing calpain-mediated pathogenesis. Additionally, several studies have revealed that calpain activation and mitochondrial damage are involved in the cell death process; however, recent evidence has not clearly indicated a neuroprotective mechanism of calpastatin against calpain-dependent mitochondrial impairment in the process of neuronal cell death. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the potential ability of calpastatin to inhibit calpain activation and mitochondrial impairment in oxidative stress-induced neuron degeneration. Calpastatin was stably overexpressed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In non-calpastatin overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly decreased cell viability, superoxide dismutase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP production and mitochondrial fusion protein (Opa1) levels in the mitochondrial fraction but increased reactive oxygen species formation, calpain and calcineurin activation, mitochondrial fission protein (Fis1 and Drp1) levels in the mitochondrial fraction and apoptotic cells. Nevertheless, these toxic effects were abolished in hydrogen peroxide-treated calpastatin-overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells. The results of the present study demonstrate the potential ability of calpastatin to diminish calpain and calcineurin activation and mitochondrial impairment in neurons that are affected by oxidative damage. PMID:27453331

  16. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B.; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge—a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry. PMID:26730950

  17. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger.

    PubMed

    Markosyan, Ruben M; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge-a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry.

  18. A sensitive HIV-1 envelope induced fusion assay identifies fusion enhancement of thrombin

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, De-Chun; Zhong, Guo-Cai; Su, Ju-Xiang; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan; Wang, Jia-Ye; Hattori, Toshio; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Feng-Min

    2010-01-22

    To evaluate the interaction between HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and target cell receptors, various cell-cell-fusion assays have been developed. In the present study, we established a novel fusion system. In this system, the expression of the sensitive reporter gene, firefly luciferase (FL) gene, in the target cells was used to evaluate cell fusion event. Simultaneously, constitutively expressed Renilla luciferase (RL) gene was used to monitor effector cell number and viability. FL gave a wider dynamic range than other known reporters and the introduction of RL made the assay accurate and reproducible. This system is especially beneficial for investigation of potential entry-influencing agents, for its power of ruling out the false inhibition or enhancement caused by the artificial cell-number variation. As a case study, we applied this fusion system to observe the effect of a serine protease, thrombin, on HIV Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and have found the fusion enhancement activity of thrombin over two R5-tropic HIV strains.

  19. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  20. Calorimetric detection of influenza virus induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Nebel, S; Bartoldus, I; Stegmann, T

    1995-05-01

    Membrane fusion induced by the hemagglutinin glycoprotein of influenza virus has been extensively characterized, but the mechanism whereby the protein achieves the merger of the viral and target membrane lipids remains enigmatic. Various lipid intermediate structures have been proposed, and the energies required for their formation predicted. Here, we have analyzed the enthalpies of fusion of influenza with liposomes by titration calorimetry. If a small sample of virus in a weak neutral pH buffer was added to an excess of liposomes at low pH, a two-component reaction was seen, composed of an exothermic reaction and a slower endothermic reaction. The exothermic reaction was the result of acid-base reactions between the neutral pH virus sample and low pH buffer and low-pH-induced changes in the virus. The endothermic reaction was not observed in the absence of liposomes and much reduced if acid-inactivated virus, which had lost its fusion but not its binding activity, was added to liposomes. The endothermic reaction was more temperature dependent than the exothermic reaction; its pH dependence corresponded with that of fusion and its enthalpy was higher if fusion was more extensive. These data indicate that most of the endothermic reaction was due to membrane fusion. The experimentally determined enthalpy of fusion, 0.6-0.7 kcal per mol of viral phospholipids, is much higher than expected on the basis of current theories about the formation of lipid intermediates during membrane fusion.

  1. Streptococcal preparation OK-432 promotes fusion efficiency and enhances induction of antigen-specific CTL by fusions of dendritic cells and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Hara, Eiichi; Homma, Sadamu; Torii, Akira; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Toyama, Yoichi; Kawahara, Hidejiro; Watanabe, Michiaki; Yoshida, Seiya; Kobayashi, Susumu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Fujise, Kiyotaka; Tajiri, Hisao

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic/tumor fusion cell (FC) vaccine is an effective approach for various types of cancer but has not yet been standardized. Antitumor activity can be modulated by different mechanisms such as dendritic cell (DC) maturation state. This study addressed optimal strategies for FC preparations to enhance Ag-specific CTL activity. We have created three types of FC preparations by alternating fusion cell partners: 1) immature DCs fused with autologous colorectal carcinoma cells (Imm-FCs); 2) Imm-FCs followed by stimulation with penicillin-inactivated Streptococcus pyogenes (OK-432) (Imm-FCs/OK); and 3) OK-432-stimulated DCs directly fused to autologous colorectal carcinoma cells (OK-FCs). Both OK-FCs and Imm-FCs/OK coexpressed the CEA, MUC1, and significantly higher levels of CD86, CD83, and IL-12 than those obtained with Imm-FCs. Short-term culture of fusion cell preparations promoted the fusion efficiency. Interestingly, OK-FCs were more efficient in stimulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells capable of high levels of IFN-gamma production and cytolysis of autologous tumor or semiallogeneic targets. Moreover, OK-FCs are more effective inducer of CTL activation compared with Imm-FCs/OK on a per fusion cell basis. The pentameric assay confirmed that CEA- and MUC1-specific CTL was induced simultaneously by OK-FCs at high frequency. Furthermore, the cryopreserved OK-FCs retained stimulatory capacity for inducing antitumor immunity. These results suggest that OK-432 promotes fusion efficiency and induction of Ag-specific CTL by fusion cells. We conclude that DCs fused after stimulation by OK-432 may have the potential applicability to the field of antitumor immunotherapy and may provide a platform for adoptive immunotherapy in the clinical setting.

  2. Posterolateral spinal fusion with ostegenesis induced BMSC seeded TCP/HA in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Shamsul, B S; Tan, K K; Chen, H C; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I

    2014-04-01

    Autogenous bone graft is the gold standard for fusion procedure. However, pain at donor site and inconsistent outcome have left a surgeon to venture into some other technique for spinal fusion. The objective of this study was to determine whether osteogenesis induced bone marrow stem cells with the combination of ceramics granules (HA or TCP/HA), and fibrin could serve as an alternative to generate spinal fusion. The sheep's bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were aspirated form iliac crest and cultured for several passages until confluence. BMSCs were trypsinized and seeded on hydroxyapatite scaffold (HA) and tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HA) for further osteogenic differentiation in the osteogenic medium one week before implantation. Six adult sheep underwent three-level, bilateral, posterolateral intertransverse process fusions at L1-L6. Three fusion sites in each animal were assigned to three treatments: (a) HA constructs group/L1-L2, (b) TCP/HA constructs group/L2-L3, and (c) autogenous bone graft group/L5-L6. The spinal fusion segments were evaluated using radiography, manual palpation, histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) 12 weeks post implantation. The TCP/HA constructs achieved superior lumbar intertransverse fusion compared to HA construct but autogenous bone graft still produced the best fusion among all.

  3. Epigenetics changes caused by the fusion of human embryonic stem cell and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Ke; Qu, Hu; Xu, Li-Nan; Gao, Jun; Cheng, Fu-Yi; Xiang, Peng; Zhou, Can-Quan

    2016-10-01

    To observe the effect of gene expression and tumorigenicity in hybrid cells of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using a mouse model, and to determine its feasibility in reprogramming tumour cells growth and apoptosis, for a potential exploration of the role of hESCs and tumour cells fusion in the management of ovarian cancer. Stable transgenic hESCs (H1) and ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3 were established before fusion, and cell fusion system was established to analyse the related indicators. PTEN expression in HO-H1 cells was higher than those in the parental stem cells and lower than those in parental tumour cells; the growth of OV-H1 (RFP+GFP) hybrid cells with double fluorescence expressions were obviously slower than that of human embryonic stem cells and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. The apoptosis signal of the OV-H1 hybrid cells was significantly higher than that of the hESCs and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. In vivo results showed that compared with 7 days, 28 days and 35 days after inoculation of OV-H1 hybrid cells; also, apoptotic cell detection indicated that much stronger apoptotic signal was found in OV-H1 hybrid cells inoculated mouse. The hESCs can inhibit the growth of OVCAR-3 cells in vitro by suppressing p53 and PTEN expression to suppress the growth of tumour that may be achieved by inducing apoptosis of OVCAR-3 cells. The change of epigenetics after fusion of ovarian cancer cells and hESCs may become a novel direction for treatment of ovarian cancer.

  4. Epigenetics changes caused by the fusion of human embryonic stem cell and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Ke; Qu, Hu; Xu, Li-Nan; Gao, Jun; Cheng, Fu-Yi; Xiang, Peng; Zhou, Can-Quan

    2016-10-01

    To observe the effect of gene expression and tumorigenicity in hybrid cells of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using a mouse model, and to determine its feasibility in reprogramming tumour cells growth and apoptosis, for a potential exploration of the role of hESCs and tumour cells fusion in the management of ovarian cancer. Stable transgenic hESCs (H1) and ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3 were established before fusion, and cell fusion system was established to analyse the related indicators. PTEN expression in HO-H1 cells was higher than those in the parental stem cells and lower than those in parental tumour cells; the growth of OV-H1 (RFP+GFP) hybrid cells with double fluorescence expressions were obviously slower than that of human embryonic stem cells and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. The apoptosis signal of the OV-H1 hybrid cells was significantly higher than that of the hESCs and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. In vivo results showed that compared with 7 days, 28 days and 35 days after inoculation of OV-H1 hybrid cells; also, apoptotic cell detection indicated that much stronger apoptotic signal was found in OV-H1 hybrid cells inoculated mouse. The hESCs can inhibit the growth of OVCAR-3 cells in vitro by suppressing p53 and PTEN expression to suppress the growth of tumour that may be achieved by inducing apoptosis of OVCAR-3 cells. The change of epigenetics after fusion of ovarian cancer cells and hESCs may become a novel direction for treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27377320

  5. Epigenetics changes caused by the fusion of human embryonic stem cell and ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Ke; Qu, Hu; Xu, Li-Nan; Gao, Jun; Cheng, Fu-Yi; Xiang, Peng; Zhou, Can-Quan

    2016-01-01

    To observe the effect of gene expression and tumorigenicity in hybrid cells of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using a mouse model, and to determine its feasibility in reprogramming tumour cells growth and apoptosis, for a potential exploration of the role of hESCs and tumour cells fusion in the management of ovarian cancer. Stable transgenic hESCs (H1) and ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3 were established before fusion, and cell fusion system was established to analyse the related indicators. PTEN expression in HO-H1 cells was higher than those in the parental stem cells and lower than those in parental tumour cells; the growth of OV-H1 (RFP+GFP) hybrid cells with double fluorescence expressions were obviously slower than that of human embryonic stem cells and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. The apoptosis signal of the OV-H1 hybrid cells was significantly higher than that of the hESCs and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. In vivo results showed that compared with 7 days, 28 days and 35 days after inoculation of OV-H1 hybrid cells; also, apoptotic cell detection indicated that much stronger apoptotic signal was found in OV-H1 hybrid cells inoculated mouse. The hESCs can inhibit the growth of OVCAR-3 cells in vitro by suppressing p53 and PTEN expression to suppress the growth of tumour that may be achieved by inducing apoptosis of OVCAR-3 cells. The change of epigenetics after fusion of ovarian cancer cells and hESCs may become a novel direction for treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27377320

  6. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity by promotion of mitochondrial fusion in neuroblastoma cells by liquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Jo, Doo Sin; Shin, Dong Woon; Park, So Jung; Bae, Ji-Eun; Kim, Joon Bum; Park, Na Yeon; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su; Shin, Jung-Won; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics control mitochondrial morphology and function, and aberrations in these are associated with various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. To identify novel regulators of mitochondrial dynamics, we screened a phytochemical library and identified liquiritigenin as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fusion. Treatment with liquiritigenin induced an elongated mitochondrial morphology in SK-N-MC cells. In addition, liquiritigenin rescued mitochondrial fragmentation induced by knockout of mitochondrial fusion mediators such as Mfn1, Mfn2, and Opa1. Furthermore, we found that treatment with liquiritigenin notably inhibited mitochondrial fragmentation and cytotoxicity induced by Aβ in SK-N-MC cells. PMID:27515055

  7. Protection against morbillivirus-induced encephalitis by immunization with a rationally designed synthetic peptide vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, O E; Partidos, C D; Howard, C R; Steward, M W

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing T- and B-cell epitopes from the fusion (F) protein of measles virus (MV) were tested for their ability to induce a protective immune response against intracerebral challenge with neuroadapted strains of MV and canine distemper virus (CDV) in mice. Of the panel of peptides tested, only a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a promiscuous T-cell epitope (representing residues 288 to 302 of MV F protein) synthesized at the amino terminus of a B-cell epitope (representing residues 404 to 414 of MV F protein) was able to induce a protective response against challenge with MV and CDV in inbred mice. The protective response induced by this peptide (TTB) was associated with a significant reduction in mortality, histological absence of acute encephalitis, and greatly reduced titers of virus in the brains of TTB-immune mice following challenge compared with the results for nonimmunized controls. A chimeric peptide comprising one copy of the T-cell epitope and one copy of the B-cell epitope (TB) did not induce a protective response. A comparison of the antibody responses induced by the two chimeras suggested that differences in protective efficacy following immunization may be a result of the higher affinity of the antibody induced by the TTB peptide than that of the antibody induced by the TB peptide. In addition, differences in the immunoglobulin G subclass of the antipeptide antibody responses were observed, and these may play a role in the differences in protection observed. These results indicate that appropriately designed synthetic peptides have potential as vaccines for the induction of cross-reactive protection against morbilliviruses. PMID:7531779

  8. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer–macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression. - Highlights: • The fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion. • The resulting hybrid cells acquire a new property of drug resistance. • The resulting hybrid cells express the markers of both parental cells (i.e. vimentin and cytokeratin 18). • The hybrid cells contribute to tumor repopulation in vivo.

  9. Thermally-induced aggregation and fusion of protein-free lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ibarguren, Maitane; Bomans, Paul H H; Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Frederik, Peter M; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-12-01

    Membrane fusion is an important phenomenon in cell biology and pathology. This phenomenon can be modeled using vesicles of defined size and lipid composition. Up to now fusion models typically required the use of chemical (polyethyleneglycol, cations) or enzymatic catalysts (phospholipases). We present here a model of lipid vesicle fusion induced by heat. Large unilamellar vesicles consisting of a phospholipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine), cholesterol and diacylglycerol in a 43:57:3 mol ratio were employed. In this simple system, fusion was the result of thermal fluctuations, above 60 °C. A similar system containing phospholipid and cholesterol but no diacylglycerol was observed to aggregate at and above 60 °C, in the absence of fusion. Vesicle fusion occurred under our experimental conditions only when (31)P NMR and cryo-transmission electron microscopy of the lipid mixtures used in vesicle preparation showed non-lamellar lipid phase formation (hexagonal and cubic). Non-lamellar structures are probably the result of lipid reassembly of the products of individual fusion events, or of fusion intermediates. A temperature-triggered mechanism of lipid reassembly might have occurred at various stages of protocellular evolution.

  10. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bjaelde, Randi G.; Arnadottir, Sigrid S.; Overgaard, Morten T.; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A.

    2013-01-01

    Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30), which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1) cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin) reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%)-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1) and vesicular transport (nocodazole). These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ~90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP) or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50%) or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8 and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells. PMID:24065923

  11. Different activities of the reovirus FAST proteins and influenza hemagglutinin in cell-cell fusion assays and in response to membrane curvature agents

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, Eileen K.; Barry, Chris; Ciechonska, Marta; Duncan, Roy

    2010-02-05

    The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins evolved to induce cell-cell, rather than virus-cell, membrane fusion. It is unclear whether the FAST protein fusion reaction proceeds in the same manner as the enveloped virus fusion proteins. We now show that fluorescence-based cell-cell and cell-RBC hemifusion assays are unsuited for detecting lipid mixing in the absence of content mixing during FAST protein-mediated membrane fusion. Furthermore, membrane curvature agents that inhibit hemifusion or promote pore formation mediated by influenza hemagglutinin had no effect on p14-induced cell-cell fusion, even under conditions of limiting p14 concentrations. Standard assays used to detect fusion intermediates induced by enveloped virus fusion proteins are therefore not applicable to the FAST proteins. These results suggest the possibility that the nature of the fusion intermediates or the mechanisms used to transit through the various stages of the fusion reaction may differ between these distinct classes of viral fusogens.

  12. Oral administration of a non-absorbable plant cell-expressed recombinant anti-TNF fusion protein induces immunomodulatory effects and alleviates nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ilan, Yaron; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Shabbat, Yehudit; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Almon, Einat; Shaaltiel, Yoseph

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of oral administration of PRX-106 in the high-fat diet model. METHODS For 22 wk, C57BL/6 HFD-fed mice received daily oral treatments with BY-2 cells expressing recombinant anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha fusion protein (PRX-106). Mice were followed for serum liver enzyme and triglyceride levels, liver histology and intrahepatic and systemic FACS. RESULTS The orally administered non-absorbable PRX-106 was biologically active. Altered distribution of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ between the liver and spleen and an increase in the intrasplenic-to-intrahepatic CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ ratio and a decrease in the intrasplenic-to-intrahepatic CD8+CD25+FoxP3+ ratio were observed. An increase in intrahepatic NKT cells and a decrease in the intrasplenic-to-intrahepatic NKT ratio were noted. Assessment of the CD4-to-CD8 ratios showed sequestration of CD8+ lymphocytes in the liver. These effects were associated with a decrease in serum triglyceride levels, decrease in the aspartate aminotransferase levels, serum glucose levels, and HOMA-IR score. A decrease in hepatic triglycerides content was observed in the high dose-treated mice. CONCLUSION Orally administered PRX-106 shows biological activity and exerts an immunomodulatory effect, alleviating liver damage. The data suggest that PRX-106 may provide an oral immunotherapy for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  13. Oral cancer/endothelial cell fusion experiences nuclear fusion and acquisition of enhanced survival potential.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Song, Yong; Zhao, Xiao-Ping; Shen, Hui; Wang, Meng; Yan, Ting-Lin; Liu, Ke; Shang, Zheng-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Most previous studies have linked cancer-macrophage fusion with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the characteristics of hybrid cells derived from oral cancer and endothelial cells and their involvement in cancer remained unknown. Double-immunofluorescent staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed to confirm spontaneous cell fusion between eGFP-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and RFP-labeled SCC9, and to detect the expression of vementin and cytokeratin 18 in the hybrids. The property of chemo-resistance of such hybrids was examined by TUNEL assay. The hybrid cells in xenografted tumor were identified by FISH and GFP/RFP dual-immunofluoresence staining. We showed that SCC9 cells spontaneously fused with cocultured endothelial cells, and the resultant hybrid cells maintained the division and proliferation activity after re-plating and thawing. Such hybrids expressed markers of both parental cells and became more resistant to chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as compared to the parental SCC9 cells. Our in vivo data indicated that the hybrid cells contributed to tumor composition by using of immunostaining and FISH analysis, even though the hybrid cells and SCC9 cells were mixed with 1:10,000, according to the FACS data. Our study suggested that the fusion events between oral cancer and endothelial cells undergo nuclear fusion and acquire a new property of drug resistance and consequently enhanced survival potential. These experimental findings provide further supportive evidence for the theory that cell fusion is involved in cancer progression.

  14. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely — even inside solid materials.

  15. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-30

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials.

  16. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  17. The Yeast Cell Fusion Protein Prm1p Requires Covalent Dimerization to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion. PMID:20485669

  18. Cell fusion to study nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions in endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Polunovsky, V. A.; Ingbar, D. H.; Peterson, M.; Bitterman, P. B.

    1996-01-01

    Studies examining the regulation of nuclear rearrangements during apoptosis have led to conflicting results. Cytoplasmic control of nuclear events has been strongly suggested by cell-free experimental systems. In contrast, strict cytoplasmic control cannot account for the results of fibroblast-thymocyte fusion experiments in which dexamethasone induction of polykaryons led only to thymocyte nuclear apoptosis. Unresolved by these fusion studies was whether fibroblast nuclei were indifferent to heterologous cytoplasmic signals. Our objective was to resolve this discrepancy using cell fusion in a homologous system. Our strategy was to fuse endothelial cells with high levels of susceptibility to the induction of apoptosis (log phase cells arrested in G1 for 48 hours by isoleucine deprivation) with those manifesting low levels of susceptibility (serum-deprived, G0). Resultant fused and unfused cells were induced to undergo apoptosis by incubation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cycloheximide. Depending on the parental cell of origin, between 14 and 30% of dikaryons contained one apoptotic and one intact nucleus, indicating that strict cytoplasmic control was not occurring. In accord with this, the total frequency of nuclear apoptosis was unchanged after fusion. However, the distribution of apoptotic nuclei revealed a pronounced cytoplasmic influence, with a two- to fivefold increase in coordinate nuclear behavior. This pattern of nuclear apoptosis was consistent with a model of control in which both the state of nuclear susceptibility to apoptosis and expression of cytoplasmic pro-apoptotic regulators determined whether nuclear apoptosis would eventuate. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8686735

  19. Membrane potential and endocytic activity control disintegration of cell-cell adhesion and cell fusion in vinculin-injected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Palovuori, Riitta; Myrsky, Essi; Eskelinen, Sinikka

    2004-09-01

    Cell fusion occurs during fertilization and in the formation of organs such as muscles, placenta, and bones. We have developed an experimental model for epithelial cell fusion which permits analysis of the processes during junction disintegration and formation of polykaryons (Palovuori and Eskelinen [2000] Eur. J. Cell. Biol. 79: 961-974). In the present work, we analyzed the process in detail. Cell fusion was achieved by microinjecting into the cytoplasm of kidney epithelial Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells TAMRA-tagged vinculin, which incorporated into lateral membranes, focal adhesions and nucleus, and, prior fusion, induced internalization of actin, cadherin and plakoglobin to small clusters in cytoplasm. Injected vinculin was still visible at lateral membranes after removal of junctional proteins indicating that it was tightly associated and perturbed the cell-cell contact sites resulting in membrane fragmentation. Injection of active Rac together with vinculin induced accumulation of cadherin to the membranes, but did not affect vinculin-membrane association. However, it hampered cell fusion probably by supporting adherens junctions. In order to stop endocytosis, we lowered intracellular pH of vinculin-injected cells to 5.5 with the aid of nigericin in KCl buffer. In acidified cells, injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as thick layers, cadherin remained in situ, and cell fusion was completely inhibited. Since this treatment also leads to cell depolarization, we checked the vinculin incorporation in a KCl solution containing nigericin at neutral pH. In these circumstances, both endogenous and injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as very thin discontinuous layers, but still fusion was hampered most likely due to perturbation in the initial vinculin-membrane association. We suggest that vinculin might function as a sensor of the environment triggering cell fusion during development in circumstances where membrane potential and local

  20. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  1. Structure of a flavivirus envelope glycoprotein in its low-pH-induced membrane fusion conformation

    PubMed Central

    Bressanelli, Stéphane; Stiasny, Karin; Allison, Steven L; Stura, Enrico A; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Lescar, Julien; Heinz, Franz X; Rey, Félix A

    2004-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter cells via a membrane fusion reaction driven by conformational changes of specific viral envelope proteins. We report here the structure of the ectodomain of the tick-borne encephalitis virus envelope glycoprotein, E, a prototypical class II fusion protein, in its trimeric low-pH-induced conformation. We show that, in the conformational transition, the three domains of the neutral-pH form are maintained but their relative orientation is altered. Similar to the postfusion class I proteins, the subunits rearrange such that the fusion peptide loops cluster at one end of an elongated molecule and the C-terminal segments, connecting to the viral transmembrane region, run along the sides of the trimer pointing toward the fusion peptide loops. Comparison with the low-pH-induced form of the alphavirus class II fusion protein reveals striking differences at the end of the molecule bearing the fusion peptides, suggesting an important conformational effect of the missing membrane connecting segment. PMID:14963486

  2. Frequent fusion of the CRTC1 and MAML2 genes in clear cell variants of cutaneous hidradenomas.

    PubMed

    Winnes, Marta; Mölne, Lena; Suurküla, Mart; Andrén, Ywonne; Persson, Fredrik; Enlund, Fredrik; Stenman, Göran

    2007-06-01

    Fusion of the CREB regulated transcription coactivator CRTC1 (a.k.a. MECT1, TORC1, or WAMTP1) to the Notch coactivator MAML2 is a characteristic feature of low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas of salivary and bronchial glands. The CRTC1-MAML2 fusion protein acts by inducing transcription of cAMP/CREB target genes, and this activity is crucial for the transforming properties of the protein. Here we show that the CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion is also frequent in benign hidradenomas of the skin. FISH and RT-PCR analyses revealed that hidradenomas are genetically heterogeneous, and that 10 of the 20 tumors analyzed (50%) contained the CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion and expressed the resulting fusion transcript. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated expression of the fusion protein in the majority of tumor cells, including clear cells, poroid cells, and cells with epidermoid and ductal differentiation. In addition, we could show that all fusion-positive tumors were morphologically distinguished by the presence of more or less abundant areas of clear cells whereas all fusion-negative tumors lacked clear cells. Our findings thus demonstrate that the CRTC1-MAML2 gene fusion is frequent in hidradenomas and is associated with clear cell variants of this tumor. Taken together, the present and previous observations indicate that the CRTC1-MAML2 fusion is etiologically linked to benign and low-grade malignant tumors originating from diverse exocrine glands rather than being linked to a separate tumor entity.

  3. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  4. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines. PMID:25828520

  5. Adhesion and Fusion of Muscle Cells Are Promoted by Filopodia.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dagan; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-08-01

    Indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila are generated during pupariation by fusion of hundreds of myoblasts with larval muscle templates (myotubes). Live observation of these muscles during the fusion process revealed multiple long actin-based protrusions that emanate from the myotube surface and require Enabled and IRSp53 for their generation and maintenance. Fusion is blocked when formation of these filopodia is compromised. While filopodia are not required for the signaling process underlying critical myoblast cell-fate changes prior to fusion, myotube-myoblast adhesion appears to be filopodia dependent. Without filopodia, close apposition between the cell membranes is not achieved, the cell-adhesion molecule Duf is not recruited to the myotube surface, and adhesion-dependent actin foci do not form. We therefore propose that the filopodia are necessary to prime the heterotypic adhesion process between the two cell types, possibly by recruiting the cell-adhesion molecule Sns to discrete patches on the myoblast cell surface.

  6. Blastocysts derivation from somatic cell fusion with premature oocytes (prematuration somatic cell fusion).

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Islam M; Khoirinaya, Candrani; Kim, Su Jin; Moon, Joon Ho; Almadaly, Essam; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the development of immature oocytes after their fusion with male somatic cells expressing red fluorescence protein (RFP). RFP-expressing cells were fused with immature oocytes, matured in vitro and then parthenogenetically activated. Somatic nuclei showed spindle formation, 1st polar body extrusion after in vitro maturation and protruded the 2nd polar body after parthenogenetic activation. RFP was expressed in the resultant embryos; two-cell stage and blastocysts. Chromosomal analysis showed aneuploidy in 81.82% of the resulting blastocysts while 18.18% of the resulting blastocysts were diploid. Among eight RFP-expressing blastocysts, Xist mRNAs was detected in six while Sry mRNA was detected in only one blastocyst. We propose "prematuration somatic cell fusion" as an approach to generate embryos using somatic cells instead of spermatozoa. The current approach, if improved, would assist production of embryos for couples where the male partner is sterile, however, genetic and chromosomal analysis of the resultant embryos are required before transfer to the mothers.

  7. Quantification of cell fusion events human breast cancer cells and breast epithelial cells using a Cre-LoxP-based double fluorescence reporter system.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Marieke; Tosun, Songül; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Edenhofer, Frank; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion plays an important role in several physiological processes, like fertilization, placentation, or wound healing/tissue regeneration, as well as pathophysiological processes, such as cancer. Despite this fact, considerably less is still known about the factors and conditions that will induce the merging of two plasma membranes. Inflammation and proliferation has been suggested as a positive trigger for cell fusion, but it remains unclear, which of the factor(s) of the inflamed microenvironment are being involved. To clarify this we developed a reliable assay to quantify the in vitro fusion frequency of cells using a fluorescence double reporter vector (pFDR) containing a LoxP-flanked HcRed/DsRed expression cassette followed by an EGFP expression cassette. Because cell fusion has been implicated in cancer progression four human breast cancer cell lines were stably transfected with a pFDR vector and were co-cultured with the stably Cre-expressing human breast epithelial cell line. Cell fusion is associated with a Cre-mediated recombination resulting in induction of EGFP expression in hybrid cells, which can be quantified by flow cytometry. By testing a panel of different cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and other compounds, including exosomes, under normoxic and hypoxic conditions our data indicate that the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α together with hypoxia is a strong inducer of cell fusion in human MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

  8. Elcatonin prevents bone loss caused by skeletal unloading by inhibiting preosteoclast fusion through the unloading-induced high expression of calcitonin receptors in bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Manabu; Menuki, Kunitaka; Murai, Teppei; Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Takada, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Kayoko; Sakai, Akinori

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether elcatonin (EL) has a preventive action on bone dynamics in skeletal unloading. Seven-week-old male C57BL/6J mice with either ground control (GC) or tail suspension (TS) were administered EL 20U/kg or a vehicle (veh) three times per week and assigned to one of the following four groups: GCEL, GCveh, TSEL, and TSveh. Blood samples and bilateral femurs and tibias of the mice were obtained for analysis. After 7days of unloading, the trabecular bone mineral density in the distal femur obtained via peripheral quantitative computed tomography and the trabecular bone volume were significantly higher in the TSEL group than in the TSveh group. The bone resorption histomorphometric parameters, such as the osteoclast surface and osteoclast number, were significantly suppressed in the TSEL mice, whereas the number of preosteoclasts was significantly increased. The plasma level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b (TRACP-5b) was significantly lower in the TSEL group than in all other groups. In the bone marrow cell culture, the number of TRACP-positive (TRACP(+)) multinucleated cells was significantly lower in the TSEL mice than in the TSveh mice, whereas the number of TRACP(+) mononucleated cells was higher in the TSEL mice. On day 4, the expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K and d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase V0 domain (ATP6V0D2) mRNA in the bone marrow cells in the TSEL mice was suppressed, and the expression of calcitonin receptor (Calcr) mRNA on day 1 and Calcr antigen on day 4 were significantly higher in the TSveh mice than in the GCveh mice. EL prevented the unloading-induced bone loss associated with the high expression of Calcr in the bone marrow cells of mouse hindlimbs after tail suspension, and it suppressed osteoclast development from preosteoclasts to mature osteoclasts through bone-resorbing activity. This study of EL-treated unloaded mice provides the

  9. Activation of Developmentally Mutated Human Globin Genes by Cell Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Enver, Tariq; Takegawa, Susumu; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    1988-11-01

    Human fetal globin genes are not expressed in hybrid cells produced by the fusion of normal human lymphocytes with mouse erythroleukemia cells. In contrast, when lymphocytes from persons with globin gene developmental mutations (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) are used for these fusions, fetal globin is expressed in the hybrid cells. Thus, mutations of developmental origin can be reconstituted in vitro by fusing mutant lymphoid cells with differentiated cell lines of the proper lineage. This system can readily be used for analyses, such as globin gene methylation, that normally require large numbers of pure nucleated erythroid cells, which are difficult to obtain.

  10. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo; Hara, Eiichi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination. PMID:20182533

  11. Cell Fusion in the War on Cancer: A Perspective on the Inception of Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jeffrey L; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Lefferts, Adam R; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion occurs in development and in physiology and rarely in those settings is it associated with malignancy. However, deliberate fusion of cells and possibly untoward fusion of cells not suitably poised can eventuate in aneuploidy, DNA damage and malignant transformation. How often cell fusion may initiate malignancy is unknown. However, cell fusion could explain the high frequency of cancers in tissues with low underlying rates of cell proliferation and mutation. On the other hand, cell fusion might also engage innate and adaptive immune surveillance, thus helping to eliminate or retard malignancies. Here we consider whether and how cell fusion might weigh on the overall burden of cancer in modern societies. PMID:27420051

  12. Cell Fusion in the War on Cancer: A Perspective on the Inception of Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Lefferts, Adam R.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion occurs in development and in physiology and rarely in those settings is it associated with malignancy. However, deliberate fusion of cells and possibly untoward fusion of cells not suitably poised can eventuate in aneuploidy, DNA damage and malignant transformation. How often cell fusion may initiate malignancy is unknown. However, cell fusion could explain the high frequency of cancers in tissues with low underlying rates of cell proliferation and mutation. On the other hand, cell fusion might also engage innate and adaptive immune surveillance, thus helping to eliminate or retard malignancies. Here we consider whether and how cell fusion might weigh on the overall burden of cancer in modern societies. PMID:27420051

  13. Cell Fusion in the War on Cancer: A Perspective on the Inception of Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Platt, Jeffrey L; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Lefferts, Adam R; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion occurs in development and in physiology and rarely in those settings is it associated with malignancy. However, deliberate fusion of cells and possibly untoward fusion of cells not suitably poised can eventuate in aneuploidy, DNA damage and malignant transformation. How often cell fusion may initiate malignancy is unknown. However, cell fusion could explain the high frequency of cancers in tissues with low underlying rates of cell proliferation and mutation. On the other hand, cell fusion might also engage innate and adaptive immune surveillance, thus helping to eliminate or retard malignancies. Here we consider whether and how cell fusion might weigh on the overall burden of cancer in modern societies.

  14. N-(3-Cyanophenyl)-2-phenylacetamide, an effective inhibitor of morbillivirus-induced membrane fusion with low cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Singethan, K; Hiltensperger, G; Kendl, S; Wohlfahrt, J; Plattet, P; Holzgrabe, U; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    2010-11-01

    Based on the structural similarity of viral fusion proteins within the family Paramyxoviridae, we tested recently described and newly synthesized acetanilide derivatives for their capacity to inhibit measles virus (MV)-, canine distemper virus (CDV)- and Nipah virus (NiV)-induced membrane fusion. We found that N-(3-cyanophenyl)-2-phenylacetamide (compound 1) has a high capacity to inhibit MV- and CDV-induced (IC(50) μM), but not NiV-induced, membrane fusion. This compound is of outstanding interest because it can be easily synthesized and its cytotoxicity is low [50 % cytotoxic concentration (CC(50)) ≥ 300 μM], leading to a CC(50)/IC(50) ratio of approximately 100. In addition, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes and primary dog brain cell cultures (DBC) also tolerate high concentrations of compound 1. Infection of human PBMC with recombinant wild-type MV is inhibited by an IC(50) of approximately 20 μM. The cell-to-cell spread of recombinant wild-type CDV in persistently infected DBC can be nearly completely inhibited by compound 1 at 50 μM, indicating that the virus spread between brain cells is dependent on the activity of the viral fusion protein. Our findings demonstrate that this compound is a most applicable inhibitor of morbillivirus-induced membrane fusion in tissue culture experiments including highly sensitive primary cells. PMID:20685931

  15. Superior protective and therapeutic effects of IL-12 and IL-18 gene-transduced dendritic neuroblastoma fusion cells on liver metastasis of murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Hisae; Okinaga, Kota; Fukushima, Ryoji; Inaba, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Kota; Okinaga, Akira; Takahashi, Ichiro; Kaneko, Michio

    2006-03-15

    Fusion vaccine of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells has the advantage of inducing an immune response against multiple tumor Ags, including unknown tumor Ags. Using the liver metastasis model of C1300 neuroblastoma cells, we assessed the protective and therapeutic effects of fusion cells transduced with the IL-12 gene and/or the IL-18 gene. Improving the fusion method by combining polyethylene glycol and electroporation increased loading efficiency. In the A/J mice vaccinated with fusion cells modified with the LacZ gene (fusion/LacZ), IFN-gamma production and CTL activity increased significantly compared with that of DCs/LacZ, C1300/LacZ, or a mixture of the two (mixture/LacZ). With the transduction of IL-12 and IL-18 genes into the fusion cells (fusion/IL-12/IL-18), the level of IFN-gamma increased more than five times that of other fusion groups. In addition, NK cell activity and CTL activity increased significantly compared with that of mixture/LacZ, fusion/LacZ, DC/LacZ, or C1300/LacZ. In the protective and therapeutic studies of fusion cell vaccine, mice vaccinated with fusion/LacZ, fusion/IL-12, fusion/IL-18, or fusion/IL-12/IL-18 showed a significant decrease in liver metastasis and a significant increase in survival compared with mice given a mixture/LacZ, DCs/LacZ, or C1300/LacZ. In particular, the mice receiving fusion/IL-12/IL-18 vaccine showed a complete protective effect and the highest therapeutic effects. The present study investigates the improved loading efficiency of fusion cells and suggests that the introduction of IL-12 and IL-18 genes can induce extremely strong protective and therapeutic effects on liver metastasis of neuroblastoma.

  16. Radiation-induced segregation in candidate fusion-reactor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-07-01

    The effect of radiation on surface segregation of minor and impurity elements has been studied in four candidate fusion reactor alloys. Radiation induced surface segregation of phosphorus was found in both 316 type stainless steel and in Nimonic PE-16. Segregation and depletion of the other alloying elements in 316 stainless steel agreed with that reported by other investigators. Segregation of nitrogen in ferritic HT-9 was enhanced by radiation but no phosphorus segregation was detected. No significant radiation enhanced or induced segregation was observed in a Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results indicate that radiaton enhanced grain boundary segregation could contribute to the embrittlement of 316 SS and PE-16.

  17. Identification of novel fusion genes in testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Andreas M.; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their non-malignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. PMID:26659575

  18. Organotypic three-dimensional culture model of mesenchymal and epithelial cells to examine tissue fusion events.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires coordination of multiple cell types, the extracellular matrix, and complex signaling pathways. Fusion events during processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on signaling ...

  19. Lysosome-membrane fusion mediated superoxide production in hyperglycaemia-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jun-Xiang; Chang, Hui; Lv, Yong-Gang; Yu, Jin-Wen; Bai, Yun-Gang; Liu, Huan; Cai, Yue; Wang, Ling; Ma, Jin; Chang, Yao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal exocytosis and fusion to cellular membrane is critical in the oxidative stress formation of endothelium under apoptotic stimulus. We investigated the role therein of it in hyperglycaemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. The lysosome-membrane fusion was shown by the expression of lamp1, the lysosomal membrane marker, on cellular membrane and the transportation of lysosomal symbolic enzymes into cultural medium. We also examined the ceramide production, lipid rafts (LRs) clustering, colocalization of gp91(phox), a NADPH oxidase subunit (NOX) to LRs clusters, superoxide (O₂·⁻) formation and nitric oxide (NO) content in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the endothelium-dependent NO-mediated vasodilation in isolated rat aorta. As compared to normal glucose (5.6 mmol/l, Ctrl) incubation, high glucose (22 mmol/l, HG) exposure facilitated the lysosome-membrane fusion in HUVEC shown by significantly increased quantity of lamp1 protein on cellular membrane and enhanced activity of lysosomal symbolized enzymes in cultural medium. HG incubation also elicited ceramide generation, LRs clustering and gp91(phox) colocalization to LRs clusters which were proved to mediate the HG induced O₂·⁻ formation and NO depletion in HUVEC. Functionally, the endothelium-dependent NO-mediated vasodilation in aorta was blunted substantially after HG incubation. Moreover, the HG-induced effect including ceramide production, LRs clustering, gp91(phox) colocalization to LRs clusters, O₂·⁻ formation and endothelial dysfunction could be blocked significantly by the inhibition of lysosome-membrane fusion. We propose that hyperglycaemia-induced endothelial impairment is closely related to the lysosome-membrane fusion and the following LRs clustering, LRs-NOX platforms formation and O₂·⁻ production. PMID:22253932

  20. Global epigenomic analysis indicates protocadherin-7 activates osteoclastogenesis by promoting cell–cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Haruhiko; Nakashima, Tomoki; Hayashi, Mikihito; Izawa, Naohiro; Yasui, Tetsuro; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Identification of epigenetically regulated genes during osteoclastogenesis. • Pcdh7 is regulated by H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 during osteoclastogenesis. • Pcdh7 expression is increased by RANKL during osteoclastogenesis. • Establishment of novel cell fusion analysis for osteoclasts by imaging cytometer. • Pcdh7 regulates osteoclastogenesis by promoting cell fusion related gene expressions. - Abstract: Gene expression is dependent not only on genomic sequences, but also epigenetic control, in which the regulation of chromatin by histone modification plays a crucial role. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) are related to transcriptionally activated and silenced sequences, respectively. Osteoclasts, the multinucleated cells that resorb bone, are generated by the fusion of precursor cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. To elucidate the molecular and epigenetic regulation of osteoclast differentiation, we performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis for H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 in combination with RNA sequencing. We focused on the histone modification change from H3K4me3(+)H3K27me3(+) to H3K4me3(+)H3K27me3(–) and identified the protocadherin-7 gene (Pcdh7) to be among the genes epigenetically regulated during osteoclastogenesis. Pcdh7 was induced by RANKL stimulation in an NFAT-dependent manner. The knockdown of Pcdh7 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation due to the impairment of cell–cell fusion, accompanied by a decreased expression of the fusion-related genes Dcstamp, Ocstamp and Atp6v0d2. This study demonstrates that Pcdh7 plays a key role in osteoclastogenesis by promoting cell–cell fusion.

  1. Dynamics of cell aggregates fusion: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gilberto L.; Mironov, Vladimir; Nagy-Mehez, Agnes; Mombach, José C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Fusion of cell tissues is an ubiquitous phenomenon and has important technological applications including tissue biofabrication. In this work we present experimental results of aggregates fusion using adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) and a three dimensional computer simulation of the process using the cellular Potts model with aggregates reaching 10,000 cells. We consider fusion of round aggregates and monitor the dimensionless neck area of contact between the two aggregates to characterize the process, as done for the coalescence of liquid droplets and polymers. Both experiments and simulations show that the evolution of this quantity obeys a power law in time. We also study quantitatively individual cell motion with the simulation and it corresponds to an anomalous diffusion.

  2. Human cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells acquire functional cardiac properties through a cell fusion process.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Daniele; Crespi, Alessia; Brioschi, Chiara; Parente, Valeria; Toietta, Gabriele; Devanna, Paolo; Baruscotti, Mirko; Truffa, Silvia; Scavone, Angela; Rusconi, Francesca; Biondi, Andrea; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Vigna, Elisa; Difrancesco, Dario; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Barbuti, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    The efficacy of cardiac repair by stem cell administration relies on a successful functional integration of injected cells into the host myocardium. Safety concerns have been raised about the possibility that stem cells may induce foci of arrhythmia in the ischemic myocardium. In a previous work (36), we showed that human cord blood CD34(+) cells, when cocultured on neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, exhibit excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes, even though no human genes were upregulated. The aims of the present work are to investigate whether human CD34(+) cells, isolated after 1 wk of coculture with neonatal ventricular myocytes, possess molecular and functional properties of cardiomyocytes and to discriminate, using a reporter gene system, whether cardiac differentiation derives from a (trans)differentiation or a cell fusion process. Umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were isolated by a magnetic cell sorting method, transduced with a lentiviral vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, and seeded onto primary cultures of spontaneously beating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cocultured EGFP(+)/CD34(+)-derived cells were analyzed for their electrophysiological features at different time points. After 1 wk in coculture, EGFP(+) cells, in contact with cardiomyocytes, were spontaneously contracting and had a maximum diastolic potential (MDP) of -53.1 mV, while those that remained isolated from the surrounding myocytes did not contract and had a depolarized resting potential of -11.4 mV. Cells were then resuspended and cultured at low density to identify EGFP(+) progenitor cell derivatives. Under these conditions, we observed single EGFP(+) beating cells that had acquired an hyperpolarization-activated current typical of neonatal cardiomyocytes (EGFP(+) cells, -2.24 ± 0.89 pA/pF; myocytes, -1.99 ± 0.63 pA/pF, at -125 mV). To discriminate between cell autonomous differentiation and fusion, EGFP(+)/CD34

  3. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Permyakova, Natalia V.; Zagorskaya, Alla A.; Belavin, Pavel A.; Uvarova, Elena A.; Nosareva, Olesya V.; Nesterov, Andrey E.; Novikovskaya, Anna A.; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Deineko, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25949997

  4. Tissue Regeneration in the Chronically Inflamed Tumor Environment: Implications for Cell Fusion Driven Tumor Progression and Therapy Resistant Tumor Hybrid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Thomas; Zänker, Kurt S.

    2015-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion in a cancer context is still a matter of controversial debates. Even though a plethora of in vitro and in vivo data have been published in the past decades the ultimate proof that tumor hybrid cells could originate in (human) cancers and could contribute to the progression of the disease is still missing, suggesting that the cell fusion hypothesis is rather fiction than fact. However, is the lack of this ultimate proof a valid argument against this hypothesis, particularly if one has to consider that appropriate markers do not (yet) exist, thus making it virtually impossible to identify a human tumor cell clearly as a tumor hybrid cell. In the present review, we will summarize the evidence supporting the cell fusion in cancer concept. Moreover, we will refine the cell fusion hypothesis by providing evidence that cell fusion is a potent inducer of aneuploidy, genomic instability and, most likely, even chromothripsis, suggesting that cell fusion, like mutations and aneuploidy, might be an inducer of a mutator phenotype. Finally, we will show that “accidental” tissue repair processes during cancer therapy could lead to the origin of therapy resistant cancer hybrid stem cells. PMID:26703575

  5. Mitochondrial fusion is regulated by Reaper to modulate Drosophila programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Thomenius, M; Freel, C D; Horn, S; Krieser, R; Abdelwahid, E; Cannon, R; Balasundaram, S; White, K; Kornbluth, S

    2011-01-01

    In most multicellular organisms, the decision to undergo programmed cell death in response to cellular damage or developmental cues is typically transmitted through mitochondria. It has been suggested that an exception is the apoptotic pathway of Drosophila melanogaster, in which the role of mitochondria remains unclear. Although IAP antagonists in Drosophila such as Reaper, Hid and Grim may induce cell death without mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, it is surprising that all three localize to mitochondria. Moreover, induction of Reaper and Hid appears to result in mitochondrial fragmentation during Drosophila cell death. Most importantly, disruption of mitochondrial fission can inhibit Reaper and Hid-induced cell death, suggesting that alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can modulate cell death in fly cells. We report here that Drosophila Reaper can induce mitochondrial fragmentation by binding to and inhibiting the pro-fusion protein MFN2 and its Drosophila counterpart dMFN/Marf. Our in vitro and in vivo analyses reveal that dMFN overexpression can inhibit cell death induced by Reaper or γ-irradiation. In addition, knockdown of dMFN causes a striking loss of adult wing tissue and significant apoptosis in the developing wing discs. Our findings are consistent with a growing body of work describing a role for mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery in the decision of cells to die. PMID:21475305

  6. Effects of polycystin‑1 N‑terminal fragment fusion protein on the proliferation and apoptosis of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tianjun; Gao, Qing; Chen, Ping; Fu, Lili; Zhao, Haidan; Zou, Zhuying; Mei, Changlin

    2014-09-01

    Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) is characterized by widespread mesangial cell proliferation and an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the mesangial area. In a previous study we developed a polycystin‑1 N‑terminal fragment (PC‑1 NF) fusion protein that inhibits the proliferation of cyst‑lining epithelial cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In addition, the PC‑1 NF fusion protein arrests the cell cycle of cancer cells at the G0/G1 phase, inhibiting their proliferation. In the present study, the effect of the PC‑1 NF fusion protein on MsPGN was investigated. It was found that the PC‑1 NF fusion protein inhibited the proliferation of rat mesangial cells and induced G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in vitro. PC‑1 NF fusion protein treatment also resulted in a decrease in mRNA expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1 and B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2) and an increase in mRNA expression levels of Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and p21Waf1. Furthermore, a decrease in Bcl‑2, c‑fos, c‑jun and protein kinase C‑α protein levels was observed, whereas Bax protein levels increased. Additionally, PC‑1 NF fusion protein induced ECM degradation and inhibited ECM expansion. The results also demonstrated that PC‑1 NF fusion protein treatment resulted in a decrease in type IV collagen and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase mRNA levels but an increase in matrix metalloproteinase 2 mRNA levels. In combination, these results suggest that the PC‑1 NF fusion protein inhibits proliferation, promotes apoptosis and induces ECM degradation in MsPGN rats. This study offers novel perspectives for the treatment of MsPGN.

  7. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 enhances histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA-induced cell death of chronic myeloid leukemia cells by an ROS-mediated mechanism and downregulation of the Bcr-Abl fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WENJING; ZHU, WEIWEI; MA, LIYA; XIAO, FENG; QIAN, WENBIN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been progress in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, novel therapeutic strategies are required in order to address the emerging problem of imatinib resistance. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and proteasome inhibitors are promising alternatives, and may be amenable to integration with current therapeutic approaches. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between these two agents remain unclear. The present study assessed the cytotoxic effect of the HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), in combination with the proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, in imatinib-sensitive K562 and imatinib-resistant K562G cells, and investigated the mechanism underlying this effect. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method and protein expression levels were determined by western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation levels were observed under a fluorescence microscope The results indicated that SAHA and MG-132 act in a synergistic manner to induce cell death in K562 and K562G cells. This effect was associated with Bcr-Abl downregulation and the production of ROS. Notably, the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, almost fully reversed the cell death and Bcr-Abl downregulation that was induced by the combination of SAHA and MG-132. By contrast, the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially reversed the cell death induced by these two drugs in CML cells. These results indicated that increased intracellular ROS levels are important in the induction of cell death and the downregulation of Bcr-Abl. In conclusion, the present results suggested that combined SAHA and MG-132 may be a promising treatment for CML. PMID:26722260

  8. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment.

  9. Restricted movement of lipid and aqueous dyes through pores formed by influenza hemagglutinin during cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The fusion of cells by influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is the best characterized example of protein-mediated membrane fusion. In simultaneous measurements of pairs of assays for fusion, we determined the order of detectable events during fusion. Fusion pore formation in HA-triggered cell-cell fusion was first detected by changes in cell membrane capacitance, next by a flux of fluorescent lipid, and finally by flux of aqueous fluorescent dye. Fusion pore conductance increased by small steps. A retardation of lipid and aqueous dyes occurred during fusion pore fluctuations. The flux of aqueous dye depended on the size of the molecule. The lack of movement of aqueous dyes while total fusion pore conductance increased suggests that initial HA-triggered fusion events are characterized by the opening of multiple small pores: the formation of a "sieve". PMID:7806567

  10. Cell fusion in the brain: two cells forward, one cell back.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Wilkins, Alastair; Scolding, Neil

    2014-11-01

    Adult stem cell populations, notably those which reside in the bone marrow, have been shown to contribute to several neuronal cell types in the rodent and human brain. The observation that circulating bone marrow cells can migrate into the central nervous system and fuse with, in particular, cerebellar Purkinje cells has suggested, at least in part, a potential mechanism behind this process. Experimentally, the incidence of cell fusion in the brain is enhanced with age, radiation exposure, inflammation, chemotherapeutic drugs and even selective damage to the neurons themselves. The presence of cell fusion, shown by detection of increased bi-nucleated neurons, has also been described in a variety of human central nervous system diseases, including both multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Accumulating evidence is therefore raising new questions into the biological significance of cell fusion, with the possibility that it represents an important means of cell-mediated neuroprotection or rescue of highly complex neurons that cannot be replaced in adult life. Here, we discuss the evidence behind this phenomenon in the rodent and human brain, with a focus on the subsequent research investigating the physiological mechanisms of cell fusion underlying this process. We also highlight how these studies offer new insights into endogenous neuronal repair, opening new exciting avenues for potential therapeutic interventions against neurodegeneration and brain injury.

  11. Advances in Reprogramming Somatic Cells to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minal; Yang, Shuying

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, nuclear reprogramming of cells has been performed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by combining somatic and pluripotent cells together through cell fusion and through genetic integration of factors through somatic cell chromatin. All of these techniques changes gene expression which further leads to a change in cell fate. Here we discuss recent advances in generating induced pluripotent stem cells, different reprogramming methods and clinical applications of iPS cells. Viral vectors have been used to transfer transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-myc, Klf4, and nanog) to induce reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts, neural stem cells, neural progenitor cells, keratinocytes, B lymphocytes and meningeal membrane cells towards pluripotency. Human fibroblasts, neural cells, blood and keratinocytes have also been reprogrammed towards pluripotency. In this review we have discussed the use of viral vectors for reprogramming both animal and human stem cells. Currently, many studies are also involved in finding alternatives to using viral vectors carrying transcription factors for reprogramming cells. These include using plasmid transfection, piggyback transposon system and piggyback transposon system combined with a non viral vector system. Applications of these techniques have been discussed in detail including its advantages and disadvantages. Finally, current clinical applications of induced pluripotent stem cells and its limitations have also been reviewed. Thus, this review is a summary of current research advances in reprogramming cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:20336395

  12. Proteasome Impairment Induces Recovery of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and an Alternative Pathway of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Ryohei; Yashiroda, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital and highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse and divide to maintain mitochondrial quality. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs cellular integrity and is known to be associated with various human diseases. However, the mechanism by which the quality of mitochondria is maintained remains largely unexplored. Here we show that impaired proteasome function recovers the growth of yeast cells lacking Fzo1, a pivotal protein for mitochondrial fusion. Decreased proteasome activity increased the mitochondrial oxidoreductase protein Mia40 and the ratio of the short isoform of mitochondrial intermembrane protein Mgm1 (s-Mgm1) to the long isoform (l-Mgm1). The increase in Mia40 restored mitochondrial membrane potential, while the increase in the s-Mgm1/l-Mgm1 ratio promoted mitochondrial fusion in an Fzo1-independent manner. Our findings demonstrate a new pathway for mitochondrial quality control that is induced by proteasome impairment. PMID:26552703

  13. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle -the fusion pore- can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, "flipped" t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  14. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M.; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R.; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle –the fusion pore– can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, “flipped” t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  15. Lysosome fusion to the cell membrane is mediated by the dysferlin C2A domain in coronary arterial endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Xu, Ming; Boini, Krishna M.; Ritter, Joseph K.; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin has recently been reported to participate in cell membrane repair in muscle and other cells through lysosome fusion. Given that lysosome fusion is a crucial mechanism that leads to membrane raft clustering, the present study attempted to determine whether dysferlin is involved in this process and its related signalling, and explores the mechanism underlying dysferlin-mediated lysosome fusion in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). We found that dysferlin is clustered in membrane raft macrodomains after Fas Ligand (FasL) stimulation as detected by confocal microscopy and membrane fraction flotation. Small-interfering RNA targeted to dysferlin prevented membrane raft clustering. Furthermore, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to membrane raft clusters, whereby local ASMase activation and ceramide production – an important step that mediates membrane raft clustering – was attenuated. Functionally, silencing of the dysferlin gene reversed FasL-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in isolated small coronary arteries. By monitoring fluorescence quenching or dequenching, silencing of the dysferlin gene was found to almost completely block lysosome fusion to plasma membrane upon FasL stimulation. Further studies to block C2A binding and silencing of AHNAK (a dysferlin C2A domain binding partner), showed that the dysferlin C2A domain is required for FasL-induced lysosome fusion to the cell membrane, ASMase translocation and membrane raft clustering. We conclude that dysferlin determines lysosome fusion to the plasma membrane through its C2A domain and it is therefore implicated in membrane-raft-mediated signaling and regulation of endothelial function in coronary circulation. PMID:22349696

  16. RAB-5- and DYNAMIN-1-Mediated Endocytosis of EFF-1 Fusogen Controls Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Smurova, Ksenia; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell-cell fusion plays essential roles during fertilization and organogenesis. Previous studies in C. elegans led to the identification of the eukaryotic fusion protein (EFF-1 fusogen), which has structural homology to class II viral fusogens. Transcriptional repression of EFF-1 ensures correct fusion fates, and overexpression of EFF-1 results in embryonic lethality. EFF-1 must be expressed on the surface of both fusing cells; however, little is known regarding how cells regulate EFF-1 surface exposure. Here, we report that EFF-1 is actively removed from the plasma membrane of epidermal cells by dynamin- and RAB-5-dependent endocytosis and accumulates in early endosomes. EFF-1 was transiently localized to apical domains of fusion-competent cells. Effective cell-cell fusion occurred only between pairs of cell membranes in which EFF-1 localized. Downregulation of dynamin or RAB-5 caused EFF-1 mislocalization to all apical membrane domains and excessive fusion. Thus, internalization of EFF-1 is a safety mechanism preventing excessive cell fusion. PMID:26854231

  17. Macrophage fusion, giant cell formation, and the foreign body response require matrix metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    MacLauchlan, Susan; Skokos, Eleni A.; Meznarich, Norman; Zhu, Dana H.; Raoof, Sana; Shipley, J. Michael; Senior, Robert M.; Bornstein, Paul; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages undergo fusion to form multinucleated giant cells in several pathologic conditions, including the foreign body response (FBR). We detected high levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 during macrophage fusion in vitro and in foreign body giant cells (FBGCs) in vivo. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow-derived macrophages were induced to fuse with IL-4 in the presence of MMP-9 function-blocking antibodies and displayed reduced fusion. A similar defect, characterized by delayed shape change and abnormal morphology, was observed in MMP-9 null macrophages. Analysis of the FBR in MMP-9 null mice was then pursued to evaluate the significance of these findings. Specifically, mixed cellulose ester disks and polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted s.c. in MMP-9 null and WT mice and excised 2–4 weeks later. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses indicated equal macrophage recruitment between MMP-9 null and WT mice, but FBGC formation was compromised in the former. In addition, MMP-9 null mice displayed abnormalities in extracellular matrix assembly and angiogenesis. Consistent with a requirement for MMP-9 in fusion, we also observed reduced MMP-9 levels in MCP-1 null macrophages, previously shown to be defective in FBGC formation. Collectively, our studies show abnormalities in MMP-9 null mice during the FBR and suggest a role for MMP-9 in macrophage fusion. PMID:19141565

  18. Drug Delivery via Cell Membrane Fusion Using Lipopeptide Modified Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of drugs to living cells is still a major challenge. Currently, most methods rely on the endocytotic pathway resulting in low delivery efficiency due to limited endosomal escape and/or degradation in lysosomes. Here, we report a new method for direct drug delivery into the cytosol of live cells in vitro and invivo utilizing targeted membrane fusion between liposomes and live cells. A pair of complementary coiled-coil lipopeptides was embedded in the lipid bilayer of liposomes and cell membranes respectively, resulting in targeted membrane fusion with concomitant release of liposome encapsulated cargo including fluorescent dyes and the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin. Using a wide spectrum of endocytosis inhibitors and endosome trackers, we demonstrate that the major site of cargo release is at the plasma membrane. This method thus allows for the quick and efficient delivery of drugs and is expected to have many invitro, ex vivo, and invivo applications. PMID:27725960

  19. Embryonic Stem Cells Contribute to Mouse Chimeras in the Absence of Detectable Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Benjamin L.; Oseth, Leann; Miller, Shanna; Hirsch, Betsy; Verfaillie, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all embryonic and adult cell types following mouse chimera production. Although injection of diploid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts suggests that tetraploid cells have a selective disadvantage in the developing embryo, tetraploid hybrid cells, formed by cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells, have been reported to contribute to mouse chimeras. In addition, other examples of apparent stem cell plasticity have recently been shown to be the result of cell fusion. Here we investigate whether ES cells contribute to mouse chimeras through a cell fusion mechanism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for X and Y chromosomes was performed on dissociated tissues from embryonic, neonatal, and adult wild-type, and chimeric mice to follow the ploidy distributions of cells from various tissues. FISH analysis showed that the ploidy distributions in dissociated tissues, notably the tetraploid cell number, did not differ between chimeric and wild-type tissues. To address the possibility that early cell fusion events are hidden by subsequent reductive divisions or other changes in cell ploidy, we injected Z/EG (lacZ/EGFP) ES cells into ACTB-cre blastocysts. Recombination can only occur as the result of cell fusion, and the recombined allele should persist through any subsequent changes in cell ploidy. We did not detect evidence of fusion in embryonic chimeras either by direct fluorescence microscopy for GFP or by PCR amplification of the recombined Z/EG locus on genomic DNA from ACTB-cre::Z/EG chimeric embryos. Our results argue strongly against cell fusion as a mechanism by which ES cells contribute to chimeras. PMID:18338954

  20. Embryonic stem cells contribute to mouse chimeras in the absence of detectable cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Kidder, Benjamin L; Oseth, Leann; Miller, Shanna; Hirsch, Betsy; Verfaillie, Catherine; Coucouvanis, Electra

    2008-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into all embryonic and adult cell types following mouse chimera production. Although injection of diploid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts suggests that tetraploid cells have a selective disadvantage in the developing embryo, tetraploid hybrid cells, formed by cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells, have been reported to contribute to mouse chimeras. In addition, other examples of apparent stem cell plasticity have recently been shown to be the result of cell fusion. Here we investigate whether ES cells contribute to mouse chimeras through a cell fusion mechanism. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for X and Y chromosomes was performed on dissociated tissues from embryonic, neonatal, and adult wild-type, and chimeric mice to follow the ploidy distributions of cells from various tissues. FISH analysis showed that the ploidy distributions in dissociated tissues, notably the tetraploid cell number, did not differ between chimeric and wild-type tissues. To address the possibility that early cell fusion events are hidden by subsequent reductive divisions or other changes in cell ploidy, we injected Z/EG (lacZ/EGFP) ES cells into ACTB-cre blastocysts. Recombination can only occur as the result of cell fusion, and the recombined allele should persist through any subsequent changes in cell ploidy. We did not detect evidence of fusion in embryonic chimeras either by direct fluorescence microscopy for GFP or by PCR amplification of the recombined Z/EG locus on genomic DNA from ACTB-cre::Z/EG chimeric embryos. Our results argue strongly against cell fusion as a mechanism by which ES cells contribute to chimeras.

  1. Heme-mediated apoptosis and fusion damage in BeWo trophoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingli; Hassana, Salifu; Stiles, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Placental malaria (PM) is a complication associated with malaria infection during pregnancy that often leads to abortion, premature delivery, intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight. Increased levels of circulating free heme, a by-product of Plasmodium-damaged erythrocytes, is a major contributor to inflammation, tissue damage and loss of blood brain barrier integrity associated with fatal experimental cerebral malaria. However, the role of heme in PM remains unknown. Proliferation and apoptosis of trophoblasts and fusion of the mononucleated state to the syncytial state are of major importance to a successful pregnancy. In the present study, we examined the effects of heme on the viability and fusion of a trophoblast-derived cell line (BeWo). Results indicate that heme induces apoptosis in BeWo cells by activation of the STAT3/caspase-3/PARP signaling pathway. In the presence of forskolin, which triggers trophoblast fusion, heme inhibits BeWo cell fusion through activation of STAT3. Understanding the effects of free plasma heme in pregnant women either due to malaria, sickle cell disease or other hemolytic diseases, will enable identification of high-risk women and may lead to discovery of new drug targets against associated adverse pregnancy outcome. PMID:27796349

  2. Direct Involvement of HERV-W Env Glycoprotein in Human Trophoblast Cell Fusion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Frendo, Jean-Louis; Olivier, Delphine; Cheynet, Valérie; Blond, Jean-Luc; Bouton, Olivier; Vidaud, Michel; Rabreau, Michèle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Mallet, François

    2003-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the product of the HERV-W env gene, a retroviral envelope protein also dubbed syncytin, is a highly fusogenic membrane glycoprotein inducing the formation of syncytia on interaction with the type D mammalian retrovirus receptor. In addition, the detection of HERV-W Env protein (Env-W) expression in placental tissue sections led us to propose a role for this fusogenic glycoprotein in placenta formation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we analyzed the involvement of Env-W in the differentiation of primary cultures of human villous cytotrophoblasts that spontaneously differentiate by cell fusion into syncytiotrophoblasts in vitro. First, we observed that HERV-W env mRNA and glycoprotein expression are colinear with primary cytotrophoblast differentiation and with expression of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a marker of syncytiotrophoblast formation. Second, we observed that in vitro stimulation of trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation by cyclic AMP is also associated with a concomitant increase in HERV-W env and hCG mRNA and protein expression. Finally, by using specific antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that inhibition of Env-W protein expression leads to a decrease of trophoblast fusion and differentiation, with the secretion of hCG in culture medium of antisense oligonucleotide-treated cells being decreased by fivefold. Taken together, these results strongly support a direct role for Env-W in human trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. PMID:12724415

  3. The molecular role of connexin 43 in human trophoblast cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Dunk, Caroline E; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Drewlo, Sascha; Baczyk, Dora; Pötgens, Andy J G; Winterhager, Elke; Kingdom, John C P; Lye, Steven J

    2012-04-01

    Connexin expression and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) mediated by connexin 43 (Cx43)/gap junction A1 (GJA1) are required for cytotrophoblast fusion into the syncytium, the outer functional layer of the human placenta. Cx43 also impacts intracellular signaling through protein-protein interactions. The transcription factor GCM1 and its downstream target ERVW-1/SYNCYTIN-1 are key players in trophoblast fusion and exert their actions through the ERVW-1 receptor SLC1A5/ASCT-2/RDR/ATB(0). To investigate the molecular role of the Cx43 protein and its interaction with this fusogenic pathway, we utilized stable Cx43-transfected cell lines established from the choriocarcinoma cell line Jeg3: wild-type Jeg3, alphahCG/Cx43 (constitutive Cx43 expression), JpUHD/Cx43 (doxycyclin-inducible Cx43 expression), or JpUHD/trCx43 (doxycyclin-inducible Cx43 carboxyterminal deleted). We hypothesized that truncation of Cx43 at its C-terminus would inhibit trophoblast fusion and protein interaction with either ERVW-1 or SLC1A5. In the alphahCG/Cx43 and JpUHD/Cx43 lines, stimulation with cAMP caused 1) increase in GJA1 mRNA levels, 2) increase in percentage of fused cells, and 3) downregulation of SLC1A5 expression. Cell fusion was inhibited by GJIC blockade using carbenoxylone. Neither Jeg3, which express low levels of Cx43, nor the JpUHD/trCx43 cell line demonstrated cell fusion or downregulation of SLC1A5. However, GCM1 and ERVW-1 mRNAs were upregulated by cAMP treatment in both Jeg3 and all Cx43 cell lines. Silencing of GCM1 prevented the induction of GJA1 mRNA by forskolin in BeWo choriocarcinoma cells, demonstrating that GCM1 is upstream of Cx43. All cell lines and first-trimester villous explants also demonstrated coimmunoprecipitation of SLC1A5 and phosphorylated Cx43. Importantly, SLC1A5 and Cx43 gap junction plaques colocalized in situ to areas of fusing cytotrophoblast, as demonstrated by the loss of E-cadherin staining in the plasma membrane in first

  4. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun; Lim, Chaeseung; Kim, Jungho; Cha, Dae Ryong; Oh, Junseo

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  5. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  6. Cell-fusion method to visualize interphase nuclear pore formation.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Funakoshi, Tomoko; Imamoto, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the nucleus is a complex and sophisticated organelle that organizes genomic DNA to support essential cellular functions. The nuclear surface contains many nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), channels for macromolecular transport between the cytoplasm and nucleus. It is well known that the number of NPCs almost doubles during interphase in cycling cells. However, the mechanism of NPC formation is poorly understood, presumably because a practical system for analysis does not exist. The most difficult obstacle in the visualization of interphase NPC formation is that NPCs already exist after nuclear envelope formation, and these existing NPCs interfere with the observation of nascent NPCs. To overcome this obstacle, we developed a novel system using the cell-fusion technique (heterokaryon method), previously also used to analyze the shuttling of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, to visualize the newly synthesized interphase NPCs. In addition, we used a photobleaching approach that validated the cell-fusion method. We recently used these methods to demonstrate the role of cyclin-dependent protein kinases and of Pom121 in interphase NPC formation in cycling human cells. Here, we describe the details of the cell-fusion approach and compare the system with other NPC formation visualization methods.

  7. Raman spectroscopic evidence of tissue restructuring in heat-induced tissue fusion.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Cloyd, Kristy L; Arya, Shobhit; Hedegaard, Martin A B; Steele, Joseph A M; Elson, Daniel S; Stevens, Molly M; Hanna, George B

    2014-09-01

    Heat-induced tissue fusion via radio-frequency (RF) energy has gained wide acceptance clinically and here we present the first optical-Raman-spectroscopy study on tissue fusion samples in vitro. This study provides direct insights into tissue constituent and structural changes on the molecular level, exposing spectroscopic evidence for the loss of distinct collagen fibre rich tissue layers as well as the denaturing and restructuring of collagen crosslinks post RF fusion. These findings open the door for more advanced optical feedback-control methods and characterization during heat-induced tissue fusion, which will lead to new clinical applications of this promising technology.

  8. Glioma-associated Oncogene 2 Is Essential for Trophoblastic Fusion by Forming a Transcriptional Complex with Glial Cell Missing-a.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Tang, Lanfang; Wu, Xiaokai; Xiong, Wenyi; Ruan, Hongfeng; Hussain, Musaddique; Wu, Junsong; Zou, Chaochun; Wu, Ximei

    2016-03-11

    Cell-cell fusion of human villous trophoblasts, referred to as a process of syncytialization, acts as a prerequisite for the proper development and functional maintenance of the human placenta. Given the fact that the main components of the Hedgehog signaling pathway are expressed predominantly in the syncytial layer of human placental villi, in this study, we investigated the potential roles and underlying mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling in trophoblastic fusion. Activation of Hedgehog signaling by a variety of approaches robustly induced cell fusion and the expression of syncytial markers, whereas suppression of Hedgehog signaling significantly attenuated cell fusion and the expression of syncytial markers in both human primary cytotrophoblasts and trophoblast-like BeWo cells. Moreover, among glioma-associated oncogene (GLI) family transcriptional factors in Hedgehog signaling, knockdown of GLI2 but not GLI1 and GLI3 significantly attenuated Hedgehog-induced cell fusion, whereas overexpression of the GLI2 activator alone was sufficient to induce cell fusion. Finally, GLI2 not only stabilized glial cell missing-a, a pivotal transcriptional factor for trophoblastic syncytialization, but also formed a transcriptional heterodimer with glial cell missing-a to transactivate syncytin-1, a trophoblastic fusogen, and promote trophoblastic syncytialization. Taken together, this study uncovered a so far uncharacterized role of Hedgehog/GLI2 signaling in trophoblastic fusion, implicating that Hedgehog signaling, through GLI2, could be required for human placental development and pregnancy maintenance.

  9. Characterization of functionally active interleukin-18/eGFP fusion protein expression during cell cycle phases in recombinant chicken DF1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing Chieh; Chen, Yu San; Shien, Jui Hung; Shen, Pin Chun; Lee, Long Huw

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of foreign gene expression on cell cycle phases in mammalian cells has been described. In this study, a DF1/chIL-18a cell line that stably expresses the fusion protein chIL-18 was constructed and the enhanced green fluorescence protein connected through a (G4 S)3 linker sequence investigated the relationship between cell cycle phases and fusion protein production. DF1/chIL-18a cells (1 × 10(5) ) were inoculated in 60-mm culture dishes containing 5 mL of media to achieve 50%-60% confluence and were cultured in the presence of the cycle-specific inhibitors 10058-F4, aphidicolin, and colchicine for 24 and 48 h. The percentage of cell density and mean fluorescence intensity in each cell cycle phase were assessed using flow cytometry. The inhibitors effectively arrested cell growth. The fusion protein production rate was higher in the S phase than in the G0/G1 and G2/M phases. When cell cycle progression was blocked in the G0/G1, S, and G2/M phases by the addition of 10058-F4, aphidicolin, and colchicine, respectively, the aphidicolin-induced single cells showed higher fusion protein levels than did the 10058-F4- or colchicine-induced phase cells and the uninduced control cells. Although the cells did not proliferate after the drug additions, the amount of total fusion protein accumulated in aphidicolin-treated cells was similar to that in the untreated cultures. Fusion protein is biologically active because it induces IFN-γ production in splenocyte cultures of chicken. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:581-591, 2016.

  10. Active inclusion bodies of acid phosphatase PhoC: aggregation induced by GFP fusion and activities modulated by linker flexibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biologically active inclusion bodies (IBs) have gained much attention in recent years. Fusion with IB-inducing partner has been shown to be an efficient strategy for generating active IBs. To make full use of the advantages of active IBs, one of the key issues will be to improve the activity yield of IBs when expressed in cells, which would need more choices on IB-inducing fusion partners and approaches for engineering IBs. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been reported to aggregate when overexpressed, but GFP fusion has not been considered as an IB-inducing approach for these fusion proteins so far. In addition, the role of linker in fusion proteins has been shown to be important for protein characteristics, yet impact of linker on active IBs has never been reported. Results Here we report that by fusing GFP and acid phosphatase PhoC via a linker region, the resultant PhoC-GFPs were expressed largely as IBs. These IBs show high levels of specific fluorescence and specific PhoC activities (phosphatase and phosphotransferase), and can account for up to over 80% of the total PhoC activities in the cells. We further demonstrated that the aggregation of GFP moiety in the fusion protein plays an essential role in the formation of PhoC-GFP IBs. In addition, PhoC-GFP IBs with linkers of different flexibility were found to exhibit different levels of activities and ratios in the cells, suggesting that the linker region can be utilized to manipulate the characteristics of active IBs. Conclusions Our results show that active IBs of PhoC can be generated by GFP fusion, demonstrating for the first time the potential of GFP fusion to induce active IB formation of another soluble protein. We also show that the linker sequence in PhoC-GFP fusion proteins plays an important role on the regulation of IB characteristics, providing an alternative and important approach for engineering of active IBs with the goal of obtaining high activity yield of IBs. PMID:23497261

  11. Evaluation of posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep using mineral scaffolds seeded with cultured bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-López, María D; Andrades, José A; Gómez, Santiago; Zamora-Navas, Plácido; Guerado, Enrique; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo; Becerra, José

    2014-12-16

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of hybrid constructs in comparison to bone grafts (autograft and allograft) for posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in sheep, instrumented with transpedicular screws and bars. Hybrid constructs using cultured bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in several bone healing models. In particular, hybrid constructs made by calcium phosphate-enriched cells have had similar fusion rates to bone autografts in posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep. In our study, four experimental spinal fusions in two animal groups were compared in sheep: autograft and allograft (reference group), hydroxyapatite scaffold, and hydroxyapatite scaffold seeded with cultured and osteoinduced bone marrow MSCs (hybrid construct). During the last three days of culture, dexamethasone (dex) and beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) were added to potentiate osteoinduction. The two experimental situations of each group were tested in the same spinal segment (L4-L5). Spinal fusion and bone formation were studied by clinical observation, X-ray, computed tomography (CT), histology, and histomorphometry. Lumbar fusion rates assessed by CT scan and histology were higher for autograft and allograft (70%) than for mineral scaffold alone (22%) and hybrid constructs (35%). The quantity of new bone formation was also higher for the reference group, quite similar in both (autograft and allograft). Although the hybrid scaffold group had a better fusion rate than the non-hybrid scaffold group, the histological analysis revealed no significant differences between them in terms of quantity of bone formation. The histology results suggested that mineral scaffolds were partly resorbed in an early phase, and included in callus tissues. Far from the callus area the hydroxyapatite alone did not generate bone around it, but the hybrid scaffold did. In nude mice, labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vivo and monitored by

  12. Evaluation of posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep using mineral scaffolds seeded with cultured bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Cuenca-López, María D; Andrades, José A; Gómez, Santiago; Zamora-Navas, Plácido; Guerado, Enrique; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo; Becerra, José

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of hybrid constructs in comparison to bone grafts (autograft and allograft) for posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in sheep, instrumented with transpedicular screws and bars. Hybrid constructs using cultured bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in several bone healing models. In particular, hybrid constructs made by calcium phosphate-enriched cells have had similar fusion rates to bone autografts in posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep. In our study, four experimental spinal fusions in two animal groups were compared in sheep: autograft and allograft (reference group), hydroxyapatite scaffold, and hydroxyapatite scaffold seeded with cultured and osteoinduced bone marrow MSCs (hybrid construct). During the last three days of culture, dexamethasone (dex) and beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) were added to potentiate osteoinduction. The two experimental situations of each group were tested in the same spinal segment (L4-L5). Spinal fusion and bone formation were studied by clinical observation, X-ray, computed tomography (CT), histology, and histomorphometry. Lumbar fusion rates assessed by CT scan and histology were higher for autograft and allograft (70%) than for mineral scaffold alone (22%) and hybrid constructs (35%). The quantity of new bone formation was also higher for the reference group, quite similar in both (autograft and allograft). Although the hybrid scaffold group had a better fusion rate than the non-hybrid scaffold group, the histological analysis revealed no significant differences between them in terms of quantity of bone formation. The histology results suggested that mineral scaffolds were partly resorbed in an early phase, and included in callus tissues. Far from the callus area the hydroxyapatite alone did not generate bone around it, but the hybrid scaffold did. In nude mice, labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vivo and monitored by

  13. Evaluation of Posterolateral Lumbar Fusion in Sheep Using Mineral Scaffolds Seeded with Cultured Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca-López, María D.; Andrades, José A.; Gómez, Santiago; Zamora-Navas, Plácido; Guerado, Enrique; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo; Becerra, José

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of hybrid constructs in comparison to bone grafts (autograft and allograft) for posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in sheep, instrumented with transpedicular screws and bars. Hybrid constructs using cultured bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown promising results in several bone healing models. In particular, hybrid constructs made by calcium phosphate-enriched cells have had similar fusion rates to bone autografts in posterolateral lumbar fusion in sheep. In our study, four experimental spinal fusions in two animal groups were compared in sheep: autograft and allograft (reference group), hydroxyapatite scaffold, and hydroxyapatite scaffold seeded with cultured and osteoinduced bone marrow MSCs (hybrid construct). During the last three days of culture, dexamethasone (dex) and beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) were added to potentiate osteoinduction. The two experimental situations of each group were tested in the same spinal segment (L4–L5). Spinal fusion and bone formation were studied by clinical observation, X-ray, computed tomography (CT), histology, and histomorphometry. Lumbar fusion rates assessed by CT scan and histology were higher for autograft and allograft (70%) than for mineral scaffold alone (22%) and hybrid constructs (35%). The quantity of new bone formation was also higher for the reference group, quite similar in both (autograft and allograft). Although the hybrid scaffold group had a better fusion rate than the non-hybrid scaffold group, the histological analysis revealed no significant differences between them in terms of quantity of bone formation. The histology results suggested that mineral scaffolds were partly resorbed in an early phase, and included in callus tissues. Far from the callus area the hydroxyapatite alone did not generate bone around it, but the hybrid scaffold did. In nude mice, labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vivo and monitored by

  14. The cesium-induced delay in myoblast membrane fusion is accompanied by changes in cellular subfraction lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Santini, M T; Indovina, P L; Cantafora, A

    1991-11-18

    We have recently demonstrated that the delay in myoblast membrane fusion induced by cesium is accompanied by changes in isolated membrane lipids (Santini, M.T., Indovina, P.L., Cantafora, A. and Blotta, I. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1023, 298-304). In the present study, we have investigated changes in the lipid profile of total cell homogenates and microsomal membrane fractions during myoblast membrane fusion as well as the effects that addition of cesium may have on these lipid variations in order to try to understand the production and translocation of lipids during this myogenic process. The data presented here indicate that the lipid composition of cell homogenates and microsomes varies in a different manner from isolated plasma membranes during myogenic fusion. In addition, cesium affects, in a different manner, the normally-occurring lipid production and distribution which takes place in each subcellular fraction.

  15. Rho GTPases and the Downstream Effectors Actin-related Protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) Complex and Myosin II Induce Membrane Fusion at Self-contacts*

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Grant M.; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Actin regulation is required for membrane activities that drive cell adhesion and migration. The Rho GTPase family plays critical roles in actin and membrane dynamics; however, the roles of the Rho GTPase family are not limited to cell adhesion and migration. Using micron-sized obstacles to induce the formation of self-contacts in epithelial cells, we previously showed that self-adhesion is distinct from cell-to-cell adhesion in that self-contacts are eliminated by membrane fusion. In the current study, we identified Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, as potential upstream regulators of membrane fusion. The RhoA downstream effector myosin II is required for fusion as the expression of mutant myosin light chain reduced membrane fusion. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the Arp2/3 complex, a downstream effector of Rac1 and Cdc42, also reduced self-contact-induced membrane fusion. At self-contacts, while the concentration of E-cadherin diminished, the intensity of GFP-tagged Arp3 rapidly fluctuated then decreased and stabilized after membrane fusion. Taken together, these data suggest that the Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization brings two opposing membranes into close apposition by possibly excluding E-cadherin from contact sites, thus promoting membrane fusion at self-contacts. PMID:25527498

  16. Cell fusion in space: plasma membrane fusion in human fibroblasts during short term microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongkind, J. F.; Visser, P.; Verkerk, A.

    During short-term microgravity in sounding rocket experiments (6 min.) the cytoskeleton undergoes changes and therefore it is possible that cell processes which are dependent on the structure and function of the cytoskeleton are influenced. A cell fusion experiment, initiated by a short electric pulse, was chosen as a model experiment for this sounding rocket experiment. Confluent monolayers of primary human skin fibroblasts, grown on coverslips, were mounted between two electrodes (distance 0.5 cm) and fused by discharging a capacitor (68 muF 250 V; 10 msec) in a low conductive medium. During a microgravity experiment in which nearly all the requirements for an optimal result were met (only the recovery of the payload was delayed) results were found that indicated that microgravity during 6 minutes did not influence cell fusion since the percentage of fused products did not change during microgravity. Within the limits of discrimination using morphological assays microgravity has no influence on the actin/cortical cytoskeleton just after electrofusion.

  17. Hemi-fused structure mediates and controls fusion and fission in live cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Dong; Hamid, Edaeni; Shin, Wonchul; Wen, Peter J; Krystofiak, Evan S; Villarreal, Seth A; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Kachar, Bechara; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-06-15

    Membrane fusion and fission are vital for eukaryotic life. For three decades, it has been proposed that fusion is mediated by fusion between the proximal leaflets of two bilayers (hemi-fusion) to produce a hemi-fused structure, followed by fusion between the distal leaflets, whereas fission is via hemi-fission, which also produces a hemi-fused structure, followed by full fission. This hypothesis remained unsupported owing to the lack of observation of hemi-fusion or hemi-fission in live cells. A competing fusion hypothesis involving protein-lined pore formation has also been proposed. Here we report the observation of a hemi-fused Ω-shaped structure in live neuroendocrine chromaffin cells and pancreatic β-cells, visualized using confocal and super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy. This structure is generated from fusion pore opening or closure (fission) at the plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the transition to full fusion or fission is determined by competition between fusion and calcium/dynamin-dependent fission mechanisms, and is notably slow (seconds to tens of seconds) in a substantial fraction of the events. These results provide key missing evidence in support of the hemi-fusion and hemi-fission hypothesis in live cells, and reveal the hemi-fused intermediate as a key structure controlling fusion and fission, as fusion and fission mechanisms compete to determine the transition to fusion or fission.

  18. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  19. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  20. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2015-07-14

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  1. FUSION-COMPETENT STATE INDUCED BY A C-TERMINAL HIV-1 FUSION PEPTIDE IN CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative cycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 begins after fusion of the viral and target-cell membranes. The envelope glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit contains conserved hydrophobic domains that engage and perturb the merging lipid bilayers. In this work, we have characterized the fusion-committed state generated in vesicles by CpreTM, a synthetic peptide derived from the sequence connecting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41. Pre-loading cholesterol-rich vesicles with CpreTM rendered them competent for subsequent lipid-mixing with fluorescently-labeled target vesicles. Highlighting the physiological relevance of the lasting fusion-competent state, the broadly neutralizing antibody 4E10 bound to the CpreTM-primed vesicles and inhibited lipid-mixing. Heterotypic fusion assays disclosed dependence on the lipid composition of the vesicles that acted either as virus or cell membrane surrogates. Lipid-mixing exhibited above all a critical dependence on the cholesterol content in those experiments. We infer that the fusion-competent state described herein resembles bona-fide perturbations generated by the pre-hairpin MPER-TMD connection within the viral membrane. PMID:25617671

  2. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  3. The Effect of Acute Microgravity on Mechanically-Induced Membrane Damage and Membrane-Membrane Fusion Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark, S. F.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Feedback, Daniel L.

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". This response is characterized by both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  4. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone.

  5. Prm3p is a pheromone-induced peripheral nuclear envelope protein required for yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E; Rose, Mark D

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromone-responding cells, with significant colocalization with the spindle pole body in zygotes. A previous report, using a truncated protein, claimed that Prm3p is localized to the inner nuclear envelope. Based on biochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and live cell microscopy, we find that functional Prm3p is a peripheral membrane protein exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the outer nuclear envelope. In support of this, mutations in a putative nuclear localization sequence had no effect on full-length protein function or localization. In contrast, point mutations and deletions in the highly conserved hydrophobic carboxy-terminal domain disrupted both protein function and localization. Genetic analysis, colocalization, and biochemical experiments indicate that Prm3p interacts directly with Kar5p, suggesting that nuclear membrane fusion is mediated by a protein complex.

  6. Fusion and metabolism of plant cells as affected by microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hampp, R; Hoffmann, E; Schönherr, K; Johann, P; De Filippis, L

    1997-01-01

    Plant cell protoplasts derived from leaf tissue of two different tobacco species (Nicotiana tabacum., N. rustica L.) were exposed to short-term (sounding rocket experiments) and long-term (spacelab) microgravity environments in order to study both (electro) cell fusion and cell metabolism during early and later stages of tissue regeneration. The period of exposure to microgravity varied from 10 min (sounding rocket) to 10 d (space shuttle). The process of electro fusion of protoplasts was improved under conditions of microgravity: the time needed to establish close membrane contact between protoplasts (alignment time) was reduced (5 as compared to 15 s under 1 g) and numbers of fusion products between protoplasts of different specific density were increased by a factor of about 10. In addition, viability of fusion products, as shown by the ability to form callus, increased from about 60% to more than 90%. Regenerated fusion products obtained from both sounding-rocket and spacelab experiments showed a wide range of intermediate properties between the two parental plants. This was verified by isozyme analysis and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). In order to address potential metabolic responses, more general markers such as the overall energy state (ATP/ADP ratio), the redox charge of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide system (NADH/NAD ratio), and the pool size of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru 2,6 bisp), a regulator of the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, were determined. Responses of these parameters were different with regard to short-term and long-term exposure. Shortly after transition to reduced gravitation (sounding rocket) ratios of ATP/ADP exhibited strong fluctuation while the pool size of NAD decreased (indicating an increased NADH/NAD ratio) and that of Fru 2,6 bisp increased. As similar changes can be observed under stress conditions, this response is probably indicative of a metabolic stress

  7. p-Glycoprotein ABCB5 and YB-1 expression plays a role in increased heterogeneity of breast cancer cells: correlations with cell fusion and doxorubicin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells recurrently develop into acquired resistance to the administered drugs. The iatrogenic mechanisms of induced chemotherapy-resistance remain elusive and the degree of drug resistance did not exclusively correlate with reductions of drug accumulation, suggesting that drug resistance may involve additional mechanisms. Our aim is to define the potential targets, that makes drug-sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells turn to drug-resistant, for the anti-cancer drug development against drug resistant breast cancer cells. Methods Doxorubicin resistant human breast MCF-7 clones were generated. The doxorubicin-induced cell fusion events were examined. Heterokaryons were identified and sorted by FACS. In the development of doxorubicin resistance, cell-fusion associated genes, from the previous results of microarray, were verified using dot blot array and quantitative RT-PCR. The doxorubicin-induced expression patterns of pro-survival and pro-apoptotic genes were validated. Results YB-1 and ABCB5 were up regulated in the doxorubicin treated MCF-7 cells that resulted in certain degree of genomic instability that accompanied by the drug resistance phenotype. Cell fusion increased diversity within the cell population and doxorubicin resistant MCF-7 cells emerged probably through clonal selection. Most of the drug resistant hybrid cells were anchorage independent. But some of the anchorage dependent MCF-7 cells exhibited several unique morphological appearances suggesting minor population of the fused cells maybe de-differentiated and have progenitor cell like characteristics. Conclusion Our work provides valuable insight into the drug induced cell fusion event and outcome, and suggests YB-1, GST, ABCB5 and ERK3 could be potential targets for the anti-cancer drug development against drug resistant breast cancer cells. Especially, the ERK-3 serine/threonine kinase is specifically up-regulated in the resistant cells and known to be susceptible to synthetic

  8. Pronuclear fusion failure: an alternate conjugational pathway in Tetrahymena thermophila, induced by vinblastine

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.P.; Suhr-Jessen, P.B.; Orias, E.

    1988-04-01

    Vinblastine is shown to induce pronuclear fusion failure in conjugating Tetrahymena thermophila. In this alternate conjugational pathway gametic pronuclei are exchanged between conjugants but do not fuse. Each pronucleus undergoes one mitotic division to produce a new macro- and micronucleus. Genetic consequences of pronuclear fusion failure include the following: (1) the progeny are whole genome homozygotes with nuclei derived from single meiotic products, and (2) half of the progeny are heterokaryons with micro- and macronuclei of different genetic origins. These facts make this process extremely useful in strain construction and mutant isolation. The induction of pronuclear fusion failure by vinblastine suggests that microtubules play an essential role in pronuclear fusion. In this paper the authors present autoradiographic and genetic evidence that vinblastine induces pronuclear fusion failure in T. thermophila.

  9. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  10. Evidence that a BCR-ABL fusion peptide does not induce lymphocyte proliferation or cytokine production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abu-Eisha, Hazem M; Butt, Nauman M; Clark, Richard E; Christmas, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    The BCR-ABL fusion protein is characteristic of chronic myeloid leukaemia and may be an effective tumour-specific antigen. CD8+ T cell responses to BCR-ABL fusion peptides have been reported in normal subjects and CML patients but CD4+ T cell responses have been less well characterised. Here, the 23-mer e14a2 fusion peptide VHSATGFKQSSKALQRPVASDFE has been used to stimulate T cell responses. Most normal subjects and CML patients showed no proliferative responses to this peptide, with stimulation indices not significantly greater than 1.0. Following a second stimulation with the same peptide, small proliferative responses were obtained in normal subjects but not CML patients. These responses were not improved following a third stimulation with 23-mer peptide, nor by using mature autologous dendritic cells to present the peptide. Intracellular interferon-gamma production by CD4+ T cells was also not induced by the 23-mer e14a2 peptide. Hence, this e14a2 peptide does not stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro in most normal subjects or CML patients. The precise sequence of amino acids may be critical in defining immunogenicity for CD4+ T cell responses against BCR-ABL peptides.

  11. The impact of dendritic cell-tumor fusion cells on cancer vaccines - past progress and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that can be used in cancer vaccines. Thus, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens via DCs. One strategy includes administering DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) to induce antitumor immune responses in cancer patients. However, clinical trials using this strategy have fallen short of expectations. Several factors might limit the efficacy of these anticancer vaccines. To induce efficient antitumor immune responses and enhance potential clinical benefits, DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines require manipulations that improve immunogenicity for both DCs and whole tumor cells. This review addresses recent progress in improving clinical outcomes using DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines. PMID:26507578

  12. Membrane fusion-competent virus-like proteoliposomes and proteinaceous supported bilayers made directly from cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Costello, Deirdre A; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Millet, Jean K; Porri, Teresa; Daniel, Susan

    2013-05-28

    Virus-like particles are useful materials for studying virus-host interactions in a safe manner. However, the standard production of pseudovirus based on the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone is an intricate procedure that requires trained laboratory personnel. In this work, a new strategy for creating virus-like proteoliposomes (VLPLs) and virus-like supported bilayers (VLSBs) is presented. This strategy uses a cell blebbing technique to induce the formation of nanoscale vesicles from the plasma membrane of BHK cells expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein of influenza X-31. These vesicles and supported bilayers contain HA and are used to carry out single particle membrane fusion events, monitored using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The results of these studies show that the VLPLs and VLSBs contain HA proteins that are fully competent to carry out membrane fusion, including the formation of a fusion pore and the release of fluorophores loaded into vesicles. This new strategy for creating spherical and planar geometry virus-like membranes has many potential applications. VLPLs could be used to study fusion proteins of virulent viruses in a safe manner, or they could be used as therapeutic delivery particles to transport beneficial proteins coexpressed in the cells to a target cell. VLSBs could facilitate high throughput screening of antiviral drugs or pathogen-host cell interactions.

  13. An immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif in varicella-zoster virus glycoprotein B regulates cell fusion and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Brady, Jennifer J; Sommer, Marvin H; Reichelt, Mike; Sung, Phillip; Blau, Helen M; Arvin, Ann M

    2013-01-29

    Herpesvirus entry functions of the conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL have been delineated, but their role in regulating cell-cell fusion is poorly understood. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection provides a valuable model for investigating cell-cell fusion because of the importance of this process for pathogenesis in human skin and sensory ganglia. The present study identifies a canonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) in the gB cytoplasmic domain (gBcyt) and demonstrates that the gBcyt is a tyrosine kinase substrate. Orbitrap mass spectrometry confirmed that Y881, central to the ITIM, is phosphorylated. To determine whether the gBcyt ITIM regulates gB/gH-gL-induced cell-cell fusion in vitro, tyrosine residues Y881 and Y920 in the gBcyt were substituted with phenylalanine separately or together. Recombinant viruses with these substitutions were generated to establish their effects on syncytia formation in replication in vitro and in the human skin xenograft model of VZV pathogenesis. The Y881F substitution caused significantly increased cell-cell fusion despite reduced cell-surface gB. Importantly, the Y881F or Y881/920F substitutions in VZV caused aggressive syncytia formation, reducing cell-cell spread. These in vitro effects of aggressive syncytia formation translated to severely impaired skin infection in vivo. In contrast, the Y920F substitution did not affect virus replication in vitro or in vivo. These observations suggest that gB modulates cell-cell fusion via an ITIM-mediated Y881 phosphorylation-dependent mechanism, supporting a unique concept that intracellular signaling through this gBcyt motif regulates VZV syncytia formation and is essential for skin pathogenesis.

  14. Rapid fusion between mesenchymal stem cells and cardiomyocytes yields electrically active, non-contractile hybrid cells

    PubMed Central

    Shadrin, Ilya Y.; Yoon, Woohyun; Li, Liqing; Shepherd, Neal; Bursac, Nenad

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac cell therapies involving bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have shown promising results, although their mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated direct interactions between hMSCs and cardiomyocytes in vitro. Using a genetic Ca2+ indicator gCaMP3 to efficiently label hMSCs in co-cultures with neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs), we determined that 25–40% of hMSCs (from 4 independent donors) acquired periodic Ca2+ transients and cardiac markers through spontaneous fusion with NRVMs. Sharp electrode and voltage-clamp recordings in fused cells showed action potential properties and Ca2+ current amplitudes in between those of non-fused hMSCs and NRVMs. Time-lapse video-microscopy revealed the first direct evidence of active fusion between hMSCs and NRVMs within several hours of co-culture. Application of blebbistatin, nifedipine or verapamil caused complete and reversible inhibition of fusion, suggesting potential roles for actomyosin bridging and Ca2+ channels in the fusion process. Immunostaining for Cx43, Ki67, and sarcomeric α-actinin showed that fused cells remain strongly coupled to surrounding NRVMs, but downregulate sarcomeric structures over time, acquiring a non-proliferative and non-contractile phenotype. Overall, these results describe the phenotype and mechanisms of hybrid cell formation via fusion of hMSCs and cardiomyocytes with potential implications for cardiac cell therapy. PMID:26159124

  15. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0+/-0.1 degrees C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  16. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  17. Construction and Characterization of Insect Cell-Derived Influenza VLP: Cell Binding, Fusion, and EGFP Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi-Shin; Wei, Hung-Ju; Chang, Chung-Chieh; Lin, Chung-Hung; Wei, Ting-Shyang; Wu, Suh-Chin; Chang, Ding-Kwo

    2010-01-01

    We have constructed virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), matrix protein 1 (M1) ,and proton channel protein (M2) using baculovirus as a vector in the SF9 insect cell. The size of the expressed VLP was estimated to be ~100 nm by light scattering experiment and transmission electron microscopy. Recognition of HA on the VLP surface by the HA2-specific monoclonal antibody IIF4 at acidic pH, as probed by surface plasmon resonance, indicated the pH-induced structural rearrangement of HA. Uptake of the particle by A549 mediated by HA-sialylose receptor interaction was visualized by the fluorescent-labeled VLP. The HA-promoted cell-virus fusion activity was illustrated by fluorescence imaging on the Jurkat cells incubated with rhodamine-loaded VLP performed at fusogenic pH. Furthermore, the green fluorescence protein (GFP) was fused to NA to produce VLP with a pH-sensitive probe, expanding the use of VLP as an antigen carrier and a tool for viral tracking. PMID:21197092

  18. Investigation of contribution of incomplete fusion in the total fusion process induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the relative contribution of incomplete fusion (ICF) and complete fusion (CF) in total fusion (TF) induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at energies in the vicinity of Coulomb barrier using classical dynamical model and Wong's formula in conjugation with energy dependent Woods-Saxon formula. It is found that at above barrier energies ICF contributes almost 30% in TF while at energies below the barrier qualitatively its contribution is much more than thirty percent.

  19. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M. . E-mail: lhuttf@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL.

  20. Microtubule-dependent balanced cell contraction and luminal-matrix modification accelerate epithelial tube fusion.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kagayaki; Dong, Bo; Wada, Housei; Tanaka-Matakatsu, Miho; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Connection of tubules into larger networks is the key process for the development of circulatory systems. In Drosophila development, tip cells of the tracheal system lead the migration of each branch and connect tubules by adhering to each other and simultaneously changing into a torus-shape. We show that as adhesion sites form between fusion cells, myosin and microtubules form polarized bundles that connect the new adhesion site to the cells' microtubule-organizing centres, and that E-cadherin and retrograde recycling endosomes are preferentially deposited at the new adhesion site. We demonstrate that microtubules help balancing tip cell contraction, which is driven by myosin, and is required for adhesion and tube fusion. We also show that retrograde recycling and directed secretion of a specific matrix protein into the fusion-cell interface promote fusion. We propose that microtubule bundles connecting these cell-cell interfaces coordinate cell contractility and apical secretion to facilitate tube fusion. PMID:27067650

  1. Transduction of the TAT-FLIP fusion protein results in transient resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Stefan; Ziegler, Ekkehard; Tiede, Karen; Pust, Rainer; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2004-10-15

    Although tightly regulated programmed cell death (apoptosis) possesses great importance for tissue homeostasis, several pathologic processes are associated with organ failure due to adversely activated cell apoptosis. Transient increase in apoptosis has been shown to cause organ damage during fulminant hepatitis B, autoimmune diseases, ischemia-reperfusion injury, sepsis, or allograft rejection. A defined and temporary inhibition of cell apoptosis may therefore be of high clinical relevance. Activation of death receptors results in caspase-8 recruitment to the death-inducing signaling complex, which initiates the apoptotic process through cleavage of caspase-8 and downstream substrates. This initial step may be inhibited by the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP (FLICE inhibitory protein). To specifically inhibit the initiation of death receptor-mediated apoptosis we constructed a fusion protein containing FLIP fused N-terminally to the human immunodeficiency virus TAT domain. This TAT domain allows the fusion protein to cross the cell membrane and thus makes the FLIP domain able to interfere with the death-inducing signaling complex inside of the cell. We observed that incubation of lymphocytic Jurkat or BJAB cells with TAT-FLIPS proteins significantly inhibits Fas-induced activation of procaspase-8 and downstream caspases, preventing cells from undergoing apoptosis. Systemic application of TAT-FLIPS prolongs survival and reduces multi-organ failure due to Fas-receptor-mediated lethal apoptosis in mice. Therefore, application of cellular FLIPS in the form of a TAT fusion protein may open a promising, easily applicable new tool for providing protection against transient, pathologically increased apoptosis in various diseases. PMID:15304499

  2. HaloPROTACS: Use of Small Molecule PROTACs to Induce Degradation of HaloTag Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Dennis L; Raina, Kanak; Darricarrere, Nicole; Hines, John; Gustafson, Jeffrey L; Smith, Ian E.; Miah, Afjal H; Harling, John D; Crews, Craig M

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule-induced protein degradation is an attractive strategy for the development of chemical probes. One method for inducing targeted protein degradation involves the use of PROTACs, heterobifunctional molecules that can recruit specific E3 ligases to a desired protein of interest. PROTACs have been successfully used to degrade numerous proteins in cells, but the peptidic E3 ligase ligands used in previous PROTACs have hindered their development into more mature chemical probes or therapeutics. We report the design of a novel class of PROTACs that incorporate small molecule VHL ligands to successfully degrade HaloTag7 fusion proteins. These HaloPROTACs will inspire the development of future PROTACs with more drug-like properties. Additionally, these HaloPROTACs are useful chemical genetic tools, due to their ability to chemically knockdown widely used HaloTag7 fusion proteins in a general fashion. PMID:26070106

  3. Characterization of the plasma membrane localization and orientation of HPV16 E5 for cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus with an approx 8000 base pair genome. Infection with certain types of HPV is associated with cervical cancer, although the molecular mechanism by which HPV induces carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Three genes encoded by HPV16 are regarded as oncogenic - E5, E6, and E7. The role of E5 has been controversial. Expression of HPV16 E5 causes cell-cell fusion, an event that can lead to increased chromosomal instability, particularly in the presence of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors like HPV16 E6 and E7. Using biochemical and cell biological assays to better understand HPV16 E5, we find that HPV16 E5 localizes to the plasma membrane with an intracellular amino terminus and an extracellular carboxyl-terminus. Further, HPV16 E5 must be expressed on both cells for cell fusion to occur. When the extracellular epitope of HPV16 E5 is targeted with an antibody, the number of bi-nucleated cells decreases.

  4. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin enhances myoblast fusion and induces the formation of myotubes with disorganized nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Cláudia S; Portilho, Débora M; Medeiros, Rommel B; Matos, Aline R; Einicker-Lamas, Marcelo; Tortelote, Giovane G; Vieyra, Adalberto; Costa, Manoel L

    2005-02-01

    The formation of a skeletal muscle fiber begins with the withdrawal of committed mononucleated precursors from the cell cycle. These myoblasts elongate while aligning with each other, guided by recognition between their membranes. This step is followed by cell fusion and the formation of long striated multinucleated myotubes. We used methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) in primary cultured chick skeletal muscle cells to deplete membrane cholesterol and investigate its role during myogenesis. MCD promoted a significant increase in the expression of troponin T, enhanced myoblast fusion, and induced the formation of large multinucleated myotubes with nuclei being clustered centrally and not aligned at the cell periphery. MCD myotubes were striated, as indicated by sarcomeric alpha-actinin staining, and microtubule and desmin filament distribution was not altered. Pre-fusion MCD-treated myoblasts formed large aggregates, with cadherin and beta-catenin being accumulated in cell adhesion contacts. We also found that the membrane microdomain marker GM1 was not present as clusters in the membrane of MCD-treated myoblasts. Our data demonstrate that cholesterol is involved in the early steps of skeletal muscle differentiation.

  5. Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lei; Fonseca, Martina B.; Arya, Shobhit; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Robert; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced tissue fusion is an important procedure in modern surgery and can greatly reduce trauma, complications, and mortality during minimally invasive surgical blood vessel anastomosis, but it may also have further benefits if applied to other tissue types such as small and large intestine anastomoses. We present a tissue-fusion characterization technology using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which provides further insight into tissue constituent variations at the molecular level. In particular, an increase of fluorescence intensity in 450- to 550-nm range for 375- and 405-nm excitation suggests that the collagen cross-linking in fused tissues increased. Our experimental and statistical analyses showed that, by using fluorescence spectral data, good fusion could be differentiated from other cases with an accuracy of more than 95%. This suggests that the fluorescence spectroscopy could be potentially used as a feedback control method in online tissue-fusion monitoring.

  6. Laser-induced tissue fluorescence in radiofrequency tissue-fusion characterization.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Fonseca, Martina B; Arya, Shobhit; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Robert; Hanna, George B; Elson, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    Heat-induced tissue fusion is an important procedure in modern surgery and can greatly reduce trauma, complications, and mortality during minimally invasive surgical blood vessel anastomosis, but it may also have further benefits if applied to other tissue types such as small and large intestine anastomoses. We present a tissue-fusion characterization technology using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which provides further insight into tissue constituent variations at the molecular level. In particular, an increase of fluorescence intensity in 450- to 550-nm range for 375- and 405-nm excitation suggests that the collagen cross-linking in fused tissues increased. Our experimental and statistical analyses showed that, by using fluorescence spectral data, good fusion could be differentiated from other cases with an accuracy of more than 95%. This suggests that the fluorescence spectroscopy could be potentially used as a feedback control method in online tissue-fusion monitoring.

  7. Microtubule-dependent balanced cell contraction and luminal-matrix modification accelerate epithelial tube fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kagayaki; Dong, Bo; Wada, Housei; Tanaka-Matakatsu, Miho; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Connection of tubules into larger networks is the key process for the development of circulatory systems. In Drosophila development, tip cells of the tracheal system lead the migration of each branch and connect tubules by adhering to each other and simultaneously changing into a torus-shape. We show that as adhesion sites form between fusion cells, myosin and microtubules form polarized bundles that connect the new adhesion site to the cells' microtubule-organizing centres, and that E-cadherin and retrograde recycling endosomes are preferentially deposited at the new adhesion site. We demonstrate that microtubules help balancing tip cell contraction, which is driven by myosin, and is required for adhesion and tube fusion. We also show that retrograde recycling and directed secretion of a specific matrix protein into the fusion-cell interface promote fusion. We propose that microtubule bundles connecting these cell–cell interfaces coordinate cell contractility and apical secretion to facilitate tube fusion. PMID:27067650

  8. Inhibition of mitochondrial fusion is an early and critical event in breast cancer cell apoptosis by dietary chemopreventative benzyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Anuradha; Croix, Claudette St; Baty, Catherine J; Watkins, Simon; Tailor, Dhanir; Singh, Rana P; Singh, Shivendra V

    2016-09-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a highly promising phytochemical abundant in cruciferous vegetables with preclinical evidence of in vivo efficacy against breast cancer in xenograft and transgenic mouse models. Mammary cancer chemoprevention by BITC is associated with apoptotic cell death but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that altered mitochondrial dynamics is an early and critical event in BITC-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Exposure of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells to plasma achievable doses of BITC resulted in rapid collapse of mitochondrial filamentous network. BITC treatment also inhibited polyethyleneglycol-induced mitochondrial fusion. In contrast, a normal human mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) that was derived from fibrocystic breast disease, was resistant to BITC-mediated alterations in mitochondrial dynamics as well as apoptosis. Transient or sustained decrease in levels of proteins engaged in regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion was clearly evident after BITC treatment in both cancer cell lines. A trend for a decrease in the levels of mitochondrial fission- and fusion-related proteins was also observed in vivo in tumors of BITC-treated mice compared with control. Immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Drp1 knockout mice were resistant to BITC-induced apoptosis when compared with those from wild-type mice. Upon treatment with BITC, Bak dissociated from mitofusin 2 in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells suggesting a crucial role for interaction of Bak and mitofusins in BITC-mediated inhibition of fusion and morphological dynamics. In conclusion, the present study provides novel insights into the molecular complexity of BITC-induced cell death. PMID:27374852

  9. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Kurisaki, Tomohiro; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kondoh, Gen; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2009-10-15

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, {beta}-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  10. Fusion materials irradiation test facility test-cell instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, J. L.; Burke, R. J.

    1982-05-01

    Many of the facility instrumentation components and systems currently under development, though specifically designed for FMIT purposes, are similar to those useful for fusion reactors. Various ceramic-insulated signal-cable components are being evaluated for 14-MeV neutron tolerance. Thermocouples are shown to decalibrate in high energy fields. Nondestructive optical viewing of deuteron-induced residual gas flow is planned for beam profiling in real space and phase space. Various optics were irradiated to 10(18) n/cm(2) at 14 MeV with good results. Feasibility of neutron and gamma field imaging was demonstrated using pinhole collimator and microchannel plate devices. Infrared thermography and optical monitoring of the target surface is being investigated. Considerable experience on the compatibility of optical and insulator materials with (highly reactive) lithium was obtained.

  11. [SapM-induced fusion blocking of autophagosome-lysosome is depended on interaction with Rab7].

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong; Wang, Wan; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Xing, Yingru; Ni, Shengfa; Xu, Congjing; Tie, Baoxian; Zhang, Rongbo; Wu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Objective To study the role of Rab7 in the blockage of autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by secretory acid phosphatase (SapM), a virulence factor of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Methods The Raw264.7 cells were transfected with siRab7, and the P62 was detected using Western blotting. After transfected with mCherry-SapM, the co-localization of SapM and Rab7 in Raw264.7 cells was detected by immunofluorescence cytochemistry and the interaction of SapM with Rab7 was determined by co-immunoprecipitation. SapM mutants including SapM(δ ARCA), SapM(δ FRED) and SapM(δ CT) were used to transfect Raw264.7 cells, and their associations with Rab7 were analyzed. Results The treatment of siRab7 induced a significant increase of P62 in these cells. Immunofluorescence cytochemistry showed the intracellular co-localization of SapM and Rab7. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that SapM and Rab7 were precipitated by each other. Only SapM(δ CT) failed to interact with Rab7 among the three SapM mutants. Conclusion The inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM is dependent on the interaction between SapM and Rab7. PMID:27609571

  12. Somatic Cell Fusions Reveal Extensive Heterogeneity in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Subedee, Ashim; Bloushtain-Qimron, Noga; Savova, Virginia; Krzystanek, Marcin; Li, Lewyn; Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Zak, Alexander; Flacker, Mary Jo; Li, Mei; Lin, Jessica J; Sukumar, Saraswati; Suzuki, Hiromu; Long, Henry; Szallasi, Zoltan; Gimelbrant, Alexander; Maruyama, Reo; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-06-16

    Basal-like and luminal breast tumors have distinct clinical behavior and molecular profiles, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. To interrogate processes that determine these distinct phenotypes and their inheritance pattern, we generated somatic cell fusions and performed integrated genetic and epigenetic (DNA methylation and chromatin) profiling. We found that the basal-like trait is generally dominant and is largely defined by epigenetic repression of luminal transcription factors. Definition of super-enhancers highlighted a core program common in luminal cells but a high degree of heterogeneity in basal-like breast cancers that correlates with clinical outcome. We also found that protein extracts of basal-like cells are sufficient to induce a luminal-to-basal phenotypic switch, implying a trigger of basal-like autoregulatory circuits. We determined that KDM6A might be required for luminal-basal fusions, and we identified EN1, TBX18, and TCF4 as candidate transcriptional regulators of the luminal-to-basal switch. Our findings highlight the remarkable epigenetic plasticity of breast cancer cells. PMID:26051943

  13. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Kim, Hwain; Lee, Daekee

    2009-10-09

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26{sup tm1Sor}, revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 {mu}M of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  14. Recurrent chimeric fusion RNAs in non-cancer tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Babiceanu, Mihaela; Qin, Fujun; Xie, Zhongqiu; Jia, Yuemeng; Lopez, Kevin; Janus, Nick; Facemire, Loryn; Kumar, Shailesh; Pang, Yuwei; Qi, Yanjun; Lazar, Iulia M; Li, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Gene fusions and their products (RNA and protein) were once thought to be unique features to cancer. However, chimeric RNAs can also be found in normal cells. Here, we performed, curated and analyzed nearly 300 RNA-Seq libraries covering 30 different non-neoplastic human tissues and cells as well as 15 mouse tissues. A large number of fusion transcripts were found. Most fusions were detected only once, while 291 were seen in more than one sample. We focused on the recurrent fusions and performed RNA and protein level validations on a subset. We characterized these fusions based on various features of the fusions, and their parental genes. They tend to be expressed at higher levels relative to their parental genes than the non-recurrent ones. Over half of the recurrent fusions involve neighboring genes transcribing in the same direction. A few sequence motifs were found enriched close to the fusion junction sites. We performed functional analyses on a few widely expressed fusions, and found that silencing them resulted in dramatic reduction in normal cell growth and/or motility. Most chimeras use canonical splicing sites, thus are likely products of 'intergenic splicing'. We also explored the implications of these non-pathological fusions in cancer and in evolution. PMID:26837576

  15. Using ApoE Nanolipoprotein Particles To Analyze SNARE-Induced Fusion Pores.

    PubMed

    Bello, Oscar D; Auclair, Sarah M; Rothman, James E; Krishnakumar, Shyam S

    2016-03-29

    Here we introduce ApoE-based nanolipoprotein particle (NLP)-a soluble, discoidal bilayer mimetic of ∼23 nm in diameter, as fusion partners to study the dynamics of fusion pores induced by SNARE proteins. Using in vitro lipid mixing and content release assays, we report that NLPs reconstituted with synaptic v-SNARE VAMP2 (vNLP) fuse with liposomes containing the cognate t-SNARE (Syntaxin1/SNAP25) partner, with the resulting fusion pore opening directly to the external buffer. Efflux of encapsulated fluorescent dextrans of different sizes show that unlike the smaller nanodiscs, these larger NLPs accommodate the expansion of the fusion pore to at least ∼9 nm, and dithionite quenching of fluorescent lipid introduced in vNLP confirms that the NLP fusion pores are short-lived and eventually reseal. The NLPs also have capacity to accommodate larger number of proteins and using vNLPs with defined number of VAMP2 protein, including physiologically relevant copy numbers, we find that 3-4 copies of VAMP2 (minimum 2 per face) are required to keep a nascent fusion pore open, and the SNARE proteins act cooperatively to dilate the nascent fusion pore. PMID:26972604

  16. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea . E-mail: aciarlet@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by {beta}-galactosidase {alpha}-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  17. Development of a Lentivirus Vector-Based Assay for Non-Destructive Monitoring of Cell Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J.; de Vries, Antoine A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS−) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS− both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS− while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS− was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for

  18. Development of a lentivirus vector-based assay for non-destructive monitoring of cell fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J; de Vries, Antoine A F

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS-) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS- both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS- while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS- was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for quantifying

  19. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  20. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature.

  1. Horizontal gene transfers and cell fusions in microbiology, immunology and oncology (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2009-09-01

    Evolving young genomes of archaea, prokaryota and unicellular eukaryota were wide open for the acceptance of alien genomic sequences, which they often preserved and vertically transferred to their descendants throughout three billion years of evolution. Established complex large genomes, although seeded with ancestral retroelements, have come to regulate strictly their integrity. However, intruding retroelements, especially the descendents of Ty3/Gypsy, the chromoviruses, continue to find their ways into even the most established genomes. The simian and hominoid-Homo genomes preserved and accommodated a large number of endogenous retroviral genomic segments. These retroelements may mature into exogenous retroviruses, or into functional new genes. Phages and viruses have been instrumental in incorporating and transferring host cell genes. These events profoundly influenced and altered the course of evolution. Horizontal (lateral) gene transfers (HGT) overwhelmed the genomes of the ancient protocells and the evolving unicellular microorganisms, actually leading to their Cambrian explosion. While the rigidly organized genomes of multicellular organisms increasingly resist H/LGT, de-differentiated cells assuming the metabolism of their onto- or phylogenetic ancestors, open up widely to the practice of H/LGT by direct transfer, or to transfers mediated by viruses, or by cell fusions. This activity is intensified in malignantly transformed cells, thus rendering these subjects receptive to therapy with oncolytic viruses and with viral vectors of tumor-suppressive or immunogenic genetic materials. Naturally formed hybrids of dendritic and tumor cells are often tolerogenic, whereas laboratory products of these unisons may be immunogenic in the hosts of origin. As human breast cancer stem cells are induced by a treacherous class of CD8+ T cells to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal (ETM) transition and to yield to malignant transformation by the omnipresent proto

  2. Dissociation of mitochondrial from sarcoplasmic reticular stress in Drosophila cardiomyopathy induced by molecularly distinct mitochondrial fusion defects

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Poonam; Song, Moshi; Dorn, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamism (fusion and fission) is responsible for remodeling interconnected mitochondrial networks in some cell types. Adult cardiac myocytes lack mitochondrial networks, and their mitochondria are inherently “fragmented”. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is so infrequent in cardiomyocytes as to not be observable under normal conditions, suggesting that mitochondrial dynamism may be dispensable in this cell type. However, we previously observed that cardiomyocyte-specific genetic suppression of mitochondrial fusion factors optic atrophy 1 (Opa1) and mitofusin/MARF evokes cardiomyopathy in Drosophila hearts. We posited that fusion-mediated remodeling of mitochondria may be critical for cardiac homeostasis, although never directly observed. Alternately, we considered that inner membrane Opa1 and outer membrane mitofusin/MARF might have other as-yet poorly described roles that affect mitochondrial and cardiac function. Here we compared heart tube function in three models of mitochondrial fragmentation in Drosophila cardiomyocytes: Drp1 expression, Opa1 RNAi, and mitofusin MARF RNA1. Mitochondrial fragmentation evoked by enhanced Drp1-mediated fission did not adversely impact heart tube function. In contrast, RNAi-mediated suppression of either Opa1 or mitofusin/MARF induced cardiac dysfunction associated with mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production. Inhibiting ROS by overexpressing superoxide dismutase (SOD) or suppressing ROMO1 prevented mitochondrial and heart tube dysfunction provoked by Opa1 RNAi, but not by mitofusin/MARF RNAi. In contrast, enhancing the ability of endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum to handle stress by expressing Xbp1 rescued the cardiomyopathy of mitofusin/MARF insufficiency without improving that caused by Opa1 deficiency. We conclude that decreased mitochondrial size is not inherently detrimental to cardiomyocytes. Rather, preservation of mitochondrial function by Opa1 located on the inner mitochondrial membrane, and

  3. Laser Fusion of Mouse Embryonic Cells and Intra-Embryonic Fusion of Blastomeres without Affecting the Embryo Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Krivokharchenko, Alexander; Karmenyan, Artashes; Sarkisov, Oleg; Bader, Michael; Chiou, Arthur; Shakhbazyan, Avetik

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation with early mammalian embryos is the one of the most important approach to study preimplantation development. Artificial cell fusion is a research tool for various biotechnological experiments. However, the existing methods have various disadvantages, first of them impossibility to fuse selected cells within multicellular structures like mammalian preimplantation embryos. In our experiments we have successfully used high repetition rate picosecond near infrared laser beam for fusion of pairs of oocytes and oocytes with blastomeres. Fused cells looked morphologically normal and keep their ability for further divisions in vitro. We also fused two or three blastomeres inside four-cell mouse embryos. The presence of one, two or three nuclei in different blastomeres of the same early preimplantation mouse embryo was confirmed under UV-light after staining of DNA with the vital dye Hoechst-33342. The most of established embryos demonstrated high viability and developed in vitro to the blastocyst stage. We demonstrated for the first time the use of laser beam for the fusion of various embryonic cells of different size and of two or three blastomeres inside of four-cell mouse embryos without affecting the embryo’s integrity and viability. These embryos with blastomeres of various ploidy maybe unique model for numerous purposes. Thus, we propose laser optical manipulation as a new tool for investigation of fundamental mechanisms of mammalian development. PMID:23227157

  4. Laser fusion of mouse embryonic cells and intra-embryonic fusion of blastomeres without affecting the embryo integrity.

    PubMed

    Krivokharchenko, Alexander; Karmenyan, Artashes; Sarkisov, Oleg; Bader, Michael; Chiou, Arthur; Shakhbazyan, Avetik

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation with early mammalian embryos is the one of the most important approach to study preimplantation development. Artificial cell fusion is a research tool for various biotechnological experiments. However, the existing methods have various disadvantages, first of them impossibility to fuse selected cells within multicellular structures like mammalian preimplantation embryos. In our experiments we have successfully used high repetition rate picosecond near infrared laser beam for fusion of pairs of oocytes and oocytes with blastomeres. Fused cells looked morphologically normal and keep their ability for further divisions in vitro. We also fused two or three blastomeres inside four-cell mouse embryos. The presence of one, two or three nuclei in different blastomeres of the same early preimplantation mouse embryo was confirmed under UV-light after staining of DNA with the vital dye Hoechst-33342. The most of established embryos demonstrated high viability and developed in vitro to the blastocyst stage. We demonstrated for the first time the use of laser beam for the fusion of various embryonic cells of different size and of two or three blastomeres inside of four-cell mouse embryos without affecting the embryo's integrity and viability. These embryos with blastomeres of various ploidy maybe unique model for numerous purposes. Thus, we propose laser optical manipulation as a new tool for investigation of fundamental mechanisms of mammalian development.

  5. Frequent CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion in diverse types of T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Pora; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sangok; Kang, So Young; Jang, Hye Yoon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jaesang; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2016-06-01

    CTLA4 and CD28 are co-regulatory receptors with opposite roles in T-cell signaling. By RNA sequencing, we identified a fusion between the two genes from partial gene duplication in a case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The fusion gene, which codes for the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and the cytoplasmic region of CD28, is likely capable of transforming inhibitory signals into stimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Ectopic expression of the fusion transcript in Jurkat and H9 cells resulted in enhanced proliferation and AKT and ERK phosphorylation, indicating activation of downstream oncogenic pathways. To estimate the frequency of this gene fusion in mature T-cell lymphomas, we examined 115 T-cell lymphoma samples of diverse subtypes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and Sanger sequencing. We identified the fusion in 26 of 45 cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (58%), nine of 39 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified (23%), and nine of 31 extranodal NK/T cell lymphomas (29%). We further investigated the mutation status of 70 lymphoma-associated genes using ultra-deep targeted resequencing for 74 mature T-cell lymphoma samples. The mutational landscape we obtained suggests that T-cell lymphoma results from diverse combinations of multiple gene mutations. The CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion is likely a major contributor to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas and represents a potential target for anti-CTLA4 cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26819049

  6. Frequent CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion in diverse types of T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Pora; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sangok; Kang, So Young; Jang, Hye Yoon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jaesang; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2016-01-01

    CTLA4 and CD28 are co-regulatory receptors with opposite roles in T-cell signaling. By RNA sequencing, we identified a fusion between the two genes from partial gene duplication in a case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The fusion gene, which codes for the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and the cytoplasmic region of CD28, is likely capable of transforming inhibitory signals into stimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Ectopic expression of the fusion transcript in Jurkat and H9 cells resulted in enhanced proliferation and AKT and ERK phosphorylation, indicating activation of downstream oncogenic pathways. To estimate the frequency of this gene fusion in mature T-cell lymphomas, we examined 115 T-cell lymphoma samples of diverse subtypes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and Sanger sequencing. We identified the fusion in 26 of 45 cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (58%), nine of 39 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified (23%), and nine of 31 extranodal NK/T cell lymphomas (29%). We further investigated the mutation status of 70 lymphoma-associated genes using ultra-deep targeted resequencing for 74 mature T-cell lymphoma samples. The mutational landscape we obtained suggests that T-cell lymphoma results from diverse combinations of multiple gene mutations. The CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion is likely a major contributor to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas and represents a potential target for anti-CTLA4 cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26819049

  7. Fusion of phospholipid vesicles induced by muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the absence of calcium.

    PubMed

    Morero, R D; Viñals, A L; Bloj, B; Farías, R N

    1985-04-01

    Ca2+-induced fusion of phospholipid vesicles (phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidic acid, 9:1 mol/mol) prepared by ethanolic injection was followed by five different procedures: resonance energy transfer, light scattering, electron microscopy, intermixing of aqueous content, and gel filtration through Sepharose 4-B. The five methods gave concordant results, showing that vesicles containing only 10% phosphatidic acid can be induced to fuse by millimolar concentrations of Ca2+. When the fusing capability of several soluble proteins was assayed, it was found that concanavalin A, bovine serum albumin, ribonuclease, and protease were inactive. On the other hand, lysozyme, L-lactic dehydrogenase, and muscle and yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were capable of inducing vesicle fusion. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle, the most extensively studied protein, proved to be very effective: 0.1 microM was enough to induce complete intermixing of bilayer phospholipid vesicles. Under conditions used in this work, fusion was accompanied by leakage of internal contents. The fusing capability of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was not affected by 5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The Ca2+ concentration in the medium, as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was 5 ppm. Heat-denatured enzyme was incapable of inducing fusion. We conclude that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a soluble protein inherently endowed with the capability of fusing phospholipid vesicles.

  8. Tracking Fusion of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation to the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brian T.; Kouris, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Significance Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells participate in prostate carcinogenesis and promote growth of prostate cancer by cell fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianan; Li, Jian; Ma, Pengde; Ding, Hao; Feng, Guowei; Lin, Dong; Xu, Yong; Yang, Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is comprised of diverse stromal cells that contribute towards tumor progression. As a result, there has been a growing interest in the role of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) in cancer progression. However, the role of BMDCs in prostate cancer (PCa) progression still remains unclear. In this study, we established GFP bone marrow transplanted TRAMP and MUN-induced prostate cancer models, in order to investigate the role of BMDCs in prostate cancer progression. By tracing GFP positive cells, we observed that BMDCS were recruited into mouse prostate tissues during tumorigenesis. GFP+/Sca-1+/CD45− BMDCs were significantly increased in the MNU-induced PCa group, as compared to the citrated-treated control group (2.67 ± 0.25% vs 0.67 ± 0.31%, p = 0.006). However, there were no significant differences found in GFP+/Sca-1+/CD45+ cell populations between the two groups (0.27 ± 0.15% vs 0.10 ± 0.10%, p = 0.334). Moreover, co-grafting of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and RM1 cells were found to promote RM1 tumor growth in vivo, and cell fusion was observed in RM-1+BMMSCs xenografts. Therefore, the data suggests that BMDCs can be recruited to the prostate during carcinogenesis, and that BMMSCs may promote the growth of PCa. PMID:27129157

  10. Human Metapneumovirus Is Capable of Entering Cells by Fusion with Endosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Reagan G.; Mainou, Bernardo A.; Johnson, Monika; Hastings, Andrew K.; Schuster, Jennifer E.; Dermody, Terence S.; Williams, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a leading cause of lower respiratory illness. Although receptor binding is thought to initiate fusion at the plasma membrane for paramyxoviruses, the entry mechanism for HMPV is largely uncharacterized. Here we sought to determine whether HMPV initiates fusion at the plasma membrane or following internalization. To study the HMPV entry process in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells, we used fluorescence microscopy, an R18-dequenching fusion assay, and developed a quantitative, fluorescence microscopy assay to follow virus binding, internalization, membrane fusion, and visualize the cellular site of HMPV fusion. We found that HMPV particles are internalized into human bronchial epithelial cells before fusing with endosomes. Using chemical inhibitors and RNA interference, we determined that HMPV particles are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a dynamin-dependent manner. HMPV fusion and productive infection are promoted by RGD-binding integrin engagement, internalization, actin polymerization, and dynamin. Further, HMPV fusion is pH-independent, although infection with rare strains is modestly inhibited by RNA interference or chemical inhibition of endosomal acidification. Thus, HMPV can enter via endocytosis, but the viral fusion machinery is not triggered by low pH. Together, our results indicate that HMPV is capable of entering host cells by multiple pathways, including membrane fusion from endosomal compartments. PMID:26629703

  11. Assessing cell fusion and cytokinesis failure as mechanisms of clone 9 hepatocyte multinucleation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simic, Damir; Euler, Catherine; Thurby, Christina; Peden, Mike; Tannehill-Gregg, Sarah; Bunch, Todd; Sanderson, Thomas; Van Vleet, Terry

    2012-08-01

    In this in vitro model of hepatocyte multinucleation, separate cultures of rat Clone 9 cells are labeled with either red or green cell tracker dyes (Red Cell Tracker CMPTX or Vybrant CFDA SE Cell Tracer), plated together in mixed-color colonies, and treated with positive or negative control agents for 4 days. The fluorescent dyes become cell-impermeant after entering cells and are not transferred to adjacent cells in a population, but are inherited by daughter cells after fusion. The mixed-color cultures are then evaluated microscopically for multinucleation and analysis of the underlying mechanism (cell fusion/cytokinesis). Multinucleated cells containing only one dye have undergone cytokinesis failure, whereas dual-labeled multinucleated cells have resulted from fusion.

  12. A soluble form of Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL inhibits EBV-induced membrane fusion and does not function in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Connolly, Sarah A.; Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-02-05

    We investigated whether soluble EBV gH/gL (sgH/gL) functions in fusion and made a series of truncations of gH/gL domains based on the gH/gL crystal structure. We found sgH/gL failed to mediate cell-cell fusion both when co-expressed with the other entry glycoproteins and when added exogenously to fusion assays. Interestingly, sgH/gL inhibited cell-cell fusion in a dose dependent manner when co-expressed. sgH/gL from HSV was unable to inhibit EBV fusion, suggesting the inhibition was specific to EBV gH/gL. sgH/gL stably binds gp42, but not gB nor gH/gL. The domain mutants, DI/gL, DI-II/gL and DI-II-III/gL were unable to bind gp42. Instead, DI-II/gL, DI-II-III/gL and sgH/gL but not DI/gL decreased the expression of gp42, resulting in decreased overall fusion. Overall, our results suggest that domain IV may be required for proper folding and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of EBV gH/gL are required for the most efficient fusion.

  13. Immunogenicity of genetically engineered glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing a T-cell epitope from diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, S; Dermody, K; Metcalf, B

    1995-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) has been shown to induce a marginal antibody response in experimental animals as well as partial protection against a number of parasitic worms, including Schistosoma and Fasciola species. The objective of our study was to increase the immunogenicity of GST by adding heterologous T-cell epitopes at the carboxy terminus of the protein. We generated recombinant GST proteins by attaching one or three tandem repeats of a T-cell epitope of CRM197, a nontoxic variant of diphtheria toxin. This T-cell epitope encoding the region of amino acids 366 to 383 of CRM197, when contained in a GST fusion protein and/or after purification as a recombinant peptide, retained the ability to induce a CRM197-specific T-cell response. The fusion protein containing a single T-cell epitope induced a strong T-cell proliferative response to GST and also enhanced anti-GST antibody production in mice. The addition of three repeats of the epitope did not augment the responses when compared with the responses of GST itself. The results suggest that the addition of a single T-cell epitope to a larger protein like GST increases the immunogenicity of the protein. PMID:7534277

  14. Identification of canine helper T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Souravi; Walker, John; Jackson, David C

    2001-01-01

    The fusion protein of canine distemper virus (CDV-F), a 662 amino-acid envelope protein, was used as the target molecule for identification of canine T helper (Th) epitopes. A library of 94 peptides, each 17 residues in length overlapping by 10 residues and covering the entire sequence of CDV-F, was screened using a lymphocyte proliferation assay with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from dogs inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine. Initially we observed low and inconsistent proliferation of PBMC in response to these peptides, even when using cells obtained from dogs that had received multiple doses of CDV. Subsequently, the use of expanded cell populations derived by in vitro stimulation of canine PBMC with pools of peptides allowed the identification of a number of putative canine Th-epitopes within the protein sequence of CDV-F. There were two major clusters of Th-epitopes identified close to the cleavage site of the F0 fusion protein, while some others were scattered in both the F1 and F2 fragments of the protein. Some of these peptides, in particular peptide 35 (p35), were stimulatory in dogs of different breeds and ages. The identification of such promiscuous canine Th-epitopes encouraged us to assemble p35 in tandem with luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) a 10 amino-acid residue synthetic peptide representing a B-cell epitope which alone induces no antibody in dogs. The totally synthetic immunogen was able to induce the production of very high titres of antibodies against LHRH in all dogs tested. These results indicate that p35 could be an ideal candidate for use as a Th-epitope for use in outbred dogs. PMID:11576221

  15. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  16. Identification of kinase fusion oncogenes in post-Chernobyl radiation-induced thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ricarte-Filho, Julio C.; Li, Sheng; Garcia-Rendueles, Maria E.R.; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Voza, Francesca; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; Bogdanova, Tetyana; Thomas, Geraldine A.; Mason, Christopher E.; Fagin, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood markedly increases the risk of developing papillary thyroid cancer. We examined tissues from 26 Ukrainian patients with thyroid cancer who were younger than 10 years of age and living in contaminated areas during the time of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. We identified nonoverlapping somatic driver mutations in all 26 cases through candidate gene assays and next-generation RNA sequencing. We found that 22 tumors harbored fusion oncogenes that arose primarily through intrachromosomal rearrangements. Altogether, 23 of the oncogenic drivers identified in this cohort aberrantly activate MAPK signaling, including the 2 somatic rearrangements resulting in fusion of transcription factor ETS variant 6 (ETV6) with neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3 (NTRK3) and fusion of acylglycerol kinase (AGK) with BRAF. Two other tumors harbored distinct fusions leading to overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPARγ. Fusion oncogenes were less prevalent in tumors from a cohort of children with pediatric thyroid cancers that had not been exposed to radiation but were from the same geographical regions. Radiation-induced thyroid cancers provide a paradigm of tumorigenesis driven by fusion oncogenes that activate MAPK signaling or, less frequently, a PPARγ-driven transcriptional program. PMID:24135138

  17. Role of Surface Energy Coefficients and Temperature in the Fusion Reactions Induced by Weakly Bound Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; O. N., Ghodsi

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study is provided to analyze the behaviors of the interaction potential and complete fusion cross section which are influenced by the effects of the surface energy coefficients γ and temperature T. Our framework is restricted to the proximity formalism for fusion reactions induced by weakly bound projectiles 6Li, 7Li and 9Be. The different surface energy coefficients (γ-MN76, γ-MN95, γ-MS00 and γ-PD03) are used to study the role of the parameter γ in the proximity potentials AW 95 and BW 91. Comparison of the theoretical and the experimental values of the barrier characteristics (barrier heights and its positions) indicates that the modified versions AW 95 (γ-MS00) and BW 91 (γ-MS00) give the least deviations for fusion barrier heights. Moreover, it is shown that the temperature-dependence improves the calculated barrier heights based on the potentials AW 95 and BW 91. In the present study, the analysis of the mentioned effects on the complete fusion cross sections has been also discussed for the systems of interest. The obtained results reveal that the above-modified versions provide a more accurate description for behavior of the complete fusion cross sections than the original potentials at above-barrier energies. It is demonstrated that the increase of the temperature T enhances the complete fusion suppression at this energy range.

  18. Viral fusion protein transmembrane domain adopts β-strand structure to facilitate membrane topological changes for virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Michelle W; Waring, Alan J; Wong, Gerard C L; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-01

    The C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins such as HIV gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is traditionally viewed as a passive α-helical anchor of the protein to the virus envelope during its merger with the cell membrane. The conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of these fusion protein TMDs have so far eluded high-resolution structure characterization because of their highly hydrophobic nature. Using magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we show that the TMD of the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein adopts lipid-dependent conformations and interactions with the membrane and water. In phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes, the TMD is predominantly α-helical, but in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) membranes, the TMD changes significantly to the β-strand conformation. Measured order parameters indicate that the strand segments are immobilized and thus oligomerized. (31)P NMR spectra and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data show that this β-strand-rich conformation converts the PE membrane to a bicontinuous cubic phase, which is rich in negative Gaussian curvature that is characteristic of hemifusion intermediates and fusion pores. (1)H-(31)P 2D correlation spectra and (2)H spectra show that the PE membrane with or without the TMD is much less hydrated than PC and PG membranes, suggesting that the TMD works with the natural dehydration tendency of PE to facilitate membrane merger. These results suggest a new viral-fusion model in which the TMD actively promotes membrane topological changes during fusion using the β-strand as the fusogenic conformation.

  19. La3+-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine liposomes. Close approach, intermembrane intermediates, and the electrostatic surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J; Alford, D; Cohen, J; Düzgüneş, N

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylserine liposomes (PS LUV) induced by La3+ has been monitored using the 1-aminoapthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid/p-xylenebis(pyridinium bromide) (ANTS/DPX) fluorescence assay for the mixing of aqueous contents. The fusion event is extensive and nonleaky, with up to 95% mixing of contents in the fused liposomes. However, addition of excess EDTA leads to disruption of the fusion products in a way that implies the existence of metastable intermembrane contact sites. The maximal fusion activity occurs between 10 and 100 microM La3+ and fusion can be terminated rapidly, without loss of contents, by the addition of excess La3+, e.g., 1 mM La3+ at pH 7.4. This observation is explained by the very large intrinsic binding constant (approximately 10(5) M-1) of La3+ to the PS headgroup, as measured by microelectrophoresis. Addition of 1 mM La3+ causes charge reversal of the membrane and a large positive surface potential. La3+ binding to PS causes the release of a proton. These data can be explained if La3+ can chelate to PS at two sites, with one of the sites being the primary amino group. This binding model successfully predicts that at pH 4.5 fusion occurs up to 2 mM La3+, due to reduced La3+ binding at low pH. We conclude that the general mechanism of membrane fusion includes three kinetic steps. In addition to (a) aggregation, there is (b) the close approach of the surfaces, or thinning of the hydration layer, and (c) the formation of intermembrane intermediates which determine the extent to which membrane destabilization leads to fusion (mixing of aqueous contents), as opposed to lysis. The lifetime of these intermembrane intermediates appears to depend upon La3+ binding to both PS sites. PMID:3382713

  20. Characterization of electric field-induced fusion in erythrocyte ghost membranes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Fusion has been reported to occur in a variety of membrane systems in response to the application of certain electric currents to the medium (Zimmermann, U., 1982, Biochim. Biophys. Acta., 694:227-277). The application of a weak but continuous alternating current causes the membranes in suspension to become rearranged into the "pearl-chain" formation. Fusion can then be induced by one or more strong direct current pulses that cause pore formation. This results in the conversion of individual membranes in the "pearl-chain" formation to a single membrane with one or more hourglass constrictions that form lumens which connect the cytoplasmic compartments. As the diameter of the lumens increases, the overall membrane shape grows to one large sphere. To further characterize electric field-induced fusion, experiments were conducted using the erythrocyte ghost as a model membrane, and a new combination of electrical circuit and fusion chamber that is simpler and improved over previous systems. All odd- shaped ghosts (collapsed or partly collapsed spherical shapes, echinocytes, discocytes, and stomatocytes) in 30 mM phosphate buffer was first converted to spherocytes and then fused with increasing yields by increasing the number of pulses. After fusion, the lateral diffusion of a fluorescent lipid soluble label (Dil) from labeled to unlabeled membranes was observed to occur both with and without the appearance in phase-contrast optics of distinct communication (lumens) between cytoplasmic compartments of the fused membranes. Connections between cytoplasmic compartments, however, were unmistakable with the instant transfer of a fluorescent water-soluble label (fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran) from labeled to unlabeled cytoplasmic compartments upon fusion. Although pulses still resulted in the lateral diffusion of Dil to unlabeled membranes, the presence of glycerol in the medium strongly reduced the yield of lumens observable by phase- contrast optics in fusion events

  1. The Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Domain Is an Amphipathic Helical Hairpin That Functions by Inducing Membrane Curvature*

    PubMed Central

    Smrt, Sean T.; Draney, Adrian W.; Lorieau, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. PMID:25398882

  2. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain is an amphipathic helical hairpin that functions by inducing membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Smrt, Sean T; Draney, Adrian W; Lorieau, Justin L

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk.

  3. Topical and Targeted Delivery of siRNAs to Melanoma Cells Using a Fusion Peptide Carrier.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Renquan; Chen, Ming; Sun, Sijie; Wei, Pengfei; Zou, Lili; Liu, Jing; Gao, Dayong; Wen, Longping; Ding, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Topical application of siRNAs through the skin is a potentially effective strategy for the treatment of melanoma tumors. In this study, we designed a new and safe fusion peptide carrier SPACE-EGF to improve the skin and cell penetration function of the siRNAs and their targeting ability to B16 cells, such that the apoptosis of B16 cells can be induced. The results show that the carrier is stable and less toxic. The EGF motif does not affect the skin and cell penetration function of the SPACE. Because EGF can strongly bind EGFR, which is overexpressed in cancer cells, the targeting ability of the SPACE-EGF-siRNA complex is increased. In vitro experiments indicate that GAPDH siRNAs conjugated with SPACE-EGF can significantly reduce the GAPDH concentration in B16 cells, and c-Myc siRNAs can cause the gene silencing of c-Myc and thus the apoptosis of cells. In vivo experiments show that the topical application of c-Myc siRNAs delivered by SPACE-EGF through the skin can significantly inhibit the growth of melanoma tumors. This work may provide insight into the development of new transdermal drug carriers to treat a variety of skin disorders. PMID:27374619

  4. Topical and Targeted Delivery of siRNAs to Melanoma Cells Using a Fusion Peptide Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Renquan; Chen, Ming; Sun, Sijie; Wei, Pengfei; Zou, Lili; Liu, Jing; Gao, Dayong; Wen, Longping; Ding, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Topical application of siRNAs through the skin is a potentially effective strategy for the treatment of melanoma tumors. In this study, we designed a new and safe fusion peptide carrier SPACE-EGF to improve the skin and cell penetration function of the siRNAs and their targeting ability to B16 cells, such that the apoptosis of B16 cells can be induced. The results show that the carrier is stable and less toxic. The EGF motif does not affect the skin and cell penetration function of the SPACE. Because EGF can strongly bind EGFR, which is overexpressed in cancer cells, the targeting ability of the SPACE-EGF-siRNA complex is increased. In vitro experiments indicate that GAPDH siRNAs conjugated with SPACE-EGF can significantly reduce the GAPDH concentration in B16 cells, and c-Myc siRNAs can cause the gene silencing of c-Myc and thus the apoptosis of cells. In vivo experiments show that the topical application of c-Myc siRNAs delivered by SPACE-EGF through the skin can significantly inhibit the growth of melanoma tumors. This work may provide insight into the development of new transdermal drug carriers to treat a variety of skin disorders. PMID:27374619

  5. Photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-based visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Karbowski, Mariusz; Cleland, Megan M; Roelofs, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Technological improvements in microscopy and the development of mitochondria-specific imaging molecular tools have illuminated the dynamic rearrangements of these essential organelles. These rearrangements are mainly the result of two opposing processes: mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial fission. Consistent with this, in addition to mitochondrial motility, these two processes are major factors determining the overall degree of continuity of the mitochondrial network, as well as the average size of mitochondria within the cell. In this chapter, we detail the use of advanced confocal microscopy and mitochondrial matrix-targeted photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (mito-PAGFP) for the investigation of mitochondrial dynamics. We focus on direct visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living mammalian cells. These assays were instrumental in important recent discoveries within the field of mitochondrial biology, including the role of mitochondrial fusion in the activation of mitochondrial steps in apoptosis, participation of Bcl-2 family proteins in mitochondrial morphogenesis, and stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion. We present some basic directions that should be helpful in designing mito-PAGFP-based experiments. Furthermore, since analyses of mitochondrial fusion using mito-PAGFP-based assays rely on time-lapse imaging, critical parameters of time-lapse microscopy and cell preparation are also discussed.

  6. Spine Fusion Using Cell Matrix Composites Enriched in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nitto, Hironori; Matsukura, Yoichi; Boehm, Cynthia; Valdevit, Antonio; Kambic, Helen; Davros, William; Powell, Kimerly; Easley, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells including osteoblastic progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from bone marrow aspirates using the surface of selected implantable matrices for selective cell attachment. Concentration of cells in this way to produce an enriched cellular composite graft improves graft efficacy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the biologic milieu of a bone marrow clot will significantly improve the efficacy of such a graft. An established posterior spinal fusion model and cancellous bone matrix was used to compare an enriched cellular composite bone graft alone, bone matrix plus bone marrow clot, and an enriched bone matrix composite graft plus bone marrow clot. Union score, quantitative computed tomography, and mechanical testing were used to define outcome. The union score for the enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone and the bone matrix plus bone marrow clot. The enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite also was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone in fusion volume and in fusion area. These data confirm that the addition of a bone marrow clot to an enriched cell-matrix composite graft results in significant improvement in graft performance. Enriched composite grafts prepared using this strategy provide a rapid, simple, safe, and inexpensive method for intraoperative concentration and delivery of bone marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting. PMID:12567137

  7. Cell-free fusion of bacteria-containing phagosomes with endocytic compartments

    PubMed Central

    Becken, Ulrike; Jeschke, Andreas; Veltman, Katharina; Haas, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Uptake of microorganisms by professional phagocytic cells leads to formation of a new subcellular compartment, the phagosome, which matures by sequential fusion with early and late endocytic compartments, resulting in oxidative and nonoxidative killing of the enclosed microbe. Few tools are available to study membrane fusion between phagocytic and late endocytic compartments in general and with pathogen-containing phagosomes in particular. We have developed and applied a fluorescence microscopy assay to study fusion of microbe-containing phagosomes with different-aged endocytic compartments in vitro. This revealed that fusion of phagosomes containing nonpathogenic Escherichia coli with lysosomes requires Rab7 and SNARE proteins but not organelle acidification. In vitro fusion experiments with phagosomes containing pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium indicated that reduced fusion of these phagosomes with early and late endocytic compartments was independent of endosome and cytosol sources and, hence, a consequence of altered phagosome quality. PMID:21071675

  8. Fusion between Intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages in a cancer context results in nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Powell, Anne E; Anderson, Eric C; Davies, Paige S; Silk, Alain D; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Wong, Melissa H

    2011-02-15

    The most deadly phase in cancer progression is attributed to the inappropriate acquisition of molecular machinery leading to metastatic transformation and spread of disease to distant organs. Although it is appreciated that metastasis involves epithelial-mesenchymal interplay, the underlying mechanism defining this process is poorly understood. Specifically, how cancer cells evade immune surveillance and gain the ability to navigate the circulatory system remains a focus. One possible mechanism underlying metastatic conversion is fusion between blood-derived immune cells and cancer cells. While this notion is a century old, in vivo evidence that cell fusion occurs within tumors and imparts genetic or physiologic changes remains controversial. We have previously demonstrated in vivo cell fusion between blood cells and intestinal epithelial cells in an injury setting. Here, we hypothesize that immune cells, such as macrophages, fuse with tumor cells imparting metastatic capabilities by transferring their cellular identity. We used parabiosis to introduce fluorescent-labeled bone marrow-derived cells to mice with intestinal tumors, finding that fusion between circulating blood-derived cells and tumor epithelium occurs during the natural course of tumorigenesis. Moreover, we identify the macrophage as a key cellular partner for this process. Interestingly, cell fusion hybrids retain a transcriptome identity characteristic of both parental derivatives, while also expressing a unique subset of transcripts. Our data supports the novel possibility that tumorigenic cell fusion may impart physical behavior attributed to migratory macrophages, including navigation of circulation and immune evasion. As such, cell fusion may represent a promising novel mechanism underlying the metastatic conversion of cancer cells.

  9. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G. . E-mail: vtgusk@lsu.edu

    2007-04-10

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion.

  10. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Baculovirus-Engineered Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Enhance Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs) genetically modified with baculoviral bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bac-BMP-2) vectors could achieve successful fusion in a femur defect model or in a spinal fusion model. In this study, BMDMSCs expressing BMP-7 (Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs) were generated. We hypothesized that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs could secrete more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs in vitro and achieve spinal posterolateral fusion in a rabbit model. Eighteen rabbits underwent posterolateral fusion at L4-5. Group I (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-hydroxyapatite (HA), Group II (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus BMDMSCs, and Group III (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs. In vitro production of BMP-7 was quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Spinal fusion was examined using computed tomography (CT), manual palpation, and histological analysis. ELISA demonstrated that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs produced four-fold to five-fold more BMP-7 than did BMDMSCs. In the CT results, 6 fused segments were observed in Group I (50%, 6/12), 8 in Group II (67%, 8/12), and 12 in Group III (100%, 12/12). The fusion rate, determined by manual palpation, was 0% (0/6) in Group I, 0% (0/6) in Group II, and 83% (5/6) in Group III. Histology showed that Group III had more new bone and matured marrow formation. In conclusion, BMDMSCs genetically transduced with the Bac-BMP-7 vector could express more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs. These Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs on collagen-β-TCP-HA scaffolds were able to induce successful spinal fusion in rabbits. PMID:27399674

  11. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Baculovirus-Engineered Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Enhance Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs) genetically modified with baculoviral bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bac-BMP-2) vectors could achieve successful fusion in a femur defect model or in a spinal fusion model. In this study, BMDMSCs expressing BMP-7 (Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs) were generated. We hypothesized that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs could secrete more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs in vitro and achieve spinal posterolateral fusion in a rabbit model. Eighteen rabbits underwent posterolateral fusion at L4-5. Group I (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-hydroxyapatite (HA), Group II (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus BMDMSCs, and Group III (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs. In vitro production of BMP-7 was quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Spinal fusion was examined using computed tomography (CT), manual palpation, and histological analysis. ELISA demonstrated that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs produced four-fold to five-fold more BMP-7 than did BMDMSCs. In the CT results, 6 fused segments were observed in Group I (50%, 6/12), 8 in Group II (67%, 8/12), and 12 in Group III (100%, 12/12). The fusion rate, determined by manual palpation, was 0% (0/6) in Group I, 0% (0/6) in Group II, and 83% (5/6) in Group III. Histology showed that Group III had more new bone and matured marrow formation. In conclusion, BMDMSCs genetically transduced with the Bac-BMP-7 vector could express more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs. These Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs on collagen-β-TCP-HA scaffolds were able to induce successful spinal fusion in rabbits.

  12. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Baculovirus-Engineered Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Enhance Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jen-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMDMSCs) genetically modified with baculoviral bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bac-BMP-2) vectors could achieve successful fusion in a femur defect model or in a spinal fusion model. In this study, BMDMSCs expressing BMP-7 (Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs) were generated. We hypothesized that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs could secrete more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs in vitro and achieve spinal posterolateral fusion in a rabbit model. Eighteen rabbits underwent posterolateral fusion at L4-5. Group I (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-hydroxyapatite (HA), Group II (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus BMDMSCs, and Group III (n = 6) was implanted with collagen-β-TCP-HA plus Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs. In vitro production of BMP-7 was quantified with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Spinal fusion was examined using computed tomography (CT), manual palpation, and histological analysis. ELISA demonstrated that Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs produced four-fold to five-fold more BMP-7 than did BMDMSCs. In the CT results, 6 fused segments were observed in Group I (50%, 6/12), 8 in Group II (67%, 8/12), and 12 in Group III (100%, 12/12). The fusion rate, determined by manual palpation, was 0% (0/6) in Group I, 0% (0/6) in Group II, and 83% (5/6) in Group III. Histology showed that Group III had more new bone and matured marrow formation. In conclusion, BMDMSCs genetically transduced with the Bac-BMP-7 vector could express more BMP-7 than untransduced BMDMSCs. These Bac-BMP-7-BMDMSCs on collagen-β-TCP-HA scaffolds were able to induce successful spinal fusion in rabbits. PMID:27399674

  13. Ordered chromatin changes and human X chromosome reactivation by cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Irene; Bagci, Hakan; Dormann, Dirk; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Nesterova, Tatyana; Brockdorff, Neil; Rougeulle, Claire; Vallot, Celine; Heard, Edith; Chaligne, Ronan; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Erasure of epigenetic memory is required to convert somatic cells towards pluripotency. Reactivation of the inactive X chromosome (Xi) has been used to model epigenetic reprogramming in mouse, but human studies are hampered by Xi epigenetic instability and difficulties in tracking partially reprogrammed iPSCs. Here we use cell fusion to examine the earliest events in the reprogramming-induced Xi reactivation of human female fibroblasts. We show that a rapid and widespread loss of Xi-associated H3K27me3 and XIST occurs in fused cells and precedes the bi-allelic expression of selected Xi-genes by many heterokaryons (30–50%). After cell division, RNA-FISH and RNA-seq analyses confirm that Xi reactivation remains partial and that induction of human pluripotency-specific XACT transcripts is rare (1%). These data effectively separate pre- and post-mitotic events in reprogramming-induced Xi reactivation and reveal a complex hierarchy of epigenetic changes that are required to reactivate the genes on the human Xi chromosome. PMID:27507283

  14. Fusion reactions in collisions induced by Li isotopes on Sn targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fisichella, M.; Shotter, A. C.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Marchetta, C.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Ruiz, C.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Zadro, M.

    2012-10-20

    Fusion cross sections for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 120}Sn and {sup 7}Li+{sup 119}Sn systems have been measured. We aim to search for possible effects due to the different neutron transfer Q-values, by comparing the fusion cross sections for the two systems below the barrier. This experiment is the first step of a wider systematic aiming to study the above problems in collisions induced by stable and unstable Li isotopes on tin all forming the same compound nucleus.

  15. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhanced fusions between oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and endothelial cells via VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kai; Zhu, Fei; Zhang, Han-zhong; Shang, Zheng-jun

    2012-08-15

    Fusion between cancer cells and host cells, including endothelial cells, may strongly modulate the biological behavior of tumors. However, no one is sure about the driving factors and underlying mechanism involved in such fusion. We hypothesized in this study that inflammation, one of the main characteristics in tumor microenvironment, serves as a prominent catalyst for fusion events. Our results showed that oral cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with endothelial cells in co-culture and inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) increased fusion of human umbilical vein endothelium cells and oral cancer cells by up to 3-fold in vitro. Additionally, human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and 35 out of 50 (70%) oral squamous carcinoma specimens express VLA-4, an integrin, previously implicated in fusions between human peripheral blood CD34-positive cells and murine cardiomyocytes. Expression of VCAM-1, a ligand for VLA-4, was evident on vascular endothelium of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis revealed that expression of VCAM-1 increased obviously in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. Anti-VLA-4 or anti-VCAM-1 treatment can decrease significantly cancer-endothelial adhesion and block such fusion. Collectively, our results suggested that TNF-{alpha} could enhance cancer-endothelial cell adhesion and fusion through VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway. This study provides insights into regulatory mechanism of cancer-endothelial cell fusion, and has important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for prevention of metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous oral cancer-endothelial cell fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} enhanced cell fusions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCAM-1/VLA-4 expressed in oral cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} increased expression of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells. Black

  17. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  18. The cowpox virus fusion regulator proteins SPI-3 and hemagglutinin interact in infected and uninfected cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Peter C; Moyer, Richard W

    2006-03-30

    The serpin SPI-3 and the hemagglutinin (HA) encoded by cowpox virus (CPV) block cell-cell fusion, and colocalize at the cell surface. wtCPV does not fuse cells, but inactivation of either gene leads to fusion. SPI-3 mAb added to wtCPV-infected cells caused fusion, confirming that SPI-3 protein at the cell surface prevents fusion. The SPI-3 mAb epitope mapped to an 85-amino acid region at the C-terminus. Removal of either 44 residues from the SPI-3 C-terminus or 48 residues following the N-terminal signal sequence resulted in fusion. Interaction between SPI-3 and HA proteins in infected cells was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. SPI-3/HA was not associated with the A27L "fusion" protein. SPI-3 and HA were able to associate in uninfected cells in the absence of other viral proteins. The HA-binding domain in SPI-3 resided in the C-terminal 229 residues, and did not include helix D, which mediates cofactor interaction in many other serpins.

  19. The temperature arrested intermediate of virus-cell fusion is a functional step in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Hamani I; Hope, Thomas J

    2006-05-25

    HIV entry occurs via membrane-mediated fusion of virus and target cells. Interactions between gp120 and cellular co-receptors lead to both the formation of fusion pores and release of the HIV genome into target cells. Studies using cell-cell fusion assays have demonstrated that a temperature-arrested state (TAS) can generate a stable intermediate in fusion related events. Other studies with MLV pseudotyped with HIV envelope also found that a temperature sensitive intermediate could be generated as revealed by the loss of a fluorescently labeled membrane. However, such an intermediate has never been analyzed in the context of virus infection. Therefore, we used virus-cell infection with replication competent HIV to gain insights into virus-cell fusion. We find that the TAS is an intermediate in the process culminating in the HIV infection of a target cell. In the virion-cell TAS, CD4 has been engaged, the heptad repeats of gp41 are exposed and the complex is kinetically predisposed to interact with coreceptor to complete the fusion event leading to infection.

  20. Studies of OC-STAMP in Osteoclast Fusion: A New Knockout Mouse Model, Rescue of Cell Fusion, and Transmembrane Topology

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gutierrez, Pablo; Jia, Hong; Odgren, Paul E.; Donahue, Leah Rae; Birnbaum, Mark J.; Odgren, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells into fully active, multinucleated, bone resorbing osteoclasts is a complex cell biological phenomenon that utilizes specialized proteins. OC-STAMP, a multi-pass transmembrane protein, has been shown to be required for pre-osteoclast fusion and for optimal bone resorption activity. A previously reported knockout mouse model had only mononuclear osteoclasts with markedly reduced resorption activity in vitro, but with paradoxically normal skeletal micro-CT parameters. To further explore this and related questions, we used mouse ES cells carrying a gene trap allele to generate a second OC-STAMP null mouse strain. Bone histology showed overall normal bone form with large numbers of TRAP-positive, mononuclear osteoclasts. Micro-CT parameters were not significantly different between knockout and wild type mice at 2 or 6 weeks old. At 6 weeks, metaphyseal TRAP-positive areas were lower and mean size of the areas were smaller in knockout femora, but bone turnover markers in serum were normal. Bone marrow mononuclear cells became TRAP-positive when cultured with CSF-1 and RANKL, but they did not fuse. Expression levels of other osteoclast markers, such as cathepsin K, carbonic anhydrase II, and NFATc1, were not significantly different compared to wild type. Actin rings were present, but small, and pit assays showed a 3.5-fold decrease in area resorbed. Restoring OC-STAMP in knockout cells by lentiviral transduction rescued fusion and resorption. N- and C-termini of OC-STAMP were intracellular, and a predicted glycosylation site was shown to be utilized and to lie on an extracellular loop. The site is conserved in all terrestrial vertebrates and appears to be required for protein stability, but not for fusion. Based on this and other results, we present a topological model of OC-STAMP as a 6-transmembrane domain protein. We also contrast the osteoclast-specific roles of OC- and DC-STAMP with more generalized cell fusion

  1. Genetic complementation of human muscle cells via directed stem cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Manuel A F V; Swildens, Jim; Holkers, Maarten; Narain, Anjali; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; van de Watering, Marloes J M; Knaän-Shanzer, Shoshan; de Vries, Antoine A F

    2008-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the X chromosome-linked DMD gene, which encodes the sarcolemma-stabilizing protein-dystrophin. Initial attempts at DMD therapy deployed muscle progenitor cells from healthy donors. The utilization of these cells is, however, hampered by their immunogenicity, while those from DMD patients are scarce and display limited ex vivo replication. Nonmuscle cells with myogenic capacity may offer valuable alternatives especially if, to allow autologous transplantation, they are amenable to genetic intervention. As a paradigm for therapeutic gene transfer by heterotypic cell fusion we are investigating whether human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can serve as donors of recombinant DMD genes for recipient human muscle cells. Here, we show that forced MyoD expression in hMSCs greatly increases their tendency to participate in human myotube formation turning them into improved DNA delivery vehicles. Efficient loading of hMSCs with recombinant DMD was achieved through a new tropism-modified high-capacity adenoviral (hcAd) vector directing striated muscle-specific synthesis of full-length dystrophin. This study introduces the principle of genetic complementation of gene-defective cells via directed cell fusion and provides an initial framework to test whether transient MyoD synthesis in autologous, gene-corrected hMSCs increases their potential for treating DMD and, possibly, other muscular dystrophies.

  2. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase enhances F protein-mediated membrane fusion of reconstituted Sendai virus envelopes with cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bagai, S; Puri, A; Blumenthal, R; Sarkar, D P

    1993-01-01

    Reconstituted Sendai virus envelopes containing both the fusion (F) protein and the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) (F,HN-virosomes) or only the F protein (F-virosomes) were prepared by solubilization of the intact virus with Triton X-100 followed by its removal by using SM2 Bio-Beads. Viral envelopes containing HN whose disulfide bonds were irreversibly reduced (HNred) were also prepared by treating the envelopes with dithiothreitol followed by dialysis (F,HNred-virosomes). Both F-virosomes and F,HNred-virosomes induced hemolysis of erythrocytes in the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, but the rates and extents were markedly lower than those for hemolysis induced by F,HN-virosomes. Using an assay based on the relief of self-quenching of a lipid probe incorporated in the Sendai virus envelopes, we demonstrate the fusion of both F,HN-virosomes and F-virosomes with cultured HepG2 cells containing the asialoglycoprotein receptor, which binds to a terminal galactose moiety of F. By desialylating the HepG2 cells, the entry mediated by HN-terminal sialic acid receptor interactions was bypassed. We show that both F-virosomes and F,HN-virosomes fuse with desialylated HepG2 cells, although the rate was two- to threefold higher if HN was included in the viral envelope. We also observed enhancement of fusion rates when both F and HN envelope proteins were attached to their specific receptors. Images PMID:8388501

  3. Recent progress on MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Budny, R.V.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Herrmann, H.; Mynick, H.E.; Schivell, J.; Chang, Z.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress made toward understanding the MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products which has been seen on TFTR since 1988. These measurements have been made using the ``lost alpha`` diagnostic, which is described briefly. The largest MHD- induced loss occurs with coherent 3/2 or 2/1 MHD activity (kink/tearing modes), which can cause up to {approx}3--5 times the first-orbit loss at I{approx}1.6--1.8 MA, roughly a {approx}20--30% global los of D-D fusion products. Modeling of these MHD-induced losses has progressed to the point where the basic loss mechanism can be accounted for qualitatively, but the experimental results can not yet be understood quantitatively. Several alpha loss codes are being developed to improve the quantitative comparison between experiment and theory.

  4. The EFF-1A Cytoplasmic Domain Influences Hypodermal Cell Fusions in C. elegans But Is Not Dependent on 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shinn-Thomas, Jessica H.; del Campo, Jacob J.; Wang, Jianjun; Mohler, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulatory and biophysical mechanisms of cell-cell fusion are largely unknown despite the fundamental requirement for fused cells in eukaryotic development. Only two cellular fusogens that are not of clear recent viral origin have been identified to date, both in nematodes. One of these, EFF-1, is necessary for most cell fusions in Caenorhabditis elegans. Unregulated EFF-1 expression causes lethality due to ectopic fusion between cells not developmentally programmed to fuse, highlighting the necessity of tight fusogen regulation for proper development. Identifying factors that regulate EFF-1 and its paralog AFF-1 could lead to discovery of molecular mechanisms that control cell fusion upstream of the action of a membrane fusogen. Bioinformatic analysis of the EFF-1A isoform’s predicted cytoplasmic domain (endodomain) previously revealed two motifs that have high probabilities of interacting with 14-3-3 proteins when phosphorylated. Mutation of predicted phosphorylation sites within these motifs caused measurable loss of eff-1 gene function in cell fusion in vivo. Moreover, a human 14-3-3 isoform bound to EFF-1::GFP in vitro. We hypothesized that the two 14-3-3 proteins in C. elegans, PAR-5 and FTT-2, may regulate either localization or fusion-inducing activity of EFF-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Timing of fusion events was slightly but significantly delayed in animals unable to produce full-length EFF-1A. Yet, mutagenesis and live imaging showed that phosphoserines in putative 14-3-3 binding sites are not essential for EFF-1::GFP accumulation at the membrane contact between fusion partner cells. Moreover, although the EFF-1A endodomain was required for normal rates of eff-1-dependent epidermal cell fusions, reduced levels of FTT-2 and PAR-5 did not visibly affect the function of wild-type EFF-1 in the hypodermis. Conclusions/Significance Deletion of the EFF-1A endodomain noticeably affects the timing of hypodermal cell fusions in vivo. However

  5. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liu; Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. {yields} The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. {yields} While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. {yields} This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  6. Downregulation of Pink1 influences mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and sensitizes to neurotoxins in dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Charry, Liliana; Cookson, Mark R; Niño, Andrea; Arboleda, Humberto; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2014-09-01

    It is now well established that mitochondria are organelles that, far from being static, are subject to a constant process of change. This process, which has been called mitochondrial dynamics, includes processes of both fusion and fission. Loss of Pink1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) function is associated with early onset recessive Parkinson's disease and it has been proposed that mitochondrial dynamics might be affected by loss of the mitochondrial kinase. Here, we report the effects of silencing Pink1 on mitochondrial fusion and fission events in dopaminergic neuron cell lines. Cells lacking Pink1 were more sensitive to cell death induced by C2-Ceramide, which inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. In the same cell lines, mitochondrial morphology was fragmented and this was enhanced by application of forskolin, which stimulates the cAMP pathway that phosphorylates Drp1 and thereby inactivates it. Cells lacking Pink1 had lower Drp1 and Mfn2 expression. Based on these data, we propose that Pink1 may exert a neuroprotective role in part by limiting mitochondrial fission.

  7. Downregulation of Pink1 influences mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and sensitizes to neurotoxins in dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Charry, Liliana; Cookson, Mark R; Niño, Andrea; Arboleda, Humberto; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2014-09-01

    It is now well established that mitochondria are organelles that, far from being static, are subject to a constant process of change. This process, which has been called mitochondrial dynamics, includes processes of both fusion and fission. Loss of Pink1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) function is associated with early onset recessive Parkinson's disease and it has been proposed that mitochondrial dynamics might be affected by loss of the mitochondrial kinase. Here, we report the effects of silencing Pink1 on mitochondrial fusion and fission events in dopaminergic neuron cell lines. Cells lacking Pink1 were more sensitive to cell death induced by C2-Ceramide, which inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. In the same cell lines, mitochondrial morphology was fragmented and this was enhanced by application of forskolin, which stimulates the cAMP pathway that phosphorylates Drp1 and thereby inactivates it. Cells lacking Pink1 had lower Drp1 and Mfn2 expression. Based on these data, we propose that Pink1 may exert a neuroprotective role in part by limiting mitochondrial fission. PMID:24792327

  8. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Poehlmann, Stefan

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.

  9. Adenoviral vector which delivers FasL-GFP fusion protein regulated by the tet-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Rubinchik, S; Ding, R; Qiu, A J; Zhang, F; Dong, J

    2000-05-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) is a member of the tumor necrosis family and when bound to its receptor, Fas, induces apoptosis. It plays important roles in immune response, degenerative and lymphoproliferative diseases, development and tumorigenesis. It is also involved in generation of immune privilege sites in the eye and testis. Harnessing the power of this molecule is expected to lead to a powerful chemotherapeutic. We describe the construction and characterization of replication-deficient adenoviral vectors that express a fusion of murine FasL and green fluorescent protein (GFP). FasL-GFP retains full activity of wild-type FasL, at the same time allowing for easy visualization and quantification in both living and fixed cells. The fusion protein is under the control of a tetracycline-regulated gene expression system. Tight control of expression is achieved by creating a novel 'double recombinant' Ad vector, in which the tet-responsive element and the transactivator element are built into the opposite ends of the same vector to avoid enhancer interference. Expression can be conveniently regulated by tetracycline or its derivatives in a dose-dependent manner. The vector was able to deliver FasL-GFP gene to cells in vitro efficiently, and the expression level and function of the fusion protein was modulated by the concentration of doxycycline. This regulation allows us to produce high titers of the vector by inhibiting FasL expression in an apoptosis-resistant cell line. Induction of apoptosis was demonstrated in all cell lines tested. These results indicate that our vector is a potentially valuable tool for FasL-based gene therapy of cancer and for the study of FasL/Fas-mediated apoptosis and immune privilege. PMID:10845726

  10. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  11. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-09-15

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

  12. Roles of the Putative Integrin-Binding Motif of the Human Metapneumovirus Fusion (F) Protein in Cell-Cell Fusion, Viral Infectivity, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Zhang, Yu; Cai, Hui; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Peeples, Mark E.; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a relatively recently identified paramyxovirus that causes acute upper and lower respiratory tract infection. Entry of hMPV is unusual among the paramyxoviruses, in that fusion is accomplished by the fusion (F) protein without the attachment glycoprotein (G protein). It has been suggested that hMPV F protein utilizes integrin αvβ1 as a cellular receptor. Consistent with this, the F proteins of all known hMPV strains possess an integrin-binding motif (329RGD331). The role of this motif in viral entry, infectivity, and pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and hMPV infection. Mutational analysis found that residues R329 and G330 in the 329RGD331 motif are essential for cell-cell fusion, whereas mutations at D331 did not significantly impact fusion activity. Furthermore, fusion-defective RGD mutations were either lethal to the virus or resulted in recombinant hMPVs that had defects in viral replication in cell culture. In cotton rats, recombinant hMPV with the R329K mutation in the F protein (rhMPV-R329K) and rhMPV-D331A exhibited significant defects in viral replication in nasal turbinates and lungs. Importantly, inoculation of cotton rats with these mutants triggered a high level of neutralizing antibodies and protected against hMPV challenge. Taken together, our data indicate that (i) α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and viral replication, (ii) the first two residues in the RGD motif are essential for fusion activity, and (iii) inhibition of the interaction of the integrin-RGD motif may serve as a new target to rationally attenuate hMPV for the development of live attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is one of the major causative agents of acute respiratory disease in humans. Currently, there is no vaccine or antiviral drug for hMPV. hMPV enters host cells via a unique mechanism, in that viral

  13. Compaction, Fusion, and Functional Activation of Three-Dimensional Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ang-Chen; Liu, Yijun; Yuan, Xuegang

    2015-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are primary candidates in cell therapy and tissue engineering and are being tested in clinical trials for a wide range of diseases. Originally isolated and expanded as plastic adherent cells, hMSCs have intriguing properties of in vitro self-assembly into three-dimensional (3D) aggregates that improve a range of biological properties, including multilineage potential, secretion of therapeutic factors, and resistance against ischemic condition. While cell–cell contacts and cell–extracellular matrix interactions mediate 3D cell aggregation, the adaptive changes of hMSC cytoskeleton during self-assembly and associated metabolic reconfiguration may also influence aggregate properties and functional activation. In this study, we investigated the role of actin in regulating 3D hMSC aggregate compaction, fusion, spreading and functional activation. Individual hMSC aggregates with controlled initial cell number were formed by seeding a known number of hMSCs (500, 2000, and 5000 cells/well) in multi-well plates of an ultra-low adherent surface to form multicellular aggregates in individual wells. To assess the influence of actin-mediated contractility on hMSC aggregation and properties, actin modulators, including cytochalasin D (cytoD), nocodazole, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and Y-27632, were added at different stages of aggregation and their impacts on hMSC aggregate compaction and apoptosis were monitored. The results suggest that actin-mediated contractility influences hMSC aggregation, compaction, fusion, and spreading on adherent surface. Formation of multi-cellular aggregates significantly upregulated caspase 3/7 expression, expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4), cell migration, secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), and resistance to in vitro ischemic stress. The functional enhancement, however, is dependent on caspase activation, because treatment with Q-VD-OPh, a pan

  14. Enhancement of plaque formation and cell fusion of an enteropathogenic coronavirus by trypsin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Storz, J; Rott, R; Kaluza, G

    1981-01-01

    Plaque formation, replication, and related cytopathic functions of the enteropathogenic bovine coronavirus strain L9 in bovine fetal thyroid (BFTy) and bovine fetal brain (BFB) cells were investigated in the presence and absence of trypsin. Plaque formation was enhanced in both cell types. Plaques reached a size with an average diameter of 5 mm within 4 days with trypsin in the overlay, whereas their diameter remained less than 1 mm at this time after plating without trypsin in the overlay. Fusion of both cell types was observed 12 to 18 h after infection when trypsin was present in the medium. Fusion was not observed in infected BFB cell cultures and was rarely observed 48 h after infection of BFTy cells maintained with the trypsin-free medium. The largest polycaryons formed had 15 to 22 nuclei. They then lysed and detached. Cell fusion depended on de novo synthesis of hemagglutinin and infectivity. Fusion from without was not observed. Virus produced under trypsin-enhancing conditions accompanied by cell fusion did not lyse mouse erythrocytes that reacted with L9 coronavirus hemagglutinin. Trypsin-treated, infected BFTy cultures produced coronaviral particles that excluded stain from the envelope confinement. These virions had uniformly shorter surface projections than did the viral forms generated by trypsin-free cell cultures. Images PMID:7228403

  15. Surface apposition and multiple cell contacts promote myoblast fusion in Drosophila flight muscles.

    PubMed

    Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Segal, Dagan; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera; Shilo, Ben-Zion; VijayRaghavan, K; Schejter, Eyal D

    2015-10-12

    Fusion of individual myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers constitutes a widely conserved program for growth of the somatic musculature. We have used electron microscopy methods to study this key form of cell-cell fusion during development of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that IFM myoblast-myotube fusion proceeds in a stepwise fashion and is governed by apparent cross talk between transmembrane and cytoskeletal elements. Our analysis suggests that cell adhesion is necessary for bringing myoblasts to within a minimal distance from the myotubes. The branched actin polymerization machinery acts subsequently to promote tight apposition between the surfaces of the two cell types and formation of multiple sites of cell-cell contact, giving rise to nascent fusion pores whose expansion establishes full cytoplasmic continuity. Given the conserved features of IFM myogenesis, this sequence of cell interactions and membrane events and the mechanistic significance of cell adhesion elements and the actin-based cytoskeleton are likely to represent general principles of the myoblast fusion process.

  16. Cluster Model for Near-barrier Fusion Induced by Weakly Bound and Halo Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Keeley, N.

    2008-05-12

    The influence on the fusion process of coupling transfer/breakup channels is investigated for the medium weight {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 59}Co systems in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. Coupling effects are discussed within a comparison of predictions of the Continuum Discretized Coupled-Channels model. Applications to {sup 6}He+{sup 59}Co induced by the borromean halo nucleus {sup 6}He are also proposed.

  17. Near-barrier Fusion Induced by Stable Weakly Bound and Exotic Halo Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Zafra, A. Sanchez I.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Thompson, I. J.; Keeley, N.

    2006-08-14

    The effect of breakup is investigated for the medium weight 6Li+59Co system in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. The strong coupling of breakup/transfer channels to fusion is discussed within a comparison of predictions of the Continuum Discretized Coupled-Channels model which is also applied to 6He+59Co a reaction induced by the borromean halo nucleus 6He.

  18. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  19. Macrophage-Tumor Cell Fusions from Peripheral Blood of Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Gary A.; Matters, Gail L.; Xin, Ping; Imamura-Kawasawa, Yuka; Du, Zhen; Thiboutot, Diane M.; Helm, Klaus F.; Neves, Rogerio I.; Abraham, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background While the morbidity and mortality from cancer are largely attributable to its metastatic dissemination, the integral features of the cascade are not well understood. The widely accepted hypothesis is that the primary tumor microenvironment induces the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in cancer cells, facilitating their escape into the bloodstream, possibly accompanied by cancer stem cells. An alternative theory for metastasis involves fusion of macrophages with tumor cells (MTFs). Here we culture and characterize apparent MTFs from blood of melanoma patients. Methods We isolated enriched CTC populations from peripheral blood samples from melanoma patients, and cultured them. We interrogated these cultured cells for characteristic BRAF mutations, and used confocal microscopy for immunophenotyping, motility, DNA content and chromatin texture analyses, and then conducted xenograft studies using nude mice. Findings Morphologically, the cultured MTFs were generally large with many pseudopod extensions and lamellipodia. Ultrastructurally, the cultured MTFs appeared to be macrophages. They were rich in mitochondria and lysosomes, as well as apparent melanosomes. The cultured MTF populations were all heterogeneous with regard to DNA content, containing aneuploid and/or high-ploidy cells, and they typically showed large sheets (and/or clumps) of cytoplasmic chromatin. This cytoplasmic DNA was found within heterogeneously-sized autophagic vacuoles, which prominently contained chromatin and micronuclei. Cultured MTFs uniformly expressed pan-macrophage markers (CD14, CD68) and macrophage markers indicative of M2 polarization (CD163, CD204, CD206). They also expressed melanocyte-specific markers (ALCAM, MLANA), epithelial biomarkers (KRT, EpCAM), as well as the pro-carcinogenic cytokine MIF along with functionally related stem cell markers (CXCR4, CD44). MTF cultures from individual patients (5 of 8) contained melanoma-specific BRAF activating mutations

  20. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  1. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  2. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A. . E-mail: edward_berger@nih.gov

    2006-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor.

  3. HES6 reverses nuclear reprogramming of insulin-producing cells following cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Andrew J.; Abrahamsson, Annelie E.; Tyrberg, Bjoern; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela; Levine, Fred; E-mail: flevine@ucsd.edu

    2007-04-06

    To examine the mechanism by which growth-stimulated pancreatic {beta}-cells dedifferentiate, somatic cell fusions were performed between MIN6, a highly differentiated mouse insulinoma, and {beta}lox5, a cell line derived from human {beta}-cells which progressively dedifferentiated in culture. MIN6/{beta}lox5 somatic cells hybrids underwent silencing of insulin expression and a marked decline in PDX1, NeuroD, and MafA, indicating that {beta}lox5 expresses a dominant transacting factor(s) that represses {beta}-cell differentiation. Expression of Hes1, which inhibits endocrine differentiation was higher in hybrid cells than in parental MIN6 cells. Hes6, a repressor of Hes1, was highly expressed in primary {beta}-cells as well as MIN6, but was repressed in hybrids. Hes6 overexpression using a retroviral vector led to a decrease in Hes1 levels, an increase in {beta}-cell transcription factors and partial restoration of insulin expression. We conclude that the balance of Notch activators and inhibitors may play an important role in maintaining the {beta}-cell differentiated state.

  4. Analyzing cell fusion events within the central nervous system using bone marrow chimerism.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    It has emerged that cells which typically reside in the bone marrow have the capacity to cross the blood brain barrier and contribute genetic material to a range of neuronal cell types within the central nervous system. One such mechanism to account for this phenomenon is cellular fusion, occurring between migrating bone marrow-derived stem cells and neuronal cells in-situ. Biologically, the significance as to why cells from distinct lineages fuse with cells of the central nervous system is, as yet, unclear. Growing evidence however suggests that these cell fusion events could provide an efficient means of rescuing the highly complex and differentiated neuronal cell types that cannot be replaced in adulthood. To facilitate further understanding of cell fusion within the central nervous system, we describe here a technique to establish chimeric mice that are stably reconstituted with green fluorescent protein expressing sex-mismatched bone marrow. These chimeric mice are known to represent an excellent model for studying bone marrow cell migration and infiltration throughout the body, while in parallel, as will be described here, also provide a means to neatly analyze both bone marrow-derived cell fusion and trans-differentiation events within the central nervous system.

  5. AMPK Activation Prevents and Reverses Drug-Induced Mitochondrial and Hepatocyte Injury by Promoting Mitochondrial Fusion and Function

    PubMed Central

    Taniane, Caitlin; Farrell, Geoffrey; Arias, Irwin M.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Fu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage is the major factor underlying drug-induced liver disease but whether conditions that thwart mitochondrial injury can prevent or reverse drug-induced liver damage is unclear. A key molecule regulating mitochondria quality control is AMP activated kinase (AMPK). When activated, AMPK causes mitochondria to elongate/fuse and proliferate, with mitochondria now producing more ATP and less reactive oxygen species. Autophagy is also triggered, a process capable of removing damaged/defective mitochondria. To explore whether AMPK activation could potentially prevent or reverse the effects of drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage, we added an AMPK activator to collagen sandwich cultures of rat and human hepatocytes exposed to the hepatotoxic drugs, acetaminophen or diclofenac. In the absence of AMPK activation, the drugs caused hepatocytes to lose polarized morphology and have significantly decreased ATP levels and viability. At the subcellular level, mitochondria underwent fragmentation and had decreased membrane potential due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn1, 2 and/or Opa1. Adding AICAR, a specific AMPK activator, at the time of drug exposure prevented and reversed these effects. The mitochondria became highly fused and ATP production increased, and hepatocytes maintained polarized morphology. In exploring the mechanism responsible for this preventive and reversal effect, we found that AMPK activation prevented drug-mediated decreases in Mfn1, 2 and Opa1. AMPK activation also stimulated autophagy/mitophagy, most significantly in acetaminophen-treated cells. These results suggest that activation of AMPK prevents/reverses drug-induced mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through regulation of mitochondrial fusion and autophagy, making it a potentially valuable approach for treatment of drug-induced liver injury. PMID:27792760

  6. Cell Fusion along the Anterior-Posterior Neuroaxis in Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sankavaram, Sreenivasa R.; Svensson, Mikael A.; Olsson, Tomas; Brundin, Lou; Johansson, Clas B.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is well documented that bone marrow-derived cells can fuse with a diverse range of cells, including brain cells, under normal or pathological conditions. Inflammation leads to robust fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with Purkinje cells and the formation of binucleate heterokaryons in the cerebellum. Heterokaryons form through the fusion of two developmentally differential cells and as a result contain two distinct nuclei without subsequent nuclear or chromosome loss. Aim In the brain, fusion of bone marrow-derived cells appears to be restricted to the complex and large Purkinje cells, raising the question whether the size of the recipient cell is important for cell fusion in the central nervous system. Purkinje cells are among the largest neurons in the central nervous system and accordingly can harbor two nuclei. Results Using a well-characterized model for heterokaryon formation in the cerebellum (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis - a mouse model of multiple sclerosis), we report for the first time that green fluorescent protein-labeled bone marrow-derived cells can fuse and form heterokaryons with spinal cord motor neurons. These spinal cord heterokaryons are predominantly located in or adjacent to an active or previously active inflammation site, demonstrating that inflammation and infiltration of immune cells are key for cell fusion in the central nervous system. While some motor neurons were found to contain two nuclei, co-expressing green fluorescent protein and the neuronal marker, neuron-specific nuclear protein, a number of small interneurons also co-expressed green fluorescent protein and the neuronal marker, neuron-specific nuclear protein. These small heterokaryons were scattered in the gray matter of the spinal cord. Conclusion This novel finding expands the repertoire of neurons that can form heterokaryons with bone marrow-derived cells in the central nervous system, albeit in low numbers, possibly leading to a novel therapy

  7. Effect of COR proteins on the freeze-induced fusion of liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, M.; Steponkus, P.L. ); Gilmour, S.J.; Thomashow, M.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are regulated during cold acclimation, with few exceptions, the function of the COR proteins encoded by these genes is not known. The objectives of this study were to determine if COR6.6 and COR15am, which are synthesized in Arabidopsis thaliana, influence the freeze-induced fusion of lipid bilayers. When small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) composed of either POPC (16:0/18:1) or DOPC (18:1/18:1) were frozen to temperatures over the range of [minus]2[degrees]C to [minus]30[degrees]C liposome fusion occurred at temperatures below [minus]2[degrees]C, with a substantial increase occurring at temperatures below the T[sub m] of the lipids ([minus]3[degrees]C for POPC and [minus]18[degrees]C for DOPC). Freeze-induced fusion was not observed SUVs composed of BL[sub 2]PC (18:2/18:2), which has a t[sub m] of [minus]55[degrees]C. Addition of either COR6.6 or COR15am significantly decreased the incidence of fusion of large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC if proteins were added to the liposome suspension before freezing; there was no effect if the COR proteins were only encapsulated within the liposomes. With SUVs formed from the total lipid extract of the plasma membrane of either non-acclimated (NA) or cold-acclimated (ACC) rye leave, there was differential response to freezing. In NA-SUVs, the incidence of fusion increased after freezing to [minus]5[degrees]C and reached a maximum at [minus]10[degrees]C; in ACC-SUVs, the maximum incidence of fusion occurred at [minus]20[degrees]C. The difference in cryostability reflects differences in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane after cold acclimation. But there was a significant decrease in the incidence of fusion in both NA- and ACC-SUVs when frozen in the presence of either COR6.6 or COR15am. Thus, although the cryostability of lipid bilayers is primarily influenced by the lipid composition of the bilayers, there is an additive effect of the COR proteins.

  8. A Mechanistic Paradigm for Broad-Spectrum Antivirals that Target Virus-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Axel; Tanner, Lukas B.; Akyol Ataman, Zeynep; Yun, Tatyana; Shui, Guanghou; Aguilar, Hector C.; Zhang, Dong; Meriwether, David; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Robinson, Lindsey R.; Juelich, Terry L.; Buczkowski, Hubert; Chou, Sunwen; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Wolf, Mike C.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Banyard, Ashley; Kielian, Margaret; Reddy, Srinivasa; Wenk, Markus R.; Selke, Matthias; Santos, Nuno C.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Jung, Michael E.; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    LJ001 is a lipophilic thiazolidine derivative that inhibits the entry of numerous enveloped viruses at non-cytotoxic concentrations (IC50≤0.5 µM), and was posited to exploit the physiological difference between static viral membranes and biogenic cellular membranes. We now report on the molecular mechanism that results in LJ001's specific inhibition of virus-cell fusion. The antiviral activity of LJ001 was light-dependent, required the presence of molecular oxygen, and was reversed by singlet oxygen (1O2) quenchers, qualifying LJ001 as a type II photosensitizer. Unsaturated phospholipids were the main target modified by LJ001-generated 1O2. Hydroxylated fatty acid species were detected in model and viral membranes treated with LJ001, but not its inactive molecular analog, LJ025. 1O2-mediated allylic hydroxylation of unsaturated phospholipids leads to a trans-isomerization of the double bond and concurrent formation of a hydroxyl group in the middle of the hydrophobic lipid bilayer. LJ001-induced 1O2-mediated lipid oxidation negatively impacts on the biophysical properties of viral membranes (membrane curvature and fluidity) critical for productive virus-cell membrane fusion. LJ001 did not mediate any apparent damage on biogenic cellular membranes, likely due to multiple endogenous cytoprotection mechanisms against phospholipid hydroperoxides. Based on our understanding of LJ001's mechanism of action, we designed a new class of membrane-intercalating photosensitizers to overcome LJ001's limitations for use as an in vivo antiviral agent. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a novel class of compounds (oxazolidine-2,4-dithiones) with (1) 100-fold improved in vitro potency (IC50<10 nM), (2) red-shifted absorption spectra (for better tissue penetration), (3) increased quantum yield (efficiency of 1O2 generation), and (4) 10–100-fold improved bioavailability. Candidate compounds in our new series moderately but significantly (p≤0.01) delayed the

  9. Hemifusion and fusion of giant vesicles induced by reduction of inter-membrane distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuvingh, J.; Pincet, F.; Cribier, S.

    2004-07-01

    Proteins involved in membrane fusion, such as SNARE or influenza virus hemagglutinin, share the common function of pulling together opposing membranes in closer contact. The reduction of inter-membrane distance can be sufficient to induce a lipid transition phase and thus fusion. We have used functionalized lipids bearing DNA bases as head groups incorporated into giant unilamellar vesicles in order to reproduce the reduction of distance between membranes and to trigger fusion in a model system. In our experiments, two vesicles were isolated and brought into adhesion by the mean of micromanipulation; their evolution was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Actual fusion only occurred in about 5% of the experiments. In most cases, a state of “hemifusion” is observed and quantified. In this state, the outer leaflets of both vesicles' bilayers merged whereas the inner leaflets and the aqueous inner contents remained independent. The kinetics of the lipid probes redistribution is in good agreement with a diffusion model in which lipids freely diffuse at the circumference of the contact zone between the two vesicles. The minimal density of bridging structures, such as stalks, necessary to explain this redistribution kinetics can be estimated.

  10. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  11. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Muzaddid; de Antueno, Roberto; Langelaan, David N.; Parmar, Hiren B.; Shin, Kyungsoo; Rainey, Jan K.; Duncan, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS) in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS) but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation. PMID:26061049

  12. Surface apposition and multiple cell contacts promote myoblast fusion in Drosophila flight muscles

    PubMed Central

    Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Segal, Dagan; Shimoni, Eyal; Shinder, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of individual myoblasts to form multinucleated myofibers constitutes a widely conserved program for growth of the somatic musculature. We have used electron microscopy methods to study this key form of cell–cell fusion during development of the indirect flight muscles (IFMs) of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that IFM myoblast–myotube fusion proceeds in a stepwise fashion and is governed by apparent cross talk between transmembrane and cytoskeletal elements. Our analysis suggests that cell adhesion is necessary for bringing myoblasts to within a minimal distance from the myotubes. The branched actin polymerization machinery acts subsequently to promote tight apposition between the surfaces of the two cell types and formation of multiple sites of cell–cell contact, giving rise to nascent fusion pores whose expansion establishes full cytoplasmic continuity. Given the conserved features of IFM myogenesis, this sequence of cell interactions and membrane events and the mechanistic significance of cell adhesion elements and the actin-based cytoskeleton are likely to represent general principles of the myoblast fusion process. PMID:26459604

  13. Ankle arthrodesis fusion rates for mesenchymal stem cell bone allograft versus proximal tibia autograft.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J; Boone, Joshua J; Hansen, Myron; Brady, Chad; Gough, Adam; Swayzee, Zflan

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used in the treatment of ankle arthritis. The present study compared mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) bone allografts and proximal tibia autografts as adjuncts in performing ankle arthrodesis. A total of 109 consecutive ankle fusions performed from 2002 to 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 109 fusions, 24 were excluded from the present study, leaving 85 patients who had undergone ankle arthrodesis. Of the 85 patients, 41 had received a proximal tibia autograft and 44, an MSC bone allograft. These 2 groups were reviewed and compared retrospectively at least 2 years postoperatively for the overall fusion rate, interval to radiographic fusion, and interval to clinical fusion. A modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale was used to measure patient satisfaction. The overall fusion rate was 84.1% in the MSC bone allograft group and 95.1% in the proximal tibia autograft group (p = .158). The corresponding mean intervals to radiographic fusion were 13.0 ± 2.5 weeks and 11.3 ± 2.8 weeks (p ≤ .001). The interval to clinical fusion was 13.1 ± 2.1 weeks and 11.0 ± 1.5 weeks (p ≤ .001) in the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft group, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the fusion rates between the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft groups. Also, no statistically significant difference was found between the preoperative and postoperative scores using a modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale between the 2 groups (p = .41 and p = .44, respectively). A statistically significant delay to radiographic and clinical fusion was present in the MSC bone allograft group compared with the proximal tibia autograft group; however, no difference was found in patient satisfaction. PMID:25158608

  14. Nanoscale organization of {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor-Venus fusion protein domains on the surface of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vobornik, Dusan; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Haley, Jennifer; Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud; Taylor, Rod; Johnston, Linda J.; Pezacki, John Paul

    2009-04-24

    Adrenergic receptors are a key component of nanoscale multiprotein complexes that are responsible for controlling the beat rate in a mammalian heart. We demonstrate the ability of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to visualize {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors ({beta}{sub 2}AR) fused to the GFP analogue Venus at the nanoscale on HEK293 cells. The expression of the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein was tightly controlled using a tetracycline-induced promoter. Both the size and density of the observed nanoscale domains are dependent on the level of induction and thus the level of protein expression. At concentrations between 100 and 700 ng/ml of inducer doxycycline, the size of domains containing the {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion protein appears to remain roughly constant, but the number of domains per cell increase. At 700 ng/ml doxycycline the functional receptors are organized into domains with an average diameter of 150 nm with a density similar to that observed for the native protein on primary murine cells. By contrast, larger micron-sized domains of {beta}{sub 2}AR are observed in the membrane of the HEK293 cells that stably overexpress {beta}{sub 2}AR-GFP and {beta}{sub 2}AR-eYFP. We conclude that precise chemical control of gene expression is highly advantageous for the use {beta}{sub 2}AR-Venus fusion proteins as models for {beta}{sub 2}AR function. These observations are critical for designing future cell models and assays based on {beta}{sub 2}AR, since the receptor biology is consistent with a relatively low density of nanoscale receptor domains.

  15. Nanoscale organization of beta2-adrenergic receptor-Venus fusion protein domains on the surface of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vobornik, Dusan; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Haley, Jennifer; Bani-Yaghoub, Mahmud; Taylor, Rod; Johnston, Linda J; Pezacki, John Paul

    2009-04-24

    Adrenergic receptors are a key component of nanoscale multiprotein complexes that are responsible for controlling the beat rate in a mammalian heart. We demonstrate the ability of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) to visualize beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (beta(2)AR) fused to the GFP analogue Venus at the nanoscale on HEK293 cells. The expression of the beta(2)AR-Venus fusion protein was tightly controlled using a tetracycline-induced promoter. Both the size and density of the observed nanoscale domains are dependent on the level of induction and thus the level of protein expression. At concentrations between 100 and 700 ng/ml of inducer doxycycline, the size of domains containing the beta(2)AR-Venus fusion protein appears to remain roughly constant, but the number of domains per cell increase. At 700 ng/ml doxycycline the functional receptors are organized into domains with an average diameter of 150 nm with a density similar to that observed for the native protein on primary murine cells. By contrast, larger micron-sized domains of beta(2)AR are observed in the membrane of the HEK293 cells that stably overexpress beta(2)AR-GFP and beta(2)AR-eYFP. We conclude that precise chemical control of gene expression is highly advantageous for the use beta(2)AR-Venus fusion proteins as models for beta(2)AR function. These observations are critical for designing future cell models and assays based on beta(2)AR, since the receptor biology is consistent with a relatively low density of nanoscale receptor domains.

  16. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  17. Model-independent determination of the astrophysical S factor in laser-induced fusion plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lattuada, D.; Barbarino, M.; Bonasera, A.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Warren, M.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; et al

    2016-04-19

    In this paper, we present a new and general method for measuring the astrophysical S factor of nuclear reactions in laser-induced plasmas and we apply it to 2H(d,n)3He. The experiment was performed with the Texas Petawatt Laser, which delivered 150–270 fs pulses of energy ranging from 90 to 180 J to D2 or CD4 molecular clusters (where D denotes 2H). After removing the background noise, we used the measured time-of-flight data of energetic deuterium ions to obtain their energy distribution. We derive the S factor using the measured energy distribution of the ions, the measured volume of the fusion plasma,more » and the measured fusion yields. This method is model independent in the sense that no assumption on the state of the system is required, but it requires an accurate measurement of the ion energy distribution, especially at high energies, and of the relevant fusion yields. In the 2H(d,n)3He and 3He(d,p)4He cases discussed here, it is very important to apply the background subtraction for the energetic ions and to measure the fusion yields with high precision. While the available data on both ion distribution and fusion yields allow us to determine with good precision the S factor in the d+d case (lower Gamow energies), for the d+3He case the data are not precise enough to obtain the S factor using this method. Our results agree with other experiments within the experimental error, even though smaller values of the S factor were obtained. This might be due to the plasma environment differing from the beam target conditions in a conventional accelerator experiment.« less

  18. Heat generation above break-even from laser-induced fusion in ultra-dense deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Holmlid, Leif

    2015-08-15

    Previous results from laser-induced processes in ultra-dense deuterium D(0) give conclusive evidence for ejection of neutral massive particles with energy >10 MeV u{sup −1}. Such particles can only be formed from nuclear processes like nuclear fusion at the low laser intensity used. Heat generation is of interest for future fusion energy applications and has now been measured by a small copper (Cu) cylinder surrounding the laser target. The temperature rise of the Cu cylinder is measured with an NTC resistor during around 5000 laser shots per measured point. No heating in the apparatus or the gas feed is normally used. The fusion process is suboptimal relative to previously published studies by a factor of around 10. The small neutral particles H{sub N}(0) of ultra-dense hydrogen (size of a few pm) escape with a substantial fraction of the energy. Heat loss to the D{sub 2} gas (at <1 mbar pressure) is measured and compensated for under various conditions. Heat release of a few W is observed, at up to 50% higher energy than the total laser input thus a gain of 1.5. This is uniquely high for the use of deuterium as fusion fuel. With a slightly different setup, a thermal gain of 2 is reached, thus clearly above break-even for all neutronicity values possible. Also including the large kinetic energy which is directly measured for MeV particles leaving through a small opening gives a gain of 2.3. Taking into account the lower efficiency now due to the suboptimal fusion process, previous studies indicate a gain of at least 20 during long periods.

  19. Model-independent determination of the astrophysical S factor in laser-induced fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuada, D.; Barbarino, M.; Bonasera, A.; Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Warren, M.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Kimura, S.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Schmidt, K.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Natowitz, J. B.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a new and general method for measuring the astrophysical S factor of nuclear reactions in laser-induced plasmas and we apply it to :mmultiscripts>(d ,n )3He . The experiment was performed with the Texas Petawatt Laser, which delivered 150-270 fs pulses of energy ranging from 90 to 180 J to D2 or CD4 molecular clusters (where D denotes 2H ) . After removing the background noise, we used the measured time-of-flight data of energetic deuterium ions to obtain their energy distribution. We derive the S factor using the measured energy distribution of the ions, the measured volume of the fusion plasma, and the measured fusion yields. This method is model independent in the sense that no assumption on the state of the system is required, but it requires an accurate measurement of the ion energy distribution, especially at high energies, and of the relevant fusion yields. In the :mmultiscripts>(d ,n )3He and 3He(d ,p )4He cases discussed here, it is very important to apply the background subtraction for the energetic ions and to measure the fusion yields with high precision. While the available data on both ion distribution and fusion yields allow us to determine with good precision the S factor in the d +d case (lower Gamow energies), for the d +3He case the data are not precise enough to obtain the S factor using this method. Our results agree with other experiments within the experimental error, even though smaller values of the S factor were obtained. This might be due to the plasma environment differing from the beam target conditions in a conventional accelerator experiment.

  20. The thyroid cancer PAX8-PPARG fusion protein activates Wnt/TCF-responsive cells that have a transformed phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vu-Phan, Dang; Grachtchouk, Vladimir; Yu, Jingcheng; Colby, Lesley A; Wicha, Max S; Koenig, Ronald J

    2013-10-01

    A chromosomal translocation results in the production of a paired box 8-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PAX8-PPARG) fusion protein (PPFP) in ∼35% of follicular thyroid carcinomas. To examine the role of PPFP in thyroid oncogenesis, the fusion protein was stably expressed in the non-transformed rat thyroid cell line PCCL3. PPFP conferred on PCCL3 cells the ability to invade through Matrigel and to form colonies in anchorage-independent conditions. PPFP also increased the fraction of cells with Wnt/TCF-responsive green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression. This Wnt/TCF-activated population was enriched for colony-forming and invading cells. These actions of PPFP required a functional PPARG DNA binding domain (DBD) within PPFP and were further stimulated by PPARG agonists. These data indicate that PPFP, through its PPARG DBD, induces Wnt/TCF pathway activation in a subpopulation of cells, and these cells have properties of cellular transformation including increased invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth. PMID:24025583

  1. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  2. Induction of apoptosis in MCF‑7 human breast cancer cells by Khz (fusion of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelium).

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Ju Sung; Kim, Zoo Haye; Huang, Ren Bin; Chae, Young Lye; Wang, Ren Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Khz (fusion of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus), isolated from the mycelia of G. lucidum and P. umbellatus, exerts anti‑proliferative effects against malignant cells; however, its activity against human breast cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, cell proliferation was assessed using a 3-(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and poptosis was examined using annexin V‑propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. The activation of caspases 7, 8 and 9 were detected in the Khz‑treated cells using western blotting. The results demonstrated that Khz increased the intracellular calcium concentration and induced the production of reactive oxygen species in MCF‑7 breast cancer cells, as determined using flow cytometry. The results also demonstrated that Khz inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in the MCF‑7 cells. In addition, the mechanism by which Khz induces apoptosis in cancer cells was investigated. Khz induced apoptosis preferentially in transformed cells, with a minimal effect on non‑transformed cells, suggesting its potential as an anticancer therapeutic agent. Oxidative stress is associated with apoptotic and non‑apoptotic cell death, although pro‑oxidative conditions are not a pre‑requisite for apoptosis. Assessment of the activation status of caspases 7, 8 and 9 revealed that the levels of cleaved caspases were significantly increased in the cells treated with Khz. It is widely accepted that calcium signaling is important in apoptosis, and the present study observed an increase in [Ca2+]i in response to Khz treatment. The anti‑proliferative and pro‑apoptotic effects of Khz suggest that this extract may be developed as a potential anticancer agent. PMID:26648109

  3. [Element distribution analysis of welded fusion zone by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Zhang, Yong; Jia, Yun-Hai; Wang, Hai-Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Over the past decade there has been intense activity in the study and development of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). As a new tool for surface microanalysis, it caused widespread in materials science because of the advantage of rapid and high sensitivity. In the present paper, the distribution of Ni, Mn, C and Si near weld fusion line was analyzed on two kinds of weld sample. Line scanning mode analysis was carried out by three different kinds of methods, namely laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and electron probe X-ray microanalyser (EPMA). The concentration variation trend of Ni and Mn acquired by LIBS is coincident with SEM/EDS and EPMA. The result shows that the content of Ni and Mn was significantly different between weld seam and base metal on both the samples. The content of Ni and Mn was much higher in weld seam than in base metal, and a sharp concentration gradient was analyzed in the fusion zone. According to the distribution of Ni and Mn, all the three methods got a similar value of welded fusion zone width. The concentration variation trend of C and Si acquired by LIBS is not coincident with SEM/EDS and EPMA. The concentration difference between weld seam and base metal was analyzed by LIBS, but had not by SEM/EDS and EPMA, because of the low concentration and slight difference. The concentration gradient of C and Si in fusion zone was shows clearly by LIBS. For higher sensitivity performance, LIBS is much more adapted to analyze low content element than SEM/EDS and EPMA. PMID:25007635

  4. [Expression of human IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) fusion protein in CHO/DG44 cells].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Gao, Wenda; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Dawei; Chen, Yang; He, Bo; Liu, Quansheng

    2009-01-01

    We constructed the eukaryotic expression vector of human IL-35-IgG4 (Fc)-pOptiVEC-TOPO by gene recombination technique and expressed the fusion protein human IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) in CHO/DG44 cells. The two components of the newly discovered cytokine human IL-35, EBI3 and IL-12p35, were amplified by PCR from the cDNA library derived from the KG-I cells after LPS induction. The two PCR-amplified cDNA fragments of human IL-35 were linked by over-lapping PCR and then cloned into the IgG4 (Fc)-pOptiVEC-TOPO vector. The constructed plasmid with the recombinant cDNA IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) was verified by restriction enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing. The verified plasmid with the recombinant cDNA was transfected into CHO/DG44 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. The success of the transfection was examined and confirmed by RT-PCR. After selection in alpha-MEM (-) medium, the IL-35-Ig G4 (Fc) positive CHO/DG44 clones were chosen and the media from these positive clones were collected to be used to purify the fusion protein. The positive CHO/DG44 clones were further cultured in increasing concentrations of MTX and the expression levels of the fusion protein IL-35-Ig G4 (Fc) were repetitively induced by MTX-induced gene amplification. The IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) fusion protein was purified from the media collected from the positive CHO/DG44 clones by protein G affinity chromatography and then identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The results showed that one protein band was found to match well with the predicted relative molecular mass of human IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) and this protein could specifically bind to anti-human IgG4 (Fc) monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, our study successfully established an IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) positive DG44 cell line which could stably express IL-35-IgG4 (Fc) fusion protein.

  5. Generation and preclinical characterization of an NKp80-Fc fusion protein for redirected cytolysis of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jing; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-09-11

    The capacity of natural killer (NK) cells to mediate Fc receptor-dependent effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), largely contributes to their clinical application. Given that activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL), an identified ligand for the NK-activating receptor NKp80, is frequently highly expressed on leukemia cells, the lack of therapeutic AICL-specific antibodies limits clinical application. Here we explore a strategy to reinforce NK anti-leukemia reactivity by combining targeting AICL-expressing leukemia cells with the induction of NK cell ADCC using NKp80-Fc fusion proteins. The NKp80-Fc fusion protein we generated bound specifically to leukemia cells in an AICL-specific manner. Cell binding assays between NK and leukemia cells showed that NKp80-Fc significantly increased NK target cell conjugation. In functional analyses, treatment with NKp80-Fc clearly induced the ADCC effect of NK cells. NKp80-Fc not only promoted NK-mediated leukemia cell apoptosis in the early stage of cell conjugation but also enhanced NK cell degranulation and cytotoxicity activity in the late stage. The bifunctional NKp80-Fc could redirect NK cells toward leukemia cells and triggered NK cell killing in vitro. Moreover, NKp80-Fc enhanced the lysis of NK cells against tumors in leukemia xenograft non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NKp80-Fc potently amplifies NK cell anti-leukemia effects in vitro and in vivo through induction of the NK cell ADCC effect. This method could potentially be useful for molecular targeted therapy, and the fusion proteins may be a promising drug for immunotherapy of leukemia.

  6. Cell fusion as the formation mechanism of unreduced gametes in the gynogenetic diploid hybrid fish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qingfeng; Luo, Kaikun; Chen, Xuan; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Chun; Tao, Min; Zhao, Rurong; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    The gynogenetic diploid hybrid clone line (GDH) derived from red crucian carp (♀ RCC) × common carp (♂ CC) possesses the unusual reproductive trait of producing unreduced diploid eggs. To identify the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we examined the structure, in vivo developmental process and in vitro dynamic development of the GDH gonad. In summary, compared with RCC and CC, GDH showed certain special straits. First, a high frequency (84.7%) of germ cell fusion occurred in gonadal tissue culture in vitro as observed by time-lapse microscopy. Second, microstructural and ultrastructural observation showed numerous binucleated and multinucleated germ cells in the gonad, providing evidence of germ cell fusion in vivo. By contrast, in the diploid RCC and CC ovaries, neither cell fusion nor multinucleated cells were observed during the development of gonads. Third, the ovary of GDH remained at stage I for 10 months, whereas those of RCC and CC remained at that stage for 2 months, indicating that the GDH germ cells underwent abnormal development before meiosis. This report is the first to demonstrate that cell fusion facilitates the formation of unreduced gametes in vertebrates, which is a valuable finding for both evolutionary biology and reproductive biology. PMID:27530321

  7. Cell fusion as the formation mechanism of unreduced gametes in the gynogenetic diploid hybrid fish

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qingfeng; Luo, Kaikun; Chen, Xuan; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Chun; Tao, Min; Zhao, Rurong; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    The gynogenetic diploid hybrid clone line (GDH) derived from red crucian carp (♀ RCC) × common carp (♂ CC) possesses the unusual reproductive trait of producing unreduced diploid eggs. To identify the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we examined the structure, in vivo developmental process and in vitro dynamic development of the GDH gonad. In summary, compared with RCC and CC, GDH showed certain special straits. First, a high frequency (84.7%) of germ cell fusion occurred in gonadal tissue culture in vitro as observed by time-lapse microscopy. Second, microstructural and ultrastructural observation showed numerous binucleated and multinucleated germ cells in the gonad, providing evidence of germ cell fusion in vivo. By contrast, in the diploid RCC and CC ovaries, neither cell fusion nor multinucleated cells were observed during the development of gonads. Third, the ovary of GDH remained at stage I for 10 months, whereas those of RCC and CC remained at that stage for 2 months, indicating that the GDH germ cells underwent abnormal development before meiosis. This report is the first to demonstrate that cell fusion facilitates the formation of unreduced gametes in vertebrates, which is a valuable finding for both evolutionary biology and reproductive biology. PMID:27530321

  8. A specific flagellum beating mode for inducing fusion in mammalian fertilization and kinetics of sperm internalization

    PubMed Central

    Ravaux, Benjamin; Garroum, Nabil; Perez, Eric; Willaime, Hervé; Gourier, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The salient phases of fertilization are gamete adhesion, membrane fusion, and internalization of the spermatozoon into the oocyte but the precise timeline and the molecular, membrane and cell mechanisms underlying these highly dynamical events are far from being established. The high motility of the spermatozoa and the unpredictable location of sperm/egg fusion dramatically hinder the use of real time imaging optical techniques that should directly provide the dynamics of cell events. Using an approach based on microfluidics technology, the sperm/egg interaction zone was imaged with the best front view, and the timeline of the fertilization events was established with an unparalleled temporal accuracy from the onset of gamete contact to full sperm DNA decondensation. It reveals that a key element of the adhesion phase to initiate fusion is the oscillatory motion of the sperm head on the oocyte plasma membrane generated by a specific flagellum-beating mode. It also shows that the incorporation of the spermatozoon head is a two steps process that includes simultaneous diving, tilt, and plasma membrane degradation of the sperm head into the oocyte and subsequent DNA decondensation. PMID:27539564

  9. A specific flagellum beating mode for inducing fusion in mammalian fertilization and kinetics of sperm internalization.

    PubMed

    Ravaux, Benjamin; Garroum, Nabil; Perez, Eric; Willaime, Hervé; Gourier, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The salient phases of fertilization are gamete adhesion, membrane fusion, and internalization of the spermatozoon into the oocyte but the precise timeline and the molecular, membrane and cell mechanisms underlying these highly dynamical events are far from being established. The high motility of the spermatozoa and the unpredictable location of sperm/egg fusion dramatically hinder the use of real time imaging optical techniques that should directly provide the dynamics of cell events. Using an approach based on microfluidics technology, the sperm/egg interaction zone was imaged with the best front view, and the timeline of the fertilization events was established with an unparalleled temporal accuracy from the onset of gamete contact to full sperm DNA decondensation. It reveals that a key element of the adhesion phase to initiate fusion is the oscillatory motion of the sperm head on the oocyte plasma membrane generated by a specific flagellum-beating mode. It also shows that the incorporation of the spermatozoon head is a two steps process that includes simultaneous diving, tilt, and plasma membrane degradation of the sperm head into the oocyte and subsequent DNA decondensation. PMID:27539564

  10. Exploring the membrane fusion mechanism through force-induced disassembly of HIV-1 six-helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kai; Zhang, Yong; Lou, Jizhong

    2016-05-13

    Enveloped virus, such as HIV-1, employs membrane fusion mechanism to invade into host cell. HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain uses six-helix bundle configuration to accomplish this process. Using molecular dynamic simulations, we confirmed the stability of this six-helix bundle by showing high occupancy of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Key residues and interactions important for the bundle integration were characterized by force-induced unfolding simulations of six-helix bundle, exhibiting the collapse order of these groups of interactions. Moreover, our results in some way concerted with a previous theory that the formation of coiled-coil choose a route which involved cooperative interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal helix.

  11. Alternate carbohydrate and nontraditional inducer leads to increased productivity of a collagen binding domain fusion protein via fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fruchtl, McKinzie; Sakon, Joshua; Beitle, Robert

    2016-05-20

    The production of collagen binding domain fusion proteins is of significant importance because of their potential as therapeutic biomaterials. It was previously reported that the expression of collagen-binding domain fusion proteins in Escherichia coli was higher when expressed using lactose as an inducer and chemically defined growth media on a shake flask scale. In an effort to further investigate factors that affect expression levels on a fed-batch scale, alternative induction techniques were tested in conjunction with fed-batch fermentation. In this paper, we discuss ten fed-batch fermentation experiments utilizing either glucose or glycerol feed and using lactose or isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) as an induction source. It was found that glycerol-fed fermentations induced with lactose allowed for greater expression of target protein, though lesser cell densities were achieved.

  12. Fusions of the Escherichia coli gyrA and gyrB control regions to the galactokinase gene are inducible by coumermycin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, R; Gellert, M

    1987-01-01

    We have previously shown that the genes encoding the two subunits of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase are regulated in a manner which is dependent on DNA conformation. When the DNA encoding the gyrA and gyrB genes is relaxed, both genes are expressed at a high level; in negatively supercoiled DNA they are expressed at a low level. In this paper we describe fusions of both the gyrA and gyrB 5' sequences to the E. coli galactokinase gene. In such fusions we found that galactokinase can be induced by treating the cells with coumermycin A1, an inhibitor of DNA gyrase. Our results suggest that the regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and that only a small region of DNA is necessary for coumermycin-induced gene expression. PMID:3029031

  13. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  14. Estradiol induces gene proximity and MLL-MLLT3 fusion in an activation-induced cytidine deaminase-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rebecca L; Slemmons, Katherine K; Vaughan, Andrew T M

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological data have linked birth control formulations to an increased risk of infant acute leukemia involving MLL rearrangements. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that 10 nM estradiol enhanced MLL transcription in addition to its common translocation partners, MLLT2 (AF4) and MLLT3 (AF9). The same concentration of estradiol triggered MLL and MLLT3 co-localization without affecting the interaction of genes located on the same chromosomes. Estradiol also stimulated the generation of MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcripts as seen by RT-PCR. RNAi knockdown of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA) suppressed the induction of MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript formation observed with estradiol. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed estradiol dependent localization of AICDA in MLL intron 11, upstream of a hotspot for both DNA cleavage and rearrangement, but not downstream within intron 12. Combined, these studies show that levels of estradiol consistent with that observed during pregnancy have the potential to initiate MLL fusions through an AICDA-mediated mechanism.

  15. Parameterization of fusion barriers for light-projectiles-induced reactions using the proximity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaei, R.; Sheibani, J.

    2016-05-01

    In this article we propose a pocket formula for fusion barriers calculated by three versions of the proximity formalism, namely AW 95, Bass 80 and Prox. 2010 potentials, for fusion reactions involving the collisions of the proton and helium projectiles with different targets in mass ranges 51≤ AT ≤ 130 and 40≤ AT ≤ 233 , respectively. For the first type of the colliding systems, it is shown that the proposed pocket formulas are able to predict the actual values of RB and VB within accuracies of ±0.4% and ±0.45% , respectively. Moreover, for the second type of the selected reactions, these accuracies are obtained ±0.24% and ±0.36% , respectively. In this study, the ability of the present pocket formulas is also demonstrated to predict the exact values of the fusion cross sections for our selected mass ranges. A comparison with the results of the previous pocket formulas reveals that our parameterized forms are more successful to reproduce the empirical data of the barrier height and position in the proton- and helium-induced reactions.

  16. FuseFISH: Robust Detection of Transcribed Gene Fusions in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Stefan; Crosetto, Nicola; Bienko, Magda; Boni, Marina; Bernasconi, Bernasconi; Chiarle, Roberto; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcribed gene fusions are key biomarkers in many hematologic and solid tumors, often representing the primary oncogenic driver mutation. Here, we report an experimental and computational pipeline for detecting fusion transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH and unbiased correlation analysis (FuseFISH). We constructed a genome-wide database of optimal oligonucleotide sequences, enabling quick design of FuseFISH probes against known and novel fusions. We implemented FuseFISH in cell lines, tissue sections, and purified RNA, reliably detecting one BCR-ABL1 positive in 10,000 negative cells. In 34 hematologic samples, we detected BCR-ABL1 transcripts with high specificity and sensitivity. Finally, we measured BCR-ABL1 expression heterogeneity and dynamics in single CML cells exposed to the kinase inhibitor Nilotinib. Our resource and methods are ideal for streamlined validation of fusions newly identified by next-generation sequencing, and pave the way to studying the impact of fusion expression variability on clinical outcome. PMID:24373969

  17. Promotion of chondrogenesis of marrow stromal stem cells by TGF-β3 fusion protein in vivo. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Dan, Yang; Yang, Shu-hua; Yang, Cao; Shao, Zeng-wu; Xu, Wei-hua; Li, Jin; Liu, Xian-zhe; Zheng, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the repair of the osteoarthritis(OA)-induced cartilage injury by transfecting the new TGF-β3 fusion protein (LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3) with targeted therapy function into the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in rats. The recombinant of pIRES-EGFP-MMP was constructed by combination of DNA encoding MMP enzyme cutting site and eukaryotic expression vector pIRES-EGFP. LAP and mTGF-β3 fragments were obtained from rat embryos by RT-PCR and inserted into the upstream and downstream of MMP from pIRES-EGFP-MMP respectively, so as to construct the recombinant plasmid of pIRES-EGFP-LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3. pIRES-EGFP-LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 was transfected into rat MSCs. The genetically modified MSCs were cultured in medium with MMP-1 or not. The transfected MSCs were transplanted in the rat OA models. The OA animal models were surgically induced by anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT). The pathological changes were observed under a microscope by HE staining, Alcian blue, Safranin-fast Green and graded by Mankin's scale. pIRES-EGFP-LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 was successfully constructed by means of enzyme cutting and sequencing, and the mTGF-β3 fusion protein (39 kD) was certified by Western blotting. Those genetically modified MSCs could differentiate into chondrocytes induced by MMP and secrete the relevant-matrix. The transfected MSCs could promote chondrogenesis and matrix production in rat OA models in vivo. It was concluded that a new fusion protein LAP-MMP-mTGF-β3 was constructed successfully by gene engineering, and could be used to repair the OA-induced cartilage injury. PMID:24142722

  18. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  19. All-optical human cell fusion by a fiber femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hao; Chan, Kam Tai; Kong, Siu Kai; Lee, Rebecca Kit Ying

    2008-10-01

    Cell-cell fusion by physical methods has progressed slowly until the advent of femtosecond lasers in the near infrared range, which have an ultrahigh photon density and few side effects. Here we demonstrated using a fiber femtosecond laser at 1550 nm with an average power of 1.6×104 W per pulse to fuse human HepG2 and HeLa cells homotypically with an efficiency of 35%-37% in the absence of chemical fusogen. Heterohybrid HepG2-HeLa cells were also prepared. Our site-directed cell-cell fusion technique offers a precise tool for biotechnology and fundamental research in biomedical fields.

  20. Theory of laser-induced adiabat shaping in inertial fusion implosions: The relaxation method

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Anderson, K.; Knauer, J.; Collins, T.J.B.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Skupsky, S.

    2005-04-15

    The theory of the adiabat shaping induced by a strong shock propagating through a relaxed density profile is carried out for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules. The relaxed profile is produced through a laser prepulse, while the adiabat-shaping shock is driven by the foot of the main laser pulse. The theoretical adiabat profiles accurately reproduce the simulation results. ICF capsules with a shaped adiabat are expected to benefit from improved hydrodynamic stability while maintaining the same one-dimensional performances as flat-adiabat shells.

  1. Synesthetes show normal sound-induced flash fission and fusion illusions.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, Karen M; McDonald, J Scott; Clifford, Colin W G

    2014-12-01

    Idiopathic synesthesia, a neurological condition in which a stimulus in one sense generates a concurrent experience in a different sense, is often considered an example of multisensory integration. Consequently it has been suggested that synesthetes should experience multisensory illusions more consistently and compellingly than typical participants. To test this we measured the sound induced flash fission and fusion illusions in 22 coloured hearing synesthetes and 31 control participants. Analysis of the data using signal detection analysis, however, indicated no difference between the groups, either in perception or response bias, but a secondary analysis of the data did show evidence of a decline in the illusions for synesthetes with increasing age. PMID:25173429

  2. Analysis of Induced Gamma Activation by D-T Neutrons in Selected Fusion Reactor Relevant Materials with EAF-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klix, Axel; Fischer, Ulrich; Gehre, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Samples of lanthanum, erbium and titanium which are constituents of structural materials, insulating coatings and tritium breeder for blankets of fusion reactor designs have been irradiated in a fusion peak neutron field. The induced gamma activities were measured and the results were used to check calculations with the European activation system EASY-2010. Good agreement for the prediction of major contributors to the contact dose rate of the materials was found, but for minor contributors the calculation deviated up to 50%.

  3. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes.

  4. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions

    PubMed Central

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Merrill, Amy E.; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb–/–mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb–/–mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb–/–mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  5. TGFβ and BMP Dependent Cell Fate Changes Due to Loss of Filamin B Produces Disc Degeneration and Progressive Vertebral Fusions.

    PubMed

    Zieba, Jennifer; Forlenza, Kimberly Nicole; Khatra, Jagteshwar Singh; Sarukhanov, Anna; Duran, Ivan; Rigueur, Diana; Lyons, Karen M; Cohn, Daniel H; Merrill, Amy E; Krakow, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    Spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive vertebral fusions and caused by loss of function mutations in Filamin B (FLNB). FLNB acts as a signaling scaffold by linking the actin cytoskleteon to signal transduction systems, yet the disease mechanisms for SCT remain unclear. Employing a Flnb knockout mouse, we found morphologic and molecular evidence that the intervertebral discs (IVDs) of Flnb-/-mice undergo rapid and progressive degeneration during postnatal development as a result of abnormal cell fate changes in the IVD, particularly the annulus fibrosus (AF). In Flnb-/-mice, the AF cells lose their typical fibroblast-like characteristics and acquire the molecular and phenotypic signature of hypertrophic chondrocytes. This change is characterized by hallmarks of endochondral-like ossification including alterations in collagen matrix, expression of Collagen X, increased apoptosis, and inappropriate ossification of the disc tissue. We show that conversion of the AF cells into chondrocytes is coincident with upregulated TGFβ signaling via Smad2/3 and BMP induced p38 signaling as well as sustained activation of canonical and noncanonical target genes p21 and Ctgf. These findings indicate that FLNB is involved in attenuation of TGFβ/BMP signaling and influences AF cell fate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the IVD disruptions in Flnb-/-mice resemble aging degenerative discs and reveal new insights into the molecular causes of vertebral fusions and disc degeneration. PMID:27019229

  6. Cells with dysfunctional telomeres are susceptible to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide via generation of multichromosomal fusions and chromosomal fragments bearing telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Seon Rang; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Jeong, Jaemin; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yun, Hyun Jin; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Park, In-Chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Haekwon; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Sang Hoon; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under conditions of telomere erosion, cells become extremely sensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres are cleaved by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under such conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} thus causes multichromosomal fusions and generation of small chromosomal fragments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-acetylcysteine prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced chromosomal aberrations. -- Abstract: During genotoxic stress, reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) is a prime mediator of the DNA damage response. Telomeres function both to assist in DNA damage repair and to inhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion. Here, we show that telomere dysfunction renders cells susceptible to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, via generation of multichromosomal fusion and chromosomal fragments. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} caused formation of multichromosomal end-to-end fusions involving more than three chromosomes, preferentially when telomeres were erosive. Interestingly, extensive chromosomal fragmentation (yielding small-sized fragments) occurred only in cells exhibiting such multichromosomal fusions. Telomeres were absent from fusion points, being rather present in the small fragments, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cleaves chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres. Restoration of telomere function or addition of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevented development of chromosomal aberrations and rescued the observed hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thus, chromosomal regions adjacent to telomeres become sensitive to reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide when telomeres are dysfunctional, and are cleaved to produce multichromosomal fusions and small chromosomal fragments bearing the telomeres.

  7. b3a2 BCR-ABL fusion peptides as targets for cytotoxic T cells in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Norbury, L C; Clark, R E; Christmas, S E

    2000-06-01

    Peptide sequences spanning the BCR-ABL protein junction potentially constitute novel leukaemia-specific antigens. 9-mer b3a2 fusion peptides have been reported to bind with high affinity to HLA-A3, -A11 and -B8. We have studied the effect of b3a2 BCR-ABL junctional peptides on the cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response against normal and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) were prepared from HLA-A3- or -B8-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by incubation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and interleukin (IL)-2 for 7 d. These APCs were pulsed with the respective b3a2 junctional peptide in the presence of beta2-microglobulin and were then used to challenge autologous PBMCs at 7-d intervals in the presence of IL-2, IL-6, IL-7 and IL-12. On subsequent exposure to target cells (either further pulsed normal APCs or unpulsed CML cells), specific HLA-restricted CTL responses were observed against all HLA-A3/-B8 matched normal target cells tested, but not to targets that were HLA mismatched. Cytotoxicity was also induced against HLA-A3/-B8 unpulsed CML cells, but not against unmatched CML cells. These data indicate (i) that endogenous BCR-ABL junctional peptides may be presented by CML cells and (ii) that exogenous peptides are potential stimulators of autologous antileukaemic CTLs.

  8. Human fusion proteins between interleukin 2 and IgM heavy chain are cytotoxic for cells expressing the interleukin 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Vié, H; Gauthier, T; Breathnach, R; Bonneville, M; Godard, A; Dietrich, J; Karam, G; Gesnel, M C; Peyrat, M A; Jacques, Y

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed a hybrid cDNA coding for a fusion protein between human interleukin 2 and a truncated heavy chain from human immunoglobulin M. The protein encoded by this cDNA contains the entire interleukin 2 sequence including its signal peptide, fused at its C terminus to domains 2 to 4 of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain constant region. Cells transfected with the hybrid cDNA secrete multimeric forms of the fusion protein, which bind specifically to cells bearing high-affinity interleukin 2 receptors. This binding leads either to T-cell proliferation or, if complement is added, to T-cell death. Multimeric forms of the fusion protein with a molecular mass above 500 kDa mediate complement-dependent lysis but trigger proliferation inefficiently when compared with forms with a low molecular mass (< 500 kDa). In contrast, the latter efficiently mediate T-cell proliferation without inducing complement-dependent lysis. The high molecular mass fusion proteins could thus constitute valuable tools for specific immunosuppression in humans. Images PMID:1454817

  9. Induction of autoantibodies against mouse soluble proteins after immunization with living cells presenting the autoantigen at the cell surface in fusion with a human type 2 transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Muriel M; Vanhaudenarde, Aurélie; Nizet, Yannick; Dumoutier, Laure; Renauld, Jean-Christophe

    2011-03-31

    Induction of autoantibodies towards immune regulatory proteins, such as cytokines or their receptors, is a powerful strategy for functional studies on the role of these factors in vivo. Here we describe a new procedure to elicit autoantibodies by taking advantage of tumor cells as a vaccine against peptides presented at their surface in fusion with the human CD134L transmembrane protein. P1.HTR, an immunogenic variant of the P815 mastocytoma cell line, was used to generate stably transfected cell clones with expression vectors encoding the human CD134L transmembrane protein fused with either mouse IL-22BP or IL-9. Following repeated injections of living tumor cells expressing the mIL-22BP construct, mice developed autoantibodies that bind to mIL-22BP and inhibit its interaction with IL-22 in vitro. Mice similarly immunized against mIL-9 produced high titers of autoantibodies that block the activity of this cytokine in the TS1 bioassay. This procedure also inhibits IL-9 activity in vivo as no increase of serum MMCP-1 mast cell protease concentration was observed following IL-9 administration to immunized mice. As an alternative to the injection of living tumor cells expressing the CD134L-antigen fusion protein, intramuscular electrotransfer of the corresponding DNA construct also induced autoantibodies. These results validate this method as a simple and convenient approach to knock down the in vivo activity of soluble regulatory proteins, including cytokines and their receptors.

  10. Neutron Induced D Breakup in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schroder, W. U.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to study the deuteron breakup reaction D(n,n ') np in the thermonuclear environment created in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility. Neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV generated in the primary D-T fusion reactions scatter elastically and inelastically off the dense (cryogenic) D-T fuel assembly surrounding the central hot spot at peak fuel compression. These neutrons also induce a breakup of the fuel deuterons. The corresponding breakup cross section is measured relative to elastic n -D and n -T scattering, i.e., simultaneously in the same environment. Apart from astrophysical and technological interest, the neutron-induced deuteron breakup reaction is of interest to the physics of nucleon -nucleon forces. For example, theoretical calculations predict a noticeable influence of nucleonic three-body forces on the magnitude of the breakup cross section. Preliminary results from measurements of the neutron contribution in the 2- to 6-MeV range show reasonable agreement with the published ENDL 2008.2 semi-empirical cross-section. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Myosin 2 Maintains an Open Exocytic Fusion Pore in Secretory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Purnima

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have implicated F-actin and myosin 2 in the control of regulated secretion. Most recently, evidence suggests a role for the microfilament network in regulating the postfusion events of vesicle dynamics. This is of potential importance as postfusion behavior can influence the loss of vesicle content and may provide a new target for drug therapy. We have investigated the role of myosin 2 in regulating exocytosis in secretory epithelial cells by using novel assays to determine the behavior of the fusion pore in individual granules. We immunolocalize myosin 2A to the apical region of pancreatic acinar cells, suggesting it is this isoform that plays a role in granule exocytosis. We further show myosin 2 phosphorylation increased on cell stimulation, consistent with a regulatory role in secretion. Importantly, in a single-cell, single-granule secretion assay, neither the myosin 2 inhibitor (−)-blebbistatin nor the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-9 had any effect on the numbers of granules stimulated to fuse after cell stimulation. These data indicate that myosin 2, if it has any action on secretion, must be targeting postfusion granule behavior. This interpretation is supported by direct study of fusion pore opening in which we show that (−)-blebbistatin and ML-9 promote fusion pore closure and decrease fusion pore lifetimes. Our work now adds to a growing body of evidence showing that myosin 2 is an essential regulator of postfusion granule behavior. In particular, in the case of the secretory epithelial cells, myosin 2 activity is necessary to maintain fusion pore opening. PMID:19158378

  12. Measurement of DT fusion and neutron-induced gamma-rays using gas Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Ali, Z.; Stoeffl, W.

    2010-08-01

    A secondary gamma experiment was carried out using a Gas Cherenkov Detector (GCD) at the OMEGA laser facility. The primary experimental objective was to simulate neutron-induced secondary gamma production (n-γ) from a NIF implosion capsule, hohlraum, and thermo-mechanical package. The high-band width of the GCD enabled us to detect time delayed and Doppler broadened n-γ signals from five different puck materials (Si, SiO2, Al, Al2O3, Cu) placed near target chamber center. These measurements were used for MCNP & ITS ACCEPT code validation purposes. By a simple change of the GCD CO2 gas pressure the system can effectively eliminate signals induced by n-γ reactions and thereby allow quality measurements of DT fusion γ-rays that are produced at NIF (National Ignition Facility).

  13. Inducible site-specific recombination in myelinating cells.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Nathalie H; Macklin, Wendy B; Popko, Brian

    2003-01-01

    To explore the function of genes expressed by myelinating cells we have developed a model system that allows for the inducible ablation of predetermined genes in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. The Cre/loxP recombination system provides the opportunity to generate tissue-specific somatic mutations in mice. We have used a fusion protein between the Cre recombinase and a mutated ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor (CreER(T)) to obtain inducible, site-specific recombination. CreER(T) expression was placed under the transcriptional control of the regulatory sequences of the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is abundantly expressed in oligodendrocytes and to a lesser extent in Schwann cells. The CreER(T) fusion protein translocated to the nucleus and mediated the recombination of a LacZ reporter transgene in myelinating cells of PLP/CreER(T) mice injected with the synthetic steroid tamoxifen. In untreated animals CreER(T) remained cytoplasmic, and there was no evidence of recombination. The PLP/ CreER(T) animals should be very useful in elucidating and distinguishing a particular gene's function in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath and in analyzing mature oligodendrocyte function in pathological conditions. PMID:12481300

  14. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carmen M.; Poulin, Kathy L.; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A.; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C.; Parks, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  15. Adenovirus-Mediated Expression of the p14 Fusion-Associated Small Transmembrane Protein Promotes Cancer Cell Fusion and Apoptosis In Vitro but Does Not Provide Therapeutic Efficacy in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen M; Poulin, Kathy L; Tong, Grace; Christou, Carin; Kennedy, Michael A; Falls, Theresa; Bell, John C; Parks, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are used in numerous preclinical and clinical studies for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic genes. Unfortunately, Ad has a poor ability to distribute throughout a tumor mass after intratumoral injection, and infects cells primarily within the immediate area of the injection tract. Thus, Ad-encoded transgene expression is typically limited to only a small percentage of cells within the tumor. One method to increase the proportion of the tumor impacted by Ad is through expression of fusogenic proteins. Infection of a single cell with an Ad vector encoding a fusogenic protein should lead to syncytium formation with adjacent cells, effectively spreading the effect of Ad and Ad-encoded therapeutic transgenes to a greater percentage of the tumor mass. Moreover, syncytium formation can be cytotoxic, suggesting that such proteins may be effective sole therapeutics. We show that an early region 1 (E1)-deleted Ad expressing reptilian reovirus p14 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein caused extensive cell fusion in the replication-permissive 293 cell line and at high multiplicity of infection in non-permissive human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro. FAST protein expression in the A549 cancer cell line led to a loss of cellular metabolic activity and membrane integrity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis. However, in an A549 xenograft CD-1 nude mouse cancer model, Ad-mediated FAST gene delivery did not induce detectable cell fusion, reduce tumor burden nor enhance mouse survival compared to controls. Taken together, our results show that, although AdFAST can enhance cancer cell killing in vitro, it is not effective as a sole therapeutic in the A549 tumor model in vivo. PMID:26986751

  16. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death.

  17. Chlorotoxin-Fc fusion inhibits release of MMP-2 from pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El-Ghlban, Samah; Kasai, Tomonari; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Yin, Hong Xia; Sekhar, Sreeja; Ida, Mikiko; Sanchez, Anna; Mizutani, Akifumi; Kudoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Chlorotoxin (CTX) is a 36-amino acid peptide derived from Leiurus quinquestriatus (scorpion) venom, which inhibits low-conductance chloride channels in colonic epithelial cells. It has been reported that CTX also binds to matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), membrane type-1 MMP, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2, as well as CLC-3 chloride ion channels and other proteins. Pancreatic cancer cells require the activation of MMP-2 during invasion and migration. In this study, the fusion protein was generated by joining the CTX peptide to the amino terminus of the human IgG-Fc domain without a hinge domain, the monomeric form of chlorotoxin (M-CTX-Fc). The resulting fusion protein was then used to target pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1) in vitro. M-CTX-Fc decreased MMP-2 release into the media of PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. M-CTX-Fc internalization into PANC-1 cells was observed. When the cells were treated with chlorpromazine (CPZ), the internalization of the fusion protein was reduced, implicating a clathrin-dependent internalization mechanism of M-CTX-Fc in PANC-1 cells. Furthermore, M-CTX-Fc clearly exhibited the inhibition of the migration depending on the concentration, but human IgG, as negative control of Fc, was not affected. The M-CTX-Fc may be an effective instrument for targeting pancreatic cancer.

  18. Chlorotoxin-Fc fusion inhibits release of MMP-2 from pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El-Ghlban, Samah; Kasai, Tomonari; Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Yin, Hong Xia; Sekhar, Sreeja; Ida, Mikiko; Sanchez, Anna; Mizutani, Akifumi; Kudoh, Takayuki; Murakami, Hiroshi; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Chlorotoxin (CTX) is a 36-amino acid peptide derived from Leiurus quinquestriatus (scorpion) venom, which inhibits low-conductance chloride channels in colonic epithelial cells. It has been reported that CTX also binds to matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), membrane type-1 MMP, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2, as well as CLC-3 chloride ion channels and other proteins. Pancreatic cancer cells require the activation of MMP-2 during invasion and migration. In this study, the fusion protein was generated by joining the CTX peptide to the amino terminus of the human IgG-Fc domain without a hinge domain, the monomeric form of chlorotoxin (M-CTX-Fc). The resulting fusion protein was then used to target pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1) in vitro. M-CTX-Fc decreased MMP-2 release into the media of PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. M-CTX-Fc internalization into PANC-1 cells was observed. When the cells were treated with chlorpromazine (CPZ), the internalization of the fusion protein was reduced, implicating a clathrin-dependent internalization mechanism of M-CTX-Fc in PANC-1 cells. Furthermore, M-CTX-Fc clearly exhibited the inhibition of the migration depending on the concentration, but human IgG, as negative control of Fc, was not affected. The M-CTX-Fc may be an effective instrument for targeting pancreatic cancer. PMID:24511528

  19. An experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammons, D. W.; Zimmermann, U.; Klinman, N. R.; Gessner, P.; Humphreys, R. C.; Emmons, S. P.; Neil, G. A.

    The influence of microgravity on lymphocyte activation is central to the understanding of immunological function in space. Moreover, the adaptation of groundbased technologies to microgravity conditions presents opportunities for biotechnological applications including high efficiency production of antibody forming hybridomas. Because the emerging technology of microgravity hybridoma generation is dependent upon activation and cultivation of B lymphocytes during flight, we have adapted mitogen-driven B lymphocyte stimulation and culture that allows for the in vitro generation of large numbers of antibody forming cells suitable for cell fusion over a period of 1-2 weeks. We believe that this activation and cultivation system can be flown on near-term space flights to test fundamental hypotheses about mammalian cell activation, cell fusion, metabolism, secretion, growth, and bio-separation.

  20. Immunogenicity of a neutralizing epitope from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus: M cell targeting ligand fusion protein expressed in transgenic rice calli.

    PubMed

    Huy, Nguyen-Xuan; Kim, Sae-Hae; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Tae-Geum

    2012-10-01

    To increase immune responses of plant-based vaccines in intestine mucosal immune systems, a synthetic neutralizing epitope (sCOE) gene of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was fused with M cell-targeting ligand (Co1) and introduced into a plant expression vector under the control of rice amylase 3D promoter. The sCOE-Co1 fusion gene was introduced into rice calli via the particle bombardment-mediated transformation method. The stable integration and transcriptional expression of the sCOE-Co1 fusion gene was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR amplification and Northern blot analysis, respectively. The expression of the COE-Co1 fusion protein was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. The highest expression level of the COE-Co1 fusion protein reached 0.083 % of the total soluble protein according to quantitative densitometry of Western blot analysis. Mice immunized with transgenic rice calli protein extracts induced significant serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody levels against purified bacterial COE. The systemic and mucosal immune responses were confirmed by measuring COE-specific IgG and IgA antibody-secreting cells in the lymphocytes extracted from the spleen and COE-specific IgA antibody-secreting cells in the Peyer's patches from immunized mice. These results indicated that oral immunization of plant-produced COE-Co1 fusion protein could elicit efficient systemic and mucosal immune responses against the COE antigen. Key message Neutralizing epitope from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus-M cell targeting ligand fusion protein was produced in transgenic rice calli and elicited systemic and mucosal immune responses by oral administration in mice. PMID:22736145

  1. Small Mismatches in Fatty Acyl Tail Lengths Can Effect Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Induced Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Anupa; Sarkar, Munna

    2016-06-01

    Biological membranes are made up of a variety of lipids with diverse physicochemical properties. The lipid composition modulates different lipidic parameters, such as hydration, dynamics, lipid packing, curvature strain, etc. Changes in these parameters affect various membrane-mediated processes, such as membrane fusion which is an integral step in many biological processes. Packing defects, which originate either from mismatch in the headgroup region or in the hydrophobic acyl tail region, play a major role in modulating membrane dynamics. In this study, we demonstrate how even a small mismatch in the fatty acyl chain length, achieved by incorporation of low concentrations (up to 30 mol %) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs), alters several lipidic parameters like packing, dynamics, and headgroup hydration. This in turn affects non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced membrane fusion. Dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, second-derivative absorption spectrophotometry, and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence have been used to elucidate the effect of small mismatch in the tails in DMPC/DPPC mixed vesicles and how it modulates membrane fusion induced by the oxicam NSAIDs, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx). Fusion kinetics was monitored using fluorescence based fusion assays. At low DPPC concentration of 10 mol %, additional fluidization promotes lipid mixing to some extent for Mx, but at higher mol % of DPPC, subsequent increase in rigidity of membrane interior along with increase in headgroup hydration, synergistically inhibits fusion to various extents for the three different drugs, Mx, Px, and Tx.

  2. A 45,000-M(r) glycoprotein in the Sendai virus envelope triggers virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M; Hassan, M Q; Tyagi, S K; Sarkar, D P

    1997-01-01

    Sendai virus envelopes devoid of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase but containing the fusion protein (F-virosomes) were prepared. F-virosomes exhibited discernible serine protease activity at neutral pH. Electrophoretic analysis of the protein profile of the F-virosomes under nonreducing conditions, by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, led to the identification of a previously unknown glycoprotein with a relative molecular weight of 45,000 (45K protein) associated with the F protein. The identity of the 45K protein, as distinct from F protein, was established by Western blot analysis with F- and 45K-specific antibodies. This 45K protein forms a nexus with the F protein through noncovalent hydrophobic interactions, as proved by its sensitivity to urea treatment, and it is essential for the proteolytic activity of the F-virosomes as well as for the fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membrane. N-terminal sequence analysis (first 11 amino acids) of this protein showed strong homology (> 90%) to flavivirus NS3 serine proteases but no similarity to any of the Sendai viral proteins. On the basis of the N-terminal sequence, oligonucleotides were designed corresponding to the sense and antisense DNA sequences. Dot blot hybridization and primer extension with these oligonucleotides with the viral and the host genome confirmed the host origin of this protein. Further, the limited proteolytic digestion of the target membrane resulted in significant inhibition of viral fusion with it. On the basis of these results, we postulate a model for the molecular mechanism of F protein-induced membrane fusion, which may provide a rationale for other paramyxoviruses. PMID:9261357

  3. Continuous Flow Separation of Hydrophobin Fusion Proteins from Plant Cell Culture Extract.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Lauri J; Conley, Andrew J; Joensuu, Jussi J

    2016-01-01

    Fusion to fungal hydrophobins has proven to be a useful tool to enhance accumulation and recovery of recombinant proteins in plants. Aqueous two-phase separation (ATPS) is an attractive system to capture hydrophobin fusion proteins from plant extracts. The process can simultaneously purify and concentrate target protein with minimal background. ATPS avoids the use of chromatographic column steps, can be carried out in a short time frame, and is amenable to industrial-scale protein purification. A drawback of performing ATPS in large volumes is the lengthy time required for phase separation; however, this can be avoided by incorporating continuous systems, which are often preferred by the processing industry. This method chapter illustrates the capture of GFP-HFBI hydrophobin fusion protein from BY-2 plant cell suspension extract using a semi-continuous ATPS method. PMID:26614291

  4. Myogenic reprogramming of retina-derived cells following their spontaneous fusion with myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kirillova, Irina; Gussoni, Emanuela; Goldhamer, David J.; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2008-01-01

    Satellite cells are recognized as the main source for myoblasts in postnatal muscle. The possible participation of other cell types in myofiber maintenance remains a subject of debate. Here, we investigated the potential of vascular preparations from mouse retina to undergo myogenesis when cultured alone or with differentiated primary myogenic cultures. The choice of retina, an organ richly supplied with capillary network and anatomically separated from skeletal muscles, ensures that the vasculature preparation is devoid of satellite cells. We demonstrate that retinal-derived cells spontaneously fuse with preexisting myotubes and contribute additional myonuclei, some of which initiate expression of muscle-specific genes after fusion. Myogenic differentiation of retinal cells prior to their fusion with preexisting myotubes was not detected. Although originating from vasculature preparations, nuclei undergoing myogenic reprogramming were contributed by cells that were neither endothelial nor blood borne. Our results suggest smooth muscle/pericytes as the possible source, and that myogenic reprogramming depends on the muscle specific transcription factor MyoD. Our studies provide insights into a novel avenue for myofiber maintenance, relying on nuclei of non-myogenic origin that undergo fusion and subsequent myogenic conversion within host myofibers. This process may support ongoing myofiber maintenance throughout life. PMID:17919536

  5. Reconstitution of membrane proteins into giant unilamellar vesicles via peptide-induced fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kahya, N; Pécheur, E I; de Boeij, W P; Wiersma, D A; Hoekstra, D

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we present a protocol to reconstitute membrane proteins into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) via peptide-induced fusion. In principle, GUV provide a well-defined lipid matrix, resembling a close-to-native state for biophysical studies, including optical microspectroscopy, of transmembrane proteins at the molecular level. Furthermore, reconstitution in this manner would also eliminate potential artifacts arising from secondary interactions of proteins, when reconstituted in planar membranes supported on solid surfaces. However, assembly procedures of GUV preclude direct reconstitution. Here, for the first time, a method is described that allows the controlled incorporation of membrane proteins into GUV. We demonstrate that large unilamellar vesicles (LUV, diameter 0.1 microm), to which the small fusogenic peptide WAE has been covalently attached, readily fuse with GUV, as revealed by monitoring lipid and contents mixing by fluorescence microscopy. To monitor contents mixing, a new fluorescence-based enzymatic assay was devised. Fusion does not introduce changes in the membrane morphology, as shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Analysis of fluorescence confocal imaging intensity revealed that approximately 6 to 10 LUV fused per microm(2) of GUV surface. As a model protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was reconstituted into GUV, using LUV into which BR was incorporated via detergent dialysis. BR did not affect GUV-LUV fusion and the protein was stably inserted into the GUV and functionally active. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments show that BR inserted into GUV undergoes unrestricted Brownian motion with a diffusion coefficient of 1.2 microm(2)/s. The current procedure offers new opportunities to address issues related to membrane-protein structure and dynamics in a close-to-native state. PMID:11509360

  6. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening. PMID:25971915

  7. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening.

  8. Identification of viral membrane proteins required for cell fusion and viral dissemination that are modified during vaccinia virus persistence.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M A; Paez, E

    1994-01-01

    Wild-type vaccinia virus WR strain forms non-fusogenic (F-) large plaques and is hemagglutinin positive (HA+) under normal conditions of virus infection. We have analyzed a collection of spontaneous, highly attenuated mutants of vaccinia virus isolated from persistently infected Friend erythroleukemia cells (E. Paez, S. Dallo, and M. Esteban, J. Virol. 61, 2642-2647, 1987) for the ability to express HA during virus infection. After 14 cell passages, all the mutants isolated were hemadsorption negative (HAD-) and did not synthesize a HA that could be recognized by anti-HA monoclonal antibodies. All these HA- mutants induced extensive cell-cell fusion (F+), with the exception of two mutants (65-16 and 101-14) isolated from late cell passages. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA gene in these two mutants confirmed the HA- phenotype. A frameshift mutation very close to the initiation codon resulted in premature translational termination. The truncated gene now only encodes the first 25 amino acids. Analysis of progeny from "wild-type," like early serial passage virus (5-3) X mutant back crosses, shows that for one late passage non-fusogenic small-plaque mutant (101-14) among large plaque progeny there is good correspondence between the ability to fuse and the absence of a viral HA and that each large plaque mutant contains a normal 14 kDa membrane protein. However, with a second serial passage mutant 65-16, which, like 101-14, is a nonfusogenic small-plaque variant, there is again an excellent correlation between the inability to synthesize HA and the ability to fuse, but there is no correlation of plaque size with a normal 14 kDa viral membrane protein, as most large plaque mutants encode a larger, i.e., 17 kDa protein. Rescue experiments of 65-16 with bona fide cloned 14 kDa protein gene confirm that the ability to regulate plaque size and cell fusion in this mutant is due to a protein other than the 14 kDa protein. Marker rescue experiments indicated that the map

  9. Intercellular delivery of a herpes simplex virus VP22 fusion protein from cells infected with lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhennan; Han, Ina; Zirzow, Gregory; Brady, Roscoe O.; Reiser, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    Effective gene therapy depends on the efficient transfer of therapeutic genes and their protein products to target cells. Lentiviral vectors appear promising for virus-mediated gene delivery and long-term expression in nondividing cells. The herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 has recently been shown to mediate intercellular transport of proteins, raising the possibility that it may be helpful in a setting where the global delivery of therapeutic proteins is desired. To investigate the effectiveness of lentiviral vectors to deliver genes encoding proteins fused to VP22, and to test whether the system is sufficiently potent to allow protein delivery from transduced cells in vitro and in vivo, fusion constructs of VP22 and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were prepared and delivered into target cells by using HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors. To follow the spread of VP22-EGFP to other cells, transduced COS-7 cells were coplated with a number of different cell types, including brain choroid plexus cells, human endothelial cells, H9 cells, and HeLa cells. We found that VP22-EGFP fusion proteins were transported from transduced cells to recipient cells and that such fusion proteins accumulated in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of such cells. To determine the ability to deliver fusion proteins in vivo, we injected transduced H9 cells as well as the viral vector directly into the brain of mice. We present evidence that VP22-EGFP fusion proteins were transported effectively from lentivirus transduced cells in vivo. We also show that the VP22-EGFP fusion protein encoded by the lentivirus is transported between cells. Our data indicate that such fusion proteins are present in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of neighboring cells. Therefore, lentiviral vectors may provide a potent biological system for delivering genes encoding therapeutic proteins fused to VP22. PMID:11027330

  10. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  11. Enhanced binding and killing of target tumor cells by drug-loaded liposomes modified with tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; D’Souza, Gerard GM; Bedi, Deepa; Fagbohun, Olusegun A; Potturi, L Prasanna; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Aim To explore cancer cell-specific phage fusion pVIII coat protein, identified using phage display, for targeted delivery of drug-loaded liposomes to MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Material & methods An 8-mer landscape library f8/8 and a biopanning protocol against MCF-7 cells were used to select a landscape phage protein bearing MCF-7-specific peptide. Size and morphology of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes modified with the tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein (phage–Doxil) were determined by dynamic light scattering and freeze-fraction electron microscopy. Topology of the phage protein in liposomes was examined by western blot. Association of phage–Doxil with MCF-7 cells was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrometry. Selective targeting to MCF-7 was shown by FACS using a coculture model with target and nontarget cells. Phage–Doxil-induced tumor cell killing and apoptosis were confirmed by CellTiter-Blue® Assay and caspase-3/CPP32 fluorometric assay. Results A chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 cells, identified from a phage landscape library, was directly incorporated into the liposomal bilayer of doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®) without additional conjugation with lipophilic moieties. Western blotting confirmed the presence of both targeting peptide and pVIII coat protein in the phage–Doxil, which maintained the liposomal morphology and retained a substantial part of the incorporated drug after phage protein incorporation. The binding activity of the phage fusion pVIII coat protein was retained after incorporation into liposomes, and phage–Doxil strongly and specifically targeted MCF-7 cells, demonstrating significantly increased cytotoxicity towards target cells in vitro. Conclusion We present a novel and straightforward method for making tumor-targeted nanomedicines by anchoring specific phage proteins (substitute antibodies) on their surface. PMID:20528452

  12. Self-contact elimination by membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Grant M; Yamada, Soichiro

    2013-11-19

    Mutual, homophilic cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells is required for proper maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Whereas opposing membranes from neighboring cells rapidly assemble junctional complexes, self-contacting membranes curiously do not, suggesting that cells have the ability to prevent the maturation of self-junctions. Using a self-contact-inducing microfabricated substrate, we show that self-contacts of normal epithelial cells are rapidly eliminated by membrane fusion between two opposing plasma membranes of a single cell. This membrane fusion is most frequently observed in E-cadherin-expressing epithelial cells, but not in fibroblasts. The efficiency of self-contact elimination depends on extracellular calcium concentration and the level of E-cadherin, suggesting that E-cadherin, although not required, enhances membrane fusion efficiency by bringing opposing membranes into close apposition to one another. Additionally, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibition decreases self-contact-induced membrane fusion of epithelial cells, suggesting that this fusion may be mechanically regulated through the actin-myosin network. This self-contact-induced membrane fusion is a key elimination mechanism for unwanted self-junctions and may be a feature of cell self-recognition. PMID:24191042

  13. Melanoma-Derived BRAF(V600E) Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell's phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAF(V600E) melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAF(V600E) protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAF(V600E) with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAF(V600E) mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAF(V600E) mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAF(WT) melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  14. Induced genetic deficiency of the nucleolar organizer in rat kangaroo cells (PTK1) by ultraviolet laser microirradiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Berns, M W

    1983-03-01

    An ultraviolet laser microbeam was used to irradiate one of the two nucleolar organizer regions of PTK1 cells in early prophase. The directed nucleolar deficiency induced by ultraviolet laser irradiation was maintained in the daughter cells through subsequent cell generations. However, the frequent occurrence of spontaneous cell fusion in low density cells following the cloning procedure facilitated a recovery of cells to two or more nucleoli.

  15. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J.; Wubbolts, Richard W.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. IMPORTANCE Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  16. Proteolytic activation of the porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus spike fusion protein by trypsin in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-07-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. Importance: Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  17. Enhanced protein expression in the baculovirus/insect cell system using engineered SUMO fusions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Spurrier, Joshua; Butt, Tauseef R; Strickler, James E

    2008-11-01

    Recombinant protein expression in insect cells varies greatly from protein to protein. A fusion tag that is not only a tool for detection and purification, but also enhances expression and/or solubility would greatly facilitate both structure/function studies and therapeutic protein production. We have shown that fusion of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) to several test proteins leads to enhanced expression levels in Escherichia coli. In eukaryotic expression systems, however, the SUMO tag could be cleaved by endogenous desumoylase. In order to adapt SUMO-fusion technology to these systems, we have developed an alternative SUMO-derived tag, designated SUMOstar, which is not processed by native SUMO proteases. In the present study, we tested the SUMOstar tag in a baculovirus/insect cell system with several proteins, i.e. mouse UBP43, human tryptase beta II, USP4, USP15, and GFP. Our results demonstrate that fusion to SUMOstar enhanced protein expression levels at least 4-fold compared to either the native or His(6)-tagged proteins. We isolated active SUMOstar tagged UBP43, USP4, USP15, and GFP. Tryptase was active following cleavage with a SUMOstar specific protease. The SUMOstar system will make significant impact in difficult-to-express proteins and especially to those proteins that require the native N-terminal residue for function.

  18. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V.; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  19. Characterisation of Weibel–Palade body fusion by amperometry in endothelial cells reveals fusion pore dynamics and the effect of cholesterol on exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Emma A.; Conte, Ianina L.; Dempster, John; Hannah, Matthew J.; Carter, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Summary Regulated secretion from endothelial cells is mediated by Weibel–Palade body (WPB) exocytosis. Plasma membrane cholesterol is implicated in regulating secretory granule exocytosis and fusion pore dynamics; however, its role in modulating WPB exocytosis is not clear. To address this we combined high-resolution electrochemical analysis of WPB fusion pore dynamics, by amperometry, with high-speed optical imaging of WPB exocytosis following cholesterol depletion or supplementation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We identified serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity in WPBs, and VMAT1 expression allowing detection of secreted 5-HT as discrete current spikes during exocytosis. A high proportion of spikes (∼75%) had pre-spike foot signals, indicating that WPB fusion proceeds via an initial narrow pore. Cholesterol depletion significantly reduced pre-spike foot signal duration and increased the rate of fusion pore expansion, whereas cholesterol supplementation had broadly the reverse effect. Cholesterol depletion slowed the onset of hormone-evoked WPB exocytosis, whereas its supplementation increased the rate of WPB exocytosis and hormone-evoked proregion secretion. Our results provide the first analysis of WPB fusion pore dynamics and highlight an important role for cholesterol in the regulation of WPB exocytosis. PMID:24127569

  20. Chromatin-prebound Crm1 recruits Nup98-HoxA9 fusion to induce aberrant expression of Hox cluster genes.

    PubMed

    Oka, Masahiro; Mura, Sonoko; Yamada, Kohji; Sangel, Percival; Hirata, Saki; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Kawakami, Koichi; Tachibana, Taro; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-07

    The nucleoporin Nup98 is frequently rearranged to form leukemogenic Nup98-fusion proteins with various partners. However, their function remains largely elusive. Here, we show that Nup98-HoxA9, a fusion between Nup98 and the homeobox transcription factor HoxA9, forms nuclear aggregates that frequently associate with facultative heterochromatin. We demonstrate that stable expression of Nup98-HoxA9 in mouse embryonic stem cells selectively induces the expression of Hox cluster genes. Genome-wide binding site analysis revealed that Nup98-HoxA9 is preferentially targeted and accumulated at Hox cluster regions where the export factor Crm1 is originally prebound. In addition, leptomycin B, an inhibitor of Crm1, disassembled nuclear Nup98-HoxA9 dots, resulting in the loss of chromatin binding of Nup98-HoxA9 and Nup98-HoxA9-mediated activation of Hox genes. Collectively, our results indicate that highly selective targeting of Nup98-fusion proteins to Hox cluster regions via prebound Crm1 induces the formation of higher order chromatin structures that causes aberrant Hox gene regulation.

  1. Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high let radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Zhao, Y. L.; Roy, D.; Piao, C. Q.; Calaf, G.; Hall, E. J.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequence of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 150 keV/μm alpha particles or 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Cell fusion studies indicated that radiation-induced tumorigenic phenotype in BEP2D cells could be completely suppressed by fusion with non-tumorigenic BEP2D cells. The differential expressions of known genes between tumorigenic bronchial and breast cells induced by alpha particles and their respective control cultures were compared using cDNA expression array. Among the 11 genes identified to be differentially expressed in BEP2D cells, three ( DCC, DNA-PK and p21 CIPI) were shown to be consistently down-regulated by 2 to 4 fold in all the 5 tumor cell lines examined. In contrast, their expressions in the fusion cell lines were comparable to control BEP2D cells. Similarly, expression levels of a series of genes were found to be altered in a step-wise manner among tumorigenic MCF-10F cells. The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process.

  2. Development of a diphtheria toxin-based recombinant porcine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting porcine CD25+ cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Schenk, Marian; Li, Guoying; Zhang, Huiping; Farkash, Evan A; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Wang, Zhirui

    2013-12-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been widely recognized as crucial players in controlling immune responses. Because their major role is to ensure that the immune system is not over reactive, Tregs have been the focus of multiple research studies including those investigating transplantation tolerance, autoimmunity and cancer treatment. On their surface Tregs constitutively express CD25, a high affinity receptor for the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The reagents constructed in this study were generated by genetically linking porcine IL-2 to the truncated diphtheria toxin (DT390). This reagent functions by first binding to the cell surface via the porcine IL-2/porcine CD25 interaction then the DT390 domain facilitates internalization followed by inhibition of protein synthesis resulting in cell death. Four versions of the porcine IL-2 fusion toxin were designed in an interest to find the most effective isoform: 1) monovalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Gly); 2) monovalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (NonGly); 3) bivalent glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-Gly); 4) bivalent non-N-glycosylated porcine IL-2 fusion toxin (Bi-NonGly). Using a porcine CD25(+) B cell lymphoma cell line (LCL13271) in vitro analysis of the fusion toxins' ability to inhibit protein synthesis demonstrated that the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin is the most efficient reagent. These in vitro results are consistent with binding affinity as the Bi-NonGly fusion toxin binds strongest to CD25 on the same LCL13271 cells. The Bi-Gly fusion toxin significantly prolonged the survival (p=0.028) of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ(-/-) (NSG) mice injected with LCL13271 cells compared with untreated controls. This recombinant protein has great potential to function as a useful tool for in vivo depletion of porcine CD25(+) cells for studying immune regulation. PMID:24055128

  3. Differential gene expression in nematode-induced feeding structures of transgenic plants harbouring promoter-gusA fusion constructs.

    PubMed

    Goddijn, O J; Lindsey, K; van der Lee, F M; Klap, J C; Sijmons, P C

    1993-11-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes are able to induce specialized feeding structures in the root system of their host plants by triggering a series of dramatic cellular responses. These changes presumably are accompanied by a reprogramming of gene expression. To monitor such changes, a variety of promoter-gusA fusion constructs were introduced into Arabidopsis and tobacco. Transgenic plants were analysed histochemically for GUS activity in the nematode feeding structures after infection with either Heterodera schachtii or Meloidogyne incognita. Promoters of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S gene, the bacterial nopaline synthase, rooting loci (rol) and T-cyt genes and the plant-derived phenylalanine ammonia-lyase I gene, which are highly active in non-infected roots, were all downregulated in the feeding structures as indicated by the strong decrease of GUS activity inside these structures. Less stringent downregulation was observed with chimeric gusA fusion constructs harbouring truncated rolB and rolC promoter sequences. Similar observations were made with transgenic Arabidopsis lines that carried randomly integrated promoterless gusA constructs to identify regulatory sequences in the plant genome. Most of the lines that were selected for expression in the root vascular cylinder demonstrated local downregulation in feeding structures after infection with H. schachtii. The reverse pattern of GUS activity, a blue feeding structure amidst unstained root cells, was also found in several lines. However, GUS activity that was entirely specific for the feeding structures was not observed. Our data show that the expression of a large number of genes is influenced during the development of the nematode feeding structures.

  4. Cholesterol-Dependent Membrane Fusion Induced by the gp41 Membrane-Proximal External Region–Transmembrane Domain Connection Suggests a Mechanism for Broad HIV-1 Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Carravilla, Pablo; Requejo-Isidro, José; Huarte, Nerea

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 promotes fusion of the viral membrane with that of the target cell. Structural, biochemical, and biophysical studies suggest that its membrane-proximal external region (MPER) may interact with the HIV-1 membrane and induce its disruption and/or deformation during the process. However, the high cholesterol content of the envelope (ca. 40 to 50 mol%) imparts high rigidity, thereby acting against lipid bilayer restructuring. Here, based on the outcome of vesicle stability assays, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, and atomic force microscopy observations, we propose that the conserved sequence connecting the MPER with the N-terminal residues of the transmembrane domain (TMD) is involved in HIV-1 fusion. This junction would function by inducing phospholipid protrusion and acyl-chain splay in the cholesterol-enriched rigid envelope. Supporting the functional relevance of such a mechanism, membrane fusion was inhibited by the broadly neutralizing 4E10 antibody but not by a nonneutralizing variant with the CDR-H3 loop deleted. We conclude that the MPER-TMD junction embodies an envelope-disrupting C-terminal fusion peptide that can be targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies. IMPORTANCE Fusion of the cholesterol-enriched viral envelope with the cell membrane marks the beginning of the infectious HIV-1 replicative cycle. Consequently, the Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion function constitutes an important clinical target for inhibitors and preventive vaccines. Antibodies 4E10 and 10E8 bind to one Env vulnerability site located at the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER)–transmembrane domain (TMD) junction and block infection. These antibodies display broad viral neutralization, which underscores the conservation and functionality of the MPER-TMD region. In this work, we combined biochemical assays with molecular dynamics simulations and microscopy observations to characterize the unprecedented fusogenic activity of the

  5. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain. PMID:26484613

  6. Impaired telomerase activity in human cells expressing GFP-Ku86 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Badie, C; Yáñez-Muñoz, R J; Muller, C; Salles, B; Porter, A C G

    2008-01-01

    The Ku heterodimer is a DNA end-binding protein that promotes the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair by recruiting the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). Ku is also a normal component of telomeres where it is required for telomere maintenance, interacting not only with the DNA but also with various telomere proteins including telomerase. The way in which Ku simultaneously plays such distinct roles, end-joining at DSBs and end-maintenance at telomeres, is unclear. One way to address this is to study cells in which the NHEJ and telomeric roles of Ku have been separated. Here we describe human cells that express fusions between the large human Ku subunit (Ku86) and a fluorescent protein tag. These cells have reduced telomerase activity and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) but no change in their DNA-PK activity or in the DNA end-binding of endogenous Ku. Cells with particularly large amounts of one fusion protein undergo progressive telomere shortening and cellular senescence. These data are consistent with models in which Ku recruits telomerase to telomeres or activates recruited telomerase and suggest that the Ku86 fusion proteins specifically block this role. PMID:19188702

  7. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  8. Fusion protein Isl1-Lhx3 specifies motor neuron fate by inducing motor neuron genes and concomitantly suppressing the interneuron programs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghee; Cuvillier, James M; Lee, Bora; Shen, Rongkun; Lee, Jae W; Lee, Soo-Kyung

    2012-02-28

    Combinatorial transcription codes generate the myriad of cell types during development and thus likely provide crucial insights into directed differentiation of stem cells to a specific cell type. The LIM complex composed of Isl1 and Lhx3 directs the specification of spinal motor neurons (MNs) in embryos. Here, we report that Isl1-Lhx3, a LIM-complex mimicking fusion, induces a signature of MN transcriptome and concomitantly suppresses interneuron differentiation programs, thereby serving as a potent and specific inducer of MNs in stem cells. We show that an equimolar ratio of Isl1 and Lhx3 and the LIM domain of Lhx3 are crucial for generating MNs without up-regulating interneuron genes. These led us to design Isl1-Lhx3, which maintains the desirable 1:1 ratio of Isl1 and Lhx3 and the LIM domain of Lhx3. Isl1-Lhx3 drives MN differentiation with high specificity and efficiency in the spinal cord and embryonic stem cells, bypassing the need for sonic hedgehog (Shh). RNA-seq analysis revealed that Isl1-Lhx3 induces the expression of a battery of MN genes that control various functional aspects of MNs, while suppressing key interneuron genes. Our studies uncover a highly efficient method for directed MN generation and MN gene networks. Our results also demonstrate a general strategy of using embryonic transcription complexes for producing specific cell types from stem cells. PMID:22343290

  9. Vicenistatin induces early endosome-derived vacuole formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yuko; Ohmichi, Tomohiro; Kazami, Sayaka; Iwasaki, Hiroki; Mano, Kousuke; Nagumo, Yoko; Kudo, Fumitaka; Ichikawa, Sosaku; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Kanoh, Naoki; Eguchi, Tadashi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Usui, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Homotypic fusion of early endosomes is important for efficient protein trafficking and sorting. The key controller of this process is Rab5 which regulates several effectors and PtdInsPs levels, but whose mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that vicenistatin, a natural product, enhanced homotypic fusion of early endosomes and induced the formation of large vacuole-like structures in mammalian cells. Unlike YM201636, another early endosome vacuolating compound, vicenistatin did not inhibit PIKfyve activity in vitro but activated Rab5-PAS pathway in cells. Furthermore, vicenistatin increased the membrane surface fluidity of cholesterol-containing liposomes in vitro, and cholesterol deprivation from the plasma membrane stimulated vicenistatin-induced vacuolation in cells. These results suggest that vicenistatin is a novel compound that induces the formation of vacuole-like structures by activating Rab5-PAS pathway and increasing membrane fluidity. PMID:27104762

  10. Integrated cell and process engineering for improved transient production of a "difficult-to-express" fusion protein by CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Johari, Yusuf B; Estes, Scott D; Alves, Christina S; Sinacore, Marty S; James, David C

    2015-12-01

    Based on an optimized electroporation protocol, we designed a rapid, milliliter-scale diagnostic transient production assay to identify limitations in the ability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a model "difficult-to-express" homodimeric Fc-fusion protein, Sp35Fc, that exhibited very low volumetric titer and intracellular formation of disulfide-bonded oligomeric aggregates post-transfection. As expression of Sp35Fc induced an unfolded protein response in transfected host cells, we utilized the transient assay to compare, in parallel, multiple functionally diverse strategies to engineer intracellular processing of Sp35Fc in order to increase production and reduce aggregation as two discrete design objectives. Specifically, we compared the effect of (i) co-expression of ER-resident molecular chaperones (BiP, PDI, CypB) or active forms of UPR transactivators (ATF6c, XBP1s) at varying recombinant gene load, (ii) addition of small molecules known to act as chemical chaperones (PBA, DMSO, glycerol, betaine, TMAO) or modulate UPR signaling (PERK inhibitor GSK2606414) at varying concentration, (iii) a reduction in culture temperature to 32°C. Using this information, we designed a biphasic, Sp35Fc-specific transient manufacturing process mediated by lipofection that utilized CypB co-expression at an optimal Sp35Fc:CypB gene ratio of 5:1 to initially maximize transfected cell proliferation, followed by addition of a combination of PBA (0.5 mM) and glycerol (1% v/v) at the onset of stationary phase to maximize cell specific production and eliminate Sp35Fc aggregation. Using this optimal, engineered process transient Sp35Fc production was significantly increased sixfold over a 12 day production process with no evidence of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Finally, transient production in clonally derived sub-populations (derived from parental CHO host) screened for a heritably improved capability to produce Sp35Fc was also significantly improved by the optimized

  11. Tumorigenic potential is restored during differentiation in fusion-reprogrammed cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J; Zhang, L; Hu, L; Guo, B; Hu, X; Borjigin, U; Wei, Z; Chen, Y; Lv, M; Lau, J T Y; Wang, X; Li, G; Hu, Y-P

    2016-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the mechanistic steps underlying tumor initiation and malignant progression is critical for insights of potentially novel therapeutic modalities. Cellular reprogramming is an approach of particular interest because it can provide a means to reset the differentiation state of the cancer cells and to revert these cells to a state of non-malignancy. Here, we investigated the relationship between cellular differentiation and malignant progression by the fusion of four independent mouse cancer cell lines from different tissues, each with differing developmental potentials, to pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Fusion was accompanied by loss of differentiated properties of the four parental cancer cell lines and concomitant emergence of pluripotency, demonstrating the feasibility to reprogram the malignant and differentiative properties of cancer cells. However, the original malignant and differentiative phenotypes re-emerge upon withdrawal of the fused cells from the embryonic environment in which they were maintained. cDNA array analysis of the malignant hepatoma progression implicated a role for Foxa1, and silencing Foxa1 prevented the re-emergence of malignant and differentiation-associated gene expression. Our findings support the hypothesis that tumor progression results from deregulation of stem cells, and our approach provides a strategy to analyze possible mechanisms in the cancer initiation. PMID:27468690

  12. Human Dendritic Cell Activity against Histoplasma capsulatum Is Mediated via Phagolysosomal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, Lucy A.; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Morris, Randal E.; Newman, Simon L.

    2005-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a fungal pathogen that requires the induction of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) for host survival. We have demonstrated that human dendritic cells (DC) phagocytose H. capsulatum yeasts and, unlike human macrophages (Mø) that are permissive for intracellular growth, DC killed and degraded the fungus. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the mechanism(s) by which DC kill Histoplasma is via lysosomal hydrolases, via the production of toxic oxygen metabolites, or both. Phagosome-lysosome fusion (PL-fusion) was quantified by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran and phase and fluorescence microscopy and by electron microscopy with horseradish peroxidase colloidal gold to label lysosomes. Unlike Mφ, Histoplasma-infected DC exhibited marked PL-fusion. The addition of suramin to Histoplasma-infected DC inhibited PL-fusion and DC fungicidal activity. Incubation of Histoplasma-infected DC at 18°C also concomitantly reduced PL-fusion and decreased the capacity of DC to kill and degrade H. capsulatum yeasts. Further, culture of Histoplasma-infected DC in the presence of bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar ATPase, did not block DC anti-Histoplasma activity, indicating that phagosome acidification was not required for lysosome enzyme activity. In contrast, culture of Histoplasma-infected DC in the presence of inhibitors of the respiratory burst or inhibitors of NO synthase had little to no effect on DC fungicidal activity. These data suggest that the major mechanism by which human DC mediate anti-Histoplasma activity is through the exposure of yeasts to DC lysosomal hydrolases. Thus, DC can override one of the strategies used by H. capsulatum yeasts to survive intracellularly within Mø. PMID:16177358

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells: progress and future perspectives in the stem cell world.

    PubMed

    Rezanejad, Habib; Matin, Maryam M

    2012-12-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to differentiate into many cell types and therefore can be a valuable source for cell therapy. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, are representative of PSCs. However, use of these cells has some limitations, especially ethical restrictions and immune response. As a result, researchers have been looking for other cell sources or strategies to overcome these limitations. One kind of cellular reprogramming is the process of guiding mature cells into a state of gene expression similar to PSCs. It has been demonstrated that somatic cells can be reprogrammed by various methods, including somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and cell fusion with ESCs or treatment with their extracts. This implies that some factors in oocytes and ESCs are able to initiate the reprogramming process. Accordingly, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been derived from somatic cells by ectopic expression of some transcription factors. This discovery has resulted in raising several important questions about the mechanisms by which these factors influence the reprogramming and epigenetic status of the cells. iPSCs hold great promise for regenerative medicine, developmental biology, and drug discovery because they circumvent problems associated with both ethical issues and immunological rejection. Here we review the experiments involved in the discovery of iPSCs, important factors in their reprogramming, and their future perspectives in cell therapy.

  14. TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 Signaling via Lysosome Fusion and Membrane Raft Clustering In Coronary Arterial Endothelial Cells: Evidence from ASM Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Han, Wei-Qing; Boini, Krishna M.; Xia, Min; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its receptor death receptor 4 (DR4) have been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. However, the signaling mechanism mediating DR4 activation and leading to endothelial injury remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that ceramide production via hydrolysis of membrane sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) results in membrane raft (MRs) clustering and formation of important redox signaling platforms, which play a crucial role in amplifying redox signaling in endothelial cells leading to endothelial dysfunction. The present study aims to investigate whether TRAIL triggers MR clustering via lysosome fusion and ASM activation, thereby conducting transmembrane redox signaling and changing endothelial function. Using confocal microscopy, we found that TRAIL induced MR clustering and its co-localization with DR4 in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) isolated from wild-type (Smpd1+/+) mice. Further, TRAIL triggered ASM translocation, ceramide production and NADPH oxidase aggregation in MR clusters in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, whereas these observations were not found in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Moreover, ASM deficiency reduced TRAIL-induced O2−· production in CAECs and abolished TRAIL-induced impairment on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in small resistance arteries. By measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we found that Lamp-1 (lysosome membrane marker protein) and ganglioside GM1 (MR marker) were trafficking together in Smpd1+/+ CAECs, which was absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Consistently, fluorescence imaging of living cells with specific lysosome probes demonstrated that TRAIL-induced lysosome fusion with membrane was also absent in Smpd1−/− CAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that ASM is essential for TRAIL-induced lysosomal trafficking and fusion with membrane and formation of MR redox signaling platforms, which may

  15. DNA Triplex-Based Complexes Display Anti-HIV-1-Cell Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Xiaoyu; Chong, Huihui; Lai, Wenqing; Jiang, Xifeng; Wang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    DNA triplexes with hydrophobic modifications were designed and evaluated for their activity as inhibitors of the cell fusion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Triplex inhibitors displayed low micromolar activities in the cell–cell fusion assay and nanomolar activities in the anti-HIV-1 pseudovirus test. Helix structure and the presence of sufficient numbers of hydrophobic regions were essential for the antifusion activity. Results from native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent resonance energy transfer-based inhibitory assay indicated that these triplexes may interact with the primary pocket at the glycoprotein 41 (gp41) N-heptad repeat, thereby inhibiting formation of the HIV-1 gp41 6-helical bundle. Triplex-based complexes may represent a novel category of HIV-1 inhibitors in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. PMID:26192705

  16. Regulated vesicle fusion generates signaling nanoterritories that control T cell activation at the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Soares, Helena; Henriques, Ricardo; Sachse, Martin; Ventimiglia, Leandro; Alonso, Miguel A; Zimmer, Christophe; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Alcover, Andrés

    2013-10-21

    How the vesicular traffic of signaling molecules contributes to T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction at the immunological synapse remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that the protein tyrosine kinase Lck, the TCRζ subunit, and the adapter LAT traffic through distinct exocytic compartments, which are released at the immunological synapse in a differentially regulated manner. Lck vesicular release depends on MAL protein. Synaptic Lck, in turn, conditions the calcium- and synaptotagmin-7-dependent fusion of LAT and TCRζ containing vesicles. Fusion of vesicles containing TCRζ and LAT at the synaptic membrane determines not only the nanoscale organization of phosphorylated TCRζ, ZAP70, LAT, and SLP76 clusters but also the presence of phosphorylated LAT and SLP76 in interacting signaling nanoterritories. This mechanism is required for priming IL-2 and IFN-γ production and may contribute to fine-tuning T cell activation breadth in response to different stimulatory conditions.

  17. Fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with cancer cells: metastasis as a secondary disease in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pawelek, John M.

    2014-01-01

    This perspective article highlights the leukocyte-cancer cell hybrid theory as a mechanism for cancer metastasis. Beginning from the first proposal of the theory more than a century ago and continuing today with the first proof for this theory in a human cancer, the hybrid theory offers a unifying explanation for metastasis. In this scenario, leukocyte fusion with a cancer cell is a secondary disease superimposed upon the early tumor, giving birth to a new, malignant cell with a leukocyte-cancer cell hybrid epigenome. PMID:24589183

  18. Fusion hindrance and quasi-fission in heavy-ion induced reactions: disentangling the effect of different parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fioretto, E.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Trotta, M.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Chizhov, A. Yu.; Itkis, I. M.; Itkis, M. G.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Voskressensky, V. M.; Courtin, S.

    2006-04-26

    Experimental results on the fusion inhibition effect near the Coulomb barrier due to the onset of the quasi-fission mechanism are presented. The investigation was focused on reactions induced by 48Ca projectiles on different heavy targets and comparing them to reactions induced by light ions such as 12C and 16O leading to the same compound nuclei. Cross sections and angular distributions of evaporation residues and fission fragments have been measured.

  19. GPI-anchored influenza hemagglutinin induces hemifusion to both red blood cell and planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Melikyan, G B; White, J M; Cohen, F S

    1995-11-01

    Under fusogenic conditions, fluorescent dye redistributed from the outer monolayer leaflet of red blood cells (RBCs) to cells expressing glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored influenza virus hemagglutinin (GPI-HA) without transfer of aqueous dye. This suggests that hemifusion, but not full fusion, occurred (Kemble, G. W., T. Danieli, and J. M. White. 1994. Cell. 76:383-391). We extended the evidence for hemifusion by labeling the inner monolayer leaflets of RBCs with FM4-64 and observing that these inner leaflets did not become continuous with GPI-HA-expressing cells. The region of hemifusion-separated aqueous contents, the hemifusion diaphragm, appeared to be extended and was long-lived. But when RBCs hemifused to GPI-HA-expressing cells were osmotically swollen, some diaphragms were disrupted, and spread of both inner leaflet and aqueous dyes was observed. This was characteristic of full fusion: inner leaflet and aqueous probes spread to cells expressing wild-type HA (wt-HA). By simultaneous video fluorescence microscopy and time-resolved electrical admittance measurements, we rigorously demonstrated that GPI-HA-expressing cells hemifuse to planar bilayer membranes: lipid continuity was established without formation of fusion pores. The hemifusion area became large. In contrast, for cells expressing wt-HA, before lipid dye spread, fusion pores were always observed, establishing that full fusion occurred. We present an elastic coupling model in which the ectodomain of wt-HA induces hemifusion and the transmembrane domain, absent in the GPI-HA-expressing cells, mediates full fusion. PMID:7593189

  20. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  1. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts.

    PubMed

    Symeonides, Menelaos; Murooka, Thomas T; Bellfy, Lauren N; Roy, Nathan H; Mempel, Thorsten R; Thali, Markus

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer) and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing "fusion sinks" are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis.

  2. Fusion leads to effective segregation of damage during cell division: An analytical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lade, Steven J; Coelho, Miguel; Tolić, Iva M; Gross, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    High levels of cellular damage are associated with impairment of cellular function and cell death. Partitioning the damage into a fraction of cells in the population improves population fitness and survival. We have previously shown that protein aggregates, resulting from misfolded, damaged proteins, fuse with each other leading to damage partitioning during cell division. Here, using an analytical treatment of aggregate fusion in dividing cells we present analytical expressions for two measures of damage partition: aggregate mass partition asymmetry between two dividing cells and standard deviation of total aggregate mass across the population. The scaling laws obtained demonstrate how damage partition may generally depend on characteristics of the cellular processes, facilitating better understanding of damage segregation in biological cells.

  3. The human leukocyte antigen G promotes trophoblast fusion and β-hCG production through the Erk1/2 pathway in human choriocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji-meng; Zhao, Hong-xi; Wang, Li; Gao, Zhi-ying; Yao, Yuan-qing

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HLA-G expression promotes BeWo cells fusion and fusogenic gene expression. •HLA-G is capable of inducing β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cell lines. •Up-regulation of β-hCG production by HLA-G is mediated via the Erk1/2 pathway. -- Abstract: The human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is expressed on the fetal–maternal interface and plays a role in protecting fetal-derived trophoblasts from the maternal immune response, allowing trophoblasts to invade the uterus. However, HLA-G also possesses immune suppressing-independent functions. We found that HLA-G expressing BeWo choriocarcinoma cells increased cell–cell fusion compared to control BeWo cells under forskolin treatment. Regardless of forskolin treatment, the expression of fusogenic gene mRNAs, including syncytin-1, the transcription factor glial cell missing 1 (Gcm1), and beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) were elevated. HLA-G up-regulates β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cells because HLA-G knockdown in JEG-3 cells induces a dramatic decrease in β-hCG compared with control cells. The defect in β-hCG production in HLA-G knocked-down cells could not be completely overcome by stimulating hCG production through increasing intracellular cAMP levels. HLA-G expressing cells have increased phosphorylation levels for extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) in BeWo cells. The Erk1/2 pathway is inactivated after the inhibition of HLA-G expression in JEG-3 cells. Finally, Erk1/2 inhibition was able to suppress the increased hCG production induced by HLA-G expression. Together, these data suggest novel roles for HLA-G in regulating β-hCG production via the modulation of the Erk1/2 pathway and by inducing trophoblast cell fusion.

  4. Diphtheria toxin-based bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin with improved efficacy for targeting human CD25(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Peraino, Jaclyn Stromp; Zhang, Huiping; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Wei, Min; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) constitute a major inhibitory cell population which suppresses immune responses. Thus, Treg have proven to be key players in the induction of transplantation tolerance, protection from autoimmune disease and prevention of the development of effective anti-tumor immune reactions. Treg express high levels of the high affinity interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) consisting of IL-2Rα (CD25) together with IL-2Rβ (CD122) and the common γ-chain (CD132). An effective reagent capable of depleting Treg in vivo would facilitate better cancer treatment and allow mechanistic studies of the role of Treg in transplantation tolerance and the development of autoimmune disease. In this study, we have developed a novel bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin along with an Ontak®-like monovalent human IL-2 fusion toxin and compared the functional ability of these reagents in vitro. Here we show that genetically linking two human IL-2 domains in tandem, thereby generating a bivalent fusion toxin, results in significantly improved capacity in targeting human CD25(+) cells in vitro. Binding analysis by flow cytometry showed that the bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxin has notably increased affinity for human CD25(+) cells. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform has an increased potency of approximately 2 logs in inhibiting cellular proliferation and protein synthesis in human CD25(+) cells compared to the monovalent human IL-2 fusion toxin. Additionally, we performed two inhibition assays in order to verify that the fusion toxins target the cells specifically through binding of the human IL-2 domain of the fusion toxin to the human IL-2 receptor on the cell surface. These results demonstrated that 1) both monovalent and bivalent human IL-2 fusion toxins are capable of blocking the binding of biotinylated human IL-2 to human CD25 by flow cytometry; and 2) human IL-2 blocked the fusion toxins from inhibiting protein synthesis and cellular

  5. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  6. Temperatures of shock-induced shear instabilities and their relationship to fusion curves. [emission from glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    New emission spectra for MgO and CaAl2Si2O8 (glass) are observed from 430 to 820 nm. Taken with previous data, it is suggested that transparent solids display three regimes of light emission upon shock compression to successively higher pressures: (1) characteristic radiation such as observed in MgO and previously in other minerals, (2) heterogeneous hot spot (greybody) radiation observed in CaAl2Si2O8 and previously in all transparent solids undergoing shock-induced phase transformations, and (3) blackbody emission observed in the high pressure phase regime in NaCl, SiO2, CaO, CaAl2Si2O8, and Mg2SiO4. The onset of the second regime may delineate the onset of shock-induced polymorphism whereas the onset of the third regime delineates the Hugoniot pressure required to achieve local thermal equilibrium in the shocked solid. It is also proposed that the hot spot temperatures and corresponding shock pressures determined in the second regime delineate points on the fusion curves of the high pressure phase.

  7. Membrane Cholesterol Regulates Lysosome-Plasma Membrane Fusion Events and Modulates Trypanosoma cruzi Invasion of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hissa, Bárbara; Duarte, Jacqueline G.; Kelles, Ludmila F.; Santos, Fabio P.; del Puerto, Helen L.; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro H.; de Paula, Ana M.; Agero, Ubirajara; Mesquita, Oscar N.; Guatimosim, Cristina; Chiari, Egler; Andrade, Luciana O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages) and non-professional (epithelial) phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. Conclusion/Significance Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of lysosomes are

  8. Incorporation of T cell counterparts in the fusion partners for generation of human monoclonal antibodies from Staphylococcus aureus stimulated B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gore, M M; Singhania, S S; Basu, A; Banerjee, K

    1997-01-01

    B cell growth and differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting cells is controlled by various cytokines and cell to cell contact with T cells. Fusion partner for human hybridoma therefore should accommodate all or some of these signaling systems to overcome the unique situation of MHC incompatibility, need for specific growth factors simultaneously taking into consideration the downstream processing of the product for the clinical use. We have thus directed our efforts towards the development of a fusion partner which would not need Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B cells prior to fusion. A nontransforming mitogen, formalinized Staphylococcus aureus (FSTA) was used for stimulating human B cells. Successful production of human IgM monoclonal antibody was achieved by incorporating Jurkat-4 cells in existing mouse human heterohybrid through fusion of these cells followed by fusion with human B cells. To accommodate chromosomes of both T and B cells after fusion, human myeloid precursor cells KG1a, and to incorporate T cell, HuT78 cells were fused. CD34+ and CD4+ hybrid of KG1a and HuT 78 cells-434 AM-when used as fusion partner could allow secretion of MAbs, however growth potential was low. SP2/0 cells were then incorporated in 434 AM cells to give myeloma environment to fused human B cells. Rabies virus neutralizing human IgG MAb secreting clone was generated by fusing FSTA stimulated human B cells with this fusion partner. PMID:9265502

  9. The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kirilee A; Bär, Séverine; Maerz, Anne L; Alizon, Marc; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2005-04-01

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain an N-terminal fusion peptide that initiates virus-cell membrane fusion. The fusion peptide is linked to the coiled-coil core through a conserved sequence that is often rich in glycines. We investigated the functional role of the glycine-rich segment, Met-326 to Ser-337, of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, by alanine and proline scanning mutagenesis. Alanine substitution for the hydrophobic residue Ile-334 caused an approximately 90% reduction in cell-cell fusion activity without detectable effects on the lipid-mixing and pore formation phases of fusion. Alanine substitutions at other positions had smaller effects (Gly-329, Val-330, and Gly-332) or no effect on fusion function. Proline substitution for glycine residues inhibited cell-cell fusion function with position-dependent effects on the three phases of fusion. Retroviral glycoprotein fusion function thus appears to require flexibility within the glycine-rich segment and hydrophobic contacts mediated by this segment. PMID:15767455

  10. A Particle-in-Cell Simulation for the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chap, Andrew; Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Scott, John H.

    2013-01-01

    A Particle-in-cell simulation model has been developed to study the physics of the Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC) applied to the conversion of charged fusion products into electricity. In this model the availability of a beam of collimated fusion products is assumed; the simulation is focused on the conversion of the beam kinetic energy into alternating current (AC) electric power. The model is electrostatic, as the electro-dynamics of the relatively slow ions can be treated in the quasistatic approximation. A two-dimensional, axisymmetric (radial-axial coordinates) geometry is considered. Ion beam particles are injected on one end and travel along the axis through ring-shaped electrodes with externally applied time-varying voltages, thus modulating the beam by forming a sinusoidal pattern in the beam density. Further downstream, the modulated beam passes through another set of ring electrodes, now electrically oating. The modulated beam induces a time alternating potential di erence between adjacent electrodes. Power can be drawn from the electrodes by connecting a resistive load. As energy is dissipated in the load, a corresponding drop in beam energy is measured. The simulation encapsulates the TWDEC process by reproducing the time-dependent transfer of energy and the particle deceleration due to the electric eld phase time variations.

  11. Ezrin Is a Component of the HIV-1 Virological Presynapse and Contributes to the Inhibition of Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Lambelé, Marie; Chan, Jany; Symeonides, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT During cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1, viral and cellular proteins transiently accumulate at the contact zone between infected (producer) and uninfected (target) cells, forming the virological synapse. Rearrangements of the cytoskeleton in producer and target cells are required for proper targeting of viral and cellular components during synapse formation, yet little is known about how these processes are regulated, particularly within the producer cell. Since ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins connect F-actin with integral and peripheral membrane proteins, are incorporated into virions, and interact with cellular components of the virological presynapse, we hypothesized that they play roles during the late stage of HIV-1 replication. Here we document that phosphorylated (i.e., active) ezrin specifically accumulates at the HIV-1 presynapse in T cell lines and primary CD4+ lymphocytes. To investigate whether ezrin supports virus transmission, we sought to ablate ezrin expression in producer cells. While cells did not tolerate a complete knockdown of ezrin, even a modest reduction of ezrin expression (∼50%) in HIV-1-producing cells led to the release of particles with impaired infectivity. Further, when cocultured with uninfected target cells, ezrin-knockdown producer cells displayed reduced accumulation of the tetraspanin CD81 at the synapse and fused more readily with target cells, thus forming syncytia. Such an outcome likely is not optimal for virus dissemination, as evidenced by the fact that, in vivo, only relatively few infected cells form syncytia. Thus, ezrin likely helps secure efficient virus spread not only by enhancing virion infectivity but also by preventing excessive membrane fusion at the virological synapse. IMPORTANCE While viruses, in principal, can propagate through successions of syncytia, HIV-1-infected cells in the majority of cases do not fuse with potential target cells during viral transmission. This mode of spread is

  12. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  13. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan; Xiao, Jian; Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo; Zhang, Rongbo

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.

  14. Regulation of cell protrusions by small GTPases during fusion of the neural folds

    PubMed Central

    Rolo, Ana; Savery, Dawn; Escuin, Sarah; de Castro, Sandra C; Armer, Hannah EJ; Munro, Peter MG; Molè, Matteo A; Greene, Nicholas DE; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial fusion is a crucial process in embryonic development, and its failure underlies several clinically important birth defects. For example, failure of neural fold fusion during neurulation leads to open neural tube defects including spina bifida. Using mouse embryos, we show that cell protrusions emanating from the apposed neural fold tips, at the interface between the neuroepithelium and the surface ectoderm, are required for completion of neural tube closure. By genetically ablating the cytoskeletal regulators Rac1 or Cdc42 in the dorsal neuroepithelium, or in the surface ectoderm, we show that these protrusions originate from surface ectodermal cells and that Rac1 is necessary for the formation of membrane ruffles which typify late closure stages, whereas Cdc42 is required for the predominance of filopodia in early neurulation. This study provides evidence for the essential role and molecular regulation of membrane protrusions prior to fusion of a key organ primordium in mammalian development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13273.001 PMID:27114066

  15. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zu T.; Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  16. SARS Coronavirus Fusion Peptide-Derived Sequence Suppresses Collagen-Induced Arthritis in DBA/1J Mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zu T; Sigalov, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    During the co-evolution of viruses and their hosts, the viruses have evolved numerous strategies to counter and evade host antiviral immune responses in order to establish a successful infection, replicate and persist in the host. Recently, based on our model of immune signaling, the Signaling Chain HOmoOLigomerization (SCHOOL) model, we suggested specific molecular mechanisms used by different viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) to modulate the host immune response mediated by members of the family of multichain immune recognition receptors (MIRRs). This family includes T cell receptor (TCR) that is critically involved in immune diseases such as autoimmune arthritis. In the present study, we provide compelling experimental in vivo evidence in support of our hypothesis. Using the SCHOOL approach and the SARS-CoV fusion peptide sequence, we rationally designed a novel immunomodulatory peptide that targets TCR. We showed that this peptide ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mice and protects against bone and cartilage damage. Incorporation of the peptide into self-assembling lipopeptide nanoparticles that mimic native human high density lipoproteins significantly increases peptide dosage efficacy. Together, our data further confirm that viral immune evasion strategies that target MIRRs can be transferred to therapeutic strategies that require similar functionalities. PMID:27349522

  17. Lipid droplets fusion in adipocyte differentiated 3T3-L1 cells: A Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2014-02-15

    Several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis, atherosclerosis and other metabolic pathologies are related to the excessive accumulation of lipids in cells. Lipids accumulate in spherical cellular inclusions called lipid droplets (LDs) whose sizes range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to a fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained with spherical shape and volume equal to the sum of the progenitors’ ones. In this study, the size distribution of two populations of LDs was analyzed in immature and mature (5-days differentiated) 3T3-L1 adipocytes (first and second populations, respectively) after Oil Red O staining. A Monte Carlo simulation of interaction between LDs has been developed in order to quantify the size distribution and the number of fusion events needed to obtain the distribution of the second population size starting from the first one. Four models are presented here based on different kinds of interaction: a surface weighted interaction (R2 Model), a volume weighted interaction (R3 Model), a random interaction (Random model) and an interaction related to the place where the LDs are born (Nearest Model). The last two models mimic quite well the behavior found in the experimental data. This work represents a first step in developing numerical simulations of the LDs growth process. Due to the complex phenomena involving LDs (absorption, growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in existing droplets, de novo formation and catabolism) the study focuses on the fusion process. The results suggest that, to obtain the observed size distribution, a number of fusion events comparable with the number of LDs themselves is needed. Moreover the MC approach results a powerful tool for investigating the LDs growth process. Highlights: • We evaluated the role of the fusion process in the synthesis of the lipid droplets. • We compared the

  18. Brief Report: Human Perivascular Stem Cells and Nel-Like Protein-1 Synergistically Enhance Spinal Fusion in Osteoporotic Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchul; Zhang, Xinli; Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W; Chung, Choon G; Hardy, Reef; Li, Chenshuang; Girgius, Caroline; Zhang, Yulong; Stoker, David; Wang, Huiming; Wu, Benjamin M; Peault, Bruno; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2015-10-01

    Autologous bone grafts (ABGs) are considered as the gold standard for spinal fusion. However, osteoporotic patients are poor candidates for ABGs due to limited osteogenic stem cell numbers and function of the bone microenvironment. There is a need for stem cell-based spinal fusion of proven efficacy under either osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of human perivascular stem cells (hPSCs), a population of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from adipose tissue, in the presence and absence of NELL-1, an osteogenic protein, for spinal fusion in the osteoporosis. Osteogenic differentiation of hPSCs with and without NELL-1 was tested in vitro. The results indicated that NELL-1 significantly increased the osteogenic potential of hPSCs in both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic donors. Next, spinal fusion was performed by implanting scaffolds with regular or high doses of hPSCs, with or without NELL-1 in ovariectomized rats (n = 41). Regular doses of hPSCs or NELL-1 achieved the fusion rates of only 20%-37.5% by manual palpation. These regular doses had previously been shown to be effective in nonosteoporotic rat spinal fusion. Remarkably, the high dose of hPSCs+NELL-1 significantly improved the fusion rates among osteoporotic rats up to approximately 83.3%. Microcomputed tomography imaging and quantification further confirmed solid bony fusion with high dose hPSCs+NELL-1. Finally, histologically, direct in situ involvement of hPSCs in ossification was shown using undecalcified samples. To conclude, hPSCs combined with NELL-1 synergistically enhances spinal fusion in osteoporotic rats and has great potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for osteoporotic patients.

  19. How the stimulus defines the dynamics of vesicle pool recruitment, fusion mode, and vesicle recycling in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-06-01

    The pattern of stimulation defines important characteristics of the secretory process in neurons and neuroendocrine cells, including the pool of secretory vesicles being recruited, the type and amount of transmitters released, the mode of membrane retrieval, and the mechanisms associated with vesicle replenishment. This review analyzes the mechanisms that regulate these processes in chromaffin cells, as well as in other neuroendocrine and neuronal models. A common factor in these mechanisms is the spatial and temporal distribution of the Ca(2+) signal generated during cell stimulation. For instance, neurosecretory cells and neurons have pools of vesicles with different locations with respect to Ca(2+) channels, and those pools are therefore differentially recruited following different patterns of stimulation. In this regard, a brief stimulus will induce the exocytosis of a small pool of vesicles that is highly coupled to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, whereas longer or more intense stimulation will provoke a global Ca(2+) increase, promoting exocytosis irrespective of vesicle location. The pattern of stimulation, and therefore the characteristics of the Ca(2+) signal generated by the stimulus also influence the mode of exocytosis and the type of endocytosis. Indeed, low-frequency stimulation favors kiss-and-run exocytosis and clathrin-independent fast endocytosis, whereas higher frequencies promote full fusion and clathrin-dependent endocytosis. This latter type of endocytosis is accelerated at high-frequency stimulation. Synaptotagmins, calcineurin, dynamin, complexin, and actin remodeling, appear to be involved in the mechanisms that determine the response of these processes to Ca(2+) . In chromaffin cells, a brief stimulus induces the exocytosis of a small pool of vesicles that is highly coupled to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (A), whereas longer or high-frequency stimulation provokes a global Ca(2+) increase, promoting exocytosis irrespective of

  20. How the stimulus defines the dynamics of vesicle pool recruitment, fusion mode, and vesicle recycling in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Marengo, Fernando D

    2016-06-01

    The pattern of stimulation defines important characteristics of the secretory process in neurons and neuroendocrine cells, including the pool of secretory vesicles being recruited, the type and amount of transmitters released, the mode of membrane retrieval, and the mechanisms associated with vesicle replenishment. This review analyzes the mechanisms that regulate these processes in chromaffin cells, as well as in other neuroendocrine and neuronal models. A common factor in these mechanisms is the spatial and temporal distribution of the Ca(2+) signal generated during cell stimulation. For instance, neurosecretory cells and neurons have pools of vesicles with different locations with respect to Ca(2+) channels, and those pools are therefore differentially recruited following different patterns of stimulation. In this regard, a brief stimulus will induce the exocytosis of a small pool of vesicles that is highly coupled to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, whereas longer or more intense stimulation will provoke a global Ca(2+) increase, promoting exocytosis irrespective of vesicle location. The pattern of stimulation, and therefore the characteristics of the Ca(2+) signal generated by the stimulus also influence the mode of exocytosis and the type of endocytosis. Indeed, low-frequency stimulation favors kiss-and-run exocytosis and clathrin-independent fast endocytosis, whereas higher frequencies promote full fusion and clathrin-dependent endocytosis. This latter type of endocytosis is accelerated at high-frequency stimulation. Synaptotagmins, calcineurin, dynamin, complexin, and actin remodeling, appear to be involved in the mechanisms that determine the response of these processes to Ca(2+) . In chromaffin cells, a brief stimulus induces the exocytosis of a small pool of vesicles that is highly coupled to voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (A), whereas longer or high-frequency stimulation provokes a global Ca(2+) increase, promoting exocytosis irrespective of

  1. Identification and Characterization of LFD-2, a Predicted Fringe Protein Required for Membrane Integrity during Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Zhao, Jiuhai; Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Starr, Trevor L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of membrane merger during somatic cell fusion in eukaryotic species are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, somatic cell fusion occurs between genetically identical germinated asexual spores (germlings) and between hyphae to form the interconnected network characteristic of a filamentous fungal colony. In N. crassa, two proteins have been identified to function at the step of membrane fusion during somatic cell fusion: PRM1 and LFD-1. The absence of either one of these two proteins results in an increase of germling pairs arrested during cell fusion with tightly appressed plasma membranes and an increase in the frequency of cell lysis of adhered germlings. The level of cell lysis in ΔPrm1 or Δlfd-1 germlings is dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. An available transcriptional profile data set was used to identify genes encoding predicted transmembrane proteins that showed reduced expression levels in germlings cultured in the absence of extracellular calcium. From these analyses, we identified a mutant (lfd-2, for late fusion defect-2) that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. lfd-2 encodes a protein with a Fringe domain and showed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane localization. The deletion of an additional gene predicted to encode a low-affinity calcium transporter, fig1, also resulted in a strain that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. Genetic analyses showed that LFD-2 and FIG1 likely function in separate pathways to regulate aspects of membrane merger and repair during cell fusion. PMID:25595444

  2. Sphingomyelin derivatives increase the frequency of microvesicle and granule fusion in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, V; Montes, M A; Villanueva, J; Gimenez-Molina, Y; de Toledo, G A; Gutiérrez, L M

    2015-06-01

    Sphingomyelin derivatives like sphingosine have been shown to enhance secretion in a variety of systems, including neuroendocrine and neuronal cells. By studying the mechanisms underlying this effect, we demonstrate here that sphingomyelin rafts co-localize strongly with synaptosomal-associated protein of 25Kda (SNAP-25) clusters in cultured bovine chromaffin cells and that they appear to be linked in a dynamic manner. In functional terms, when cultured rat chromaffin cells are treated with sphingomyelinase (SMase), producing sphingomyelin derivatives, the secretion elicited by repetitive depolarizations is enhanced. This increase was independent of cell size and it was significant 15min after initiating stimulation. Interestingly, by evaluating the membrane capacitance we found that the events in control untreated cells corresponded to two populations of microvesicles and granules, and the fusion of both these populations is clearly enhanced after treatment with SMase. Furthermore, SMase does not increase the size of chromaffin granules. Together, these results strongly suggest that SNARE-mediated exocytosis is enhanced by the generation of SMase derivatives, reflecting an increase in the frequency of fusion of both microvesicles and chromaffin granules rather than an increase in the size of these vesicles.

  3. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  4. Cell fusion in osteoclasts plays a critical role in controlling bone mass and osteoblastic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Ninomiya, Ken; Miyamoto, Kana; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Yuiko

    2008-12-19

    The balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activity is central for maintaining the integrity of bone homeostasis. Here we show that mice lacking dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), an essential molecule for osteoclast cell-cell fusion, exhibited impaired bone resorption and upregulation of bone formation by osteoblasts, which do not express DC-STAMP, which led to increased bone mass. On the contrary, DC-STAMP over-expressing transgenic (DC-STAMP-Tg) mice under the control of an actin promoter showed significantly accelerated cell-cell fusion of osteoclasts and bone resorption, with decreased osteoblastic activity and bone mass. Bone resorption and formation are known to be regulated in a coupled manner, whereas DC-STAMP regulates bone homeostasis in an un-coupled manner. Thus our results indicate that inhibition of a single molecule provides both decreased osteoclast activity and increased bone formation by osteoblasts, thereby increasing bone mass in an un-coupled and a tissue specific manner.

  5. Detection of human tumor cells by amplicon fusion site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Axel; Taube, Sylvia; Starke, Sven; Bergmann, Eckhard; Christiansen, Nina Merete; Christiansen, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Reliable diagnostic strategies for individuals with cancer demand practical methods for highly sensitive and specific detection of tumor cells. Amplification of genomic regions that include putative oncogenes is common in tumor cells of various types. Genomic array platforms offer the opportunity to identify and precisely map amplified genomic regions (ampGRs). The stable existence of these tumor cell–specific genomic aberrations during and after therapy, in theory, make ampGRs optimal targets for cancer diagnostics. In this study, we mapped ampGRs around the proto-oncogene MYCN of human neuroblastomas using a high-resolution tiling array (HR-TA). Based on the HR-TA data, we were able to precisely describe the telomeric and centromeric borders of the ampGRs and deduce virtual fusion sites of the joined ampGRs (amplicon fusion sites [AFSs]). These AFSs served as blueprints for the subsequent design of AFS bridging PCR assays (AFS-PCRs). Strikingly, these assays were absolutely tumor cell specific and capable of detecting 1 tumor cell in 1 × 106 to 8 × 106 control cells. We successfully proved the in vivo practicability of AFS-PCR by detecting and quantifying the specific AFS DNA of human MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas in the patients’ corresponding peripheral blood and bone marrow samples. Thus, we believe AFS-PCR could become a powerful and nevertheless feasible personalized diagnostic tool applicable to a large number of cancer patients, including children with MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas. PMID:21293059

  6. Detection of human tumor cells by amplicon fusion site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR).

    PubMed

    Weber, Axel; Taube, Sylvia; Starke, Sven; Bergmann, Eckhard; Christiansen, Nina Merete; Christiansen, Holger

    2011-02-01

    Reliable diagnostic strategies for individuals with cancer demand practical methods for highly sensitive and specific detection of tumor cells. Amplification of genomic regions that include putative oncogenes is common in tumor cells of various types. Genomic array platforms offer the opportunity to identify and precisely map amplified genomic regions (ampGRs). The stable existence of these tumor cell–specific genomic aberrations during and after therapy, in theory, make ampGRs optimal targets for cancer diagnostics. In this study, we mapped ampGRs around the proto-oncogene MYCN of human neuroblastomas using a high-resolution tiling array (HR-TA). Based on the HR-TA data, we were able to precisely describe the telomeric and centromeric borders of the ampGRs and deduce virtual fusion sites of the joined ampGRs (amplicon fusion sites [AFSs]). These AFSs served as blueprints for the subsequent design of AFS bridging PCR assays (AFS-PCRs). Strikingly, these assays were absolutely tumor cell specific and capable of detecting 1 tumor cell in 1 × 10(6) to 8 × 10(6) control cells. We successfully proved the in vivo practicability of AFS-PCR by detecting and quantifying the specific AFS DNA of human MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas in the patients’ corresponding peripheral blood and bone marrow samples. Thus, we believe AFS-PCR could become a powerful and nevertheless feasible personalized diagnostic tool applicable to a large number of cancer patients, including children with MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas.

  7. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells derived heat shock protein70-peptide complex has enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use.

  8. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  9. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and

  10. Intracellular application of guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) induces exocytotic granule fusion in guinea pig eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of eosinophil secretion was studied in guinea pig eosinophils by measuring release of hexosaminidase from cell suspensions (greater than 98% pure) permeabilized with streptolysin-O and by whole-cell patch-clamp capacitance measurements. It is shown that release of eosinophil granule components occurs by an exocytotic mechanism in which individual granules fuse with the plasma membrane. Exocytosis can be induced by intracellular application of the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP- gamma-S), suggesting the involvement of a GTP-binding protein. The activation is modulated by the intracellular calcium concentration, with activation by GTP-gamma-S inducing transient elevations in the concentration of Ca2+. Thus, the nature and regulation of the release mechanism appear to be very similar to that of the mast cell and neutrophil. PMID:2137856

  11. Dual microRNA Screens Reveal That the Immune-Responsive miR-181 Promotes Henipavirus Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chwan Hong; Rootes, Christina L.; Marsh, Glenn A.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Klein, Reuben; Riddell, Sarah J.; Middleton, Deborah; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Bean, Andrew G. D.; Stewart, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Henipavirus) are bat-borne viruses that cause fatal disease in humans and a range of other mammalian species. Gaining a deeper understanding of host pathways exploited by henipaviruses for infection may identify targets for new anti-viral therapies. Here we have performed genome-wide high-throughput agonist and antagonist screens at biosafety level 4 to identify host-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) impacting henipavirus infection in human cells. Members of the miR-181 and miR-17~93 families strongly promoted Hendra virus infection. miR-181 also promoted Nipah virus infection, but did not affect infection by paramyxoviruses from other genera, indicating specificity in the virus-host interaction. Infection promotion was primarily mediated via the ability of miR-181 to significantly enhance henipavirus-induced membrane fusion. Cell signalling receptors of ephrins, namely EphA5 and EphA7, were identified as novel negative regulators of henipavirus fusion. The expression of these receptors, as well as EphB4, were suppressed by miR-181 overexpression, suggesting that simultaneous inhibition of several Ephs by the miRNA contributes to enhanced infection and fusion. Immune-responsive miR-181 levels was also up-regulated in the biofluids of ferrets and horses infected with Hendra virus, suggesting that the host innate immune response may promote henipavirus spread and exacerbate disease severity. This study is the first genome-wide screen of miRNAs influencing infection by a clinically significant mononegavirus and nominates select miRNAs as targets for future anti-viral therapy development. PMID:27783670

  12. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  13. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-07

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  14. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion. PMID:26022509

  15. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion.

  16. Near-field nonuniformities in angularly multiplexed KrF fusion lasers with induced spatial incoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmberg, Robert H.; Chan, Yung

    2005-05-01

    Induced spatial incoherence (ISI) has been proposed for KrF laser drivers to achieve the high degree of spatial beam uniformity required for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Although ISI provides ultrasmooth illumination at the far field of the laser, where the target is located, it can still allow the beams in the quasi-near field to develop a time-averaged spatial structure. This speckle, which arises primarily from random-phase aberration, builds up as the laser beams propagate away from the pupil plane located at the final amplifier stage; it is distinct from any structure imposed by gain nonuniformities in the amplifiers. Because of the spatial incoherence, the speckle is significantly smaller than that experienced by coherent beams. Nevertheless, it remains a damage issue, especially for the long beam delay paths required in angularly multiplexed KrF lasers. We develop a novel algorithm for calculating the time-integrated intensities; compare simulations and measurements of the near-field speckle in the Nike KrF laser; and explore options, such as aberration reduction and optical relaying, for controlling the problem in future angularly multiplexed KrF drivers. © Optical Society of America

  17. Rat-derived amniotic epithelial cells differentiate into mature hepatocytes in vivo with no evidence of cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Michela; Serra, Maria Paola; Contini, Antonella; Sini, Marcella; Strom, Stephen C; Laconi, Ezio; Marongiu, Fabio

    2015-06-15

    Amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from human placenta represent a useful and noncontroversial source for liver-based regenerative medicine. Previous studies suggested that human- and rat-derived AEC differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation. In the retrorsine (RS) model of liver repopulation, clusters of donor-derived cells engrafted in the recipient liver and, importantly, showed characteristics of mature hepatocytes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible involvement of cell fusion in the emergence of hepatocyte clusters displaying a donor-specific phenotype. To this end, 4-week-old GFP(+)/DPP-IV(-) rats were treated with RS and then transplanted with undifferentiated AEC isolated from the placenta of DPP-IV(+) pregnant rats at 16-19 days of gestational age. Results indicated that clusters of donor-derived cells were dipeptidyl peptidase type IV (DPP-IV) positive, but did not express the green fluorescent protein (GFP), suggesting that rat amniotic epithelial cells (rAEC) did not fuse within the host parenchyma, as no colocalization of the two tags was observed. Moreover, rAEC-derived clusters expressed markers of mature hepatocytes (eg, albumin, cytochrome P450), but were negative for the expression of biliary/progenitor markers (eg, epithelial cell adhesion molecule [EpCAM]) and did not express the marker of preneoplastic hepatic nodules glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P). These results extend our previous findings on the potential of AEC to differentiate into mature hepatocytes and suggest that this process can occur in the absence of cell fusion with host-derived cells. These studies support the hypothesis that amnion-derived epithelial cells can be an effective cell source for the correction of liver disease.

  18. Rat-Derived Amniotic Epithelial Cells Differentiate into Mature Hepatocytes In Vivo with No Evidence of Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Michela; Serra, Maria Paola; Contini, Antonella; Sini, Marcella; Strom, Stephen C.; Laconi, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Amniotic epithelial cells (AEC) derived from human placenta represent a useful and noncontroversial source for liver-based regenerative medicine. Previous studies suggested that human- and rat-derived AEC differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation. In the retrorsine (RS) model of liver repopulation, clusters of donor-derived cells engrafted in the recipient liver and, importantly, showed characteristics of mature hepatocytes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possible involvement of cell fusion in the emergence of hepatocyte clusters displaying a donor-specific phenotype. To this end, 4-week-old GFP+/DPP-IV− rats were treated with RS and then transplanted with undifferentiated AEC isolated from the placenta of DPP-IV+ pregnant rats at 16–19 days of gestational age. Results indicated that clusters of donor-derived cells were dipeptidyl peptidase type IV (DPP-IV) positive, but did not express the green fluorescent protein (GFP), suggesting that rat amniotic epithelial cells (rAEC) did not fuse within the host parenchyma, as no colocalization of the two tags was observed. Moreover, rAEC-derived clusters expressed markers of mature hepatocytes (eg, albumin, cytochrome P450), but were negative for the expression of biliary/progenitor markers (eg, epithelial cell adhesion molecule [EpCAM]) and did not express the marker of preneoplastic hepatic nodules glutathione S-transferase P (GST-P). These results extend our previous findings on the potential of AEC to differentiate into mature hepatocytes and suggest that this process can occur in the absence of cell fusion with host-derived cells. These studies support the hypothesis that amnion-derived epithelial cells can be an effective cell source for the correction of liver disease. PMID:25647334

  19. A Fusion Algorithm for GFP Image and Phase Contrast Image of Arabidopsis Cell Based on SFL-Contourlet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peng; Wang, Jing; Wei, Biao; Mi, Deling

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid multiscale and multilevel image fusion algorithm for green fluorescent protein (GFP) image and phase contrast image of Arabidopsis cell is proposed in this paper. Combining intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) transform and sharp frequency localization Contourlet transform (SFL-CT), this algorithm uses different fusion strategies for different detailed subbands, which include neighborhood consistency measurement (NCM) that can adaptively find balance between color background and gray structure. Also two kinds of neighborhood classes based on empirical model are taken into consideration. Visual information fidelity (VIF) as an objective criterion is introduced to evaluate the fusion image. The experimental results of 117 groups of Arabidopsis cell image from John Innes Center show that the new algorithm cannot only make the details of original images well preserved but also improve the visibility of the fusion image, which shows the superiority of the novel method to traditional ones. PMID:23476716

  20. Furin cleavage of the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein enhances cell-cell fusion but does not affect virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Follis, Kathryn E.; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H. . E-mail: jack.nunberg@umontana.edu

    2006-07-05

    The fusogenic potential of Class I viral envelope glycoproteins is activated by proteloytic cleavage of the precursor glycoprotein to generate the mature receptor-binding and transmembrane fusion subunits. Although the coronavirus (CoV) S glycoproteins share membership in this class of envelope glycoproteins, cleavage to generate the respective S1 and S2 subunits appears absent in a subset of CoV species, including that responsible for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To determine whether proteolytic cleavage of the S glycoprotein might be important for the newly emerged SARS-CoV, we introduced a furin recognition site at single basic residues within the putative S1-S2 junctional region. We show that furin cleavage at the modified R667 position generates discrete S1 and S2 subunits and potentiates membrane fusion activity. This effect on the cell-cell fusion activity by the S glycoprotein is not, however, reflected in the infectivity of pseudotyped lentiviruses bearing the cleaved glycoprotein. The lack of effect of furin cleavage on virion infectivity mirrors that observed in the normally cleaved S glycoprotein of the murine coronavirus and highlights an additional level of complexity in coronavirus entry.

  1. Novel innate immune functions for galectin-1: galectin-1 inhibits cell fusion by Nipah virus envelope glycoproteins and augments dendritic cell secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Levroney, Ernest L; Aguilar, Hector C; Fulcher, Jennifer A; Kohatsu, Luciana; Pace, Karen E; Pang, Mabel; Gurney, Kevin B; Baum, Linda G; Lee, Benhur

    2005-07-01

    Galectin-1 (gal-1), an endogenous lectin secreted by a variety of cell types, has pleiotropic immunomodulatory functions, including regulation of lymphocyte survival and cytokine secretion in autoimmune, transplant disease, and parasitic infection models. However, the role of gal-1 in viral infections is unknown. Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging pathogen that causes severe, often fatal, febrile encephalitis. The primary targets of NiV are endothelial cells. NiV infection of endothelial cells results in cell-cell fusion and syncytia formation triggered by the fusion (F) and attachment (G) envelope glycoproteins of NiV that bear glycan structures recognized by gal-1. In the present study, we report that NiV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion is blocked by gal-1. This inhibition is specific to the Paramyxoviridae family because gal-1 did not inhibit fusion triggered by envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, including two retroviruses and a pox virus, but inhibited fusion triggered by envelope glycoproteins of the related Hendra virus and another paramyxovirus. The physiologic dimeric form of gal-1 is required for fusion inhibition because a monomeric gal-1 mutant had no inhibitory effect on cell fusion. gal-1 binds to specific N-glycans on NiV glycoproteins and aberrantly oligomerizes NiV-F and NiV-G, indicating a mechanism for fusion inhibition. gal-1 also increases dendritic cell production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, known to be protective in the setting of other viral diseases such as Ebola infections. Thus, gal-1 may have direct antiviral effects and may also augment the innate immune response against this emerging pathogen.

  2. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants.

  3. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation. PMID:26415228

  4. Protective effects of a bacterially expressed NIF-KGF fusion protein against bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinping; Li, Shengli; Zhang, Miaotao; Li, Xiukun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wenlong; Li, Chuanghong

    2010-08-01

    Current evidence suggests that the keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and the polymorphonuclear leukocyte may play key roles in the development of lung fibrosis. Here we describe the construction, expression, purification, and identification of a novel NIF (neutrophil inhibitory factor)-KGF mutant fusion protein (NKM). The fusion gene was ligated via a flexible octapeptide hinge and expressed as an insoluble protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The fusion protein retained the activities of KGF and NIF, as it inhibited both fibroblast proliferation and leukocyte adhesion. Next, the effects of NKM on bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in mice were examined. The mice were divided into the following four groups: (i) saline group; (ii) bleomycin group (instilled with 5 mg/kg bleomycin intratracheally); (iii) bleomycin plus dexamethasone (Dex) group (Dex was given intraperitoneally (i.p.) at 1 mg/kg/day 2 days prior to bleomycin instillation and daily after bleomycin instillation until the end of the treatment); and (iv) bleomycin plus NKM group (NKM was given i.p. at 2 mg/kg/day using the same protocol as the Dex group). NKM significantly improved the survival rates of mice exposed to bleomycin. The marked morphological changes and increased hydroxyproline levels resulted from the instillation of bleomycin (on Day 17) in the lungs were significantly inhibited by NKM. These results revealed that NKM can attenuate bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, suggesting that NKM could be used to prevent bleomycin-induced lung damage or other interstitial pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. A fusion inhibitor prevents spread of immunodeficiency viruses, but not activation of virus-specific T cells, by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Frank, I; Stössel, H; Gettie, A; Turville, S G; Bess, J W; Lifson, J D; Sivin, I; Romani, N; Robbiani, M

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in innate immune responses, and their interactions with T cells are critical for the induction of adaptive immunity. However, immunodeficiency viruses are efficiently captured by DCs and can be transmitted to and amplified in CD4(+) T cells, with potentially deleterious effects on the induction of immune responses. In DC-T-cell cocultures, contact with CD4(+), not CD8(+), T cells preferentially facilitated virus movement to and release at immature and mature DC-T-cell contact sites. This occurred within 5 min of DC-T-cell contact. While the fusion inhibitor T-1249 did not prevent virus capture by DCs or the release of viruses at the DC-T-cell contact points, it readily blocked virus transfer to and amplification in CD4(+) T cells. Higher doses of T-1249 were needed to block the more robust replication driven by mature DCs. Virus accumulated in DCs within T-1249-treated cocultures but these DCs were actually less infectious than DCs isolated from untreated cocultures. Importantly, T-1249 did not interfere with the stimulation of virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses when present during virus-loading of DCs or for the time of the DC-T-cell coculture. These results provide clues to identifying strategies to prevent DC-driven virus amplification in CD4(+) T cells while maintaining virus-specific immunity, an objective critical in the development of microbicides and therapeutic vaccines.

  6. Human metapneumovirus Induces Reorganization of the Actin Cytoskeleton for Direct Cell-to-Cell Spread

    PubMed Central

    El Najjar, Farah; Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Zhu, Haining; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Moncman, Carole L.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxovirus spread generally involves assembly of individual viral particles which then infect target cells. We show that infection of human bronchial airway cells with human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a recently identified paramyxovirus which causes significant respiratory disease, results in formation of intercellular extensions and extensive networks of branched cell-associated filaments. Formation of these structures is dependent on actin, but not microtubule, polymerization. Interestingly, using a co-culture assay we show that conditions which block regular infection by HMPV particles, including addition of neutralizing antibodies or removal of cell surface heparan sulfate, did not prevent viral spread from infected to new target cells. In contrast, inhibition of actin polymerization or alterations to Rho GTPase signaling pathways significantly decreased cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, viral proteins and viral RNA were detected in intercellular extensions, suggesting direct transfer of viral genetic material to new target cells. While roles for paramyxovirus matrix and fusion proteins in membrane deformation have been previously demonstrated, we show that the HMPV phosphoprotein extensively co-localized with actin and induced formation of cellular extensions when transiently expressed, supporting a new model in which a paramyxovirus phosphoprotein is a key player in assembly and spread. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for HMPV direct cell-to-cell spread and provide insights into dissemination of respiratory viruses. PMID:27683250

  7. Fusion and erosion of cell walls during confugation in the fussion yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe).

    PubMed

    Calleja, G B; Yoo, B Y; Johnson, B F

    1977-06-01

    Conjugation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Mural and nuclear events were scored from induction, the initial event, to meiosis I, the start of sporulation. These morphogenic markers were separately identifiable as flocculation, copulation, conjugation-tube formation, cross-wall formation, cross-wall erosion, conjugation-tube expansion, cytoplasmic fusion, de-differentiation of site of union, nuclear migration and karyogamy. The following were identified as new structural elements: sex hairs, which presumably mediate hydrogen bonding between cells during flocculation; crimp at the site of union; dark patch, which presumably serves as a leak-proof seal at the time of cross-wall erosion; suture, an electron-dense seam formed by the union of a copulant pair; and small electron-dense particles close to the site of wall erosion. No special structures on the cell wall could be identified as indicative of specific sites for potential copulatory activity. The discontinuity of the 2 cell walls at the site of union became so de-differentiated after fusion and erosion that it was no longer possible to pinpoint the site of union.

  8. Recombinant GDNF: Tetanus toxin fragment C fusion protein produced from insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Celia, Samuel A.; Kashi, Brenda B.; Tamrazian, Eric; Matthews, Jonathan C.; Remington, Mary P.; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-07-31

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival-promoting effects on CNS motor neurons in experimental animals. Its therapeutic efficacy in humans, however, may have been limited by poor bioavailability to the brain and spinal cord. With a view toward improving delivery of GDNF to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we generated a recombinant fusion protein comprised of rat GDNF linked to the non-toxic, neuron-binding fragment of tetanus toxin. Recombinant GDNF:TTC produced from insect cells was a soluble homodimer like wild-type GDNF and was bi-functional with respect to GDNF and TTC activity. Like recombinant rat GDNF, the fusion protein increased levels of immunoreactive phosphoAkt in treated NB41A3-hGFR{alpha}-1 neuroblastoma cells. Like TTC, GDNF:TTC bound to immobilized ganglioside GT1b in vitro with high affinity and selectivity. These results support further testing of recombinant GDNF:TTC as a non-viral vector to improve delivery of GDNF to brain and spinal cord in vivo.

  9. The SNARE protein Syp71 is essential for turnip mosaic virus infection by mediating fusion of virus-induced vesicles with chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Zhang, Changwei; Hou, Xilin; Sanfaçon, Hélène; Wang, Aiming

    2013-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses induce the biogenesis of cytoplasmic membrane-bound virus factories for viral genome multiplication. We have previously demonstrated that upon plant potyvirus infection, the potyviral 6K2 integral membrane protein induces the formation of ER-derived replication vesicles that subsequently target chloroplasts for robust genome replication. Here, we report that following the trafficking of the Turnip mosaic potyvirus (TuMV) 6K2 vesicles to chloroplasts, 6K2 vesicles accumulate at the chloroplasts to form chloroplast-bound elongated tubular structures followed by chloroplast aggregation. A functional actomyosin motility system is required for this process. As vesicle trafficking and fusion in planta are facilitated by a superfamily of proteins known as SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors), we screened ER-localized SNARES or SNARE-like proteins for their possible involvement in TuMV infection. We identified Syp71 and Vap27-1 that colocalize with the chloroplast-bound 6K2 complex. Knockdown of their expression using a Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing vector showed that Syp71 but not Vap27-1 is essential for TuMV infection. In Syp71-downregulated plant cells, the formation of 6K2-induced chloroplast-bound elongated tubular structures and chloroplast aggregates is inhibited and virus accumulation is significantly reduced, but the trafficking of the 6K2 vesicles from the ER to chloroplast is not affected. Taken together, these data suggest that Syp71 is a host factor essential for successful virus infection by mediating the fusion of the virus-induced vesicles with chloroplasts during TuMV infection.

  10. Transcriptomic and epigenomic landscapes during cell fusion in BeWo trophoblast cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Syncytialization is a process essential to the genesis and vitality of the decisive maternal-fetal interface, the syncytiotrophoblast. While the role of specific genes important in syncytial fusion is appreciated, an integrated global analysis of syncytialization is absent. We leveraged a variety of...

  11. Transfer of an expression YAC into goat fetal fibroblasts by cell fusion for mammary gland bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xufeng; Wu Guoxiang; Chen, Jian-Quan; Zhang Aimin; Liu Siguo; Jiao Binghua . E-mail: jiaobh@uninet.com.cn; Cheng Guoxiang . E-mail: Chenggx@cngenon.com

    2005-07-22

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) as transgenes in transgenic animals are likely to ensure optimal expression levels. Microinjection of YACs is the exclusive technique used to produce YACs transgenic livestock so far. However, low efficiency and high cost are its critical restrictive factors. In this study, we presented a novel procedure to produce YACs transgenic livestock as mammary gland bioreactor. A targeting vector, containing the gene of interest-a human serum albumin minigene (intron 1, 2), yeast selectable marker (G418R), and mammalian cell resistance marker (neo{sup r}), replaced the {alpha}-lactalbumin gene in a 210 kb human {alpha}-lactalbumin YAC by homogeneous recombination in yeasts. The chimeric YAC was introduced into goat fetal fibroblasts using polyethylene glycol-mediated spheroplast fusion. PCR and Southern analysis showed that intact YAC was integrated in the genome of resistant cells. Perhaps, it may offer a cell-based route by nuclear transfer to produce YACs transgenic livestock.

  12. RESOLFT Nanoscopy of Fixed Cells Using a Z-Domain Based Fusion Protein for Labelling

    PubMed Central

    Kilisch, Markus; Hell, Stefan W.; Jakobs, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    RESOLFT super-resolution microscopy allows subdiffraction resolution imaging of living cells using low intensities of light. It relies on the light-driven switching of reversible switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs). So far, RESOLFT imaging was restricted to living cells, because chemical fixation typically affects the switching characteristics of RSFPs. In this study we created a fusion construct (FLASR) consisting of the RSFP rsEGFP2 and the divalent form of the antibody binding Z domain from protein A. FLASR can be used analogous to secondary antibodies in conventional immunochemistry, facilitating simple and robust sample preparation. We demonstrate RESOLFT super-resolution microscopy on chemically fixed mammalian cells. The approach may be extended to other super-resolution approaches requiring fluorescent proteins in an aqueous environment. PMID:26375606

  13. Fusion and regenerative therapies: is immortality really recessive?

    PubMed

    Stolzing, Alexandra; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sethe, Sebastian

    2007-12-01

    Harnessing cellular fusion as a potential tool for regenerative therapy has been under tentative investigation for decades. A look back the history of fusion experiments in gerontology reveals that whereas some studies indicate that aging-related changes are conserved in fused cells, others have demonstrated that fusion can be used as a tool to revoke cellular senescence and induce tissue regeneration. Recent findings about the role of fusion processes in tissue homeostasis, replenishment, and repair link insights from fusion studies of previous decades with modern developments in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. We suggest that age-associated loss of regenerative capacity is associated with a decline of effectiveness in stem cell fusion. We project how studies into the fusion of stem cells with tissue cells, or the fusion between activator stem cells and patient cells might help in the development of applications that "rejuvenate" certain target cells, thereby strategically reinstating a regeneration cascade. The outlook is concluded with a discussion of the next research milestones and the potential hazards of fusion therapies. PMID:18072882

  14. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide induces multinuclear cell from RAW264.7 line with increased phagocytosis activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Yano, Shio; Matsumoto, Naomi; Futai, Masamitsu

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multinuclear cells are formed through cell-cell fusion in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multinuclear cells do not express osteoclast-specific enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They internalized more and larger beads than mononuclear cells and osteoclasts. -- Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria, induces strong proinflammatory responses, including the release of cytokines and nitric oxide from macrophage. In this study, we found that a murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, became multinuclear through cell-cell fusion after incubation with highly purified LPS or synthetic lipid A in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. The same cell line is known to differentiate into multinuclear osteoclast, which expresses a specific proton pumping ATPase together with osteoclast markers on stimulation by the extracellular domain of receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (Toyomura, T., Murata, Y., Yamamoto, A., Oka, T., Sun-Wada, G.-H., Wada, Y. and Futai, M., 2003). The LPS-induced multinuclear cells did not express osteoclast-specific enzymes including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K. During multinuclear cell formation, the cells internalized more and larger polystyrene beads (diameter 6-15 {mu}m) than mononuclear cells and osteoclasts. The internalized beads were located in lysosome-marker positive organelles, which were probably phagolysosomes. The LPS-induced multinuclear cell could be a good model system to study phagocytosis of large foreign bodies.

  16. The Drosophila Dead end Arf-like3 GTPase controls vesicle trafficking during tracheal fusion cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Rogers, Stephen L.; Crews, Stephen T.

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila larval tracheal system consists of a highly branched tubular organ that becomes interconnected by migration-fusion events during embryonic development. Fusion cells at the tip of each branch guide migration, adhere, and then undergo extensive remodeling as the tracheal lumen extends between the two branches. The Drosophila dead end gene is expressed in fusion cells, and encodes an Arf-like3 GTPase. Analyses of dead end RNAi and mutant embryos reveals that the lumen fails to connect between the two branches. Expression of a constitutively active form of Dead end in S2 cells reveal that it influences the state of actin polymerization, and is present on particles that traffic along actin/microtubule-containing processes. Imaging experiments in vivo reveal that Dead end-containing vesicles are associated with recycling endosomes and the exocyst, and control exocyst localization in fusion cells. These results indicate that the Dead end GTPase plays an important role in trafficking membrane components involved in tracheal fusion cell morphogenesis and lumenal development. PMID:17919535

  17. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  18. Radiation induced surface modification and contamination for EUV lithography and fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ajlony, Al-Montaser Bellah

    Al-Montaser Bellah Al-Ajlony. Ph.D., Purdue University, May 2014. Radiation Induced Surface Modification and Contamination for EUV Lithography and Fusion Applications. Major Professor: Ahmed Hassanein. The effect of ionizing radiation on materials surfaces is of major interest for many engineering applications. The importance of this topic rises from the severity of the implications that a surface at a certain application might suffer due its interaction with some sort of ionizing radiation. The severity of implication is not always related to the severity of the radiation, in many applications the concern comes from the over-sensitivity of the surface to a low doses of radiations. One example of these sensitive applications is the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) induced surface contaminations of the optics in EUV lithography devices. In this application, a small dose of ionizing radiation (EUV at 13.5 nm wavelength) can cause slight change in the chemical composition of the irradiated surface. This change in chemical composition can cause large change in the surface optical properties of the irradiated surface (EUV optics). This degradation in reflectivity is an issue that needs to be avoided. On the other extreme where intense radiation is implemented, the main concern of the radiation-surface interaction comes from the severity of the irradiation process. The plasma-facing component (PFC) in future thermonuclear devices represent the ultimate example where the materials might be exposed to severe irradiation processes. Under such extreme irradiation processes, some candidate PFC materials exhibit the formation of very fine and fragile nanostructure (Fuzz) that can be washed out into the fusion device plasma and stop the fusion reaction. These two extreme examples of the radiation-surface interaction were selected to be my PhD research topic. The change in chemical properties of Ru surface during exposure to a 13.5 nm wavelength of EUV light radiation was investigated

  19. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  20. Protein kinase G inhibits flow-induced Ca2+ entry into collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wong, Wei-Yan; Sun, Lei; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2012-07-01

    The renal cortical collecting duct (CCD) contributes to the maintenance of K(+) homeostasis by modulating renal K(+) secretion. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) mediates flow-induced K(+) secretion in the CCD, but the mechanisms regulating flow-induced Ca(2+) entry into renal epithelial cells are not well understood. Here, we found that atrial natriuretic peptide, nitric oxide, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) act through protein kinase G (PKG) to inhibit flow-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in M1-CCD cells. Coimmunoprecipitation, double immunostaining, and functional studies identified heteromeric TRPV4-P2 channels as the mediators of flow-induced Ca(2+) entry into M1-CCD cells and HEK293 cells that were coexpressed with both TRPV4 and TRPP2. In these HEK293 cells, introducing point mutations at two putative PKG phosphorylation sites on TRPP2 abolished the ability of cGMP to inhibit flow-induced Ca(2+) entry. In addition, treating M1-CCD cells with fusion peptides that compete with the endogenous PKG phosphorylation sites on TRPP2 also abolished the cGMP-mediated inhibition of the flow-induced Ca(2+) entry. Taken together, these data suggest that heteromeric TRPV4-P2 channels mediate the flow-induced entry of Ca(2+) into collecting duct cells. Furthermore, substances such as atrial natriuretic peptide and nitric oxide, which increase cGMP, abrogate flow-induced Ca(2+) entry through PKG-mediated inhibition of these channels. PMID:22518003

  1. Oligophrenin-1 Connects Exocytotic Fusion to Compensatory Endocytosis in Neuroendocrine Cells.

    PubMed

    Houy, Sébastien; Estay-Ahumada, Catherine; Croisé, Pauline; Calco, Valérie; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Bailly, Yannick; Billuart, Pierre; Vitale, Nicolas; Bader, Marie-France; Ory, Stéphane; Gasman, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1) is a protein with multiple domains including a Rho family GTPase-activating (Rho-GAP) domain, and a Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain. Involved in X-linked intellectual disability, OPHN1 has been reported to control several synaptic functions, including synaptic plasticity, synaptic vesicle trafficking, and endocytosis. In neuroendocrine cells, hormones and neuropeptides stored in large dense core vesicles (secretory granules) are released through calcium-regulated exocytosis, a process that is tightly coupled to compensatory endocytosis, allowing secretory granule recycling. We show here that OPHN1 is expressed and mainly localized at the plasma membrane and in the cytosol in chromaffin cells from adrenal medulla. Using carbon fiber amperometry, we found that exocytosis is impaired at the late stage of membrane fusion in Ophn1 knock-out mice and OPHN1-silenced bovine chromaffin cells. Experiments performed with ectopically expressed OPHN1 mutants indicate that OPHN1 requires its Rho-GAP domain to control fusion pore dynamics. On the other hand, compensatory endocytosis assessed by measuring dopamine-β-hydroxylase (secretory granule membrane) internalization is severely inhibited in Ophn1 knock-out chromaffin cells. This inhibitory effect is mimicked by the expression of a truncated OPHN1 mutant lacking the BAR domain, demonstrating that the BAR domain implicates OPHN1 in granule membrane recapture after exocytosis. These findings reveal for the first time that OPHN1 is a bifunctional protein that is able, through distinct mechanisms, to regulate and most likely link exocytosis to compensatory endocytosis in chromaffin cells.

  2. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  3. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  4. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  5. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals activation of unique gene groups as a consequence of stem cell-parenchymal cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian T; Jung, Jangwook P; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of donor mesenchymal stem cells with parenchymal cells of the recipient can occur in the brain, liver, intestine and heart following transplantation. The therapeutic benefit or detriment of resultant hybrids is unknown. Here we sought a global view of phenotypic diversification of mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte hybrids and associated time course. Using single-cell RNA-seq, we found hybrids consistently increase ribosome components and decrease genes associated with the cell cycle suggesting an increase in protein production and decrease in proliferation to accommodate the fused state. But in the case of most other gene groups, hybrids were individually distinct. In fact, though hybrids can express a transcriptome similar to individual fusion partners, approximately one-third acquired distinct expression profiles in a single day. Some hybrids underwent reprogramming, expressing pluripotency and cardiac precursor genes latent in parental cells and associated with developmental and morphogenic gene groups. Other hybrids expressed genes associated with ontologic cancer sets and two hybrids of separate experimental replicates clustered with breast cancer cells, expressing critical oncogenes and lacking tumor suppressor genes. Rapid transcriptional diversification of this type garners consideration in the context of cellular transplantation to damaged tissues, those with viral infection or other microenvironmental conditions that might promote fusion. PMID:26997336

  6. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals activation of unique gene groups as a consequence of stem cell-parenchymal cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian T; Jung, Jangwook P; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-03-21

    Fusion of donor mesenchymal stem cells with parenchymal cells of the recipient can occur in the brain, liver, intestine and heart following transplantation. The therapeutic benefit or detriment of resultant hybrids is unknown. Here we sought a global view of phenotypic diversification of mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte hybrids and associated time course. Using single-cell RNA-seq, we found hybrids consistently increase ribosome components and decrease genes associated with the cell cycle suggesting an increase in protein production and decrease in proliferation to accommodate the fused state. But in the case of most other gene groups, hybrids were individually distinct. In fact, though hybrids can express a transcriptome similar to individual fusion partners, approximately one-third acquired distinct expression profiles in a single day. Some hybrids underwent reprogramming, expressing pluripotency and cardiac precursor genes latent in parental cells and associated with developmental and morphogenic gene groups. Other hybrids expressed genes associated with ontologic cancer sets and two hybrids of separate experimental replicates clustered with breast cancer cells, expressing critical oncogenes and lacking tumor suppressor genes. Rapid transcriptional diversification of this type garners consideration in the context of cellular transplantation to damaged tissues, those with viral infection or other microenvironmental conditions that might promote fusion.

  7. Long-term live cell microscopy studies of lipid droplet fusion dynamics in adipocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    Jüngst, Christian; Klein, Matthias; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    During the adipogenic differentiation process of mesenchymal stem cells, lipid droplets (LDs) grow slowly by transferring lipids between each other. Recent findings hint at the possibility that a fusion pore is involved. In this study, we analyze lipid transfer data obtained in long-term label-free microscopy studies in the framework of a Hagen-Poiseuille model. The data obtained show a LD fusion process in which the lipid transfer directionality depends on the size difference between LDs, whereas the respective rates depend on the size difference and additionally on the diameter of the smaller LDs. For the data analysis, the viscosity of the transferred material has to be known. We demonstrate that a viscosity-dependent molecular rotor dye can be used to measure LD viscosities in live cells. On this basis, we calculate the diameter of a putative lipid transfer channel which appears to have a direct dependence on the diameter of the smaller of the two participating LDs. PMID:24103784

  8. Increased Cell Fusion in Cerebral Cortex May Contribute to Poststroke Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Paltsyn, Alexander; Komissarova, Svetlana; Dubrovin, Ivan; Kubatiev, Aslan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used a model of a hemorrhagic stroke in a motor zone of the cortex in rats at the age of 3 months The report shows that cortical neurons can fuse with oligodendrocytes. In formed binuclear cells, the nucleus of an oligodendrocyte undergoes neuron specific reprogramming. It can be confirmed by changes in chromatin structure and in size of the second nucleus, by expression of specific neuronal markers and increasing total transcription rate. The nucleus of an oligodendrocyte likely transforms into a second neuronal nucleus. The number of binuclear neurons was validated with quantitative analysis. Fusion of neurons with oligodendrocytes might be a regenerative process in general and specifically following a stroke. The appearance of additional neuronal nuclei increases the functional outcome of the population of neurons. Participation of a certain number of binuclear cells in neuronal function might compensate for a functional deficit that arises from the death of a subset of neurons. After a stroke, the number of binuclear neurons increased in cortex around the lesion zone. In this case, the rate of recovery of stroke-damaged locomotor behavior also increased, which indicates the regenerative role of fusion. PMID:23691431

  9. Efficient killing of CD22{sup +} tumor cells by a humanized diabody-RNase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Juergen . E-mail: juergen.krauss@uni-essen.de; Arndt, Michaela A.E.; Vu, Bang K.; Newton, Dianne L.; Seeber, Siegfried; Rybak, Susanna M.

    2005-06-03

    We report on the generation of a dimeric immunoenzyme capable of simultaneously delivering two ribonuclease (RNase) effector domains on one molecule to CD22{sup +} tumor cells. As targeting moiety a diabody derived from the previously humanized scFv SGIII with grafted specificity of the murine anti-CD22 mAb RFB4 was constructed. Further engineering the interface of this construct (V{sub L}36{sub Leu{yields}}{sub Tyr}) resulted in a highly robust bivalent molecule that retained the same high affinity as the murine mAb RFB4 (K{sub D} 0.2 nM). A dimeric immunoenzyme comprising this diabody and Rana pipiens liver ribonuclease I (rapLRI) was generated, expressed as soluble protein in bacteria, and purified to homogeneity. The dimeric fusion protein killed several CD22{sup +} tumor cell lines with high efficacy (IC{sub 50} = 3-20 nM) and exhibited 9- to 48-fold stronger cytotoxicity than a monovalent rapLRI-scFv counterpart. Our results demonstrate that engineering of dimeric antibody-ribonuclease fusion proteins can markedly enhance their biological efficacy.

  10. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  11. Effect of electrical stimulation-induced resistance exercise on mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Yu; Ogasawara, Riki; Tamura, Yuki; Fujita, Satoshi; Hatta, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and muscle strength. However, little is known about the effect of resistance exercise on mitochondrial dynamics, which is coupled with mitochondrial function. In skeletal muscle, mitochondria exist as dynamic networks that are continuously remodeling through fusion and fission. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute and chronic resistance exercise, which induces muscle hypertrophy, on the expression of proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics in rat skeletal muscle. Resistance exercise consisted of maximum isometric contraction, which was induced by percutaneous electrical stimulation of the gastrocnemius muscle. Our results revealed no change in levels of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission (Fis1 and Drp1) or fusion (Opa1, Mfn1, and Mfn2) over the 24-h period following acute resistance exercise. Phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser616 was increased immediately after exercise (P < 0.01). Four weeks of resistance training (3 times/week) increased Mfn1 (P < 0.01), Mfn2 (P < 0.05), and Opa1 (P < 0.01) protein levels without altering mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation proteins. These observations suggest that resistance exercise has little effect on mitochondrial biogenesis but alters the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission, which may contribute to mitochondrial quality control and improved mitochondrial function.

  12. The Effects of Weak Combined Magnetic Field on Cell Wall Regeneration and Frequency of Plant Protoplasts Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, Olena

    The major purpose of these experiments was to investigate plant protoplast fusion frequency and regeneration of a cell wall by protoplasts at weak combined magnetic field (CMF) with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The protoplasts were isolated from Nicotiana lumbaginifolia and N. silvestris leaf mesophyll and from callus tissues (Nicotiana tabacum and Glycine max). The special extra apparatus with ferromagnetic shield was used for estimate of CMF with the frequency resonance to the cyclotron frequency of Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ ions. The fusion of protoplasts is realized by using of parent protoplasts isolated from one plant species, as well as from various plant species. Control samples were situated near the apparatus with CMF. The laser confocal microscopy was used for study of cell wall regeneration by single and fused protoplasts. The cytochemical methods with DAPI and calcofluor dye were also applied as the detectors for protoplast fusion and regeneration of cell wall. We have been established that CMF with frequency adjusted to the cyclotron frequency Mg2+ ions have shown the most positive influence on regeneration of cell wall by protoplasts. CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of K+ ions very weakly affected on the frequency of protoplast fusion. Largest frequency of protoplasts fusion is noted in the CMF adjusted to the cyclotron frequency of Ca2+ in comparison with the control samples.

  13. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 5-Fluorocytosine combined with Fcy-hEGF fusion protein targets EGFR-expressing cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Keng-Hsueh; Shih, Yi-Sheng; Chang, Cheng Allen; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lan, Keng-Li

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR-expressing epithelial cancers account for significant portion of cancer deaths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGF-EGFR signaling pathway is validated as an important anticancer drug target. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGF and Fcy fusion protein (Fcy-hEGF) can bind to EGFR and convert 5-FC to 5-FU. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fcy-hEGF combined with 5-FC preferentially