Science.gov

Sample records for cell growth inhibitory

  1. Inhibitory effect of DNA topoisomerase inhibitor isoliquiritigenin on the growth of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shupeng; Chang, Haigang; Ma, Pengju; Gao, Guojun; Jin, Cailing; Zhao, Xinli; Zhou, Wenke; Jin, Baozhe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of isoliquiritigenin on the activity of DNA topoisomerase (TOP I) and its inhibitory effect on the growth of U87 glioma cells. Methods: This study investigated the inhibitory effect of isoliquiritigenin on the growth of U87 glioma cells and its cytotoxicity by MTT method and determined the effect of isoliquiritigenin on TOP I activity by agarose gel electrophoresis. On this basis, we studied the interaction between isoliquiritigenin and TOP I and DNA. Finally, we further discussed the effect of isoliquiritigenin on the activity of Caspase 3, the apoptosis protein of U87 glioma cells. Results: Isoliquiritigenin could inhibit the growth of U87 glioma cells (half inhibitory concentration IC50: 0.221 mM) and is of low cytotoxicity to normal cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that isoliquiritigenin had significant inhibitory effect on TOP I activity. Molecular simulation results indicated that isoliquiritigenin took priority of binding to the active center of TOP I, and formed hydrogen bonds with the catalytic site Try723. Finally, Caspase 3 activity detection results suggested that isoliquiritigenin could significantly increase the activity of Caspase 3 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Isoliquiritigenin had a reversible inhibitory effect on TOP I activity, reduced the rate of single strand DNA unwinding in tumor cells, and thus played an important role in inducing the apoptosis of U87 glioma cells. PMID:26722447

  2. Growth-inhibitory activity of lymphoid cell plasma membranes. II. Partial characterization of the inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We have shown that plasma membranes from lymphoid cells have inhibitory activity for the growth of normal lymphocytes and lymphoid tumor cells (Stallcup, K. C., A. Dawson, and M. F. Mescher, J. Cell Biol. 99:1221- 1226). This growth-inhibitory activity has been found to co-purify with major histocompatibility complex class I antigens (H-2K and D) when these cell surface glycoproteins are isolated from detergent lysates of cells by affinity chromatography on monoclonal antibody columns. When incorporated into liposomes, the affinity-purified H-2 antigens inhibited the growth of both normal lymphocytes and tumor cells at concentrations of 1-3 micrograms/ml. Inhibition was readily reversed upon removal of the liposomes from the cell cultures, even after several days of exposure of cells to the inhibitor. Inhibitory activity was insensitive to protease digestion or heat treatment, indicating that it was not due to the H-2 glycoproteins. This was confirmed by the demonstration that inhibitory activity could be separated from the H-2 protein by gel filtration in the presence of deoxycholate and could be extracted from membranes or H-2 antigen preparations with organic solvents. The results demonstrate that the growth-inhibitory component(s) of the plasma membrane is a minor lipid or lipid-like molecule which retains activity in the absence of other membrane components. The findings reported here and in the preceding article suggest that this novel membrane component may have a role in control of lymphoid cell growth, possibly mediated by cell contacts. PMID:6332814

  3. Growth inhibitory activity of Ankaferd hemostat on primary melanoma cells and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Seyhan; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Hocaoglu, Helin; Mutlu, Duygu; Gunes, Gursel; Aksu, Salih; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Ankaferd hemostat is the first topical hemostatic agent about the red blood cell–fibrinogen relations tested in the clinical trials. Ankaferd hemostat consists of standardized plant extracts including Alpinia officinarum, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Thymus vulgaris, Urtica dioica, and Vitis vinifera. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Ankaferd hemostat on viability of melanoma cell lines. Methods: Dissimilar melanoma cell lines and primary cells were used in this study. These cells were treated with different concentrations of Ankaferd hemostat to assess the impact of different dosages of the drug. All cells treated with different concentrations were incubated for different time intervals. After the data had been obtained, one-tailed T-test was used to determine whether the Ankaferd hemostat would have any significant inhibitory impact on cell growth. Results: We demonstrated in this study that cells treated with Ankaferd hemostat showed a significant decrease in cell viability compared to control groups. The cells showed different resistances against Ankaferd hemostat which depended on the dosage applied and the time treated cells had been incubated. We also demonstrated an inverse relationship between the concentration of the drug and the incubation time on one hand and the viability of the cells on the other hand, that is, increasing the concentration of the drug and the incubation time had a negative impact on cell viability. Conclusion: The findings in our study contribute to our knowledge about the anticancer impact of Ankaferd hemostat on different melanoma cells. PMID:28293423

  4. Growth inhibitory effects of sodium phenylacetate (NSC 3039) on ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ferrandina, G; Melichar, B; Loercher, A; Verschraegen, C F; Kudelka, A P; Edwards, C L; Scambia, G; Kavanagh, J J; Abbruzzese, J L; Freedman, R S

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antiproliferative activity of sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) against ovarian carcinoma cell lines. NaPa induced a dose-dependent inhibition (IC50 from 12 mM to >20 mM) of all ovarian carcinoma cell lines, although the sensitivity of individual lines to NaPa varied. Both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cell lines responded to NaPa, and growth-inhibitory activity was also detected against cells freshly isolated from malignant ascites of previously treated patients. The growth inhibitory effects that were produced by NaPa were time dependent, showing a maximum effect at 72 h, and were not associated with cytotoxic action. Growth inhibitory effects of NaPa were also reversible. After 48- and 72-h exposures to NaPa, a reduction in the percentage of cells in the S-phase was detected, with a concomitant recruitment of cells in the G0-G1 phase. Treatment with NaPa after different exposure times did not significantly increase the proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis. NaPa also produced a significant reduction in the percentage of cyclin-D1- and p21/ras-positive cells and in the percentage of cells positive for bcl-2, whereas the percentages of bax/p21-positive cells increased. NaPa produced minimal, if any, alterations of expression of HLA class I and transforming growth factor beta1 antigens. In contrast, the percentage of transforming growth factor beta2-positive cells decreased after exposure to NaPa. The combination of NaPa with cisplatin resulted in an additive inhibitory effect. Our results show, for the first time, that NaPa inhibits the growth of ovarian carcinoma cell lines and the cells from malignant ascites of chemotherapy-treated patients with ovarian carcinoma. The growth-inhibitory properties of NaPa suggest that this molecule could represent a prototype of a new class of compounds with possible therapeutic potential in patients with ovarian carcinoma.

  5. Inhibitory effect of substituted dextrans on MCF7 human breast cancer cell growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Morere, J F; Letourneur, D; Planchon, P; Avramoglou, T; Jozefonvicz, J; Israel, L; Crepin, M

    1992-12-01

    Substituted dextrans can reproduce some of the properties of heparin and can thus be used to alter cellular growth. We studied the effect of heparin (H108), dextran (D), carboxymethylbenzylamide dextran (CMDB) and carboxymethylbenzylamide sulfonate dextran (CMDBS) on the growth of human mammary cells of the MCF7 tumor line. The cells were cultured in minimum Eagle's medium containing 2% fetal calf serum without biopolymer, or with increasing concentrations of H108, D, CMDB or CMDBS. Growth curves were accurately based on cell counting using a Coulter counter. Cell distribution in the various phases of the cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Dose-dependent growth inhibitory effects (400-4000 micrograms/ml) were observed. The effect on MCF7 tumor cells was most apparent with CMDBS. The percentage of cells in the S phase decreased with preferential blocking in the G0/G1 phase. Pre-clinical studies can be anticipated as there is an absence of in vivo toxicity.

  6. Metabolism and growth inhibitory activity of cranberry derived flavonoids in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Prasain, Jeevan K; Rajbhandari, Rajani; Keeton, Adam B; Piazza, Gary A; Barnes, Stephen

    2016-09-14

    In the present study, anti-proliferative activities of cranberry derived flavonoids and some of their in vivo metabolites were evaluated using a panel of human bladder tumor cell lines (RT4, SCABER, and SW-780) and non-tumorigenic immortalized human uroepithelial cells (SV-HUC). Among the compounds tested, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, isorhamnetin (3'-O-methylquercetin), myricetin and quercetin showed strong concentration-dependent cell growth inhibitory activities in bladder cancer cells with IC50 values in a range of 8-92 μM. Furthermore, isorhamnetin and myricetin had very low inhibitory activity against SV-HUC even at very high concentrations (>200 μM) compared to bladder cancer cells, indicating that their cytotoxicity is selective for cancer cells. To determine whether the differential cell growth inhibitory effects of isomeric flavonoids quercetin 3-O-glucoside (active) and hyperoside (quercetin 3-O-galactoside) (inactive) are related to their metabolism by the cancer cells, SW-780 cells were incubated with these compounds and their metabolism was examined by LC-MS/MS. Compared to quercetin 3-O-glucoside, hyperoside undergoes relatively less metabolic biotransformation (methylation, glucuronidation and quinone formation). These data suggest that isorhamnetin and quercetin 3-O-glucoside may be the active forms of quercetin in prevention of bladder cancer in vivo and emphasize the importance of metabolism for the prevention of bladder cancer by diets rich in cranberries.

  7. Growth inhibitory activity of extracts and compounds from Cimicifuga species on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Einbond, Linda Saxe; Wen-Cai, Ye; He, Kan; Wu, Hsan-au; Cruz, Erica; Roller, Marc; Kronenberg, Fredi

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to explore the growth inhibitory effect of extracts and compounds from black cohosh and related Cimicifuga species on human breast cancer cells and to determine the nature of the active components. Black cohosh fractions enriched for triterpene glycosides and purified components from black cohosh and related Asian species were tested for growth inhibition of the ER(-) Her2 overexpressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. Growth inhibitory activity was assayed using the Coulter Counter, MTT and colony formation assays. Results suggested that the growth inhibitory activity of black cohosh extracts appears to be related to their triterpene glycoside composition. The most potent Cimicifuga component tested was 25-acetyl-7,8-didehydrocimigenol 3-O-beta-d-xylopyranoside, which has an acetyl group at position C-25. It had an IC(50) of 3.2microg/ml (5microM) compared to 7.2microg/ml (12.1microM) for the parent compound 7,8-didehydrocimigenol 3-O-beta-d-xylopyranoside. Thus, the acetyl group at position C-25 enhances growth inhibitory activity. The purified triterpene glycoside actein (beta-d-xylopyranoside), with an IC(50) equal to 5.7microg/ml (8.4microM), exhibited activity comparable to cimigenol 3-O-beta-d-xyloside. MCF7 (ER(+)Her2 low) cells transfected for Her2 are more sensitive than the parental MCF7 cells to the growth inhibitory effects of actein from black cohosh, indicating that Her2 plays a role in the action of actein. The effect of actein on Her2 overexpressing MDA-MB-453 and MCF7 (ER(+)Her2 low) human breast cancer cells was examined by fluorescent microscopy. Treatment with actein altered the distribution of actin filaments and induced apoptosis in these cells. These findings, coupled with our previous evidence that treatment with the triterpene glycoside actein induced a stress response and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells, suggest that compounds from Cimicifuga species may be useful in the prevention and

  8. Troglitazone enhances tamoxifen-induced growth inhibitory activity of MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hong-Nu; Noh, Eun-Mi; Lee, Young-Rae; Roh, Si-Gyun; Song, Eun-Kyung; Han, Myung-Kwan; Lee, Yong-Chul; Shim, In Kyong; Lee, Seung Jin; Jung, Sung Hoo; Kim, Jong-Suk Youn, Hyun Jo

    2008-12-05

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) ligands have been identified as a potential source of therapy for human cancers. However, PPAR{gamma} ligands have a limitation for breast cancer therapy, since estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{sub {alpha}}) negatively interferes with PPAR{gamma} signaling in breast cancer cells. Here we show that ER{sub {alpha}} inhihits PPAR{gamma} transactivity and ER{sub {alpha}}-mediated inhibition of PPAR{gamma} transactivity is blocked by tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor blocker. The activation of ER{sub {alpha}} with 17-{beta}-estradiol blocked PPRE transactivity induced by troglitazone, a PPAR{gamma} ligand, indicating the resistance of ER{sub {alpha}}-positive breast cancer cells to troglitazone. Indeed, troglitazone inhibited the growth of ER{sub {alpha}}-negative MDA-MB-231 cells more than that of ER{sub {alpha}}-positive MCF-7 cells. Combination of troglitazone with tamoxifen led to a marked increase in growth inhibition of ER{sub {alpha}}-positive MCF-7 cells compared to either agent alone. Our data indicates that troglitazone enhances the growth inhibitory activity of tamoxifen in ER{sub {alpha}}-positive MCF-7 cells.

  9. In vitro growth inhibitory effects of cytochalasins and derivatives in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Van Goietsenoven, Gwendoline; Mathieu, Véronique; Andolfi, Anna; Cimmino, Alessio; Lefranc, Florence; Kiss, Robert; Evidente, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    The in vitro anticancer activity of eight natural cytochalasins and three hemisynthetic derivatives of cytochalasin B on six cancer cell lines was evaluated. The IC (50) in vitro growth inhibitory concentrations, as determined by an MTT colorimetric assay, ranged between 3 and 90 µM and did not relate to the intrinsic sensitivity of the cancer cell lines to proapoptotic stimuli. Structure activity relationship (SAR) analyses revealed that the presence of an unmodified hydroxyl group at C-7 of the perhydroisoinsolyl-1-one residue as well as the functionalities and the conformational freedom of the macrocycle are all important features for cytochalasin-mediated anticancer activities in vitro. Computer-assisted phase-contrast microscopy revealed two groups of cytochalasins, i.e., cytotoxic versus cytostatic ones. Our data open new possibilities for tuning cytochalasin targets and developing nontoxic, cytostatic cytochalasins to combat cancers associated with poor prognoses, such as those that display intrinsic resistance to proapoptotic stimuli.

  10. [Progress of study on inhibitory effects of traditional Chinese herbs on growth factor induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Min-zhou; Jiang, Wei

    2005-10-01

    This paper sums up some studies in the last decade regarding the inhibitory effects of traditional Chinese herbs on growth factor induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) via directly measuring the mRNA expression of its growth factors and the related receptors by electron microscope, immunohistochemistry, blot and hybridization in situ.

  11. Physical and biological characterization of a growth-inhibitory activity purified from the neuroepithelioma cell line A673.

    PubMed Central

    Stam, K; Stewart, A A; Qu, G Y; Iwata, K K; Fenyö, D; Chait, B T; Marshak, D R; Haley, J D

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial- and haematopoietic-cell growth-inhibitory activities have been identified in the conditioned medium of the human peripheral neuroepithelioma cell line A673. An A673-cell-derived growth-inhibitory activity was previously fractionated into two distinct components which inhibited the proliferation of human carcinoma and leukaemia cells in culture. One inhibitory activity was shown to comprise interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha). Here, we have purified to homogeneity a distinct activity which inhibited the growth of the epithelial cells in vitro. Using a combination of protein-sequence analysis and mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that biological activity can be assigned to a dimeric protein with a molecular mass of 25,576 (+/- 4) Da and an N-terminal sequence identical with that of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). Further characterization of the growth inhibitor with TGF-beta-isoform-specific antibodies showed that > 90% of the bioactivity consists of TGF-beta 1 and not TGF-beta 2 or TGF-beta 3. Although A673 cells were growth-inhibited by exogenous TGF-beta 1, we showed that TGF-beta 1 in A673-cell-conditioned media was present in the latent, biologically inactive, form which did not act as an autocrine growth modulator of A673 cells in vitro. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7826358

  12. Trichomonas vaginalis homolog of macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces prostate cell growth, invasiveness, and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Twu, Olivia; Dessí, Daniele; Vu, Anh; Mercer, Frances; Stevens, Grant C; de Miguel, Natalia; Rappelli, Paola; Cocco, Anna Rita; Clubb, Robert T; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Johnson, Patricia J

    2014-06-03

    The human-infective parasite Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Infections in men may result in colonization of the prostate and are correlated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We have found that T. vaginalis secretes a protein, T. vaginalis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TvMIF), that is 47% similar to human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (HuMIF), a proinflammatory cytokine. Because HuMIF is reported to be elevated in prostate cancer and inflammation plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancers, we have explored a role for TvMIF in prostate cancer. Here, we show that TvMIF has tautomerase activity, inhibits macrophage migration, and is proinflammatory. We also demonstrate that TvMIF binds the human CD74 MIF receptor with high affinity, comparable to that of HuMIF, which triggers activation of ERK, Akt, and Bcl-2-associated death promoter phosphorylation at a physiologically relevant concentration (1 ng/mL, 80 pM). TvMIF increases the in vitro growth and invasion through Matrigel of benign and prostate cancer cells. Sera from patients infected with T. vaginalis are reactive to TvMIF, especially in males. The presence of anti-TvMIF antibodies indicates that TvMIF is released by the parasite and elicits host immune responses during infection. Together, these data indicate that chronic T. vaginalis infections may result in TvMIF-driven inflammation and cell proliferation, thus triggering pathways that contribute to the promotion and progression of prostate cancer.

  13. In Vitro Growth Inhibitory Activities of Natural Products from Irciniid Sponges against Cancer Cells: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    BenRedjem Romdhane, Yosr; Elbour, Monia; Carbone, Marianna; Ciavatta, Maria Letizia; Gavagnin, Margherita; Mathieu, Véronique; Lefranc, Florence; Ktari, Leila; Ben Mustapha, Karim; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges of the Irciniidae family contain both bioactive furanosesterterpene tetronic acids (FTAs) and prenylated hydroquinones (PHQs). Both classes of compounds are known for their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties and known to display growth inhibitory effects against various human tumor cell lines. However, the different experimental conditions of the reported in vitro bioassays, carried out on different cancer cell lines within separate studies, prevent realistic actual discrimination between the two classes of compounds from being carried out in terms of growth inhibitory effects. In the present work, a chemical investigation of irciniid sponges from Tunisian coasts led to the purification of three known FTAs and three known PHQs. The in vitro growth inhibitory properties of the six purified compounds have been evaluated in the same experiment in a panel of five human and one murine cancer cell lines displaying various levels of sensitivity to proapoptotic stimuli. Surprisingly, FTAs and PHQs elicited distinct profiles of growth inhibitory-responses, differing by one to two orders of magnitude in favor of the PHQs in all cell lines. The obtained comparative results are discussed in the light of a better selection of drug candidates from natural sources. PMID:27597966

  14. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  15. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, TETSUSHI; UEMURA, KENTARO; MORIYAMA, KAHO; MITAMURA, KUNIKO; TAGA, ATSUSHI

    2015-01-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy. PMID:25647359

  16. Novel juglone and plumbagin 5-O derivatives and their in vitro growth inhibitory activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fiorito, Serena; Genovese, Salvatore; Taddeo, Vito Alessandro; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Epifano, Francesco

    2016-01-15

    Juglone 1 an plumbagin 2 are plant secondary metabolites nowadays well known for their anticancer properties. In this study we synthesized analogues of 1 and 2 deriving from the functionalization of the OH group in position 5 with different side chains in form of esters and ethers. Therefore the growth inhibitory activities of these adducts were evaluated in vitro on six cancer cell lines using the MTT colorimetric assays along with the two natural parent compounds. The data revealed that these latter displayed the strongest growth inhibitory activities in vitro. Quantitative videomicroscopy analyses were then carried out on human U373 glioblastoma cells, which are characterized by various level of resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli. We compared the naturally occurring reference compounds 1 and 2 with the derivatives exerting the best activities in terms of IC50 growth inhibitory values. These analyses showed that both juglone and plumbagin had a cytostatic effect on U373 cells and were able to overcome the intrinsic resistance of U373 cancer cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli.

  17. Pretreatment with anti-oxidants sensitizes oxidatively stressed human cancer cells to growth inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)

    PubMed Central

    Mahlum, Amy; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Kegel, Stacy J.; Guo, Song; Peters, Noel R.; Wilding, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Most prostate, colon and breast cancer cells are resistant to growth inhibitory effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We have examined whether the high oxidative stress in these cells causes a loss of SAHA activity and if so, whether pretreatment with an anti-oxidant can sensitize these cells to SAHA. Methods A DNA-Hoechst dye fluorescence measured cell growth and dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCF-DA) dye fluorescence measured reactive oxygen species (ROS). Growth inhibitory and ROS-generating activities of SAHA in androgen-treated or untreated LNCaP cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, HT-29 and HCT-115 colon cancer cells, MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells and A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cells with or without pretreatment with an anti-oxidant Vitamin E was determined. SAHA activity against LNCaP cells treated with another anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was also determined. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) was used to determine intracellular SAHA level. Results SAHA treatment markedly inhibits LNCaP cell growth, when the cells are at a low ROS level. SAHA is, however, inactive against the same cell line, when the cells are at a high ROS level. A significant decrease in SAHA level was observed in LNCaP cells with high ROS after 24-and 72-h treatment when compared to cells with low ROS. Vitamin E pretreatment that reduces cellular ROS, synergistically sensitizes oxidatively stressed LNCaP, PC-3, HT-29, HCT-115 and MDA-MB231 cells, but not the A-549 and NCI-H460 cells with low ROS to SAHA. NAC treatment also sensitized androgen-treated LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA. Conclusion Response to SAHA could be improved by combining anti-oxidants such as Vitamin E with SAHA for the treatment of oxidatively stressed human malignancies that are otherwise resistant to SAHA. PMID:20512578

  18. Transcript profiling identifies novel key players mediating the growth inhibitory effect of NS-398 on human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Efferth, Thomas; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2011-01-10

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. Despite an increase in the number of systemic treatments available for pancreatic cancer, the impact of therapy on the clinical course of the disease has been modest, underscoring an urgent need for new therapeutic options. Although selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors have been demonstrated to have cancer-preventive effects, the mechanism of their effects is not clearly known. Moreover, there have been no unbiased studies to identify novel molecular targets of NS-398 regarding pancreatic cancer. Here we undertook a gene expression profiling study to identify novel molecular targets modulating the growth inhibitory effects of NS-398 on pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our mRNA-based gene expression results showed that the growth inhibitory effect of NS-398 was accompanied with an activation of G1/S and G2/M cell cycle regulation, P53 signalling, apoptotic, aryl hydrocarbon receptor and death receptor signalling pathways. Moreover, we reported, for the first time, that the growth inhibitory effect of NS-398 is mediated by down-regulation of RRM2, CTGF, MCM2 and PCNA and up-regulation of NAG-1 in all cell lines.

  19. Inhibitory effects of different forms of tocopherols, tocopherol phosphates, and tocopherol quinones on growth of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dolfi, Sonia C; Yang, Zhihong; Lee, Mao-Jung; Guan, Fei; Hong, Jungil; Yang, Chung S

    2013-09-11

    Tocopherols are the major source of dietary vitamin E. In this study, the growth inhibitory effects of different forms of tocopherols (T), tocopheryl phosphates (TP), and tocopherol quinones (TQ) on human colon cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells were investigated. δ-T was more active than γ-T in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth, decreasing cancer cell colony formation, and inducing apoptosis; however, α-T was rather ineffective. Similarly, the rate of cellular uptake also followed the ranking order δ-T > γ-T ≫ α-T. TP and TQ generally had higher inhibitory activities than their parent compounds. Interestingly, the γ forms of TP and TQ were more active than the δ forms in inhibiting cancer cell growth, whereas the α forms were the least effective. The potencies of γ-TQ and δ-TQ (showing IC50 values of ∼0.8 and ∼2 μM on HCT116 cells after a 72 h incubation, respectively) were greater than 100-fold and greater than 20-fold higher, respectively, than those of their parent tocopherols. Induction of cancer cell apoptosis by δ-T, γ-TP, and γ-TQ was characterized by the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP1 and DNA fragmentation. These studies demonstrated the higher growth inhibitory activity of δ-T than γ-T, the even higher activities of the γ forms of TP and TQ, and the ineffectiveness of the α forms of tocopherol and their metabolites against colon cancer cells.

  20. Inhibitory effects of small molecular peptides from Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis on cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhujun; Zhang, Xuewu

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the whole proteins of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis were extracted, hydrolysis with three proteases (trypsin, alcalase and papain) was performed, and gel filtration chromatography was employed to separate hydrolysates. Totally, 15 polypeptides were isolated, which showed anti-proliferation activities on five cancer cells (HepG-2, MCF-7, SGC-7901, A549 and HT-29), with the IC50 values between <31.25 and 336.57 μg mL(-1). Moreover, a new peptide YGFVMPRSGLWFR was identified from papain-digested hydrolysates. It also exhibited inhibitory activities on cancer cells, and the best activity was observed on A549 cancer cells (IC50 values 104.05 μg mL(-1)). In other words, these polypeptides exhibited anti-proliferation activities on cancer cells, and low toxicity or stimulatory activity on normal cells, suggesting that they are promising ingredients in food and pharmaceutical applications.

  1. NEU3 inhibitory effect of naringin suppresses cancer cell growth by attenuation of EGFR signaling through GM3 ganglioside accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Ayana; Kajiya, Natsuki; Oishi, Kazuki; Kamada, Yuko; Ikeda, Asami; Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Kibe, Toshiro; Kishida, Michiko; Kishida, Shosei; Komatsu, Masaharu; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-05

    Naringin, which is one of the flavonoids contained in citrus fruits, is well known to possess various healthy functions to humans. It has been reported that naringin suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, the roles of glycoconjugates, such as gangliosides, in cancer cells have been focused because of their regulatory effects of malignant phenotypes. Here, to clarify the roles of naringin in the negative-regulation of cancer cell growth, the alteration of glycoconjugates induced by naringin exposure and its significance on cell signaling were investigated. Human cancer cells, HeLa and A549, were exposed to various concentrations of naringin. Naringin treatment induced the suppression of cell growth toward HeLa and A549 cells accompanied with an increase of apoptotic cells. In naringin-exposed cells, GM3 ganglioside was drastically increased compared to the GM3 content prior to the treatment. Furthermore, naringin inhibited NEU3 sialidase, a GM3 degrading glycosidase. Similarly, NEU3 inhibition activities were also detected by other flavanone, such as hesperidin and neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, but their aglycones showed less inhibitions. Naringin-treated cancer cells showed suppressed EGFR and ERK phosphorylation levels. These results suggest a novel mechanism of naringin in the suppression of cancer cell growth through the alteration of glycolipids. NEU3 inhibitory effect of naringin induced GM3 accumulation in HeLa and A549 cells, leading the attenuation of EGFR/ERK signaling accompanied with a decrease in cell growth.

  2. An Investigation of the Growth Inhibitory Capacity of Several Medicinal Plants From Iran on Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilbeig, Maryam; Kouhpayeh, Seyed Amin; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditional herbal medicine is a valuable resource that provides new drugs for cancer treatment. Objectives: In this study we aim to screen and investigate the in vitro anti-tumor activities of ten species of plants commonly grown in Southern Iran. Materials and Methods: We used the MTT colorimetric assay to evaluate the cytotoxic activities of the methanol extracts of these plants on various tumor cell lines. The IC50 was calculated as a scale for this evaluation. Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Satureja hortensis, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis and Mentha lonigfolia showed the inhibitoriest effects on Jurkat cells with > 80% inhibition at 200 µg/mL. Satureja hortensis (IC50: 66.7 µg/mL) was the most effective. These plants also strongly inhibited K562 cell growth; Satureja bachtiarica (IC50: 28.3 µg/mL), Satureja hortensis (IC50: 52 µg/mL) and Thymus vulgaris (IC50: 87 µg/mL) were the most effective extracts. Cichorium intybus, Rheum ribes, Alhagi pseudalhagi and Glycyrrihza glabra also showed notable effects on the leukemia cell lines. The Raji cell line was mostly inhibited by Satureja bachtiarica and Thymus vulgaris with approximately 40% inhibition at 200µg/ml. The influence of these extracts on solid tumor cell lines was not strong. Fen cells were mostly affected by Glycyrrihza glabra (IC50: 182 µg/mL) and HeLa cells by Satureja hortensis (31.6% growth inhibitory effect at 200 µg/mL). Conclusions: Leukemic cell lines were more sensitive to the extracts than the solid tumor cell lines; Satureja hortensis, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis and Mentha lonigfolia showed remarkable inhibitory potential. PMID:26634114

  3. Liposomal delivery improves the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic activity of low doses of gemcitabine in multiple myeloma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Malara, Natalia; Terracciano, Rosa; Cosco, Donato; Paolino, Donatella; Fresta, Massimo; Savino, Rocco

    2008-06-01

    Gemcitabine-loaded pegylated unilamellar liposomes (200 nm) were proposed for the treatment of multiple myeloma cancer disease. Physicochemical and technological parameters of liposomes were evaluated by using laser light scattering and gel permeation chromatography. The growth-inhibitory activity of gemcitabine-loaded liposomes compared to the free drug was assayed in vitro on U266 (autocrine, interleukin-6-independent) and INA-6 (IL-6-dependent) multiple myeloma cell lines. Liposomes noticeably improved the growth-inhibitory activity of gemcitabine in terms of both dose-dependent and incubation-time effects. Liposomal delivery of gemcitabine consistently and significantly increased induction of apoptosis and caused a complete inhibition of proliferation. Liposomes were able to interact with multiple myeloma cells as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and hence to improve the intracellular gemcitabine delivery. Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes were much more effective in vitro than the free drug. This formulation may offer even more in vivo advantages both in terms of drug pharmacokinetic and biodistribution.

  4. Sodium phenylacetate enhances the inhibitory effect of dextran derivative on breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Benedetto, M Di; Kourbali, Y; Starzec, A; Vassy, R; Jozefonvicz, J; Perret, G; Crepin, M; Kraemer, M

    2001-01-01

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) and carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran derivative (CMDBLS4) are able to inhibit growth of breast tumour cells. In this study, we explored whether the combination of NaPa and CMDBLS4 may enhance their respective inhibitory effects on the MCF-7ras cell growth in vitro and in vivo. NaPa inhibited MCF-7ras cell proliferation by reducing the DNA replication concomitantly with a recruitment of cells in G0/G1 phase and by inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The addition of CMDBLS4 potentiated the NaPa antiproliferative effect in the manner dependent on the ratio of CMDBLS4 and NaPa concentrations. In nude mice, CMDBLS4 (150 mg kg−1) or NaPa (40 mg kg−1) administrated twice a week, for 7 weeks inhibited MCF-7ras xenograft growth by 40% and 60%, respectively. The treatment by both, CMDBLS4 and NaPa, decreased tumour growth by 83% without any toxicity. To better understand the mechanism of NaPa and CMDBLS4 action we assessed their effect on mitogenic activity of MCF-7ras conditioned medium (CM) on BALBC/3T3 fibroblasts. CMDBLS4 added to the CM, inhibited its mitogenic activity whereas NaPa had an anti-mitogenic effect when CM was prepared from MCF-7ras cells pretreated with NaPa. Thus, the antiproliferative effects of NaPa and CMDBLS4 involve 2 different mechanisms explaining, at least in part, the possible synergism between them. Overall, this study points to the potential use of a combination of dextran derivatives with NaPa to inhibit the breast tumour growth. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556846

  5. Sodium phenylacetate enhances the inhibitory effect of dextran derivative on breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Di Benedetto, M; Kourbali, Y; Starzec, A; Vassy, R; Jozefonvicz, J; Perret, G; Crepin, M; Kraemer, M

    2001-09-14

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) and carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran derivative (CMDB(LS4)) are able to inhibit growth of breast tumour cells. In this study, we explored whether the combination of NaPa and CMDB(LS4)may enhance their respective inhibitory effects on the MCF-7ras cell growth in vitro and in vivo. NaPa inhibited MCF-7ras cell proliferation by reducing the DNA replication concomitantly with a recruitment of cells in G0/G1 phase and by inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The addition of CMDB(LS4)potentiated the NaPa antiproliferative effect in the manner dependent on the ratio of CMDB(LS4)and NaPa concentrations. In nude mice, CMDB(LS4)(150 mg kg(-1)) or NaPa (40 mg kg(-1)) administrated twice a week, for 7 weeks inhibited MCF-7ras xenograft growth by 40% and 60%, respectively. The treatment by both, CMDB(LS4)and NaPa, decreased tumour growth by 83% without any toxicity. To better understand the mechanism of NaPa and CMDB(LS4)action we assessed their effect on mitogenic activity of MCF-7ras conditioned medium (CM) on BALBC/3T3 fibroblasts. CMDB(LS4)added to the CM, inhibited its mitogenic activity whereas NaPa had an anti-mitogenic effect when CM was prepared from MCF-7ras cells pretreated with NaPa. Thus, the antiproliferative effects of NaPa and CMDB(LS4)involve 2 different mechanisms explaining, at least in part, the possible synergism between them. Overall, this study points to the potential use of a combination of dextran derivatives with NaPa to inhibit the breast tumour growth.

  6. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M S; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu; Pandey, B N

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  7. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D.; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M. S.; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  8. Polyphenols bearing cinnamaldehyde scaffold showing cell growth inhibitory effects on the cisplatin-resistant A2780/Cis ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soon Young; Jung, Hyeryoung; Ahn, Seunghyun; Hwang, Doseok; Yoon, Hyuk; Hyun, Jiye; Yong, Yeonjoong; Cho, Hi Jae; Koh, Dongsoo; Lee, Young Han; Lim, Yoongho

    2014-03-15

    Ovarian carcinoma remains the most lethal among gynecological cancers. Chemoresistance is a clinical problem that severely limits treatment success. To identify potent anticancer agents against the cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell line A2780/Cis, 26 polyphenols bearing a cinnamaldehyde scaffold were synthesized. Structural differences in their inhibitory effect on clonogenicity of A2780/Cis cells were elucidated using comparative molecular field analysis and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis. Structural conditions required for increased inhibitory activity can be derived based on the analysis of their contour maps. The two most active compounds (16 and 19) were selected and further characterized their biological activities. We found that compounds 16 and 19 trigger cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptotic cell death in cisplatin-resistant A2780/Cis human ovarian cancer cells. The molecular mechanism of compound 16 was elucidated using in vitro aurora A kinase assay, and the binding mode between the compound 16 and aurora A kinase was interpreted using in silico docking experiments. The findings obtained here may help us develop novel plant-derived polyphenols used for potent chemotherapeutic agents. In conclusion, compounds 16 and 19 could be used as promising lead compounds for the development of novel anticancer therapies in the treatment of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancers.

  9. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  10. Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory Effect of Bee Venom via Increase of Death Receptor 3 Expression and Inactivation of NF-kappa B in NSCLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Chul Ju; Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Kim, Joo Hwan; Park, Joo Ho; Ahn, Young Jin; Kim, Ji Young; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that bee venom (BV) has anti-cancer activity in several cancer cells. However, the effects of BV on lung cancer cell growth have not been reported. Cell viability was determined with trypan blue uptake, soft agar formation as well as DAPI and TUNEL assay. Cell death related protein expression was determined with Western blotting. An EMSA was used for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activity assay. BV (1–5 μg/mL) inhibited growth of lung cancer cells by induction of apoptosis in a dose dependent manner in lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of DR3 and DR6 was significantly increased. However, deletion of DRs by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV induced cell growth inhibitory effects. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (caspase-3 and Bax) was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited. A combination treatment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, docetaxel and cisplatin, with BV synergistically inhibited both A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cell growth with further down regulation of NF-κB activity. These results show that BV induces apoptotic cell death in lung cancer cells through the enhancement of DR3 expression and inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25068924

  11. Growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 on Hep G{sub 2} cells via inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jing; Du, Yi-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Yi; Pan, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Huan, Lin; Gong, Zhu-Nan; Wei, Shao-Hua; Huang, Shi-Qian; Xun, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Chang, Lei-Lei; Xie, Meng-Yu; Ao, Gui-Zhen; Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting; Xu, Guang-Lin

    2014-01-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the inhibitory activity test on Hep G{sub 2} growth. We found that KYKZL-1 inhibited the growth of Hep G{sub 2} cells via inducing apoptosis. Further studies showed that KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c release from mitochondria and down regulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and reduced the high level of COX-2 and 5-LOX. As shown in its anti-inflammatory effect, KYKZL-1 also exhibited inhibitory effect on the PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} production in Hep G{sub 2} cells. Accordingly, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or LTB{sub 4} reversed the decreases in cell viability. In addition, KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest at the S–G{sub 2} checkpoint via the activation of p21{sup CIP1} protein and down-regulation of cyclin A expression. These data indicate that the growth inhibitory effect of KYKZL-1 is associated with inhibition of AA metabolites and caspase-3 pathway and cell cycle arrest. Combined with our previous findings, KYKZL-1 exhibiting COX/5-LOX inhibition may be a promising potential agent not only for inflammation control but also for cancer prevention/therapy with an enhanced gastric safety profile. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 resulted in apoptosis of Hep G{sub 2} cells. • KYKZL-1 activated caspase-3 through cytochrome c and bcl-2/bax ratio. • KYKZL-1 caused cell cycle arrest via modulation of p21{sup CIP1} and cyclin A level.

  12. Ophiobolin A, a sesterterpenoid fungal phytotoxin, displays higher in vitro growth-inhibitory effects in mammalian than in plant cells and displays in vivo antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Bury, Marina; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Andolfi, Anna; Cimini, Sara; Wauthoz, Nathalie; Heffeter, Petra; Lallemand, Benjamin; Avolio, Fabiana; Delporte, Cédric; Cimmino, Alessio; Dubois, Jacques; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Zonno, Maria Chiara; Vurro, Maurizio; Poumay, Yves; Berger, Walter; Evidente, Antonio; De Gara, Laura; Kiss, Robert; Locato, Vittoria

    2013-08-01

    Ophiobolin A, a sesterterpenoid produced by plant pathogenic fungi, was purified from the culture extract of Drechslera gigantea and tested for its growth-inhibitory activity in both plant and mammalian cells. Ophiobolin A induced cell death in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2 (TBY-2) cells at concentrations ≥10 µM, with the TBY-2 cells showing typical features of apoptosis-like cell death. At a concentration of 5 µM, ophiobolin A did not affect plant cell viability but prevented cell proliferation. When tested on eight cancer cell lines, concentrations <1 µM of ophiobolin A inhibited growth by 50% after 3 days of culture irrespective of their multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes and their resistance levels to pro-apoptotic stimuli. It is, thus, unlikely that ophiobolin A exerts these in vitro growth-inhibitory effects in cancer cells by activating pro-apoptotic processes. Highly proliferative human keratinocytes appeared more sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effects of ophiobolin A than slowly proliferating ones. Ophiobolin A also displayed significant antitumor activity at the level of mouse survival when assayed at 10 mg/kg in the B16F10 mouse melanoma model with lung pseudometastases. Ophiobolin A could, thus, represent a novel scaffold to combat cancer types that display various levels of resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli and/or various MDR phenotypes.

  13. Chemical constituents of Rhododendron formosanum show pronounced growth inhibitory effect on non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Way, Tzong-Der; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Wang, Chao-Min; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2014-01-29

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Rhododendron formosanum Hemsl. (Ericaceae), an endemic species in Taiwan, exhibits antineoplastic potential against non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). R. formosanum was successively extracted with methanol and then separated into dichloromethane (RFL-DCM), ethyl acetate (RFL-EA), n-butanol (RFL-BuOH), and water (RFL-H2O) fractions. Among these extracts, RFL-EA exhibited the most effective antineoplastic effect. This study also demonstrated that fractions 2 and 3 from the RFL-EA extract (RFL-EA-2, RFL-EA-3) possessed the strongest antineoplastic potential against NSCLC cells. The major phytochemical constituents of RFL-EA-2 and RFL-EA-3 were ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, and betulinic acid. This study indicated that ursolic acid demonstrated the most efficient antineoplastic effects on NSCLC cells. Ursolic acid inhibited growth of NSCLC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and stimulated apoptosis. Apoptosis was substantiated by activation of caspase-3 and -9, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and an elevation of the Bax were also observed following ursolic acid treatment. Ursolic acid activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and then inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which controls protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, ursolic acid decreased the expression and/or activity of lipogenic enzymes, such as acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) via AMPK activation. Collectively, these data provide insight into the chemical constituents and anticancer activity of R. formosanum against NSCLC cells, which are worthy of continued study.

  14. Dietary genistein negates the inhibitory effect of letrozole on the growth of aromatase-expressing estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells (MCF-7Ca) in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young H; Doerge, Daniel R; Woodling, Kellie A; Hartman, James A; Kwak, Jieun; Helferich, William G

    2008-11-01

    Genistein (GEN), a soy isoflavone, stimulates growth of estrogen-dependent human tumor cells (MCF-7) in a preclinical mouse model for postmenopausal breast cancer. Antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors are frontline therapies for estrogen-dependent breast cancer. We have demonstrated that dietary GEN can negate the inhibitory effect of tamoxifen. In this study, we evaluated the interaction of dietary GEN (at 250-1000 p.p.m. in the American Institute of Nutrition 93 growth diet) and an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole (LET), on the growth of tumors in an aromatase-expressing breast cancer xenograft model (MCF-7Ca) in the presence and absence of the substrate androstenedione (AD). Dietary GEN (250 and 500 p.p.m.) or implanted AD stimulated MCF-7Ca tumor growth. Implanted LET inhibited AD-stimulated MCF-7Ca tumor growth. In the presence of AD and LET, dietary GEN (250, 500 and 1000 p.p.m.) reversed the inhibitory effect of LET in a dose-dependent manner. Uterine wet weight, plasma estradiol (E(2)) levels (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and total plasma GEN and LET levels (liquid chromatography-electrospray/tandem mass spectrometry) were measured. Ki-67 (cellular proliferation), aromatase and pS2 protein expression in tumors were evaluated using immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. In conclusion, dietary GEN increased the growth of MCF-7Ca tumors implanted in ovariectomized mice and could also negate the inhibitory effect of LET on MCF-7Ca tumor growth. These findings are significant because tumors, which express aromatase and synthesize estrogen, are good candidates for aromatase therapy dietary and GEN can reverse the inhibitory effect of LET on tumor growth and adversely impact breast cancer therapy. Caution is warranted for consumption of dietary GEN by postmenopausal women with estrogen-dependent breast cancer taking LET treatment.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 are being extensively studied as anticancer agents. In the present study we evaluated the mechanisms by which a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, affects tumor growth of two differentially invasive human breast cancer cell lines. Methods MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive) and MDA-MB-468 (moderately invasive) cell lines were treated with varying concentrations of celecoxib in vitro, and the effects of this agent on cell growth and angiogenesis were monitored by evaluating cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and vasculogenic mimicry. The in vitro results of MDA-MB-231 cell line were further confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. Results The highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells express higher levels of COX-2 than do the less invasive MDA-MB-468 cells. Celecoxib treatment inhibited COX-2 activity, indicated by prostaglandin E2 secretion, and caused significant growth arrest in both breast cancer cell lines. In the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, the mechanism of celecoxib-induced growth arrest was by induction of apoptosis, associated with reduced activation of protein kinase B/Akt, and subsequent activation of caspases 3 and 7. In the less invasive MDA-MB-468 cells, growth arrest was a consequence of cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. Celecoxib-induced growth inhibition was reversed by addition of exogenous prostaglandin E2 in MDA-MB-468 cells but not in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, MDA-MB-468 cells formed significantly fewer extracellular matrix associated microvascular channels in vitro than did the high COX-2 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells. Celecoxib treatment not only inhibited cell growth and vascular channel formation but also reduced vascular endothelial growth factor levels. The in vitro findings corroborated in vivo data from a mouse xenograft model in which daily administration of celecoxib significantly reduced tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 cells, which was associated with

  16. MLS-2384, a new 6-bromoindirubin derivative with dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitory activity, suppresses growth of diverse cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Vougogianopoulou, Konstantina; Tian, Yan; Wu, Jun; Wen, Wei; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) and Src kinase are the two major tyrosine kinase families upstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT). Among the seven STAT family proteins, STAT3 is constitutively activated in many diverse cancers. Upon activation, JAK and Src kinases phosphorylate STAT3, and thereby promote cell growth and survival. MLS-2384 is a novel 6-bromoindirubin derivative with a bromo-group at the 6-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3'-position on the other indole ring. In this study, we investigated the kinase inhibitory activity and anticancer activity of MLS-2384. Our data from in vitro kinase assays, cell viability analyses, western blotting analyses, and animal model studies, demonstrate that MLS-2384 is a dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitor, and suppresses growth of various human cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, skin, ovarian, lung, and liver. Consistent with the inactivation of JAK and Src kinases, phosphorylation of STAT3 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the cancer cells treated with MLS-2384. STAT3 downstream proteins involved in cell proliferation and survival, such as c-Myc and Mcl-1, are downregulated by MLS-2384 in prostate cancer cells, whereas survivin is downregulated in A2058 cells. In these two cancer cell lines, PARP is cleaved, indicating that MLS-2384 induces apoptosis in human melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2384 suppresses tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Taken together, MLS-2384 demonstrates dual JAK/Src inhibitory activity and suppresses tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings support further development of MLS-2384 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets JAK, Src, and STAT3 signaling in multiple human cancer cells.

  17. [Inhibitory effects of a hot water extract from Japanese tea on the cell growth of mutans streptococci].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Loyola, J P; Sobue, S

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of a hot water extract from Japanese tea on the cellular growth of mutans streptococci in vitro. The extract contained polyphenol compounds, mainly catechin derivatives. Few fluoride components were contained in the extract. Streptococcus mutans MT8148R (serotype c) and S. sobrinus MT6715 (serotype g) strains were used in the present study. The organisms (10-10(7) CFU/ml) were cultured in brain heart infusion (BHI) and tryptose phosphate (TP) broths containing the tea extract (0-8 mg/ml). After incubation for 24-48 hours the cell numbers in the cultures were determined. Furthermore, cell growth of these strains on BHI agar plates containing the extract (0-2 mg/ml) were examined. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The tea extract (2-8 mg/ml) in BHI broth inhibited remarkably the growth of S. mutans and S. sobrinus (inoculum size; 10(6) CFU/ml). No difference in susceptibility to the tea extract between S. mutans and S. sobrinus was noted. 2. The cell growth of both strains in TP broth was inhibited by the tea extract. However S. sobrinus was found to be more sensitive to the extract than S. mutans. 3. Growth of S. sobrinus cells on the BHI agar plate was suppressed by the tea extract more effectively than that of S. mutans. These results suggest that the tea extract would be useful as an anti-cariogenic agent.

  18. Inhibitory effects of simvastatin on platelet-derived growth factor signaling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Akagi, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima; Matsubara, Hiromi; Fujio, Hideki; Ogawa, Aiko; Miura, Aya; Miura, Daiji; Oto, Takahiro; Yamanaka, Ryutaro; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive disease characterized by inappropriate increase of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) leading to occlusion of pulmonary arterioles. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling is starting to garner attention as a targeted therapy for IPAH. We assessed the inhibitory effects of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutanyl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, on PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of PASMCs obtained from 6 patients with IPAH who underwent lung transplantation. PDGF stimulation caused a significantly higher growth rate of PASMCs from patients with IPAH than that of normal control PASMCs as assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Simvastatin (0.1 micromol/L) significantly inhibited PDGF-induced cell proliferation of PASMCs from patients with IPAH but did not inhibit proliferation of normal control cells at the same concentration. Western blot analysis revealed that simvastatin significantly increased the expression of cell cycle inhibitor p27. PDGF significantly increased the migration distance of IPAH-PASMCs compared with that of normal PASMCs, and simvastatin (1 micromol/L) significantly inhibited PDGF-induced migration. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that simvastatin (1 micromol/L) inhibited translocation of Rho A from the cytoplasm to membrane and disorganized actin fibers in PASMCs from patients with IPAH. In conclusion, simvastatin had inhibitory effects on inappropriate PDGF signaling in PASMCs from patients with IPAH.

  19. Colon tumor cell growth inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide and other NSAIDs is associated with PDE5 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tinsley, Heather N.; Gary, Bernard D.; Thaiparambil, Jose; Li, Nan; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y.; Keeton, Adam B.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    In experimental studies, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) display promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicity resulting from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their clinical use for chemoprevention. Studies suggest that the mechanism may be COX independent, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here we show that the NSAID, sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in colon tumor cell lysates at concentrations that inhibit colon tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. A series of chemically diverse NSAIDs inhibited cGMP hydrolysis at concentrations that correlate with their potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth, while no correlation was observed with COX-2 inhibition. Consistent with its selectivity for inhibiting cGMP hydrolysis compared with cAMP hydrolysis, SS inhibited the cGMP specific PDE5 isozyme and increased cGMP levels in colon tumor cells. Of numerous PDE isozyme specific inhibitors evaluated, only the PDE5 selective inhibitor MY5445 inhibited colon tumor cell growth. The effects of SS and MY5445 on cell growth were associated with inhibition of β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity to suppress the synthesis of cyclin D and survivin, which regulate tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. SS had minimal effects on cGMP PDE activity in normal colonocytes, which displayed reduced sensitivity to SS and did not express PDE5. PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in colon tumor cell lines as well as in colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas compared to normal colonic mucosa. These results suggest that PDE5 inhibition, cGMP elevation, and inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of certain NSAIDs. PMID:20876730

  20. Inhibitory effects of nisin and potassium sorbate alone or in combination on vegetative cells growth and spore germination of Bacillus sporothermodurans in milk.

    PubMed

    Aouadhi, Chedia; Mejri, Slah; Maaroufi, Abderrazak

    2015-04-01

    The inhibitory activities of nisin or/and potassium sorbate on spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus sporothermodurans LTIS27, which are known to be a contaminant of dairy products and to be extremely heat-resistant, were investigated. First, the tested concentrations of nisin or potassium sorbate inhibited vegetative cell growth; with the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 × 10(3) IU/ml and 2% (w/v), respectively. Then, the behaviour of vegetative cells and spores in presence of sub-lethal concentrations of nisin (50 UI/ml) or/and potassium sorbate (0.2%), in milk at 37 °C for 5 days, were evaluated. In the absence of inhibitors, strain grew and sporulated at the end of the exponential phase. Nisin (50 UI/ml) was able to inhibit spore outgrowth but didn't affect their germination. It induced an immediate and transitory reduction (1.6log(10) after 1 h and 2.8log(10) after 6 h of incubation) of vegetative cell growth which reappeared between 10 h and 24 h. Potassium sorbate (0.2%) had a durable bacteriostatic effect (1.1log(10) after 6 h), on vegetative cells, followed by a slower regrowth. It was able to inhibit both germination and outgrowth of spores. Association of nisin and potassium sorbate, at sub-lethal concentrations, showed a synergistic effect and resulted in a total inhibition of cells growth after 5 days. The results illustrate the efficacy of nisin and potassium sorbate in combination, and the commercial potential of applying such treatment to decontaminate any product that has a problem with persistence of bacterial spores.

  1. Melatonin downregulates nuclear receptor RZR/RORγ expression causing growth-inhibitory and anti-angiogenesis activity in human gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ri-Xiong; Liu, Hui; Xu, Li; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Rui-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    An adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients, derived from the formation of novel blood vessels, is critical for the growth and expansion of tumor cells. It has been demonstrated that melatonin (MLT) exhibits marked in vitro and in vivo oncostatic activities. The primary purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of MLT on the growth and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells, and explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. The present results revealed that MLT inhibited the growth of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the present study demonstrated that low concentrations (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mM) of MLT had no clear effect on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion, whereas a high concentration (3 mM) of MLT suppressed VEGF secretion in SGC-7901 cells. Notably, administration of MLT caused suppression of gastric cancer growth and blockade of tumor angiogenesis in tumor-bearing nude mice. Furthermore, MLT treatment reduced the expression of the MLT nuclear receptor RZR/RORγ, SUMO-specific protease 1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and VEGF at transcriptional and translational levels within gastric cancer cells during tumorigenesis. In conclusion, MLT nuclear receptor RZR/RORγ may be of great importance in the MLT mediated anti-angiogenesis and growth-inhibitory effect in gastric cancer cells. Since RZR/RORγ is overexpressed in multiple human cancers, MLT may be a promising agent for the treatment of cancers. PMID:27446366

  2. The inhibitory effects of xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone derived from hops, on cell growth and tumorigenesis in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiliang; Zhao, Senlin; Xu, Ling; Lu, Yingying; Lu, Zhanjun; Chen, Congying; Ni, Jianbo; Wan, Rong; Yang, Lijuan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal human malignancies worldwide. Here, we demonstrated that xanthohumol (XN), the most abundant prenylated chalcone isolated from hops, inhibited the growth of cultured PC cells and their subcutaneous xenograft tumors. XN treatment was found to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of PC cells (PANC-1, BxPC-3) by inhibiting phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and expression of its downstream targeted genes cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-xL at the messenger RNA level, which involved in regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle. Overall, our results suggested that XN presents a promising candidate therapeutic agent against human PC and the STAT3 signaling pathway is its key molecular target.

  3. Metabolic and growth inhibitory effects of conjugated fatty acids in the cell line HT-29 with special regard to the conversion of t11,t13-CLA.

    PubMed

    Degen, Christian; Ecker, Josef; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Conjugated fatty acids (CFAs) exhibit growth inhibitory effects on colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. To investigate whether the anticancerogenic potency depends on number or configuration of the conjugated double bonds, the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; C18:2) isomers and conjugated linolenic acid (CLnA; C18:3) isomers on viability and growth of HT-29 cells were compared. Low concentrations of CLnAs (<10μM) yielded a higher degree of inhibitory effects compared to CLAs (40μM). All trans-CFAs were more effective compared to cis/trans-CFAs as follows: t9,t11,t13-CLnA≥c9,t11,t13-CLnA>t11,t13-CLA≥t9,t11-CLA>c9,t11-CLA. The mRNA expression analysis of important genes associated with fatty acid metabolism showed an absence of ∆5-/∆6-desaturases and elongases in HT-29 cells, which was confirmed by fatty acid analysis. Using time- and dose-dependent stimulation experiments several metabolites were determined. Low concentrations of all trans-CFAs (5-20μM) led to dose-dependent increase of conjugated t/t-C16:2 formed by β-oxidation of C18 CFAs, ranging from 1-5% of total FAME. Importantly, it was found that CLnA is converted to CLA and that CLA is inter-converted (t11,t13-CLA is metabolized to c9,t11-CLA) by HT-29 cells. In summary, our study shows that growth inhibition of human cancer cells is associated with a specific cellular transcriptomic and metabolic profile of fatty acid metabolism, which might contribute to the diversified ability of CFAs as anti-cancer compounds.

  4. Growth inhibitory activities of crude extracts obtained from herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands on several human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Tatsuya; Suzui, Masumi; Takamatsu, Reika; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Fujino, Tetsuya; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of herbs for the treatment of human diseases including cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether crude extracts obtained from 44 herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands might contain components capable of inhibiting the growth of a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines. Leaves, roots and other parts of the plants were extracted with chloroform, and the crude extracts were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide and used for the experiments. Extracts of Hemerocallis fulva, Ipomoea batatas, Curcuma longa, and Nasturium officinale caused marked dose-dependent growth inhibition, with IC(50) values in the range of 10-80 mug/ml. With the HCT116 cell line, the extracts of Hemerocallis fulva and Ipomoea batatas induced G1 cell cycle arrest after 48 h of treatment. In addition, we found that extracts of Curcuma longa, and Nasturium officinale induced apoptosis in these cells after 48 h of treatment. The present studies are the first systematic examination of the growth inhibitory effects of crude extracts obtained from herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands. The findings provide evidence that several plants in the Ryukyu Islands contain components that may have anticancer activity.

  5. Synergistic growth inhibitory effects of the dual endothelin-1 receptor antagonist bosentan on pancreatic stellate and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Brit; Brock, Peter; Holzhüter, Stephanie-Anna; Nizze, Horst; Sparmann, Gisela; Emmrich, Jörg; Liebe, Stefan; Jaster, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) play a key role in pancreatic fibrosis. Activation of PSC occurs in response to pro-fibrogenic stimuli and is maintained by autocrine loops of mediators, such as endothelin (ET)-1. Here, we have evaluated effects of the dual ET receptor antagonist bosentan in models of pancreatic fibrogenesis and cancer. Cell culture studies revealed that PSC and DSL6A pancreatic cancer cells expressed both ET-1 and ET receptors. Bosentan efficiently inhibited proliferation of both cell types and collagen synthesis in PSC. Expression of the myofibroblastic marker alpha-smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, and ET-1 itself in PSC was reduced, while expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 was enhanced. Like PSC, DSL6A cells secrete less ET-1 when cultured with bosentan. In a rat model of pancreatic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis induced by dibutyltin dichloride, a tendency towards a diminished disease progression was observed in a subgroup of rats with less severe disease. Together, our results indicate that bosentan exerts antifibrotic and antitumor effects in vitro. Its efficiency in vivo warrants further investigation.

  6. Inhibitory effects of retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) on the growth of human prostate cancer cells and LNCaP prostate tumour xenografts in SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, C K; Brodie, A M H; Njar, V C O

    2006-01-01

    In recent studies, we have identified several highly potent all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs). On the basis of previous effects of liarozole (a first-generation RAMBA) on the catabolism of ATRA and on growth of rat Dunning R3227G prostate tumours, we assessed the effects of our novel RAMBAs on human prostate tumour (PCA) cell lines. We examined three different PCA cell lines to determine their capacity to induce P450-mediated oxidation of ATRA. Among the three different cell lines, enhanced catabolism was detected in LNCaP, whereas it was not found in PC-3 and DU-145. This catabolism was strongly inhibited by our RAMBAs, the most potent being VN/14-1, VN/50-1, VN/66-1, and VN/69-1 with IC50 values of 6.5, 90.0, 62.5, and 90.0 nM, respectively. The RAMBAs inhibited the growth of LNCaP cells with IC50 values in the μM-range. In LNCaP cell proliferation assays, VN/14-1, VN/50-1, VN/66-1, and VN/69-1 also enhanced by 47-, 60-, 70-, and 65-fold, respectively, the ATRA-mediated antiproliferative activity. We then examined the molecular mechanism underlying the growth inhibitory properties of ATRA alone and in combination with RAMBAs. The mechanism appeared to involve the induction of differentiation, cell-cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis (TUNEL), involving increase in Bad expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression. Treatment of LNCaP tumours growing in SCID mice with VN/66-1 and VN/69-1 resulted in modest but statistically significant tumour growth inhibition of 44 and 47%, respectively, while treatment with VN/14-1 was unexpectedly ineffective. These results suggest that some of our novel RAMBAs may be useful agents for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:16449997

  7. Inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on the cell growth of cardiac myxomas via the PTEN and PHLPP2 phosphatase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xing-Li; Yang, Ding-You; Tan, Duan-Jun; Yao, Heng-Chen; Chai, Wenhui; Peng, Li

    2013-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a molecule with strong proliferative effects, and statins have been reported to exhibit antitumor effects based on clinical and experimental studies. However, their effects on cardiac myxoma (CM) cells and the underlying signaling mechanism(s) are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether the protein/lipid phosphatases and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN) and pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat phosphatase 1 and 2 (PHLPP1 and 2) are involved in the proliferative effect of IGF-1 on CM cells and the pharmacological impact of atorvastatin. The activity of PTEN and PHLPPs was determined using specific substrate diC16PIP3 and pNPP. We found that IGF-1 enhanced CM cell proliferation and inhibited both PTEN and PHLPP2 activity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Atorvastatin acted counter to IGF-1 and reversed the above effects mediated by IGF-1. Both IGF-1 and atorvastatin did not affect the activity of PHLPP1 and the protein expression of the three phosphatases. The results suggest that IGF-1 may exert its proliferative effects by negatively regulating the PTEN/PHLPP2 signaling pathway in CM cells, and atorvastatin may be a potential drug for the treatment of CM by enhancing the activity of PTEN and PHLPP2.

  8. Estrogen receptor beta growth-inhibitory effects are repressed through activation of MAPK and PI3K signalling in mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, C Z; Fabris, V; Doria, M L; Lindberg, K; Gustafsson, J-Å; Amado, F; Lanari, C; Helguero, L A

    2013-05-09

    Two thirds of breast cancers express estrogen receptors (ER). ER alpha (ERα) mediates breast cancer cell proliferation, and expression of ERα is the standard choice to indicate adjuvant endocrine therapy. ERbeta (ERβ) inhibits growth in vitro; its effects in vivo have been incompletely investigated and its role in breast cancer and potential as alternative target in endocrine therapy needs further study. In this work, mammary epithelial (EpH4 and HC11) and breast cancer (MC4-L2) cells with endogenous ERα and ERβ expression and T47-D human breast cancer cells with recombinant ERβ (T47-DERβ) were used to explore effects exerted in vitro and in vivo by the ERβ agonists 2,3-bis (4-hydroxy-phenyl)-propionitrile (DPN) and 7-bromo-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3-benzoxazol-5-ol (WAY). In vivo, ERβ agonists induced mammary gland hyperplasia and MC4-L2 tumour growth to a similar extent as the ERα agonist 4,4',4''-(4-propyl-(1H)-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol (PPT) or 17β-estradiol (E2) and correlated with higher number of mitotic and lower number of apoptotic features. In vitro, in MC4-L2, EpH4 or HC11 cells incubated under basal conditions, ERβ agonists induced apoptosis measured as upregulation of p53 and apoptosis-inducible factor protein levels and increased caspase 3 activity, whereas PPT and E2 stimulated proliferation. However, when extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK ½) were activated by co-incubation with basement membrane extract or epidermal growth factor, induction of apoptosis by ERβ agonists was repressed and DPN induced proliferation in a similar way as E2 or PPT. In a context of active ERK ½, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/RAC-alpha serine/threonine-protein kinase (AKT) signalling was necessary to allow proliferation stimulated by ER agonists. Inhibition of MEK ½ with UO126 completely restored ERβ growth-inhibitory effects, whereas inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 inhibited ERβ-induced proliferation. These

  9. Ciliary neurotropic factor, interleukin 11, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M are growth factors for human myeloma cell lines using the interleukin 6 signal transducer gp130

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a major growth factor for tumor plasma cells involved in human multiple myeloma (MM). In particular, human myeloma cell lines (HMCL), whose growth is completely dependent on addition of exogenous IL-6, can be obtained reproducibly from every patient with terminal disease. Four cytokines, ciliary neurotropic factor (CNTF), IL- 11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and oncostatin M (OM), use the same transducer chain (signal transducer gp130) as IL-6 and share numerous biological activities with this IL. We found that these four cytokines stimulated proliferation and supported the long-term growth of two out of four IL-6-dependent HMCL obtained in our laboratory. Half- maximal proliferation was obtained with cytokine concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 ng/ml for IL-11, LIF, and OM. CNTF worked at high concentrations only (90 ng/ml), but addition of soluble CNTF receptor increased sensitivity to CNTF 30-fold. The growth-promoting effect of these four cytokines was abrogated by anti-gp130 antibodies, contrary to results for anti-IL-6 receptor or anti-IL-6 antibodies. No detectable changes in the morphology and phenotype were found when myeloma cells were cultured with one of these four cytokines instead of IL-6. Concordant with their IL-6-dependent growth, the four HMCL expressed membrane IL-6R and gp130 detected by FACS analysis. LIF- binding chain gene (LIFR) was expressed only in the two HMCL responsive to LIF and OM. PMID:8145045

  10. Inhibitory Effects of PEI-RGD/125I-(αV) ASODN on Growth and Invasion of HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Haidong; Qiao, Yu; Sun, Ming; Yuan, Xueyu; Luo, Qiong; Yang, Yuehua; Yuan, Shidong; Lv, Zhongwei

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the in vitro inhibitory effects of PEI-RGD/125I-(αV)ASODN (PEI, polyethylenimine; RGD, Arg-Gly-Asp; ASODN, antisense oligodeoxynucleotide) on the growth and invasion of HepG2 cells. Material/Methods ASODN of the integrin αV-subunit was marked with 125I and underwent complexation with PEI-RGD, a PEI derivative. Next, PEI-RGD/125I-(αV) ASODN was introduced into HepG2 cells via receptor-mediated transfection, and its inhibition rate on HepG2 cell growth was tested using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) method. The effects of PEI-RGD/125I-(αV) ASODN on HepG2 cell invasion ability were evaluated using the Boyden chamber assay. Results 1) The 125I marking rate of (αV) ASODN was 73.78±4.09%, and the radiochemical purity was 96.68±1.38% (greater than 90% even after a 48-h incubation period at 37°C), indicating high stability. 2) The cytotoxicity assays showed that the cell inhibition rates did not differ significantly between the PEI-RGD/125I-(αV)ASODN group and the PEI-RGD/(αV) ASODN group, but they were both significantly higher than in the other groups and were positively correlated (r=0.879) with the dosage within a certain range. 3) The invasion assays showed that the inhibition rate was significantly greater in the PEI-RGD/125I-(αV) ASODN group compared to the other groups. Conclusions PEI-RGD/125I-(αV) ASODN can efficiently inhibit the growth and proliferation of HepG2 cells and can also weaken their invasive ability. PMID:26258995

  11. INHIBITORY ACTION OF CoCl2-INDUCED MCF-7 CELL HYPOXIA MODEL OF BREAST CANCER AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Ma, R; Li, Q

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer, a malignant tumor frequently occurring in females, is traditionally treated with excision. In the search for a new treatment, we analyzed the influence of CoCl2 on MCF-7 cell proliferation of breast cancer and tumor angiogenesis factor and discussed the results. Having applied CoCl2 as chemical hypoxia-induced agent, in-vitro MCF-7 cell hypoxia model of breast cancer was established, after which methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) staining was performed in detecting inhibitory action of CoCl2 to proliferation of MCF-7 cells cultured in-vitro, and inverted phase contrast microscope was adopted to observe morphological changes of MCF-7 cell in hypoxia model. Furthermore, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was made to determine how CoCl2 influences mRNA expression changes of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in MCF-7 cells. Western blot was designed to study and record data on the influence of CoCl2 on protein expression changes of HIF-1α, CXCR4 and VEGF. As a result, CoCl2 was proved to control MCF-7 cell proliferation and increase expression of HIF-1α, CXCR4 and VEGF.

  12. The inhibitory effects of carnosic acid on cervical cancer cells growth by promoting apoptosis via ROS-regulated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Ke; Wang, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Ying; Cai, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer has been the fourth most common cancer killing many women across the world. Carnosic acid (CA), as a phenolic diterpene, has been suggested to against cancer, exerting protective effects associated with inflammatory cytokines. It is aimed to demonstrate the therapeutic role of carnosic acid against cervical cancer and indicate its underlying molecular mechanisms. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was performed to assess the possible anti-proliferative effects of carnosic acid. And also, colony formation was used to further estimate carnosic acid's ability in suppressing cervical cancer cells proliferation. Flow cytometry assays were performed here to indicate the alterations of cervical cancer cells cycle and the development of apoptosis. Western blot assays and RT-PCR were also applied to clarify the apoptosis-associated signaling pathways affected by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. And immunofluorescence was used to detect ROS-positive cells. In vivo experiments, CaSki xenograft model samples of nude mice were involved to further elucidate the effects of carnosic acid. In our results, we found that carnosic acid exerted anti-tumor ability in vitro supported by up-regulation of apoptosis and ROS production in cervical cancer cells. Also, acceleration of ROS led to the phospharylation of (c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its-related signals, as well as activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress, promoting the progression of apoptosis via stimulating Caspase3 expression. The development and growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice were found to be inhibited by the administration of carnosic acid for five weeks. And the suppressed role of carnosic acid in proliferation of cervical cancer cells and apoptosis of nude mice with tumor tissues were observed in our study. Taken together, our data indicated that carnosic acid resulted in apoptosis both in vitro and vivo experiments via promoting ROS and

  13. Preparation of Black Hoof medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus (Berk. et M.A. Curt.) Teng (Aphyllophoromycetideae) beta-glucan sulfate and in vitro tumor cell growth inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Bae, In Young; Shin, Ji-Yoon; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharide beta-glucans were extracted from the medicinal mushroom Phellinus linteus (Hymenochaetaceae, Aphyllophoromycetideae) and subjected to sulfation. Chemical modification of the beta-glucan was confirmed by structural analysis, and its biological properties were compared with those of native beta-glucan. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis indicated that successive preparation of the sulfated derivative yielded a degree of substitution of 0.47. Nitric oxide production measured by the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) experiments increased 1.5-fold after sulfation. In addition, the introduction of sulfate groups into the beta-glucan chains improved in vitro growth inhibitory activity against SNU-C2A cells. Therefore, sulfated beta-glucan extracted from Ph. linteus may be beneficial for immune support due to its incorporation of functional groups into its polymer structure.

  14. Isolation of an inhibitory insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from bone cell-conditioned medium: A potential local regulator of IGF action

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, S.; Bautista, C.M.; Wergedal, J.; Baylink, D.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Inhibitory insulin-like growth factor binding protein (In-IGF-BP) has been purified to homogeneity from medium conditioned by TE89 human osteosarcoma cells by two different methods using Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, FPLC Mono Q ion-exchange, HPLC C{sub 4} reverse-phase, HPLC CN reverse-phase and affinity chromatographies. In-IGF-BP thus purified appeared to be homogeneous and unique by the following criteria. (i) N-terminal sequence analysis yielded a unique sequence (Asp-Glu-Ala-Ile-His-Cys-Pro-Pro-Glu-Ser-Glu-Ala-Lys-Leu-Ala). (ii) Amino acid composition of In-IGF-BP revealed marked differences with the amino acid compositions of other known PBs. (iii) In-IGF-BP exhibited a single band with molecular mass of 25 kDa under reducing conditions on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. IGF-I and IGF-II but not insulin displaced the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-I or {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-II binding to In-IGF-BP. In-IGF-BP inhibited basal, IGF-stimulated bone cell proliferation and serum-stimulated bone cell proliferation. Forskolin increases synthesis of In-IGF-BP in TE85 human osteosarcoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that In-IGF-BP is a protein that has a unique sequence and significant biological actions on bone cells.

  15. Comparative study of the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities of black tea theaflavins and green tea catechin on murine myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lung, Hong-Lok; Ip, Wai-Ki; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Mak, Nai-Ki; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2004-03-01

    Among the black tea polyphenols, theaflavins are generally considered to be the more effective components for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. In this study, we attempted to compare the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities of the four black tea theaflavins (TF-1, TF-2A, TF-2B and TF-3) with the major green tea catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells. All the four black tea theaflavins were shown to exert potent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects on the leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose-dependent manner. The observed anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects were in the following order of potency: EGCG > TF-2B > TF-3 > TF-2A > TF-1. In addition, all theaflavins were capable of inducing apoptosis in the leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells. Among the four theaflavins tested, TF-2B and TF-3 were found to be slightly more potent in inducing apoptosis of the WEHI-3B JCS cells than that of TF-2A and TF-1 but were comparable to the major green tea epicatechin EGCG. More interestingly, both TF-2B and TF-3 were found to be much more effective than TF-1 and TF-2B in reducing both the in vitro clonogenicity and in vivo tumorigenicity of the WEHI-3B JCS cells, suggesting that these two black tea theaflavins might represent potential candidates for the treatment of some forms of leukemia.

  16. Inhibitory effect of BCG cell-wall skeletons (BCG-CWS) emulsified in squalane on tumor growth and metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yung Choon; Hata, Katsusuke; Lee, Kyung Bok; Azuma, Ichiro

    2002-08-01

    The antimetastatic effect of BCG-CWS, which was emulsified in an oil-in-water form with either Drakeol 6VR mineral oil (BCG-CWS/DK) or squalane (BCG-CWS/SQA), on lung metastasis produced by highly metastatic murine tumor cells, Colon26-M3.1 carcinoma cells and B16-BL6 melanoma cells, was investigated in syngeneic mice. An intravenous (i.v.) administration of BCG-CWS (100 mg/mouse) 1 day after tumor inoculation significantly inhibited tumor metastasis of both Colon26-M3.1 carcinoma and B16-BL6 melanoma cells in experimental lung metastasis models. No differences in the antitumor activity of the two oil-based formulations (BCG-CWS/DK and BCG-CWS/SQA) were obverved. However, BCG-CWS/SQA administered through subcutaneous (s.c.) route was shown to be effective only when it was consecutively injected (3 times) after tumor inoculation. An in vivo analysis for tumor-induced angiogenesis showed that a single i.v. administration of BCG-CWS/SQA inhibited the number of tumor-induced blood vessels and suppressed tumor growth. Furthermore, the multiple administration of BCG-CWS/SQA given at on week intervals led to a significant reduction in spontaneous lung metastasis of B16-BL6 melanoma cells in a spontaneous metastasis model. These results suggest that BCG-CWS emulsified with squalane is a potent inhibitory agent of lung metastasis, and that the antimetastatic effect of BCG-CWS is related to the suppression of tumor growth and the inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis.

  17. Predictors of Longitudinal Growth in Inhibitory Control in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Kristin L.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we examined latent growth in 731 young children's inhibitory control from the ages of two to four years, and whether demographic characteristics or parenting behaviors were related to initial levels and growth in inhibitory control. As part of an ongoing longitudinal evaluation of the family check-up, children's inhibitory…

  18. Synergistic growth inhibitory effect of deracoxib with doxorubicin against a canine mammary tumor cell line, CMT-U27

    PubMed Central

    BAKIREL, Tülay; ALKAN, Fulya Üstün; ÜSTÜNER, Oya; ÇINAR, Suzan; YILDIRIM, Funda; ERTEN, Gaye; BAKIREL, Utku

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been shown to exert anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities on many types of malignant tumors. These anticancer properties make it worthwhile to examine the possible benefit of combining COX inhibitors with other anti-cancer agents. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of deracoxib (DER) in potentiating antitumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX) in canine mammary carcinoma cells (CMT-U27). DER (50–250 µM) enhanced the antiproliferative activity of DOX by reducing the IC50 (approximately 3- to 3.5 fold). Interaction analysis of the data showed that combinations of DOX at 0.9 µM with DER (100–250 µM) produced synergism in the CMT-U27 cell line, with a ratio index ranging from 1.98 to 2.33. In additional studies identifying the mechanism of observed synergistic effect, we found that DER strongly potentiated DOX-caused G0/G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. Also, DER (100–250 µM) augmented apoptosis induction with approximately 1.35- and 1.37- fold increases in apoptotic response caused by DOX in the cells. DER enhanced the antiproliferative effect of DOX in conjunction with induction of apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 expression and changes in the cell cycle of the CMT-U27 cell line. Although the exact molecular mechanism of the alterations in the cell cycle and apoptosis observed with DER and DOX combinations require further investigations, the results suggest that the synergistic effect of DOX and DER combinations in CMT therapy may be achieved at relatively lower doses of DOX with lesser side effects. Therefore, combining DER with DOX may prove beneficial in the clinical treatment of canine mammary cancer. PMID:26822118

  19. Growth inhibitory effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Ryo; Sato, Mitsuo; Kakumu, Tomohiko; Hase, Tetsunari; Yogo, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Eiichi; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Both pro- and anti-oncogenic roles of miR-221 and miR-222 microRNAs are reported in several types of human cancers. A previous study suggested their oncogenic role in invasiveness in lung cancer, albeit only one cell line (H460) was used. To further evaluate involvement of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer, we investigated the effects of miR-221 and miR-222 overexpression on six lung cancer cell lines, including H460, as well as one immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cell line, HBEC4. miR-221 and miR-222 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like changes in a minority of HBEC4 cells but, unexpectedly, both the microRNAs rather suppressed their invasiveness. Consistent with the prior report, miR-221 and miR-222 promoted growth in H460; however, miR-221 suppressed growth in four other cell lines with no effects in one, and miR-222 suppressed growth in three cell lines but promoted growth in two. These are the first results to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer cells, and we focused on clarifying the mechanisms. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses revealed that growth suppression by miR-221 and miR-222 occurred through intra-S-phase arrest and/or apoptosis. Finally, lung cancer cell lines transfected with miR-221 or miR-222 became more sensitive to the S-phase targeting drugs, possibly due to an increased S-phase population. In conclusion, our data are the first to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and miR-222 on lung cancer, warranting testing their potential as therapeutics for the disease. PMID:25641933

  20. Growth inhibitory effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Ryo; Sato, Mitsuo; Kakumu, Tomohiko; Hase, Tetsunari; Yogo, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Eiichi; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2015-04-01

    Both pro- and anti-oncogenic roles of miR-221 and miR-222 microRNAs are reported in several types of human cancers. A previous study suggested their oncogenic role in invasiveness in lung cancer, albeit only one cell line (H460) was used. To further evaluate involvement of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer, we investigated the effects of miR-221 and miR-222 overexpression on six lung cancer cell lines, including H460, as well as one immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial cell line, HBEC4. miR-221 and miR-222 induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like changes in a minority of HBEC4 cells but, unexpectedly, both the microRNAs rather suppressed their invasiveness. Consistent with the prior report, miR-221 and miR-222 promoted growth in H460; however, miR-221 suppressed growth in four other cell lines with no effects in one, and miR-222 suppressed growth in three cell lines but promoted growth in two. These are the first results to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and miR-222 in lung cancer cells, and we focused on clarifying the mechanisms. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses revealed that growth suppression by miR-221 and miR-222 occurred through intra-S-phase arrest and/or apoptosis. Finally, lung cancer cell lines transfected with miR-221 or miR-222 became more sensitive to the S-phase targeting drugs, possibly due to an increased S-phase population. In conclusion, our data are the first to show tumor-suppressive effects of miR-221 and miR-222 on lung cancer, warranting testing their potential as therapeutics for the disease.

  1. Purine analogs sensitize the multidrug resistant cell line (NCI-H460/R) to doxorubicin and stimulate the cell growth inhibitory effect of verapamil.

    PubMed

    Pesić, Milica; Podolski, Ana; Rakić, Ljubisa; Ruzdijić, Sabera

    2010-08-01

    The resistant cell line NCI-H460/R and its counterpart NCI-H460 were used to investigate the ability of purine analogs to overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) that seriously limit the efficacy of lung cancer regimens with chemotherapeutic agents. Two purine analogs, sulfinosine (SF) and 8-Cl-cAMP, exerted dose-dependent effects on cell growth in both parental and resistant cell lines. They significantly decreased mdr1 expression in NCI-H460/R cells. Low concentrations (1 microM) of SF and 8-Cl-cAMP in combination with doxorubicin (DOX) exerted synergistic growth inhibition in both cell lines. Pretreatment with SF and 8-Cl-cAMP improved the sensitivity to DOX more than verapamil (VER), the standard modulator of MDR. The increased accumulation of DOX observed after the treatment with SF and 8-Cl-cAMP was consistent with the results obtained with VER. VER stimulated the effect of 8-Cl-cAMP on DOX cytotoxicity and mdr1 expression. Combinations of either SF or 8-Cl-cAMP with VER at clinically acceptable concentrations exhibited synergistic effects on cell growth inhibition in the resistant cell line. SF and 8-Cl-cAMP modulated MDR in NCI-H460/R cells, especially when applied before DOX administration. This feature, together with their ability to reverse MDR, renders the purine analogs (in combination with VER) as potential candidates for improving the clinical activity of existing lung cancer therapeutics.

  2. Plant-derived SAC domain of PAR-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) exhibits growth inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shayan; Jain, Sumeet; Rai, Vineeta; Sahoo, Dipak K.; Raha, Sumita; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2015-01-01

    The gene Par-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) was originally identified in prostate cancer cells undergoing apoptosis and its product Par-4 showed cancer specific pro-apoptotic activity. Particularly, the SAC domain of Par-4 (SAC-Par-4) selectively kills cancer cells leaving normal cells unaffected. The therapeutic significance of bioactive SAC-Par-4 is enormous in cancer biology; however, its large scale production is still a matter of concern. Here we report the production of SAC-Par-4-GFP fusion protein coupled to translational enhancer sequence (5′ AMV) and apoplast signal peptide (aTP) in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants under the control of a unique recombinant promoter M24. Transgene integration was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR, Southern and Northern blotting, Real-time PCR, and Nuclear run-on assays. Results of Western blot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP protein and it was as high as 0.15% of total soluble protein. In addition, we found that targeting of plant recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP to the apoplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was essential for the stability of plant recombinant protein in comparison to the bacterial derived SAC-Par-4. Deglycosylation analysis demonstrated that ER-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP-SEKDEL undergoes O-linked glycosylation unlike apoplast-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP. Furthermore, various in vitro studies like mammalian cells proliferation assay (MTT), apoptosis induction assays, and NF-κB suppression suggested the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of plant-derived SAC-Par-4-GFP against multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Additionally, pre-treatment of MAT-LyLu prostate cancer cells with purified SAC-Par-4-GFP significantly delayed the onset of tumor in a syngeneic rat prostate cancer model. Taken altogether, we proclaim that plant made SAC-Par-4 may become a useful alternate therapy for effectively alleviating cancer in the new era. PMID:26500666

  3. Characterization, Purification of Poncirin from Edible Citrus Ougan (Citrus reticulate cv. Suavissima) and Its Growth Inhibitory Effect on Human Gastric Cancer Cells SGC-7901

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Luo, Fenglei; Zheng, Yixiong; Zhang, Jiukai; Huang, Jianzhen; Sun, Chongde; Li, Xian; Chen, Kunsong

    2013-01-01

    Poncirin is a bitter flavanone glycoside with various biological activities. Poncirin was isolated from four different tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane, and juice sac) of Ougan fruit (Citrus reticulate cv. Suavissima). The highest content of poncirin was found in the albedo of Ougan fruit (1.37 mg/g DW). High speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) combined with D101 resin chromatography was utilized for the separation and purification of poncirin from the albedo of Ougan fruit. After this two-step purification, poncirin purity increased from 0.14% to 96.56%. The chemical structure of the purified poncirin was identified by both HPLC-PDA and LC-MS. Poncirin showed a significant in vitro inhibitory effect on the growth of the human gastric cancer cells, SGC-7901, in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, poncirin from Ougan fruit, may be beneficial for gastric cancer prevention. The purification method demonstrated here will be useful for further studies on the pharmacological mechanism of poncirin activity, as well as for guiding the consumption of Ougan fruit. PMID:23615464

  4. Structure-activity relationships of hybrid annonaceous acetogenins: powerful growth inhibitory effects of their connecting groups between heterocycle and hydrophobic carbon chain bearing THF ring on human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Naoto; Fushimi, Tetsuya; Tatsukawa, Takahiro; Yoshimitsu, Takehiko; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Yamori, Takao; Dan, Shingo; Iwasaki, Hiroki; Yamashita, Masayuki

    2013-05-01

    Five novel hybrid molecules of annonaceous acetogenins and insecticides targeting mitochondrial complex I were synthesized and their growth inhibitory activities against 39 human cancer cell lines were investigated. It was revealed that the connecting group between the N-methylpyrazole part and the hydrophobic alkyl chain bearing the THF ring influenced their biological activities significantly. Amide-connected analog 2, in particular, showed selective and very potent activity (<10 nM) against some cancer cell lines.

  5. Recombinant human IgG antibodies recognizing distinct extracellular domains of EGF receptor exhibit different degrees of growth inhibitory effects on human A431 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chialun; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recently, we isolated 4 distinct kinds of single chain antibody against human EGF receptor (EGFR) after screening the Keio phage display scFv library by using two methods of target-guided proximity labeling. In the current study, these monovalent scFv antibodies were converted to bivalent IgGs of humanized forms (hIgGs) by recombinant technology using the specially designed expression vectors followed by protein production in CHO cells. The resulting recombinant hIgGs were examined for their binding specificity using several different transformed human BJ cell lines that express deletion mutants of EGFR, each lacking one of 4 distinct extracellular domains (L1, L2, C1 and C2). Immuno-fluorescent microscopy and immuno-precipitation assay on these cells indicated that 4 distinct kinds of hIgGs bind to one of 3 different domains (L1, C1 and C2). Then, these hIgGs were further examined for biological effects on human A431 cancer cells, which overexpress EGFR. The results indicated that hIgG38 binding to L1 and hIgG45 binding to C2 substantially suppressed the EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, resulting in the growth inhibition of A431 cancer cells. On the contrary, hIgG40 binding to C1 and hIgG42 binding to another site (epitope) of C2 exhibited no such inhibitory effects. Thus, the newly produced four recombinant hIgG antibodies recognize 4 different sites (epitopes) in 3 different extracellular domains of EGFR and exhibit different biological effects on cancer cells. These characteristics are somewhat different from the currently utilized therapeutic anti-EGFR antibodies. Hence, these hIgG antibodies will be invaluable as a research tool for the detailed molecular analysis of the EGFR-mediated signal transduction mechanism and more importantly a possible application as new therapeutic agents to treat certain types of cancers.

  6. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through up-regulating PGC-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yongxian; Zen, Ke; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2011-05-01

    Dexamethasone has been shown to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, which is required for preventing restenosis. However, the mechanism underlying effect of dexamethasone remains unknown. We have previously demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) can inhibit VSMC migration and proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1{alpha} in dexamethasone-reduced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanism. We first examined PGC-1{alpha} expression in cultured rat aortic VSMCs. The results revealed that incubation of VSMCs with dexamethasone could significantly elevate PGC-1{alpha} mRNA expression. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) decreased PGC-1{alpha} expression while stimulating VSMC migration. Mechanistic study showed that suppression of PGC-1{alpha} by small interfering RNA strongly abrogated the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VSMC migration, whereas overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} had the opposite effect. Furthermore, an analysis of MAPK signal pathways showed that dexamethasone inhibited ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in VSMCs. Overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} decreased both basal and PDGF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but it had no effect on ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activation by a PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 abolished the suppressive effects of PGC-1{alpha} on p38 MAPK phosphorylation and VSMC migration. These effects of PGC-1{alpha} were enhanced by a PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone. Collectively, our data indicated for the first time that one of the anti-migrated mechanisms of dexamethasone is due to the induction of PGC-1{alpha} expression. PGC-1{alpha} suppresses PDGF-induced VSMC migration through PPAR{gamma} coactivation and, consequently, p38 MAPK inhibition.

  7. Neuregulin-1 Regulates Cortical Inhibitory Neuron Dendrite and Synapse Growth through DISC1

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Vickie

    2016-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory neurons play crucial roles in regulating excitatory synaptic networks and cognitive function and aberrant development of these cells have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. The secreted neurotrophic factor Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are established regulators of inhibitory neuron connectivity, but the developmental signalling mechanisms regulating this process remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that NRG1-ErbB4 signalling functions through the multifunctional scaffold protein, Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), to regulate the development of cortical inhibitory interneuron dendrite and synaptic growth. We found that NRG1 increases inhibitory neuron dendrite complexity and glutamatergic synapse formation onto inhibitory neurons and that this effect is blocked by expression of a dominant negative DISC1 mutant, or DISC1 knockdown. We also discovered that NRG1 treatment increases DISC1 expression and its localization to glutamatergic synapses being made onto cortical inhibitory neurons. Mechanistically, we determined that DISC1 binds ErbB4 within cortical inhibitory neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that a NRG1-ErbB4-DISC1 signalling pathway regulates the development of cortical inhibitory neuron dendrite and synaptic growth. Given that NRG1, ErbB4, and DISC1 are schizophrenia-linked genes, these findings shed light on how independent risk factors may signal in a common developmental pathway that contributes to neural connectivity defects and disease pathogenesis. PMID:27847649

  8. A novel CXCR3-B chemokine receptor-induced growth-inhibitory signal in cancer cells is mediated through the regulation of Bach-1 protein and Nrf2 protein nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Balan, Murugabaskar; Pal, Soumitro

    2014-02-07

    Chemokines and their receptors play diverse roles in regulating cancer growth and progression. The receptor CXCR3 can have two splice variants with opposite functions. CXCR3-A promotes cell growth, whereas CXCR3-B mediates growth-inhibitory signals. However, the negative signals through CXCR3-B in cancer cells are not well characterized. In this study, we found that CXCR3-B-mediated signaling in MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells induced apoptotic cell death. Signals through CXCR3-B decreased the levels of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and increased the expression of apoptotic cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Along with up-regulation in apoptosis, CXCR3-B signals were associated with a decrease in cellular autophagy with reduced levels of the autophagic markers Beclin-1 and LC3B. Notably, CXCR3-B down-regulated the expression of the cytoprotective and antiapoptotic molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) at the transcriptional level. There was an increased nuclear localization of Bach-1 and nuclear export of Nrf2, which are important negative and positive transcription factors, respectively, for HO-1 expression. We also observed that CXCR3-B promoted the activation of p38 MAPK and the inhibition of ERK-1/2. CXCR3-B could not induce cancer cell apoptosis at the optimal level when we either inhibited p38 activity or knocked down Bach-1. Further, CXCR3-B-induced apoptosis was down-regulated when we overexpressed HO-1. Together, our data suggest that CXCR3-B mediates a growth-inhibitory signal in breast cancer cells through the modulations of nuclear translocation of Bach-1 and Nrf2 and down-regulation of HO-1. We suggest that the induction of CXCR3-B-mediated signaling can serve as a novel therapeutic approach where the goal is to promote tumor cell apoptosis.

  9. Molecular mechanism of inhibitory effects of C-phycocyanin combined with all-trans-retinoic acid on the growth of HeLa cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Li, Bing; Chu, Xian-Ming; Lv, Cong-Yi; Xu, Ying-Jie; Yang, Peng

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effects of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), C-phycocyanin (C-PC), or ATRA+C-PC on the growth of cervical cells (HeLa cells), cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis. The anticancer mechanism of the drug combination was revealed. MTT assay was adopted to determine the effects of C-PC and ATRA on the growth of HeLa cells. The expression quantities of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, caspase-3, and CD59 were determined by in situ hybridization, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry staining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. TUNEL assay was adopted to determine the cellular apoptosis levels. Both C-PC and ATRA could inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, and the combination of ATRA+C-PC functioned cooperatively to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. The dosage of ATRA was reduced when it cooperated with C-PC to reduce the toxicity. ATRA treated with C-PC could induce more cell cycle arrests than the single drug used by decrease in cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression. The combination of the two drugs could upregulate caspase-3 and downregulate the Bcl-2 gene and induce cell apoptosis. Moreover, the combination therapy has an important immunological significance in decreased expression of the CD59 protein. Singly, C-PC or ATRA could inhibit the growth of HeLa cells, and the effects of treatment were further enhanced in the combination group. In combination with C-PC, the dosage of ATRA was effectively reduced. The C-PC + ATRA combination might take effect by inhibiting the progress of the cell cycle, inducing cell apoptosis and promoting complement-mediated cytolysis.

  10. Relationship between the methylation status of dietary flavonoids and their growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Landis-Piwowar, Kristin R.; Milacic, Vesna; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-01-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Compelling research indicates that flavonoids have important roles in cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy possibly due to biological activities that include action through anti-inflammation, free radical scavenging, modulation of survival/proliferation pathways, and inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Plant polyphenols including the green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate or (-)-EGCG, and the flavonoids apigenin, luteolin, quercetin, and chrysin have been shown to inhibit proteasome activity and induce apoptosis in human leukemia cells. However, biotransformation reactions to the reactive hydroxyl groups on polyphenols could reduce their biological activities. Although methylated polyphenols have been suggested to be metabolically more stable than unmethylated polyphenols, the practical use of methylated polyphenols as a cancer preventative agent warrants further investigation. In the current study, methylated and unmethylated flavonoids were studied for their proteasome-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing abilities in human leukemia HL60 cells. Methylated flavonoids displayed sustained bioavailability and inhibited cellular proliferation by arresting cells in the G1 phase. However, they did not act as proteasome inhibitors in either an in vitro system or an in silico model and only weakly induced apoptosis. In contrast, unmethylated flavonoids exhibited inhibition of the proteasomal activity in intact HL60 cells, accumulating proteasome target proteins and inducing caspase activation and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We conclude that methylated flavonoids lack potent cytotoxicity against human leukemia cells and most likely have limited ability as chemopreventive agents. PMID:18636546

  11. Growth Inhibitory Effect of Low Fat Diet on Prostate Cancer Cells: Results of a Prospective, Randomized Dietary Intervention Trial in Men With Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, William J.; Barnard, R. James; Freedland, Stephen J.; Henning, Susanne; Elashoff, David; Jardack, Patricia M.; Cohen, Pinchas; Heber, David; Kobayashi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A high fat Western diet and sedentary lifestyle may predispose men to prostate cancer through changes in serum hormones and growth factors. We evaluated the effect of a low fat diet on serum factors affecting prostate cancer cell growth by performing a prospective, randomized dietary intervention trial in men with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We randomized 18 men with prostate cancer who did not receive prior therapy to a low fat (15% kcal), high fiber, soy protein supplemented diet or a Western (40% kcal fat) diet for 4 weeks. Fasting serum was collected at baseline and after the intervention to measure prostate specific antigen, sex hormones, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I and II, insulin-like growth factor binding proteins, lipids and fatty acids. LNCaP cells (ATCC®) were cultured in medium containing pre-intervention and post-intervention human serum to assess the in vitro effect of the diet on prostate cancer cell proliferation. Results Subjects in each group were highly compliant with the dietary intervention. Serum from men in the low fat group significantly decreased the growth of LNCaP cells relative to Western diet serum (p = 0.03). There were no significant between group changes in serum prostate specific antigen, sex hormones, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I and II, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. Serum triglyceride and linoleic acid (ω-6) levels were decreased in the low fat group (p = 0.034 and 0.005, respectively). Correlation analysis revealed that decreased ω-6 and increased ω-3 fatty acid correlated with decreased serum stimulated LNCaP cell growth (r = 0.64, p = 0.004 and r = −0.49, p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions In this prospective, randomized dietary intervention trial a low fat diet resulted in changes in serum fatty acid levels that were associated with decreased human LNCaP cancer cell growth. Further prospective trials are indicated to evaluate the potential of low fat diets for

  12. Polo-like kinase-1 as a novel target in neoplastic mast cells: demonstration of growth-inhibitory effects of small interfering RNA and the Polo-like kinase-1 targeting drug BI 2536

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Barbara; Gleixner, Karoline V.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Herrmann, Harald; Winter, Viviane; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Ferenc, Veronika; Schuch, Karina; Mirkina, Irina; Horny, Hans-Peter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Müllauer, Leonhard; Willmann, Michael; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background In advanced systemic mastocytosis the response of neoplastic mast cells to conventional drugs is poor and the prognosis is bad. Current research is, therefore, attempting to identify novel drug targets in neoplastic mast cells. Polo-like kinase-1 is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an essential role in mitosis and has recently been introduced as a new target in myeloid leukemias and solid tumors. Design and Methods In the present study, we analyzed the expression and function of Polo-like kinase-1 in neoplastic mast cells in systemic mastocytosis. Results As determined by immunostaining, primary neoplastic mast cells as well as the human mast cell leukemia cell line HMC-1 displayed phosphorylated Polo-like kinase-1. In addition, neoplastic mast cells expressed Polo-like kinase-1 mRNA. Polo-like kinase-1-specific small interfering RNA induced apoptosis in neoplastic mast cells, whereas no effect was seen with a control small interfering RNA. BI 2536, a drug targeting Polo-like kinase-1, was found to inhibit proliferation in HMC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. BI 2536 also inhibited the growth of primary neoplastic mast cells and cells of the canine mastocytoma cell line C2. The growth-inhibitory effects of BI 2536 on neoplastic mast cells were found to be associated with mitotic arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Finally, BI 2536 was found to synergize with the KIT-targeting kinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) in inhibiting the growth of neoplastic mast cells. In control experiments, BI 2536 did not induce apoptosis in normal cultured mast cells. Conclusions Collectively, our data show that Polo-like kinase-1 is a potential therapeutic target in neoplastic mast cells. Targeting Polo-like kinase-1 may be an attractive pharmacological concept in the management of advanced systemic mastocytosis. PMID:21242189

  13. Colon tumor cell growth-inhibitory activity of sulindac sulfide and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Heather N; Gary, Bernard D; Thaiparambil, Jose; Li, Nan; Lu, Wenyan; Li, Yonghe; Maxuitenko, Yulia Y; Keeton, Adam B; Piazza, Gary A

    2010-10-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity, but toxicity resulting from cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition limits their clinical use for chemoprevention. Studies suggest that the mechanism may be COX independent, although alternative targets have not been well defined. Here, we show that the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS) inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in colon tumor cell lysates at concentrations that inhibit colon tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. A series of chemically diverse NSAIDs also inhibited cGMP hydrolysis at concentrations that correlate with their potency to inhibit colon tumor cell growth, whereas no correlation was observed with COX-2 inhibition. Consistent with its selectivity for inhibiting cGMP hydrolysis compared with cyclic AMP hydrolysis, SS inhibited the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme and increased cGMP levels in colon tumor cells. Of numerous PDE isozyme-specific inhibitors evaluated, only the PDE5-selective inhibitor MY5445 inhibited colon tumor cell growth. The effects of SS and MY5445 on cell growth were associated with inhibition of β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity to suppress the synthesis of cyclin D and survivin, which regulate tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. SS had minimal effects on cGMP PDE activity in normal colonocytes, which displayed reduced sensitivity to SS and did not express PDE5. PDE5 was found to be overexpressed in colon tumor cell lines as well as in colon adenomas and adenocarcinomas compared with normal colonic mucosa. These results suggest that PDE5 inhibition, cGMP elevation, and inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity may contribute to the chemopreventive properties of certain NSAIDs.

  14. Relationship Between Organization of Mammary Tumors and the Ability of Tumor Cells to Replicate Mammary Tumor Virus and to Recognize Growth-Inhibitory Contact Signals In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Charles M.; Nandi, S.; Young, Lawrence

    1972-01-01

    Mammary tumor virus (MTV) replication was confined primarily to cells organized as acini in intact mouse mammary glands. Primary mammary tumors maintained a high degree of acinar organization and cells therein continued to replicate MTV vegetatively. Nonacinar mammary cells, derived by serial transplantation of acinar tumor cells, no longer actively replicated MTV. This suggests that phenotypic differences exist among mammary epithelial cells in their ability to support virus replication, that a fundamental relationship exists between the organization of epithelium for secretion and active virus replication, and that this relationship is not altered as a primary consequence of neoplastic transformation. Mammary epithelial cells from pregnant, non-tumor-bearing, MTV-infected BALB/cfC3H mice or from acinar mammary tumors from a number of mouse strains were grown in primary monolayer cultures. Such cell cultures under the influence of insulin and cortisol exhibited the ability to organize into discrete three-dimensional structures called “domes.” MTV replication in such cultures took place primarily in cells within the organized domes. Cells cultured from nonacinar tumors did not exhibit any propensity to organize into domes, nor did they replicate MTV in primary culture. This suggests that the cell organizational requirement for MTV replication observed in vivo is conserved in primary culture. Dome formation is not an effect of virus replication, as cells from uninfected BALB/c animals organized into domes in culture without concomitant MTV replication. Growth-regulating signals, exerted between contiguous cells in cultures of non-MTV-infected mammary epithelium, were not modified by the occurrence of active virus replication nor as a direct consequence of neoplastic transformation. Cells derived from nontumor BALB/cfC3H glands and from spontaneous tumors exhibited cell growth kinetics, saturation densities, and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis kinetics nearly

  15. In Search of the Molecular Mechanisms Mediating the Inhibitory Effect of the GnRH Antagonist Degarelix on Human Prostate Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Monica; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Patterson, Nathan H.; Chaurand, Pierre; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Degarelix is a gonadrotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor (GnRHR) antagonist used in patients with prostate cancer who need androgen deprivation therapy. GnRHRs have been found in extra-pituitary tissues, including prostate, which may be affected by the GnRH and GnRH analogues used in therapy. The direct effect of degarelix on human prostate cell growth was evaluated. Normal prostate myofibroblast WPMY-1 and epithelial WPE1-NA22 cells, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-1 cells, androgen-independent PC-3 and androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as VCaP cells derived from a patient with castration-resistant prostate cancer were used. Discriminatory protein and lipid fingerprints of normal, hyperplastic, and cancer cells were generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The investigated cell lines express GNRHR1 and GNRHR2 and their endogenous ligands. Degarelix treatment reduced cell viability in all prostate cell lines tested, with the exception of the PC-3 cells; this can be attributed to increased apoptosis, as indicated by increased caspase 3/7, 8 and 9 levels. WPE1-NA22, BPH-1, LNCaP, and VCaP cell viability was not affected by treatment with the GnRH agonists leuprolide and goserelin. Using MALDI MS, we detected changes in m/z signals that were robust enough to create a complete discriminatory profile induced by degarelix. Transcriptomic analysis of BPH-1 cells provided a global map of genes affected by degarelix and indicated that the biological processes affected were related to cell growth, G-coupled receptors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. Taken together, these data demonstrate that (i) the GnRH antagonist degarelix exerts a direct effect on prostate cell growth through apoptosis; (ii) MALDI MS analysis provided a basis to fingerprint degarelix-treated prostate cells; and (iii) the clusters of genes affected by degarelix suggest that

  16. Rig-G is a growth inhibitory factor of lung cancer cells that suppresses STAT3 and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Bals, Robert; Wu, Junlu; Quan, Wenqiang; Yao, Yiwen; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Wu, Kaiyin

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the retinoic acid-induced G (Rig-G) gene, an all trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-inducible gene, was observed in multiple cancer cells, including lung cancer cells. However, whether Rig-G is a tumor suppressor in lung cancer is unknown. Here, we found that ectopic expression of Rig-G can lead to a significant decrease in proliferation of lung cancer cells, resulting in an inhibition of tumor growth. Rig-G knockdown results in a modest increase in cell proliferation, as well as confers an increase in colony formation. Furthermore, transcriptome and pathway analyses of cancer cells revealed a fundamental impact of Rig-G on various growth signaling pathways, including the NF-κB pathway. Rig-G inhibits NF-κB activity by suppressing STAT3 in lung cancer cells. The downregulation of miR21 and miR181b-1 and subsequent activation of PTEN/Akt and CYLD/IκB signaling axis leading to decreased NF-κB activity required to maintain the tumor-inhibiting effect of Rig-G.. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the antitumor effect mechanism of Rig-G, as well as offer a novel strategy for lung cancer therapy. PMID:27602766

  17. Rig-G is a growth inhibitory factor of lung cancer cells that suppresses STAT3 and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Sun, Junjun; Liu, Wenfang; Wang, Xuan; Bals, Robert; Wu, Junlu; Quan, Wenqiang; Yao, Yiwen; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Wu, Kaiyin

    2016-10-04

    The expression of the retinoic acid-induced G (Rig-G) gene, an all trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-inducible gene, was observed in multiple cancer cells, including lung cancer cells. However, whether Rig-G is a tumor suppressor in lung cancer is unknown. Here, we found that ectopic expression of Rig-G can lead to a significant decrease in proliferation of lung cancer cells, resulting in an inhibition of tumor growth. Rig-G knockdown results in a modest increase in cell proliferation, as well as confers an increase in colony formation. Furthermore, transcriptome and pathway analyses of cancer cells revealed a fundamental impact of Rig-G on various growth signaling pathways, including the NF-κB pathway. Rig-G inhibits NF-κB activity by suppressing STAT3 in lung cancer cells. The downregulation of miR21 and miR181b-1 and subsequent activation of PTEN/Akt and CYLD/IκB signaling axis leading to decreased NF-κB activity required to maintain the tumor-inhibiting effect of Rig-G.. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the antitumor effect mechanism of Rig-G, as well as offer a novel strategy for lung cancer therapy.

  18. Transforming growth factor beta 1 prevents cytokine-mediated inhibitory effects and induction of nitric oxide synthase in the RINm5F insulin-containing beta-cell line.

    PubMed

    Mabley, J G; Cunningham, J M; John, N; Di Matteo, M A; Green, I C

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if the growth factor, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1), could prevent induction of nitric oxide synthase and cytokine-mediated inhibitory effects in the insulin-containing, clonal beta cell line RINm5F. Treatment of RINm5F cells for 24 h with interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) (100 pM) induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and inhibited glyceraldehyde-stimulated insulin secretion. Combinations of IL-1 beta (100 pM), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (100 pM) and interferon-gamma (100 pM) reduced RINm5F cell viability (determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay) and de novo protein synthesis, as measured by incorporation of radiolabelled amino acids into perchloric acid-precipitable protein. Pretreatment of RINm5F cells with TGF beta 1 (10 pM) for 18 or 24 h, prior to the addition of either IL-1 beta or combined cytokines, prevented cytokine-induced inhibition of insulin secretion, protein synthesis and the loss of cell viability. TGF beta 1 pretreatment inhibited cytokine-induced expression and activity of nitric oxide synthase in RINm5F cells as determined by Western blotting and by cytosolic conversion of radiolabelled arginine into labelled citrulline and nitric oxide. Chemically generated superoxide also induced expression of nitric oxide synthase possibly due to direct activation of the nuclear transcription factor NF kappa B, an effect prevented by both an antioxidant and TGF beta 1 pretreatment. In conclusion, the mechanism of action of TGF beta 1 in blocking cytokine inhibitory effects was by preventing induction of nitric oxide synthase.

  19. Growth inhibitory effect of paratocarpin E, a prenylated chalcone isolated from Euphorbia humifusa Wild., by induction of autophagy and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Suyu; Sun, Dejuan; Wang, Guan; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Yingnan; Li, Guoyu; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Lei; Huang, Jian; Chen, Lixia

    2016-12-01

    Five flavones, including four flavonoids and one prenylated chalcone (paratocarpin E), were isolated from E. humifusa. and their chemical structures were established by spectroscopic analyses. We assessed the efficacy of these compounds against the growth of human breast cancer, leukemic, kidney cancer cell lines. Among them, paratocarpin E showed significant cytotoxicity against these cancer cell lines with an IC50 of 19.6μM on the growth of MCF-7 cells. Paratocarpin E treatment of MCF-7 cells resulted in typical apoptotic features via increasing expression of activated caspase-8 and -9 and PARP cleavage. Moreover, paratocarpin E altered the expression of Bax and Bcl-2, leading to the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol, suggesting that the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was initiated. In addition, paratocarpin E increased the MDC-positive autophagic vacuoles, the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I protein levels of Beclin-1, but decreased p62 expression, indicating the potent pro-autophagic effects of paratocarpin E in MCF-7 cells. Mechanistically, cell death induced by paratocarpin E is able to induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells by activating p38 and JNK signaling pathway while inhibiting Erk pathway. Furthermore, paratocarpin E promotes the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which plays an important role in balancing paratocarpin E-mediated apoptosis and autophagy. The molecular docking study also revealed that paratocarpin E bound to Fas and NF-κB complex. These findings provide initial evidences that paratocarpin E can be used as a potential anti-cancer drug in future for breast cancer therapy.

  20. Inhibitory effects of megakaryocytic cells in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Koh, Amy J; Wang, Zhengyan; Soki, Fabiana N; Park, Serk In; Pienta, Kenneth J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells commonly spread through the circulation, but few successfully generate metastatic foci in bone. Osteoclastic cellular activity has been proposed as an initiating event for skeletal metastasis. Megakaryocytes (MKs) inhibit osteoclastogenesis, which could have an impact on tumor establishment in bone. Given the location of mature MKs at vascular sinusoids, they may be the first cells to physically encounter cancer cells as they enter the bone marrow. Identification of the interaction between MKs and prostate cancer cells was the focus of this study. K562 (human MK precursors) and primary MKs derived from mouse bone marrow hematopoietic precursor cells potently suppressed prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells in coculture. The inhibitory effects were specific to prostate carcinoma cells and were enhanced by direct cell-cell contact. Flow cytometry for propidium iodide (PI) and annexin V supported a proapoptotic role for K562 cells in limiting PC-3 cells. Gene expression analysis revealed reduced mRNA levels for cyclin D1, whereas mRNA levels of apoptosis-associated specklike protein containing a CARD (ASC) and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) were increased in PC-3 cells after coculture with K562 cells. Recombinant thrombopoietin (TPO) was used to expand MKs in the marrow and resulted in decreased skeletal lesion development after intracardiac tumor inoculation. These novel findings suggest a potent inhibitory role of MKs in prostate carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. This new finding, of an interaction of metastatic tumors and hematopoietic cells during tumor colonization in bone, ultimately will lead to improved therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer patients.

  1. Growth inhibitory effects of gastric cancer cells with an increase in S phase and alkaline phosphatase activity repression by aloe-emodin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junming; Xiao, Bingxiu; Zhang, Shun; Liu, Donghai; Liao, Yiping; Sun, Qian

    2007-01-01

    Aloe-emodin is a novel active compound found in the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum. To investigate the effects and mechanisms of aloe-emodin on human gastric cancer, MGC-803 cells were treated with 2.5, 5, 10, 20 and 40 microM aloe-emodin for 1-5 d. The results showed that aloe-emodin inhibited the growth of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner with an increase in S phase and in the proportion of cells cycling at a higher ploidy level (>G2/M). Moreover, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, an indicator of cell differentiation, was found decreased. This is one of the first to focus on the effect of ALP activity in human gastric carcinomas cells treated by aloe-emodin. These results indicate that aloe-emodin has a potential value for the treatment of gastric cancer and its mechanisms are by means of cell cycle interruption and induce differentiation.

  2. In vitro growth-inhibitory activity and malaria risk in a cohort study in mali.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Peter D; Miura, Kazutoyo; Traore, Boubacar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Weiss, Greta; Doumbo, Safiatou; Doumtabe, Didier; Kone, Younoussou; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Miller, Louis H; Long, Carole A; Pierce, Susan K

    2010-02-01

    Immunity to the asexual blood stage of Plasmodium falciparum is complex and likely involves several effector mechanisms. Antibodies are thought to play a critical role in malaria immunity, and a corresponding in vitro correlate of antibody-mediated immunity has long been sought to facilitate malaria vaccine development. The growth inhibition assay (GIA) measures the capacity of antibodies to limit red blood cell (RBC) invasion and/or growth of P. falciparum in vitro. In humans, naturally acquired and vaccine-induced P. falciparum-specific antibodies have growth-inhibitory activity, but it is unclear if growth-inhibitory activity correlates with protection from clinical disease. In a longitudinal study in Mali, purified IgGs, obtained from plasmas collected before the malaria season from 220 individuals aged 2 to 10 and 18 to 25 years, were assayed for growth-inhibitory activity. Malaria episodes were recorded by passive surveillance over the subsequent 6-month malaria season. Logistic regression showed that greater age (odds ratio [OR], 0.78; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.63 to 0.95; P = 0.02) and growth-inhibitory activity (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.85; P = 0.01) were significantly associated with decreased malaria risk in children. A growth-inhibitory activity level of 40% was determined to be the optimal cutoff for discriminating malaria-immune and susceptible individuals in this cohort, with a sensitivity of 97.0%, but a low specificity of 24.3%, which limited the assay's ability to accurately predict protective immunity and to serve as an in vitro correlate of antibody-mediated immunity. These data suggest that antibodies which block merozoite invasion of RBC and/or inhibit the intra-RBC growth of the parasite contribute to but are not sufficient for the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  3. Tamoxifen enhances the differentiation-inducing and growth-inhibitory effects of all-trans retinoic acid in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koji; Honma, Yoshio; Miyake, Takaaki; Kawakami, Koshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Suzumiya, Junji

    2016-03-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is valuable in differentiation therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, ATRA has had limited success as a single agent, due to the development of resistance. We found that tamoxifen effectively enhanced the differentiation-inducing effect of ATRA. Tamoxifen alone inhibited the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cell lines while only slightly increasing morphologic differentiation. Tamoxifen effectively enhanced the growth-inhibiting actions of various differentiation-inducing agents. ATRA in the presence of tamoxifen increased NBT reduction and the expression of CD11b in HL-60 cells more effectively than ATRA alone. Tamoxifen also enhanced the differentiation induced by the other inducers tested. ATRA induced the differentiation of APL cell lines NB4 and HT93 and APL cells in primary culture, and this differentiation was also enhanced by tamoxifen. Tamoxifen is one of the most widely used drugs for the treatment of cancer and has few side effects. The combination of ATRA and tamoxifen might be considered for the treatment of APL patients in whom it can be difficult to apply arsenic trioxide or anthracyclines.

  4. Growth inhibitory effects of endotoxins from Bacteroides gingivalis and intermedius on human gingival fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Layman, D.L.; Diedrich, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Purified endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide from Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides intermedius caused a similar dose-dependent inhibition of growth of cultured human gingival fibroblasts as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation and direct cell count. Approximately 200 micrograms/ml endotoxin caused a 50% reduction in /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake of logarithmically growing cells. Inhibition of growth was similar in cultures of fibroblasts derived from either healthy or diseased human gingiva. When examining the change in cell number with time of exposure in culture, the rate of proliferation was significantly suppressed during the logarithmic phase of growth. However, the cells recovered so that the rate of proliferation, although reduced, was sufficient to produce a cell density similar to the control cells with prolonged culture. The endotoxins were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The profiles of the Bacteroides endotoxins were different. B. gingivalis endotoxin showed a wide range of distinct bands indicating a heterogeneous distribution of molecular species. Endotoxin from B. intermedius exhibited a few discrete low molecular weight bands, but the majority of the lipopolysaccharides electrophoresed as a diffuse band of high molecular weight material. The apparent heterogeneity of the two Bacteroides endotoxins and the similarity in growth inhibitory capacity suggest that growth inhibitory effects of these substances cannot be attributed to any polysaccharide species of endotoxin.

  5. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-dependent Down-regulation of the Transcription Factor Glioma-associated Protein 1 (GLI1) Underlies the Growth Inhibitory Properties of Arachidonic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Andrea; Almada, Luciana L.; Tolosa, Ezequiel J.; Iguchi, Eriko; Marks, David L.; Vara Messler, Marianela; Silva, Renata; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G.; Enriquez-Hesles, Elisa; Vrabel, Anne L.; Botta, Bruno; Di Marcotulio, Lucia; Ellenrieder, Volker; Eynard, Aldo R.; Pasqualini, Maria E.; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous reports have demonstrated a tumor inhibitory effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, the molecular mechanisms modulating this phenomenon are in part poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence of a novel antitumoral mechanism of the PUFA arachidonic acid (AA). In vivo and in vitro experiments showed that AA treatment decreased tumor growth and metastasis and increased apoptosis. Molecular analysis of this effect showed significantly reduced expression of a subset of antiapoptotic proteins, including BCL2, BFL1/A1, and 4-1BB, in AA-treated cells. We demonstrated that down-regulation of the transcription factor glioma-associated protein 1 (GLI1) in AA-treated cells is the underlying mechanism controlling BCL2, BFL1/A1, and 4-1BB expression. Using luciferase reporters, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and expression studies, we found that GLI1 binds to the promoter of these antiapoptotic molecules and regulates their expression and promoter activity. We provide evidence that AA-induced apoptosis and down-regulation of antiapoptotic genes can be inhibited by overexpressing GLI1 in AA-sensitive cells. Conversely, inhibition of GLI1 mimics AA treatments, leading to decreased tumor growth, cell viability, and expression of antiapoptotic molecules. Further characterization showed that AA represses GLI1 expression by stimulating nuclear translocation of NFATc1, which then binds the GLI1 promoter and represses its transcription. AA was shown to increase reactive oxygen species. Treatment with antioxidants impaired the AA-induced apoptosis and down-regulation of GLI1 and NFATc1 activation, indicating that NFATc1 activation and GLI1 repression require the generation of reactive oxygen species. Collectively, these results define a novel mechanism underlying AA antitumoral functions that may serve as a foundation for future PUFA-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:26601952

  6. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  7. Monofunctional platinum(II) complexes with potent tumor cell growth inhibitory activity: the effect of a hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor N-heterocyclic ligand.

    PubMed

    Margiotta, Nicola; Savino, Salvatore; Gandin, Valentina; Marzano, Christine; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the possibility of further increase the role of the N-donor aromatic base in antitumor Hollis-type compounds by conferring the possibility to act as a hydrogen-bond donor/acceptor. Therefore, we synthesized the Pt(II) complex cis-[PtCl(NH3 )2 (naph)]NO3 (1) containing the 1,8-naphthyridine (naph) ligand. The naphthyridine ligand is generally monodentate, and the second nitrogen atom can act as H-bond donor/acceptor depending upon its protonation state. The possibility of forming such an H-bond could be crucial in the interaction of the drug with DNA or proteins. Apart from the synthesis of the compound, in this study we evaluated its in vitro antitumor activity in a wide panel of tumor cell lines, also including cells selected for their sensitivity/resistance to oxaliplatin, which was compared with that of previously reported complex 2 ([PtI(2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline)(1-methyl-cytosine)]I) and oxaliplatin and cisplatin as reference compounds. The cytotoxicity data were correlated with the cellular uptake and the DNA platination levels. Finally, the reactivity of 1 towards guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) and glutathione was investigated to provide insights into its mechanism of action.

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Salinomycin on Cell Survival, Colony Growth, Migration, and Invasion of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 and LNM35: Involvement of NAG-1.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Kholoud; Iratni, Rabah; Takahashi, Takashi; Parekh, Khatija; Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Adrian, Thomas E; Attoub, Samir

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop more potent and less toxic drugs that will decrease the tumor growth and improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Salinomycin is a polyether antibiotic used to kill gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria, protozoans such as plasmodium falciparum, and the parasites responsible for the poultry disease coccidiosis. This old agent is now a serious anti-cancer drug candidate that selectively inhibits the growth of cancer stem cells. We investigated the impact of salinomycin on survival, colony growth, migration and invasion of the differentiated human non-small cell lung cancer lines LNM35 and A549. Salinomycin caused concentration- and time-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35 and A549 cells through a caspase 3/7-associated cell death pathway. Similarly, salinomycin (2.5-5 µM for 7 days) significantly decreased the growth of LNM35 and A549 colonies in soft agar. Metastasis is the main cause of death related to lung cancer. In this context, salinomycin induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We also demonstrated for the first time that salinomycin induced a marked increase in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein NAG-1 leading to the inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion but not cell survival. These findings identify salinomycin as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer.

  9. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  10. H-Ras Mediates the Inhibitory Effect of Epidermal Growth Factor on the Epithelial Na+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Il-Ha; Song, Sung-Hee; Cook, David I.; Dinudom, Anuwat

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of small G-proteins of the Ras family in the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-activated cellular signalling pathway that downregulates activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). We found that H-Ras is a key component of this EGF-activated cellular signalling mechanism in M1 mouse collecting duct cells. Expression of a constitutively active H-Ras mutant inhibited the amiloride-sensitive current. The H-Ras-mediated signalling pathway that inhibits activity of ENaC involves c-Raf, and that the inhibitory effect of H-Ras on ENaC is abolished by the MEK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059. The inhibitory effect of H-Ras is not mediated by Nedd4-2, a ubiquitin protein ligase that regulates the abundance of ENaC at the cell surface membrane, or by a negative effect of H-Ras on proteolytic activation of the channel. The inhibitory effects of EGF and H-Ras on ENaC, however, were not observed in cells in which expression of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) had been knocked down by siRNA. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effect of EGF on ENaC-dependent Na+ absorption is mediated via the H-Ras/c-Raf, MEK/ERK signalling pathway, and that Cav-1 is an essential component of this EGF-activated signalling mechanism. Taken together with reports that mice expressing a constitutive mutant of H-Ras develop renal cysts, our findings suggest that H-Ras may play a key role in the regulation of renal ion transport and renal development. PMID:25774517

  11. Inhibitory effects of xanthohumol from hops (Humulus lupulus L.) on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Chien; Liu, Chi-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Nan; Duan, Kow-Jen; Lin, Ming-Tse

    2008-11-01

    Xanthohumol is one of the main flavonoids in hop extracts and in beer. Very few investigations of xanthohumol have studied hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, the inhibitory effects of xanthohumol on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were investigated. The IC(50) values of xanthohumol for two hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines and one normal hepatocyte cell line were 108, 166 and 211 microm, respectively. Normal murine hepatocyte cell line had more resistance to xanthohumol than hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Besides, the inhibitory effects of xanthohumol on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were attributed to apoptosis as indicated in the results of flow cytometry, fluorescent nuclear staining and electrophoresis of oligonucleosomal DNA fragments. Hop xanthohumol was more efficient in the growth inhibition of hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines than the flavonoids silibinin and naringin from thistle and citrus. It was shown for the first time that xanthohumol from hops effectively inhibits proliferation of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

  12. Inhibitory effects of Chinese nutritional herbs in isogenic breast carcinoma cells with modulated estrogen receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Nitin; Li, Guo; Katdare, Meena; Sepkovic, Daniel; Bradlow, Leon; Wong, George

    2016-01-01

    In estrogen receptor (ER)+ MCF-7 cells, ER represents a ligand-activated transcription factor, and 17β-estradiol (E2) represents its physiological ligand. Maintenance of the human breast carcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells with 0.7% serum selected a proliferative sub-population of E2-responsive cells with transiently non-functional ER due to limited availability of E2. Culture of MCF-7 cells in the presence of either 0.7% serum, <1 nM E2 or 0.7% serum + 20 nM E2 selected isogenic cells with either non-functional ER (ER-NF) or functional ER (ER-F) phenotype. The two phenotypes responded to the growth-promoting effects of E2 and to the growth-inhibitory effects of the selective ER modulator tamoxifen, indicating retention of E2 responsiveness. Comparative dose-response experiments with Chinese nutritional herbs on ER-NF and ER-F cells identified the inhibitory concentration (IC)50 values for these herbs, while the IC50 ratios for the ER-NF:ER-F phenotypes facilitated their rank ordering in terms of efficacy. Out of the 11 efficacious herbs tested, five herbs exhibited ER-F > ER-NF inhibitory activity, four exhibited ER-F = ER-NF inhibitory activity and two exhibited ER-NF > ER-F inhibitory activity. Extracts from representative herbs, Lycium barbarum bark, Epimedium grandiflorum and Cornus officinalis, from each of the three groups inhibited anchorage-independent growth, induced G1 or G2/M arrest and/or apoptosis, and generated anti-proliferative E2 metabolites. The differential growth inhibition in ER-NF and ER-F phenotypes, together with the mechanistic efficacy of representative herbs, identified potential leads for their efficacy on ER+ and/or ER- breast cancer. PMID:27895755

  13. Inhibitory effects of Chinese nutritional herbs in isogenic breast carcinoma cells with modulated estrogen receptor function.

    PubMed

    Telang, Nitin; Li, Guo; Katdare, Meena; Sepkovic, Daniel; Bradlow, Leon; Wong, George

    2016-11-01

    In estrogen receptor (ER)+ MCF-7 cells, ER represents a ligand-activated transcription factor, and 17β-estradiol (E2) represents its physiological ligand. Maintenance of the human breast carcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells with 0.7% serum selected a proliferative sub-population of E2-responsive cells with transiently non-functional ER due to limited availability of E2. Culture of MCF-7 cells in the presence of either 0.7% serum, <1 nM E2 or 0.7% serum + 20 nM E2 selected isogenic cells with either non-functional ER (ER-NF) or functional ER (ER-F) phenotype. The two phenotypes responded to the growth-promoting effects of E2 and to the growth-inhibitory effects of the selective ER modulator tamoxifen, indicating retention of E2 responsiveness. Comparative dose-response experiments with Chinese nutritional herbs on ER-NF and ER-F cells identified the inhibitory concentration (IC)50 values for these herbs, while the IC50 ratios for the ER-NF:ER-F phenotypes facilitated their rank ordering in terms of efficacy. Out of the 11 efficacious herbs tested, five herbs exhibited ER-F > ER-NF inhibitory activity, four exhibited ER-F = ER-NF inhibitory activity and two exhibited ER-NF > ER-F inhibitory activity. Extracts from representative herbs, Lycium barbarum bark, Epimedium grandiflorum and Cornus officinalis, from each of the three groups inhibited anchorage-independent growth, induced G1 or G2/M arrest and/or apoptosis, and generated anti-proliferative E2 metabolites. The differential growth inhibition in ER-NF and ER-F phenotypes, together with the mechanistic efficacy of representative herbs, identified potential leads for their efficacy on ER(+) and/or ER- breast cancer.

  14. The Role of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor Signaling in Skeletal Muscle Growth, Injury and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Liam C; White, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines are an incredibly diverse group of secreted proteins with equally diverse functions. The actions of cytokines are mediated by the unique and sometimes overlapping receptors to which the soluble ligands bind. Classified within the interleukin-6 family of cytokines are leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin-M (OSM), cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). These cytokines all bind to the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) and gp130, and in some cases an additional receptor subunit, leading to activation of downstream kinases and transcriptional activators. LIFR is expressed on a broad range of cell types and can generate pleiotropic effects. In the context of skeletal muscle physiology, these cytokines have been shown to exert effects on motor neurons, inflammatory and muscle cells. From isolated cells through to whole organisms, manipulations of LIFR signaling cytokines have a wide range of outcomes influencing muscle cell growth, myogenic differentiation, response to exercise, metabolism, neural innervation and recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of muscle injury. This article will discuss the shared and distinct processes that LIFR cytokines regulate in a variety of experimental models with the common theme of skeletal muscle physiology.

  15. Identification of candidate angiogenic inhibitors processed by matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) in cell-based proteomic screens: disruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/heparin affin regulatory peptide (pleiotrophin) and VEGF/Connective tissue growth factor angiogenic inhibitory complexes by MMP-2 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Richard A; Butler, Georgina S; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Brigstock, David R; Courty, José; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert both pro- and antiangiogenic functions by the release of cytokines or proteolytically generated angiogenic inhibitors from extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling. In the Mmp2-/- mouse neovascularization is greatly reduced, but the mechanistic aspects of this remain unclear. Using isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of proteins analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry we explored proteome differences between Mmp2-/- cells and those rescued by MMP-2 transfection. Proteome signatures that are hallmarks of proteolysis revealed cleavage of many known MMP-2 substrates in the cellular context. Proteomic evidence of MMP-2 processing of novel substrates was found. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6, follistatin-like 1, and cystatin C protein cleavage by MMP-2 was biochemically confirmed, and the cleavage sites in heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP; pleiotrophin) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. MMP-2 processing of HARP and CTGF released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from angiogenic inhibitory complexes. The cleaved HARP N-terminal domain increased HARP-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HARP C-terminal domain was antagonistic and decreased cell proliferation and migration. Hence the unmasking of cytokines, such as VEGF, by metalloproteinase processing of their binding proteins is a new mechanism in the control of cytokine activation and angiogenesis.

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Metabolites of 5-Demethylnobiletin on Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingyue; Charoensinphon, Noppawat; Wu, Xian; Zheng, Jinkai; Gao, Zili; Xu, Fei; Wang, Minqi; Xiao, Hang

    2016-06-22

    5-Demethylnobiletin is a unique flavonoid found in citrus fruits with potential chemopreventive effects against human cancers. We previously identified three metabolites of 5DN, namely 5,4'-didemethylnobiletin (M1), 5,3',4'- tridemethylnobiletin (M2), and 5,3'-didemethylnobiletin (M3) in mice fed 5DN. Herein, we investigated the inhibitory effects of these three metabolites on NSCLC cells. Our results demonstrated that M1, M2, and especially M3 showed stronger inhibition on the growth and colony formation of H460 and H1299 cells compared to 5DN. Three metabolites significantly inhibited the tumorsphere formation of A549 cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that all metabolites induced cell cycle arrest and cellular apoptosis, and these effects were also stronger than that of 5DN. The inhibitory effects of these metabolites were associated with their ability to modulate the key signaling proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Overall, our results provided a basis for utilizing 5DN and its metabolites for chemoprevention of lung cancer.

  17. RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alkasalias, Twana; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Hennig, Katharina; Danielsson, Frida; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Fielden, Matthew; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Lehti, Kaisa; Kashuba, Vladimir; Madapura, Harsha S.; Bozoky, Benedek; Lundberg, Emma; Balland, Martial; Guvén, Hayrettin; Klein, George; Gad, Annica K. B.; Pavlova, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of α-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth. PMID:28174275

  18. RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alkasalias, Twana; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Hennig, Katharina; Danielsson, Frida; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Fielden, Matthew; Turunen, S Pauliina; Lehti, Kaisa; Kashuba, Vladimir; Madapura, Harsha S; Bozoky, Benedek; Lundberg, Emma; Balland, Martial; Guvén, Hayrettin; Klein, George; Gad, Annica K B; Pavlova, Tatiana

    2017-02-21

    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of α-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth.

  19. [Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory neurones in cultured dissociated hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Moskaliuk, A O; Kolodin, Iu O; Kravchenko, M O; Fedulova, S A; Veselovs'kyĭ, M S

    2004-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of inhibitory (GABAergic) neurones were studied in dissociated hippocampal culture using simultaneous whole cell recordings from pairs of monosynaptically coupled neurons. Reliable identification of GABAergic neuron was performed by presence of monosynaptic inhibitory currents at postsynaptic cell in response to action potentials at stimulated cell. It was shown that GABAergic neurons in hippocampal culture are divided in two groups by their firing characteristics: first type generates action potentials at high frequency in response to injection of current (duration 0.5 s)--fast-spiking neurons (FS), cells from second type has no ability for high-frequency action potential generation--regular spiking neurons (RS). These two groups were distinguished by kinetic characteristics of action potentials, adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials and inhibitory effect making on postsynaptic cell. Application of potassium channel blocker 4-AP to somas of FS neurons in concentration, which selectively inhibits Kv3 potassium channels evoked reversible changes in kinetic of action potentials, frequency and adaptation characteristics during continuous generation of action potentials. It was concluded that there is hight level of expression of Kv3 potassium channels in the first group of neurons.

  20. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of medicinal plants from growth of plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Panjehkeh, N; Jahani Hossein-Abadi, Z

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells produce a vast amount of secondary metabolites. Production of some compounds is restricted to a single species. Some compounds are nearly always found only in certain specific plant organs and during a specific developmental period of the plant. Some secondary metabolites of plants serve as defensive compounds against invading microorganisms. Nowadays, it is attempted to substitute the biological and natural agents with chemically synthesized fungicides. In the present research, the antifungal activities of essential oils of seven medicinal plants on mycelial growth of three soilborne plant pathogenic fungi were investigated. The plants consisted of Zataria multiflora, Thymus carmanicus, Mentha pieperata, Satureja hortensis, Lavandual officinolis, Cuminum cyminum and Azadirachta indica. The first five plants are from the family Labiatae. Examined fungi, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani are the causal agents of tomato root rot. Essential oils of Z. multiflora, T. carmanicus, M. pieperata, S. hortensis and C. cyminum were extracted by hydro-distillation method. Essential oils of L. officinalis and A. indica were extracted by vapor-distillation method. A completely randomized design with five replicates was used to examine the inhibitory impact of each concentration (300, 600 and 900 ppm) of each essential oil. Poisoned food assay using potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium was employed. Results showed that essential oils of A. indica, Z. multiflora, T. carmanicus and S. hortensis in 900 ppm at 12 days post-inoculation, when the control fungi completely covered the plates, prevented about 90% from mycelial growth of each of the fungi. While, the essential oils of M. pieperata, C. cyminum and L. officinalis in the same concentration and time prevented 54.86, 52.77 and 48.84%, respectively, from F. solani growth. These substances did not prevent from F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and R. solani growth. Minimum

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Baicalin and Baicalein on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianchu; Li, Zhaoliang; Chen, Allen Y.; Ye, Xingqian; Luo, Haitao; Rankin, Gary O.; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the primary causes of death for women all through the Western world. Baicalin and baicalein are naturally occurring flavonoids that are found in the roots and leaves of some Chinese medicinal plants and are thought to have antioxidant activity and possible anti-angiogenic, anti-cancer, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. Two kinds of ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3 and CP-70) cell lines and a normal ovarian cell line (IOSE-364) were selected to be investigated in the inhibitory effect of baicalin and baicalein on cancer cells. Largely, baicalin and baicalein inhibited ovarian cancer cell viability in both ovarian cancer cell lines with LD50 values in the range of 45–55 μM for baicalin and 25–40 μM for baicalein. On the other hand, both compounds had fewer inhibitory effects on normal ovarian cells viability with LD50 values of 177 μM for baicalin and 68 μM for baicalein. Baicalin decreased expression of VEGF (20 μM), cMyc (80 μM), and NFkB (20 μM); baicalein decreased expression of VEGF (10 μM), HIF-1α (20 μM), cMyc (20 μM), and NFkB (40 μM). Therefore baicalein is more effective in inhibiting cancer cell viability and expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB in both ovarian cancer cell lines. It seems that baicalein inhibited cancer cell viability through the inhibition of cancer promoting genes expression including VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB. Overall, this study showed that baicalein and baicalin significantly inhibited the viability of ovarian cancer cells, while generally exerting less of an effect on normal cells. They have potential for chemoprevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. PMID:23502466

  2. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Minako; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ohta, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-11-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected.

  3. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody single therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma exhibits a marked tumor growth-inhibitory effect

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, KAZUHIKO; NAGAKAWA, YUICHI; SUZUKI, MINAKO; TANAKA, HIROAKI; OHTA, HIROSHI; ITOI, TAKAO; TSUCHIDA, AKIHIKO

    2011-01-01

    At present, no effective chemotherapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) exists. However, anti-angiogenic therapy is expected to be effective for PNEC, a hypervascular tumor. We treated PNEC and hypovascular pancreatic ductal cell carcinoma (DCC) cell lines with the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab, and compared the antitumor effect between the two different types of cell lines. The PNEC cell line QGP-1 and the DCC cell lines BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 were used. We evaluated the ability of the cell lines to proliferate and secrete VEGF in vitro, the antitumor effect of bevacizumab administration in vivo and the side effects of bevacizumab on the pancreas in a caerulein-induced pancreatitis model. Comparison of the QGP-1 and DCC cell lines showed that QGP-1 secreted a higher level of VEGF under a hypoxic environment than the DCC cell line, and bevacizumab exerted the most marked growth-inhibitory effect on QGP-1; the number of intratumoral blood vessels decreased and the percentage of proliferating cells was approximately the same. In the pancreatitis model, bevacizumab administration did not adversely affect the pancreatitis or the associated hypoxic environment. Bevacizumab does not affect the pancreas itself; therefore, its potent inhibitory effect on the growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors alone can be expected. PMID:22977618

  4. Inhibitory effects of several saturated fatty acids and their related fatty alcohols on the growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Yui, Satoru; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of 5 saturated fatty acids and their related alcohols on the growth of Candida albicans. The inhibitory effects of these compounds against the yeast and hyphal growth forms of C. albicans were examined using the modified NCCLS method and crystal violet staining, respectively. Among these compounds, capric acid inhibited both types of growth at the lowest concentration. The IC(80), i.e., the concentration at which the compounds reduced the growth of C. albicans by 80% in comparison with the growth of control cells, of capric acid for the hyphal growth of this fungus, which is indispensable for its mucosal invasion, was 16.7 μM. These fatty acids, including capric acid, have an unpleasant smell, which may limit their therapeutic use. To test them at reduced concentrations, the combined effect of these fatty acids and oligonol, a depolymerized polyphenol, was evaluated in vitro. These combinations showed potent synergistic inhibition of hyphal growth [fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index = 0.319]. Our results demonstrated that capric acid combined with oligonol could be used as an effective anti-Candida compound. It may be a candidate prophylactic or therapeutic tool against mucosal Candida infection.

  5. Inhibition of Nb2 T-lymphoma cell growth by transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed Central

    Rayhel, E J; Prentice, D A; Tabor, P S; Flurkey, W H; Geib, R W; Laherty, R F; Schnitzer, S B; Chen, R; Hughes, J P

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, a rat T lymphoma, in response to lactogens and interleukin-2. Prostaglandins may play an important role in the pathway through which TGF-beta exerts its inhibitory actions, because prostaglandin E2 also inhibits proliferation of Nb2 cells, and indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, reverses the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta on Nb2 cell proliferation. PMID:3262338

  6. Growth-inhibitory effect of a fucoidan from brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifida on Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Hu; Lim, Jung-Dae; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Choi, Yong-Soon; Han, Eun-Taek

    2009-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effects of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from the edible brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifida, on the growth of Plasmodium parasites. In order to assess the anti-malarial activity of fucoidan, growth inhibition activities were evaluated using cultured Plasmodium falciparum parasites in vitro and on Plasmodium berghei-infected mice in vivo. Fucoidan significantly inhibited the invasion of erythrocytes by P. falciparum merozoites, and its 50% inhibition concentration was similar to those for the chloroquine-sensitive P. falciparum 3D7 strain and the chloroquine-resistant K1 strain. Four-day suppressive testing in P. berghei-infected mice with fucoidan resulted in a 37% suppressive effect versus the control group and a delay in death associated with anemia (P < 0.05). In addition, fucoidans had no toxic effect on RAW 264.7 cells. These findings indicate that fucoidans from the Korean brown algae U. pinnatifida inhibits the invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into erythrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Prenatal Origins of Temperament: Fetal Growth, Brain Structure, and Inhibitory Control in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Schlotz, Wolff; Godfrey, Keith M.; Phillips, David I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Individual differences in the temperamental dimension of effortful control are constitutionally based and have been associated with an adverse prenatal developmental environment, with structural brain alterations presenting a potential mechanism. We investigated this hypothesis for anatomically defined brain regions implicated in cognitive and inhibitory motor control. Methods Twenty-seven 15–16 year old participants with low, medium, or high fetal growth were selected from a longitudinal birth cohort to maximize variation and represent the full normal spectrum of fetal growth. Outcome measures were parent ratings of attention and inhibitory control, thickness and surface area of the orbitofrontal cortex (lateral (LOFC) and medial (MOFC)) and right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), and volumetric measures of the striatum and amygdala. Results Lower birth weight was associated with lower inhibitory control, smaller surface area of LOFC, MOFC and rIFG, lower caudate volume, and thicker MOFC. A mediation model found a significant indirect effect of birth weight on inhibitory control via caudate volume. Conclusions Our findings support a neuroanatomical mechanism underlying potential long-term consequences of an adverse fetal developmental environment for behavioral inhibitory control in adolescence and have implications for understanding putative prenatal developmental origins of externalizing behavioral problems and self-control. PMID:24802625

  8. Inhibitory effects of spices on growth and toxin production of toxigenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Hitokoto, H; Morozumi, S; Wauke, T; Sakai, S; Kurata, H

    1980-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of 29 commercial powdered spices on the growth and toxin production of three species of toxigenic Aspergillus were observed by introducing these materials into culture media for mycotoxin production. Of the 29 samples tested, cloves, star anise seeds, and allspice completely inhibited the fungal growth, whereas most of the others inhibited only the toxin production. Eugenol extracted from cloves and thymol from thyme caused complete inhibition of the growth of both Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus versicolor at 0.4 mg/ml or less. At a concentration of 2 mg/ml, anethol extracted from star anise seeds inhibited the growth of all the strains.

  9. Microarray analysis of early adipogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells: Cooperative inhibitory effects of growth factors and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, Paul R.; Cimafranca, Melissa A.; Liu Xueqing; Cho, Young C.; Jefcoate, Colin R. . E-mail: jefcoate@facstaff.wisc.edu

    2005-08-22

    C3H10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts differentiate into adipocytes when stimulated by a standard hormonal mixture (IDMB). 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), inhibits induction of the key adipogenic gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and subsequent adipogenesis. This TCDD-mediated inhibition requires activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which can be accomplished by serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or fibroblast growth factor (FGF). In the absence of serum or growth factors, IDMB induced adipogenesis without mitosis. Microarray analysis identified 200 genes that exhibited expression changes of at least twofold after 24 h of IDMB treatment. This time precedes most PPAR{gamma} stimulation but follows the period of TCDD/ERK cooperation and periods of increased cell contraction and DNA synthesis. Functionally related gene clusters include genes associated with cell structure, triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism, oxidative regulation, and secreted proteins. In the absence of growth factors TCDD inhibited 30% of these IDMB responses without inhibiting the process of differentiation. A combination of EGF and TCDD that blocks differentiation cooperatively blocked a further 44 IDMB-responsive genes, most of which have functional links to differentiation, including PPAR{gamma}. Cell cycle regulators that are stimulated by EGF were substantially inhibited by IDMB but these responses were unaffected by TCDD. By contrast, TCDD and EGF cooperatively reversed IDMB-induced changes in cell adhesion complexes immediately prior to increases in PPAR{gamma}1 expression. Changes in adhesion-linked signaling may play a key role in TCDD affects on differentiation.

  10. Inhibitory and Cytotoxic Activities of Chrysin on Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cells by Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Borji, Abasalt; Hasanzadeh, Malihe; Jabbari, Farahzad; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Chrysin, an active natural bioflavonoid found in honey and many plant extracts, was first known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The fact that antioxidants have several inhibitory effects against different diseases, such as cancer, led to search for food rich in antioxidants. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of chrysin on the cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Materials and Methods: Cells were cultured in Roswell Park Memorial Institute medium and treated with different chrysin concentrations for three consecutive days. Cell viability was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate. Results: The MTT assay showed that chrysin had an antiproliferative effect on MCF-7 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The 50% cell growth inhibition values for chrysin against MCF-7 cells were 19.5 and 9.2 μM after 48 and 72 h, respectively. Chrysin induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as determined by flow cytometry. Chrysin inhibits the growth of the breast cancer cells by inducing cancer cell apoptosis which may, in part, explain its anticancer activity. Conclusion: This study shows that chrysin could also be considered as a promising chemotherapeutic agent and anticancer activity in treatment of the breast cancer cells in future. SUMMARY Chrysin had an antiproliferative effect on human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) cells in a dose- and time-dependent mannerChrysin induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, as determined by flow cytometryChrysin inhibits the growth of the breast cancer cells by inducing cancer cell apoptosisChrysin may have anticancer activity. Abbreviations used: Human breast cancer cells (MCF-7), 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), normal fibroblast mouse (L929). PMID

  11. Inhibitory effects of Satureja hortensis L. essential oil on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Rezaee, Mohammad-Bagher; Jaimand, Kamkar; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2008-04-30

    In an effort to screen the essential oils of some Iranian medicinal plants for novel aflatoxin (AF) inhibitors, Satureja hortensis L. was found as a potent inhibitor of aflatoxins B1 (AFB1) and G1(AFG1) production by Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999. Fungal growth was also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Separation of the plant inhibitory substance(s) was achieved using initial fractionation of its effective part (leaf essential oil; LEO) by silica gel column chromatography and further separation by reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). These substances were finally identified as carvacrol and thymol, based on the interpretation of 1H and 13C NMR spectra. Microbioassay (MBA) on cell culture microplates contained potato-dextrose broth (PDB) medium (4 days at 28 degrees C) and subsequent analysis of cultures with HPLC technique revealed that both carvacrol and thymol were able to effectively inhibit fungal growth, AFB1 and AFG1 production in a dose-dependent manner at all two-fold concentrations from 0.041 to 1.32 mM. The IC50 values for growth inhibition were calculated as 0.79 and 0.86 mM for carvacrol and thymol, while for AFB1 and AFG1, it was reported as 0.50 and 0.06 mM for carvacrol and 0.69 and 0.55 mM for thymol. The results obtained in this study clearly show a new biological activity for S. hortensis L. as strong inhibition of aflatoxin production by A. parasiticus. Carvacrol and thymol, the effective constituents of S. hortensis L., may be useful to control aflatoxin contamination of susceptible crops in the field.

  12. Efficient synthesis of chloro-derivatives of sialosyllactosylceramide, and their enhanced inhibitory effect on epidermal growth factor receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    KAWASHIMA, NAGAKO; QU, HUANHUAN; LOBATON, MARLIN; ZHU, ZHENYUAN; SOLLOGOUB, MATTHIEU; CAVENEE, WEBSTER K.; HANDA, KAZUKO; HAKOMORI, SEN-ITIROH; ZHANG, YONGMIN

    2014-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids are components of essentially all mammalian cell membranes and are involved in a variety of significant cellular functions, including proliferation, adhesion, motility and differentiation. Sialosyllactosylceramide (GM3) is known to inhibit the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In the present study, an efficient method for the total chemical synthesis of monochloro- and dichloro-derivatives of the sialosyl residue of GM3 was developed. The structures of the synthesized compounds were fully characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. In analyses of EGFR autophosphorylation and cell proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells, two chloro-derivatives exhibited stronger inhibitory effects than GM3 on EGFR activity. Monochloro-GM3, but not GM3 or dichloro-GM3, showed a significant inhibitory effect on ΔEGFR, a splicing variant of EGFR that lacks exons 2–7 and is often found in human glioblastomas. The chemical synthesis of other GM3 derivatives using approaches similar to those described in the present study, has the potential to create more potent EGFR inhibitors to block cell growth or motility of a variety of types of cancer that express either wild-type EGFR or ΔEGFR. PMID:24944646

  13. Efficient synthesis of chloro-derivatives of sialosyllactosylceramide, and their enhanced inhibitory effect on epidermal growth factor receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Nagako; Qu, Huanhuan; Lobaton, Marlin; Zhu, Zhenyuan; Sollogoub, Matthieu; Cavenee, Webster K; Handa, Kazuko; Hakomori, Sen-Itiroh; Zhang, Yongmin

    2014-04-01

    Glycosphingolipids are components of essentially all mammalian cell membranes and are involved in a variety of significant cellular functions, including proliferation, adhesion, motility and differentiation. Sialosyllactosylceramide (GM3) is known to inhibit the activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In the present study, an efficient method for the total chemical synthesis of monochloro- and dichloro-derivatives of the sialosyl residue of GM3 was developed. The structures of the synthesized compounds were fully characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. In analyses of EGFR autophosphorylation and cell proliferation ([(3)H]-thymidine incorporation) in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells, two chloro-derivatives exhibited stronger inhibitory effects than GM3 on EGFR activity. Monochloro-GM3, but not GM3 or dichloro-GM3, showed a significant inhibitory effect on ΔEGFR, a splicing variant of EGFR that lacks exons 2-7 and is often found in human glioblastomas. The chemical synthesis of other GM3 derivatives using approaches similar to those described in the present study, has the potential to create more potent EGFR inhibitors to block cell growth or motility of a variety of types of cancer that express either wild-type EGFR or ΔEGFR.

  14. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  15. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents.

  16. Inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the growth of Babesia parasites.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ichikawa, Madoka; Davaasuren, Batdorj; Nyamjargal, Tserendorj; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the in vitro and in vivo growths of Babesia parasites. The in vitro growth of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and B. equi was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by micromolar concentrations of pepstatin A (50% inhibitory concentrations = 38.5, 36.5, 17.6, and 18.1 μM, respectively) and mefloquine (50% inhibitory concentrations = 59.7, 56.7, 20.7, and 4 μM, respectively). Furthermore, both reagents either alone at a concentration of 5 mg/kg or in combinations (2.5/2.5 and 5/5 mg/kg) for 10 days significantly inhibited the in vivo growth of B. microti in mice. Mefloquine treatment was highly effective and the combination treatments were less effective than other treatments. Therefore, mefloquine may antagonize the actions of pepstatin A against babesiosis and aspartic proteases may play an important role in the asexual growth cycle of Babesia parasites.

  17. Relationship between interstitial cells of Cajal, fibroblast-like cells and inhibitory motor nerves in the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Cobine, Caroline A; Hennig, Grant W; Kurahashi, Masaaki; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Keef, Kathleen D

    2011-04-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) have been shown to participate in nitrergic neurotransmission in various regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Recently, fibroblast-like cells, which are positive for platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα(+)), have been suggested to participate additionally in inhibitory neurotransmission in the GI tract. The distribution of ICC and PDGFRα(+) cell populations and their relationship to inhibitory nerves within the mouse internal anal sphincter (IAS) are unknown. Immunohistochemical techniques and confocal microscopy were therefore used to examine the density and arrangement of ICC, PDGFRα(+) cells and neuronal nitric-oxide-synthase-positive (nNOS(+)) nerve fibers in the IAS of wild-type (WT) and W/W ( v ) mice. Of the total tissue volume within the IAS circular muscle layer, 18% consisted in highly branched PDGFRα(+) cells (PDGFRα(+)-IM). Other populations of PDGFRα(+) cells were observed within the submucosa and along the serosal and myenteric surfaces. Spindle-shaped intramuscular ICC (ICC-IM) were present in the WT mouse IAS but were largely absent from the W/W ( v ) IAS. The ICC-IM volume (5% of tissue volume) in the WT mouse IAS was significantly smaller than that of PDGFRα(+)-IM. Stellate-shaped submucosal ICC (ICC-SM) were observed in the WT and W/W ( v ) IAS. Minimum surface distance analysis revealed that nNOS(+) nerve fibers were closely aligned with both ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM. An even closer association was seen between ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM. Thus, a close morphological arrangement exists between inhibitory motor neurons, ICC-IM and PDGFRα(+)-IM suggesting that some functional interaction occurs between them contributing to inhibitory neurotransmission in the IAS.

  18. The inhibitory effect of CIL-102 on the growth of human astrocytoma cells is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of ERK1/2 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Chih-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Cheng, Ho-Chen; Wang, Ting-Chung; Sze, Chun-I

    2012-08-15

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata, with multiple pharmacological activities, including anticancer effects and promotion of apoptosis. The mechanism by which CIL-102 inhibits growth remains poorly understood in human astrocytoma cells. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 affects the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle G2/M arrest in glioma cells. Treatment of U87 cells with 1.0 μM CIL-102 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, and cdk1), and phosphorylation of cdk1Tyr{sup 15} and Cdc25cSer{sup 216}. Furthermore, treatment with the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 abolished CIL-102-induced Cdc25cSer{sup 216} expression and reversed CIL-102-inhibited cdk1 activation. In addition, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an ROS scavenger, blocked cell cycle G2/M arrest and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} in U87 cells. CIL-102-mediated ERK1/2 and ROS production, and cell cycle arrest were blocked by treatment with specific inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a novel CIL-102-inhibited proliferation in U87 cells by activating the ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} cell cycle-related proteins and inducing ROS production; this might be a new mechanism in human astrocytoma cells. -- Highlights: ► We show the effects of CIL-102 on the G2/M arrest of human astrocytoma cells. ► ROS and the Ras/ERK1/2 triggering pathways are involved in the CIL-102 treatment. ► CIL-102 induces sustained activation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25c and ROS are required.

  19. Peripheral Nervous System Genes Expressed in Central Neurons Induce Growth on Inhibitory Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Smith, Robin P.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Haddox, Candace L.; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R.; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS’s enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons. PMID:22701605

  20. Peripheral nervous system genes expressed in central neurons induce growth on inhibitory substrates.

    PubMed

    Buchser, William J; Smith, Robin P; Pardinas, Jose R; Haddox, Candace L; Hutson, Thomas; Moon, Lawrence; Hoffman, Stanley R; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2012-01-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord and brain can result in irreparable loss of function. This failure of recovery is in part due to inhibition of axon regeneration by myelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). Peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibit increased regenerative ability compared to central nervous system neurons, even in the presence of inhibitory environments. Previously, we identified over a thousand genes differentially expressed in PNS neurons relative to CNS neurons. These genes represent intrinsic differences that may account for the PNS's enhanced regenerative ability. Cerebellar neurons were transfected with cDNAs for each of these PNS genes to assess their ability to enhance neurite growth on inhibitory (CSPG) or permissive (laminin) substrates. Using high content analysis, we evaluated the phenotypic profile of each neuron to extract meaningful data for over 1100 genes. Several known growth associated proteins potentiated neurite growth on laminin. Most interestingly, novel genes were identified that promoted neurite growth on CSPGs (GPX3, EIF2B5, RBMX). Bioinformatic approaches also uncovered a number of novel gene families that altered neurite growth of CNS neurons.

  1. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  2. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  3. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  4. Chemistry and Tumor Cell Growth Inhibitory Activity of 11,20-Epoxy-3Z,5(6)E-diene Briaranes from the South China Sea Gorgonian Dichotella gemmacea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cui; Jiang, Mei; La, Ming-Ping; Li, Tie-Jun; Tang, Hua; Sun, Peng; Liu, Bao-Shu; Yi, Yang-Hua; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Eighteen new 11,20-epoxy-3Z,5E-dien briaranes, gemmacolides AA–AR (1–18), were isolated together with three known analogs, dichotellides F (19) and I (20), and juncenolide C (21), from the South China Sea gorgonian Dichotella gemmacea. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analysis and comparison with reported data. The absolute configuration was determined based on the ECD experiment. In the in vitro bioassay, compounds 1–3, 5, 6, 8–12, and 14–19 exhibited different levels of growth inhibition activity against A549 and MG63 cell lines. Preliminary structure-activity analysis suggests that 12-O-isovalerate may increase the activity whereas 13- or 14-O-isovalerate may decrease the activity. Contribution of substitutions at C-2 and C-16 remains uncertain. PMID:23697947

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Dichlorophenoxyacetones on Auxin-induced Growth of Avena Coleoptile Sections 1

    PubMed Central

    Masingale, Robert E.; Lewis, Janet E.; Bryant, Sarah R.; Skinner, Charles G.

    1968-01-01

    Six dichlorophenoxyacetones were synthesized and examined as potential metabolic antagonists utilizing Avena coleoptile sections and the straight growth assay procedure. Supplements of indoleacetic acid promoted growth of the sections which were inhibited by the analogs; the most inhibitory derivatives were 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-; and 3,4-dichlorophenoxyacetone which produced half-maximal growth responses (relative to the unaug-mented control growth) at concentrations of 106, 86, 80, and 62 μg/ml, respectively. A Lineweaver-Burk plot of the data for the inhibition by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetone and its reversal by indoleacetic acid appeared to represent an uncompetitive-like inhibition. PMID:16656819

  6. Characterization of DicB by partially masking its potent inhibitory activity of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaoyuan; Pei, Hairun; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wei, Qiang; Zhu, Jia; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    DicB, a protein encoded by the Kim (Qin) prophage in Escherichia coli, inhibits cell division through interaction with MinC. Thus far, characterization of DicB has been severely hampered owing to its potent activity which ceases cell division and leads to cell death. In this work, through fusing maltose-binding protein to the N-terminus of DicB (MBP–DicB), we successfully expressed and purified recombinant DicB that enabled in vitro analysis for the first time. More importantly, taking advantage of the reduced inhibitory activity of MBP–DicB, we were able to study its effects on cell growth and morphology. Inhibition of cell growth by MBP–DicB was systematically evaluated using various DicB constructs, and their corresponding effects on cell morphology were also investigated. Our results revealed that the N-terminal segment of DicB plays an essential functional role, in contrast to its C-terminal tail. The N-terminus of DicB is of critical importance as even the first amino acid (following the initial Met) could not be removed, although it could be mutated. This study provides the first glimpse of the molecular determinants underlying DicB's function. PMID:27466443

  7. Neural cells play an inhibitory role in pancreatic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Morooka, Mayu; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Sakano, Daisuke; Ogaki, Soichiro; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic endocrine β-cells derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have received attention as screening systems for therapeutic drugs and as the basis for cell-based therapies. Here, we used a 12-day β-cell differentiation protocol for mouse ES cells and obtained several hit compounds that promoted β-cell differentiation. One of these compounds, mycophenolic acid (MPA), effectively promoted ES cell differentiation with a concomitant reduction of neuronal cells. The existence of neural cell-derived inhibitory humoral factors for β-cell differentiation was suggested using a co-culture system. Based on gene array analysis, we focused on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and showed that the Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed MPA-induced β-cell differentiation. Wnt pathway activation promoted β-cell differentiation also in human iPS cells. Our results showed that Wnt signaling activation positively regulates β-cell differentiation, and represent a downstream target of the neural inhibitory factor.

  8. Growth inhibitory response and ultrastructural modification of oral-associated candidal reference strains (ATCC) by Piper betle L. extract.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Mohd-Al-Faisal; Wan Harun, Wan Himratul-Aznita; Abdul Razak, Fathilah; Musa, Md Yusoff

    2014-03-01

    Candida species have been associated with the emergence of strains resistant to selected antifungal agents. Plant products have been used traditionally as alternative medicine to ease mucosal fungal infections. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper betle extract on the growth profile and the ultrastructure of commonly isolated oral candidal cells. The major component of P. betle was identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (LC-MS/MS). Seven ATCC control strains of Candida species were cultured in yeast peptone dextrose broth under four different growth environments: (i) in the absence of P. betle extract; and in the presence of P. betle extract at respective concentrations of (ii) 1 mg⋅mL(-1); (iii) 3 mg⋅mL(-1); and (iv) 6 mg⋅mL(-1). The growth inhibitory responses of the candidal cells were determined based on changes in the specific growth rates (µ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe any ultrastructural alterations in the candida colonies. LC-MS/MS was performed to validate the presence of bioactive compounds in the extract. Following treatment, it was observed that the µ-values of the treated cells were significantly different than those of the untreated cells (P<0.05), indicating the fungistatic properties of the P. betle extract. The candidal population was also reduced from an average of 13.44×10(6) to 1.78×10(6) viable cell counts (CFU)⋅mL(-1). SEM examination exhibited physical damage and considerable morphological alterations of the treated cells. The compound profile from LC-MS/MS indicated the presence of hydroxybenzoic acid, chavibetol and hydroxychavicol in P. betle extract. The effects of P. betle on candida cells could potentiate its antifungal activity.

  9. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  10. Mutation at Glu23 eliminates the neuron growth inhibitory activity of human metallothionein-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Zhichun; Teng Xinchen; Cai Bin; Wang Hui; Zheng Qi; Wang Yang; Zhou Guoming; Zhang Mingjie; Wu Houming; Sun Hongzhe . E-mail: hsun@hku.hk; Huang Zhongxian . E-mail: zxhuang@fudan.edu.cn

    2006-10-20

    Human metallothionein-3 (hMT3), first isolated and identified as a neuronal growth inhibitory factor (GIF), is a metalloprotein expressed predominantly in brain. However, untill now, the exact mechanism of the bioactivity of hMT3 is still unknown. In order to study the influence of acid-base catalysis on S-nitrosylation of hMT3, we constructed the E23K mutant of hMT3. During the course of bioassay, we found out unexpectedly that mutation at E23 of hMT3 eliminates the neuronal growth inhibitory activity completely. To the best of our knowledge, it is First report that other residues, besides the TCPCP motif, in the {beta}-domain can alter the bioactivity of hMT3. In order to figure out the causes for the loss of bioactivity of the E23K mutant, the biochemical properties were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy, pH titration, DTNB reaction, EDTA reaction, and SNOC reaction. All data demonstrated that stability of the metal-thiolate cluster and overall structure of the E23K mutant were not altered too much. However, the reaction of the E23K mutant with SNOC exhibited biphasic kinetics and the mutant protein released zinc ions much faster than hMT3 in the initial step, while hMT3 exhibited single kinetic process. The 2D [{sup 1}H-{sup 15}N] HSQC was also employed to characterize structural changes during the reaction of hMT3 with varying mounts of nitric oxide. It was shown that the resonance of Glu23 disappeared at a molar ratio of NO to protein of 4. Based on these results, we suggest that mutation at Glu23 may alter the NO metabolism and/or affect zinc homeostasis in brain, thus altering the neuronal growth inhibitory activity.

  11. Growth inhibitory effect of shelf life extending agents on Bacillus subtilis IAM 1026.

    PubMed

    Mitsuboshi, Saori; Obitsu, Rie; Muramatsu, Kanako; Furube, Kentaro; Yoshitake, Shigehiro; Kiuchi, Kan

    2007-06-01

    Natural shelf life extending agents and sugar fatty acid esters that might inhibit the growth of B. subtilis IAM 1026 were screened, and the effective agents were as follows: beta-thujaplicin (Hinokitiol) and chitosan, inhibited the growth of IAM 1026 at a concentration of 0.001% ; epsilon-polylysine and M-1695 (a sugar fatty acid ester) at 0.005%; citrus seed extract, thiamin lauryl sulfate, and grapefruit seed extract at 0.01%; CT-1695 and L-1695 (sugar fatty acid esters) at 0.05%; pectin digests and SM-800 (a sugar fatty acid ester) at 0.5%; water pepper seed extract and the sugar fatty acid esters SM-1000 and CE-1695 at 1.0%. The growth inhibitory effects of the agents in custard cream were not necessarily similar to those in liquid culture. The agent that showed the highest inhibitory effect in custard cream was 0.3% beta-thujaplicin, followed by 0.3% epsilon-polylysine.

  12. Inhibitory Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Aspartyl Protease Inhibitors against Encephalitozoon intestinalis Evaluated by Cell Culture-Quantitative PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Menotti, Jean; Santillana-Hayat, Maud; Cassinat, Bruno; Sarfati, Claudine; Derouin, Francis; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Immune reconstitution might not be the only factor contributing to the low prevalence of microsporidiosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients treated with protease inhibitors, as these drugs may exert a direct inhibitory effect against fungi and protozoa. In this study, we developed a cell culture-quantitative PCR assay to quantify Encephalitozoon intestinalis growth in U-373-MG human glioblastoma cells and used this assay to evaluate the activities of six HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors against E. intestinalis. A real-time quantitative PCR assay targeted the E. intestinalis small-subunit rRNA gene. HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors were tested over serial concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 10 mg/liter, with albendazole used as a control. Ritonavir, lopinavir, and saquinavir were able to inhibit E. intestinalis growth, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 1.5, 2.2, and 4.6 mg/liter, respectively, whereas amprenavir, indinavir, and nelfinavir had no inhibitory effect. Pepstatin A, a reference aspartyl protease inhibitor, could also inhibit E. intestinalis growth, suggesting that HIV protease inhibitors may act through the inhibition of an E. intestinalis-encoded aspartyl protease. These results showed that some HIV protease inhibitors can inhibit E. intestinalis growth at concentrations that are achievable in vivo and that the real-time quantitative PCR assay that we used is a valuable tool for the in vitro assessment of the activities of drugs against E. intestinalis. PMID:15917534

  13. Cbln1 downregulates the formation and function of inhibitory synapses in mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Kakegawa, Wataru; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Miura, Eriko; Okabe, Shigeo; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2014-04-01

    The formation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses must be tightly coordinated to establish functional neuronal circuitry during development. In the cerebellum, the formation of excitatory synapses between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells is strongly induced by Cbln1, which is released from parallel fibers and binds to the postsynaptic δ2 glutamate receptor (GluD2). However, Cbln1's role, if any, in inhibitory synapse formation has been unknown. Here, we show that Cbln1 downregulates the formation and function of inhibitory synapses between Purkinje cells and interneurons. Immunohistochemical analyses with an anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibody revealed an increased density of interneuron-Purkinje cell synapses in the cbln1-null cerebellum. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from Purkinje cells showed that both the amplitude and frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents were increased in cbln1-null cerebellar slices. A 3-h incubation with recombinant Cbln1 reversed the increased amplitude of inhibitory currents in Purkinje cells in acutely prepared cbln1-null slices. Furthermore, an 8-day incubation with recombinant Cbln1 reversed the increased interneuron-Purkinje cell synapse density in cultured cbln1-null slices. In contrast, recombinant Cbln1 did not affect cerebellar slices from mice lacking both Cbln1 and GluD2. Finally, we found that tyrosine phosphorylation was upregulated in the cbln1-null cerebellum, and acute inhibition of Src-family kinases suppressed the increased inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cbln1-null Purkinje cells. These findings indicate that Cbln1-GluD2 signaling inhibits the number and function of inhibitory synapses, and shifts the excitatory-inhibitory balance towards excitation in Purkinje cells. Cbln1's effect on inhibitory synaptic transmission is probably mediated by a tyrosine kinase pathway.

  14. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion.

  15. Effect of a dominant inhibitory Ha-ras mutation on neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Szeberényi, J; Cai, H; Cooper, G M

    1990-01-01

    A dominant inhibitory mutation of Ha-ras which changes Ser-17 to Asn-17 in the gene product p21 [p21 (Asn-17)Ha-ras] has been used to investigate the role of ras in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells. The growth of PC12 cells, in contrast to NIH 3T3 cells, was not inhibited by p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras expression. However, PC12 cells expressing the mutant Ha-ras protein showed a marked inhibition of morphological differentiation induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF). These cells, however, were still able to respond with neurite outgrowth to dibutyryl cyclic AMP and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Induction of early-response genes (fos, jun, and zif268) by NGF and FGF but not by TPA was also inhibited by high levels of p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. However, lower levels of p21(Asn-17) expression were sufficient to block neuronal differentiation without inhibiting induction of these early-response genes. Induction of the secondary-response genes SCG10 and transin by NGF, like morphological differentiation, was inhibited by low levels of p21(Asn-17) whether or not induction of early-response genes was blocked. Therefore, although inhibition of ras function can inhibit early-response gene induction, this is not required to block morphological differentiation or secondary-response gene expression. These results suggest that ras proteins are involved in at least two different pathways of signal transduction from the NGF receptor, which can be distinguished by differential sensitivity to p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. In addition, ras and protein kinase C can apparently induce early-response gene expression by independent pathways in PC12 cells. Images PMID:2118994

  16. Inhibitory effects of novel SphK2 inhibitors on migration of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deokho; Jung, Junghyun; Lee, Euiyeon; Mok, Chang Soo; Jeon, Hyunjin; Park, Chang Seo; Jang, Wonhee; Kwon, Youngeun

    2017-02-13

    Cell migration is an essential process for survival and differentiation of mammalian cells. Numerous diseases are induced or influenced by inappropriate regulation of cell migration, which plays a key role in cancer cell metastasis. In fact, very few anti-metastasis drugs are available on the market. SphKs are enzymes that convert sphingosine to sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P) and are known to control various cellular functions, including migration of cells. Among two human isozymes of SphK2, SphK2 is known to promote apoptosis, suppresses cell growth, and controls cell migration; in addition, the specific ablation of SphK2 activity was reported to inhibit cancer cell metastasis. The previously identified SG12 and SG14 are synthetic analogs of sphingoid, natural inhibitors of SphKs, and can specifically inhibit the functions of SphK2. In this paper, we investigated how SG12 and SG14 affect cell migration by monitoring both cumulative and individual cell migration behavior using HeLa cells. SG12 and SG14 mutually showed stronger inhibitory effects with less cytotoxicity compared with a general SphK inhibitor, N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS). The mechanistic aspects of specific SphK2 inhibition were studied by examining actin filamentation as well as the expression levels of motility-related genes. The data revealed that SG12 and SG14 resemble DMS in decreasing overall cell motility, but differ in that they differentially affect motility parameters and motility-related signal transduction pathways and therefore actin polymerization, which are not altered by DMS. Our findings show that SphK2 inhibitors are putative candidates for anti-metastatic drugs.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of phycocyanin inhibitory effects on SKOV-3 cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Wang, Jian; Ji, Huijuan; Lin, Chaoqing; Pan, Ruowang; Zhou, Li; Song, Yulong; Zhang, Enyong; Ren, Ping; Chen, Jishun; Liu, Qian; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Jinsong; Bao, Qiyu; Hu, Yunliang; Li, Peizhen

    2016-07-01

    Phycocyanin (PC) from Spirulina platensis has inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth. In this research, the transcriptome study was designed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of PC inhibition on human ovarian cancer cell SKOV-3 proliferation. The PC IC50 was 216.6μM and 163.8μM for 24h and 48h exposure, respectively, as determined by CCK-8 assay. The morphological changes of SKOV-3 cells after PC exposure were recorded using HE staining. Cells arrested in G2/M stages as determined by flow cytometry. The transcriptome analysis showed that 2031 genes (with > three-fold differences) were differentially expressed between the untreated and the PC-treated cells, including 1065 up-regulated and 966 down-regulated genes. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analysis identified 18 classical pathways that were remarkably enriched, such as neurotrophin signaling pathway, VEGF signaling pathway and P53 signaling pathway. qPCR results further showed that PTPN12, S100A2, RPL26, and LAMA3 increased while HNRNPA1P10 decreased in PC-treated cells. Molecules and genes in those pathways may be potential targets to develop treatments for ovarian cancer.

  18. [Inhibitory effects of Lantana camera and its contained phenolic compounds in Eichhornia crassipes growth].

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhen; Zhang, Maoxin; Ling, Bing; Xu, Di; Ye, Jingzhong

    2006-09-01

    This paper studied the effects of Lantana camera fresh leaves aqueous extract and its contained phenolic compounds on the growth and physiologic-biochemical indexes of Eichhornia crassipes. The results showed that this extract had obvious inhibitory effects on the growth and development of E. crassipes. When the concentration was higher than 30 g FW x L(-1), it could kill E. crassipes after 6 days treatment. A total of seven phenolic compounds in the abstract were identified by HPLC, which were salicylic acid, gentisic acid, beta-resorcylic acid , coumarin, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 6-methyl coumarin, with the concentrations being, 50.95, 13.46, 5.28, 3.36, 2.92, 2.19 and 0.34 mg x L(-1), respectively. The mixture of the seven compounds had the strongest inhibitory effect, followed by salicylic acid, 6-methyl coumarin, coumarin, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid, while the effects of beta-resorcylic acid and gentisic acid were not significant.

  19. In vitro inhibitory effect of tetrahydrocurcuminoids on Fusarium proliferatum growth and fumonisin B₁ biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Coma, Véronique; Portes, Elise; Gardrat, Christian; Richard-Forget, Florence; Castellan, Alain

    2011-02-01

    Many plant pathogens produce toxic metabolites when growing on food and feed. Some antioxidative components seem to prevent fungal growth and mycotoxin formation. Recently, we synthesized a new class of powerful antioxidative compounds, i.e. tetrahydrocurcuminoids, and its structure/antioxidant activity relationships have been established. The South West of France produces large amounts of corn, which can be infected by Fusarium species, particularly F. proliferatum. In this context, the efficiency of tetrahydrocurcuminoids, which can be obtained from natural curcuminoids, was investigated to control in vitro the growth of F. proliferatum and the production of its associated mycotoxin, fumonisin B₁. The relation between structure and antifungal activity was studied. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC1), with two guaiacyl phenolic subunits, showed the highest inhibitory activity (measured as radial growth on agar medium) against the F. proliferatum development (67% inhibition at a concentration of 13.6 µmol ml⁻¹). The efficiencies of THC2 (36% at a concentration of 11.5 µmol ml⁻¹), which contains syringyl phenolic units, and THC3 (30% at a concentration of 13.6 µmol ml⁻¹), which does not have any substituent on the aromatic rings, were relatively close. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of guaiacyl phenols and the enolic function of the β-diketone moiety play an important role in the inhibition mechanisms. The importance of this combination was confirmed using n-propylguaiacol and acetylacetone as molecular models. Under the same conditions, ferulic acid and eugenol, other natural phenolic antioxidants, were less efficient in inhibiting fungal growth. THC1 also reduced fumonisin B₁ production in liquid medium by approximately 35, 50 and 75% at concentrations of 0.8, 1.3, and 1.9 µmol ml⁻¹, respectively. These very low inhibitory concentrations show that tetrahydrocurcuminoids could be one of the most promising biobased molecules for the

  20. Toll-like receptor 9 expression is associated with breast cancer sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of bisphosphonates in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Ishizu, Tamiko; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Clark, Jeremy; Härkönen, Pirkko; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Schrey, Aleksi; Harris, Kevin W.; Tuomela, Johanna M.; Selander, Katri S.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are standard treatments for bone metastases. When given in the adjuvant setting, they reduce breast cancer mortality and recurrence in bone but only among post-menopausal patients. Optimal drug use would require biomarker-based patient selection. Such biomarkers are not yet in clinical use. Based on the similarities in inflammatory responses to bisphosphonates and Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, we hypothesized that TLR9 expression may affect bisphosphonate responses in cells. We compared bisphosphonate effects in breast cancer cell lines with low or high TLR9 expression. We discovered that cells with decreased TLR9 expression are significantly more sensitive to the growth-inhibitory effects of bisphosphonates in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, cancer growth-promoting effects seen with some bisphosphonates in some control shRNA cells were not detected in TLR9 shRNA cells. These differences were not associated with inhibition of Rap1A prenylation or p38 phosphorylation, which are known markers for bisphosphonate activity. However, TLR9 shRNA cells exhibited increased sensitivity to ApppI, a metabolite that accumulates in cells after bisphosphonate treatment. We conclude that decreased TLR9-expression sensitizes breast cancer cells to the growth inhibitory effects of bisphosphonates. Our results suggest that TLR9 should be studied as a potential biomarker for adjuvant bisphosphonate sensitivity among breast cancer patients. PMID:27888633

  1. Recruitment of an inhibitory hippocampal network after bursting in a single granule cell.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Gähwiler, Beat H; Gerber, Urs

    2007-05-01

    The hippocampal CA3 area, an associational network implicated in memory function, receives monosynaptic excitatory as well as disynaptic inhibitory input through the mossy-fiber axons of the dentate granule cells. Synapses made by mossy fibers exhibit low release probability, resulting in high failure rates at resting discharge frequencies of 0.1 Hz. In recordings from functionally connected pairs of neurons, burst firing of a granule cell increased the probability of glutamate release onto both CA3 pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, such that subsequent low-frequency stimulation evoked biphasic excitatory/inhibitory responses in a CA3 pyramidal cell, an effect lasting for minutes. Analysis of the unitary connections in the circuit revealed that granule cell bursting caused powerful activation of an inhibitory network, thereby transiently suppressing excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal cells. This phenomenon reflects the high incidence of spike-to-spike transmission at granule cell to interneuron synapses, the numerically much greater targeting by mossy fibers of inhibitory interneurons versus principal cells, and the extensively divergent output of interneurons targeting CA3 pyramidal cells. Thus, mossy-fiber input to CA3 pyramidal cells appears to function in three distinct modes: a resting mode, in which synaptic transmission is ineffectual because of high failure rates; a bursting mode, in which excitation predominates; and a postbursting mode, in which inhibitory input to the CA3 pyramidal cells is greatly enhanced. A mechanism allowing the transient recruitment of inhibitory input may be important for controlling network activity in the highly interconnected CA3 pyramidal cell region.

  2. Feeding deterrent and growth inhibitory activities of PONNEEM, a newly developed phytopesticidal formulation against Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner)

    PubMed Central

    Packiam, Soosaimanickam Maria; Baskar, Kathirvelu; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feeding deterrent, growth inhibitory and egg hatchability effects of PONNEEM on Helicoverpa armigera (H. armigera). Methods Five oil formulations were prepared at different ratios to assess the feeding deterrent, growth inhibitory and egg hatchability effects on H. armigera. Results Invariably all the newly formulated phytopesticidal oil formulations showed the feeding deterrent and growth inhibitory activities against H. armigera. The maximum feeding deterrent activity of 88.44% was observed at 15 µL/L concentration of PONNEEM followed by formulation A (74.54%). PONNEEM was found to be effective in growth inhibitory activities and egg hatchability at 10 µL/L concentration. It exhibited statistically significant feeding deterrent activity and growth inhibitory activity compared with all the other treatments. Conclusions PONNEEM was found to be effective phytopesticidal formulation to control the larval stage of H. armigera. This is the first report for the feeding deterrent activity of PONNEEM against H. armigera. This newly formulated phytopesticide was patented in India. PMID:25183105

  3. HLA and NK cell inhibitory receptor genes in resolving hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Khakoo, Salim I; Thio, Chloe L; Martin, Maureen P; Brooks, Collin R; Gao, Xiaojiang; Astemborski, Jacquie; Cheng, Jie; Goedert, James J; Vlahov, David; Hilgartner, Margaret; Cox, Steven; Little, Ann-Margeret; Alexander, Graeme J; Cramp, Matthew E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Rosenberg, William M C; Thomas, David L; Carrington, Mary

    2004-08-06

    Natural killer (NK) cells provide a central defense against viral infection by using inhibitory and activation receptors for major histocompatibility complex class I molecules as a means of controlling their activity. We show that genes encoding the inhibitory NK cell receptor KIR2DL3 and its human leukocyte antigen C group 1 (HLA-C1) ligand directly influence resolution of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This effect was observed in Caucasians and African Americans with expected low infectious doses of HCV but not in those with high-dose exposure, in whom the innate immune response is likely overwhelmed. The data strongly suggest that inhibitory NK cell interactions are important in determining antiviral immunity and that diminished inhibitory responses confer protection against HCV.

  4. Maturation of the inhibitory response of growth hormone secretion to ether stress in postnatal rat.

    PubMed

    Strbák, V; Jurcovicová, J; Vigas, M

    1985-05-01

    To study the maturation of inhibitory influences on growth hormone (GH) secretion the effect of ether stress on plasma GH levels was studied during postnatal ontogenesis in female rats. Ether stress did not affect plasma GH levels in 1-day-old pups. A distinct decrease of plasma GH was found in 3- and 9-day-old pups, and the response was prevented by treatment of 3-day-old animals with somatostatin antiserum. No effect of ether stress on plasma GH was noted in 12-, 15-, 18- and 21-day-old rats. Treatment of intact 12-day-old pups with the somatostatin antiserum increased plasma GH level under basal conditions. The inhibitory effect of ether stress on plasma GH was noted again at the age 30 days and in adult animals. It is concluded that the hypothalamus of 3-day-old rats is able to release enough somatostatin to inhibit GH secretion after stress. At the period 12-18 days a phase of pituitary refractoriness was noted: ether stress as well as TRH injection (our previous observation) fail to affect plasma GH in female pups, probably due to high somatostatin secretion under basal conditions and (or) low capacity of pituitary to release GH. It is suggested that regulation of GH secretion is not mature until after the 21st day of life.

  5. Interneuron- and GABAA receptor-specific inhibitory synaptic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qionger; Duguid, Ian; Clark, Beverley; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Patel, Bijal; Thomas, Philip; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitory synaptic plasticity is important for shaping both neuronal excitability and network activity. Here we investigate the input and GABAA receptor subunit specificity of inhibitory synaptic plasticity by studying cerebellar interneuron-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses. Depolarizing PCs initiated a long-lasting increase in GABA-mediated synaptic currents. By stimulating individual interneurons, this plasticity was observed at somatodendritic basket cell synapses, but not at distal dendritic stellate cell synapses. Basket cell synapses predominantly express β2-subunit-containing GABAA receptors; deletion of the β2-subunit ablates this plasticity, demonstrating its reliance on GABAA receptor subunit composition. The increase in synaptic currents is dependent upon an increase in newly synthesized cell surface synaptic GABAA receptors and is abolished by preventing CaMKII phosphorylation of GABAA receptors. Our results reveal a novel GABAA receptor subunit- and input-specific form of inhibitory synaptic plasticity that regulates the temporal firing pattern of the principal output cells of the cerebellum.

  6. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL(-1) levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL(-1) ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL(-1) .

  7. Adhesion and growth inhibitory effect of chicken egg yolk antibody (IgY) on Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chalghoumi, Raja; Théwis, André; Beckers, Yves; Marcq, Christopher; Portetelle, Daniel; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2009-06-01

    The protective effects of powder preparation of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY), specific to Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium outer membrane proteins (OMP), against these two Salmonella sp. serovars were investigated in vitro in two different assays: adhesion-prevention and growth-inhibition. The adhesion-prevention assay was conducted using polarized monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell line. First, the conditions of Salmonella adherence to Caco-2 cells were optimized, and interferences of bacteria with the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of fully differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers and the lactate dehydrogenase release upon exposure of the cells to Salmonella were evaluated. Both Salmonella sp. serovars were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells and decreased TER. Results from the adhesion-prevention assay demonstrated that specific IgY reduced the decrease in TER of the infected Caco-2 cell monolayers and blocked the Salmonella sp. adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Nonspecific IgY also exhibited an inhibitory effect on these two parameters, but to a lesser extent than that of the specific IgY (p < 0.05). The protective effect of nonspecific IgY could be attributed to the low-density lipoprotein component of the water-soluble fraction of egg yolks that may not have been eliminated during ultrafiltration. The growth-inhibition assay revealed that specific IgY had an inhibitory effect on the bacterial growth, markedly during the late exponential phase, whereas nonspecific IgY failed to do so. Taken together, these results suggest that the in vitro growth inhibitory effect of specific IgY on Salmonella spp. resulted from the specific binding activity of these IgY to Salmonella sp. OMP. Passive immunization with Salmonella sp. OMP-specific IgY could thus be useful to prevent Salmonella colonization in broiler chickens and the subsequent carcass contamination during processing.

  8. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus fermentum on microbial growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Rybalchenko, Oxana V; Bondarenko, Viktor M; Orlova, Olga G; Markov, Alexander G; Amasheh, S

    2015-10-01

    Beneficial effects of Lactobacilli have been reported, and lactic bacteria are employed for conservation of foods. Therefore, the effects of a Lactobacillus fermentum strain were analyzed regarding inhibitory effects on staphylococci, Candida albicans and enterotoxigenic enterobacteria by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM of bacterial biofilms was performed using cocultures of bacteriocin-producing L. fermentum 97 with different enterotoxigenic strains: Staphylococcus epidermidis expressing the ica gene responsible for biofilm formation, Staphylococcus aureus producing enterotoxin type A, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloaceae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Proteus mirabilis producing thermolabile and thermostable enterotoxins determined by elt or est genes, and Candida albicans. L. fermentum 97 changed morphological features and suppressed biofilm formation of staphylococci, enterotoxigenic enterobacteria and Candida albicans; a marked transition to resting states, a degradation of the cell walls and cytoplasm, and a disruption of mature bacterial biofilms were observed, the latter indicating efficiency even in the phase of higher cell density.

  9. Unusual target selectivity of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Buzsáki, G; Freund, T F

    2000-09-15

    Perisomatic inhibitory innervation of all neuron types profoundly affects their firing characteristics and vulnerability. In this study we examined the postsynaptic targets of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus where the proportion of potential target cells (excitatory mossy cells and inhibitory interneurons) is approximately equal. Both cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket cells formed multiple contacts on the somata and proximal dendrites of mossy cells. Unexpectedly, however, perisomatic inhibitory terminals arriving from these cell types largely ignored hilar GABAergic cell populations. Eighty-ninety percent of various GABAergic neurons including other CCK-containing basket cells received no input from CCK-positive terminals. Parvalbumin-containing cells sometimes innervated each other but avoided 75% of other GABAergic cells. Overall, a single mossy cell received 40 times more CCK-immunoreactive terminals and 15 times more parvalbumin-positive terminals onto its soma than the cell body of an average hilar GABAergic cell. In contrast to the pronounced target selectivity in the hilar region, CCK- and parvalbumin-positive neurons innervated each other via collaterals in stratum granulosum and moleculare. Our observations indicate that the inhibitory control in the hilar region is qualitatively different from other cortical areas at both the network level and the level of single neurons. The paucity of perisomatic innervation of hilar interneurons should have profound consequences on their action potential generation and on their ensemble behavior. These findings may help explain the unique physiological patterns observed in the hilus and the selective vulnerability of the hilar cell population in various pathophysiological conditions.

  10. A novel inhibitory nucleo-cortical circuit controls cerebellar Golgi cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Lea; Husson, Zoé; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Proville, Rémi; Léna, Clément; Yarom, Yosef; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Uusisaari, Marylka Yoe

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum, a crucial center for motor coordination, is composed of a cortex and several nuclei. The main mode of interaction between these two parts is considered to be formed by the inhibitory control of the nuclei by cortical Purkinje neurons. We now amend this view by showing that inhibitory GABA-glycinergic neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN) project profusely into the cerebellar cortex, where they make synaptic contacts on a GABAergic subpopulation of cerebellar Golgi cells. These spontaneously firing Golgi cells are inhibited by optogenetic activation of the inhibitory nucleo-cortical fibers both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the CN may contribute to the functional recruitment of the cerebellar cortex by decreasing Golgi cell inhibition onto granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06262.001 PMID:25965178

  11. A study on the inhibitory effect of polysaccharides from Radix ranunculus ternati on human breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sun, De-Li; Xie, Han-Bing; Xia, Yun-Zhan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the in vitro anti-breast cancer activity of polysaccharides from Radix ranunculus ternati. Different concentrations of polysaccharide extracts were selected, and MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to investigate their growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects on human breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines. Radix ranunculus ternati polysaccharides had varying degrees of effects on the growth of human breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines, and the differences were significant compared with the blank control group. FCM showed that the polysaccharides can induce apoptosis. In addition, it can also enhance NK cell activity. Radix ranunculus ternati polysaccharides have a relatively good in-vitro anti-breast cancer activity.

  12. Secondary metabolites from Glycine soja and their growth inhibitory effect against Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Ying; Luo, Shi-Hong; Yi, Ting-Shuang; Li, Chun-Huan; Luo, Qian; Hua, Juan; Liu, Yan; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2011-06-08

    The wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc) has been reported to be relatively resistant to insect and pathogenic pests. However, the responsible secondary metabolites in the aerial part of this important plant are largely unknown. From the aerial part of G. soja, 13 compounds were isolated and identified, including seven isoflavonoids (1-7), a cyclitol (8), two sterol derivatives (9 and 10), and three triterpenoids (11-13). Compound 7 is a new isoflavonoid, and compounds 9 and 10 are reported as natural products for the first time. The growth inhibitory activity of 1, 3, 4, and 8 against the larvae of Spodoptera litura was investigated. The most abundant isoflavonoid in the aerial part of G. soja, daidzein (1), which could not be metabolized by S. litura, was found to inhibit the insect larvae growth significantly in 3 days after feeding diets containing the compound. Compounds 3, 4, and 8, which could be partially or completely metabolized, were inactive. Our results suggested that the isoflavonoid daidzein (1) might function as a constitutive defense component in G. soja against insect pests.

  13. Regio- and stereoselective synthesis of pregnane-fused isoxazolines by nitril-oxide/alkene 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and an evaluation of their cell-growth inhibitory effect in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mótyán, Gergő; Baji, Ádám; Zupkó, István; Frank, Éva

    2016-04-01

    Efficient syntheses of some pregnane-fused isoxazolines from 16-dehydropregnenolone acetate with different arylnitrile oxides were carried out by 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. The intermolecular ring-closures occurred in a highly regio- and stereoselective manner permitting the formation of a single 16α,17α-condensed diastereomer in which the O terminus of the nitrile oxide dipole is attached to C-17 of the sterane core. The conversions were found to be affected significantly by the electronic character of the substituents on the aromatic moiety of the 1,3-dipoles. Deacetylation of the primary products resulted in the corresponding 3β-OH analogs. All of the synthesized compounds were subjected to in vitro pharmacological studies for the determination of their antiproliferative effects on four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361).

  14. Exploring the inhibitory effect of membrane tension on cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Gen; Ouyang, Qi; Wang, Yugang; Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Cell polarization toward an attractant is influenced by both physical and chemical factors. Most existing mathematical models are based on reaction-diffusion systems and only focus on the chemical process occurring during cell polarization. However, membrane tension has been shown to act as a long-range inhibitor of cell polarization. Here, we present a cell polarization model incorporating the interplay between Rac GTPase, filamentous actin (F-actin), and cell membrane tension. We further test the predictions of this model by performing single cell measurements of the spontaneous polarization of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), as the former have lower cell membrane tension. Based on both our model and the experimental results, cell polarization is more sensitive to stimuli under low membrane tension, and high membrane tension improves the robustness and stability of cell polarization such that polarization persists under random perturbations. Furthermore, our simulations are the first to recapitulate the experimental results described by Houk et al., revealing that aspiration (elevation of tension) and release (reduction of tension) result in a decrease in and recovery of the activity of Rac-GTP, respectively, and that the relaxation of tension induces new polarity of the cell body when a cell with the pseudopod-neck-body morphology is severed. PMID:28135277

  15. Proliferative and Inhibitory Activity of Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) Extract on Cancer Cell Lines; A-549, XWLC-05, HCT-116, CNE and Beas-2b.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo; Yao, Qian; Dowell, Ashley; Leury, Brian; He, Xiao-Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is used primarily as an adaptogen herb and also for its immune stimulant properties in Western herbal medicine. Another closely related species used in East Asian medicine systems i.e. Kampo, TCM (Manchuria, Korea, Japan and Ainu of Hokkaido) and also called Siberian ginseng (Acanthopanax senticosus) also displays immune-stimulant and anti-cancer properties. These may affect tumour growth and also provide an anti-fatigue effect for cancer patients, in particular for those suffering from lung cancer. There is some evidence that a carbohydrate in Siberian ginseng may possess not only immune stimulatory but also anti-tumour effects and also display other various anti-cancer properties. Our study aimed to determine the inhibitory and also proliferative effects of a methanol plant extract of Siberan ginseng (E. senticosus) on various cancer and normal cell lines including: A-549 (small cell lung cancer), XWLC-05 (Yunnan lung cancer cell line), CNE (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line), HCT-116 (human colon cancer) and Beas-2b (human lung epithelial). These cell lines were treated with an extract from E. senticosus that was evaporated and re- constituted in DMSO. Treatment of A-549 (small cell lung cancer) cells with E. senticosus methanolic extract showed a concentration-dependent inhibitory trend from 12.5 - 50μg/mL, and then a plateau, whereas at 12.5 and 25 μg/mL, there is a slight growth suppression in QBC-939 cells, but then a steady suppression from 50, 100 and 200μg/mL. Further, in XWLC-05 (Yunnan lung cancer cell line), E. senticosus methanolic extract displayed an inhibitory effect which plateaued with increasing dosage. Next, in CNE (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line) there was a dose dependent proliferative response, whereas in Beas-2 (human lung epithelial cell line), an inhibitory effect. Finally in colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) we observed an initially weak inhibitory effect and then plateau.

  16. A balance between B cell receptor and inhibitory receptor signaling controls plasma cell differentiation by maintaining optimal Ets1 levels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Mayeux, Jessica; Gutierrez, Toni; Russell, Lisa; Getahun, Andrew; Müller, Jennifer; Tedder, Thomas; Parnes, Jane; Rickert, Robert; Nitschke, Lars; Cambier, John; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann

    2014-07-15

    Signaling through the BCR can drive B cell activation and contribute to B cell differentiation into Ab-secreting plasma cells. The positive BCR signal is counterbalanced by a number of membrane-localized inhibitory receptors that limit B cell activation and plasma cell differentiation. Deficiencies in these negative signaling pathways may cause autoantibody generation and autoimmune disease in both animal models and human patients. We have previously shown that the transcription factor Ets1 can restrain B cell differentiation into plasma cells. In this study, we tested the roles of the BCR and inhibitory receptors in controlling the expression of Ets1 in mouse B cells. We found that Ets1 is downregulated in B cells by BCR or TLR signaling through a pathway dependent on PI3K, Btk, IKK2, and JNK. Deficiencies in inhibitory pathways, such as a loss of the tyrosine kinase Lyn, the phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP1) or membrane receptors CD22 and/or Siglec-G, result in enhanced BCR signaling and decreased Ets1 expression. Restoring Ets1 expression in Lyn- or SHP1-deficient B cells inhibits their enhanced plasma cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that downregulation of Ets1 occurs in response to B cell activation via either BCR or TLR signaling, thereby allowing B cell differentiation and that the maintenance of Ets1 expression is an important function of the inhibitory Lyn → CD22/SiglecG → SHP1 pathway in B cells.

  17. Inhibition of breast cancer cell motility with a non-cyclooxygenase inhibitory derivative of sulindac by suppressing TGFβ/miR-21 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bin; Chang, Hong; Ma, Ruixia; Feng, Xiangling; Li, Wei; Piazza, Gary A; Xi, Yaguang

    2016-02-16

    Compelling efficacy on intervention of tumorigenesis by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been documented intensively. However, the toxicities related to cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition resulting in suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limit their clinical use for human cancer chemoprevention. A novel derivative of the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS), referred as sulindac sulfide amide (SSA), was recently developed, which lacks COX inhibitory activity, yet shows greater suppressive effect than SS on growth of various cancer cells. In this study, we focus on the inhibitory activity of SSA on breast tumor cell motility, which has not been studied previously. Our results show that SSA treatment at non-cytotoxic concentrations can specifically reduce breast tumor cell motility without influencing tumor cell growth, and the mechanism of action involves the suppression of TGFβ signaling by directly blocking Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Moreover, miR-21, a well-documented oncogenic miRNA for promoting tumor cell metastasis, was also found to be involved in inhibitory activity of SSA in breast tumor cell motility through the modulation of TGFβ pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a non-COX inhibitory derivative of sulindac can inhibit breast tumor metastasis by a mechanism involving the TGFβ/miR-21 signaling axis.

  18. Inhibition of breast cancer cell motility with a non-cyclooxygenase inhibitory derivative of sulindac by suppressing TGFβ/miR-21 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ruixia; Feng, Xiangling; Li, Wei; Piazza, Gary A.; Xi, Yaguang

    2016-01-01

    Compelling efficacy on intervention of tumorigenesis by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been documented intensively. However, the toxicities related to cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition resulting in suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limit their clinical use for human cancer chemoprevention. A novel derivative of the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS), referred as sulindac sulfide amide (SSA), was recently developed, which lacks COX inhibitory activity, yet shows greater suppressive effect than SS on growth of various cancer cells. In this study, we focus on the inhibitory activity of SSA on breast tumor cell motility, which has not been studied previously. Our results show that SSA treatment at non-cytotoxic concentrations can specifically reduce breast tumor cell motility without influencing tumor cell growth, and the mechanism of action involves the suppression of TGFβ signaling by directly blocking Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Moreover, miR-21, a well-documented oncogenic miRNA for promoting tumor cell metastasis, was also found to be involved in inhibitory activity of SSA in breast tumor cell motility through the modulation of TGFβ pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a non-COX inhibitory derivative of sulindac can inhibit breast tumor metastasis by a mechanism involving the TGFβ/miR-21 signaling axis. PMID:26769851

  19. Inhibitory effects of 3-bromopyruvate in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xue; Zhang, Mengxiao; Sun, Yiming; Zhao, Surong; Wei, Yingmei; Zhang, Xudong; Jiang, Chenchen; Liu, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cells depend on aerobic glycolysis for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, which is therefore targeted by therapeutic agents. The compound 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a strong alkylating agent and hexokinase inhibitor, inhibits tumor cell glycolysis and the production of ATP, causing apoptosis. 3-BrPA induces apoptosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines HNE1 and CNE-2Z, which may be related to its molecular mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-BrPA on the viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis and other types of programmed cell death in NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. PI staining showed significant apoptosis in NPC cells accompanied by the overproduction of ROS and downregulation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm) by 3-BrPA. However, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly reduced 3-BrPA-induced apoptosis by decreasing ROS and facilitating the recovery of MMP. We elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying 3-BrPA activity and found that it caused mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS production, leading to necroptosis of NPC cells. We investigated the effects of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, which inhibits apoptosis but promotes death domain receptor (DR)-induced NPC cell necrosis. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) inhibits necroptosis, apparently via a DR signaling pathway and thus abrogates the effects of z-VAD‑fmk. In addition, we demonstrated the effective attenuation of 3-BrPA-induced necrotic cell death by Nec-1. Finally, animal studies proved that 3-BrPA exhibited significant antitumor activity in nude mice. The present study is the first demonstration of 3-BrPA-induced non-apoptotic necroptosis and ROS generation in NPC cells and provides potential strategies for developing agents against apoptosis‑resistant cancers.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Arhgap6 on cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Junping; Liu, Yang; Yin, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    Ras homology GTPase activation protein 6 (Arhgap6), as a member of the rhoGAP family of proteins, performs vital functions on the regulation of actin polymerization at the plasma membrane during several cellular processes. The role of Arhgap6 in the progression and development of cancer remains nearly unknown. This study aimed at exploring the effects of Arhgap6 on cervical carcinoma. Human cervical cancer cells HeLa and SiHa were transduced with a lentivirus targeting Arhgap6 (Arhgap6+), while CaSki and C4-1 cells were transfected with miRNA. Cell proliferation was identified by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). Cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis were identified by flow cytometry. The capacity of cell migration, invasion, and adhesion were detected by Transwell assay. Further, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot were used to analyze the expression levels of Arhgap6 and several tumor-related genes. Co-immunoprecipitation assay was performed to validate the interaction between Arhgap6 and Rac3 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 3). Results showed that Arhgap6 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and adhesion of cervical carcinoma, induced cell apoptosis, and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase (n = 3, p < 0.05). Expression of the tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes were up- and down-regulated respectively by Arhgap6, and Rac3 was proved to be the target of Arhgap6. Besides, in in vivo assays, tumor size and weight were destructed in Arhgap6+ athymic nude mouse. This study indicated that Arhgap6 may play a role in the treatment of cervical cancer as a tumor supressor.

  1. Inhibitory Effects of Verrucarin A on Tunicamycin-Induced ER Stress in FaO Rat Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Young; Lee, Seung Woong; Seong, Sin; Cho, Wonjun; Ahn, Jong Seog; Cho, Hyun-Sug

    2015-05-19

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is linked with development and maintenance of cancer, and serves as a therapeutic target for treatment of cancer. Verrucarin A, isolated from the broth of Fusarium sp. F060190, showed potential inhibitory activity on tunicamycin-induced ER stress in FaO rat liver cells. In addition, the compound decreased tunicamycin-induced GRP78 promoter activity in a dose dependent manner without inducing significant inhibition of luciferase activity and cell growth for 6 and 12 h. Moreover, the compound decreased the expression of GRP78, CHOP, XBP-1, and suppressed XBP-1, and reduced phosphorylation of IRE1α in FaO rat liver cells. This evidence suggests for the first time that verrucarin A inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress in FaO rat liver cells.

  2. The inhibitory effects of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan and polysaccharides upon polyclonal and monoclonal human T cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, C; Mehlert, A; Lamb, J

    1988-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was able to inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation of human CD4+ T cell clones specific for influenza virus. The inhibitory effect was also present when peripheral human T cells were stimulated with crude mycobacterial antigen extracts. Non-specific T cell stimulation, i.e. IL-2, PHA and anti-CD3 antibodies coupled to beads, was not affected. The inhibitory property was also found when arabinomannan and arabinogalactan of mycobacterial origin were tested but not with other unrelated polysaccharides used as controls. The effect appears to be related to the processing of the antigen by the antigen-presenting cells, since it was evident when T cell clones were stimulated with whole virus, whereas stimulation with a synthetic peptide containing the relevant epitope was not inhibitable. PMID:3147152

  3. The C/EBPbeta isoform, liver-inhibitory protein (LIP), induces autophagy in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria M; Sealy, Linda

    2010-11-15

    Autophagy is a process involving the bulk degradation of cellular components in the cytoplasm via the lysosomal degradation pathway. Autophagy manifests a protective role in stressful conditions such as nutrient or growth factor depletion; however, extensive degradation of regulatory molecules or organelles essential for survival can lead to the demise of the cell, or autophagy-mediated cell death. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex with roles in both tumor suppression and tumor promotion proposed. Here we report that an isoform of the C/EBPbeta transcription factor, liver-enriched inhibitory protein (LIP), induces cell death in human breast cancer cells and stimulates autophagy. Overexpression of LIP is incompatible with cell growth and when cell cycle analysis was performed, a DNA profile of cells undergoing apoptosis was not observed. Instead, LIP expressing cells appeared to have large autophagic vesicles when examined via electron microscopy. Autophagy was further assessed in LIP expressing cells by monitoring the development of acidic vesicular organelles and conversion of LC3 from the cytoplasmic form to the membrane-bound form. Our work shows that C/EBPbeta isoform, LIP, is another member of the group of transcription factors, including E2F1 and p53, which are capable of playing a role in autophagy.

  4. The C/EBPbeta isoform, liver-inhibitory protein (LIP), induces autophagy in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu, Maria M.; Sealy, Linda

    2010-11-15

    Autophagy is a process involving the bulk degradation of cellular components in the cytoplasm via the lysosomal degradation pathway. Autophagy manifests a protective role in stressful conditions such as nutrient or growth factor depletion; however, extensive degradation of regulatory molecules or organelles essential for survival can lead to the demise of the cell, or autophagy-mediated cell death. The role of autophagy in cancer is complex with roles in both tumor suppression and tumor promotion proposed. Here we report that an isoform of the C/EBPbeta transcription factor, liver-enriched inhibitory protein (LIP), induces cell death in human breast cancer cells and stimulates autophagy. Overexpression of LIP is incompatible with cell growth and when cell cycle analysis was performed, a DNA profile of cells undergoing apoptosis was not observed. Instead, LIP expressing cells appeared to have large autophagic vesicles when examined via electron microscopy. Autophagy was further assessed in LIP expressing cells by monitoring the development of acidic vesicular organelles and conversion of LC3 from the cytoplasmic form to the membrane-bound form. Our work shows that C/EBPbeta isoform, LIP, is another member of the group of transcription factors, including E2F1 and p53, which are capable of playing a role in autophagy.

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Tanshinone IIA on Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Wei; Huang, Yi-Tsau

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-inflammation via inhibition of NF-κB pathways in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is one therapeutic approach to hepatic fibrosis. Tanshinone IIA (C19H18O3, Tan IIA) is a lipophilic diterpene isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, with reported anti-inflammatory activity. We tested whether Tan IIA could inhibit HSC activation. Materials and Methods The cell line of rat hepatic stellate cells (HSC-T6) was stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100 ng/ml). Cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assay. HSC-T6 cells were pretreated with Tan IIA (1, 3 and 10 µM), then induced by LPS (100 ng/ml). NF-κB activity was evaluated by the luciferase reporter gene assay. Western blotting analysis was performed to measure NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38). Cell chemotaxis was assessed by both wound-healing assay and trans-well invasion assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect gene expression in HSC-T6 cells. Results All concentrations of drugs showed no cytotoxicity against HSC-T6 cells. LPS stimulated NF-κB luciferase activities, nuclear translocation of NF-κB-p65, and phosphorylations of ERK, JNK and p38, all of which were suppressed by Tan IIA. In addition, Tan IIA significantly inhibited LPS-induced HSCs chemotaxis, in both wound-healing and trans-well invasion assays. Moreover, Tan IIA attenuated LPS-induced mRNA expressions of CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, ICAM-1, iNOS, and α-SMA in HSC-T6 cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that Tan IIA decreased LPS-induced HSC activation. PMID:25076488

  6. Cytotoxic and growth inhibitory effects of the methanol extract Struchium sparganophora Ktze (Asteraceae) leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ayinde, B. A.; Agbakwuru, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Global research into medicinal plants used in treating tumor-related ailments has become imperative due to the emergence of various forms of cancer diseases. Usually consumed as a vegetable, Struchium sparganophora is indicated in traditional herbal medicine as one of the plants used in treating tumor-related ailments. Materials and Methods: This claim was examined using bench-top assay methods involving the cytotoxicity of the methanol extract of the leaves to tadpoles of Raniceps ranninus at 10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/ml. Also, the growth inhibitory effects of the extract on guinea corn radicle at 0.5, 1.0, 2 and 4 mg/ml in addition to evaluation of the phytochemical constituents of the leaves was performed. After 24 h, the crude extract and the chloroform fraction produced the highest cytotoxicity of 96.67 ± 4.71%, each at a concentration of 80 μg/ml, while the aqueous fraction produced 100% cytotoxicity at a concentration of 20 μg/ml. Results: The crude extract had an LC50 of 26 μg/ml, the chloroform fraction had 6.25 while the aqueous fraction had 5 μg/ml. On the inhibition of the guinea corn radicle growth, after 96 h, the controls had an average length of 67.81 ± 2.6 mm, whereas the seeds treated with 4 mg/ml of the crude extract had an average length of 35.83 ±1.75 mm, indicating 47.81% reduction in length. At the same concentration, the chloroform and the aqueous fractions showed 32.51 and 43.81% inhibitions. The plant material was observed to contain alkaloids, tannins, saponins and flavonoids, with no traces of anthracene derivatives. Conclusion: The results suggest the probable use of the plant in preparing recipes for tumor-related ailments. PMID:21120031

  7. Inhibitory role of ERβ on anterior pituitary cell proliferation by controlling the expression of proteins related to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Pablo A; Petiti, Juan P; Wagner, Ignacio A; Sabatino, Maria E; Sasso, Corina V; De Paul, Ana L; Torres, Alicia I; Gutiérrez, Silvina

    2015-11-05

    Considering that the role of ERβ in the growth of pituitary cells is not well known, the aim of this work was to determine the expression of ERβ in normal and tumoral cells and to investigate its implications in the proliferative control of this endocrine gland, by analyzing the participation of cyclin D1, Cdk4 and p21. Our results showed that the expression of ERβ decreased during pituitary tumoral development induced by chronic E2 stimulation. The 20 ± 1.6% of normal adenohypophyseal cells expressed ERβ, with this protein being reduced in the hyperplastic/adenomatous pituitary: at 20 days the ERβ+ population was 10.7 ± 2.2%, while after 40 and 60 days of treatment an almost complete loss in the ERβ expression was observed (40 d: 1 ± 0.6%; 60 d: 2 ± 0.6%). The ERα/β ratio increased starting from tumors at 40 days, mainly due to the loss of ERβ expression. The cell proliferation was analyzed in normal and hyperplastic pituitary and also in GH3β- and GH3β+ which contained different levels of ERβ expression, and therefore different ERα/β ratios. The over-expression of ERβ inhibited the GH3 cell proliferation and expression of cyclin D1 and ERα. Also, the ERβ activation by its agonist DPN changed the subcellular localization of p21, inducing an increase in the p21 nuclear expression, where it acts as a tumoral suppressor. These results show that ERβ exerts an inhibitory role on pituitary cell proliferation, and that this effect may be partially due to the modulation of some key regulators of the cell cycle, such as cyclin D1 and p21. These data contribute significantly to the understanding of the ER effects in the proliferative control of pituitary gland, specifically related to the ERβ function in the E2 actions on this endocrine gland.

  8. Inhibitory effects of whisky congeners on melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ohguchi, Kenji; Koike, Minako; Suwa, Yoshihide; Koshimizu, Seiichi; Mizutani, Yuki; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Akao, Yukihiro

    2008-04-01

    We examined the effect of whisky congeners, substances other than ethanol in whisky, on melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells. Treatment with whisky congeners significantly blocked melanogenesis. Our results indicate that the inhibitory effects of whisky congeners on melanogenesis is due to direct inhibition of tyrosinase activity and to suppression of tyrosinase protein levels.

  9. Amygdalin inhibits the growth of renal cell carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Thomas, Anita; Rutz, Jochen; Makarevic, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-01

    Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is a lack of information on the efficacy and toxicity of this natural compound. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amygdalin on the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells was examined. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to the RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, for 24 h or 2 weeks. Untreated cells served as controls. Tumor cell growth and proliferation were determined using MTT and BrdU tests, and cell cycle phases were evaluated. Expression of the cell cycle activating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1 and D3 as well as of the cell cycle inhibiting proteins p19 and p27 was examined by western blot analysis. Surface expression of the differentiation markers E- and N-cadherin was also investigated. Functional blockade by siRNA was used to determine the impact of several proteins on tumor cell growth. Amygdalin treatment caused a significant reduction in RCC cell growth and proliferation. This effect was correlated with a reduced percentage of G2/M-phase RCC cells and an increased percentage of cells in the G0/1-phase (Caki-1 and A498) or cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (KTC-26). Furthermore, amygdalin induced a marked decrease in cell cycle activating proteins, in particular cdk1 and cyclin B. Functional blocking of cdk1 and cyclin B resulted in significantly diminished tumor cell growth in all three RCC cell lines. Aside from its inhibitory effects on growth, amygdalin also modulated the differentiation markers, E- and N-cadherin. Hence, exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibited cell cycle progression and tumor cell growth by impairing cdk1 and cyclin B expression. Moreover, we noted that amygdalin affected differentiation markers. Thus, we suggest that amygdalin exerted RCC antitumor effects in vitro.

  10. Development of a high-throughput method to evaluate the impact of inhibitory compounds from lignocellulosic hydrolysates on the growth of Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T; Zhang, Min

    2009-12-01

    Overcoming the effects of hydrolysate toxicity towards ethanologens is a key technical barrier in the biochemical conversion process for biomass feedstocks to ethanol. Despite its importance, the complexity of the hydrolysate toxicity phenomena and the lack of systematic studies, analysis and tools surrounding this issue have blocked a full understanding of relationships involving toxic compounds in hydrolysates and their effects on ethanologen growth and fermentation. In this study, we developed a quantitative, high-throughput biological growth assay using an automated turbidometer to obtain detailed inhibitory kinetics for individual compounds present in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysate. Information about prolonged lag time and final cell densities can also be obtained. The effects of furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), acetate and ethanol on growth rate and final cell densities of Zymomonas mobilis 8b on glucose are presented. This method was also shown to be of value in toxicity studies of hydrolysate itself, despite the highly colored nature of this material. Using this approach, we can generate comprehensive inhibitory profiles with many individual compounds and develop models that predict and examine toxic effects in the complex mixture of hydrolysates, leading to the development of improved pretreatment and conditioning processes as well as fermentation organisms.

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Sophorolipid on Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Hyphal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Farazul; Alfatah, Md.; Ganesan, K.; Bhattacharyya, Mani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans causes superficial and life-threatening systemic infections. These are difficult to treat often due to drug resistance, particularly because C. albicans biofilms are inherently resistant to most antifungals. Sophorolipid (SL), a glycolipid biosurfactant, has been shown to have antimicrobial and anticancer properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. SL was found to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation as well as reduce the viability of preformed biofilms. Moreover, SL, when used along with amphotericin B (AmB) or fluconazole (FLZ), was found to act synergistically against biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation was further visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which revealed absence of hyphae, typical biofilm architecture and alteration in the morphology of biofilm cells. We also found that SL downregulates the expression of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4, which possibly explains the inhibitory effect of SL on hyphae and biofilm formation. PMID:27030404

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Sophorolipid on Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Hyphal Growth.

    PubMed

    Haque, Farazul; Alfatah, Md; Ganesan, K; Bhattacharyya, Mani Shankar

    2016-03-31

    Candida albicans causes superficial and life-threatening systemic infections. These are difficult to treat often due to drug resistance, particularly because C. albicans biofilms are inherently resistant to most antifungals. Sophorolipid (SL), a glycolipid biosurfactant, has been shown to have antimicrobial and anticancer properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. SL was found to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation as well as reduce the viability of preformed biofilms. Moreover, SL, when used along with amphotericin B (AmB) or fluconazole (FLZ), was found to act synergistically against biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Effect of SL on C. albicans biofilm formation was further visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which revealed absence of hyphae, typical biofilm architecture and alteration in the morphology of biofilm cells. We also found that SL downregulates the expression of hypha specific genes HWP1, ALS1, ALS3, ECE1 and SAP4, which possibly explains the inhibitory effect of SL on hyphae and biofilm formation.

  13. The X protein of hepatitis B virus activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing melanoma inhibitory activity 2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yilin; Yang, Yang; Cai, Yanyan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yingle; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Jianguo

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated that HBV represses MIA2 gene expression both invitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X protein of HBV plays a major role in such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activates cell growth and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates cell proliferation, over-expression of MIA2 impaired such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing MIA2 expression. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths globally. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection accounts for over 75% of all HCC cases; however, the molecular pathogenesis of HCC is not well understood. In this study, we found that the expression of the newly identified gene melanoma inhibitory activity 2 (MIA2) was reduced by HBV infection invitro and invivo, and that HBV X protein (HBx) plays a major role in this regulation. Recent studies have revealed that MIA2 is a potential tumor suppressor, and that, in most HCCs, MIA2 expression is down-regulated or lost. We found that the knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activated cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that MIA2 inhibits HCC cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the over-expression of HBx alone induced cell proliferation, whereas MIA2 over-expression impaired the HBx-mediated induction of proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that HBx activates hepatoma cell growth and proliferation through repression of the potential tumor suppressor MIA2.

  14. Short Promoters in Viral Vectors Drive Selective Expression in Mammalian Inhibitory Neurons, but do not Restrict Activity to Specific Inhibitory Cell-Types

    PubMed Central

    Nathanson, Jason L.; Jappelli, Roberto; Scheeff, Eric D.; Manning, Gerard; Obata, Kunihiko; Brenner, Sydney; Callaway, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    Short cell-type specific promoter sequences are important for targeted gene therapy and studies of brain circuitry. We report on the ability of short promoter sequences to drive fluorescent protein expression in specific types of mammalian cortical inhibitory neurons using adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus (LV) vectors. We tested many gene regulatory sequences derived from fugu (Takifugu rubripes), mouse, human, and synthetic composite regulatory elements. All fugu compact promoters expressed in mouse cortex, with only the somatostatin (SST) and the neuropeptide Y (NPY) promoters largely restricting expression to GABAergic neurons. However these promoters did not control expression in inhibitory cells in a subtype specific manner. We also tested mammalian promoter sequences derived from genes putatively coexpressed or coregulated within three major inhibitory interneuron classes (PV, SST, VIP). In contrast to the fugu promoters, many of the mammalian sequences failed to express, and only the promoter from gene A930038C07Rik conferred restricted expression, although as in the case of the fugu sequences, this too was not inhibitory neuron subtype specific. Lastly and more promisingly, a synthetic sequence consisting of a composite regulatory element assembled with PAX6 E1.1 binding sites, NRSE and a minimal CMV promoter showed markedly restricted expression to a small subset of mostly inhibitory neurons, but whose commonalities are unknown. PMID:19949461

  15. Mediators in cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.J.; Maizel, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among seven sections. The section headings are: Cell Cycle and Control of Cell Growth, Growth Factors for Nonlymphoid Cells, Colony-Stimulating Factors, Stem Cells and Hematopoiesis, Lymphoid Growth Factors, Growth Factors in Neoplasia, Interferon, and Differentiation in Normal and Neoplastic Cells.

  16. Hypertonic stress induces VEGF production in human colon cancer cell line Caco-2: inhibitory role of autocrine PGE₂.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luciana B; Piva, Bruno; Diaz, Bruno L

    2011-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is a major regulator of angiogenesis. VEGF expression is up regulated in response to micro-environmental cues related to poor blood supply such as hypoxia. However, regulation of VEGF expression in cancer cells is not limited to the stress response due to increased volume of the tumor mass. Lipid mediators in particular arachidonic acid-derived prostaglandin (PG)E₂ are regulators of VEGF expression and angiogenesis in colon cancer. In addition, increased osmolarity that is generated during colonic water absorption and feces consolidation seems to activate colon cancer cells and promote PGE₂ generation. Such physiological stimulation may provide signaling for cancer promotion. Here we investigated the effect of exposure to a hypertonic medium, to emulate colonic environment, on VEGF production by colon cancer cells. The role of concomitant PGE₂ generation and MAPK activation was addressed by specific pharmacological inhibition. Human colon cancer cell line Caco-2 exposed to a hypertonic environment responded with marked VEGF and PGE₂ production. VEGF production was inhibited by selective inhibitors of ERK 1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways. To address the regulatory role of PGE₂ on VEGF production, Caco-2 cells were treated with cPLA₂ (ATK) and COX-2 (NS-398) inhibitors, that completely block PGE₂ generation. The Caco-2 cells were also treated with a non selective PGE₂ receptor antagonist. Each treatment significantly increased the hypertonic stress-induced VEGF production. Moreover, addition of PGE₂ or selective EP₂ receptor agonist to activated Caco-2 cells inhibited VEGF production. The autocrine inhibitory role for PGE₂ appears to be selective to hypertonic environment since VEGF production induced by exposure to CoCl₂ was decreased by inhibition of concomitant PGE₂ generation. Our results indicated that hypertonicity stimulates VEGF production in colon cancer cell lines. Also PGE₂ plays an inhibitory

  17. Inhibitory action of soybean beta-conglycinin hydrolysates on Salmonella typhimurium translocation in Caco-2 epithelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baichong; Lv, Ying; Chen, Yang; Wang, Jin; Tang, Wuxia; Guo, Shuntang

    2008-08-27

    Soybean protein hydrolysates are widely used as functional foods as they have antioxidative properties able to enhance immune responses in humans. The alcalase enzymatic hydrolysates of beta-conglycinin were fractionated by ultrafiltration, and two main fractions, SP1 (<10 kDa) and SP2 (10-20 kDa), were obtained. The effects of these two fractions on the growth, development of epithelial cells, and formation of intercellular tight junctions were tested on an in vitro Caco-2 cell culture system. The inhibitory effects of SP1 and SP2 on the penetration of Salmonella typhimurium into Caco-2 epithelial cells were also examined. The results showed that the addition of >0.05 g/L of SP2 improved epithelial cell growth and that a concentration of 0.5 g/L of SP2 increased intercellular tight junction formation, which resulted in increased of transepithelial monolayer resistance (TER) values. Moreover, a lower S. typhimurium count compared to control was obtained when Caco-2 cells were grown in 0.05 and 0.5 g/L of SP2. These results show that beta-conglycinin hydrolysates play an important role in resisting S. typhimurium penetration into intestinal epithelial cells and that high molecular mass peptides (10-20 kDa) were more effective overall than low molecular mass peptides.

  18. Inhibitory effect of allicin and garlic extracts on growth of cultured hyphae

    PubMed Central

    Aala, Farzad; Yusuf, Umi Kalsom; Nulit, Rosimah; Rezaie, Sassan

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum) is one of the most common dermatophytes worldwide. This fungus invaded skin appendages of humans and animals. Recently, resistance to antifungal drugs as well as appearance of side effects due to indication of these kinds of antibiotics has been reported. Besides, using some plant extracts have been indicated in herbal medicine as an alternative treatment of these fungal infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Garlic (Allium sativum) and pure allicin on the growth of hypha in T. rubrum using Electron miscroscopy. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out to observe the morphological changes of T. rubrum treated with allicin as well as aqueous garlic extract using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: SEM surveys, showed that hypha treated with allicin has rough and granular like surface, abnormal and irregularly-shape. However, hypha treated with garlic extract had rough and fluffy surface and also irregularly-shape. TEM studies also found that hypha treated with allicin displays disintegration of cytoplasm, breaking down in cell membrane and the cell wall, and collapsing of hypha, meanwhile hypha treated with garlic extract exhibiting degradation and dissolution of cytoplasm components, demolition of cell wall and cell membrane, and hypha appeared to break. Conclusion: The present study revealed that pure allicin (6.25 µg/ml and 12.5 µg/ml) is more efficient in inhibition of the growth in hyphal cells compare to the garlic extract (2 mg/ml and 4 mg/ml) and they could be used as alternatives in treatment of dermatophytosis. PMID:24847416

  19. Melanogenesis Inhibitory Activity of Two Generic Drugs: Cinnarizine and Trazodone in Mouse B16 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    More than 200 generic drugs were screened to identify the inhibitory activity on melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells. Cinnarizine and trazodone were identified as melanogenesis inhibitors. The inhibitory effects of the two drugs on cell survival, melanogenesis, and tyrosinase activity were investigated. The results showed that both cinnarizine and trazodone inhibited melanogenesis in B16 cells by a dose-dependent manner at the non-cytotoxic concentrations. Based on the results of the present study, seeking new melanogenesis inhibitors from generic drugs is an alternative approach to developing new depigmenting agents in cosmeceuticals. Moreover, cinnarizine and trazodone were proven to be good candidates as skin-whitening agents for treatment of skin hyperpigmentation. PMID:22272104

  20. Melanogenesis inhibitory activity of two generic drugs: cinnarizine and trazodone in mouse B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    More than 200 generic drugs were screened to identify the inhibitory activity on melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells. Cinnarizine and trazodone were identified as melanogenesis inhibitors. The inhibitory effects of the two drugs on cell survival, melanogenesis, and tyrosinase activity were investigated. The results showed that both cinnarizine and trazodone inhibited melanogenesis in B16 cells by a dose-dependent manner at the non-cytotoxic concentrations. Based on the results of the present study, seeking new melanogenesis inhibitors from generic drugs is an alternative approach to developing new depigmenting agents in cosmeceuticals. Moreover, cinnarizine and trazodone were proven to be good candidates as skin-whitening agents for treatment of skin hyperpigmentation.

  1. Inhibitory effect of the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) on the proliferation of AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Constanze; Nebe, Barbara; Walzel, Hermann; Weber, Heike; Jonas, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    The rat pancreatic acinar tumour cell line AR42J is a widely used model to study the secretion, proliferation and differentiation of cells under the influence of hormones. These so-called amphicrine cells synthesize and secrete digestive enzymes as well as neuroendocrine peptides. They possess both subtypes of the highly glycosylated cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor which are important for the regulation of secretion and for cell growth. AR42J cells extrude CCK and gastrin-like hormone peptides and have the ability of an autostimulation (autocrine loop). The lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) bind to the glycosylated sites of these CCK receptors with the effect inhibiting CCK binding and thus inhibiting the CCK-induced Ca2+ release and alpha-amylase secretion. The so-called trophic hormones CCK and gastrin stimulate the secretion and proliferation of AR42J cells within the autocrine loop via autostimulation of their CCK receptors. In preceding papers, we described the inhibitory effect of WGA on the binding of 125I-CCK-8s to the CCK-A and -B receptors and the subsequent enzyme secretion of AR42J cells. In the present work, we studied the influence of the lectins WGA, UEA-I and galectin-1, as well as of the lectin-like enzyme alpha-amylase, on the proliferation of AR42J cells and prevention of autostimulation. The proliferation inhibition of the growth fraction was measured by estimation of the S-phase fraction by DNA flow cytometry. Whereas WGA inhibited the growth fraction significantly, UEA-I, human galectin-1 and human alpha-amylase had no significant effect. In transmission electron microscopy, we observed the accumulation of typical zymogen granules under the effect of WGA and a better differentiation of cells.

  2. Misexpression of ptf1a in cortical pyramidal cells in vivo promotes an inhibitory peptidergic identity.

    PubMed

    Russ, Jeffrey B; Borromeo, Mark D; Kollipara, Rahul K; Bommareddy, Praveen K; Johnson, Jane E; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2015-04-15

    The intracellular transcriptional milieu wields considerable influence over the induction of neuronal identity. The transcription factor Ptf1a has been proposed to act as an identity "switch" between developmentally related precursors in the spinal cord (Glasgow et al., 2005; Huang et al., 2008), retina (Fujitani et al., 2006; Dullin et al., 2007; Nakhai et al., 2007; Lelièvre et al., 2011), and cerebellum (Hoshino et al., 2005; Pascual et al., 2007; Yamada et al., 2014), where it promotes an inhibitory over an excitatory neuronal identity. In this study, we investigate the potency of Ptf1a to cell autonomously confer a specific neuronal identity outside of its endogenous environment, using mouse in utero electroporation and a conditional genetic strategy to misexpress Ptf1a exclusively in developing cortical pyramidal cells. Transcriptome profiling of Ptf1a-misexpressing cells using RNA-seq reveals that Ptf1a significantly alters pyramidal cell gene expression, upregulating numerous Ptf1a-dependent inhibitory interneuron markers and ultimately generating a gene expression profile that resembles the transcriptomes of both Ptf1a-expressing spinal interneurons and endogenous cortical interneurons. Using RNA-seq and in situ hybridization analyses, we also show that Ptf1a induces expression of the peptidergic neurotransmitter nociceptin, while minimally affecting the expression of genes linked to other neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, Ptf1a alters neuronal morphology, inducing the radial redistribution and branching of neurites in cortical pyramidal cells. Thus Ptf1a is sufficient, even in a dramatically different neuronal precursor, to cell autonomously promote characteristics of an inhibitory peptidergic identity, providing the first example of a single transcription factor that can direct an inhibitory peptidergic fate.

  3. Solid-phase synthesis of 2'-hydroxychalcones. Effects on cell growth inhibition, cell cycle and apoptosis of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Neves, Marta Perro; Cravo, Sara; Lima, Raquel T; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Nascimento, M São José; Silva, Artur M S; Pinto, Madalena; Cidade, Honorina; Corrêa, Arlene G

    2012-01-01

    Thirty-one 2'-hydroxychalcones were prepared via solid-phase synthesis by base-catalyzed aldol condensation of substituted 2'-hydroxyacetophenones and benzaldehydes. Chalcones were tested for their growth inhibitory activity in three human tumor cell lines (MCF-7, NCI-H460 and A375-C5) using the SRB assay. Results revealed that several of the tested compounds caused a pronounced dose-dependent growth inhibitory effect on the tumor cell lines studied in the low micromolar range. To gain further insight on the cellular mechanism of action of this class of compounds, studies of their effect on cell cycle profile as well as on induction of cellular apoptosis were also carried out. Generally, the tested chalcones interfered with the cell cycle profile and increased the percentage of apoptotic MCF-7 cells. The results here presented may help to identify new chalcone-like structures with optimized cell growth inhibitory activity which may be further tested as potential antitumor agents.

  4. Inhibitory effect of endostatin gene therapy combined with phosphorus-32 colloid on tumour growth in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huiqi; Zhu, Jing; Li, Yong; Fu, Peng; Shen, Baozhong

    2016-07-01

    Eighty healthy male Wistar rats, aged 5 weeks, weighing 100-120 g, were utilized for establishing tumour-bearing models by immediate Walker-256 cancerous ascites injection and randomly divided to four groups (n=20) treated with 0.2 ml solution containing saline, (32)P-colloid (0.3 mCi), endostatin gene (20 μg), endostatin gene combined with colloid (32)P. The effect of endostatin combined with a small dose of (32)P-colloidal on tumour growth in vivo was evaluated and the potential mechanism underlying the combined therapy was explored. We found that (32)P-colloid combined with endostatin exhibited higher inhibitory effect upon tumour growth compared with application of (32)P-colloid or endostatin alone, although three therapies all significantly inhibited tumour growth compared with saline control group. The higher inhibitory effect of (32)P-colloid combined with endostatin upon tumour growth might be attributed to a synergistic effect of inhibiting angiogenesis by endostatin and inducing apoptosis by (32)P-colloid, as demonstrated by microvessel density (MVD) and apoptotic index (AI) measurement. Combined therapy of (32)P-colloid and endostatin probably serves as a novel and efficacious therapy of tumour growth.

  5. Inhibitory effect of berberine on human skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, P W; Yang, L M

    2015-09-08

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural alkaloid with significant anti-tumor activity against many types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms employed by BBR to repress the proliferation and growth of skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells. Berberine was reported to inhibit the proliferation of A431 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was observed to induce a series of biochemical events, including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c to cytosol, induction of proteins of the Bcl-2 family and caspases, and the cleavage of poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase. This suggested its ability to induce apoptosis. The results of a wound healing test revealed that berberine inhibited the migration of A431 cells. Ezrin was transfected into A431 cells by RNA interference. The level of expression of Ezrin in the transfected A431 cells was observed to decrease with berberine treatment, which suggested that berberine might inhibit the invasion of A431 cells through Ezrin. The results of this study demonstrated that berberine could potentially inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and inhibit the invasion of A431 cells.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  7. Know Thyself: NK-Cell Inhibitory Receptors Prompt Self-Tolerance, Education, and Viral Control

    PubMed Central

    Nash, William T.; Teoh, Jeffrey; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Brown, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells provide essential protection against viral infections. One of the defining features of this lymphocyte population is the expression of a wide array of variable cell surface stimulatory and inhibitory NK receptors (sNKR and iNKR, respectively). The iNKR are particularly important in terms of NK-cell education. As receptors specific for MHC class I (MHC I) molecules, they are responsible for self-tolerance and adjusting NK-cell reactivity based on the expression level of self-MHC I. The end result of this education is twofold: (1) inhibitory signaling tunes the functional capacity of the NK cell, endowing greater potency with greater education, and (2) education on self allows the NK cell to detect aberrations in MHC I expression, a common occurrence during many viral infections. Many studies have indicated an important role for iNKR and MHC I in disease, making these receptors attractive targets for manipulating NK-cell reactivity in the clinic. A greater understanding of iNKR and their ability to regulate NK cells will provide a basis for future attempts at translating their potential utility into benefits for human health. PMID:24795719

  8. Interstitial cells of Cajal integrate excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission with intestinal slow-wave activity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabine; Seidler, Barbara; Kettenberger, Anna; Sibaev, Andrei; Rohn, Michael; Feil, Robert; Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hofmann, Franz; Schemann, Michael; Rad, Roland; Storr, Martin A; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The enteric nervous system contains excitatory and inhibitory neurons, which control contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle cells as well as gastrointestinal motor activity. Little is known about the exact cellular mechanisms of neuronal signal transduction to smooth muscle cells in the gut. Here we generate a c-Kit(CreERT2) knock-in allele to target a distinct population of pacemaker cells called interstitial cells of Cajal. By genetic loss-of-function studies, we show that interstitial cells of Cajal, which generate spontaneous electrical slow waves and thus rhythmic contractions of the smooth musculature, are essential for transmission of signals from enteric neurons to gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. Interstitial cells of Cajal, therefore, integrate excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission with slow-wave activity to orchestrate peristaltic motor activity of the gut. Impairment of the function of interstitial cells of Cajal causes severe gastrointestinal motor disorders. The results of our study show at the genetic level that these disorders are not only due to loss of slow-wave activity but also due to disturbed neurotransmission.

  9. Prediction of Inhibitory Activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors Using Grid Search-Projection Pursuit Regression Method

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hongying; Hu, Zhide; Bazzoli, Andrea; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) is an important protein target for anti-tumor drug discovery. To identify potential EGFR inhibitors, we conducted a quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) study on the inhibitory activity of a series of quinazoline derivatives against EGFR tyrosine kinase. Two 2D-QSAR models were developed based on the best multi-linear regression (BMLR) and grid-search assisted projection pursuit regression (GS-PPR) methods. The results demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of quinazoline derivatives is strongly correlated with their polarizability, activation energy, mass distribution, connectivity, and branching information. Although the present investigation focused on EGFR, the approach provides a general avenue in the structure-based drug development of different protein receptor inhibitors. PMID:21811593

  10. Progression of Lung Cancer Is Associated with Increased Dysfunction of T Cells Defined by Coexpression of Multiple Inhibitory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Thommen, Daniela S; Schreiner, Jens; Müller, Philipp; Herzig, Petra; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; Klein, Christian; Bacac, Marina; Fischer, Ozana S; Moersig, Wolfgang; Savic Prince, Spasenija; Levitsky, Victor; Karanikas, Vaios; Lardinois, Didier; Zippelius, Alfred

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional T cells present in malignant lesions are characterized by a sustained and highly diverse expression of inhibitory receptors, also referred to as immune checkpoints. Yet, their relative functional significance in different cancer types remains incompletely understood. In this study, we provide a comprehensive characterization of the diversity and expression patterns of inhibitory receptors on tumor-infiltrating T cells from patients with non-small cell lung cancer. In spite of the large heterogeneity observed in the amount of PD-1, Tim-3, CTLA-4, LAG-3, and BTLA expressed on intratumoral CD8(+) T cells from 32 patients, a clear correlation was established between increased expression of these inhibitory coreceptors and progression of the disease. Notably, the latter was accompanied by a progressively impaired capacity of T cells to respond to polyclonal activation. Coexpression of several inhibitory receptors was gradually acquired, with early PD-1 and late LAG-3/BTLA expression. PD-1 blockade was able to restore T-cell function only in a subset of patients. A high percentage of PD-1(hi) T cells was correlated with poor restoration of T-cell function upon PD-1 blockade. Of note, PD-1(hi) expression marked a particularly dysfunctional T-cell subset characterized by coexpression of multiple inhibitory receptors and thus may assist in identifying patients likely to respond to inhibitory receptor-specific antibodies. Overall, these data may provide a framework for future personalized T-cell-based therapies aiming at restoration of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte effector functions.

  11. Leptin Enhances Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; Alpini, Gianfranco; Rychlicki, Chiara; Saccomanno, Stefania; DeMorrow, Sharon; Trozzi, Luciano; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Venter, Julie; Di Sario, Antonio; Marzioni, Marco; Bearzi, Italo; Glaser, Shannon; Alvaro, Domenico; Marucci, Luca; Francis, Heather; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Benedetti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a strongly aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Effective therapeutic strategies are lacking because molecular mechanisms regulating cholangiocarcinoma cell growth are unknown. Furthermore, experimental in vivo animal models useful to study the pathophysiologic mechanisms of malignant cholangiocytes are lacking. Leptin, the hormone regulating caloric homeostasis, which is increased in obese patients, stimulates the growth of several cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to define if leptin stimulates cholangiocarcinoma growth. We determined the expression of leptin receptors in normal and malignant human cholangiocytes. Effects on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (HuH-28) cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the in vitro exposure to leptin, together with the intracellular pathways, were then studied. Moreover, cholangiocarcinoma was experimentally induced in obese fa/fa Zucker rats, a genetically established animal species with faulty leptin receptors, and in their littermates by chronic feeding with thioacetamide, a potent carcinogen. After 24 weeks, the effect of leptin on cholangiocarcinoma development and growth was assessed. Normal and malignant human cholangiocytes express leptin receptors. Leptin increased the proliferation and the metastatic potential of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro through a signal transducers and activators of transcription 3–dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Leptin increased the growth and migration, and was antiapoptotic for cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the loss of leptin function reduced the development and the growth of cholangiocarcinoma. The experimental carcinogenesis model induced by thioacetamide administration is a valid and reproducible method to study cholangiocarcinoma pathobiology. Modulation of the leptin-mediated signal could be considered a valid tool for the prevention and treatment of

  12. The inhibitory effect of disulfiram encapsulated PLGA NPs on tumor growth: Different administration routes.

    PubMed

    Fasehee, Hamidreza; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamidollah; Faghihi, Shahab

    2016-06-01

    The strong anticancer activity of disulfiram is hindered by its rapid degradation in blood system. A novel folate-receptor-targeted poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticle (NP) is developed for encapsulation and delivery of disulfiram into breast cancer tumor using passive (EPR effect) and active (folate receptor) targeting. The anticancer activity of disulfiram and its effect on caspase-3 activity and cell cycle are studied. The administration of encapsulated PLGA NPs using intra-peritoneal, intravenous and intra-tumor routes is investigated using animal model. Disulfiram shows strong cytotoxicity against MCF7 cell line. The activity of caspase-3 inhibited with disulfiram via dose dependent manner while the drug causes cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and S phase time-dependently. The encapsulated disulfiram shows higher activity in apoptosis induction as compared to free drug. In nontoxic dose of encapsulated disulfiram, the highest and lowest efficacy of NPs in tumor growth inhibition is observed for intravenous injection and intraperitoneal injection. It is suggested that administration of disulfiram by targeted PLGA nanoparticles using intravenous injection would present an alternative therapeutic approach for solid tumor treatment.

  13. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  14. Inhibitory effect and cell damage on bacterial flora of fish caused by chitosan, nisin and sodium lactate.

    PubMed

    Schelegueda, Laura Inés; Zalazar, Aldana Lourdes; Gliemmo, María Fernanda; Campos, Carmen Adriana

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the combined use of chitosan, nisin and sodium lactate on the growth of Listeria innocua, Shewanella putrefaciens and psychrophilic bacteria isolated from fish was investigated in broth by means of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Furthermore, the sites of cell-injury caused by mentioned antimicrobials and their combinations on L. innocua and S. putrefaciens were studied. MIC of antimicrobial mixtures were evaluated by Berembaum design and check board method. Antimicrobials' sites of injury were investigated by the evaluation of cell constituents' release, cell surface hydrophobicity and differential scanning calorimetry. Results depended on antimicrobial used; several combinations inhibited the growth of L. innocua and S. putrefaciens and all combinations inhibited psychrophilic bacteria. Besides, some mixtures showed synergistic effects. All the mixtures affected ribosomes and DNA of the studied bacteria. Regarding cellular envelope, antimicrobials acted according to the structural characteristics of target microorganisms. Cell damage was higher when antimicrobials were combined, which could explain the observed synergistic effects. This study demonstrates and justifies the synergistic action of chitosan, nisin and sodium lactate on the inhibition of microorganisms related to fish spoilage and remarks the promissory use of the synergic combination of antimicrobials for fish preservation.

  15. Tracking Inhibitory Alterations during Interstrain Clostridium difficile Interactions by Monitoring Cell Envelope Capacitance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Global threats arising from the increasing use of antibiotics coupled with the high recurrence rates of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infections (CDI) after standard antibiotic treatments highlight the role of commensal probiotic microorganisms, including nontoxigenic C. difficile (NTCD) strains in preventing CDI due to highly toxigenic C. difficile (HTCD) strains. However, optimization of the inhibitory permutations due to commensal interactions in the microbiota requires probes capable of monitoring phenotypic alterations to C. difficile cells. Herein, by monitoring the field screening behavior of the C. difficile cell envelope with respect to cytoplasmic polarization, we demonstrate that inhibition of the host-cell colonization ability of HTCD due to the S-layer alterations occurring after its co-culture with NTCD can be quantitatively tracked on the basis of the capacitance of the cell envelope of co-cultured HTCD. Furthermore, it is shown that effective inhibition requires the dynamic contact of HTCD cells with freshly secreted extracellular factors from NTCD because contact with the cell-free supernatant causes only mild inhibition. We envision a rapid method for screening the inhibitory permutations to arrest C. difficile colonization by routinely probing alterations in the HTCD dielectrophoretic frequency response due to variations in the capacitance of its cell envelope. PMID:27547818

  16. Preservation of perisomatic inhibitory input of granule cells in the epileptic human dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Wittner, L; Maglóczky, Z; Borhegyi, Z; Halász, P; Tóth, S; Eross, L; Szabó, Z; Freund, T F

    2001-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is known to be associated with hyperactivity that is likely to be generated or amplified in the hippocampal formation. The majority of granule cells, the principal cells of the dentate gyrus, are found to be resistant to damage in epilepsy, and may serve as generators of seizures if their inhibition is impaired. Therefore, the parvalbumin-containing subset of interneurons, known to provide the most powerful inhibitory input to granule cell somata and axon initial segments, were examined in human control and epileptic dentate gyrus. A strong reduction in the number of parvalbumin-containing cells was found in the epileptic samples especially in the hilar region, although in some patches of the granule cell layer parvalbumin-positive terminals that form vertical clusters characteristic of axo-axonic cells were more numerous than in controls. Analysis of the postsynaptic target elements of parvalbumin-positive axon terminals showed that they form symmetric synapses with somata, dendrites, axon initial segments and spines as in the control, but the ratio of axon initial segment synapses was increased in the epileptic tissue (control: 15.9%, epileptic: 31.3%). Furthermore, the synaptic coverage of granule cell axon initial segments increased more than three times (control: 0.52, epileptic: 2.10 microm synaptic length/100 microm axon initial segment membrane) in the epileptic samples, whereas the amount of somatic symmetric synapses did not change significantly. Although the number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons is decreased, the perisomatic inhibitory input of dentate granule cells is preserved in temporal lobe epilepsy. Basket and axo-axonic cell terminals - whether positive or negative for parvalbumin - are present, moreover, the axon collaterals targeting axon initial segments sprout in the epileptic dentate gyrus. We suggest that perisomatic inhibitory interneurons survive in epilepsy, but their somadendritic compartment and partly the

  17. Synergistic inhibitory effect of berberine and d-limonene on human gastric carcinoma cell line MGC803.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Ling; Liu, Dong-Wu; Tang, Guang-Yan; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2014-09-01

    This study aims at evaluating the anticancer effects of berberine hydrochloride (berberine) and d-limonene, alone and in combination, on human gastric carcinoma cell line MGC803 to determine whether berberine and d-limonene work synergistically and elucidate their mechanisms. MGC803 cells were treated with berberine and d-limonene, alone and in combination, for 24-48 h. The inhibitory effects of these drugs on growth were determined by MTT assay. The combination index and drug reduction index were calculated with the Chou-Talalay method based on the median-effect principle. Flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy were employed to evaluate the effects of both drugs on cell-cycle perturbation and apoptosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 in MGC803 cells. Berberine or d-limonene alone can inhibit the growth of MGC803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Berberine and d-limonene at a combination ratio of 1:4 exhibited a synergistic effect on anti-MGC803 cells. The two drugs distinctly induced intracellular ROS generation, reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), enhanced the expression of caspase-3, and decreased the expression of Bcl-2. The combination of berberine and d-limonene showed more remarkable effects compared with drugs used singly in MGC803 cells. The combination of berberine and d-limonene exerted synergistic anticancer effects on MGC803 cells by cell-cycle arrest, ROS production, and apoptosis induction through the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic pathway.

  18. Sphingosine Kinase-1 Involves the Inhibitory Action of HIF-1α by Chlorogenic Acid in Hypoxic DU145 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Kyu-Ri; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia enhances cancer development in a solid tumor. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α) is a transcription factor that is dominantly expressed under hypoxia in solid tumor cells and is a key factor that regulates tumor. HIF-1α regulates several target genes involved in many aspects of cancer progression, including angiogenesis, metastasis, anti-apoptosis and cell proliferation as well as imparts resistance to cancer treatment. In this study, we assessed Crataegus Pinnatifida Bunge var. typical Schneider ethanol extract (CPE) for its anti-cancer effects in hypoxia-induced DU145 human prostate cancer cell line. CPE decreased the abundance of HIF-1α and sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK-1) in hypoxia-induced prostate cancer DU145 cells. CPE decreased HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity. Chlorogenic acid (CA) is one of four major compounds of CPE. Compared to CPE, CA significantly decreased the expression of HIF-1α and SPHK-1 as well as SPHK-1 activity in hypoxia-induced DU145 cells. Furthermore, CA decreased phosphorylation AKT and GSK-3β, which are associated with HIF-1α stabilization and affected SPHK-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. We confirmed the mechanism of CA-induced inhibition of HIF-1α by SPHK-1 signaling pathway using SPHK-1 siRNA and SPHK inhibitor (SKI). CA decreased the secretion and cellular expression of VEGF, thus inhibiting hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Treatment of DU145cells with SPHK1 siRNA and CA for 48 h decreased cancer cell growth, and the inhibitory action of SPHK siRNA and CA on cell growth was confirmed by decrease in the abundance of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PMID:28165392

  19. A Pipeline for Screening Small Molecules with Growth Inhibitory Activity against Burkholderia cenocepacia

    PubMed Central

    Selin, Carrie; Stietz, Maria S.; Blanchard, Jan E.; Hall, Dennis G.; Brown, Eric D.; Cardona, Silvia T.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are very difficult to eradicate in cystic fibrosis patients due the intrinsic resistance of Bcc to most available antibiotics and the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains during antibiotic treatment. In this work, we used a whole-cell based assay to screen a diverse collection of small molecules for growth inhibitors of a relevant strain of Bcc, B. cenocepacia K56-2. The primary screen used bacterial growth in 96-well plate format and identified 206 primary actives among 30,259 compounds. From 100 compounds with no previous record of antibacterial activity secondary screening and data mining selected a total of Bce bioactives that were further analyzed. An experimental pipeline, evaluating in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, toxicity and in vivo antibacterial activity using C. elegans was used for prioritizing compounds with better chances to be further investigated as potential Bcc antibacterial drugs. This high throughput screen, along with the in vitro and in vivo analysis highlights the utility of this experimental method to quickly identify bioactives as a starting point of antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:26053039

  20. A tick B-cell inhibitory protein from salivary glands of the hard tick, Hyalomma asiaticum asiaticum

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Da; Liang Jiangguo; Yu Haining; Wu Haifeng; Xu Chunhua; Liu Jingze . E-mail: jzliu21@heinfo.net; Lai Ren . E-mail: rlai72@njau.edu.cn

    2006-05-05

    Some studies done to date suggest that B-cell inhibitory factor occurred in tick saliva. In this study, a novel protein having B-cell inhibitory activity was purified and characterized from the salivary glands of the hard tick, Hyalomma asiaticum asiaticum. This protein was named B-cell inhibitory factor (BIF). The cDNA encoding BIF was cloned by cDNA library screening. The predicted protein from the cDNA sequence is composed of 138 amino acids including the mature BIF. No similarity was found by Blast search. The lipopolysaccharide-induced B-cell proliferation was inhibited by BIF. This is First report of the identification and characterization of B-cell inhibitory protein from tick. The current study facilitates the study of identifying the interaction among tick, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, and host.

  1. Discovery of Diverse Small Molecule Chemotypes with Cell-Based PKD1 Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Mustata Wilson, Gabriela; Close, David; Leimgruber, Stephanie; Tandon, Manuj; Reed, Robyn B.; Shun, Tong Ying; Wang, Q. Jane; Wipf, Peter; Lazo, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase D (PKD) is a novel family of serine/threonine kinases regulated by diacylglycerol, which is involved in multiple cellular processes and various pathological conditions. The limited number of cell-active, selective inhibitors has historically restricted biochemical and pharmacological studies of PKD. We now markedly expand the PKD1 inhibitory chemotype inventory with eleven additional novel small molecule PKD1 inhibitors derived from our high throughput screening campaigns. The in vitro IC50s for these eleven compounds ranged in potency from 0.4 to 6.1 µM with all of the evaluated compounds being competitive with ATP. Three of the inhibitors (CID 1893668, (1Z)-1-(3-ethyl-5-methoxy-1,3-benzothiazol-2-ylidene)propan-2-one; CID 2011756, 5-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-[4-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)phenyl]furan-2-carboxamide; CID 5389142, (6Z)-6-[4-(3-aminopropylamino)-6-methyl-1H-pyrimidin-2-ylidene]cyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-one) inhibited phorbol ester-induced endogenous PKD1 activation in LNCaP prostate cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The specificity of these compounds for PKD1 inhibitory activity was supported by kinase assay counter screens as well as by bioinformatics searches. Moreover, computational analyses of these novel cell-active PKD1 inhibitors indicated that they were structurally distinct from the previously described cell-active PKD1 inhibitors while computational docking of the new cell-active compounds in a highly conserved ATP-binding cleft suggests opportunities for structural modification. In summary, we have discovered novel PKD1 inhibitors with in vitro and cell-based inhibitory activity, thus successfully expanding the structural diversity of small molecule inhibitors available for this important pharmacological target. PMID:21998636

  2. Inhibitory effect of genistein on mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells involved TGF-{beta}1/Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: zengliy@yahoo.com.cn; Tang Yunan; Hu Dongsheng; Li Juan

    2005-08-05

    TGF-{beta}1/signaling has been shown to be associated with proapoptotic and antimitotic activities in epithelial tissues. Genistein, a major component of soybean isoflavone, has multiple functions resulting in anticancer proliferation. We herein showed that genistein dose-dependently increased TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression in mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells. A mouse monoclonal anti-TGF-{beta}1 neutralizing antibody partially, but not completely, blocked the growth inhibition by genistein. By using adenoviral vector, we demonstrated that Smad7 overexpression attenuated genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis as determined by MTT and apoptosis ELISA. Smad7 overexpression also inhibited upregulation of p21 and caspase-3 activity by geinistein. To further confirm inhibitory effect of genistein in MC-26 cells require TGF-{beta}1/Smad signaling, we employed Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to detect formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, respectively. Data revealed that genistein induced an evident formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, indicating increased TGF-{beta}1 signaling. Taken together, these findings first provided insights into possible molecular mechanisms of growth inhibition by genistein that required Smad signaling, which could aid in its evaluation for colon tumor prevention.

  3. Inhibitory effects of sea buckthorn procyanidins on fatty acid synthase and MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Nie, Fangyuan; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is overexpressed in many human cancers including breast cancer and is considered to be a promising target for therapy. Sea buckthorn has long been used to treat a variety of maladies. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of sea buckthorn procyanidins (SBPs) isolated from the seeds of sea buckthorn on FAS and FAS overexpressed human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. The FAS activity and FAS inhibition were measured by a spectrophotometer at 340 nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) absorption. We found that SBP potently inhibited the activity of FAS with a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.087 μg/ml. 3-4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,3-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to test the cell viability. SBP reduced MDA-MB-231 cell viability with an IC50 value of 37.5 μg/ml. Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide dual staining and flow cytometric analysis showed that SBP induced MDA-MB-231 cell apoptosis. SBP inhibited intracellular FAS activity with a dose-dependent manner. In addition, sodium palmitate could rescue the cell apoptosis induced by SBP. These results showed that SBP was a promising FAS inhibitor which could induce the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via inhibiting FAS. These findings suggested that SBP might be useful for preventing or treating breast cancer.

  4. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate nitrergic inhibitory neurotransmission in the murine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lies, Barbara; Gil, Víctor; Groneberg, Dieter; Seidler, Barbara; Saur, Dieter; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Jiménez, Marcel; Friebe, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Its main effector, NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC), is expressed in several GI cell types, including smooth muscle cells (SMC), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and fibroblast-like cells. Up to date, the interplay between neurons and these cells to initiate a nitrergic inhibitory junction potential (IJP) is unclear. Here, we investigate the origin of the nitrergic IJP in murine fundus and colon. IJPs were determined in fundus and colon SMC of mice lacking NO-GC globally (GCKO) and specifically in SMC (SM-GCKO), ICC (ICC-GCKO), and both SMC/ICC (SM/ICC-GCKO). Nitrergic IJP was abolished in ICC-GCKO fundus and reduced in SM-GCKO fundus. In the colon, the amplitude of nitrergic IJP was reduced in ICC-GCKO, whereas nitrergic IJP in SM-GCKO was reduced in duration. These results were corroborated by loss of the nitrergic IJP in global GCKO. In conclusion, our results prove the obligatory role of NO-GC in ICC for the initiation of an IJP. NO-GC in SMC appears to enhance the nitrergic IJP, resulting in a stronger and prolonged hyperpolarization in fundus and colon SMC, respectively. Thus NO-GC in both cell types is mandatory to induce a full nitrergic IJP. Our data from the colon clearly reveal the nitrergic IJP to be biphasic, resulting from individual inputs of ICC and SMC.

  5. Inhibitory effect of strychnine on acetylcholine receptor activation in bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, G A; Vergara, L A; Calvo, S; Yadid, G

    1994-01-01

    1. Strychnine, which is known as a potent and selective antagonist of the inhibitory glycine receptor in the central nervous system, inhibits the nicotinic stimulation of catecholamine release from bovine cultured adrenal chromaffin cells in a concentration-dependent (1-100 microM) manner. At 10 microM nicotine, the IC50 value for strychnine is approximately 30 microM. Strychnine also inhibits the nicotine-induced membrane depolarization and increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. 2. The inhibitory action of strychnine is reversible and is selective for nicotinic stimulation, with no effect observed on secretion elicited by a high external K+ concentration, histamine or angiotensin II. 3. Strychnine competes with nicotine in its effect, but not modify the apparent positive cooperatively of the nicotine binding sites. In the absence of nicotine, strychnine has no effect on catecholamine release. Glycine does not affect catecholamine release nor the inhibitory action of strychnine on this release. 4. These results suggest that strychnine interacts with the agonist binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in chromaffin cells, thus exerting a pharmacological effect independently of the glycine receptor. PMID:7834198

  6. Kinetics of Inhibitory Feedback from Horizontal Cells to Photoreceptors: Implications for an Ephaptic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ted J.; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Tranchina, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory feedback from horizontal cells (HCs) to cones generates center-surround receptive fields and color opponency in the retina. Mechanisms of HC feedback remain unsettled, but one hypothesis proposes that an ephaptic mechanism may alter the extracellular electrical field surrounding photoreceptor synaptic terminals, thereby altering Ca2+ channel activity and photoreceptor output. An ephaptic voltage change produced by current flowing through open channels in the HC membrane should occur with no delay. To test for this mechanism, we measured kinetics of inhibitory feedback currents in Ambystoma tigrinum cones and rods evoked by hyperpolarizing steps applied to synaptically coupled HCs. Hyperpolarizing HCs stimulated inward feedback currents in cones that averaged 8–9 pA and exhibited a biexponential time course with time constants averaging 14–17 ms and 120–220 ms. Measurement of feedback-current kinetics was limited by three factors: (1) HC voltage-clamp speed, (2) cone voltage-clamp speed, and (3) kinetics of Ca2+ channel activation or deactivation in the photoreceptor terminal. These factors totaled ∼4–5 ms in cones meaning that the true fast time constants for HC-to-cone feedback currents were 9–13 ms, slower than expected for ephaptic voltage changes. We also compared speed of feedback to feedforward glutamate release measured at the same cone/HC synapses and found a latency for feedback of 11–14 ms. Inhibitory feedback from HCs to rods was also significantly slower than either measurement kinetics or feedforward release. The finding that inhibitory feedback from HCs to photoreceptors involves a significant delay indicates that it is not due to previously proposed ephaptic mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Lateral inhibitory feedback from horizontal cells (HCs) to photoreceptors creates center-surround receptive fields and color-opponent interactions. Although underlying mechanisms remain unsettled, a longstanding hypothesis proposes that

  7. Effects of flavonoids on the growth and cell cycle of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, S U; Ryu, S Y; Yoon, S K; Jung, N P; Park, S H; Kim, K H; Choi, E J; Lee, C O

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicities of flavone (F01), 3-hydroxyflavone (F02), 6- hydroxyflavone (F03), 7-hydroxyflavone (F04), 3,6-dihydroxyflavone (F05), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (F06) and 5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone (F07) to human cancer cells including P- glycoprotein (Pgp)-expressing HCT15 cells and its multidrug resistant subline, HCT15/CL02 cells. We also examined the effects of those flavonoids on the cell cycle of these cancer cells. HCT15/CL02 cells did not reveal resistance to all the flavonoids tested in comparison with HCT15 cells. In cell cycle analysis, all the flavonoids tested, except F01 and F04, reduced the G0/G1 population of SF295 cells at growth inhibitory concentrations, and increased G2/M (F02, F03 and F06) or S (F05 and F07) populations. In addition, F02 and F03 decreased the G2/M and G0/G1 population, and increased the S and G2/M population in HCT15 cells, respectively. Meanwhile, in HCT15/CL02 cells, F02 and F03 decreased the G0/G1 populations and increased the S population. In conclusion, we deemed that the flavonoids tested had diverse cytotoxic mechanisms, and exerted their cell growth inhibitory or killing activity by distinctive ways in different cells.

  8. Inhibitory effects of some spice essential oils on Aspergillus ochraceus NRRL 3174 growth and ochratoxin A production.

    PubMed

    Basílico, M Z; Basílico, J C

    1999-10-01

    Inhibitory effects of essential oils of oregano (Origanum vulgare), mint (Menta arvensis), basil (Ocimum basilicum), sage (Salvia officinalis) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum), on the mycelial growth and ochratoxin A production by Aspergillus ochraceus NRRL 3174 were studied. Cultures were incubated on yeast extract-sucrose (YES) broth, at concentrations of 0, 500, 750 and 1000 p.p.m. of essential oils during 7, 14 and 21 d at 25 degrees C. At 1000 p.p.m., oregano and mint completely inhibited the fungal growth and ochratoxin A production up to 21 d, while basil was only effective up to 7 d. At 750 p.p.m., oregano was completely effective up to 14 d, whereas mint allowed fungal growth but no ocratoxin A production up to 14 d. At 500 p.p.m., no evident inhibition could be in observed with any of the essential oils under analysis. Sage and coriander showed no important effect at any of the concentrations studied. These inhibitory effects are interesting in connection with the prevention of mycotoxin contamination in many foods and they could be used instead of synthetic antifungal products.

  9. Steroid receptor coactivator 3 regulates autophagy in breast cancer cells through macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mei-Yi; Fu, Junjiang; Xu, Jianming; O'Malley, Bert W; Wu, Ray-Chang

    2012-01-01

    SRC-3/AIB1 (steroid receptor coactivator 3/amplified in breast cancer 1) is an authentic oncogene that contributes to the development of drug resistance and poor disease-free survival in cancer patients. Autophagy is also an important cell death mechanism that has tumor suppressor function. In this study, we identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a novel target gene of SRC-3 and demonstrated its importance in cell survival. Specifically, we showed that MIF is a strong suppressor of autophagic cell death. We further showed that suppression of MIF, in turn, induced autophagic cell death, enhanced chemosensitivity and inhibited tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse tumorigenesis model. Our study demonstrated that regulation of MIF expression and suppression of autophagic cell death is a potent mechanism by which SRC-3 contributes to increased chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. PMID:22430150

  10. Synaptic Connectivity between Renshaw Cells and Motoneurons in the Recurrent Inhibitory Circuit of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Niall J.; Bhumbra, Gardave S.; Foster, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Renshaw cells represent a fundamental component of one of the first discovered neuronal circuits, but their function in motor control has not been established. They are the only central neurons that receive collateral projections from motor outputs, yet the efficacy of the excitatory synapses from single and converging motoneurons remains unknown. Here we present the results of dual whole-cell recordings from identified, synaptically connected Renshaw cell-motoneuron pairs in the mouse lumbar spinal cord. The responses from single Renshaw cells demonstrate that motoneuron synapses elicit large excitatory conductances with few or no failures. We show that the strong excitatory input from motoneurons results from a high probability of neurotransmitter release onto multiple postsynaptic contacts. Dual current-clamp recordings confirm that single motoneuron inputs were sufficient to depolarize the Renshaw cell beyond threshold for firing. Reciprocal connectivity was observed in approximately one-third of the paired recordings tested. Ventral root stimulation was used to evoke currents from Renshaw cells or motoneurons to characterize responses of single neurons to the activation of their corresponding presynaptic cell populations. Excitatory or inhibitory synaptic inputs in the recurrent inhibitory loop induced substantial effects on the excitability of respective postsynaptic cells. Quantal analysis estimates showed a large number of converging inputs from presynaptic motoneuron and Renshaw cell populations. The combination of considerable synaptic efficacy and extensive connectivity within the recurrent circuitry indicates a role of Renshaw cells in modulating motor outputs that may be considerably more important than has been previously supposed. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We have recently shown that Renshaw cells mediate powerful shunt inhibition on motoneuron excitability. Here we complete a quantitative description of the recurrent circuit using recordings of

  11. Stimulatory and Inhibitory Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Molecules are Expressed and Functional on Lupus T Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Dhiman; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ailing; Yarlagadda, Sushma; Gorelik, Gabriela J.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Hewagama, Anura; Hinderer, Robert C.; Strickland, Faith M.; Richardson, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    T cells from lupus patients have hypomethylated DNA and overexpress genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. We found that stimulatory and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin–like receptor (KIR3) genes are aberrantly overexpressed on experimentally demethylated T cells. We therefore asked if lupus T cells also overexpress KIR, and if the proteins are functional. T cells from lupus patients were found to overexpress KIR genes, and expression was proportional to disease activity. Antibodies to the stimulatory molecule KIR2DL4 triggered IFN-γ release by lupus T cells, and production was proportional to disease activity. Similarly, crosslinking the inhibitory molecule KIR3DL1 prevented the autoreactive macrophage killing that characterizes lupus T cells. These results indicate that aberrant T cell KIR expression may contribute to IFN overproduction and macrophage killing in human lupus, and suggest that antibodies to inhibitory KIR may be a treatment for this disease. PMID:19675166

  12. Stimulatory and inhibitory killer Ig-like receptor molecules are expressed and functional on lupus T cells.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dhiman; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ailing; Yarlagadda, Sushma; Gorelik, Gabriela J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Hewagama, Anura; Hinderer, Robert C; Strickland, Faith M; Richardson, Bruce C

    2009-09-01

    T cells from lupus patients have hypomethylated DNA and overexpress genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. We found that stimulatory and inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes are aberrantly overexpressed on experimentally demethylated T cells. We therefore asked if lupus T cells also overexpress KIR, and if the proteins are functional. T cells from lupus patients were found to overexpress KIR genes, and expression was proportional to disease activity. Abs to the stimulatory molecule KIR2DL4 triggered IFN-gamma release by lupus T cells, and production was proportional to disease activity. Similarly, cross-linking the inhibitory molecule KIR3DL1 prevented the autoreactive macrophage killing that characterizes lupus T cells. These results indicate that aberrant T cell KIR expression may contribute to IFN overproduction and macrophage killing in human lupus, and they suggest that Abs to inhibitory KIR may be a treatment for this disease.

  13. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the regulatory T cell response of tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Susanna; Kim, Hang-Rae; Leng, Lin; Kang, Insoo; Jorgensen, William L.; Cho, Chul-Soo; Bucala, Richard; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is involved in tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor proliferation and evasion of apoptosis; however, its role in tumor immunity is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of MIF on the progression of the syngenic, CT26 colon carcinoma and the generation of tumor regulatory T cells (Tregs). The results showed that the tumor growth rate was significantly lower in MIF knockout (MIF−/−) mice than in wild type (MIF+/+) mice. Flow cytometric analysis of both spleen and tumor cells revealed that MIF−/− mice had significantly lower levels of tumor-associated CD4+Tregs than MIF+/+ mice. The splenic cells of MIF−/− mice also showed a decrease in CD8+Tregs, which was accompanied by an increase in CD8-induced tumor cytotoxicity. Interestingly, the inducible Treg response in spleen cells to anti-CD3/CD28+IL-2+TGF-β was greater in MIF−/− mice than in MIF+/+ mice. Spleen cells of MIF−/− mice, stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28, produced lower levels of IL-2, but not TGF-β, than those of MIF+/+ mice, which was recovered by the addition of recombinant MIF. Conversely, a neutralizing anti-MIF Ab blocked anti-CD3-induced IL-2 production by splenocytes of MIF+/+ mice and suppressed the inducible Treg generation. Moreover, the administration of IL-2 into tumor-bearing MIF−/− mice restored the generation of Tregs and tumor growth. Taken together, our data suggest that MIF promotes tumor growth by increasing Tregs generation through the modulation of IL-2 production. Thus, anti-MIF treatment might be useful in enhancing the adaptive immune response to colon cancers. PMID:22972922

  14. Isolation of virus-cell fusion inhibitory components from the stem bark of Styrax japonica S. et Z.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dung Gun; Jin, Qinglong; Jin, Hong-Guang; Shin, Ji Eun; Choi, Eun Jin; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2010-06-01

    Five compounds, styraxjaponoside A (1), matairesinoside (2), egonol glucoside (3), dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol 9'-O-glucoside (4), and styraxjaponoside B (5) were isolated from the stem bark of Styrax japonica. Among them, compounds 1 and 5 showed significantly high virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity. In addition, compound 5 exhibited almost equivalent virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity to that of dextran sulfate, which is used as a positive control.

  15. Inhibitory effect of a redox-silent analogue of tocotrienol on hypoxia adaptation in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Nobuya; Sugahara, Ryosuke; Namiki, Kozue; Sato, Chiaki; Ando, Akira; Sato, Ayami; Virgona, Nantiga; Yano, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common cancers in Western countries and acquires a malignant phenotype, androgen-independent growth. PCa under hypoxia often has resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, an effective therapy against PCa under hypoxia has not yet been established. In this report, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a redox-silent analogue of tocotrienol on the survival of a human androgen-independent PCa cell line (PC3) under hypoxia. We found that the redox-silent analogue exerted a cytotoxic effect on PC3 cells in a dose-dependent manner irrespective of either hypoxia or normoxia. Moreover, under hypoxia, the analogue dose dependently reduced the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α. In addition, a specific inhibitor toward HIF-1α induced cytotoxicity on PC3 cells, whereas selective inhibition of HIF-2α exerted no effect. Furthermore, suppression of HIFs levels by the analogue in hypoxic PC3 cells was closely associated with the inactivation of Fyn, a member of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase family, as confirmed by the action of a specific inhibitor toward the kinase (PP2). Taken together, these results suggest that the tocotrienol analogue could inhibit the survival of PC3 cells under hypoxia, mainly by the inhibition of Fyn/HIF-1α signaling, and this may lead to the establishment of a new effective therapy for androgen-independent PCa.

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Hemagglutinin with Inhibitory Activity toward Osteocarcinoma Cells from Northeast China Black Beans.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xiuli; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Chan, Francis Chun Wai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-22

    In the present study, we isolated a novel hemagglutinin from an edible legume and explored its growth-inhibitory effect on osteocarcinoma and liver cancer cells. The protein was purified by liquid chromatography techniques which entailed affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion-exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and gel filtration on Superdex 75 with an FPLC system. The hemagglutinating activity of this hemagglutinin was demonstrated to be ion dependent and stable over a wide range of temperature and pH values. Antiproliferative activity was observed in the tumor cell lines MG-63 and HepG2 but not in the normal cell line WRL 68. Osteocarcinoma cells treated with the hemagglutinin underwent obvious cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and apoptosis. The mRNA expression level of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were found to be up-regulated to different extents after treatment of this hemagglutinin.

  17. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-dependent, pluripotent stem cells established from inner cell mass of porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Sinha, Sunilima; Alexenko, Andrei P; Spate, Lee; Prather, Randall S; Roberts, R Michael

    2011-08-19

    The pig is important for agriculture and as an animal model in human and veterinary medicine, yet despite over 20 years of effort, there has been a failure to generate pluripotent stem cells analogous to those derived from mouse embryos. Here we report the production of leukemia inhibitory factor-dependent, so-called naive type, pluripotent stem cells from the inner cell mass of porcine blastocysts by up-regulating expression of KLF4 and POU5F1. The alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies resulting from reprogramming resemble mouse embryonic stem cells in colony morphology, cell cycle interval, transcriptome profile, and expression of pluripotent markers, such as POU5F1, SOX2, and surface marker SSEA1. They are dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling for maintenance of pluripotency, can be cultured over extended passage, and have the ability to form teratomas. These cells derived from the inner cell mass of pig blastocysts are clearly distinct from the FGF2-dependent "primed" induced pluripotent stem cells described recently from porcine mesenchymal cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the up-regulation of KLF4, as well as POU5F1, is required to create and stabilize the naive pluripotent state and may explain why the derivation of embryonic stem cells from pigs and other ungulates has proved so difficult.

  18. Targeting molecular and cellular inhibitory mechanisms for improvement of antitumor memory responses reactivated by tumor cell vaccine.

    PubMed

    Webster, W Scott; Thompson, R Houston; Harris, Kimberley J; Frigola, Xavier; Kuntz, Susan; Inman, Brant A; Dong, Haidong

    2007-09-01

    Development of effective vaccination approaches to treat established tumors represents a focus of intensive research because such approaches offer the promise of enhancing immune system priming against tumor Ags via restimulation of pre-existing (memory) antitumoral helper and effector immune cells. However, inhibitory mechanisms, which function to limit the recall responses of tumor-specific immunity, remain poorly understood and interfere with therapies anticipated to induce protective immunity. The mouse renal cell carcinoma (RENCA) tumor model was used to investigate variables affecting vaccination outcomes. We demonstrate that although a whole cell irradiated tumor cell vaccine can trigger a functional antitumor memory response in the bone marrows of mice with established tumors, these responses do not culminate in the regression of established tumors. In addition, a CD103+ regulatory T (Treg) cell subset accumulates within the draining lymph nodes of tumor-bearing mice. We also show that B7-H1 (CD274, PD-L1), a negative costimulatory ligand, and CD4+ Treg cells collaborate to impair the recall responses of tumor-specific memory T cells. Specifically, mice bearing large established RENCA tumors were treated with tumor cell vaccination in combination with B7-H1 blockade and CD4+ T cell depletion (triple therapy treatment) and monitored for tumor growth and survival. Triple treatment therapy induced complete regression of large established RENCA tumors and raised long-lasting protective immunity. These results have implications for developing clinical antitumoral vaccination regimens in the setting in which tumors express elevated levels of B7-H1 in the presence of abundant Treg cells.

  19. ZNF185, an actin-cytoskeleton-associated growth inhibitory LIM protein in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-S; Gong, A; Young, C Y F

    2007-01-04

    We have recently identified ZNF185 as a gene that is downregulated in prostate cancer (PCa), in part via epigenetic alteration, and maybe associated with disease progression. In this study, we cloned the ZNF185 cDNA from normal human prostate tissues and investigated its biological function. We show that ZNF185 is a novel actin-cytoskeleton-associated Lin-l 1, Isl-1 and Mec-3 (LIM) domain-containing protein that localizes to F-actin structures, and is enriched at focal adhesions. We find that the NH(2)-terminal region, which we designate the actin-targeting domain, facilitates ZNF185 binding to actin in vitro and is both necessary and sufficient to mediate actin-cytoskeleton targeting of ZNF185, whereas the LIM domain, which is localized in the COOH-terminus is dispensable for this phenomenon. Interestingly, ectopic expression of full-length ZNF185, but not a mutant lacking the actin-targeting domain, could suppress proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of PCa cells. Together, our data suggest that ZNF185 may function as a tumor-suppressor protein by associating with the actin-cytoskeleton.

  20. Investigation on cellular uptake and pharmacodynamics of DOCK2-inhibitory peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Umemoto, Tadashi; Fukuda, Yasunori; Tani, Akiyoshi; Asami, Taiji

    2017-04-01

    Protein-protein interaction between dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is an attractive intracellular target for transplant rejection and inflammatory diseases. Recently, DOCK2-selective inhibitory peptides have been discovered, and conjugation with oligoarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) improved inhibitory activity in a cell migration assay. Although a number of CPPs have been reported, oligoarginine was only one example introduced to the inhibitory peptides. In this study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility of CPP-conjugation approach for DOCK2-inhibitory peptides, and select preferable sequences as CPP moiety. First, we evaluated cell permeability of thirteen known CPPs and partial sequences of influenza A viral protein PB1-F2 using an internalization assay system based on luciferin-luciferase reaction, and then selected four CPPs with efficient cellular uptake. Among four conjugates of these CPPs and a DOCK2-inhibitory peptide, the inhibitory activity of a novel CPP, PB1-F2 fragment 5 (PF5), conjugate was comparable to oligoarginine conjugate and higher than that of the non-conjugated peptide. Finally, internalization assay revealed that oligoarginine and PF5 increased the cellular uptake of inhibitory peptides to the same extent. Hence, we demonstrated that CPP-conjugation approach is applicable to the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs based on DOCK2 inhibition by investigating both cellular uptake and bioactivity.

  1. Only a Minority of the Inhibitory Inputs to Cerebellar Golgi Cells Originates from Local GABAergic Cells123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cerebellar Golgi cells (GoCs) efficiently control the spiking activity of granule cells through GABAA receptor-mediated tonic and phasic inhibition. Recent experiments provided compelling evidence for the extensive interconnection of GoCs through electrical synapses, but their chemical inhibitory synaptic inputs are debated. Here, we investigated the GABAergic synaptic inputs of GoCs using in vitro electrophysiology and quantitative light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). We characterized GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs in GoCs and Lugaro cells (LuCs), and found that IPSCs in GoCs have lower frequencies, smaller amplitudes, and much slower decay kinetics. Pharmacological and LM immunolocalization experiments revealed that GoCs express α3, whereas LuCs express α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors. The selective expression and clustered distribution of the α3 subunit in GoCs allowed the quantitative analysis of GABAergic synapses on their dendrites in the molecular layer (ML). EM and LM experiments in rats, and wild-type and GlyT2-GFP transgenic mice revealed that only one third of axon terminals establishing GABAergic synapses on GoC dendrites contain GlyT2, ruling out LuCs, globular cells, and any noncortical glycinergic inputs as major inhibitory sources. We also show that axon terminals of stellate/basket cells very rarely innervate GlyT2-GFP-expressing GoCs, indicating that only a minority of the inhibitory inputs to GoCs in the ML originates from local interneurons, and the majority of their inhibitory inputs exclusively releases GABA. PMID:27257627

  2. Differential GABAergic and glycinergic inputs of inhibitory interneurons and Purkinje cells to principal cells of the cerebellar nuclei.

    PubMed

    Husson, Zoé; Rousseau, Charly V; Broll, Ilja; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2014-07-09

    The principal neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN), the sole output of the olivo-cerebellar system, receive a massive inhibitory input from Purkinje cells (PCs) of the cerebellar cortex. Morphological evidence suggests that CN principal cells are also contacted by inhibitory interneurons, but the properties of this connection are unknown. Using transgenic, tracing, and immunohistochemical approaches in mice, we show that CN interneurons form a large heterogeneous population with GABA/glycinergic phenotypes, distinct from GABAergic olive-projecting neurons. CN interneurons are found to contact principal output neurons, via glycine receptor (GlyR)-enriched synapses, virtually devoid of the main GABA receptor (GABAR) subunits α1 and γ2. Those clusters account for 5% of the total number of inhibitory receptor clusters on principal neurons. Brief optogenetic stimulations of CN interneurons, through selective expression of channelrhodopsin 2 after viral-mediated transfection of the flexed gene in GlyT2-Cre transgenic mice, evoked fast IPSCs in principal cells. GlyR activation accounted for 15% of interneuron IPSC amplitude, while the remaining current was mediated by activation of GABAR. Surprisingly, small GlyR clusters were also found at PC synapses onto principal CN neurons in addition to α1 and γ2 GABAR subunits. However, GlyR activation was found to account for <3% of the PC inhibitory synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation. This work establishes CN glycinergic neurons as a significant source of inhibition to CN principal cells, forming contacts molecularly distinct from, but functionally similar to, Purkinje cell synapses. Their impact on CN output, motor learning, and motor execution deserves further investigation.

  3. Growth inhibitory effect of D-arabinose against the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: Discovery of a novel bioactive monosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Sakoguchi, Hirofumi; Yoshihara, Akihide; Shintani, Tomoya; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Izumori, Ken; Sato, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Biological activities of unusual monosaccharides (rare sugars) have largely remained unstudied until recently. We compared the growth inhibitory effects of aldohexose stereoisomers against the animal model Caenorhabditis elegans cultured in monoxenic conditions with Escherichia coli as food. Among these stereoisomers, the rare sugar D-arabinose (D-Ara) showed particularly strong growth inhibition. The IC50 value for D-Ara was estimated to be 7.5 mM, which surpassed that of the potent glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (19.5 mM) used as a positive control. The inhibitory effect of D-Ara was also observed in animals cultured in axenic conditions using a chemically defined medium; this excluded the possible influence of E. coli. To our knowledge, this is the first report of biological activity of D-Ara. The D-Ara-induced inhibition was recovered by adding either D-ribose or D-fructose, but not D-glucose. These findings suggest that the inhibition could be induced by multiple mechanisms, for example, disturbance of D-ribose and D-fructose metabolism.

  4. The enhanced inhibitory effect of different antitumor agents in self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems on human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Kalantari, Azin; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Róka, Eszter; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Póka, Róbert; Kozma, Bence; Bácskay, Ildikó

    2015-07-21

    The aim of this study was to develop topical self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) containing antitumor agents (bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide) and to investigate their inhibitory potential in SMEDDS on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. The physicochemical properties of cytostatic drug loaded SMEDDS were characterized. The cytotoxicity of main components of SMEDDS was also investigated. Their IC50 values were determined. HeLa cells were treated by different concentrations of cisplatin, bleomycin and ifosfamide alone and in various SMEDDS. The inhibitory effect on cell growth was analyzed by MTT cell viability assay. Inflammation is a driving force that accelerates cancer development. The inhibitory effect of these antitumor agents has also been tested on HeLa cells in the presence of inflammatory mediators (IL-1-β, TNF-α) as an in vitro model of inflamed human cervix. Significant differences in the cytotoxicity of cytostatic drugs alone and in SMEDDS have been found in a concentration-dependent manner. The self-micro emulsifying system may potentiate the effectiveness of bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide topically. The effect of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents was decreased significantly in the presence of inflammatory mediators. According to our experiments, the optimal SMEDDS formulation is 1:1:2:6:2 ratios of Isopropyl myristate, Capryol 90, Kolliphor RH 40, Cremophor RH40, Transcutol HP and Labrasol. It can be concluded that SMEDDS may increase the inhibitory effect of bleomycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Inflammation on HeLa cells hinders the effectiveness of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents. Our results might ensure useful data for development of optimal antitumor formulations.

  5. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell-Mediated CD8 T Cell Priming Depends on Co-Inhibitory Signal Integration over Time

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Julita; Homsi, Yahya; van Üüm, Jan; Metzger, Christina; Knolle, Percy A.; Kolanus, Waldemar; Lang, Thorsten; Diehl, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The initiation of adaptive immunity requires cell-to-cell contact between T cells and antigen-presenting cells. Together with immediate TCR signal transduction, the formation of an immune synapse (IS) is one of the earliest events detected during T cell activation. Here, we show that interaction of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) with naive CD8 T cells, which induces CD8 T cells without immediate effector function, is characterized by a multi-focal type IS. The co-inhibitory molecule B7H1, which is pivotal for the development of non-responsive LSEC-primed T cells, did not alter IS structure or TCRβ/CD11a cluster size or density, indicating that IS form does not determine the outcome of LSEC-mediated T cell activation. Instead, PD-1 signaling during CD8 T cell priming by LSEC repressed IL-2 production as well as sustained CD25 expression. When acting during the first 24 h of LSEC/CD8 T cell interaction, CD28 co-stimulation inhibited the induction of non-responsive LSEC-primed T cells. However, after more than 36 h of PD-1 signaling, CD28 co-stimulation failed to rescue effector function in LSEC-primed T cells. Together, these data show that during LSEC-mediated T cell priming, integration of co-inhibitory PD-1 signaling over time turns on a program for CD8 T cell development, that cannot be overturned by co-stimulatory signals. PMID:24924593

  6. Dosage and cell line dependent inhibitory effect of bFGF supplement in human pluripotent stem cell culture on inactivated human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Quang, Tara; Marquez, Maribel; Blanco, Giselle; Zhao, Yuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Many different culture systems have been developed for expanding human pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs). In general, 4-10 ng/ml of bFGF is supplemented in culture media in feeder-dependent systems regardless of feeder cell types, whereas in feeder-free systems, up to 100 ng/ml of bFGF is required for maintaining long-term culture on various substrates. The amount of bFGF required in native hESCs growth niche is unclear. Here we report using inactivated adipose-derived human mesenchymal stem cells as feeder cells to examine long-term parallel cultures of two hESCs lines (H1 and H9) and one hiPSCs line (DF19-9-7T) in media supplemented with 0, 0.4 or 4 ng/ml of bFGF for up to 23 passages, as well as parallel cultures of H9 and DF19 in media supplemented with 4, 20 or 100 ng/ml bFGF for up to 13 passages for comparison. Across all cell lines tested, bFGF supplement demonstrated inhibitory effect over growth expansion, single cell colonization and recovery from freezing in a dosage dependent manner. In addition, bFGF exerted differential effects on different cell lines, inducing H1 and DF19 differentiation at 4 ng/ml or higher, while permitting long-term culture of H9 at the same concentrations with no apparent dosage effect. Pluripotency was confirmed for all cell lines cultured in 0, 0.4 or 4 ng/ml bFGF excluding H1-4 ng, as well as H9 cultured in 4, 20 and 100 ng/ml bFGF. However, DF19 demonstrated similar karyotypic abnormality in both 0 and 4 ng/ml bFGF media while H1 and H9 were karyotypically normal in 0 ng/ml bFGF after long-term culture. Our results indicate that exogenous bFGF exerts dosage and cell line dependent effect on human pluripotent stem cells cultured on mesenchymal stem cells, and implies optimal use of bFGF in hESCs/hiPSCs culture should be based on specific cell line and its culture system.

  7. Intrinsic conductances actively shape excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic responses in olfactory bulb external tufted cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaolin; Shipley, Michael T

    2008-10-08

    The initial synapse in the olfactory system is from olfactory nerve (ON) terminals to postsynaptic targets in olfactory bulb glomeruli. Recent studies have disclosed multiple presynaptic factors that regulate this important linkage, but less is known about the contribution of postsynaptic intrinsic conductances to integration at these synapses. The present study demonstrates voltage-dependent amplification of EPSPs in external tufted (ET) cells in response to monosynaptic (ON) inputs. This amplification is mainly exerted by persistent Na(+) conductance. Larger EPSPs, which bring the membrane potential to a relatively depolarized level, are further boosted by the low-voltage-activated Ca(2+) conductance. In contrast, the hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation conductance (I(h)) attenuates EPSPs mainly by reducing EPSP duration; this also reduces temporal summation of multiple EPSPs. Regulation of EPSPs by these subthreshold, voltage-dependent conductances can enhance both the signal-to-noise ratio and the temporal summation of multiple synaptic inputs and thus help ET cells differentiate high- and low-frequency synaptic inputs. I(h) can also transform inhibitory inputs to postsynaptic excitation. When the ET cell membrane potential is relatively depolarized, as during a burst of action potentials, IPSPs produce classic inhibition. However, near resting membrane potentials where I(h) is engaged, IPSPs produce rebound bursts of action potentials. ET cells excite GABAergic PG cells. Thus, the transformation of inhibitory inputs to postsynaptic excitation in ET cells may enhance intraglomerular inhibition of mitral/tufted cells, the main output neurons in the olfactory bulb, and hence shape signaling to olfactory cortex.

  8. Metformin inhibits salivary adenocarcinoma growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuqi; Yu, Tao; Yang, Jian; Zhang, Tianqing; Zhou, Yang; He, Fan; Kurago, Zoya; Myssiorek, David; Wu, Yingjie; Lee, Peng; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of metformin have been observed in many types of cancer. However, its effect on human salivary gland carcinoma is unknown. The effect of metformin alone or in combination with pp242 (an mTOR inhibitor) on salivary adenocarcinoma cells growth were determined in vitro and in vivo. We found that metformin suppressed HSY cell growth in vitro in a time and dose dependent manner associated with a reduced expression of MYC onco-protein, and the same inhibitory effect of metformin was also confirmed in HSG cells. In association with the reduction of MYC onco-protein, metformin significantly restored p53 tumor suppressor gene expression. The distinctive effects of metformin and PP242 on MYC reduction and P53 restoration suggested that metformin inhibited cell growth through a different pathway from PP242 in salivary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the anti-tumor efficacy of metformin was confirmed in vivo as indicated by the increases of tumor necrosis and reduced proliferation in xenograft tumors from metformin treated group. For the first time, the inhibitory effect of metformin on human salivary gland tumor cells was documented. Moreover, metformin inhibitory effects were enhanced by mTOR inhibitor suggesting that metformin and mTOR inhibitor utilize distinctive signaling pathways to suppress salivary tumor growth. PMID:26885449

  9. Inhibitory effects of Leucaena leucocephala on the metastasis and invasion of human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hsiao-Hang; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Chang, Yu-Chao; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chia-Chieh; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2017-02-09

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and metastasis is recognized as a major factor causing its low survival rate. The inhibition of metastasis progress and the improvement of the survival rate for oral cancer are critical research objectives. Leucaena leucocephala from the mimosa branch Leucaena genus is native to Central and South America and has been used as a traditional remedy for treating various disorders. Previous studies have demonstrated antioxidant, anti-inflammatory as well as anticancer properties of L. leucocephala plant materials. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the anticancer effect induced by L. leucocephala remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of L. leucocephala extract (LLE) on SCC-9 and SAS oral cancer cells and examined the potential inhibitory mechanisms involved. The results indicated that LLE attenuated the migration and invasion abilities of both SCC-9 and SAS cells by reducing the activity and protein expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2). Regarding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 exhibited a significant inhibitory effect in the presence of LLE. The application of ERK inhibitor and p38 inhibitor confirmed that both signalling transduction pathways were involved in the inhibition of cell metastasis. These data indicate that L. leucocephala could be a potent therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of oral cancer and a prominent plant source for anticancer research in the future.

  10. Inhibitory effect of Moutan Cortex aqueous fraction on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kee, Ji-Ye; Inujima, Akiko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Tanaka, Ken; Li, Feng; Kuraishi, Yasushi; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Saiki, Ikuo; Koizumi, Keiichi

    2015-04-01

    Moutan Cortex and its major compounds have been shown to possess various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of Moutan Cortex aqueous fraction (MCA) and its molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of MCA on mast cell-mediated allergy inflammation in vitro and in vivo compared with major Moutan Cortex compounds. Thus, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of a water extract of Moutan Cortex by comparing the inhibition of β-hexosaminadase and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release in an aqueous fraction with other major compounds of Moutan Cortex. The inhibitory mechanism of MCA was investigated by western blotting in IgE-mediated DNP-BSA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. We confirmed the pharmacological effects of MCA on compound 48/80-induced allergic reactions in a mouse model by assessing scratching behavior and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA)-like reaction. Consequently, MCA inhibited IgE-mediated DNP-BSA-induced β-hexosaminadase and TNF-α release via inactivation of p38, ERK, Akt, and NF-κB in RBL-2H3 cells. MCA reduced compound 48/80-induced PCA reaction and scratching behavior in mice. This inhibitory effect of MCA is more potent than major compounds of Moutan Cortex. In conclusion, our results suggest that MCA has more potential in the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases compared to other major compounds of Moutan Cortex.

  11. A dual inhibitory mechanism sufficient to maintain cell cycle restricted CENP-A assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Ana; Guo, Lucie Y.; Mata, João F.; Bodor, Dani L.; Cao, Xing-Jun; Bailey, Aaron O.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Black, Ben E.; Jansen, Lars E.T

    2017-01-01

    Summary Chromatin featuring the H3 variant CENP-A at the centromere is critical for its mitotic function and epigenetic maintenance. Assembly of centromeric chromatin is restricted to G1 phase through inhibitory action of Cdk1/2 kinases in other phases of the cell cycle. Here, we identify the two key targets sufficient to maintain cell cycle control of CENP-A assembly. We uncovered a single phosphorylation site in the licensing factor M18BP1 and a cyclin A binding site in the CENP-A chaperone, HJURP, mediating specific inhibitory phosphorylation. Simultaneous expression of mutant proteins lacking these residues, results in complete uncoupling from the cell cycle. Consequently, CENP-A assembly is fully recapitulated under high Cdk activities, indistinguishable from G1 assembly. We find that Cdk-mediated inhibition is exerted by sequestering active factors away from the centromere. Finally, we show that displacement of M18BP1 from the centromere is critical for the assembly mechanism of CENP-A. PMID:28017591

  12. Inhibitory effect of oestradiol on activation of rat hepatic stellate cells in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, I; Mizobuchi, Y; Yasuda, M; Shiba, M; Ma, Y; Horie, T; Liu, F; Ito, S

    1999-01-01

    Background—Hepatic stellate cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. 
Aims—To examine the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on stellate cell activation. 
Methods—In vivo, hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by dimethylnitrosamine or pig serum. In vitro, rat stellate cells were activated by contact with plastic dishes resulting in their transformation into myofibroblast-like cells. 
Results—In the dimethylnitrosamine and pig serum models, treatment with oestradiol at gestation related doses resulted in a dose dependent suppression of hepatic fibrosis with restored content of hepatic retinyl palmitate, reduced collagen content, lower areas of stellate cells which express α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin, and lower procollagen type I and III mRNA levels in the liver. In cultured stellate cells, oestradiol inhibited type I collagen production, α-SMA expression, and cell proliferation. These findings suggest that oestradiol is a potent inhibitor of stellate cell transformation. 
Conclusion—The antifibrogenic role of oestradiol in the liver may contribute to the sex associated differences in the progression from hepatic fibrosis to cirrhosis. 

 Keywords: hepatic stellate cells; hepatic fibrosis; oestradiol; α smooth muscle actin; retinyl palmitate PMID:9862839

  13. Inhibitory effect of interferon gamma on frequency of Ehrlichia canis-infected cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Tomoko; Wada, Makoto

    2013-12-15

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that infects the macrophage-monocyte cells of dogs, causing canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), along with other cytokines, mediates the immune response to such intracellular bacterial invasions. To determine the role of IFN-γ in the immunity of dogs to E. canis infection, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and white blood cells (WBC) were collected from E. canis-infected dogs and added to a culture of E. canis in DH82 cells. The number of E. canis inclusion-positive cells was significantly reduced in cultures containing PBMC and WBC from E. canis-infected dogs compared to uninfected dogs. However, this resistance was inhibited by the addition of an anti-dog IFN-γ antibody. Resistance was also observed when PBMC were added to the Cell Culture Inserts, which prohibited contact of PBMC to DH82 cells, while allowed the diffusion of soluble cell products. The results of this study indicate that resistance was not dependent on cell to cell contact, but was associated with soluble cell products, such as IFN-γ. The addition of recombinant canine IFN-γ to the E. canis culture also reduced the number of infected cells. A commercial recombinant canine IFN-γ, which is sold in Japan, was also effective at reducing E. canis-infected cell number. These results indicate that IFN-γ has an inhibitory effect on the frequency of E. canis-infected cells in vitro and that contact between effector and target cells is not necessary for the resistance.

  14. Decrease of SYNGAP1 in GABAergic cells impairs inhibitory synapse connectivity, synaptic inhibition and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Berryer, Martin H; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Xing, Paul; Riebe, Ilse; Bosoi, Ciprian; Sanon, Nathalie; Antoine-Bertrand, Judith; Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo; Hamdan, Fadi F; Carmant, Lionel; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Michaud, Jacques L; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-11-09

    Haploinsufficiency of the SYNGAP1 gene, which codes for a Ras GTPase-activating protein, impairs cognition both in humans and in mice. Decrease of Syngap1 in mice has been previously shown to cause cognitive deficits at least in part by inducing alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission and premature maturation of excitatory connections. Whether Syngap1 plays a role in the development of cortical GABAergic connectivity and function remains unclear. Here, we show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency significantly reduces the formation of perisomatic innervations by parvalbumin-positive basket cells, a major population of GABAergic neurons, in a cell-autonomous manner. We further show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence impairs their connectivity, reduces inhibitory synaptic activity and cortical gamma oscillation power, and causes cognitive deficits. Our results indicate that Syngap1 plays a critical role in GABAergic circuit function and further suggest that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic circuits may contribute to cognitive deficits.

  15. Inhibitory effects of stilbenes on the growth of three soybean pathogens in culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of resveratrol and pterostilbene on in vitro growth of three soybean pathogens were tested to determine if these stilbenic compounds could potentially be targets to increase innate resistance in transgenic soybean plants. Growth of Macrophomina phaseolina, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerot...

  16. Inhibitory effects of sodium azide on microbial growth in experimental resuspension of marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Quéméneur, Marianne; Misson, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Sodium azide (NaN3) was evaluated as inhibitor of microbial growth and activity in marine sediment resuspensions by monitoring the abundance of free-living and sessile bacteria using both flow cytometry and qPCR methods. Results show that 50mM of NaN3 strongly inhibits bacterial growth under natural and enriched resource conditions.

  17. Physicochemical basis for the inhibitory effects of organic and inorganic salts on the growth of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Yaganza, Elian-Simplice; Tweddell, Russell J; Arul, Joseph

    2009-03-01

    Twenty-one salts were tested for their effects on the growth of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Pectobacterium atrosepticum. In liquid medium, 11 salts (0.2 M) exhibited strong inhibition of bacterial growth. The inhibitory action of salts relates to the water-ionizing capacity and the lipophilicity of their constituent ions.

  18. Tigecycline exhibits inhibitory activity against Clostridium difficile in the colon of mice and does not promote growth or toxin production.

    PubMed

    Jump, Robin L P; Li, Yuejin; Pultz, Michael J; Kypriotakis, Georgios; Donskey, Curtis J

    2011-02-01

    Tigecycline is a broad-spectrum glycylcycline antibiotic with potent in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile. We used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that tigecycline has a low propensity to promote colonization and toxin production by C. difficile due to inhibitory activity in the colon. Mice (5 to 8 per group) received subcutaneous injections of tigecycline (low and high doses) alone or in combination with clindamycin for 6 days. Growth of and toxin production by 3 strains of C. difficile (tigecycline MICs ≤ 0.012 μg/ml) were measured in cecal contents collected 6 h or 3 days after the final antibiotic dose. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using a bioassay, and concentrations of total anaerobes and Bacteroides spp. were measured. The effects of tigecycline on rendering mice susceptible to colonization with and reducing the burden of C. difficile were also examined. In comparison to saline controls, clindamycin promoted the growth of C. difficile (P < 0.001) in cecal contents, whereas tigecycline did not. Tigecycline did not suppress total anaerobes or Bacteroides spp. in comparison to saline controls. Concurrent administration of tigecycline prevented clindamycin-induced promotion of C. difficile in cecal contents collected 6 h or 3 days (high dose only) after the final antibiotic dose. Tigecycline did not promote the establishment of colonization in mice, yet it did not reduce concentrations of C. difficile in animals with established colonization. In summary, tigecycline did not promote the growth of or toxin production by C. difficile, probably due to inhibitory activity against C. difficile and relative sparing of indigenous anaerobic microflora.

  19. Inhibitory effects of soluble algae products (SAP) released by Scenedesmus sp. LX1 on its growth and lipid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yu, Yin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Soluble algal products (SAP) accumulated in culture medium via water reuse may affect the growth of microalga during the cultivation. Scenedesmus sp. LX1, a freshwater microalga, was used in this study to investigate the effect of SAP on growth and lipid production of microalga. Under the SAP concentrations of 6.4-25.8 mg L(-1), maximum algal density (K) and maximum growth rate (Rmax) of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 were decreased by 50-80% and 35-70% compared with the control group, respectively. The effect of SAP on lipid accumulation of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 was non-significant. According to hydrophilic-hydrophobic and acid-base properties, SAP was fractionized into six fractions. All of the fractions could inhibit the growth of Scenedesmus sp. LX1. Organic bases (HIB, HOB) and hydrophilic acids (HIA) showed the strongest inhibition. HIA could also decrease the lipid content of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 by 59.2%. As the inhibitory effect, SAP should be seriously treated before water reuse.

  20. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cell death and aggravates neurologic deficits after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Ana R; Ruscher, Karsten; Leng, Lin; Bucala, Richard; Deierborg, Tomas

    2011-04-01

    Multiple mechanisms contribute to tissue demise and functional recovery after stroke. We studied the involvement of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in cell death and development of neurologic deficits after experimental stroke. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor is upregulated in the brain after cerebral ischemia, and disruption of the Mif gene in mice leads to a smaller infarct volume and better sensory-motor function after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). In mice subjected to tMCAo, we found that MIF accumulates in neurons of the peri-infarct region, particularly in cortical parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Likewise, in cultured cortical neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, MIF levels increase, and inhibition of MIF by (S,R)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole acetic acid methyl ester (ISO-1) protects against cell death. Deletion of MIF in Mif(-/-) mice does not affect interleukin-1β protein levels in the brain and serum after tMCAo. Furthermore, disruption of the Mif gene in mice does not affect CD68, but it is associated with higher galectin-3 immunoreactivity in the brain after tMCAo, suggesting that MIF affects the molecular/cellular composition of the macrophages/microglia response after experimental stroke. We conclude that MIF promotes neuronal death and aggravates neurologic deficits after experimental stroke, which implicates MIF in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury after stroke.

  1. Inhibitory effects of neferine on Nav1.5 channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Wang, Huan; Xiao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Jia-Ling; Xiang, Ji-Zhou; Tang, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Neferine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid in Lotus Plumule, was proved to have a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effects of neferine on Nav1.5 channels that are stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. We found that neferine potently and reversibly inhibited Nav1.5 currents in a concentration dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibition (IC50) being 26.15 μmol/L. The inhibitory effects of neferine on Nav1.5 currents were weaker than those of quinidine at the same concentration. The steady-state inactivation curve was significantly shifted towards hyperpolarizing direction in the presence of 30 μmol/L neferine, while the voltage-dependent activation was unaltered. Neferine prolonged the time to peak of activation, increased the inactivation time constants of Nav1.5 currents and markedly slowed the recovery from inactivation. The inhibitory effect of neferine could be potentiated in a frequency-dependent manner. These results suggested that neferine can block Nav1.5 channels under the open state and inactivating state and it is an open channel blocker of Nav1.5 channels.

  2. Inhibitory Effects of Synthetic Peptides Containing Bovine Lactoferrin C-lobe Sequence on Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woan-Sub; Ohashi, Midori; Shimazaki, Kei-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with various biological effects, with antibacterial activity being one of the first effects reported. This glycoprotein suppresses bacterial growth through bacteriostatic or bactericidal action. It also stimulates the growth of certain kinds of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria. In this study, Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg was selected and chemically synthesized based on the partial sequences of bovine lactoferrin tryptic fragments. Synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg suppressed the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. syringae and Escherichia coli. P. fluorescens is a major psychrotrophic bacteria found in raw and pasteurized milk, which decreases milk quality. P. syringae is a harmful infectious bacterium that damages plants. However, synthetic Asn-Leu-Asn-Arg did not inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus. It is expected that this synthetic peptide would be the first peptide sequence from the bovine lactoferrin C-lobe that shows antibacterial activity. PMID:27621684

  3. Effect of transforming growth factor-β1 on human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Tetsuya; Yokomuro, Shigeki; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Arima, Yasuo; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Akimaru, Koho; Tajiri, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the biological effects of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on intrahepatic cholan-giocarcinoma (ICC). METHODS: We investigated the effects of TGF-β1 on human ICC cell lines (HuCCT1, MEC, and HuH-28) by monitoring the influence of TGF-β1 on tumor growth and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in ICC cells. RESULTS: All three human ICC cell lines produced TGF-β1 and demonstrated accelerated growth in the presence of TGF-β1 with no apoptotic effect. Studies on HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced stimulation of the expression of TGF-β1, as well as a decrease in TGF-β1 mRNA expression induced by neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. These results indicate that TGF-β1 stimulates the production and function of TGF-β1 in an autocrine fashion. Further, IL-6 secretion was observed in all three cell lines and exhibited an inhibitory response to neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 antibody. Experiments using HuCCT1 revealed a TGF-β1-induced acceleration of IL-6 protein expression and mRNA levels. These findings demonstrate a functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6. All three cell lines proliferated in the presence of IL-6. In contrast, TGF-β1 induced no growth effect in HuCCT1 in the presence of small interfering RNA against a specific cell surface receptor of IL-6 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. CONCLUSION: ICC cells produce TGF-β1 and confer a TGF-β1-induced growth effect in an autocrine fashion. TGF-β1 activates IL-6 production, and the functional interaction between TGF-β1 and IL-6 contributes to ICC cell growth by TGF-β1. PMID:17072955

  4. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Soares, P.B.; Jeremias, T.S.; Alvarez-Silva, M.; Licínio, M.A.; Santos-Silva, M.C.; Vituri, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM) reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells) increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM), the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control). Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved. PMID:23011404

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds on Exoelectrogenesis in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell Bioanode

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-09-09

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are 20 lignocellulose-derived compounds known to inhibit to H2- and ethanol- producing microorganisms in dark fermentation. Bioelectrochemical conversion of furanic and phenolic compounds to electricity or H2 has recently been demonstrated as a productive method to use these compounds. However, potential inhibitory effect of furanic and phenolic compounds on exoelectrogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems is not well understood. This study systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of furfural (FF), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), syringic acid (SA), vanillic acid (VA), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) on exoelectrogenesis in the bioanode of a microbial electrolysis cell. A mixture of these five compounds at an increasing initial total concentration from 0.8 to 8.0 g/L resulted in current decrease up to 91%. The observed inhibition primarily affected exoelectrogenesis, instead of non-exoelectrogenic biotransformation pathways (e.g., fermentation) of the five compounds. Furthermore, the parent compounds at a high concentration, as opposed to their biotransformation products, were responsible for the observed inhibition. Tests with individual compounds show that all five parent compounds contributed to the observed inhibition by the mixture. The IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% current decrease) was estimated as 2.7 g/L for FF, 3.0 g/L for HMF, 1.9 g/L for SA, 2.1 g/L for VA and 2.0 g/L for HBA. Nevertheless, these compounds below their non-inhibitory concentrations jointly resulted in significant inhibition as a mixture. Catechol and phenol, which were persistent biotransformation products of the mixture, inhibited exoelectrogens at high concentrations, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. Recovery of exoelectrogenesis from inhibition by all compounds was observed, except for catechol, which resulted in irreversible inhibition. The reversibility of inhibition, as well as the observed difference in recovery rates

  6. Cell Assembly Dynamics of Sparsely-Connected Inhibitory Networks: A Simple Model for the Collective Activity of Striatal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Angulo-Garcia, David; Berke, Joshua D.; Torcini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Striatal projection neurons form a sparsely-connected inhibitory network, and this arrangement may be essential for the appropriate temporal organization of behavior. Here we show that a simplified, sparse inhibitory network of Leaky-Integrate-and-Fire neurons can reproduce some key features of striatal population activity, as observed in brain slices. In particular we develop a new metric to determine the conditions under which sparse inhibitory networks form anti-correlated cell assemblies with time-varying activity of individual cells. We find that under these conditions the network displays an input-specific sequence of cell assembly switching, that effectively discriminates similar inputs. Our results support the proposal that GABAergic connections between striatal projection neurons allow stimulus-selective, temporally-extended sequential activation of cell assemblies. Furthermore, we help to show how altered intrastriatal GABAergic signaling may produce aberrant network-level information processing in disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. PMID:26915024

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Iranian Thymus vulgaris Extracts on in Vitro Growth of Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Behnia, Maryam; Komeylizadeh, Hossein; Tabaei, Seyyed-Javad Seyyed; Abadi, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common drugs used against a wide variety of anaerobic protozoan parasites is metronidazole. However, this drug is mutagenic for bacteria and is a potent carcinogen for rodents. Thymus vulgaris is used for cough suppression and relief of dyspepsia. Also it has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The aim of this study was to investigate antiamebic effect of Thymus vulgaris against Entamoeba histolytica in comparison with metronidazole. One hundred gram air-dried T. vulgaris plant was obtained and macerated at 25℃ for 14 days using n-hexane and a mixture of ethanol and water. For essential oil isolation T. vulgaris was subjected to hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type apparatus for 3 hr. E. histolytica, HM-1: IMSS strain was used in all experiments. It was found that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic, hexanic extracts, and the essential oil after 24 hr was 4 mg/mL, 4 mg/mL, and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. After 48 hr the MIC for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic and hexanic extracts was 3 and 3 mg/mL, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Iranian T. vulgaris is effective against the trophozoites of E. histolytica. PMID:18830054

  8. Inhibitory effects of Iranian Thymus vulgaris extracts on in vitro growth of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Maryam; Haghighi, Ali; Komeylizadeh, Hossein; Tabaei, Seyyed-Javadi Seyyed; Abadi, Alireza

    2008-09-01

    One of the most common drugs used against a wide variety of anaerobic protozoan parasites is metronidazole. However, this drug is mutagenic for bacteria and is a potent carcinogen for rodents. Thymus vulgaris is used for cough suppression and relief of dyspepsia. Also it has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The aim of this study was to investigate antiamebic effect of Thymus vulgaris against Entamoeba histolytica in comparison with metronidazole. One hundred gram air-dried T. vulgaris plant was obtained and macerated at 25 degrees C for 14 days using n-hexane and a mixture of ethanol and water. For essential oil isolation T. vulgaris was subjected to hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type apparatus for 3 hr. E. histolytica, HM-1: IMSS strain was used in all experiments. It was found that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic, hexanic extracts, and the essential oil after 24 hr was 4 mg/mL, 4 mg/mL, and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. After 48 hr the MIC for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic and hexanic extracts was 3 and 3 mg/mL, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Iranian T. vulgaris is effective against the trophozoites of E. histolytica.

  9. Inhibitory effects of seaweed extracts on the growth of the vaginal bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yu-Mi; Choi, Jae-Suk; Lee, Bo-Bae; Moon, Hye Eun; Cho, Kwang Keun; Choi, In Soon

    2014-05-01

    Of 44 species of seaweed screened for potential anti-Gardnerella vaginalis activity, 27 (61.4%) showed antimicrobial activity by the agar disk-diffusion method. Among them, the strongest activities against the pathogen were exhibited by Chlorophyta, with Ulva pertusa producing an 11.3-mm zone of inhibition at 5 mg disk⁻¹. The MIC values of U. pertusa extracts against both G. vaginalis KCTC 5096 and KCTC 5097, the main cause of vaginosis, were 312 μg ml⁻¹, while the MIC values against both Candida albicans KCTC 7270 and KCTC 7965, the main cause of candidiasis, were 2.5 mg ml⁻¹. Against Lactobacillus gasseri KCTC 3173 and Lactobacillus jensenii KCTC 5194, members of the normal vaginal microflora, no inhibitory effect was seen even at 10 mg ml⁻¹. To identify the primary active compounds, a U. pertusa powder was successively fractionated according to polarity, and the main active agents against G. vaginalis KCTC 5096 were determined to be nitrogenous compounds (156 μg ml⁻¹ of the MIC value). According to these results, it was suggested that extracts of the seaweed U. pertusa are valuable for the development of natural therapeutic agents for treating women with bacterial vaginosis.

  10. Effect of hypothalamic-hypophysary inhibitory factor on mesangial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barbero, A; Martínez-Salgado, C; Rodríguez-López, A M; Ricote, M; Sancho, J; López-Novoa, J M

    1995-12-01

    We examined the effect of a sodium pump inhibitor isolated from bovine hypothalamus and pituitary tissues on contraction, proliferation, and calcium mobilization in primary cultures of rat mesangial cells. Hypothalamic-hypophysary inhibitory factor (HHIF) inhibited rubidium uptake in a concentration-dependent manner (0.2 U/mL: 56.8 +/- 6.3% inhibition). It also induced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in planar cell surface area. Maximal contraction (25 +/- 5% reduction in cell size) was reached at 60 minutes with a concentration of 0.2 U/mL. This effect was inhibited by both verapamil and TMB-8 (10(-5) mol/L). HHIF was also observed to increase DNA synthesis (0.2 U/mL: 4361 +/- 168 versus 2129 +/- 162 cpm per well under control conditions) and cell proliferation (0.2 U/mL: 52,290 +/- 1931 versus 10,512 +/- 121 cells per well under control conditions). Both effects were also inhibited by verapamil and TMB-8. Moreover, HHIF induced the expression of immediate early genes c-fos and c-jun mRNA. HHIF-induced effects were accompanied by an increase in cytosolic free calcium (203 +/- 58 versus 101 +/- 2 nmol/L under control conditions), which was inhibited by verapamil and TMB-8. In summary, HHIF induces mesangial cell contraction and proliferation; these effects seem to be mediated by an increase in cytosolic free calcium levels.

  11. Effect of leukemia inhibitory factor and forskolin on establishment of rat embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Masumi; Goto, Teppei; Tamura, Chihiro; Sanbo, Makoto; Hara, Hiromasa; Hochi, Shinichi

    2014-03-07

    This study was designed to investigate whether supplementation of 2i medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and/or forskolin would support establishment of germline-competent rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines. Due to the higher likelihood of outgrowth rates, supplementation of forskolin with or without LIF contributed to the higher establishment efficiency of ES cell lines in the WDB strain. Germline transmission competency of the chimeric rats was not influenced by the profile of ES cell lines until their establishment. When the LIF/forskolin-supplemented 2i medium was used, the rat strain used as the blastocyst donor, such as the WI strain, was a possible factor negatively influencing the establishment efficiency of ES cell lines. Once ES cell lines were established, all lines were found to be germline-competent by a progeny test in chimeric rats. In conclusion, both LIF and forskolin are not essential but can play a beneficial role in the establishment of "genuine" rat ES cell lines.

  12. Inhibitory effects of Ephedra major Host on Aspergillus parasiticus growth and aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Gavkosh, Shahrokh; Bigdeli, Mohsen; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2009-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Ephedra major Host, an important medicinal plant with various biological activities, on growth and aflatoxin (AF) production by Aspergillus parasiticus NRRL 2999. The fungus was cultured in yeast extract-sucrose (YES) broth, a conductive medium that supports AF production, in the presence of various concentrations of essential oil (EO), hexanic and methanolic extracts of plant aerial parts, fruits, and roots using microbioassay technique. After incubating for 96 h at 28 degrees C in static conditions, mycelial dry weight was determined as an index of fungal growth, and aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) was measured using HPLC technique. Based on the obtained results, EO of plant aerial parts significantly inhibited fungal growth at the highest concentration of 1000 microg/ml without any obvious effect on AFB(1) production at all concentrations used. Among plant extracts tested, only methanolic extract of aerial parts and roots were found to inhibit fungal growth and AFB(1) production dose-dependently with an IC(50) value of 559.74 and 3.98 microg/ml for AFB(1), respectively. Based on the GC/MS data, the major components of E. major EO were bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (42.48%), pentacosane (20.94%), docosane (14.64%), citronellol (5.15%), heptadecan (4.41%), cis-3-Hexen-1-ol benzoate (4.07%), and 7-Octen-2-ol (3.25%). With respect to the potent inhibition of fungal growth and AF production by E. major, this plant may be useful in protecting crops from both toxigenic fungal growth and AF contamination.

  13. Inhibitory mechanisms of Agaricus blazei Murill on the growth of prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ching-Han; Kan, Shu-Fen; Shu, Chin-Hang; Lu, Ting-Jang; Sun-Hwang, Lucy; Wang, Paulus S

    2009-10-01

    Agaricus blazei Murill (A. blazei) has been conventionally used as a health food for the prevention of cancer. However, little is known about the direct effects and action mechanisms of A. blazei on human prostate cancer. In the present study, the effects of A. blazei on the growth of human prostate cancer were examined in vitro and in vivo. A. blazei, especially the broth fraction, inhibited cell proliferation in both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines. The broth of A. blazei induced lactate dehydrogenase leakage in three cancer cell lines, whereas the activities of caspase 3 and the DNA fragmentation were enhanced the most in androgen-independent PC3 cells. The protein expressions of apoptosis-related molecules were elevated by the broth of A. blazei in PC3 cells. Oral supplementation with the broth of A. blazei (with the higher ratio of beta-glucan) significantly suppressed tumor growth without inducing adverse effects in severe combined immunodeficient mice with PC3 tumor xenograft. Tumor xenografts from A. blazei-fed mice showed decreased proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells and reduced tumor microvessel density. Based on these results, we found that the broth of A. blazei may directly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cell via an apoptotic pathway and suppress prostate tumor growth via antiproliferative and antiangiogenic mechanisms. We therefore suggest that A. blazei might have potential therapeutic use in the prevention and treatment of human prostate cancer.

  14. Bidirectional modulation of deep cerebellar nuclear cells revealed by optogenetic manipulation of inhibitory inputs from Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Han, V Z; Magnus, G; Zhang, Y; Wei, A D; Turner, E E

    2014-09-26

    In the mammalian cerebellum, deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) cells convey all information from cortical Purkinje cells (PCs) to premotor nuclei and other brain regions. However, how DCN cells integrate inhibitory input from PCs with excitatory inputs from other sources has been difficult to assess, in part due to the large spatial separation between cortical PCs and their target cells in the nuclei. To circumvent this problem we have used a Cre-mediated genetic approach to generate mice in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), fused with a fluorescent reporter, is selectively expressed by GABAergic neurons, including PCs. In recordings from brain slice preparations from this model, mammalian PCs can be robustly depolarized and discharged by brief photostimulation. In recordings of postsynaptic DCN cells, photostimulation of PC axons induces a strong inhibition that resembles these cells' responses to focal electrical stimulation, but without a requirement for the glutamate receptor blockers typically applied in such experiments. In this optogenetic model, laser pulses as brief as 1 ms can reliably induce an inhibition that shuts down the spontaneous spiking of a DCN cell for ∼50 ms. If bursts of such brief light pulses are delivered, a fixed pattern of bistable bursting emerges. If these pulses are delivered continuously to a spontaneously bistable cell, the immediate response to such photostimulation is inhibitory in the cell's depolarized state and excitatory when the membrane has repolarized; a less regular burst pattern then persists after stimulation has been terminated. These results indicate that the spiking activity of DCN cells can be bidirectionally modulated by the optically activated synaptic inhibition of cortical PCs.

  15. Extracellular vesicles from malignant effusions induce tumor cell migration: inhibitory effect of LMWH tinzaparin.

    PubMed

    Gamperl, Hans; Plattfaut, Corinna; Freund, Annika; Quecke, Tabea; Theophil, Friederike; Gieseler, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been correlated with inflammatory diseases as well as progressive and metastatic cancer. By presenting tissue factor (TF) on their membrane surface, cellular microparticles (MPs) activate both the coagulation system and cell-signaling pathways such as the PAR/ERK pathway. We have shown before that malignant effusions are a rich source of tumor cell-derived EVs. Here, we used EVs from malignant effusions from three different patients after serial low-speed centrifugation steps as recommended by the ISTH (lsEV). Significant migration of human pancreatic carcinoma cells could be induced by lsEVs and was effectively inhibited by pre-incubation with tinzaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin. Tinzaparin induced tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) release from tumor cells, and recombinant TFPI inhibited EV-induced tumor cell migration. EVs also induced ERK phosphorylation, whereas inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suppressed EV-induced tumor cell migration. LsEVs have been characterized by high-resolution flow cytometry and, after elimination of smaller vesicles including exosomes, by further high-speed centrifugation (hsEV). The remaining population consisting primarily of MPs is indeed the main migration-inducing population with tenase activity. Compared to other LMWHs, tinzaparin is suggested to have high potency to induce TFPI release from epithelial cells. The migration-inhibitory effect of TFPI and the interruption of tumor cell migration by inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suggest that lsEVs induce tumor cell migration by activating the PAR2 signaling pathway. Tinzaparin might inhibit this process at least partly by inducing the release of TFPI from tumor cells, which blocks PAR-activating TF complexes. The clinical relevance of the results is discussed.

  16. Inhibitory effect of cyclophilin A from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis on the growth of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroki; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Kusakisako, Kodai; Galay, Remil Linggatong; Aung, Kyaw Min; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Mochizuki, Masami; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tanaka, Tetsuya

    2013-06-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis is known as one of the most important ticks transmitting Babesia parasites in East Asian countries, including Babesia ovata and Babesia gibsoni, as well as Theileria parasites. H. longicornis is not the natural vector of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. Vector ticks and transmitted parasites are thought to have established unique host-parasite interaction for their survival, meaning that vector ticks may have defensive molecules for the growth control of parasites in their bodies. However, the precise adaptation mechanism of tick-Babesia parasites is still unknown. Recently, cyclophilin A (CyPA) was reported to be important for the development of Babesia parasites in ticks. To reveal a part of their adaptation mechanism, the current study was conducted. An injection of B. bovis-infected RBCs into adult female H. longicornis ticks was found to upregulate the expression profiles of the gene and protein of CyPA in H. longicornis (HlCyPA). In addition, recombinant HlCyPA (rHlCyPA) purified from Escherichia coli exhibited significant inhibitory growth effects on B. bovis and B. bigemina cultivated in vitro, without any hemolytic effect on bovine RBCs at all concentrations used. In conclusion, our results suggest that HlCyPA might play an important role in the growth regulation of Babesia parasites in H. longicornis ticks, during natural acquisition from an infected host. Furthermore, rHlCyPA may be a potential alternative chemotherapeutic agent against babesiosis.

  17. Quiescence of Memory CD8(+) T Cells Is Mediated by Regulatory T Cells through Inhibitory Receptor CTLA-4.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vandana; Penny, Laura Anne; Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Baumann, Florian Martin; Sarkar, Surojit

    2015-06-16

    Immune memory cells are poised to rapidly expand and elaborate effector functions upon reinfection yet exist in a functionally quiescent state. The paradigm is that memory T cells remain inactive due to lack of T cell receptor (TCR) stimuli. Here, we report that regulatory T (Treg) cells orchestrate memory T cell quiescence by suppressing effector and proliferation programs through inhibitory receptor, cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4). Loss of Treg cells resulted in activation of genome-wide transcriptional programs characteristic of effector T cells and drove transitioning as well as established memory CD8(+) T cells toward terminally differentiated KLRG-1(hi)IL-7Rα(lo)GzmB(hi) phenotype, with compromised metabolic fitness, longevity, polyfunctionality, and protective efficacy. CTLA-4 functionally replaced Treg cells in trans to rescue memory T cell defects and restore homeostasis. These studies present the CTLA-4-CD28-CD80/CD86 axis as a potential target to accelerate vaccine-induced immunity and improve T cell memory quality in current cancer immunotherapies proposing transient Treg cell ablation.

  18. Interplay between cell growth and cell cycle in plants.

    PubMed

    Sablowski, Robert; Carnier Dornelas, Marcelo

    2014-06-01

    The growth of organs and whole plants depends on both cell growth and cell-cycle progression, but the interaction between both processes is poorly understood. In plants, the balance between growth and cell-cycle progression requires coordinated regulation of four different processes: macromolecular synthesis (cytoplasmic growth), turgor-driven cell-wall extension, mitotic cycle, and endocycle. Potential feedbacks between these processes include a cell-size checkpoint operating before DNA synthesis and a link between DNA contents and maximum cell size. In addition, key intercellular signals and growth regulatory genes appear to target at the same time cell-cycle and cell-growth functions. For example, auxin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroid all have parallel links to cell-cycle progression (through S-phase Cyclin D-CDK and the anaphase-promoting complex) and cell-wall functions (through cell-wall extensibility or microtubule dynamics). Another intercellular signal mediated by microtubule dynamics is the mechanical stress caused by growth of interconnected cells. Superimposed on developmental controls, sugar signalling through the TOR pathway has recently emerged as a central control point linking cytoplasmic growth, cell-cycle and cell-wall functions. Recent progress in quantitative imaging and computational modelling will facilitate analysis of the multiple interconnections between plant cell growth and cell cycle and ultimately will be required for the predictive manipulation of plant growth.

  19. Growth inhibitory effects of gossypol and related compounds on fungal cotton root pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of terpenoids gossypol, gossypolone, apogossypolone, methoxygossypol and dimethoxygossypol on growth of a collection of fungal soil pathogens. The compounds were tested at a concentration of 100 µg ml-1 in a Czapek Dox agar medium at 25°C. Gossy...

  20. Cytokines can counteract the inhibitory effect of MEK-i on NK-cell function.

    PubMed

    Manzini, Claudia; Venè, Roberta; Cossu, Irene; Gualco, Marina; Zupo, Simonetta; Dono, Mariella; Spagnolo, Francesco; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Pietra, Gabriella

    2016-09-20

    Oncogene-targeted therapies based on mutated BRAF- and/or MEK-specific inhibitors have been developed for melanoma treatment. Although these drugs induce tumor regression in a high percentage of patients, clinical responses are frequently limited in time and tumors often recur. Recent studies suggested that the combination of BRAF/MEK inhibition with immunotherapy could represent a promising strategy for the cure of melanoma. NK cells are suitable effectors for tumor immunotherapy. Here we show that PLX4032 (a mutant BRAFV600 inhibitor) had no effect on the functional properties of NK cells cultured in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15. In contrast, PD0325901 (a MEK inhibitor) induced the down-regulation of the main activating NK receptors and inhibited NK cell function. Importantly, PD0325901 did not affect the anti-tumor activity of NK cells that had been exposed to a combination of IL-15 and IL-18. In addition, both PLX4032 and PD0325901 did not exert any inhibitory effect on in vitro IL-2 or IL-15 pre-activated NK cells.Our data may provide a rationale for future clinical protocols that combine IL-15/IL-18 cytokine administration with MEK inhibitors. In addition, they suggest that oncogene-targeting drugs are compatible with NK-based adoptive therapy.

  1. Carbon nanotubes induce apoptosis resistance of human lung epithelial cells through FLICE-inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Stueckle, Todd A; Wang, Liying; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-02-01

    Chronic exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been reported to induce apoptosis resistance of human lung epithelial cells. As resistance to apoptosis is a foundation of neoplastic transformation and cancer development, we evaluated the apoptosis resistance characteristic of the exposed lung cells to understand the pathogenesis mechanism. Passage control and SWCNT-transformed human lung epithelial cells were treated with known inducers of apoptosis via the intrinsic (antimycin A and CDDP) or extrinsic (FasL and TNF-α) pathway and analyzed for apoptosis by DNA fragmentation, annexin-V expression, and caspase activation assays. Whole-genome microarray was performed to aid the analysis of apoptotic gene signaling network. The SWCNT-transformed cells exhibited defective death receptor pathway in association with cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) overexpression. Knockdown or chemical inhibition of c-FLIP abrogated the apoptosis resistance of SWCNT-transformed cells. Whole-genome expression signature analysis confirmed these findings. This study is the first to demonstrate carbon nanotube-induced defective death receptor pathway and the role of c-FLIP in the process.

  2. Inhibitory impacts of chemically modified tetracycline-3 and underlying mechanism in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Xu, Jiaying; Yang, Yang; Chong, Yu; Liu, Chang; Jiao, Yang; Fan, Saijun

    2013-09-01

    Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) have been rationally designed from tetracyclines. The CMTs that show the antimicrobial properties are eliminated, whereas matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory properties are retained. Interestingly, CMT-3 (COL-3, by eliminating the dimethylamino, methyl, and hydroxyl functionalities on the basic tetracycline structure), one of the CMTs, has shown strong anticancer activity. In this study, we found that CMT-3 showed dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity in HeLa and Siha cells, two human cervical cancer cell lines. HeLa cells were more sensitive to CMT-3 compared with Siha cells. The antiproliferation potential of CMT-3 was associated with the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, increasing reactive oxygen species level, and proapoptosis protein (e.g. caspase-3) expression, but decreasing antiapoptosis protein expression (e.g. Bcl-2). N-acetylcysteine (a reactive oxygen species inhibitor) and Z-LEHD-FMK significantly reduced or blocked the apoptosis event resulting from cytotoxic effect of CMT-3. CMT-3 also induced G0/G1 phase arrest with the reduction of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin E and the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Our findings provide the important foundation for further investigation of the underlying mechanism for the anticancer activity of CMT-3 and the potential application of CMT-3 as a new therapeutic candidate for clinical cervical cancer therapy.

  3. Cytokines can counteract the inhibitory effect of MEK-i on NK-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Manzini, Claudia; Venè, Roberta; Cossu, Irene; Gualco, Marina; Zupo, Simonetta; Dono, Mariella; Spagnolo, Francesco; Queirolo, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Pietra, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-targeted therapies based on mutated BRAF- and/or MEK-specific inhibitors have been developed for melanoma treatment. Although these drugs induce tumor regression in a high percentage of patients, clinical responses are frequently limited in time and tumors often recur. Recent studies suggested that the combination of BRAF/MEK inhibition with immunotherapy could represent a promising strategy for the cure of melanoma. NK cells are suitable effectors for tumor immunotherapy. Here we show that PLX4032 (a mutant BRAFV600 inhibitor) had no effect on the functional properties of NK cells cultured in the presence of IL-2 or IL-15. In contrast, PD0325901 (a MEK inhibitor) induced the down-regulation of the main activating NK receptors and inhibited NK cell function. Importantly, PD0325901 did not affect the anti-tumor activity of NK cells that had been exposed to a combination of IL-15 and IL-18. In addition, both PLX4032 and PD0325901 did not exert any inhibitory effect on in vitro IL-2 or IL-15 pre-activated NK cells. Our data may provide a rationale for future clinical protocols that combine IL-15/IL-18 cytokine administration with MEK inhibitors. In addition, they suggest that oncogene-targeting drugs are compatible with NK-based adoptive therapy. PMID:27563819

  4. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  5. Excitatory synaptic activity is associated with a rapid structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Lushnikova, Irina; Skibo, Galina; Muller, Dominique; Nikonenko, Irina

    2011-04-01

    Synaptic activity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP), has been shown to induce morphological plasticity of excitatory synapses on dendritic spines through the spine head and postsynaptic density (PSD) enlargement and reorganization. Much less, however, is known about activity-induced morphological modifications of inhibitory synapses. Using an in vitro model of rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and electron microscopy, we studied activity-related morphological changes of somatic inhibitory inputs triggered by a brief oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) episode, a condition associated with a synaptic enhancement referred to as anoxic LTP and a structural remodeling of excitatory synapses. Three-dimensional reconstruction of inhibitory axo-somatic synapses at different times before and after brief OGD revealed important morphological changes. The PSD area significantly and markedly increased at synapses with large and complex PSDs, but not at synapses with simple, macular PSDs. Activity-related changes of PSD size and presynaptic bouton volume developed in a strongly correlated manner. Analyses of single and serial sections further showed that the density of inhibitory synaptic contacts on the cell soma did not change within 1 h after OGD. In contrast, the proportion of the cell surface covered with inhibitory PSDs, as well as the complexity of these PSDs significantly increased, with less macular PSDs and more complex, segmented shapes. Together, these data reveal a rapid activity-related restructuring of somatic inhibitory synapses characterized by an enlargement and increased complexity of inhibitory PSDs, providing a new mechanism for a quick adjustment of the excitatory-inhibitory balance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Synaptic Plasticity & Interneurons'.

  6. Dexamethasone Regulates EphA5, a Potential Inhibitory Factor with Osteogenic Capability of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Okawa, Atsushi; Sotome, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the importance of quality management procedures for the handling of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and provided evidence for the existence of osteogenic inhibitor molecules in BMSCs. One candidate inhibitor is the ephrin type-A receptor 5 (EphA5), which is expressed in hBMSCs and upregulated during long-term culture. In this study, forced expression of EphA5 diminished the expression of osteoblast phenotypic markers. Downregulation of endogenous EphA5 by dexamethasone treatment promoted osteoblast marker expression. EphA5 could be involved in the normal growth regulation of BMSCs and could be a potential marker for replicative senescence. Although Eph forward signaling stimulated by ephrin-B-Fc promoted the expression of ALP mRNA in BMSCs, exogenous addition of EphA5-Fc did not affect the ALP level. The mechanism underlying the silencing of EphA5 in early cultures remains unclear. EphA5 promoter was barely methylated in hBMSCs while histone deacetylation could partially suppress EphA5 expression in early-passage cultures. In repeatedly passaged cultures, the upregulation of EphA5 independent of methylation could competitively inhibit osteogenic signal transduction pathways such as EphB forward signaling. Elucidation of the potential inhibitory function of EphA5 in hBMSCs may provide an alternative approach for lineage differentiation in cell therapy strategies and regenerative medicine. PMID:27057165

  7. Generation and Characterization of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Sun, Jane; Fortuna, Patrick R.J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts from an adult female horse into equine induced pluripotent stem cells (equiPSCs). These equiPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), placing them in striking contrast to previously derived equiPSCs that have been shown to be co-dependent on both LIF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These equiPSCs have a normal karyotype and have been maintained beyond 60 passages. They possess alkaline phosphatase activity and express eqNANOG, eqOCT4, and eqTERT mRNA. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that they produce NANOG, REX1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, and TRA1-81. While our equiPSCs are LIF dependent, bFGF co-stimulates their proliferation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. EquiPSCs lack expression of eqXIST and immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that during reprogramming the inactive X chromosome has likely been reactivated to generate cells that have two active X chromosomes. EquiPSCs form embryoid bodies and in vitro teratomas that contain derivatives of all three germ layers. These LIF-dependent equiPSCs likely reflect a more naive state of pluripotency than equiPSCs that are co-dependent on both LIF and bFGF and so provide a novel resource for understanding pluripotency in the horse. PMID:24555755

  8. Inhibitory effects of pharmacological doses of melatonin on aromatase activity and expression in rat glioma cells.

    PubMed

    González, A; Martínez-Campa, C; Mediavilla, M D; Alonso-González, C; Sánchez-Barceló, E J; Cos, S

    2007-09-17

    Melatonin exerts oncostatic effects on different kinds of neoplasias, especially on oestrogen-dependent tumours. Recently, it has been described that melatonin, on the basis of its antioxidant properties, inhibits the growth of glioma cells. Glioma cells express oestrogen receptors and have the ability to synthesise oestrogens from androgens. In the present study, we demonstrate that pharmacological concentrations of melatonin decreases the growth of C6 glioma cells and reduces the local biosynthesis of oestrogens, through the inhibition of aromatase, the enzyme that catalyses the conversion of androgens into oestrogens. These results are supported by three types of evidence. Firstly, melatonin counteracts the growth stimulatory effects of testosterone on glioma cells, which is dependent on the local synthesis of oestrogens from testosterone. Secondly, we found that melatonin reduces the aromatase activity of C6 cells, measured by the tritiated water release assay. Finally, by (RT)-PCR, we found that melatonin downregulates aromatase mRNA steady-state levels in these glioma cells. We conclude that melatonin inhibits the local production of oestrogens decreasing aromatase activity and expression. By analogy to the implications of aromatase in other forms of oestrogen-sensitive tumours, it is conceivable that the modulation of the aromatase by pharmacological melatonin may play a role in the growth of glioblastomas.

  9. Inhibitory effect of a rhizobitoxine analog on bud growth after release from dormancy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R H; Lieberman, M; Broome, O C

    1977-02-01

    Application of the ethoxy analog of rhizobitoxine (l-2-amino-4-[2'-aminoethoxy]-trans-3-butenoic acid), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, inhibited growth of apple, crabapple, and apricot buds released from dormancy by chilling or by treatment with benzyladenine. When tea crabapple (Malus hupehensis [Pamp.] Rehd.) buds were sprayed once with 8.8 x 10(-3)m benzyladenine, ethylene production by the buds increased significantly 24 to 48 hours after benzyladenine treatment. Application of the rhizobitoxine analog to the buds at the time of benzyladenine treatment reduced ethylene evolution to the level of the controls for up to 2 weeks after treatment. Increase in bud weight was inhibited also but to a lesser extent. These data suggest that growth of buds is accompanied by ethylene production and that the inhibition of ethylene biosynthesis also inhibits bud growth. Since additional metabolic effects result from the action of the rhizobitoxine analog, no firm conclusions on its role can be drawn at this time.

  10. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  11. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation by a cell cycle inhibitory peptide fused to a thermally responsive polypeptide carrier

    PubMed Central

    Massodi, Iqbal; Moktan, Shama; Rawat, Aruna; Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by normal tissue tolerance, resulting in a narrow therapeutic index. To increase drug specificity and efficacy and to reduce toxicity in normal tissues, we have developed a polypeptide carrier for a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, which has the potential to be thermally targeted to the tumor site. The design of this polypeptide is based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). The coding sequence of ELP was modified by the addition of the cell penetrating peptide Bac-7 at the N-terminus and a 23 amino acid peptide derived from p21 at the C-terminus (Bac-ELP1-p21). Bac-ELP1-p21 is soluble in aqueous solutions below physiological temperature (37°C) but aggregates when the temperature is raised above 39°C, making it a promising thermally responsive therapeutic carrier that may be actively targeted to solid tumors by application of focused hyperthermia. While Bac-ELP1-p21 at 37°C did not have any effect on SKOV-3 cell proliferation, the use of hyperthermia increased the antiproliferative effect of Bac-ELP1-p21 compared with a thermally unresponsive control polypeptide. Bac-ELP1-p21 displayed both a cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution in the SKOV-3 cells, with nuclear-localized polypeptide enriched in the heated cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Using Western blotting, we show that Bac-ELP1-p21 caused a decrease in Rb phosphorylation levels in cells treated at 42°C. The polypeptide also induced caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and cell cycle arrest in S-phase and G2/M-phase. These studies indicate that ELP is a promising macromolecular carrier for the delivery of cell cycle inhibitory peptides to solid tumors. PMID:19588502

  12. Inhibitory effect of putranjivain A on allergic inflammation through suppression of mast cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Park, Seung-Bin; Lee, Soyoung; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Shin, Tae-Yong; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Putranjivain A (PJA), member of ellagitannin, is known to possess beneficial effects including anti-cancer and anti-viral activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether PJA modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. The study was performed in anaphylaxis mouse model and cultured mast cells. PJA inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in immunoglobulin E-stimulated mast cells. PJA reduced this expression by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cell. The oral administration of PJA reduced systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis, the release of serum histamine, and the expression of the histamine H{sub 1} receptor. In addition, PJA attenuated the activation of mast cells. PJA inhibited the release of histamine from various types of mast cells by the suppression of intracellular calcium. The inhibitory activity of PJA on the allergic reaction was similar to that of disodium cromoglycate, a known anti-allergic drug. These results suggest that PJA can facilitate the prevention or treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases mediated by mast cells. - Highlights: • PJA reduced the degranulation of mast cells. • PJA inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines. • The effect of PJA on allergic reaction was comparable to the DSCG. • PJA might be a candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

  13. Inhibitory effects of carbocisteine on type A seasonal influenza virus infection in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Shinya, Kyoko; Hatachi, Yukimasa; Sasaki, Takahiko; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Motoki; Asada, Masanori; Fujino, Naoya; Suzuki, Takaya; Deng, Xue; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2010-08-01

    Type A human seasonal influenza (FluA) virus infection causes exacerbations of bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). l-carbocisteine, a mucolytic agent, reduces the frequency of common colds and exacerbations in COPD. However, the inhibitory effects of l-carbocisteine on FluA virus infection are uncertain. We studied the effects of l-carbocisteine on FluA virus infection in airway epithelial cells. Human tracheal epithelial cells were pretreated with l-carbocisteine and infected with FluA virus (H(3)N(2)). Viral titers in supernatant fluids, RNA of FluA virus in the cells, and concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in supernatant fluids, including IL-6, increased with time after infection. l-carbocisteine reduced viral titers in supernatant fluids, RNA of FluA virus in the cells, the susceptibility to FluA virus infection, and concentrations of cytokines induced by virus infection. The epithelial cells expressed sialic acid with an alpha2,6-linkage (SAalpha2,6Gal), a receptor for human influenza virus on the cells, and l-carbocisteine reduced the expression of SAalpha2,6Gal. l-carbocisteine reduced the number of acidic endosomes from which FluA viral RNA enters into the cytoplasm and reduced the fluorescence intensity from acidic endosomes. Furthermore, l-carbocisteine reduced NF-kappaB proteins including p50 and p65 in the nuclear extracts of the cells. These findings suggest that l-carbocisteine may inhibit FluA virus infection, partly through the reduced expression of the receptor for human influenza virus in the human airway epithelial cells via the inhibition of NF-kappaB and through increasing pH in endosomes. l-carbocisteine may reduce airway inflammation in influenza virus infection.

  14. Inhibitory effect of vanillic acid on methylglyoxal-mediated glycation in apoptotic Neuro-2A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shang-Ming; Hsu, Chin-Lin; Chuang, Hong-Chih; Shih, Ping-Hsiao; Wu, Chi-Hao; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2008-11-01

    Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound generated as an intermediate of glycolysis during the physical glycation in the diabetic condition. It is considered to be a potent precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) formation. Methylglyoxal itself and methylglyoxal-derived AGEs have been commonly implicated in the development of diabetic neuropathy. Our previous study indicated that vanillic acid showed an inhibitory effect against methylglyoxal-mediated Neuro-2A cell apoptosis, suggesting that vanillic acid might possess cytoprotective properties in the prevention of diabetic neuropathy complication. In this study, the effects of vanillic acid on the methylglyoxal-mediated glycation system involved in the progression of Neuro-2A cell apoptosis were further investigated. Our findings indicated that methylglyoxal-induced Neuro-2A cell apoptosis was mediated through the possible glycation mechanism of oxidative stress, activation of the MAPK signaling pathway (p38 and JNK) and oxidation-sensitive protein expression (PKC and p47(phox)) and methylglyoxal-derived N-epsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) formation. Vanillic acid, however, suppressed methylglyoxal-induced Neuro-2A cell apoptosis via inhibition of glycation mechanisms including ROS, p38 and JNK, PKC and p47(phox), and methylglyoxal-derived CML formation. In the present study, we established the first evidence that vanillic acid might contribute to the prevention of the development of diabetic neuropathy by blocking the methylglyoxal-mediated intracellular glycation system.

  15. Neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) localizes to the cytokinetic machinery during cell division

    PubMed Central

    Abadía-Molina, Francisco; Morón-Calvente, Virginia; Baird, Stephen D.; Shamim, Fahad; Martín, Francisco; MacKenzie, Alex

    2017-01-01

    The neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) is a constituent of the inflammasome and a key component of the innate immune system. Here we use immunofluorescence to position NAIP within the cytokinetic apparatus, contiguous to chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Centralspindlin, PRC1 and KIF4A. During metaphase, NAIP accumulates in the mitotic spindle poles and is shown in spindle microtubules; in anaphase NAIP is detected in the middle of the central spindle. At the end of cytokinesis, NAIP is localized in the outlying region of the stem body, the center of the intercellular bridge formed between daughter cells prior to cellular abscission. We also describe the sustained presence of NAIP mRNA and protein throughout the cell cycle with a significant increase observed in the G2/M phase. Consistent with a role for NAIP in cytokinesis, NAIP overexpression in HeLa cells promotes the acquisition of a multinuclear phenotype. Conversely, NAIP siRNA gene silencing results in an apoptotic lethal phenotype. Our confocal and super resolution stimulated-emission-depletion (STED) examination of mammalian cell cytokinesis demonstrate a potential new role for NAIP in addition to anti-apoptotic and innate immunology functions. PMID:28059125

  16. High gravity and high cell density mitigate some of the fermentation inhibitory effects of softwood hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    After steam pretreatment of lignocellulosic substrates the fermentation of the biomass derived sugars to ethanol is typically problematic because of both the generally low sugar concentrations that can be supplied and the presence of naturally occurring and process derived inhibitors. As the majority of the inhibitory materials are usually associated with the hemicellulose rich, water soluble component, this fraction was supplemented with glucose to simulate high solids, un-detoxified substrate to see if a high gravity/high cell consistency approach might better cope with inhibition. Several yeast strains were assessed, with the Tembec T1, T2 and Lallemand LYCC 6469 strains showing the greatest ethanol productivity and yield. The addition of supplemental glucose enabled the faster and quantitatively higher removal of hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). High cell density could provide effective fermentation at high sugar concentrations while enhancing inhibitor reduction. A 77% ethanol yield could be achieved using strain LYCC 6469 after 48 h at high cell density. It was apparent that a high cell density approach improved ethanol production by all of the evaluated yeast strains. PMID:23410516

  17. Plasmodium falciparum line-dependent association of in vitro growth-inhibitory activity and risk of malaria.

    PubMed

    Rono, Josea; Färnert, Anna; Olsson, Daniel; Osier, Faith; Rooth, Ingegerd; Persson, Kristina E M

    2012-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum's ability to invade erythrocytes is essential for its survival within the human host. Immune mechanisms that impair this ability are therefore expected to contribute to immunity against the parasite. Plasma of humans who are naturally exposed to malaria has been shown to have growth-inhibitory activity (GIA) in vitro. However, the importance of GIA in relation to protection from malaria has been unclear. In a case-control study nested within a longitudinally followed population in Tanzania, plasma samples collected at baseline from 171 individuals (55 cases and 116 age-matched controls) were assayed for GIA using three P. falciparum lines (3D7, K1, and W2mef) chosen based on their erythrocyte invasion phenotypes. Distribution of GIA differed between the lines, with most samples inhibiting the growth of 3D7 and K1 and enhancing the growth of W2mef. GIA to 3D7 was associated with a reduced risk of malaria within 40 weeks of follow-up (odds ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21 to 0.96; P = 0.04), whereas GIA to K1 and W2mef was not. These results show that GIA, as well as its association with protection from malaria, is dependent on the P. falciparum line and can be explained by differences in erythrocyte invasion phenotypes between parasite lines. Our study contributes knowledge on the biological importance of growth inhibition and the potential influence of P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion phenotypic differences on its relationship to protective immunity against malaria.

  18. A sulfated polysaccharide of Ecklonia cava inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells by inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ginnae; Lee, WonWon; Kim, Kil-Nam; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Heo, Soo-Jin; Kang, Nalae; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Jeon, You-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We investigated anticancer effects of the crude polysaccharides (CPs) isolated from Ecklonia cava enzymatic extracts using AMG, Viscozyme, Protamex, and Alcalase enzyme against a colon cancer cell line, CT26 cells. Among them, the CP of Protamex extract (PCP) contained the highest fucose and sulfated group contents and showed the highest growth inhibitory effect against CT-26 cells. In addition, PCP dose-dependently increased the formation of apoptotic body and the percentage of Sub-G1 DNA contents. Also, PCP activated caspase 9 and PARP as regulating the expressions of Bax and Bcl-2. Moreover, PPP2, a fraction purified from PCP showed the highest growth inhibitory effect against CT 26 cells with the increased fucose and sulfated group contents. The results demonstrate that the isolated SP containing plentiful fucose and sulfated group contents has the anticancer effect on colon cancer cells via regulation of Bcl-2/Bax signal pathway. PMID:26417363

  19. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Miyoshi; Mosley, S.P.; Barbero, L.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

  20. [Inhibitory effect of kaempferol on inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human mast cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun-jiang; Wang, Hu; Li, Li; Sui, He-huan; Huang, Jia-jun

    2015-06-01

    This study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of kaempferol on inflammatory response of lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-stimulated HMC-1 mast cells. The cytotoxicity of kaempferol to HMC-1 mast cells were analyzed by using MTT assay and then the administration concentrations of kaempferol were established. Histamine, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α were measured using ELISA assay in activated HMC-1 mast cells after incubation with various concentrations of kaempferol (10, 20 and 40 µmol.L-1). Western blot was used to test the protein expression of p-IKKβ, IκBα, p-IκBα and nucleus NF-κB of LPS-induced HMC-1 mast cells after incubation with different concentrations of kaempferol. The optimal concentrations of kaempferol were defined as the range from 5 µmol.L-1 to 40 µmol.L-1. Kaempferol significantly decreased the release of histamine, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α of activated HMC-1 mast cells (P<0.01). After incubation with kaempferol, the protein expression of p-IKKβ, p-IKBa and nucleus NF-κB (p65) markedly reduced in LPS-stimulated HMC-1 mast cells (P<0.01). Taken together, we concluded that kaempferol markedly inhibit mast cell-mediated inflammatory response. At the same time, kaempferol can inhibit the activation of IKKβ, block the phosphorylation of IκBα, prevent NF-KB entering into the nucleus, and then decrease the release of inflammatory mediators.

  1. Luteolin and its inhibitory effect on tumor growth in systemic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, Shailendra

    2013-04-01

    Lamy et al have provided interesting data in their recent article in your esteemed journal. Luteolin augments apoptosis in a number of systemic malignancies. Luteolin reduces tumor growth in breast carcinomas. Luteolin mediates this effect by up-regulating the expression of Bax and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-xL. EGFR-induced MAPK activation is also attenuated. As a result there is increased G2/ M phase arrest. These effects have been seen both in vivo as well as in vitro. It also reduces ERα expression and causes inhibition of IGF-1 mediated PI3K–Akt pathway. Luteolin also activates p38 resulting in nuclear translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor. Simultaneously it also activates ERK. As a result there is increased intra-tumoral apoptosis which is caspase dependent as well as caspase independent. - Highlights: ► Luteolin and tumor growth in breast carcinomas. ► Luteolin and pulmonary cancer. ► Luteolin and colon cancer.

  2. Inhibitory effect of cinnamon powder on pathogen growth in laboratory media and oriental-style rice cakes (sulgidduk).

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu-Jin; Bae, Young-Min; Moon, Bokyung; Lee, Sun-Young

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the use of natural plant materials as alternative food preservatives. We examined the antimicrobial effects of natural plant materials used as additives against foodborne pathogens in laboratory media and Sulgidduk, oriental-style rice cakes. Cinnamon, mugwort, and garlic powder solutions (3%) were tested for their antimicrobial activities against pathogens in laboratory media. Sulgidduk prepared with different amounts of cinnamon powder (1, 3, and 6%) was inoculated with a Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus cereus cocktail. The samples were air or vacuum packaged and stored at 22 ± 1°C for 72 h, and microbial growth was determined. Cinnamon powder showed more inhibitory properties against pathogens such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, S. aureus, and B. cereus than did mugwort or garlic powder. The populations of S. aureus and B. cereus in Sulgidduk containing cinnamon powder were significantly lower than in the control during storage time. Different packaging methods did not result in a significant difference in pathogen growth. In a sensory evaluation, Sulgidduk containing 1 and 3% cinnamon powder did not significantly differ from the control sample in any of the attributes tested other than flavor. These results indicate that natural plant materials such as cinnamon powder could be used as food additives to improve the microbiological stability of rice cakes.

  3. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  4. Production of Macrophage Inhibitory Factor (MIF) by Primary Sertoli Cells; its Possible Involvement in Migration of Spermatogonial Cells.

    PubMed

    Huleihel, M; Abofoul-Azab, M; Abarbanel, Y; Einav, I; Levitas, E; Lunenfeld, E

    2016-12-07

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multifunctional molecule. MIF was originally identified as a T-cell-derived factor responsible for the inhibition of macrophage migration. In testicular tissue of adult rats, MIF is constitutively expressed by Leydig cells under physiological conditions. The aim of this study was to examine MIF levels in testicular homogenates from different aged mice, and the capacity of Sertoli cells to produce it. We also examined MIF involvement in spermatogonial cell migration. Similar levels of MIF protein were detected in testicular homogenates of mice of different ages (1-8 weeks-old). However, the RNA expression levels of MIF were high in 1-week-old mice and significantly decreased with age compared to 1-week-old mice. MIF was stained in Sertoli, Leydig cells and developed germ cells in the seminiferous tubules. Isolated Sertoli cells from 1 week-old mice stained to MIF. Cultures of Sertoli cells from 1-week-old mice produced and expressed high levels of MIF which significantly decreased with age. MIF was localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of Sertoli cell cultures isolated from 1-weeks-old mice; however it was localized only in the cytoplasm and branches of cultures isolated from 8-week-old mice. MIFR was detected in GFRα1 and Sertoli cells. MIF could induce migration of spermatogonial cells, and this effect was synergistic with glial cell-line neurotrophic factor. Our results show, for the first time, the capacity of Sertoli cells to produce MIF under normal conditions and that MIFR expressed in GFRα1 and Sertoli cells. We also showed that MIF induced spermatogonial cell migration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    TOYOHARA, YUKIYO; HASHITANI, SUSUMU; KISHIMOTO, HIROMITSU; NOGUCHI, KAZUMA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUTO; URADE, MASAHIRO

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  6. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Yukiyo; Hashitani, Susumu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model.

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor produced by the tumour stroma but not by tumour cells regulates angiogenesis in the B16-F10 melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Girard, E; Strathdee, C; Trueblood, E; Quéva, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been proposed as a link between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Despite its potentially broad influence in tumour biology and prevalent expression, the value of MIF as a therapeutic target in cancer remains unclear. We sought to validate MIF in tumour models by achieving a complete inhibition of its expression in tumour cells and in the tumour stroma. Methods: We used MIF shRNA-transduced B16-F10 melanoma cells implanted in wild-type and MIF−/− C57Bl6 mice to investigate the effect of loss of MIF on tumour growth. Cytokine detection and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to evaluate tumours ex vivo. Results: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor shRNA inhibited expression of MIF protein by B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the loss of MIF in this cell line resulted in a decreased response to hypoxia as indicated by reduced expression of VEGF. In vivo the growth of B16-F10 tumours was inhibited by an average of 47% in the MIF−/− mice compared with wild-type but was unaffected by loss of MIF expression by the tumour cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that microvessel density was decreased in tumours implanted in the MIF−/− mice. Profiling of serum cytokines showed a decrease in pro-angiogenic cytokines in MIF−/− mice. Conclusion: We report that the absence of MIF in the host resulted in slower tumour growth, which was associated with reduced vascularity. While the major contribution of MIF appeared to be in the regulation of angiogenesis, tumour cell-derived MIF played a negligible role in this process. PMID:22955855

  8. Inhibitory effect of chlorine and ultraviolet radiation on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken breast and development of predictive growth models.

    PubMed

    Oh, S R; Kang, I; Oh, M H; Ha, S D

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of chlorine (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) was investigated with and without UV radiation (300 mW·s/cm(2)) for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in chicken breast meat. Using a polynomial model, predictive growth models were also developed as a function of chlorine concentration, UV exposure, and storage temperature (4, 10, and 15°C). A maximum L. monocytogenes reduction (0.8 log cfu, cfu/g) was obtained when combining chlorine at 200 mg/kg and UV at 300 mW·s/cm(2), and a maximum synergistic effect (0.4 log cfu/g) was observed when using chlorine at 100 mg/kg and UV at 300 mW·s/cm(2). Primary models developed for specific growth rate and lag time showed a good fitness (R(2) > 0.91), as determined by the reparameterized Gompertz equation. Secondary polynomial models were obtained using nonlinear regression analysis. The developed models were validated with mean square error, bias factor, and accuracy factor, which were 0.0003, 0.96, and 1.11, respectively, for specific growth rate and 7.69, 0.99, and 1.04, respectively, for lag time. The treatment of chlorine and UV did not change the color and texture of chicken breast after 7 d of storage at 4°C. As a result, the combination of chlorine at 100 mg/kg and UV at 300 mW·s/cm(2) appears to an effective method into inhibit L. monocytogenes growth in broiler carcasses with no negative effects on color and textural quality. Based on the validation results, the predictive models can be used to accurately predict L. monocytogenes growth in chicken breast.

  9. [Studying the tumor growth inhibitory effect of modified GnRH-III-anthracycline bioconjugates in subcutaneous vs. orthotopic models in vivo].

    PubMed

    Kapuvári, Bence; Schulcz, Ákos; Hegedüs, Rózsa; Szabó, Ildikó; Manea, Marilena; Vincze, Borbála; Tóvári, József; Gacs, Alexandra; Tejeda, Miguel; Gaál, Dezsõ; Mezõ, Gábor

    2015-12-01

    Targeted tumor therapy is a perspective procedure to specifically destroy the cancer tissues with eliminating or at least decreasing the side effects of anticancer drugs. For this purpose the drug molecule is attached to a targeting moiety (e.g. peptide hormones) that recognizes tumor specific or overexpressed receptors on cancer cells. The in vitro cytostatic or cytotoxic assays do not give proper information whether the tumor growth inhibitory effect of the conjugate is better than the activity of the free drug. Only in vivo studies are adequate to answer this question. However, the selection of the appropriate tumor model is important to eliminate the false positive results. In our studies a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH-III) was applied as targeting moiety in drug conjugates. The in vivo antitumor activity of these conjugates was investigated on mice bearing subcutaneously or orthotopically szigdeveloped tumors. The subcutaneously implanted tumor model which is isolated from its surroundings may provide false results in tumor growth inhibition. In contrast, the orthotopically developed tumor is a better model representing appropriate anatomical and clinical status of cancer. Therefore, the orthotopical colon cancer developed in our laboratory is a suitable model for the study of the antitumor activity of the conjugates prepared for targeted tumor therapy.

  10. A recombinant inhibitory isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor164/165 aggravates ischemic brain damage in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya, Ganta V; Cromer, Walter E; Parker, Courtney P; Couraud, Pierre O; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Mathis, J Michael; Minagar, Alireza; Alexander, J Steven

    2013-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) are a Janus-faced family of growth factors exerting both neuroprotective and maladaptive effects on the blood-brain barrier. For example, VEGFs are beneficial in promoting postischemic brain angiogenesis, but the newly formed vessels are leaky. We investigated the role of the naturally occurring murine inhibitory VEGF isoform VEGF165b in a mouse model of focal cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (I/R) in male C57BL/6 mice. We investigated the roles of VEGF164/165 and VEGF165b in both brain and nonbrain endothelial barrier, angiogenesis, and neutrophil migration using oxygen glucose deprivation and reoxygenation as in vitro model. We investigated the role of VEGF165b in brain edema, neutrophil infiltration, ischemic brain damage, and neuronal death in vivo using an adenovirus encoding a recombinant VEGF164b isoform. Neither VEGF164/165 nor VEGF165b significantly altered brain endothelial barrier or angiogenesis in vitro. However, treatment of brain endothelial cells with VEGF165b increased neutrophil migration in vitro and exacerbated stroke injury by aggravating neutrophil infiltration and neurodegeneration in vivo. Our results indicate that alterations in the delicate balance in the relative levels of pro- and antiangiogenic VEGF isoforms can result in either adaptive or detrimental effects, depending on the VEGF isoform levels and on the duration and extent of injury.

  11. Inhibitory effect of liposome-entrapped lemongrass oil on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese.

    PubMed

    Cui, H Y; Wu, J; Lin, L

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection in dairy products is of mounting public concern. To inhibit bacterial growth, we engineered stimuli-responsive liposomes containing lemongrass oil for this study. The controlled release of liposome-entrapped lemongrass oil is triggered by listerolysin O, secreted by L. monocytogenes. We investigated the antibiotic activities of lemongrass oil liposomes against L. monocytogenes in cheese. We also assessed their possible effects on the quality of the cheese. Liposomes containing lemongrass oil (5.0mg/mL) presented the optimal polydispersity index (0.246), zeta-potential (-58.9mV) and entrapment efficiency (25.7%). The liposomes displayed satisfactory antibiotic activity against L. monocytogenes in cheese over the storage period at 4°C. We observed no effects on the physical and sensory properties of the cheese after the liposome treatment.

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Essential Oils on Aspergillus ochraceus Growth and Ochratoxin A Production

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Yueju; Zhou, Lu; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin which is a common contaminant in grains during storage. Aspergillus ochraceus is the most common producer of OTA. Essential oils play a crucial role as a biocontrol in the reduction of fungal contamination. Essential oils namely natural cinnamaldehyde, cinnamon oil, synthetic cinnamaldehyde, Litsea citrate oil, citral, eugenol, peppermint, eucalyptus, anise and camphor oils, were tested for their efficacy against A. ochraceus growth and OTA production by fumigation and contact assays. Natural cinnamaldehyde proved to be the most effective against A. ochraceus when compared to other oils. Complete fungal growth inhibition was obtained at 150–250 µL/L with fumigation and 250–500 µL/L with contact assays for cinnamon oil, natural and synthetic cinnamaldehyde, L. citrate oil and citral. Essential oils had an impact on the ergosterol biosynthesis and OTA production. Complete inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was observed at ≥100 µg/mL of natural cinnamaldehyde and at 200 µg/mL of citral, but total inhibition was not observed at 200 µg/mL of eugenol. But, citral and eugenol could inhibit the OTA production at ≥75 µg/mL and ≥150 µg/mL respectively, while natural cinnamaldehyde couldn’t fully inhibit OTA production at ≤200 µg/mL. The inhibition of OTA by natural cinnamaldehyde is mainly due to the reduction in fungal biomass. However, citral and eugenol could significant inhibit the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Also, we observed that cinnamaldehyde was converted to cinnamic alcohol by A. ochraceus, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde was mainly attributed to its carbonyl aldehyde group. The study concludes that natural cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol could be potential biocontrol agents against OTA contamination in storage grains. PMID:25255251

  13. Inhibitory effects of lactoferrin on growth and biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2009-08-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is an iron-binding antimicrobial protein present in saliva and gingival crevicular fluids, and it is possibly associated with host defense against oral pathogens, including periodontopathic bacteria. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro effects of LF-related agents on the growth and biofilm formation of two periodontopathic bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, which reside as biofilms in the subgingival plaque. The planktonic growth of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was suppressed for up to 5 h by incubation with >or=130 microg/ml of human LF (hLF), iron-free and iron-saturated bovine LF (apo-bLF and holo-bLF, respectively), and >or=6 microg/ml of bLF-derived antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B (LFcin B); but those effects were weak after 8 h. The biofilm formation of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia over 24 h was effectively inhibited by lower concentrations (>or=8 microg/ml) of various iron-bound forms (the apo, native, and holo forms) of bLF and hLF but not LFcin B. A preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis and P. intermedia was also reduced by incubation with various iron-bound bLFs, hLF, and LFcin B for 5 h. In an examination of the effectiveness of native bLF when it was used in combination with four antibiotics, it was found that treatment with ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and minocycline in combination with native bLF for 24 h reduced the amount of a preformed biofilm of P. gingivalis compared with the level of reduction achieved with each agent alone. These results demonstrate the antibiofilm activity of LF with lower iron dependency against P. gingivalis and P. intermedia and the potential usefulness of LF for the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases and as adjunct therapy for periodontal diseases.

  14. Effects of KRC-108 on the Aurora A activity and growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye Jin; Park, Kyeong Ryang; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Lee, Jongkook; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Chul; Han, Sun-Young

    2015-06-12

    Aurora A is involved in regulating multiple steps of mitosis. Over-expression of Aurora A is related to tumorigenesis and poor prognosis. KRC-108 is a novel multi-kinase inhibitor which has anti-tumor activity in vivo. In this study, we identified the inhibitory effects of KRC-108 on Aurora A kinase and growth-inhibitory characteristics of KRC-108. The in vitro kinase activity assay, immunoblot, and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that KRC-108 inhibited Aurora A activity. KRC-108 exhibited cytotoxicity against human colorectal cancer cell line HT-29. Colony formation assays showed that KRC-108 reduced the colony growth of HT-29 cells. KRC-108 also inhibited migration of HT-29 cells. The expression levels of cyclin B1 and CDC2 were decreased by KRC-108 in HT-29 cells. Cell cycle analysis and flow cytometry indicated that the inhibitory effects of KRC-108 on cell growth are due to induction of G2/M arrest and apoptosis by inhibition of Aurora A. KRC-108 induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell line by Aurora A inhibition. The reported in vivo anti-tumor effects of KRC-108 might partly be due to anti-Aurora A effects. This study suggests that KRC-108 has potential for development as an anti-tumor agent, although further studies are needed.

  15. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  16. Decrease of SYNGAP1 in GABAergic cells impairs inhibitory synapse connectivity, synaptic inhibition and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Berryer, Martin H.; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Xing, Paul; Riebe, Ilse; Bosoi, Ciprian; Sanon, Nathalie; Antoine-Bertrand, Judith; Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo; Hamdan, Fadi F.; Carmant, Lionel; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Michaud, Jacques L.; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the SYNGAP1 gene, which codes for a Ras GTPase-activating protein, impairs cognition both in humans and in mice. Decrease of Syngap1 in mice has been previously shown to cause cognitive deficits at least in part by inducing alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission and premature maturation of excitatory connections. Whether Syngap1 plays a role in the development of cortical GABAergic connectivity and function remains unclear. Here, we show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency significantly reduces the formation of perisomatic innervations by parvalbumin-positive basket cells, a major population of GABAergic neurons, in a cell-autonomous manner. We further show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence impairs their connectivity, reduces inhibitory synaptic activity and cortical gamma oscillation power, and causes cognitive deficits. Our results indicate that Syngap1 plays a critical role in GABAergic circuit function and further suggest that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic circuits may contribute to cognitive deficits. PMID:27827368

  17. The inhibitory effect of shakuyakukanzoto on K+ current in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Suganami, Azusa; Sakamoto, Kazuho; Ono, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Hirotake; Hijioka, Nahoko; Murakawa, Masahiro; Kimura, Junko

    2014-01-01

    Shakuyakukanzoto (shao-yao-gan-cao-tang) is a commonly used Chinese traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of acute pain with muscle cramp. However, its mechanism of action is unclear. We previously reported that a low concentration of Kanzo (licorice) and isoliquiritigenin, a component of licorice, inhibited the potassium (K(+)) current in H9c2 cells. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of Shakuyakukanzoto, Shakuyaku or Kanzo on the K(+) current (IKur) in H9c2 cells. Shakuyakukanzoto inhibited IKur in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-maximal concentration of Shakuyakukanzoto was approximately 1.3 mg/mL and the Hill coefficient was 1.2. The order of potency of inhibiting IKur was Kanzo>Shakuyakukanzoto>Shakuyaku. Glycyrrhizin, a major component of licorice, had no inhibitory effect on IKur. A small interfering RNA experiment indicated that IKur was most likely to be Kv2.1 in H9c2 cells. Our results suggest that Shakuyakukanzoto may normalize intracellular and extracellular K(+) balance by inhibiting IKur and reducing K(+) efflux, while the Na(+)-K(+) pump promotes K(+) influx into myofibers. Consequently, excess K(+) may be reduced from external space of myofibers. This may be a part of the Shakuyakukanzoto mechanism for improving muscle pain.

  18. Salinomycin inhibits the tumor growth of glioma stem cells by selectively suppressing glioma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tunan; Yi, Liang; Li, Fei; Hu, Rong; Hu, Shengli; Yin, Yi; Lan, Chuan; Li, Zhao; Fu, Chuhua; Cao, Liu; Chen, Zhi; Xian, Jishu; Feng, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Glioma‑initiating cells are a small population of cells that have the ability to undergo self‑renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. In the present study, the potential role of salinomycin, a polyether antibiotic, on the suppression of glioma cell growth was investigated. GL261 glioma cells were maintained in a stem‑cell‑like status [GL261 neurospheres (GL261‑NS)] or induced for differentiation [GL261 adherent cells (GL261‑AC)]. It was demonstrated that salinomycin significantly reduced the cell viability of GL261‑NS and GL261‑AC cells in a dose‑dependent manner, with a more substantial inhibition of GL261‑NS proliferation (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of salinomycin on cell growth was more effective than that of 1‑(4‑amino‑2‑methyl‑5‑pyrimid l)‑methyl‑3‑(2‑chloroethyl)‑3‑nitrosourea hydrochloride and vincristine (P<0.05). Salinomycin depleted GL261‑NS from tumorspheres and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, salinomycin prolonged the median survival time of glioma‑bearing mice (P<0.05). Therefore, the present study indicated that salinomycin may preferentially inhibit glioma‑initiated cell growth by inducing apoptosis, suggesting that salinomycin may provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds on Exoelectrogenesis in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell Bioanode

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-09-09

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are 20 lignocellulose-derived compounds known to inhibit to H2- and ethanol- producing microorganisms in dark fermentation. Bioelectrochemical conversion of furanic and phenolic compounds to electricity or H2 has recently been demonstrated as a productive method to use these compounds. However, potential inhibitory effect of furanic and phenolic compounds on exoelectrogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems is not well understood. This study systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of furfural (FF), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), syringic acid (SA), vanillic acid (VA), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) on exoelectrogenesis in the bioanode of a microbial electrolysis cell. A mixture of these five compounds atmore » an increasing initial total concentration from 0.8 to 8.0 g/L resulted in current decrease up to 91%. The observed inhibition primarily affected exoelectrogenesis, instead of non-exoelectrogenic biotransformation pathways (e.g., fermentation) of the five compounds. Furthermore, the parent compounds at a high concentration, as opposed to their biotransformation products, were responsible for the observed inhibition. Tests with individual compounds show that all five parent compounds contributed to the observed inhibition by the mixture. The IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% current decrease) was estimated as 2.7 g/L for FF, 3.0 g/L for HMF, 1.9 g/L for SA, 2.1 g/L for VA and 2.0 g/L for HBA. Nevertheless, these compounds below their non-inhibitory concentrations jointly resulted in significant inhibition as a mixture. Catechol and phenol, which were persistent biotransformation products of the mixture, inhibited exoelectrogens at high concentrations, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. Recovery of exoelectrogenesis from inhibition by all compounds was observed, except for catechol, which resulted in irreversible inhibition. The reversibility of inhibition, as well as the observed difference in recovery

  20. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} regulates leukemia inhibitory factor signaling through JAK-STAT pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasingh, Johnson; Bright, John J. . E-mail: jbright1@clarian.org

    2006-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are genetically normal, pluripotent cells, capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all cell lineages. While leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) maintains pluripotency in mouse ES cells, retinoic acid and other nuclear hormones induce neuro-glial differentiation in mouse and human ES cells in culture. Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptor transcription factors that regulate cell growth and differentiation in many cell types. However, the role of PPARs in the regulation of ES cell growth and differentiation is not known. In this study, we show that LIF induces proliferation and self-renewal of mouse D3-ES cells in culture. However, treatment with 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-Prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ2), a natural ligand for PPAR{gamma}, or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) results in a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation and self-renewal in D3-ES cells. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses showed that LIF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, TYK2 and STAT3 in 30 min and treatment with 15d-PGJ2 or ATRA results in a dose-dependent decrease in LIF-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and STAT3 in D3-ES cells. However, treatment of D3-ES cells with Ciglitazone or 15d-PGJ2 for 48 h in culture resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PPAR{gamma} protein expression. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} agonists regulate LIF signaling through JAK-STAT pathway leading to growth and self-renewal of ES cells.

  1. The inhibitory effects of endostatin on endothelial cells are modulated by extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, Christie E.; Weagant, Brodie T.; Addison, Christina L. . E-mail: caddison@ohri.ca

    2006-08-01

    We investigated the ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to modulate the response of endothelial cells to both promoters and inhibitors of angiogenesis. Using human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC), we found that cells demonstrated different adhesive properties and proliferative responses to the growth factor VEGF depending upon which ECM protein with which they were in contact, with fibronectin having the most impact on VEGF-induced HDMEC proliferation and survival. More importantly, we observed that ECM could modulate the ability of the angiogenic inhibitor endostatin to prevent endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. We observed that growth on vitronectin or fibronectin impaired the ability of endostatin to inhibit VEGF-induced HDMEC proliferation to the greatest extent as determined by BrdU incorporation. We found that, following growth on collagen I or collagen IV, endostatin only inhibited VEGF-induced HDMEC proliferation at the highest dose tested (2500 ng/ml). In a similar manner, we observed that growth on ECM proteins modulated the ability of endostatin to induce endothelial cell apoptosis, with growth on collagen I, fibronectin and collagen IV impairing endostatin-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, endostatin inhibited VEGF-induced HDMEC migration following culture on collagen I, collagen IV and laminin, while migration was not inhibited by endostatin following HDMEC culture on other matrices including vitronectin, fibronectin and tenascin-C. These results suggest that different matrix proteins may affect different mechanisms of endostatin inhibition of angiogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that the ECM may have a profound impact on the ability of angiostatic molecules such as endostatin to inhibit angiogenesis and thus may have impact on the clinical efficacy of such inhibitors.

  2. Evaluation of inhibitory potential of some selective methanolic plants extracts on biological characteristics of Acanthamoeba castellanii using human corneal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Hafiz Muhammad; Muazzam, Ambreen Gul; Mir, Asif; Jung, Suk-Yul; Matin, Abdul

    2013-03-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protozoan pathogen and known to be one of the most ubiquitous organisms, play a vital role in ecosystem, and recognized to cause blinding keratitis and rare but fatal granulomatous encephalitis involving the central nervous system with a very poor prognosis. This is due to limited availability of effective anti-Acanthamoeba drugs. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy of methanolic plants crude extracts on the viability and biological properties of Acanthamoeba castellanii (T4 genotype) and its cytotoxic effects on human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). Using HCEC, it was observed that Acanthamoeba exhibited binding (>90 %) and cytotoxicity (>80 %) to host cells. However, plant crude extracts remarkably inhibited more than 70 and 60 % of Acanthamoeba binding and cytotoxicity to HCEC, respectively. It was further established that crude extracts (ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 mg/ml) exhibited amoebicidal effects, i.e., >50 % of trophozoites were killed/reduced at maximum dose (1.5 mg/ml) within 1 h incubation. However, the residual subpopulation remained static over longer incubations. Furthermore, growth assay demonstrated crude extracts inhibited >50 % Acanthamoeba numbers up to 7 days. Our results confirmed that plant crude extracts has inhibitory effects on Acanthamoeba growth and viability. Overall, these findings revealed that tested plant extracts is inhibitory to Acanthamoeba properties associated with pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, our findings demonstrated for the first time that selected methanol plant crude extracts exhibits inhibitory effects on biological properties of Acanthamoeba without any toxic effects on HCEC cells in vitro.

  3. Pythium insidiosum: inhibitory effects of propolis and geopropolis on hyphal growth.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Maria José Abigail Mendes; Bosco, Sandra de Moraes Gimenes; Sforcin, José Maurício

    Propolis and geopropolis are resinous products of bees showing antimicrobial effects. There is no data concerning their action against Pythium insidiosum - the causative agent of pythiosis, a pyogranulomatous disease of the subcutaneous tissue that affects mostly horses, dogs and humans. Fragments of 15 isolates of P. insidiodum were incubated with propolis and geopropolis extracts and evaluated for up to seven days to detect the minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC). Propolis inhibited three isolates at 1.0mgmL(-1) after 24h and all other isolates at 3.4mgmL(-1). Geopropolis led to more variable results, exerting predominantly a fungistatic action than a fungicidal one. Propolis was more efficient than geopropolis in inhibiting P. insidiosum since lower concentrations led to no growth after 24h. This effect may be due to propolis chemical composition, which has more active compounds than geopropolis. Propolis seemed to be a good candidate for in vivo studies, since treatment with conventional antifungal compounds is difficult in most of the cases, requiring extensive surgical debridement.

  4. Corrosion by bacteria of concrete in sewerage systems and inhibitory effects of formates on their growth.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Tateo; Aso, Iwao; Togashi, Shunsuke; Tanigawa, Minoru; Shoji, Kazuo; Watanabe, Tsugumichi; Watanabe, Naoki; Maki, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    Not only sulfur-oxidizing bacteria but also an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium (or bacteria) were found in the corroded concrete from several sewerage systems in Japan. The surface pH of concrete test piece exposed to an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide of the concentrations more than 600 ppm in the systems was usually below 2 after a month. This was attributable to ability of the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to grow in the thin water layer which contained hydrogen sulfide and covered the piece even when the surface pH of concrete was 12-13. When the sulfuroxidizing bacteria grew in the surface of concrete and produced sulfuric acid, the pH of the inner parts of concrete was lowered where the bacteria were hardly found. Probably, sulfuric acid formed by the bacteria in the surface parts penetrated into the inner parts. The different species of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were found in different sewerage systems. The growth of the sulfur-oxidizing and acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria was completely inhibited by formates, especially by calcium formate of concentrations more than 50 mM. Calcium formate can protect concrete in sewerage systems from bacterial corrosion.

  5. Parthenolide suppresses pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weifeng; Wang, Xinshuai; Sun, Junjun; Yang, Yanhui; Li, Wensheng; Song, Junxin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy and is unresponsive to conventional chemotherapies. Parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from feverfew, has exhibited potent anticancer effects against various cancers. The purpose of this report was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of parthenolide in human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and BxPC3 cells. The results demonstrated that parthenolide suppressed the growth and induced apoptosis of Panc-1 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging between 7 and 9 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by parthenolide treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Parthenolide treatment concentration-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression levels of p62/SQSTM1, Beclin 1, and LC3II in Panc-1 cells. Punctate LC3II staining confirmed autophagy. Furthermore, inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, 3-methyladenine, or LC3II siRNA significantly blocked parthenolide-induced apoptosis, suggesting that parthenolide induced apoptosis through autophagy in this study. In conclusion, these studies established that parthenolide inhibits pancreatic cell growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Data of the present study suggest that parthenolide can serve as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer. PMID:28176967

  6. Caudatin Inhibits Human Glioma Cells Growth Through Triggering DNA Damage-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Kun; Yang, Ming-feng; Fan, Cun-dong; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    Caudatin, one of the species of C-21 steroidal glycosides mainly isolated from the root of Cynanchum bungei Decne, exhibits potent anticancer activities. However, the mechanism remains poorly defined. In the present study, the growth inhibitory effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma cells were evaluated in vitro. The results revealed that caudatin time- and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and U87 cells growth. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that caudatin-induced growth inhibition against U251 and U87 cells was mainly achieved by the induction of G0/G1 and S-phase cell cycle arrest through triggering DNA damage, as convinced by the up-regulation of p53, p21, and histone phosphorylation, as well as the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, caudatin treatment also triggered the activation of ERK and inactivation of AKT pathway. LY294002 (an AKT inhibitor) addition enhanced caudation-induced AKT inhibition, indicating that caudatin inhibited U251 cells growth in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that caudatin may act as a novel cytostatic reagent against human glioma cells through the induction of DNA damage-mediated cell cycle arrest with the involvement of modulating MAPK and AKT pathways.

  7. Inhibitory and toxic effects of volatiles emitted by strains of Pseudomonas and Serratia on growth and survival of selected microorganisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Popova, Alexandra A; Koksharova, Olga A; Lipasova, Valentina A; Zaitseva, Julia V; Katkova-Zhukotskaya, Olga A; Eremina, Svetlana Iu; Mironov, Alexander S; Chernin, Leonid S; Khmel, Inessa A

    2014-01-01

    In previous research, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by various bacteria into the chemosphere were suggested to play a significant role in the antagonistic interactions between microorganisms occupying the same ecological niche and between bacteria and target eukaryotes. Moreover, a number of volatiles released by bacteria were reported to suppress quorum-sensing cell-to-cell communication in bacteria, and to stimulate plant growth. Here, volatiles produced by Pseudomonas and Serratia strains isolated mainly from the soil or rhizosphere exhibited bacteriostatic action on phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and fungi and demonstrated a killing effect on cyanobacteria, flies (Drosophila melanogaster), and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans). VOCs emitted by the rhizospheric Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 449 and by Serratia proteamaculans strain 94 isolated from spoiled meat were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis, and the effects of the main headspace compounds--ketones (2-nonanone, 2-heptanone, 2-undecanone) and dimethyl disulfide--were inhibitory toward the tested microorganisms, nematodes, and flies. The data confirmed the role of bacterial volatiles as important compounds involved in interactions between organisms under natural ecological conditions.

  8. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) suppressed cyclin D1 expression and hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Hui; Jian, Wei-Hua; Wu, Zhao-Feng; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Hua; Li, Wen; Xia, Jin-Tang

    2014-07-30

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory and immunoregulatory chemokine, plays important roles in cancer-related biological processes. However, few studies have focused on the clinical relevance of MIF and cyclin D1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs). In this study, MIF and cyclin D1 expression levels in HCC tissues and cell lines were significantly upregulated compared with adjacent normal tissues or a normal liver cell line. In HCC specimens, MIF expression positively correlated with cyclin D1 expression. Additionally, MIF and cyclin D1 expression positively correlated with tumor size. MIF knockdown inhibited the proliferation of PLC and HepG2 cells and promoted apoptosis. However, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MIF did not influence the cell cycle in these cells. In an in vivo xenograft model, MIF knockdown reduced the tumor growth rate. The expression levels of Bcl-2, p-caspase-3, BIM and Bax were upregulated, while the expression levels of cyclin D1, p-Akt and p-ERK were downregulated in MIF-knockdown cells. These findings indicate that MIF siRNA reduces proliferation and increases apoptosis in HCC cells. MIF knockdown inhibits the expression of growth-related proteins and induces the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, supporting a role for MIF as a novel therapeutic target for HCC.

  9. Inhibitory Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Growth and Aflatoxin B1 Production by Aspergillus Parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyyed Amin Ayatollahi; Pourtalebi, Somayyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxins (AFs) are secondary hazardous fungal metabolites that are produced by strains of some Aspergillus species on food and feedstuffs. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is one of the most important AF with high toxicity. Prevention of AF production and their elimination from food products is a matter of importance for many researchers in the last decades. Nanomaterials applications in medical science have been widely studied in the recent years. Most of existing researches seek the effect of nanoparticles on bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on growth and AFB1 production of AF-producing Aspergillus parasiticus. Methods: A parasiticus was inoculated (106 conidia per ml of medium) to potato dextrose broth (PDB) medium and then AgNPs was added and incubated with shaking at 130 rpm and 28°C for 7 days. AF was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Microbiological assay (MBA) on microplates contained potato dextrose broth (PDB) medium (4 days at 28°C) at different concentrations of AgNPs (60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180 and 200 μg/ml) was measured. Results: The results demonstrated that a minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) equal to 180 μg/ml was determined for AgNPs against A. parasiticus. The AgNPs effectively inhibited AFB1 production at a concentration of 90 μg/ml. Conclusion: The results obtained in this study show AgNPs at concentrations lower than the MIC drastically inhibited production of AFB1 by A. parasiticus in culture medium. The AgNPs may be useful to control AF contamination of susceptible crops in the field. PMID:26538778

  10. Human tumor cell growth inhibition by nontoxic anthocyanidins, the pigments in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2005-02-11

    Anthocyanidins, the aglycones of anthocyanins, impart brilliant colors in many fruits and vegetables. The widespread consumption of diets rich in anthocyanin and anthocyanidins prompted us to determine their inhibitory effects on human cancer cell proliferation. Five anthocyanidins, cyanidin (1), delphinidin (2), pelargonidin (3), petunidin (4) and malvidin (5), and four anthocyanins, cyanidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside and pelargonidin-3-galactoside were tested for cell proliferation inhibitory activity against human cancer cell lines, AGS (stomach), HCT-116 (colon), MCF-7 (breast), NCI H460 (lung), and SF-268 (Central Nervous System, CNS) at 12.5-200 microg/mL concentrations. The viability of cells after exposure to anthocyanins and anthocyanidins was determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) colorimetric methods. The anthocyanins assayed did not inhibit cell proliferation of cell lines tested at 200 microg/mL. However, anthocyanidins showed cell proliferation inhibitory activity. Malvidin inhibited AGS, HCT-116, NCI-H460, MCF-7 and SF-268 cell growth by 69, 75.7, 67.7, 74.7 and 40.5%, respectively, at 200 microg/mL. Similarly, pelargonidin inhibited AGS, HCT-116, NCI H460, MCF-7 and SF-268 cell growth by 64, 63, 62, 63 and 34%, respectively, at 200 microg/mL. At 200 microg/mL, cyanidin, delphinidin and petunidin inhibited the breast cancer cell growth by 47, 66 and 53%, respectively. This is the first report of tumor cell proliferation inhibitory activity by anthocyanidins.

  11. Detection of microRNA-200b may predict the inhibitory effect of gefitinib on non-small cell lung cancer and its potential mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiwu; Yao, Liqiong; Tan, Bangyun; Li, Li; Chen, Baojin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association and underlying mechanisms between microRNA-200b level and the inhibitory effect of gefitinib on non-small cell lung cancer. In total, 100 patients (43 males and 57 females; median age, 63 years) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were selected. All patients were administered with gefitinib orally (250 mg/day) and the effect of gefitinib was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors guidelines. Tumor tissue and plasma samples were collected prior to and subsequent to therapy. The microRNA-200b levels in tissues and plasma were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A549 cells were cultured in vitro and transfected with microRNA-200b mimic. Using Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, the proliferation inhibition detected was induced by 0.1 µM gefitinib in transfected or non-transfected A549 cells. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle progression were analyzed by flow cytometry and the migration of cells was observed by Transwell assay. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), together with the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in A549 cells, were determined by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The microRNA-200b levels in gefitinib-insensitive patients were decreased compared with gefitinib-sensitive patients. Transfection with microRNA-200b mimic increased the gefitinib induced proliferation inhibition, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in A549 cells. Also, transfection with microRNA-200b mimic increased the migration inhibitory effect of gefitinib on A549 cells. Decreased IGF-1R expression together with reduced phosphorylation of AKT and ERK were observed following transfection of A549 cells with the microRNA 200b mimic. In conclusion, detection of microRNA-200b may predict the inhibitory effect of gefitinib on NSCLC. Upregulation

  12. Control of human glioma cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro by transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Merzak, A.; McCrea, S.; Koocheckpour, S.; Pilkington, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    Factors involved in the control of the biological properties of gliomas, the major form of brain tumour in man, are poorly documented. We investigated the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in the control of proliferation of human glioma cell lines as well as normal human fetal brain cells. The data presented show that TGF-beta 1 exerts a growth-inhibitory action on both human fetal brain cells and three cell lines derived from human glioma of different grades of malignancy. In addition, this growth-inhibitory effect is dose dependent and serum independent. Since TGF-beta 1 is known to be involved in the control of cell migration during ontogenesis and oncogenesis, we investigated the role of this factor in the motile and invasive behaviour that characterises human gliomas in vivo. TGF-beta 1 was found to elicit a strong stimulation of migration and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro. In combination with recent data showing an inverse correlation between TGF-beta 1 expression in human gliomas and survival, these findings may suggest that TGF-beta 1 plays an important role in the malignant progression of gliomas in man. A study of the molecular mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative action and the invasion-promoting action of TGF-beta 1 may help to identify new targets in therapy for brain tumours. A combined antiproliferative and anti-invasive therapy could be envisaged. Images Figure 3 PMID:8054266

  13. High temperatures alter physiological properties of pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jennifer A.; Connors, Barry W.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature has multiple effects on neurons, yet little is known about the effects of high temperature on the physiology of mammalian central neurons. Hyperthermia can influence behavior and cause febrile seizures. We studied the effects of acute hyperthermia on the immature hippocampus in vitro by recording from pyramidal neurons and inhibitory oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons (identified by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the GIN mouse line). Warming to 41°C caused depolarization, spontaneous action potentials, reduced input resistance and membrane time constant, and increased spontaneous synaptic activity of most pyramidal cells and O-LM interneurons. Pyramidal neurons of area CA3 were more strongly excited by hyperthermia than those of area CA1. About 90% of O-LM interneurons in both CA1 and CA3 increased their firing rates at hyperthermic temperatures; interneurons in CA3 fired faster than those in CA1 on average. Blockade of fast synaptic transmission did not abolish the effect of hyperthermia on neuronal excitability. Our results suggest that hyperthermia increases hippocampal excitability, particularly in seizure-prone area CA3, by altering the intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal cells and interneurons. PMID:22783167

  14. High temperatures alter physiological properties of pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer A; Connors, Barry W

    2012-01-01

    Temperature has multiple effects on neurons, yet little is known about the effects of high temperature on the physiology of mammalian central neurons. Hyperthermia can influence behavior and cause febrile seizures. We studied the effects of acute hyperthermia on the immature hippocampus in vitro by recording from pyramidal neurons and inhibitory oriens-lacunosum moleculare (O-LM) interneurons (identified by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the GIN mouse line). Warming to 41°C caused depolarization, spontaneous action potentials, reduced input resistance and membrane time constant, and increased spontaneous synaptic activity of most pyramidal cells and O-LM interneurons. Pyramidal neurons of area CA3 were more strongly excited by hyperthermia than those of area CA1. About 90% of O-LM interneurons in both CA1 and CA3 increased their firing rates at hyperthermic temperatures; interneurons in CA3 fired faster than those in CA1 on average. Blockade of fast synaptic transmission did not abolish the effect of hyperthermia on neuronal excitability. Our results suggest that hyperthermia increases hippocampal excitability, particularly in seizure-prone area CA3, by altering the intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal cells and interneurons.

  15. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F; Kady, Ismail O

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase.

  16. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  17. Inhibitory Smads and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) modulate anterior photoreceptor cell number during planarian eye regeneration.

    PubMed

    González-Sastre, Alejandro; Molina, Ma Dolores; Saló, Emili

    2012-01-01

    Planarians represent an excellent model to study the processes of body axis and organ re-specification during regeneration. Previous studies have revealed a conserved role for the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway and its intracellular mediators Smad1/5/8 and Smad4 in planarian dorsoventral (DV) axis re-establishment. In an attempt to gain further insight into the role of this signalling pathway in planarians, we have isolated and functionally characte-rized the inhibitory Smads (I-Smads) in Schmidtea mediterranea. Two I-Smad homologues have been identified: Smed-smad6/7-1 and Smed-smad6/7-2. Expression of smad6/7-1 was detected in the parenchyma, while smad6/7-2 was found to be ex-pressed in the central nervous system and the eyes. Neither single smad6/7-1 and smad6/7-2 nor double smad6/7-1,-2 silencing gave rise to any apparent disruption of the DV axis. However, both regenerating and intact smad6/7-2 (RNAi) planarians showed defects in eye morphogenesis and displayed small, rounded eyes that lacked the anterior subpopulation of photoreceptor cells. The number of pigment cells was also reduced in these animals at later stages of regeneration. In contrast, after low doses of Smed-bmp(RNAi), planarians regenerated larger eyes in which the anterior subpopulation of photoreceptor cells was expanded. Our results suggest that Smed-smad6/7-2 and Smed-bmp control the re-specification and maintenance of anterior photoreceptor cell number in S. mediterranea.

  18. Interneurons are the local targets of hippocampal inhibitory cells which project to the medial septum.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, A I; Hájos, N; Katona, I; Freund, T F

    2003-05-01

    A subset of GABAergic neurons projecting to the medial septum has long been described in the hippocampus. However, the lack of information about their local connectivity pattern or their correspondence with any of the well-established hippocampal interneuron types has hampered the understanding of their functional role. Retrograde tracing combined with immunostaining for neurochemical markers in the adult rat hippocampus showed that nearly all hippocampo-septal (HS) neurons express somatostatin (>95%) and, in the hilus and CA3 stratum lucidum, many contain calretinin (>45%). In contrast, in stratum oriens of the CA1 and CA3 subfields, the majority of HS neurons contain somatostatin (>86%) and calbindin (>73%), but not calretinin. Because somatostatin-positive hippocampal interneurons have been most extensively characterized in the stratum oriens of CA1, we focused our further analysis on HS cells found in this region. In 18-20-day-old rats, intracellularly filled CA1-HS cells had extensive local axon collaterals crossing subfield boundaries and innervating the CA3 region and the dentate gyrus. Electron microscopic analysis provided evidence that the axon terminals of CA1-HS cells form symmetrical synapses selectively on GABAergic interneurons, both locally and in the CA3 region. In addition, double retrograde labelling experiments revealed that many CA1-HS neurons of the dorsal hippocampus also have collateral projections to the ventral hippocampus. Thus, CA1-HS cells innervate inhibitory interneurons locally and in remote hippocampal regions, in addition to targeting mostly GABAergic neurons in the medial septum. This dual projection with striking target selectivity for GABAergic neurons may be ideally suited to synchronize neuronal activity along the septo-hippocampal axis.

  19. Excitatory synapses from CA3 pyramidal cells onto neighboring pyramidal cells differ from those onto inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Aaron, G B; Dichter, M A

    2001-12-15

    The glutamatergic pyramidal cell (PYR) to pyramidal cell synapse was compared to the PYR to inhibitory interneuron (INT) synapse in area CA3 of rat hippocampal roller-tube cultures. Paired-pulses and tetanic stimulations of a presynaptic PYR were conducted utilizing dual whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of either two PYRs or of a PYR and visually identified stratum oriens INT. Differences in synaptic characteristics were observed, depending on the postsynaptic target cell. Across cell pairs the variation of EPSC amplitudes was much larger for postsynaptic PYRs than for INTs. EPSCs recorded from INTs had faster rise times and shorter decays than those recorded in PYRs. There were also differences in the short-term plasticity of these synapses. Dual PYR:PYR recordings during paired-pulse stimulation at 100 ms interstimulus intervals demonstrated no modulation of EPSC amplitudes, while PYR:INT synapses showed paired-pulse depression. During trains of action potentials, the PYR:PYR EPSCs followed the presynaptic action potential train reliably, with little depression of EPSCs, while PYR:INT EPSCs demonstrated failures of transmission or profound depression after the initial EPSC. These results indicate multiple differences at both the pre- and postsynaptic level in the characteristics of pyramidal cell synapses that depend on the postsynaptic target's identity as either PYR or INT.

  20. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of Brazilian plants extracts against Paenibacillus larvae and toxicity in bees.

    PubMed

    Piana, Mariana; de Brum, Thiele F; Boligon, Aline A; Alves, Camilla F S; de Freitas, Robson B; Nunes, Letícia T; Mossmann, Natalia J; Janovik, Vanessa; Jesus, Roberta S; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Santos, Roberto C V; Athayde, Margareth L

    2015-01-01

    American foulbrood (AFB) is a serious worldwide spreading disease in bees caused by Paenibacillus larvae. Plants extracts are known to decrease or inhibit the growth of these bacteria. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Calendula. officinalis, Cariniana domestica, and Nasturtium officinale extracts against the P. larvae and to evaluate the toxicity of the extracts in bees. In vitro activity against P. larvae of the extracts was evaluated by micro dilution method and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were also determined. The concentrations used in the toxicity test were established based on the MIC values and by the spraying application method. The P. larvae was susceptible to the evaluated crude extract of C. officinalis and N. officinale. To C. domestica, only the ethyl acetate (EtAc) fraction and n-butanol (BuOH) fractions had activity against P. larvae. Toxicity analysis in bees showed no toxicity for N. officinale crude extract and for C. domestica BuOH fraction during 15 days of treatment, however, some deaths of bees occurred during the first three days of treatment with C. officinalis and C. domestica EtAc fraction. The results with these species were firstly described and showed that N. officinale crude extract and C. domestica BuOH fraction both presented not toxic effects in the concentration tested by the spraying application method, and can be a useful alternative for treatment or prevention of AFB.

  1. Biphasic modulation of cell growth by recombinant human galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Adams, L; Scott, G K; Weinberg, C S

    1996-06-13

    Human soluble galactose-binding lectin (galectin-1) has been expressed as an Escherichia coli fusion protein, following the amplification by polymerase chain reaction of cDNA prepared from a human osteosarcoma cell line. The fusion protein is a functional beta-galactoside-binding lectin, as is the recombinant galectin when purified from the cleaved fusion protein. The recombinant galectin has a biphasic effect on cell proliferation. Unlike the fusion protein, it functions as a human cell growth inhibitor, confirming earlier findings with natural human galectin-1, though it is less effective than the natural galectin. This reaction is not significantly inhibited by lactose, and is thus largely independent of the beta-galactoside-binding site. At lower concentrations, recombinant galectin-1 is mitogenic, this activity being susceptible to inhibition by lactose, and thus attributable to the beta-galactoside-binding ability of the protein. Some tumour cells are susceptible to the growth-inhibitory effect, and the galectin-1 gene is expressed in both normal and tumour cells.

  2. Selective growth-inhibitory effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline towards Clostridium difficile and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum in co-culture analysed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Novakova, Jitka; Džunková, Mária; Musilova, Sarka; Vlkova, Eva; Kokoska, Ladislav; Moya, Andrés; D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    The major risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the use of antibiotics owing to the disruption of the equilibrium of the host gut microbiota. To preserve the beneficial resident probiotic bacteria during infection treatment, the use of molecules with selective antibacterial activity enhances the efficacy by selectively removing C. difficile. One of them is the plant alkaloid 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ), which has been shown to selectively inhibit clostridia without repressing bifidobacteria. Selective antimicrobial activity is generally tested by culture techniques of individual bacterial strains. However, the main limitation of these techniques is the inability to describe differential growth dynamics of more bacterial strains in co-culture within the same experiment. In the present study, we combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and flow cytometry to describe the changes in active and non-active cells of a mixed culture formed by the opportunistic pathogen C. difficile CECT 531 and the beneficial Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum CCMDMND BL1 after exposure to 8HQ. It was observed that without 8HQ, the proportion of both strains was almost equal, oscillating between 22.7 and 77.9 % during a time lapse of 12 h, whereas with 8HQ the proportion of active C. difficile decreased after 4 h, and persisted only between 8.8 and 17.5 %. In contrast, bifidobacterial growth was not disturbed by 8HQ. The results of this study showed the selective inhibitory effect of 8HQ on clostridial and bifidobacterial growth dynamics, and the potential of this compound for the development of selective agents to control CDIs.

  3. Inhibitory effects of physalin B and physalin F on various human leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, H C; Jaw, S M; Chen, P M

    1992-01-01

    Physalins B and F were isolated and characterized from the ethanolic extract of the whole plant of Physalis angulata L. (Solanaceae). Both physalin B and physalin F inhibited the growth of several human leukemia cells: K562 (erythroleukemia), APM1840 (acute T lymphoid leukemia), HL-60 (acute promyelocytic leukemia), KG-1 (acute myeloid leukemia), CTV1 (acute monocytic leukemia) and B cell (acute B lymphoid leukemia). Physalin F showed a stronger activity against these leukemia cells than physalin B, especially against acute myeloid leukemia (KG-1) and acute B lymphoid leukemia (B cell). From the structural features, the active site seems to be the functional epoxy group for physalin F and the double bond for physalin B located at carbon 5 and 6; the former is much more active than the latter as regards anti-leukemic effects.

  4. Prenylated derivatives of baicalein and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone: synthesis and study of their effects on tumor cell lines growth, cell cycle and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Neves, Marta Perro; Cidade, Honorina; Pinto, Madalena; Silva, Artur M S; Gales, Luís; Damas, Ana Margarida; Lima, Raquel T; Vasconcelos, M Helena; de São José Nascimento, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Fourteen baicalein and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against the in vitro growth of three human tumor cell lines. The synthetic approaches were based on the reaction with prenyl or geranyl bromide in alkaline medium, followed by cyclization of the respective monoprenylated derivative. Dihydropyranoflavonoids were also obtained by one-pot synthesis, using Montmorillonite K10 clay as catalyst combined with microwave irradiation. In vitro screening of the compounds for cell growth inhibitory activity revealed that the presence of one geranyl group was associated with a remarkable increase in the inhibitory activity. Moreover, for the 3,7-dihydroxyflavone derivatives a marked increase in growth inhibitory effect was also observed for compounds with furan and pyran fused rings. The most active compounds were also studied regarding their effect on cell cycle profile and induction of apoptosis. Overall the results point to the relevant role of the prenylation of flavone scaffold in the growth inhibitory activity of cancer cells.

  5. Potential Inhibitory Influence of miRNA 210 on Regulatory T Cells during Epicutaneous Chemical Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Long, Carrie Mae; Lukomska, Ewa; Marshall, Nikki B.; Nayak, Ajay; Anderson, Stacey E.

    2016-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is a potent low molecular weight chemical sensitizer and a leading cause of chemical-induced occupational asthma. The regulatory potential of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been recognized in a variety of disease states, including allergic disease; however, the roles of miRNAs in chemical sensitization are largely unknown. In a previous work, increased expression of multiple miRNAs during TDI sensitization was observed and several putative mRNA targets identified for these miRNAs were directly related to regulatory T-cell (Treg) differentiation and function including Foxp3 and Runx3. In this work, we show that miR-210 expression is increased in the mouse draining lymph node (dLN) and Treg subsets following dermal TDI sensitization. Alterations in dLN mRNA and protein expression of Treg related genes/putative miR-210 targets (foxp3, runx3, ctla4, and cd25) were observed at multiple time points following TDI exposure and in ex vivo systems. A Treg suppression assay, including a miR-210 mimic, was utilized to investigate the suppressive ability of Tregs. Cells derived from TDI sensitized mice treated with miR-210 mimic had less expression of miR-210 compared to the acetone control suggesting other factors, such as additional miRNAs, might be involved in the regulation of the functional capabilities of these cells. These novel findings indicate that miR-210 may have an inhibitory role in Treg function during TDI sensitization. Because the functional roles of miRNAs have not been previously elucidated in a model of chemical sensitization, these data contribute to the understanding of the potential immunologic mechanisms of chemical induced allergic disease. PMID:28035981

  6. Stage-dependent suppression of the formation of dentin-resorbing multinuclear cells with migration inhibitory factor in vitro

    PubMed Central

    KIKUIRI, TAKASHI; YOSHIMURA, YOSHITAKA; TABATA, FUTOSHI; HASEGAWA, TOMOKAZU; NISHIHIRA, JUN; SHIRAKAWA, TETSUO

    2012-01-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a crucial mediator of immune responses and is known to play a pivotal role in cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we assessed whether MIF exerts regulatory effects on osteoclast formation in bone marrow cells and, if so, by what mechanism. Bone marrow cells were either co-cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells or cultured with macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the soluble form of the receptor activator of the nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Under the influence of MIF, the formation of osteoclastic multinuclear cells was examined. The number of multinuclear TRAP-positive cells formed in the co-culture was significantly reduced when MIF (≥0.1 μg/ml) was exogenously applied during the third and fourth days of the 6-day cultivation period. MIF affected neither the number of mononuclear TRAP-positive cells induced with M-CSF and RANKL, nor the expression of RANKL and osteoprotegerin in MC3T3-E1 cells. TRAP-positive cells cultured on dentin slices with MIF showed lower dentin-resorbing activity than those cultured without MIF. These results suggest that MIF has no regulatory roles in the differentiation of bone marrow cells to mononuclear TRAP-positive cells, but has inhibitory effects on the formation of mature osteoclasts by preventing cell fusion, which may eventually interfere with the osteoclast-mediated dentin resorption. PMID:22969841

  7. Synthesis of coumaperine derivatives: Their NF-κB inhibitory effect, inhibition of cell migration and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Natarajan; Muthuraman, Subramani; Gopinath, Pushparathinam; Nithya, Pattusamy; Gopas, Jacob; Kumar, Rajendran Saravana

    2017-01-05

    Coumaperine (an amide alkaloid, present in white piper) and its derivatives were synthesized and investigated for their cytotoxicity against L428 and A549 cells and their NF-κB inhibitory activity. It was found that the coumaperine derivatives CP-9 and CP-38 suppress NF-κB subunits p50 and p65 in nuclear fractions by western blot and by NF-κB luciferase reporter gene assay in a dose dependent manner. Confirmation of these results was obtained by confocal microscopy. CP-9, CP-32 and CP-38 also exhibited dose dependent cell cytotoxicity in a L428 cells expressing constitutively active NF-κB and in A549 cells, with an IC50 value of 43.25 μg/ml, 0.39 μg/ml and 16.85 μg/ml respectively against L428 cells and 57.15 μg/ml, 69.1 μg/ml and 63.2 μg/ml respectively against A549 cells. In addition, the coumaperine derivatives show remarkable inhibitory activity on the cancer cell migration assay against A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells at the concentrations of 5 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, and 5 μg/ml of CP-9, CP-32 and CP-38 respectively. Aromatic substituents and number of olefinic double bond in coumaperine derivatives found to influence the inhibitory activity. In luciferase reporter gene assay, di-olefin conjugated coumaperine derivatives, CP-38, CP-32 and PIP exhibited higher inhibitory activity than their corresponding tri-olefin conjugated coumaperine derivatives, CP-102, CP-146 and PIP-155 respectively. CP-32 with a stronger electron donating group (-N(CH3)2) showed better inhibitory activity in luciferase reporter gene assay and in cell proliferation of L428 cells. Simple coumaperine derivative (CP-9, with no substituent) effectively inhibited A549 cells proliferation and migration than the other coumaperine derivatives. CP-9 and CP-38 diminish significantly the NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65) of L428 cells in nuclear fractions at the dosage of 10 μg/ml and 30 μg/ml respectively. Which clearly shows that CP-9 and CP-38 inactivate the NF-κB pathway

  8. Extracellular Molecular Markers and Soma Size of Inhibitory Neurons: Evidence for Four Subtypes of GABAergic Cells in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Nichole L.; Young, Jesse W.; Mellott, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition plays an important role in shaping responses to stimuli throughout the CNS, including in the inferior colliculus (IC), a major hub in both ascending and descending auditory pathways. Subdividing GABAergic cells has furthered the understanding of inhibition in many brain areas, most notably in the cerebral cortex. Here, we seek the same understanding of subcortical inhibitory cell types by combining staining for two types of extracellular markers—perineuronal nets (PNs) and perisomatic rings of terminals expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) —to subdivide IC GABAergic cells in adult guinea pigs. We found four distinct groups of GABAergic cells in the IC: (1) those with both a PN and a VGLUT2 ring; (2) those with only a PN; (3) those with only a VGLUT2 ring; and (4) those with neither marker. In addition, these four GABAergic subtypes differ in their soma size and distribution among IC subdivisions. Functionally, the presence or absence of VGLUT2 rings indicates differences in inputs, whereas the presence or absence of PNs indicates different potential for plasticity and temporal processing. We conclude that these markers distinguish four GABAergic subtypes that almost certainly serve different roles in the processing of auditory stimuli within the IC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT GABAergic inhibition plays a critical role throughout the brain. Identification of subclasses of GABAergic cells (up to 15 in the cerebral cortex) has furthered the understanding of GABAergic roles in circuit modulation. Inhibition is also prominent in the inferior colliculus, a subcortical hub in auditory pathways. Here, we use two extracellular markers to identify four distinct groups of GABAergic cells. Perineuronal nets and perisomatic rings of glutamatergic boutons are present in many subcortical areas and often are associated with inhibitory cells, but they have rarely been used to identify inhibitory subtypes. Our results further the understanding of

  9. Jellyfish skin polysaccharides: extraction and inhibitory activity on macrophage-derived foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Cui, Shao-Hua; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Bansal, Vibha; Xue, Lei; Li, Xiao-Long; Hao, Ran; Pan, Li-Hua; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2014-06-15

    In this work, response surface methodology was used to determine optimum conditions for extraction of polysaccharides from jellyfish skin (JSP). The optimum parameters were found to be raw material to water ratio 1:7.5 (w/v), extraction temperature 100°C and extraction time 4h. Under these conditions, the JSP yield reached 1.007 mg/g. Papain (15 U/mL) in combination with Sevag reagent was beneficial in removing proteins from JSP. After precipitation with ethanol at final concentration of 40%, 60% and 80% in turn, three polysaccharide fractions of JSP1, JSP2 and JSP3 were obtained from JSP, respectively. The three fractions exhibited different physicochemical properties with respect to molecular weight distribution, monosaccharide composition, infrared absorption spectra, and glycosyl bond composition. In addition, JSP3 showed strong inhibitory effects on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced conversion of macrophages into foam cells, which possibly attributed to the down-regulation of some atherogenesis-related gene expressions.

  10. Cell Density Effects of Frog Skin Bacteria on Their Capacity to Inhibit Growth of the Chytrid Fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Yasumiba, Kiyomi; Bell, Sara; Alford, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial symbionts on frog skin can reduce the growth of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) through production of inhibitory metabolites. Bacteria can be effective at increasing the resistance of amphibians to chytridiomycosis when added to amphibian skin, and isolates can be screened for production of metabolites that inhibit Bd growth in vitro. However, some bacteria use density-dependent mechanism such as quorum sensing to regulate metabolite production. It is therefore important to consider cell density effects when evaluating bacteria as possible candidates for bioaugmentation. The aim of our study was to evaluate how the density of cutaneous bacteria affects their inhibition of Bd growth in vitro. We sampled cutaneous bacteria isolated from three frog species in the tropical rainforests of northern Queensland, Australia, and selected ten isolates that were inhibitory to Bd in standardised pilot trials. We grew each isolate in liquid culture at a range of initial dilutions, sub-sampled each dilution at a series of times during the first 48 h of growth and measured spectrophotometric absorbance values, cell counts and Bd-inhibitory activity of cell-free supernatants at each time point. The challenge assay results clearly demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of most isolates were density dependent, with relatively low variation among isolates in the minimum cell density needed to inhibit Bd growth. We suggest the use of minimum cell densities and fast-growing candidate isolates to maximise bioaugmentation efforts.

  11. Antroquinonol, a Ubiquinone Derivative from the Mushroom Antrodia camphorata, Inhibits Colon Cancer Stem Cell-like Properties: Insights into the Molecular Mechanism and Inhibitory Targets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Chun; Lin, Mei-Hsiang; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Mi, Fwu-Long; Wu, Chi-Hao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Wei

    2017-01-11

    Antroquinonol (ANQ) is a ubiquinone derivative from the unique mushroom Antrodia camphorata, which exhibits broad-spectrum bioactivities. The effects of ANQ on cancer stem cell-like properties in colon cancer, however, remain unclear. In this study, we found that ANQ inhibited growth of colon cancer cells. The 50% growth inhibitions (GI50) of ANQ on HCT15 and LoVo were 34.8 ± 0.07 and 17.9 ± 0.07 μM. Moreover, ANQ exhibited inhibitory activities toward migration/invasion and tumorsphere formation of colon cancer cells. Mechanistically, ANQ inhibited pluripotent and cancer stem cell-related genes and down-regulated β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) signaling. Moreover, activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/β-catenin signaling axis was identified to be crucial for regulating the expressions of pluripotent genes, whereas suppression of PI3K/AKT by ANQ inhibited expressions of β-catenin and downstream targets. Molecular docking identified the potential interaction of ANQ with PI3K. Our data show for the first time that the bioactive component of A. camphorata, ANQ, suppresses stem cell-like properties via targeting PI3K/AKT/β-catenin signaling. ANQ could be a promising cancer prevention agent for colon cancer.

  12. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells.

  13. Transforming Growth Factor β Suppresses Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Expression via Both SMAD Binding and Novel TGF-β Inhibitory Elements.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Reddy, Aravind T; Reddy, Raju C

    2017-01-18

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) contributes to wound healing and, when dysregulated, to pathological fibrosis. TGF-β and the anti-fibrotic nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) repress each other's expression, and such PPARγ downregulation is prominent in fibrosis and mediated, via previously unknown mechanisms, by SMAD signaling. Here we show that TGF-β induces association of SMAD3 with both SMAD4, needed for translocation of the complex into the nucleus, and the essential context-sensitive corepressors E2F4 and p107. The complex mediates TGF-β-induced repression by binding to regulatory elements in the target promoter. In the PPARG promoter, we found that the SMAD3-SMAD4 complex binds both to a previously unknown consensus TGF-β inhibitory element (TIE) and also to canonical SMAD-binding elements (SBEs). Furthermore, the TIE and SBEs independently mediated partial repression of PPARG transcription, the first demonstration of a TIE and SBEs functioning within the same promoter. Also, TGF-β-treated fibroblasts contained SMAD complexes that activated a SMAD target gene in addition to those repressing PPARG transcription, the first finding of such dual activity within the same cell. These findings describe in detail novel mechanisms by which TGF-β represses PPARG transcription, thereby facilitating its own pro-fibrotic activity.

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Herbal Remedy PERVIVO and Anti-Inflammatory Drug Sulindac on L-1 Sarcoma Tumor Growth and Tumor Angiogenesis in Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Skopiński, P.; Bałan, B. J.; Kocik, J.; Zdanowski, R.; Lewicki, S.; Niemcewicz, M.; Gawrychowski, K.; Skopińska-Różewska, E.; Stankiewicz, W.

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer activity of many herbs was observed for hundreds of years. They act as modifiers of biologic response, and their effectiveness may be increased by combining multiple herbal extracts . PERVIVO, traditional digestive herbal remedy, contains some of them, and we previously described its antiangiogenic activity. Numerous studies documented anticancer effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We were the first to show that sulindac and its metabolites inhibit angiogenesis. In the present paper the combined in vivo effect of multicomponent herbal remedy PERVIVO and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac on tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis, and tumor volume in Balb/c mice was studied. These effects were checked after grafting cells collected from syngeneic sarcoma L-1 tumors into mice skin. The strongest inhibitory effect was observed in experimental groups treated with PERVIVO and sulindac together. The results of our investigation showed that combined effect of examined drugs may be the best way to get the strongest antiangiogenic and antitumor effect. PMID:23935247

  15. Inhibitory effects of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions by cell cultured Siberian Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Koo, H N; Myung, N I; Shin, M K; Kim, J W; Kim, D K; Kim, K S; Kim, H M; Lee, Y M

    2001-02-01

    The crude drug "Siberian Ginseng (SG)" has long been used in empirical Oriental medicine for the nonspecific enhancement of resistance in humans and animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of cell cultured SG by oral administration in mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. SG dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic allergy with doses of 10(-2) to 1 g/kg 1 h before oral administration. Of special note, SG inhibited systemic allergy with the dose of 1 g/kg by 25%. SG (1 g/kg) also inhibited passive cutaneous allergic reaction by 51%. SG dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. When SG (0.01 mg/ml) was added, the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in antidinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody-stimulated mast cells was inhibited 39.5% and 23.3%, respectively. In addition, SG inhibited anti-DNP IgE antibody-stimulated TNF-alpha protein expression in mast cells. Our studies provide evidence that SG may be beneficial in the treatment of various types of allergic diseases.

  16. Immune inhibitory molecules LAG-3 and PD-1 synergistically regulate T-cell function to promote tumoral immune escape.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seng-Ryong; Turnis, Meghan E; Goldberg, Monica V; Bankoti, Jaishree; Selby, Mark; Nirschl, Christopher J; Bettini, Matthew L; Gravano, David M; Vogel, Peter; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Grosso, Joseph F; Netto, George; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Chaux, Alcides; Utz, Paul J; Workman, Creg J; Pardoll, Drew M; Korman, Alan J; Drake, Charles G; Vignali, Dario A A

    2012-02-15

    Inhibitory receptors on immune cells are pivotal regulators of immune escape in cancer. Among these inhibitory receptors, CTLA-4 (targeted clinically by ipilimumab) serves as a dominant off-switch while other receptors such as PD-1 and LAG-3 seem to serve more subtle rheostat functions. However, the extent of synergy and cooperative interactions between inhibitory pathways in cancer remain largely unexplored. Here, we reveal extensive coexpression of PD-1 and LAG-3 on tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in three distinct transplantable tumors. Dual anti-LAG-3/anti-PD-1 antibody treatment cured most mice of established tumors that were largely resistant to single antibody treatment. Despite minimal immunopathologic sequelae in PD-1 and LAG-3 single knockout mice, dual knockout mice abrogated self-tolerance with resultant autoimmune infiltrates in multiple organs, leading to eventual lethality. However, Lag3(-/-)Pdcd1(-/-) mice showed markedly increased survival from and clearance of multiple transplantable tumors. Together, these results define a strong synergy between the PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory pathways in tolerance to both self and tumor antigens. In addition, they argue strongly that dual blockade of these molecules represents a promising combinatorial strategy for cancer.

  17. IL-6 promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CD133+ cells of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yang, Xiaodong; Duan, Shanzhou; Tsai, Ying; Strojny, Laura R; Keng, Peter; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2016-02-09

    We examined IL-6 effects on growth, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, and metastatic ability of CD133+ and CD133- cell subpopulations isolated from three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, H157, and H1299. We developed IL-6 knocked-down and scramble (sc) control cells of A549 and H157 cell lines by lentiviral infection system, isolated CD133+ and CD133- sub-populations, and investigated the IL-6 role in self-renewal/growth of these cells. IL-6 showed either an inhibitory or lack of effect in modulating growth of CD133- cells depending on intracellular IL-6 levels, but there was higher self-renewal ability of IL-6 expressing CD133+ cells than IL-6 knocked down cells, confirming the promoter role of IL-6 in CD133+ cells growth. We then examined tumor growth of xenografts developed from CD133+ cells of A549IL-6si vs. A549sc cell lines. Consistently, there was retarded growth of tumors developed from A549IL-6si, CD133+ cells compared to tumors originating from A549sc, CD133+ cells. The effect of IL-6 in promoting CD133+ self-renewal was due to hedgehog (Hhg) and Erk signaling pathway activation and higher Bcl-2/Bcl-xL expression. We also investigated whether IL-6 regulates the EMT process of CD133- and CD133+ cells differently. Expression of the EMT/metastasis-associated molecules in IL-6 expressing cells was higher than in IL-6 knocked down cells. Together, we demonstrated dual roles of IL-6 in regulating growth of CD133- and CD133+ subpopulations of lung cancer cells and significant regulation of IL-6 on EMT/metastasis increase in CD133+ cells, not in CD133- cells.

  18. Inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on residual Lewis lung cancer cells in mice following palliative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ningbo; Ji, Huaijun; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Qiang; Cao, Ming; Zang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies found that glucocorticoids were closely associated with the oncogenesis and development of numerous types of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of dexamethasone on the growth and angiogenesis of Lewis lung cancer cells in mice who received palliative surgery. Lewis lung carcinoma cells were inoculated subcutaneously into the right axilla of C57BL/6 mice. When tumor diameter reached 0.5 cm, 2 weeks later, palliative surgery was performed, and the mice were randomly divided into 3 groups with 6 animals in each group (control group, cisplatin group and dexamethasone group). From the first postoperative day, all the mice were administered with saline, cisplatin or dexamethasone for 10 days, and changes in xenograft tumor volumes were monitored. Cisplatin and dexamethasone were dissolved in normal saline (0.9%). All mice were sacrificed on postoperative day 11, and the whole body and the local tumors were weighed immediately. The expression levels of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the microvessel density (MVD) in the tumor mass, were measured by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the present study, tumor growth was inhibited in the cisplatin group and dexamethasone group, and the weights of tumors were significantly decreased in the cisplatin group and dexamethasone group compared with the control group (P<0.001). The expression levels of HIF-1α and VEGF and the MVD were significantly lower in the cisplatin group and dexamethasone group than in the control group (P<0.01). In conclusion, dexamethasone can inhibit the growth and angiogenesis of residual Lewis lung carcinoma subsequent to palliative surgery partially through downregulation of HIF-1α and VEGF signaling pathways. PMID:28123567

  19. Identifying inhibitory effects of lignocellulosic by-products on growth of lactic acid producing micro-organisms using a rapid small-scale screening method.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Edwin C; Vaessen, Evelien; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Eggink, Gerrit

    2016-06-01

    Sugars obtained from pretreated lignocellulose are interesting as substrate for the production of lactic acid in fermentation processes. However, by-products formed during pretreatment of lignocellulose can inhibit microbial growth. In this study, a small-scale rapid screening method was used to identify inhibitory effects of single and combined by-products on growth of lactic acid producing micro-organisms. The small-scale screening was performed in 48-well plates using 5 bacterial species and 12 by-products. Large differences were observed in inhibitory effects of by-products between different species. Predictions can be made for growth behaviour of different micro-organisms on acid pretreated or alkaline pretreated bagasse substrates using data from the small-scale screening. Both individual and combined inhibition effects were shown to be important parameters to predict growth. Synergy between coumaric acid, formic acid and acetic acid is a key inhibitory parameter in alkaline pretreated lignocellulose, while furfural is a key inhibitor in acid pretreated lignocellulose.

  20. Cancer Stem Cell-Secreted Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Stimulates Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cell Function and Facilitates Glioblastoma Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Balint; Silver, Daniel J; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Turaga, Soumya M; Sorensen, Mia D; Rayman, Patricia; Flavahan, William A; Hale, James S; Stoltz, Kevin; Sinyuk, Maksim; Wu, Qiulian; Jarrar, Awad; Kim, Sung-Hak; Fox, Paul L; Nakano, Ichiro; Rich, Jeremy N; Ransohoff, Richard M; Finke, James; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Lathia, Justin D

    2016-08-01

    Shifting the balance away from tumor-mediated immune suppression toward tumor immune rejection is the conceptual foundation for a variety of immunotherapy efforts currently being tested. These efforts largely focus on activating antitumor immune responses but are confounded by multiple immune cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which serve to suppress immune system function. We have identified immune-suppressive MDSCs in the brains of GBM patients and found that they were in close proximity to self-renewing cancer stem cells (CSCs). MDSCs were selectively depleted using 5-flurouracil (5-FU) in a low-dose administration paradigm, which resulted in prolonged survival in a syngeneic mouse model of glioma. In coculture studies, patient-derived CSCs but not nonstem tumor cells selectively drove MDSC-mediated immune suppression. A cytokine screen revealed that CSCs secreted multiple factors that promoted this activity, including macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which was produced at high levels by CSCs. Addition of MIF increased production of the immune-suppressive enzyme arginase-1 in MDSCs in a CXCR2-dependent manner, whereas blocking MIF reduced arginase-1 production. Similarly to 5-FU, targeting tumor-derived MIF conferred a survival advantage to tumor-bearing animals and increased the cytotoxic T cell response within the tumor. Importantly, tumor cell proliferation, survival, and self-renewal were not impacted by MIF reduction, demonstrating that MIF is primarily an indirect promoter of GBM progression, working to suppress immune rejection by activating and protecting immune suppressive MDSCs within the GBM tumor microenvironment. Stem Cells 2016;34:2026-2039.

  1. Inhibitory activity of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes) on transformed cells by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Márquez, Eva; Lagunas-Martínez, Alfredo; Bermudez-Morales, Victor H; Burgete-García, Ana I; León-Rivera, Ismael; Montiel-Arcos, Elizur; García-Villa, Enrique; Gariglio, Patricio; Madrid-Marina V, Vicente; Ondarza-Vidaurreta, Raul N

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of the aqueous extracts of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, obtained from three localities (China; and Morelos and Michoacan, Mexico) on cervical cells transformed by human papillomavirus (HeLa and SiHa) and C-33A cancer cells. The cells were plated in DMEM medium supplemented, and were incubated in the presence of different concentrations of G. lucidum for 24 h. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT colorimetric assay and viability by trypan blue assay. Inhibitory dose was determined (IC50) of the three different extracts of G. lucidum in the culture cell lines mentioned above. The apoptosis process was confirmed by nuclear DNA fragmentation and the cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry. The results showed that aqueous extracts G. lucidum obtained from three localities produced inhibition in the proliferation of VPH transformed cells; they also induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A cancer cells. Therefore, it was found that aqueous extracts G. lucidum obtained from three different locations produced inhibitory effect on cancer cells and may have a potential therapeutic use for the prevention and treatment of this disease.

  2. An Aqueous Extract of Tuberaria lignosa Inhibits Cell Growth, Alters the Cell Cycle Profile, and Induces Apoptosis of NCI-H460 Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana M; Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Xavier, Cristina P R; Lima, M João; Lima, Raquel T; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2016-05-06

    Tuberaria lignosa (Sweet) Samp. is found in European regions, and has antioxidant properties due to its composition in ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds. Given its traditional use and antioxidant properties, the tumor cell growth inhibitory potential of aqueous extracts from T. lignosa (prepared by infusion and decoction) was investigated in three human tumor cell lines: MCF-7 (breast adenocarcinoma), NCI-H460 (non-small cell lung cancer), and HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma). Both extracts inhibited the growth of these cell lines; the most potent one being the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion in the NCI-H460 cells (GI50 of approximately 50 μg/mL). Further assays were carried out with this extract in NCI-H460 cells. At 100 μg/mL or 150 μg/mL it caused an increase in the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and a decrease of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, these concentrations caused an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. In agreement, a decrease in total poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and pro-caspase 3 levels was found. In conclusion, the T. lignosa extract obtained by infusion was more potent in NCI-H460 cells, altering the cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis. This work highlights the importance of T. lignosa as a source of bioactive compounds with tumor cell growth inhibitory potential.

  3. Inhibitory Effects and Underlying Mechanism of 7-Hydroxyflavone Phosphate Ester in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liguo; Chen, Xiaolan; Yang, Fang; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Chrysin and its phosphate ester have previously been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in Hela cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains to be characterized. In the present study, we therefore synthesized diethyl flavon-7-yl phosphate (FP, C19H19O6P) by a simplified Atheron-Todd reaction, and explored its anti-tumor characteristics and mechanisms. Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by MTS, flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling techniques, respectively in human cervical cancer HeLa cells treated with 7-hydroxyflavone (HF) and FP. p21, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cAMP levels in Hela cells were analyzed by western blot and radioimmunoassay. Both HF and FP inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells via induction of PCNA/p21 expression, cleaved caspase-3/poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1, elevation of cAMP levels, and cell cycle arrest with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 fraction. The effects of FP were more potent than those of HF. The interactions of FP with Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) and Ca2+-CaM-phosphodiesterase (PDE)1 were explored by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectra. FP, but not HF, formed non-covalent complexes with Ca2+-CaM-PDE1, indicating that FP is an inhibitor of PDE1, and resulting in elevated cellular cAMP levels. It is possible that the elevated cAMP levels inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in Hela cells through induction of p21 and cleaved caspase-3/PARP-1 expression, and causing down-regulation of PCNA and cell cycle arrest with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 and G2/M fractions. In conclusion, FP was shown to be a Ca2+-CaM-PDE inhibitor, which might account for its underlying anti-cancer mechanism in HeLa cells. These observations clearly demonstrate the special roles of phosphorylated flavonoids in biological processes, and suggest that FP might represent a potential

  4. Enterohepatic recirculation of bioactive ginger phytochemicals is associated with enhanced tumor growth-inhibitory activity of ginger extract.

    PubMed

    Gundala, Sushma R; Mukkavilli, Rao; Yang, Chunhua; Yadav, Pooja; Tandon, Vibha; Vangala, Subrahmanyam; Prakash, Satya; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-06-01

    Phytochemical complexity of plant foods confers health-promoting benefits including chemopreventive and anticancer effects. Isolating single constituents from complex foods may render them inactive, emphasizing the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts. Recently, we demonstrated in vitro synergy among the most abundant bioactive constituents of ginger extract (GE), viz., 6-gingerol (6G), 8-gingerol (8G), 10-gingerol (10G) and 6-shogaol (6S). However, no study has yet examined the in vivo collaboration among ginger phytochemicals or evaluated the importance, if any, of the natural 'milieu' preserved in whole extract. Here, we comparatively evaluated in vivo efficacy of GE with an artificial quasi-mixture (Mix) formulated by combining four most active ginger constituents at concentrations equivalent to those present in whole extract. Orally fed GE showed 2.4-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than Mix in human prostate tumor xenografts. Pharmacokinetic evaluations and bioavailability measurements addressed the efficacy differences between GE and Mix. Plasma concentration-time profiles revealed multiple peaking phenomenon for ginger constituents when they were fed as GE as opposed to Mix, indicating enterohepatic recirculation. Bioavailability of 6G, 8G, 10G and 6S was 1.6-, 1.1-, 2.5- and 3.4-fold higher, respectively, when dosed with GE compared with Mix. In addition, gingerol glucuronides were detected in feces upon intravenous administration confirming hepatobiliary elimination. These data ascribe the superior in vivo efficacy of GE to higher area under the concentration time curves, greater residence time and enhanced bioavailability, of ginger phytochemicals, when fed as a natural extract compared with artificial Mix, emphasizing the usefulness of consuming whole foods over single agents.

  5. Cancer cells. 3: Growth factors and transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Feramisco, J.; Ozanne, B.; Stiles, C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure of Human Epidermal Growth Factor and Expression of Normal and Variant mRNAs in Epdermoid Carcinoma Cells; Tyrosine Kinase Activity Associated with the v-erb-B Gene Product; Cloning and Characterization of Human Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor Gene Sequences in A431 Carcinoma Cells; Anti-oncogenes and the Suppression of Tumor Formation; and Normal Human sis/PDGF-2 Gene Expression Induces Cellular Transformation.

  6. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  7. Zinc-Induced Polymerization of Killer-Cell Ig-like Receptor into Filaments Promotes Its Inhibitory Function at Cytotoxic Immunological Synapses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Rajagopalan, Sumati; Sarkar, Pabak; Dorward, David W; Peterson, Mary E; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Guillermier, Christelle; Steinhauser, Matthew L; Vogel, Steven S; Long, Eric O

    2016-04-07

    The inhibitory function of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that bind HLA-C and block activation of human natural killer (NK) cells is dependent on zinc. We report that zinc induced the assembly of soluble KIR into filamentous polymers, as detected by electron microscopy, which depolymerized after zinc chelation. Similar KIR filaments were isolated from lysates of cells treated with zinc, and membrane protrusions enriched in zinc were detected on whole cells by scanning electron microscopy and imaging mass spectrometry. Two independent mutations in the extracellular domain of KIR, away from the HLA-C binding site, impaired zinc-driven polymerization and inhibitory function. KIR filaments formed spontaneously, without the addition of zinc, at functional inhibitory immunological synapses of NK cells with HLA-C(+) cells. Adding to the recent paradigm of signal transduction through higher order molecular assemblies, zinc-induced polymerization of inhibitory KIR represents an unusual mode of signaling by a receptor at the cell surface.

  8. Berberine inhibits cell growth and mediates caspase-independent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Garcia, Lina; Efferth, Thomas; Torres, Amada; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Youns, Mahmoud

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. In addition to the poor survival rates, combinations using gemcitabine as a backbone have failed to show any benefit beyond monotherapy. These facts underscore an urgent need for novel therapeutic options and motivated us to study the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we undertook an mRNA-based gene expression profiling study in order to get deeper insight into the molecular targets mediating the growth inhibitory effects of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Twenty-four hours after treatment, berberine showed preferential selectivity toward pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Moreover, expression profiling and Ingenuity pathway analysis results showed that the cytotoxicity of berberine was accompanied with an activation of BRCA1-mediated DNA damage response, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation, and P53 signalling pathways. The activation of these signalling pathways might be explained by the fact that berberine intercalates DNA and induces DNA strand break through inhibition of topoisomerases and induction of DNA lesions.

  9. Differential wiring of local excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to islet cells in rat spinal lamina II demonstrated by laser scanning photostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Go; Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Ji, Ru-Rong; Strassman, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (lamina II) of the spinal dorsal horn contains inhibitory and excitatory interneurons that are thought to play a critical role in the modulation of nociception. However, the organization of the intrinsic circuitry within lamina II remains poorly understood. We used glutamate uncaging by laser scanning photostimulation to map the location of neurons that give rise to local synaptic inputs to islet cells, a major class of inhibitory interneuron in lamina II. We also mapped the distribution of sites on the islet cells that exhibited direct (non-synaptic) responses to uncaging of excitatory and inhibitory transmitters. Local synaptic inputs to islet cells arose almost entirely from within lamina II, and these local inputs included both excitatory and inhibitory components. Furthermore, there was a striking segregation in the location of sites that evoked excitatory versus inhibitory synaptic inputs, such that inhibitory presynaptic neurons were distributed more proximal to the islet cell soma. This was paralleled in part by a differential distribution of transmitter receptor sites on the islet cell, in that inhibitory sites were confined to the peri-somatic region while excitatory sites were more widespread. This differential organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs suggests a principle for the wiring of local circuitry within the substantia gelatinosa. PMID:17289782

  10. Suppression of the Lytic and Bactericidal Effects of Cell Wall-Inhibitory Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruben; Ronda-Lain, Conchita; Tapia, Alfonso; Waks, Susan B.; Tomasz, Alexander

    1976-01-01

    The bacteriolytic effect of beta-lactam antibiotics on Bacillus subtilis and on Streptococcus pneumoniae was found to be a function of the pH; lysis was suppressed if the pH of the pneumococcal culture was below 6.0 during penicillin treatment. In the case of B. subtilis, growth at pH 6.6 prevented penicillin-induced lysis. In pneumococci, the addition of trypsin to the growth medium also protected against lysis. The pH-dependent protection phenomenon resembled in several respects the antibiotic “tolerance” of pneumococci with a defective autolytic system. (i) At the pH nonpermissive for lysis, the bacteria retained their normal sensitivity to beta-lactam and to other cell wall inhibitors; however, instead of lysis, the drug-treated bacteria simply stopped growing. Loss of viability of the cells was also greatly reduced. (ii) Protection against lysis was independent of the dose and chemical nature of the cell wall inhibitors. (iii) The protection effect was reversible; lysis and loss of viability could be triggered by a postincubation of the drug-treated bacteria at the pH permissive for lysis. PMID:10831

  11. Transforming growth factor type. beta. can act as a potent competence factor for AKR-2B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goustin, A.S.; Nuttall, G.A.; Leof, E.B.; Ranganathan, G.; Moses, H.L. )

    1987-10-01

    Transforming growth factor type {beta} (TGF{beta}) is a pleiotropic regulator of cell growth with specific high-affinity cell-surface receptors on a large number of cells; its mechanism of action, however, is poorly defined. In this report, the authors utilized the mouse fibroblast line AKR-2B to explore the question of the temporal requirements during the cell cycle in regard to both the growth inhibitory and the growth stimulatory action of TGF{beta}. The results indicate that AKR-2B cells are most sensitive to the inhibitory action of TGF{beta} during early to mid-G{sub 1}. In addition, TGF{beta} need be present only briefly in order to exert its inhibitory effect on EGF-induced DNA synthesis. Likewise, the stimulatory effect of TGF{beta} in the absence of EGF requires only an equally brief exposure to TGF{beta}. Use of homogeneous {sup 125}I-labeled TGF{beta} in a cell-binding assay demonstrates that TGF{beta} bound to cell-surface receptors can readily exchange into the culture medium, helping to rule out the possibility that persistent receptor-bound TGF{beta} is the source of a continuous stimulus. The data indicate that TGF{beta} exposure induces a stable state in the cell similar to but distinct from the state of competence induced by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF).

  12. Progesterone potentiates the growth inhibitory effects of calcitriol in endometrial cancer via suppression of CYP24A1

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Amber A.; Lee, Laura R.; Raboteau, Dewayne; Turbov, Jane; Rodriguez, Isabel V.; Pike, John Wesley; Hamilton, Chad A.; Maxwell, George Larry; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Syed, Viqar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we evaluated the expression of CYP24A1, a protein that inactivates vitamin D in tissues. CYP24A1 expression was increased in advanced-stage endometrial tumors compared to normal tissues. Similarly, endometrial cancer cells expressed higher levels of CYP24A1 than immortalized endometrial epithelial cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to examine CYP24A1 mRNA and protein levels in endometrial cancer cells after 8, 24, 72, and 120 h of exposure to progesterone, progestin derivatives and calcitriol, either alone or in combination. Progestins inhibited calcitriol-induced expression of CYP24A1 and splice variant CYP24SV mRNA and protein in cancer cells. Furthermore, actinomycin D, but not cycloheximide, blocked calcitriol-induced CYP24A1 splicing. siRNA-induced knockdown of CYP24A1 expression sensitized endometrial cancer cells to calcitriol-induced growth inhibition. These data suggest that CYP24A1 overexpression reduces the antitumor effects of calcitriol in cancer cells and that progestins may be beneficial for maintaining calcitriol's anti-endometrial cancer activity. PMID:27769055

  13. Effect of soluble products from lectin-stimulated lymphocytes on the growth, adhesiveness, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis of cultured synovial fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiades, T P; Wood, A

    1981-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells exposed to concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin secrete a soluble factor that arrests the growth of human synovial fibroblastic cells in culture. Once the growth-inhibitory effect is initiated it cannot be reversed by washing the fibroblastic cells, by refeeding with nonconditioned fresh serum-containing medium, by trypsinization, EDTA treatment, or a combination of these procedures. Media from nonstimulated mononuclear cells, fibroblastic cells, or the lectins themselves do not contain similar inhibitory activity that can be detected by the present culture systems. This lectin-dependent, growth-inhibitory activity does not have a cytotoxic effect on the fibroblasts but increases their adhesiveness to plastic or glass surfaces, and the cells tend to assume a less fibroblastic morphology. The growth-inhibitory activity is stable in the cold and is nondialyzable or ultrafilterable, but the activity is rapidly lost at temperature between 60 degrees and 70 degrees C and at pH 2.0. The growth-arrested cells secrete more glycosaminoglycan per cell in the medium and synthesize more cell surface glycosaminoglycan than the controls. However, the increased glycosaminoglycan synthesis cannot be explained as being entirely secondary to a cell density effect as it is also observed when adjustments are made for the differences in growth rates. PMID:7276172

  14. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  15. Inhibitory Effects of the Four Main Theaflavin Derivatives Found in Black Tea on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YING; RANKIN, GARY O.; TU, YOUYING; CHEN, YI CHARLIE

    2016-01-01

    Background Some polyphenols induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. Consumption of black tea, rich in polyphenols, has been found to reduce ovarian cancer risk. Theaflavin (TF1), theaflavin-3-gallate (TF2a), theaflavin-3′-gallate (TF2b) and theaflavin-3, 3′-digallate (TF3) are four main theaflavin derivatives found in black tea. Materials and Methods Cell proliferation assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay, Caspase-Glo Assay, western blot, human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation assay and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed. Results All four theaflavin derivatives reduced viability of ovarian cancer cells at lower concentrations than with normal ovarian cells. TF1 mainly mediated apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway, while the others via the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. TF1 inhibited tube formation via reducing VEGF secretion in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-independent manner, while the others in a HIF1α-dependent way. Conclusion All four theaflavin derivatives inhibited ovarian cancer cells. Some of the effects and mechanisms of TF1 are different from those of the other three theaflavin derivatives. PMID:26851019

  16. Ascl1 and Gsh1/2 control inhibitory and excitatory cell fate in spinal sensory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Rumiko; Kriks, Sonja; Cordes, Ralf; Gossler, Achim; Ma, Qiufu; Goulding, Martyn

    2006-06-01

    Sensory information from the periphery is integrated and transduced by excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal spinal cord. Recent studies have identified a number of postmitotic factors that control the generation of these sensory interneurons. We show that Gsh1/2 and Ascl1 (Mash1), which are expressed in sensory interneuron progenitors, control the choice between excitatory and inhibitory cell fates in the developing mouse spinal cord. During the early phase of neurogenesis, Gsh1/2 and Ascl1 coordinately regulate the expression of Tlx3, which is a critical postmitotic determinant for dorsal glutamatergic sensory interneurons. However, at later developmental times, Ascl1 controls the expression of Ptf1a in dIL(A) progenitors to promote inhibitory neuron differentiation while at the same time upregulating Notch signaling to ensure the proper generation of dIL(B) excitatory neurons. We propose that this switch in Ascl1 function enables the cogeneration of inhibitory and excitatory sensory interneurons from a common pool of dorsal progenitors.

  17. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM.

  18. Epitope mapping of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody and induction of growth-inhibitory polyclonal antibodies by vaccination with EGFR mimotope.

    PubMed

    Navari, Mohsen; Zare, Mehrak; Javanmardi, Masoud; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Modjtahedi, Helmout; Rasaee, Mohammad Javed

    2014-10-01

    One of the proposed approaches in cancer therapy is to induce and direct the patient's own immune system against cancer cells. In this study, we determined the epitope mapping of the rat anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody ICR-62 using a phage display of random peptide library and identified a 12 amino acids peptide, which was recognized as a mimotope. The peptide was synthesized and conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as carrier protein (P-BSA). We have shown that ICR-62 can react specifically with P-BSA as well as native EGFR. Two rabbits were immunized either by BSA or P-BSA and the rabbits IgGs were purified and examined for binding to the antigens, mimotope and the EGFR protein purified from the EGFR overexpressing A431 cell line. We showed that the rabbit IgG generated against the mimotope is capable of inhibiting the growth of A431 cells by 15%, but does not have any effect on the growth of EGFR-negative MDA-MB-453 cell line in vitro. Our results support the need for further investigations on the potential of vaccination with either mimotope of the EGFR or epitope displayed on the surface of phage particles for use in active immunotherapy of cancer.

  19. Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study

    PubMed Central

    Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The phytochemical, its mode of action and safety issues are yet to be determined. PMID:22275971

  20. Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study.

    PubMed

    Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The phytochemical, its mode of action and safety issues are yet to be determined.

  1. Inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (iKIR) mismatches improve survival after T-cell-repleted haploidentical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bastos-Oreiro, Mariana; Anguita, Javier; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Fernández, Lucía; Buces, Elena; Navarro, Almudena; Pascual, Cristina; Pérez-Corral, Ana; Balsalobre, Pascual; Muñoz, Cristina; Kwon, Mi; Serrano, David; Perez-Martinez, Antonio; Buño, Ismael; Gayoso, Jorge; Díez-Martín, José Luís

    2016-05-01

    Alloreactivity triggered by interaction between killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and natural killer (NK) cells plays a role in the graft-versus-tumor effect after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Our aim in this study was to evaluate this role in the setting of T-cell-repleted haploidentical SCT with postinfusion high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy). We included 33 patients. Among patient-donor pairs with at least 1 inhibitory KIR (iKIR) gene mismatch, event-free survival (EFS) and cumulative incidence of relapse 1 year after transplant were significantly better (85% vs. 37% [P = 0.008] and 18% vs. 46% [P = 0.041], respectively). A subanalysis in 12 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) showed an improvement in EFS 1 year after transplant in those patients with KIR ligand mismatch (100% vs. 25%, P = 0.012), although overall survival (OS) was not affected (85% vs. 80%, P = 0.2). Eight of 12 patient-donors pairs presented iKIR mismatches. Of note, this outcome was better in the small subgroup, both for EFS (100% vs. 25%, P = 0.012) and for OS (100% vs. 37%, P = 0.004). Our data suggest that in the setting of T-cell-repleted haploidentical SCT with PT-Cy, iKIR mismatch is associated with improved survival, with particularly good results for both iKIR and KIR ligand mismatches in patients with HL.

  2. [Abnormal expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor].

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Yan, X D; Cai, Y; Gu, J J; Yang, X L; Pan, L H; Wang, L; Yao, D F

    2016-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the expression of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) in liver cancer and the inhibitory effect of its transcription intervention on nude mice xenograft tumor. Methods: A total of 40 patients with primary liver cancer were enrolled, and 40 samples of cancer lesions, peri-cancerous tissues (with a distance of 2 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), or distal liver tissues (with a distance of 5 cm to the margin of cancer lesion), with a weight of 200 mg, were collected after surgery. Some of these samples were used for pathological examination, and the rest were stored at -85°C. A total of 18 BALB/c nude mice aged 4-6 weeks with a body weight of 18-20 g (9 male and 9 female mice) were randomly divided into control group, negative control group, and co-intervention group, with 6 mice in each group, and fed under specific pathogen-free conditions. The cell line was cultured in the dimethyl sulfoxide complete medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum in a CO2incubator at 37°C. When the cell confluence reached 90% after cell inoculation, shRNA was divided into co-intervention group, negative control group, and untreated control group and were transfected to hepatoma cells using PolyJetTM transfection reagent. Stable cell clones obtained by G418 screening and used for the in vivo study. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to analyze the expression of IGF-IR in the human hepatoma tissue and cell line. The IGF-IR shRNA eukaryotic expression plasmids were established and screened for the most effective sequence; they were transfected to PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells, and the CCK-8 assay was used to analyze the changes in cell proliferation. The stable cell line screened out by G418 was inoculated to establish the subcutaneous xenograft tumor in nude mice. The tumor growth curve was plotted and histological examination was performed. Graphpad Prism 5.0 and SPSS 18.0 were used for plotting and data

  3. Application of recombinant human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) produced in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Youngblood, Bradford A; Alfano, Randall; Pettit, Steve C; Zhang, Deshui; Dallmann, H Garry; Huang, Ning; Macdonald, Clinton C

    2014-02-20

    Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into any somatic cell type, and thus have potential to treat a number of diseases that are currently incurable. Application of these cells for clinical or industrial uses would require an increase in production to yield adequate numbers of viable cells. However, the relatively high costs of cytokines and growth factors required for maintenance of stem cells in the undifferentiated state have the potential to limit translational research. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the IL-6 cytokine family, is a key regulator in the maintenance of naïve states for both human and mouse stem cells. In this study, we describe a new recombinant human LIF (rhLIF) using a plant-based (rice) expression system. We found that rice-derived rhLIF possessed the same specific activity as commercial Escherichia coli-derived LIF and was capable of supporting mouse embryonic stem cell proliferation in the undifferentiated state as evidenced from pluripotency marker level analysis. Retention of the pluripotent state was found to be indistinguishable between rice-derived rhLIF and other recombinant LIF proteins currently on the market.

  4. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions.

  5. Petroleum ether extract of Chenopodium album L. prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting; Pan, Hui; Feng, Yang; Li, Haizhou; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Chenopodium album L. is a common edible herb distributed in China that has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for antiviral, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and cancer treatment. However, to the best of our knowledge no previous reports have investigated its the function of its phytochemical extracts in lung cancer cells. The purpose of the present study was to assess the anticancer activities of the phytochemical extracts of C. album L. on human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells. The present findings demonstrated that the petroleum ether (PE) extract of C. album L. exhibited significant growth inhibitory effects on A549 with an IC50 value of 33.31±2.79 µg/ml. As determined by MTT and colony formation assays, its growth inhibitory effects were dose- and time-dependent. Furthermore, PE extract-treated A549 cells exhibited dose-dependent cell growth arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and cell apoptosis was induced. These results provide useful data on the anticancer activities of C. album L. in human lung cancer and demonstrated the novel possibilities of this plant in developing lung cancer therapies. PMID:27882153

  6. Inhibitory control of hippocampal inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Simon; Topolnik, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Information processing within neuronal networks is determined by a dynamic partnership between principal neurons and local circuit inhibitory interneurons. The population of GABAergic interneurons is extremely heterogeneous and comprises, in many brain regions, cells with divergent morphological and physiological properties, distinct molecular expression profiles, and highly specialized functions. GABAergic interneurons have been studied extensively during the past two decades, especially in the hippocampus, which is a relatively simple cortical structure. Different types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons control spike initiation [e.g., axo-axonic and basket cells (BCs)] and synaptic integration (e.g., bistratified and oriens–lacunosum moleculare interneurons) within pyramidal neurons and synchronize local network activity, providing a means for functional segregation of neuronal ensembles and proper routing of hippocampal information. Thus, it is thought that, at least in the hippocampus, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons represent critical regulating elements at all stages of information processing, from synaptic integration and spike generation to large-scale network activity. However, this raises an important question: if inhibitory interneurons are fundamental for network computations, what are the mechanisms that control the activity of the interneurons themselves? Given the essential role of synaptic inhibition in the regulation of neuronal activity, it would be logical to expect that specific inhibitory mechanisms have evolved to control the operation of interneurons. Here, we review the mechanisms of synaptic inhibition of interneurons and discuss their role in the operation of hippocampal inhibitory circuits. PMID:23162426

  7. Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) Augments IFN-Gamma Mediated Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    demonstrated that MIS promotes IFN-y-induced apoptosis demonstrating a functional interaction between these two classes of signaling molecules in regulation...mammary tumors which do not express ER and have functional inactivation of Rb and p53. In agreement with results observed in the transgenic mice, MIS...Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), a gene known for its growth inhibitory functions in breast cancer cells is induced by MIS and IFN-y through a NFkB

  8. Cell metabolism: an essential link between cell growth and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Emily F.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Growth factor-stimulated or cancerous cells require sufficient nutrients to meet the metabolic demands of cell growth and division. If nutrients are insufficient, metabolic checkpoints are triggered that lead to cell cycle arrest and the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade through a process dependent on the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Given the connections between metabolism and apoptosis, the notion of targeting metabolism to induce cell death in cancer cells has recently garnered much attention. However, the signaling pathways by which metabolic stresses induce apoptosis have not as of yet been fully elucidated. Thus, the best approach to this promising therapeutic avenue remains unclear. This review will discuss the intricate links between metabolism, growth, and intrinsic apoptosis and will consider ways in which manipulation of metabolism might be exploited to promote apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. PMID:20816705

  9. Adolescent maturation of inhibitory inputs onto cingulate cortex neurons is cell-type specific and TrkB dependent

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Angela; Piekarski, David J.; Caporale, Natalia; Munoz-Cuevas, Francisco Javier; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The maturation of inhibitory circuits during adolescence may be tied to the onset of mental health disorders such as schizophrenia. Neurotrophin signaling likely plays a critical role in supporting inhibitory circuit development and is also implicated in psychiatric disease. Within the neocortex, subcircuits may mature at different times and show differential sensitivity to neurotrophin signaling. We measured miniature inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs and mEPSCs) in Layer 5 cell-types in the mouse anterior cingulate (Cg) across the periadolescent period. We differentiated cell-types mainly by Thy1 YFP transgene expression and also retrobead injection labeling in the contralateral Cg and ipsilateral pons. We found that YFP− neurons and commissural projecting neurons had lower frequency of mIPSCs than neighboring YFP+ neurons or pons projecting neurons in juvenile mice (P21–25). YFP− neurons and to a lesser extent commissural projecting neurons also showed a significant increase in mIPSC amplitude during the periadolescent period (P21–25 vs. P40–50), which was not seen in YFP+ neurons or pons projecting neurons. Systemic disruption of tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) signaling during P23–50 in TrkBF616A mice blocked developmental changes in mIPSC amplitude, without affecting miniature excitatory post synaptic currents (mEPSCs). Our data suggest that the maturation of inhibitory inputs onto Layer 5 pyramidal neurons is cell-type specific. These data may inform our understanding of adolescent brain development across species and aid in identifying candidate subcircuits that may show greater vulnerability in mental illness. PMID:25762898

  10. Purification and identification of a polysaccharide from medicinal mushroom Amauroderma rude with immunomodulatory activity and inhibitory effect on tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Honghui; Han, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiguo; Yu, Xiongtao; Jiao, Chunwei; Yang, Xiaobing; Dhaliwal, Preet; Xie, Yizhen; Yang, Burton B.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms in recent years have been the subject of many experiments searching for anticancer properties. We previously screened thirteen mushrooms for their potential in inhibiting tumor growth, and found that the water extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest activity. Previous studies have shown that the polysaccharides contained in the water extract were responsible for the anticancer properties. This study was designed to explore the potential effects of the polysaccharides on immune regulation and tumor growth. Using the crude Amauroderma rude extract, in vitro experiments showed that the capacities of spleen lymphocytes, macrophages, and natural killer cells were all increased. In vivo experiments showed that the extract increased macrophage metabolism, lymphocyte proliferation, and antibody production. In addition, the partially purified product stimulated the secretion of cytokines in vitro, and in vivo. Overall, the extract decreased tumor growth rates. Lastly, the active compound was purified and identified as polysaccharide F212. Most importantly, the purified polysaccharide had the highest activity in increasing lymphocyte proliferation. In summary, this molecule may serve as a lead compound for drug development. PMID:26219260

  11. Elevated thymidine phosphorylase activity in psoriatic lesions accounts for the apparent presence of an epidermal growth inhibitor, but is not in itself growth inhibitory

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, C.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1991-08-01

    An apparent tissue-specific growth inhibitor, or chalone, obtained from psoriatic lesions was tentatively identified in the 100-kDa fraction based upon inhibition of DNA synthesis, as measured by (3H)-thymidine uptake by a squamous cell carcinoma cell line, SCC 38. This fraction, however, failed to inhibit SCC 38 cell growth when assessed directly in a neutral red uptake assay. Characterization of the inhibitor of (3H)-thymidine uptake revealed it to have biochemical properties identical to thymidine phosphorylase: (1) molecular weight close to 100 kDa, (2) isoelectric point of 4.2, and (3) thymidine phosphorylase enzyme activity. Thus, the authors conclude that its ability to inhibit (3H)-thymidine uptake was due to thymidine catabolism rather than inhibition of DNA synthesis or growth inhibition. Examination of thymidine phosphorylase activity in keratome biopsies from psoriatic and normal skin demonstrated a twentyfold increase in activity in psoriatic lesions relative to non-lesional or normal skin. This increase in metabolism of thymidine was due to thymidine phosphorylase rather than uridine phosphorylase activity. The correlation between increased thymidine phosphorylase activity and increased keratinocyte proliferation in vitro (cultured) and in vivo (psoriasis), suggests that this enzyme may play a critical role in providing the thymidine necessary for keratinocyte proliferation.

  12. Different Inhibitory Effect and Mechanism of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles on Normal Cells and Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yingchao; Li, Shipu; Cao, Xianying; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Youfa; Yin, Yixia; Qiu, Tong; Dai, Honglian; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP), similar to inorganic phase in bones, shows good biocompatibility and bioactivity as bone defect repairing material. Recently, nanoscaled HAP shows the special properties differing from bulk HAP in physics, chemistry and biology. This paper demonstrates that HAP nanoparticle (nHAP) possesses the ability for inhibiting cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, after treatment with nHAP for 3 days, proliferation of human cancer cells are inhibited by more than 65% and by less than 30% for human normal cells. In vivo, injection of nHAP in transplanted tumor results in significant reduction (about 50%) of tumor size. The anticancer effect of nHAP is mainly attributed to high amount by endocytosis in cancer cells and inhibition on protein synthesis in cells. The abundant nHAP internalized in cancer cells around endoplasmic reticulum may inhibit the protein synthesis by decreasing the binding of mRNA to ribosome due to its high adsorption capacity for ribosome and arrest cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. nHAP shows no ROS-involved cytotoxicity and low cytotoxicity to normal cells. These results strongly suggest that nHAP can inhibit cancer cell proliferation and have a potential application in cancer treatment.

  13. Inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle via inhibition of growth and histidine decarboxylase activity of Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Koth Bong Woo Ri; Cho, Ji Young; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2014-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle. First, antimicrobial activities of brown algae extracts against Morganella morganii were investigated using a disk diffusion method. An ethanol extract of Ecklonia cava (ECEE) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ECEE was 2 mg/ml. Furthermore, the brown algae extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit crude histidine decarboxylase (HDC) of M. morganii. The ethanol extract of Eisenia bicyclis (EBEE) and ECEE exhibited significant inhibitory activities (19.82% and 33.79%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. To obtain the phlorotannin dieckol, ECEE and EBEE were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel column chromatography, and HPLC. Dieckol exhibited substantial inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.61 mg/ml, and exhibited competitive inhibition. These extracts were also tested on mackerel muscle. The viable cell counts and histamine production in mackerel muscle inoculated with M. morganii treated with ≥2.5 MIC of ECEE (weight basis) were highly inhibited compared with the untreated sample. Furthermore, treatment of crude HDC-inoculated mackerel muscle with 0.5% ECEE and 0.5% EBEE (weight basis), which exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against crude HDC, reduced the overall histamine production by 46.29% and 56.89%, respectively, compared with the untreated sample. Thus, these inhibitory effects of ECEE and EBEE should be helpful in enhancing the safety of mackerel by suppressing histamine production in this fish species.

  14. The inhibitory effect of glycolic acid and lactic acid on melanin synthesis in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Usuki, Akiko; Ohashi, Akiko; Sato, Hirofumi; Ochiai, Yasunobu; Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Funasaka, Yoko

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) such as glycolic acid (GA) and lactic acid (LA) have been reported to be effective in treating pigmentary lesions such as melasma, solar lentigines, and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. The mechanism of this effect might be due to epidermal remodeling and accelerated desquamation, which would result in quick pigment dispersion. However, the direct effect of AHAs on melanin synthesis has not yet been well studied. To elucidate such a direct effect of AHAs on melanogenesis, we performed melanin assays, growth curve determinations, Northern and Western blotting for melanogenic proteins [tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1 and TRP-2], and tyrosinase and, 4-dihydroxyphenylalaninechrome tautomerase enzyme activity assays using mouse B16 and human melanoma cells. GA or LA (at doses of 300 or 500 microg/ml) inhibited melanin formation in similar dose-dependent manner, without affecting cell growth. Although the mRNA and protein expression or molecular size of tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2 were not affected, tyrosinase activity was inhibited. To see whether GA and/or LA directly inhibit tyrosinase catalytic function, the effect of GA and LA on human tyrosinase purified from the melanosome-rich large granule fraction of human melanoma cells was performed. GA or LA were shown to inhibit tyrosinase enzyme activity directly, but this effect was not due to the acidity of GA or LA, because adjusting the pH to 5.6 (the pH of GA and LA at concentrations of 2500 microg/ml), did not affect tyrosinase activity. Taken together, these results show that GA and LA suppress melanin formation by directly inhibiting tyrosinase activity, an effect independent of their acidic nature. GA and LA might work on pigmentary lesions not only by accelerating the turnover of the epidermis but also by directly inhibiting melanin formation in melanocytes.

  15. Cancer Cells Hijack Gluconeogenic Enzymes to Fuel Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Balsa-Martinez, Eduardo; Puigserver, Pere

    2015-11-19

    In this issue and the October 15th issue of Molecular Cell, studies by Montal et al. (2015) and Vincent et al. (2015) report that certain types of cancer cells utilize the gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 2 (PCK2) to reprogram anabolic metabolism and support cell growth.

  16. [Inhibitory effect of 14-3-3ζ on the proliferation of HL-60 cells and HL-60/VCR cells].

    PubMed

    Liang, Rong; Chen, Xie-Qun; Wang, Zhe; Xiong, Hua; Bai, Qing-Xian; Gao, Guang-Xun; Dong, Bao-Xia; Zhu, Hua-Feng

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression and role of 14-3-3ζ in the AML cell lines: sensitive HL-60 and drug-resistant HL-60/VCR cells. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot were respectively used to examine the expression of mdr1 mRNA and Pgp in AML cell lines to validate the results of microarray. Western blot was performed to investigate the expression of Pgp, 14-3-3ζ, and anti-apoptosis protein BCL-2, MCL-1 proteins. Immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the subcellular location of 14-3-3ζ protein in HL-60 and HL-60/VCR cells by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Transduction with siRNA was used to silence 14-3-3ζ in AML cell lines. Cell count method and flow cytometry of cell cycle were used to analyze the changes of growth of AML cells. The results found that mdr1 mRNA and Pgp did not expressed in HL-60 cells, but significantly overexpressed in HL-60/VCR cells. Except 14-3-3σ, the expression of other subtypes of 14-3-3 was higher in HL-60/VCR cells than that in HL-60 cells, especially 14-3-3ζ. The higher expression of 14-3-3ζ, BCL-2, MCL-1 protein was observed in HL-60/VCR cells than that in HL-60 cells. These results were same results from gene chip. It was also noticed that 14-3-3ζ was located in the cytoplasma and nuclei of AML cell lines, especially over-expressed in HL-60/VCR cells. Furthermore, suppression of 14-3-3ζ by RNA interference resulted in inhibition of the proliferation of AML cells with decreased protein expression of BCL-2 and MCL-1, especially in HL-60/VCR cells. It is concluded that 14-3-3ζ plays an important role in proliferation of AML cells and associates with BCL-2 and MCL-1 expression. These results suggested that development of therapy targeting 14-3-3ζ may provide novel, effective strategies for refractory and relapsed AML.

  17. Function of Membrane-Associated Proteoglycans in the Regulation of Satellite Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Muscle growth can be divided into embryonic and postnatal periods. During the embryonic period, mesenchymal stem cells proliferate and differentiate to form muscle fibers. Postnatal muscle growth (hypertrophy) is characterized by the enlargement of existing muscle fiber size. Satellite cells (also known as adult myoblasts) are responsible for hypertrophy. The activity of satellite cells can be regulated by their extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is composed of collagens, proteoglycans, non-collagenous glycoproteins, cytokines and growth factors. Proteoglycans contain a central core protein with covalently attached glycosaminoglycans (GAGs: chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate) and N- or O-linked glycosylation chains. Membrane-associated proteoglycans attach to the cell membrane either through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor or transmembrane domain. The GAGs can bind proteins including cytokines and growth factors. Both cytokines and growth factors play important roles in regulating satellite cell growth and development. Cytokines are generally associated with immune cells. However, cytokines can also affect muscle cell development. For instance, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leukemia inhibitory factor have been reported to affect the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and myoblasts. Growth factors are potent stimulators or inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. The proper function of some cytokines and growth factors requires an interaction with the cell membrane-associated proteoglycans to enhance the affinity to bind to their primary receptors to initiate downstream signal transduction. This chapter is focused on the interaction of membrane-associated proteoglycans with cytokines and growth factors, and their role in satellite cell growth and development.

  18. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF)

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  19. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  20. Inhibitory effects of the dopamine agonists quinagolide (CV 205-502) and bromocriptine on prolactin secretion and growth of SMtTW pituitary tumors in the rat.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, J; Chevallier, P; Claustrat, B; Hooghe-Peters, E; Dubray, C; Rousset, B; Girod, C

    1994-01-01

    The SMtTW tumor, a spontaneous PRL-secreting transplantable tumor, is the only available animal model sensitive to dopamine agonists. This model has been used to compare the long term in vivo effects of CV 205-502 (CV) and bromocriptine (BR) on PRL secretion and tumor growth. These two drugs were given for 2 months to female Wistar-Furth rats bearing either small or large tumors 4 and 6 months after the graft. Untreated grafted rats served as control. In all rats treated with 5 or 10 mg/kg.day BR or 0.3 mg/kg.day CV, a normalization of plasma PRL levels was observed whatever the pretreatment levels (plasma PRL or CV or BR-treated rats, < 15 ng/ml vs. 28253 ng/ml in control rats 8 months after graft). An inhibition of tumor growth was found for both small and large tumors, but the tumors never disappeared completely (mean tumor weights at autopsy, 440 and 660 mg in BR and CV groups vs. 5270 mg in control group 8 months after graft). Experiments performed with increasing doses of BR (0.15-5 mg/kg.day) or CV (0.03-0.6 mg/kg.day) indicated that CV is effective at doses 5-10 times lower than those of BR. A shrinkage under treatment and a regrowth after drug withdrawal were demonstrated for large tumors by in vivo ultrasonographic measurements of tumor size. Histological and ultrastructural effects were similar for the two drugs: decrease in hemorrhage, reduction of the cell size and secretory activity, increase in immunoreactive PRL cellular content, and inhibition of exocytosis. There was no difference in the PRL mRNA content of treated and untreated tumors, as assessed by in situ hybridization. In conclusion, CV and BR exhibit similar inhibitory effects on tumor growth and PRL secretion. These effects are rapidly and fully reversible after drug withdrawal. The present results give a complete account of the actions of the two dopamine agonists under conditions comparable to those used in the treatment of human prolactinomas.

  1. Control of cell cycle and cell growth by molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Martí; Garí, Eloi; Colomina, Neus

    2007-11-01

    Cells adapt their size to both intrinsic and extrinsic demands and, among them, those that stem from growth and proliferation rates are crucial for cell size homeostasis. Here we revisit mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell growth in budding yeast. Cyclin Cln3, the most upstream activator of Start, is retained at the endoplasmic reticulum in early G(1) and released by specific chaperones in late G(1) to initiate the cell cycle. On one hand, these chaperones are rate-limiting for release of Cln3 and cell cycle entry and, on the other hand, they are required for key biosynthetic processes. We propose a model whereby the competition for specialized chaperones between growth and cycle machineries could gauge biosynthetic rates and set a critical size threshold at Start.

  2. "Dormant basket cell" hypothesis revisited: relative vulnerabilities of dentate gyrus mossy cells and inhibitory interneurons after hippocampal status epilepticus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sloviter, Robert S; Zappone, Colin A; Harvey, Brian D; Bumanglag, Argyle V; Bender, Roland A; Frotscher, Michael

    2003-04-21

    The "dormant basket cell" hypothesis suggests that postinjury hippocampal network hyperexcitability results from the loss of vulnerable neurons that normally excite insult-resistant inhibitory basket cells. We have reexamined the experimental basis of this hypothesis in light of reports that excitatory hilar mossy cells are not consistently vulnerable and inhibitory basket cells are not consistently seizure resistant. Prolonged afferent stimulation that reliably evoked granule cell discharges always produced extensive hilar neuron degeneration and immediate granule cell disinhibition. Conversely, kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in chronically implanted animals produced similarly extensive hilar cell loss and immediate granule cell disinhibition, but only when granule cells discharged continuously during status epilepticus. In both preparations, electron microscopy revealed degeneration of presynaptic terminals forming asymmetrical synapses in the mossy cell target zone, including some terminating on gamma-aminobutyric acid-immunoreactive elements, but no evidence of axosomatic or axoaxonic degeneration in the adjacent granule cell layer. Although parvalbumin immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed decreased staining, this apparently was due to altered parvalbumin expression rather than basket cell death, because substance P receptor-positive interneurons, some of which contained residual parvalbumin immunoreactivity, survived. These results confirm the inherent vulnerability of dendritically projecting hilar mossy cells and interneurons and the relative resistance of dentate inhibitory basket and chandelier cells that target granule cell somata. The variability of hippocampal cell loss after status epilepticus suggests that altered hippocampal structure and function cannot be assumed to cause the spontaneous seizures that develop in these animals and highlights the importance of confirming hippocampal pathology and pathophysiology in vivo in

  3. Activation of Presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) Receptors Inhibits Synaptic Transmission at Mammalian Inhibitory Cholinergic Olivocochlear–Hair Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Carolina; Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia; Torbidoni, Ana Vanesa; Fuchs, Paul A.; Bettler, Bernhard; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    The synapse between olivocochlear (OC) neurons and cochlear mechanosensory hair cells is cholinergic, fast, and inhibitory. The inhibitory sign of this cholinergic synapse is accounted for by the activation of Ca2+-permeable postsynaptic α9α10 nicotinic receptors coupled to the opening of hyperpolarizing Ca2+-activated small-conductance type 2 (SK2)K+ channels. Acetylcholine (ACh) release at this synapse is supported by both P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Although the OC synapse is cholinergic, an abundant OC GABA innervation is present along the mammalian cochlea. The role of this neurotransmitter at the OC efferent innervation, however, is for the most part unknown. We show that GABA fails to evoke fast postsynaptic inhibitory currents in apical developing inner and outer hair cells. However, electrical stimulation of OC efferent fibers activates presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) receptors [GABAB(1a,2)Rs] that downregulate the amount of ACh released at the OC–hair cell synapse, by inhibiting P/Q-type VGCCs. We confirmed the expression of GABABRs at OC terminals contacting the hair cells by coimmunostaining for GFP and synaptophysin in transgenic mice expressing GABAB1–GFP fusion proteins. Moreover, coimmunostaining with antibodies against the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and synaptophysin support the idea that GABA is directly synthesized at OC terminals contacting the hair cells during development. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a physiological role for GABA in cochlear synaptic function. In addition, our data suggest that the GABAB1a isoform selectively inhibits release at efferent cholinergic synapses. PMID:24068816

  4. Enhanced Fermentative Hydrogen and Methane Production from an Inhibitory Fruit-Flavored Medium with Membrane-Encapsulated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Akinbomi, Julius; Wikandari, Rachman; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the possibility of improving fermentative hydrogen and methane production from an inhibitory fruit-flavored medium using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane-encapsulated cells. Hexanal, myrcene, and octanol, which are naturally produced in fruits such as apple, grape, mango, orange, strawberry, and plum, were investigated. Batch and semi-continuous fermentation processes at 55 °C were carried out. Presence of 5 g/L of myrcene, octanol, and hexanal resulted in no methane formation by fermenting bacteria, while encapsulated cells in the membranes resulted in successful fermentation with 182, 111, and 150 mL/g COD of methane, respectively. The flavor inhibitions were not serious on hydrogen-producing bacteria. With free cells in the presence of 5 g/L (final concentration) of hexanal-, myrcene-, and octanol-flavored media, average daily yields of 68, 133, and 88 mL/g COD of hydrogen, respectively, were obtained. However, cell encapsulation further improved these hydrogen yields to 189, 179, and 198 mL/g COD. The results from this study indicate that the yields of fermentative hydrogen and methane productions from an inhibitory medium could be improved using encapsulated cells. PMID:26501329

  5. Inhibitory effect of cinnamon, clove, lemongrass, oregano and palmarose essential oils on growth and fumonisin B1 production by Fusarium proliferatum in maize grain.

    PubMed

    Velluti, A; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J; Egido, J; Marín, S

    2003-12-31

    The effect of cinnamon, clove, oregano, palmarose and lemongrass oils on growth and FB1 production by three different isolates of F. proliferatum in irradiated maize grain at 0.995 and 0.950 aw and at 20 and 30 degrees C was evaluated. The five essential oils inhibited growth of F. proliferatum isolates at 0.995 aw at both temperatures, while at 0.950 aw only cinnamon, clove and oregano oils were effective in inhibiting growth of F. proliferatum at 20 degrees C and none of them at 30 degrees C. Cinnamon, oregano and palmarose oils had significant inhibitory effect on FB1 production by the three strains of F. proliferatum at 0.995 aw and both temperatures, while clove and lemongrass oils had only significant inhibitory effect at 30 degrees C. No differences were found using 500 or 1000 microg essential oil g(-1). At 0.950 aw, none of the essential oils had any significant effect on FB1 production. The results suggest that mainly cinnamon and oregano oils could be effective in controlling growth and FB1 production by F. proliferatum in maize under preharvest conditions.

  6. Stimulation of human thyroid growth via the inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein Gi: constitutive expression of the G-protein alpha subunit Gi alpha-1 in autonomous adenoma.

    PubMed Central

    Selzer, E; Wilfing, A; Schiferer, A; Hermann, M; Grubeck-Loebenstein, B; Freissmuth, M

    1993-01-01

    The alpha subunits of the stimulatory and inhibitory G proteins, Gs alpha and Gi alpha, activate transmembrane-signaling systems involved in the control of cell proliferation. We have investigated the pattern of expression of Gi alpha subtypes and Gi alpha-mediated proliferative responses in the human thyroid. Human thyroid membranes contain two subtypes of Gi alpha, Gi alpha-1 and Gi alpha-2, as assessed by using specific antibodies. The expression of Gi alpha-1 is under tight control by thyrotropin in vivo and in primary cultures of thyroid epithelial cells. In contrast, Gi alpha-1 is expressed in the absence of thyrotropin in thyroid autonomous adenoma, an endocrine-active tumor, and its levels are not regulated by thyrotropin in thyroid epithelial cells prepared from these tumors. If thyroid epithelial cells are treated with pertussis toxin to block signal transduction via Gi, the mitogenic response to serum factors is reduced. These observations demonstrate that Gi subtypes transmit growth stimuli in the human thyroid. The constitutive expression of Gi alpha-1 in autonomous adenoma may allow for the unregulated stimulation of thyroid cell proliferation by a yet unidentified signaling pathway and, thus, be causally related to autonomous growth of thyroid cells. Images PMID:8434024

  7. The cell biology of bone growth.

    PubMed

    Price, J S; Oyajobi, B O; Russell, R G

    1994-02-01

    The field of bone cell biology is clearly of relevance to the problem of stunting in children, as in the final analysis the cells of the growing long bone are the ultimate 'regulators'. It is the alterations in the functions of these cells that manifests as a reduction in height. Normal longitudinal growth is achieved by the coordinated recruitment, proliferation, differentiation, maturation and eventual death of the cells of growth plate and bone. Cellular activity is closely regulated by endocrine factors acting directly or indirectly, with factors produced locally and stored within the bone and cartilage microenvironment having a critical role in intercellular communication. Disruption of any of these processes can lead to growth disturbances, since it only requires a defect in a single gene to have profound effects. Studies in recent years have shed light on the biochemical and molecular effects of cytokines and growth factors and have shown that these regulatory molecules may mediate the effects of certain hormones important in controlling growth. However, the complex interrelationship of these molecules is still not clear. Notwithstanding, understanding of the mechanisms involved in bone remodelling is increasing, as this area attracts much research because of the high incidence of metabolic bone disease in Western society. Although studies of adult bone remodelling are of relevance, there is a requirement for increased research directed specifically at the mechanisms of endochondral ossification and its regulation. Longitudinal bone growth is a challenge to the cell biologist, since it is an accelerated cycle of cellular division and differentiation, within which it is not easy to separate events temporally and spatially. In addition, different regulatory mechanisms are probably important at different stages of growth. Another difficulty impeding progress in this field is the lack of appropriate animal models for research. Much information has come from

  8. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells inhibit C6 glioma growth via secretion of dickkopf-1 (DKK1).

    PubMed

    Ma, Shanshan; Liang, Shuo; Jiao, Hongliang; Chi, Liankai; Shi, Xinyi; Tian, Yi; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a potential therapeutic target for glioma. We determined the molecular mechanism of inhibitory effect of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUC-MSCs) on the growth of C6 glioma cells. We demonstrated that hUC-MSCs inhibited C6 cell growth and modulated the cell cycle to G0/G1 phase. The expression of β-catenin and c-Myc was downregulated in C6 cells by conditioned media from hUC-MSCs, and the levels of secreted DKK1 were positively correlated with concentrations of hUCMSCs-CM. The inhibitory effect of hUC-MSCs on C6 cell proliferation was enhanced as the concentration of DKK1 in hUCMSCs-CM increased. When DKK1 was neutralized by anti-DKK1 antibody, the inhibitory effect of hUC-MSCs on C6 cells was attenuated. Furthermore, we found that conditioned media from hUC-MSCs transfection with siRNA targeting DKK1 mRNA or pEGFPN1-DKK1 plasmid lost or enhanced the abilities to regulate the Wnt signaling in C6 cells. Therefore, hUC-MSCs inhibited C6 glioma cell growth via secreting DKK1, an inhibitor of Wnt pathway, may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for malignant glioma.

  9. Inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on collagen synthesis and cell proliferation in human stellate cells from pancreatic head adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have described an increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in pancreatic cancer, but the role of COX-2 in tumour development and progression is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine expression of COX-2 in cancer cells and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer specimens, and to explore the role of PGE2 in pancreatic stellate cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Methods Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence was performed on slides from whole sections of tissue blocks using antibodies against COX-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) were isolated from surgically resected tumour tissue by the outgrowth method. Cells were used between passages 4 and 8. Collagen synthesis was determined by [3H]-proline incorporation, or by enzyme immunoassay measurement of collagen C-peptide. DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine in DNA. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) was determined by radioimmunoassay. Collagen 1A1 mRNA was determined by RT-qPCR. Results Immunohistochemistry staining showed COX-2 in pancreatic carcinoma cells, but not in stromal cells. All tumours showed positive staining for αSMA in the fibrotic stroma. Cultured PSC expressed COX-2, which could be further induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), epidermal growth factor (EGF), thrombin, and PGE2, but not by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ). Indirect coculture with the adenocarcinoma cell line BxPC-3, but not HPAFII or Panc-1, induced COX-2 expression in PSC. Treatment of PSC with PGE2 strongly stimulated cAMP accumulation, mediated by EP2 receptors, and also stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Treatment of PSC with PGE2 or forskolin suppressed both TGFβ-stimulated collagen synthesis and PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Conclusions The present results show that COX-2 is mainly produced in carcinoma cells and suggest that the cancer cells are the main source of PGE2 in pancreatic

  10. Immunolocalization of Growth, Inhibitory, and Proliferative Factors Involved in Initial Ovarian Folliculogenesis From Adult Common Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri collinsi)

    PubMed Central

    Brito, A. B.; Domingues, S. F. S.; Santos, R. R.; Amorim, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed an immunohistochemical (IHC) study to determine the follicular expression of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), Kit Ligand (KL), and c-Kit in squirrel monkey ovary. Ovarian tissue fragments from 4 squirrel monkeys were collected by laparotomy and processed for classical histology and IHC. Additionally, follicle development was assessed by Ki67 immunostaining to evaluate proliferative status of granulosa cells. A total of 4025 follicles were examined (1475 for classical histology and 2550 for immunohistochemistry). More than 80% of the evaluated follicles were morphologically normal. The GDF-9 protein was detectable in oocyte cytoplasm from primordial (100%), primary (99.1%), and secondary (100%) follicles. The AMH was not expressed in primordial follicles but just in few primary follicles (13.8%). On the other hand, it was highly expressed in granulosa cells from secondary follicles (67.9%). c-Kit, KL receptor, was found in the oolemma of primordial (100%), primary (100%), and secondary (100%) follicles. The KL expression was observed in oocytes and granulosa cells from primordial (94.9%), primary (91.6%) and secondary follicles (100%). Ki67 immunostaining was observed in granulosa cells from primary (5.7%) and secondary (54.8%) follicles but not in primordial follicles. In conclusion, we described the localization of GDF-9, KL, c-Kit, and Ki67 proteins and confirmed the presence of AMH protein in preantral follicles from squirrel monkey. Our results offer contribution for understanding of folliculogenesis in neotropical nonhuman primates. Moreover, these markers can be used to assess follicular viability and functionality after cryopreservation, transplantation, or in vitro culture of ovarian tissue. PMID:24784715

  11. A Role for cis Interaction between the Inhibitory Ly49A receptor and MHC class I for natural killer cell education.

    PubMed

    Chalifour, Anick; Scarpellino, Léonardo; Back, Jonathan; Brodin, Petter; Devèvre, Estelle; Gros, Frédéric; Lévy, Frédéric; Leclercq, Georges; Höglund, Petter; Beermann, Friedrich; Held, Werner

    2009-03-20

    Natural killer (NK) cells show enhanced functional competence when they express inhibitory receptors specific for inherited major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. Current models imply that NK cell education requires an interaction of inhibitory receptors with MHC-I expressed on other cells. However, the inhibitory Ly49A receptor can also bind MHC-I ligand on the NK cell itself (in cis). Here we describe a Ly49A variant, which can engage MHC-I expressed on other cells but not in cis. Even though this variant inhibited NK cell effector function, it failed to educate NK cells. The association with MHC-I in cis sequestered wild-type Ly49A, and this was found to relieve NK cells from a suppressive effect of unengaged Ly49A. These data explain how inhibitory MHC-I receptors can facilitate NK cell activation. They dissociate classical inhibitory from educating functions of Ly49A and suggest that cis interaction of Ly49A is necessary for NK cell education.

  12. Inhibitory effect of polyphenol cyanidin on TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis through multiple signaling pathways in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Wen; Ikeda, Katsumi; Yamori, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of non-aglycone cyanidin on TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell apoptosis and its mechanism through enhancing expression of thioredoxin in endothelial cells. We found that exposure of the serum-starved BAECs to TNF-alpha increased significantly the number of dead cells, the cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (RARP)assayed by Western blot, whereas supplementation with cyanidin considerably suppressed these events. Inhibitors of the Akt, ERK1/2, Src kinase and transfection with a dominant-negative Akt cDNA blocked the inhibitory effect of cyanidin on cleaved caspase-3. Cyanidin significantly elevated expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and thioredoxin (Trx). The increased Trx expression was blocked by siRNA transfection of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and by using a PKG inhibitor, KT5823. Cyanidin also ameliorated TNF-alpha-induced decrease of Trx S-nitrosylation and intracellular glutathione and elevation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, cyanidin also restored S-nitrosylation of caspase-3 and reduced the rise in expression and acetylation of tumor suppression gene p53. However, KT5823 or L-NAME, an inhibitor of eNOS, removed the preventive effects of cyanidin. Our data show that inhibitory effect of cyanidin on TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis involves multiple pathways, such as Akt activation, eNOS and thioredoxin expression in endothelial cells.

  13. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Cabeen, Matthew T; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, Waldemar; Born, Petra; Ausmees, Nora; Weibel, Douglas B; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology. PMID:19279668

  14. Monocarboxylate transporter 8 in neuronal cell growth.

    PubMed

    James, S R; Franklyn, J A; Reaves, B J; Smith, V E; Chan, S Y; Barrett, T G; Kilby, M D; McCabe, C J

    2009-04-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal growth and development of the fetus, and even small alterations in maternal thyroid hormone status during early pregnancy may be associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities in childhood. Mutations in the novel and specific thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) have been associated with severe neurodevelopmental impairment. However, the mechanism by which MCT8 influences neural development remains poorly defined. We have therefore investigated the effect of wild-type (WT) MCT8, and the previously reported L471P mutant, on the growth and function of human neuronal precursor NT2 cells as well as MCT8-null JEG-3 cells. HA-tagged WT MCT8 correctly localized to the plasma membrane in NT2 cells and increased T(3) uptake in both cell types. In contrast, L471P MCT8 was largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and displayed no T(3) transport activity. Transient overexpression of WT and mutant MCT8 proteins failed to induce endoplasmic reticular stress or apoptosis. However, MCT8 overexpression significantly repressed cell proliferation in each cell type in both the presence and absence of the active thyroid hormone T(3) and in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, L471P MCT8 showed no such influence. Finally, small interfering RNA depletion of endogenous MCT8 resulted in increased cell survival and decreased T(3) uptake. Given that T(3) stimulated proliferation in embryonic neuronal NT2 cells, whereas MCT8 repressed cell growth, these data suggest an entirely novel role for MCT8 in addition to T(3) transport, mediated through the modulation of cell proliferation in the developing brain.

  15. Dickkopf-1 has an Inhibitory Effect on Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Fibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Qiu, Sang-Sang; Shao, Yan; Song, Hong-Huan; Li, Gu-Li; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Li-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are bone marrow stem cells which play an important role in tissue repair. The treatment with MSCs will be likely to aggravate the degree of fibrosis. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in developmental and physiological processes, such as fibrosis. Dickkopfs (DKKs) are considered as an antagonist to block Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by binding the receptor of receptor-related protein (LRP5/6). DKK1 was chosen in attempt to inhibit fibrosis of MSCs by lowering activity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Methods: Stable MSCs were randomly divided into four groups: MSCs control, MSCs + transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), MSCs + DKK1, and MSCs + TGF-β + DKK1. Flow cytometry was used to identify MSCs. Cell viability was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide test. Immunofluorescence was used to detect protein expression in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Western blotting analysis was employed to test expression of fibroblast surface markers and, finally, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was employed to test mRNA expression of fibroblast surface markers and Wnt/β-catenin signaling proteins. Results: Cultivated MSCs were found to conform to the characteristics of standard MSCs: expression of cluster of differentiation (CD) 73, 90, and 105, not expression of 34, 45, and 79. We found that DKK1 could maintain the normal cell morphology of MSCs. Western blotting analysis showed that fibroblast surface markers were expressed in high quantities in the group MSCs + TGF-β. However, the expression was lower in the MSCs + TGF-β + DKK1. Immunofluorescence showed high expression of all Wnt/β-catnin molecules in the MSCs + TGF-β group but expressed in lower quantities in MSCs + TGF-β + DKK1 group. Finally, mRNA expression of fibroblast markers vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin and Wnt/β-catenin signaling proteins β-catenin, T-cell factor

  16. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    PubMed Central

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength. PMID:24963862

  17. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  18. Growth inhibition of MCF-7 tumor cell line by phenylacetate linked to functionalized dextran.

    PubMed

    Frank, L; Avramoglou, T; Sainte-Catherine, O; Jozefonvicz, J; Kraemer, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the antiproliferative effect of phenylacetate covalently linked to dextran derivatives (DMCBPA conjugates) on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. We show that free sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) inhibits the cell growth (IC50 = 14 mM), while an important inhibitory effect is observed for DMCBPA conjugates. The IC50 dose of these conjugates is as low as 1.0 mg/ml, corresponding to 1.3 mM of phenylacetate. The precursors, dextran substituted with methylcarboxylate and benzylamide groups, did not affect the growth of MCF-7 tumor cells. We have observed that MCF-7 cell growth inhibition depends on amount of phenylacetate linked to the conjugate. The data indicated that an optimum antiproliferative effect is more significant when the amount of phenylacetate groups present on the dextran backbone is high. Analysis of doubling time by growth kinetics study shows that conjugates have more time-sustained effect than free NaPA. It is noteworthy that the inhibitory effect is observed at non-toxic concentration. Theses conjugates could be considered as acceptable derivatives to prevent tumor progression.

  19. Cell metabolism: Growth and environment. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, T.A.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes: Protein metabolism in relation to secondary biosynthesis; nucleic acid metabolism in relation to growth; the spatial organization of secondary metabolism in microbial and plant cells; aflatoxin bioysynthesis; role of oxygenases in the metabolism of phenolic compounds; regulation of secondary metabolism by trace metals; and index.

  20. Poloxamines display a multiple inhibitory activity of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mathet, Verónica L

    2011-08-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma is the third most common fatal cancer worldwide with more than 500,000 annual deaths. Approximately 40% of the patients with HCC showed tumoral overexpression of transmembrane proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette protein superfamily (ABC) which pump drugs out of cells. The overexpression of these efflux transporters confers on the cells a multiple drug resistance phenotype, which is considered a crucial cause of treatment refractoriness in patients with cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of different concentrations of pH- and temperature-responsive X-shaped poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers (poloxamines, Tetronic, PEO-PPO) showing a wide range of molecular weights and EO/PO ratios on the functional activity of three different ABC proteins, namely P-glycoprotein (P-gp or MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP1, in two human hepatocarcinoma cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. First, the cytotoxicity of the different copolymers (at different concentrations) on both liver carcinoma cell lines was thoroughly evaluated by means of apoptosis analysis using annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Thus, viable cells (AV-/PI-), early apoptotic cells (AV+/PI-) and late apoptotic cells (V-FITC+/PI+) were identified. Results pointed out copolymers of intermediate to high hydrophobicity and intermediate molecular weight (e.g., T904) as the most cytotoxic. Then, DiOC2, rhodamine 123 and vinblastine were used as differential substrates of these pumps. HeLa, an epithelial cell line of human cervical cancer that does not express P-gp, was used exclusively as a control and enabled the discerning between P-gp and MRP1 inhibition. Moderate to highly hydrophobic poloxamines T304, T904 and T1301 showed inhibitory activity against P-gp and BCRP but not against MRP1 in both hepatic cell lines. A remarkable dependence of this effect on the

  1. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  2. Mycoflora of two types of Portuguese dry-smoked sausages and inhibitory effect of sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate, and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate on mold growth rate.

    PubMed

    Matos, T J S; Jensen, B B; Bernardo, F M A; Barreto, A H S; Hojberg, O

    2007-06-01

    The mycoflora of chouriqo types Alentejano and Ribatejano, two varieties of Portuguese dry-smoked sausages, have been investigated after a producer-defined shelf life period (120 days at 20 +/- 5 degrees C) in modified atmosphere packaging (55% N2 and 45% CO2). On the basis of morphological and physiological characteristics, the isolates were identified as Penicillium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Rhizopus, Monilia, Absidia, and Cephalosporium. The species identified were as follows: Penicillium terrestres (43.4%), Penicillium sp. (13.3%), Fusarium sp. (10%), Aspergillus glaucus (10%), Aspergillus versicolor (6.8%), Monilia fruticola (3.3%), Absidia sp. (3.3%), Cephalosporium sp. (3.3%), Rhizopus stolonifer (3.3%), and Fusarium tricinctum (3.3%). Additionally, the effects of three preservatives (potassium sorbate [PS], sodium benzoate [SB], and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate [MHB]) were studied on the growth rate of mold representative isolates. MHB showed a greater inhibitory effect than SB and PS in all fungi isolates, except in A. glaucus [Tm30(A)], in which the inhibitory effect of MHB was similar to PS. At 0.05% (wt/vol), all fungi were inhibited with MHB, except for R. stolonifer [Tm25(A)], which started to decrease the growth rate only at a concentration higher than 0.1%. PS was more effective at inhibiting mold growth than SB, except in Absidia sp. [Tm16(R)], in which both showed a similar inhibitory effect. MHB showed great promise as an application to the surface at 0.1% (wt/vol) to improve the stability and safety of the product through the inhibition of potential spoilage and toxigenic molds.

  3. Establishing Equivalence for Microbial-Growth-Inhibitory Effects (“Iso-Hurdle Rules”) by Analyzing Disparate Listeria monocytogenes Data with a Gamma-Type Predictive Model

    PubMed Central

    Kan-King-Yu, Denis; Le Marc, Yvan; Johnston, Moira D.; Rama-Heuzard, Florence; Guillou, Sandrine; McClure, Peter; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Preservative factors act as hurdles against microorganisms by inhibiting their growth; these are essential control measures for particular food-borne pathogens. Different combinations of hurdles can be quantified and compared to each other in terms of their inhibitory effect (“iso-hurdle”). We present here a methodology for establishing microbial iso-hurdle rules in three steps: (i) developing a predictive model based on existing but disparate data sets, (ii) building an experimental design focused on the iso-hurdles using the model output, and (iii) validating the model and the iso-hurdle rules with new data. The methodology is illustrated with Listeria monocytogenes. Existing data from industry, a public database, and the literature were collected and analyzed, after which a total of 650 growth rates were retained. A gamma-type model was developed for the factors temperature, pH, aw, and acetic, lactic, and sorbic acids. Three iso-hurdle rules were assessed (40 logcount curves generated): salt replacement by addition of organic acids, sorbic acid replacement by addition of acetic and lactic acid, and sorbic acid replacement by addition of lactic/acetic acid and salt. For the three rules, the growth rates were equivalent in the whole experimental domain (γ from 0.1 to 0.5). The lag times were also equivalent in the case of mild inhibitory conditions (γ ≥ 0.2), while they were longer in the presence of salt than acids under stress conditions (γ < 0.2). This methodology allows an assessment of the equivalence of inhibitory effects without intensive data generation; it could be applied to develop milder formulations which guarantee microbial safety and stability. PMID:22156426

  4. Inhibitory effect of commercial green tea and rosemary leaf powders on the growth of foodborne pathogens in laboratory media and oriental-style rice cakes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Gwon, So-Young; Kim, Seung-Ju; Moon, Bo Kyung

    2009-05-01

    The antimicrobial effects of green tea and rosemary added to foods as antagonists to foodborne pathogens were determined in laboratory media and oriental-style rice cakes. The growth of each pathogen (Bacillus cereus, Salmonella Typhimurium, Enterobacter sakazakii, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes) in tryptic soy broth or rice cake with or without addition of green tea or rosemary leaf powders before autoclaving or cooking, respectively, was investigated after inoculation. The addition of 1% green tea or rosemary produced similar results for inhibiting the growth of pathogens in tryptic soy broth. However, green tea was more effective than rosemary for inhibiting the growth of L. monocytogenes. Both botanicals had inhibitory effects against all pathogens tested in this study. Green tea was particularly effective against B. cereus, S. aureus, and L. monocytogenes, and rosemary was strongly inhibitory against B. cereus and S. aureus. The addition of 1 or 3% green tea or rosemary to rice cakes did not significantly reduce total aerobic counts; however, levels of B. cereus and S. aureus were significantly reduced in rice cakes stored for 3 days at room temperature (22 degrees C). The order of antimicrobial activities against B. cereus in rice cake was 1% rosemary < 1% green tea < 3% rosemary = 3% green tea. These results indicate that the use of natural plant materials such as green tea and rosemary could improve the microbial quality of foods in addition to their functional properties.

  5. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 as a Novel Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker in Stage I and II Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Teng; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Kun-Peng; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Ke-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased level of serum macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), a member of transforming growth factor-β superfamily, was found in patients with epithelial tumors. This study aimed to evaluate whether serum level of MIC-1 can be a candidate diagnostic and prognostic indicator for early-stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A prospective study enrolled 152 patients with Stage I–II NSCLC, who were followed up after surgical resection. Forty-eight patients with benign pulmonary disease (BPD) and 105 healthy controls were also included in the study. Serum MIC-1 levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the association with clinical and prognostic features was analyzed. Results: In patients with NSCLC, serum protein levels of MIC-1 were significantly increased compared with healthy controls and BPD patients (all P < 0.001). A threshold of 1000 pg/ml of MIC-1 was found in patients with early-stage (Stage I and II) NSCLC, with sensitivity and specificity of 70.4% and 99.0%, respectively. The serum levels of MIC-1 were associated with age (P = 0.001), gender (P = 0.030), and T stage (P = 0.022). Serum MIC-1 threshold of 1465 pg/ml was found in patients with poor early outcome, with sensitivity and specificity of 72.2% and 66.1%, respectively. The overall 3-year survival rate of NSCLC patients with high serum levels of MIC-1 (≥1465 pg/ml) was lower than that of NSCLC patients with low serum MIC-1 levels (77.6% vs. 94.8%). Multivariate Cox regression survival analysis showed that a high serum level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for reduced overall survival (hazard ratio = 3.37, 95% confidential interval: 1.09–10.42, P = 0.035). Conclusion: The present study suggested that serum MIC-1 may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for patients with early-stage NSCLC. PMID:27569226

  6. Focusing on the focus: what else beyond the master switches for polar cell growth?

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuan; Dong, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Cell polarity, often associated with polarized cell expansion/growth in plants, describes the uneven distribution of cellular components, such as proteins, nucleic acids, signaling molecules, vesicles, cytoskeletal elements, and organelles, which may ultimately modulate cell shape, structure, and function. Pollen tubes and root hairs are model cell systems for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying sustained tip growth. The formation of intercalated epidermal pavement cells requires excitatory and inhibitory pathways to coordinate cell expansion within single cells and between cells in contact. Strictly controlled cell expansion is linked to asymmetric cell division in zygotes and stomatal lineages, which require integrated processes of pre-mitotic cellular polarization and division asymmetry. While small GTPase ROPs are recognized as fundamental signaling switches for cell polarity in various cellular and developmental processes in plants, the broader molecular machinery underpinning polarity establishment required for asymmetric division remains largely unknown. Here, we review the widely used ROP signaling pathways in cell polar growth and the recently discovered feedback loops with auxin signaling and PIN effluxers. We discuss the conserved phosphorylation and phospholipid signaling mechanisms for regulating uneven distribution of proteins, as well as the potential roles of novel proteins and MAPKs in the polarity establishment related to asymmetric cell division in plants.

  7. Adenovirus serotype 5 vaccine vectors trigger IL-27-dependent inhibitory CD4+ T cell responses that impair CD8+ T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Larocca, Rafael A.; Provine, Nicholas M.; Aid, Malika; Iampietro, M. Justin; Borducchi, Erica N.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David; Bricault, Christine A.; Blass, Eryn; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vaccine vectors elicit robust CD8+ T cell responses, but these responses typically exhibit a partially exhausted phenotype. However, the immunologic mechanism by which Ad5 vectors induce dysfunctional CD8+ T cells has not previously been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that, following immunization of B6 mice, Ad5 vectors elicit antigen-specific IL-10+CD4+ T cells with a distinct transcriptional profile in a dose-dependent fashion. In rhesus monkeys, we similarly observed upregulated expression of IL-10 and PD-1 by CD4+ T cells following Ad5 vaccination. These cells markedly suppressed vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in vivo and IL-10 blockade increased the frequency and functionality of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells as well as improved protective efficacy against challenge with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Moreover, induction of these inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells correlated with IL-27 expression and IL-27 blockade substantially improved CD4+ T cell functionality. These data highlight a role for IL-27 in the induction of inhibitory IL-10+CD4+ T cells, which suppress CD8+ T cell magnitude and function following Ad5 vector immunization. A deeper understanding of the cytokine networks and transcriptional profiles induced by vaccine vectors should lead to strategies to improve the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of viral vector-based vaccines. PMID:28239679

  8. Low-dose naltrexone targets the opioid growth factor-opioid growth factor receptor pathway to inhibit cell proliferation: mechanistic evidence from a tissue culture model.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Renee N; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2011-09-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is an opioid antagonist that inhibits or accelerates cell proliferation in vivo when utilized in a low (LDN) or high (HDN) dose, respectively. The mechanism of opioid antagonist action on growth is not well understood. We established a tissue culture model of LDN and HDN using short-term and continuous opioid receptor blockade, respectively, in human ovarian cancer cells, and found that the duration of opioid receptor blockade determines cell proliferative response. The alteration of growth by NTX also was detected in cells representative of pancreatic, colorectal and squamous cell carcinomas. The opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met(5)]-enkephalin) and its receptor (OGFr) were responsible for mediating the action of NTX on cell proliferation. NTX upregulated OGF and OGFr at the translational but not at the transcriptional level. The mechanism of inhibition by short-term NTX required p16 and/or p21 cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinases, but was not dependent on cell survival (necrosis, apoptosis). Sequential administration of short-term NTX and OGF had a greater inhibitory effect on cell proliferation than either agent alone. Given the parallels between short-term NTX in vitro and LDN in vivo, we now demonstrate at the molecular level that the OGF-OGFr axis is a common pathway that is essential for the regulation of cell proliferation by NTX.

  9. In Vitro Selective Growth-Inhibitory Effect of 8-Hydroxyquinoline on Clostridium perfringens versus Bifidobacteria in a Medium Containing Chicken Ileal Digesta

    PubMed Central

    Skrivanova, Eva; Van Immerseel, Filip; Hovorkova, Petra; Kokoska, Ladislav

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis is generally controlled by antibiotics. However, because of increasing antibiotic resistance, other antibacterial agents are required, preferably ones that do not affect the beneficial intestinal microbiota of the host. This study evaluated the in vitro selective growth-inhibitory effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ) on C. perfringens vs. bifidobacteria in a medium containing chicken ileal digesta. Prior to the experiments, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 8HQ and penicillin G were determined by broth microdilution assay. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of 8HQ for C. perfringens were 16–32 times lower than the values for bifidobacteria. Treatment of autoclaved and non-autoclaved chicken ileal digesta with 8HQ showed a selective anticlostridial effect. After incubation of C. perfringens with autoclaved ileal digesta for 3 h, all 8HQ concentrations tested (32–2048 μg/mL) significantly reduced C. perfringens bacterial count. In contrast, the same treatment had no or only a slight effect on bifidobacteria counts. Unlike 8HQ, penicillin G did not exhibit any selectivity. Similar results were obtained after incubation for 24 h. In non-autoclaved ileal digesta, all 8HQ concentrations tested significantly reduced C. perfringens bacterial counts after incubation for 30 min and 3 h, while no effect was observed on bifidobacteria. These results suggest that 8HQ may serve as a prospective veterinary compound for use against necrotic enteritis in poultry. PMID:27936245

  10. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis and their inhibitory activity on NO production in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Yang, Zhiyou; Yao, Xuechun; Wang, Hua; Han, Na; Liu, Zhihui; Wang, Yu; Yang, Jingyu; Yin, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Four dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, schisanchinins A-D, and 10 known compounds were isolated from the EtOAc extract of fruits of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. Structures of compounds 1-4 were elucidated using a combination of spectroscopic techniques, including MS, UV and IR, NMR ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HMQC, HMBC). The stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the biphenyl configuration were determined using NOESY, as well as analysis of CD spectra. In vitro activity assays showed that 11 of the 14 compounds exhibited inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO release in primary murine BV2 microglia cells.

  11. Insufficient Acidification of Autophagosomes Facilitates Group A Streptococcus Survival and Growth in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiou-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Chen, Hao-Wen; Yang, Yi-Shuan; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Anderson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen, and its invasion via blood vessels is critically important in serious events such as bacteremia or multiorgan failure. Although GAS was identified as an extracellular bacterium, the internalization of GAS into nonphagocytic cells may provide a strategy to escape from immune surveillance and antibiotic killing. However, GAS has also been reported to induce autophagy and is efficiently killed within lysosome-fused autophagosomes in epithelial cells. In this study, we show that GAS can replicate in endothelial cells and that streptolysin O is required for GAS growth. Bacterial replication can be suppressed by altering GAS gene expression in an acidic medium before internalization into endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect on GAS replication can be reversed by treatment with bafilomycin A1, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase. Compared with epithelial cells in which acidification causes autophagy-mediated clearance of GAS, there was a defect in acidification of GAS-containing vesicles in endothelial cells. Consequently, endothelial cells fail to maintain low pH in GAS-containing autophagosomes, thereby permitting GAS replication inside LAMP-1- and LC3-positive vesicles. Furthermore, treatment of epithelial cells with bafilomycin A1 resulted in defective GAS clearance by autophagy, with subsequent bacterial growth intracellularly. Therefore, low pH is a key factor for autophagy-mediated suppression of GAS growth inside epithelial cells, while defective acidification of GAS-containing vesicles results in bacterial growth in endothelial cells. PMID:26419882

  12. Elastic Deformations During Bacterial Cell Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K. C.

    2010-03-01

    The wide variety of shapes and sizes found in bacterial species is almost universally defined by the cell wall, which is a cross-linked network of the material peptidoglycan. In recent years, cell shape has been shown to play a critical role in regulating many important biological functions including attachment, dispersal, motility, polar differentiation, predation, and cellular differentiation. In previous work, we have shown that the spatial organization of the peptidoglycan network can change the mechanical equilibrium of the cell wall and result in changes in cell shape. However, experimental data on the mechanical properties of peptidoglycan is currently limited. Here, we describe a straightforward, inexpensive approach for extracting the mechanical properties of bacterial cells in gels of user-defined stiffness, using only optical microscopy to match growth kinetics to the predictions of a continuum model of cell growth. Using this simple yet general methodology, we have measured the Young's modulus for bacteria ranging across a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and cell wall thicknesses, and our method can easily be extended to other commonly studied bacteria. This method makes it possible to rapidly determine how changes in genotype and biochemistry affect the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and may be particularly relevant for studying the relationship between cell shape and structure, the genetic and molecular control of the mechanical properties of the cell wall, and the identification of antibiotics and other small molecules that affect and specifically modify the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Our work also suggests that bacteria may utilize peptidoglycan synthesis to transduce mechanosensory signals from local environment.

  13. Expression of inhibitory receptors on intratumoral T cells modulates the activity of a T cell-bispecific antibody targeting folate receptor.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Jens; Thommen, Daniela S; Herzig, Petra; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Levitsky, Victor; Savic, Spasenija; Moersig, Wolfgang; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; von Bergwelt-Baildon, M; Lardinois, Didier; Müller, Philipp; Karanikas, Vaios; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    T-cell bispecific antibodies (TCBs) are a novel therapeutic tool designed to selectively recruit T-cells to tumor cells and simultaneously activate them. However, it is currently unknown whether the dysfunctional state of T-cells, embedded into the tumor microenvironment, imprints on the therapeutic activity of TCBs. We performed a comprehensive analysis of activation and effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs) in different tumor types, upon stimulation by a TCB targeting folate receptor 1 and CD3 (FolR1-TCB). We observed a considerable heterogeneity in T-cell activation, cytokine production and tumor cell killing upon exposure to FolR1-TCB among different FolR1-expressing tumors. Of note, tumors presenting with a high frequency of PD-1(hi) TILs displayed significantly impaired tumor cell killing and T-cell function. Further characterization of additional T-cell inhibitory receptors revealed that PD-1(hi) TILs defined a T-cell subset with particularly high levels of multiple inhibitory receptors compared with PD-1(int) and PD-1(neg) T-cells. PD-1 blockade could restore cytokine secretion but not cytotoxicity of TILs in a subset of patients with scarce PD-1(hi) expressing cells; in contrast, patients with abundance of PD-1(hi) expressing T-cells did not benefit from PD-1 blockade. Our data highlight that FolR1-TCB is a promising novel immunotherapeutic treatment option which is capable of activating intratumoral T-cells in different carcinomas. However, its therapeutic efficacy may be substantially hampered by a pre-existing dysfunctional state of T-cells, reflected by abundance of intratumoral PD-1(hi) T-cells. These findings present a rationale for combinatorial approaches of TCBs with other therapeutic strategies targeting T-cell dysfunction.

  14. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of ethanol GRAS plant and supercritical CO₂ hop extracts on planktonic cultures of oral pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pilna, J; Vlkova, E; Krofta, K; Nesvadba, V; Rada, V; Kokoska, L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional chemical antiseptics used for treatment of oral infections often produce side-effects, which restrict their long-term use. Plants are considered as perspective sources of novel natural antiseptics. However, little is still known about their inhibitory properties against oral pathogens. The objective of this study was to test in vitro antimicrobial activities of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) species against planktonic cultures of cariogenic, periodontal and candidal microorganisms and identify active compounds of the most active extracts. Growth-inhibitory effects of ethanol extracts from 109 GRAS plant species, six Humulus lupulus cultivars and two hop supercritical CO2 extracts were evaluated using broth microdilution method. The chemical analysis was done through high-performance liquid chromatography. Best results were obtained for supercritical CO2 and ethanol extracts of H. lupulus with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ≥8 μg/mL and ≥16 μg/mL, respectively. The chemical analysis of supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts revealed that α- and β-acids were their main constituents. Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens showed antibacterial effect against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus salivarius (MIC=64-128 μg/mL). These strains were further inhibited by Zanthoxylum clava-herculis (MIC=64-128 μg/mL) and Myristica fragrans (both MIC≥128 μg/mL). The latter also exhibited antimicrobial activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). Punica granatum possessed inhibitory effects against Candida albicans (MIC=128 μg/mL) and F. nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). The results indicate that supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts together with ethanol extracts of C. annuum, C. frutescens, M. fragrans, P. granatum and Z. clava-herculis are promising materials for further investigation on new antiseptic agents of oral care products.

  15. THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF PACLITAXEL ON (KV2.1) K+ CURRENT IN H9c2 CELLS

    PubMed Central

    KITAMURA, NAOKO; SAKAMOTO, KAZUHO; ONO, TOMOYUKI; KIMURA, JUNKO

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Using the whole-cell voltage clamp technique, we investigated the effect of paclitaxel, an anticancer agent which promotes microtubule formation, on K+ current in H9c2 cells originated from rat embryonic cardiac myocytes. Paclitaxel inhibited Kv2.1 voltage-dependent K+ current (IKur) with ultra-rapidly activating and slowly inactivating kinetics in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of paclitaxel on IKur was time-dependent and more marked at 200 ms after the onset than at the beginning of the depolarizing pulse. The IC50 value of paclitaxel was 1.1 µM at 200 ms. The time-dependent inhibition suggests that paclitaxel might be an open channel blocker of Kv2.1. This inhibition of Kv2.1 may be involved in the adverse effects of paclitaxel on cardiac and neuronal cells. PMID:25994081

  16. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) enhances MAP2 + and HUC/D + neurons and influences neurite extension during differentiation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (L1F), a member of the Interleukin 6 cytokine family, has a role in differentiation of Human Neural Progenitor (hNP) cells in vitro. hNP cells, derived from Human Embryonic Stem (hES) cells, have an unlimited capacity for self-renewal in monolayer cultu...

  17. Hepatocyte growth factor plays a dual role in regulating skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gal-Levi, R; Leshem, Y; Aoki, S; Nakamura, T; Halevy, O

    1998-03-12

    The role of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, c-met, in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells was studied in primary cultures of chicken skeletal muscle satellite cells and a myogenic C2 cell line. HGF mRNA was expressed mainly in the myotubes of both cultures. The addition of conditioned medium derived from those cultures had a scattering effect on the canine kidney epithelial cell line, MDCK. In contrast, c-met mRNA levels decreased during cell differentiation of C2 and primary satellite cells. Application of exogenous HGF to chicken myoblasts resulted in their enhanced DNA synthesis. Among several growth factors, HGF was the first to induce DNA synthesis in quiescent satellite cells, thereby driving them into the cell cycle. Ectopic expression of chicken HGF in primary satellite cells suppressed the activation of muscle-regulatory gene reporter constructs MCK-CAT, MRF4-CAT, MEF2-CAT and 4Rtk-CAT, as well as the gene expression of MyoD and myogenin, and MHC protein expression. Ectopic MyoD reversed HGF's inhibitory effect on MCK transactivation. These data suggest that HGF inhibits cell differentiation by inhibiting the activity of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/E protein heterodimers, thus inhibiting myogenic determination factor activity and subsequent muscle-specific protein expression. During muscle growth and regeneration, HGF plays a dual role in satellite-cell myogenesis, affecting both the proliferation and differentiation of these cells in a paracrine fashion.

  18. The Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Mast Cell-Stimulated Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Ningyan, Gu; Xu, Yao; Hongfei, Shi; Jingjing, Chen; Min, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical and translational studies have shown that mast cell plays a pivotal role in multiple fibrotic diseases including scleroderma. However, the lack of mature human mast cell culture model exhibits a major obstacle for further dissection of cytokines and signaling molecules required for mast cell mediated fibrosis in various diseases. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a mast cell released pro-inflammatory cytokine which is deregulated in scleroderma patients and is also involved in non-scleroderma related fibrosis. In the current study, we successfully generated a practical and reliable human mast cell culture system with bone marrow CD34+ hematopietic precursors. The derivative mast cell is normal in terms of both morphology and function as manifested by normal degranulation. More importantly, we were able to show mast cell conditioned medium as well as MIF supplementation augments fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. This positive regulatory effect of mast cell conditioned medium can be dampened by MIF antibody. In addition, MIF-knockdown significantly inhibits pro-fibrotic activities of CD34+ hematopietic precursor derived mast cells. These data strongly suggest that mast cell released MIF is required for mast cell mediated fibrogenic activities. The current manuscript seems to be the first mechanistic report showing the significance of MIF in mast cell mediated fibrosis, which may pave the way for the development of potential MIF-targeted therapy for fibrotic diseases to a further extent. Moreover, we strongly believe mast cell culture and differentiation model as well as corresponding genetic manipulation methodology will be helpful in characterizing novel mast cell based therapeutic targets. PMID:25826375

  19. Global Transcriptome Profiling Analysis of Inhibitory Effects of Paclobutrazol on Leaf Growth in Lily (Lilium Longiflorum-Asiatic Hybrid)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaopei; Chai, Min; Li, Yang; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Jinzheng; Sun, Guofeng; Jiang, Chuangdao; Shi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    As a popular ornamental flower, potted lily is an important object of lily breeding. Paclobutrazol, a chemical growth retardation compound, is often used to dwarf plant in producing potted lilies. However, in recent years, the plants with inherited dwarf traits by using genetic engineer breeding technology are being developed. The studies on molecular basis of lily dwarfism will offer some target genes which have profound dwarf effect for genetic engineer breeding. Here, we confirmed that paclobutrazol inhibited plant height and leaf size in Lilium Longiflorum-Asiatic hybrid, and then RNA-Seq technique was employed to analyze gene transcripts of Lilium Longiflorum-Asiatic hybrid leaves by paclobutrazol treatment in order to get a deeper insight into dwarfism mechanism of lily. Approximately 38.6 Gb data was obtained and assemble into 53,681 unigenes. Annotation, pathways, functional classification and phylogenetic classification of these data were analyzed based on Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. 2704 differentially expressed genes were screened by comparing paclobutrazol-treated samples with untreated samples and quantitative real-time PCR was performed to validate expression profiles. By analyzing dynamic changes of differentially expressed genes, nine metabolic pathways and signal transduction pathways were significantly enriched and many potentially interesting genes were identified that encoded putative regulators or key components of cell division, cell expansion, GA metabolism and signaling transduction and these genes were highlighted to reveal their importance in regulation of plant size. These results will provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanism on lily dwarfism and some potential genes related to lily organ size, which will lay the foundation for molecular breeding of potted lilies. These transcriptome data will also serve as valuable public genomic resources for other genetic research in lily. PMID:27148316

  20. Growth requirements of human mammary epithelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Shearer, M; Stoker, M G

    1977-12-15

    Colony-forming epithelial cells can be separated from the non-dividing "foam cells" in human milk by differential adhesion to glass and freezing. The growth of such partially purified mammary epithelial cells is stimulated by co-culture with non-dividing feeder cells. Foam cells, mitomycin-treated mouse fibroblast lines and human mammary fibroblasts and calf lens epithelial cells are all effective in promoting mammary epithelial cell growth. Contact between epithelial cells and feeders is not required for the growth-promoting effect. The mitogenic effect of epidermal growth factor on mammary epithelial cells also requires feeder cell activity.

  1. Histone deacetylase 2 cell autonomously suppresses excitatory and enhances inhibitory synaptic function in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Deng, Lunbin; Hackos, David H; Lo, Shih-Ching; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Steiner, Pascal; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-04-03

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) negatively regulates excitatory synapse number and memory performance. However, whether HDAC2 regulation of excitatory synapses occurs in a cell-autonomous manner and whether HDAC2 regulates inhibitory synaptic functions are not well understood. To examine these aspects of HDAC2 function, we used sparse transfection of rat hippocampal slice cultures and whole-cell recordings in pyramidal neurons. HDAC2 knockdown (KD) in single postsynaptic pyramidal neurons enhanced, whereas HDAC2 overexpression (OE) reduced, excitatory synaptic transmission. Postsynaptic KD of HDAC2 also facilitated expression of long-term potentiation induced by subthreshold induction stimuli, without altering long-term depression. In contrast, HDAC2 KD reduced, whereas HDAC2 OE enhanced, inhibitory synaptic transmission. Alterations of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) likely underlie the impact of HDAC2 on inhibitory transmission. Consistent with this, we observed reduced transcript and protein levels of the GABA(A)R γ2 subunit and reduced surface expression of the α2 subunit after HDAC2 KD. Furthermore, we observed a reduction in synaptic but not tonic GABA(A)R currents by HDAC2 KD, suggesting that HDAC2 selectively affects synaptic abundance of functional GABA(A)Rs. Immunostaining for postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs confirmed that HDAC2 KD and OE can regulate the synaptic abundance of these receptors. Together, these results highlight a role for HDAC2 in suppressing synaptic excitation and enhancing synaptic inhibition of hippocampal neurons. Therefore, a shift in the balance of synaptic excitation versus inhibition favoring excitation could contribute to the beneficial effects of reducing HDAC2 function in wild-type mice or of inhibiting HDACs in models of cognitive impairment.

  2. Physapubescin selectively induces apoptosis in VHL-null renal cell carcinoma cells through down-regulation of HIF-2α and inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lixia; Xia, Guiyang; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Chunli; Denmon, Andria P; Zi, Xiaolin

    2016-09-01

    We have purified physapubescin, a predominant steroidal lactone, from medicinal plant Physalis pubescens L., commonly named as "hairy groundcherry" in English and "Deng-Long-Cao" in Chinese. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-null 786-O, RCC4 and A498 Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) cell lines expressing high levels of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-2α are more sensitive to physapubescin-mediated apoptosis and growth inhibitory effect than VHL wild-type Caki-2 and ACHN RCC cell lines. Restoration of VHL in RCC4 cells attenuated the growth inhibitory effect of physapubescin. Physapubescin decreases the expression of HIF-2α and increases the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologus protein (CHOP), which leads to up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5), activation of caspase-8 and -3, cleavage of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase (PARP) and apoptosis. Under hypoxia conditions, the apoptotic and growth inhibitory effects of physapubescin are further enhanced. Additionally, physapubescin synergizes with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) for markedly enhanced induction of apoptosis in VHL-null 786-O cells but not in VHL wild-type Caki-2 cells. Physapubescin significantly inhibited in vivo angiogenesis in the 786-O xenograft. Physapubescin as a novel agent for elimination of VHL-null RCC cells via apoptosis is warranted for further investigation.

  3. Physapubescin selectively induces apoptosis in VHL-null renal cell carcinoma cells through down-regulation of HIF-2α and inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lixia; Xia, Guiyang; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Chunli; Denmon, Andria P.; Zi, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    We have purified physapubescin, a predominant steroidal lactone, from medicinal plant Physalis pubescens L., commonly named as “hairy groundcherry” in English and “Deng-Long-Cao” in Chinese. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-null 786-O, RCC4 and A498 Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) cell lines expressing high levels of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-2α are more sensitive to physapubescin-mediated apoptosis and growth inhibitory effect than VHL wild-type Caki-2 and ACHN RCC cell lines. Restoration of VHL in RCC4 cells attenuated the growth inhibitory effect of physapubescin. Physapubescin decreases the expression of HIF-2α and increases the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologus protein (CHOP), which leads to up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5), activation of caspase-8 and -3, cleavage of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase (PARP) and apoptosis. Under hypoxia conditions, the apoptotic and growth inhibitory effects of physapubescin are further enhanced. Additionally, physapubescin synergizes with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) for markedly enhanced induction of apoptosis in VHL-null 786-O cells but not in VHL wild-type Caki-2 cells. Physapubescin significantly inhibited in vivo angiogenesis in the 786-O xenograft. Physapubescin as a novel agent for elimination of VHL-null RCC cells via apoptosis is warranted for further investigation. PMID:27581364

  4. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions.

  5. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  6. Bacterial Cell Growth Inhibitors Targeting Undecaprenyl Diphosphate Synthase and Undecaprenyl Diphosphate Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Desai, Janish; Zhang, Yonghui; Malwal, Satish R; Shin, Christopher J; Feng, Xinxin; Sun, Hong; Liu, Guizhi; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-19

    We synthesized a series of benzoic acids and phenylphosphonic acids and investigated their effects on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. One of the most active compounds, 5-fluoro-2-(3-(octyloxy)benzamido)benzoic acid (7, ED50 ∼0.15 μg mL(-1) ) acted synergistically with seven antibiotics known to target bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis (a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of ∼0.35, on average) but had indifferent effects in combinations with six non-cell-wall biosynthesis inhibitors (average FICI∼1.45). The most active compounds were found to inhibit two enzymes involved in isoprenoid/bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis: undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) and undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), but not farnesyl diphosphate synthase, and there were good correlations between bacterial cell growth inhibition, UPPS inhibition, and UPPP inhibition.

  7. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  8. SLC26A11 (KBAT) in Purkinje Cells Is Critical for Inhibitory Transmission and Contributes to Locomotor Coordination123

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Hoebeek, Freek E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chloride homeostasis determines the impact of inhibitory synaptic transmission and thereby mediates the excitability of neurons. Even though cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) receive a pronounced inhibitory GABAergic input from stellate and basket cells, the role of chloride homeostasis in these neurons is largely unknown. Here we studied at both the cellular and systems physiological level the function of a recently discovered chloride channel, SLC26A11 or kidney brain anion transporter (KBAT), which is prominently expressed in PCs. Using perforated patch clamp recordings of PCs, we found that a lack of KBAT channel in PC-specific KBAT KO mice (L7-KBAT KOs) induces a negative shift in the reversal potential of chloride as reflected in the GABAA-receptor-evoked currents, indicating a decrease in intracellular chloride concentration. Surprisingly, both in vitro and in vivo PCs in L7-KBAT KOs showed a significantly increased action potential firing frequency of simple spikes, which correlated with impaired motor performance on the Erasmus Ladder. Our findings support an important role for SLC26A11 in moderating chloride homeostasis and neuronal activity in the cerebellum. PMID:27390771

  9. Evaluation of the inhibitory activity of (aza)isoindolinone-type compounds: toward in vitro InhA action, Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth and mycolic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chollet, Aurélien; Stigliani, Jean-Luc; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Mori, Giorgia; Lherbet, Christian; Constant, Patricia; Quémard, Annaïk; Bernadou, Jean; Pratviel, Geneviève; Bernardes-Génisson, Vania

    2016-11-01

    Inhibitors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase (InhA) are considered as potential promising therapeutics for the treatment of tuberculosis. Previously, we reported that azaisoindolinone-type compounds displayed, in vitro, inhibitory activity toward InhA. Herein, we describe chemical modifications of azaisoindolinone scaffold, the synthesis of 15 new compounds and their evaluations toward the in vitro InhA activity. Based on these results, a structure-InhA inhibitory activity relationship analysis and a molecular docking study, using the conformation of InhA found in the 2H7M crystal structure, were carried out to predict a possible mode of interaction of the best (aza)isoindolinone-type inhibitors with InhA in vitro. Then, the work was extended toward evaluations of these compounds against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, and finally, some of them were also investigated in respect of their ability to inhibit mycolic acid biosynthesis inside mycobacteria. Although, some azaisoindolinones were able to inhibit InhA activity and Mtb growth in vitro, they did not inhibit the mycolic acid biosynthesis inside Mtb.

  10. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  11. Tumour necrosis factor-α suppresses the hypoxic response by NF-κB-dependent induction of inhibitory PAS domain protein in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Goryo, Kenji; Torii, Satoru; Yasumoto, Ken-Ichi; Sogawa, Kazuhiro

    2011-09-01

    Inflammation is often accompanied by hypoxia. However, crosstalk between signalling pathways activated by inflammation and signalling events that control adaptive response to hypoxia is not fully understood. Here we show that exposure to tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activates expression of the inhibitory PAS domain protein (IPAS) to suppress the hypoxic response caused by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and HIF-2 in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells but not in human hepatoma Hep3B cells. This induction of IPAS was dependent on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway and attenuated hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HIF-dependent reporter activity in hypoxia was also decreased following TNF-α treatment. Knockdown of IPAS mRNA by small interfering RNA (siRNA) restored the TNF-α-suppressed hypoxic response. These results indicate that TNF-α is a cell-type specific suppressor of HIFs and suggest a novel crosstalk between stimulation by inflammatory mediators and HIF-dependent hypoxic response.

  12. Proepithelin Regulates Prostate Cancer Cell Biology by Promoting Cell Growth, Migration, and Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Giada; Emiliozzi, Velia; Bitto, Alessandro; Lovat, Francesca; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Goldoni, Silvia; Fassan, Matteo; Serrero, Ginette; Gomella, Leonard G.; Baffa, Raffaele; Iozzo, Renato V.; Morrione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The growth factor proepithelin has recently emerged as an important regulator of transformation in several physiological and pathological systems. In this study, we determined the biological roles of proepithelin in prostate cancer cells using purified human recombinant proepithelin as well as proepithelin-depletion strategies. Proepithelin promoted the migration of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells; androgen-independent DU145 cells were the more responsive. In these cells, proepithelin additionally stimulated wound closure, invasion, and promotion of cell growth in vitro. These effects required the activation of both the Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have analyzed proepithelin expression levels in different available prostate cancer microarray studies using the Oncomine database and found a statistically significant increase in proepithelin mRNA expression levels in prostate cancers compared with nonneoplastic controls. Notably, depletion of endogenous proepithelin by siRNA and antisense strategies impaired the ability of DU145 cells to grow and migrate after serum withdrawal and inhibited anchorage-independent growth. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of proepithelin in stimulating the migration, invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This study supports the hypothesis that proepithelin may play a critical role as an autocrine growth factor in the establishment and initial progression of prostate cancer. Furthermore, proepithelin may prove to be a useful clinical marker for the diagnosis of prostate tumors. PMID:19179604

  13. Regulatory Dendritic Cells Restrain NK Cell IFN-γ Production through Mechanisms Involving NKp46, IL-10, and MHC Class I-Specific Inhibitory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Spallanzani, Raúl G; Torres, Nicolás I; Avila, Damián E; Ziblat, Andrea; Iraolagoitia, Ximena L Raffo; Rossi, Lucas E; Domaica, Carolina I; Fuertes, Mercedes B; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2015-09-01

    Cross-talk between mature dendritic cells (mDC) and NK cells through the cell surface receptors NKp30 and DNAM-1 leads to their reciprocal activation. However, the impact of regulatory dendritic cells (