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Sample records for cell killing ability

  1. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  2. Selective cancer-killing ability of metal-based nanoparticles: implications for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Kumar, Sudhir; Alrokayan, Salman A; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2015-11-01

    There has been little focus on the promising ability of metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) to kill cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Many in vitro and in vivo reports suggest that certain metal-based NPs are able to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells at specific concentrations that are not significantly toxic to non-cancerous cells. Those NPs are thought to exploit the oxidative stress conditions that prevail in cancer cells, which are largely exhausted of antioxidant ability. This review considers the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by metal-based NPs as a mechanism for the specific killing of cancer cells. The article concomitantly provides a comprehensive description of the important pathways and molecules leading to programmed cell death (PCD), which occurs mainly via apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis. The PCD pathways are followed as ROS-burdened cancer cells succumb to ROS-generating metal-based NPs. Exploration of nanotechnology interventions in anticancer therapy demands further research into the mechanism of intracellular induction of ROS by metal-based NPs. Furthermore, the induction of ROS by NPs should be strictly controlled if ROS-based therapy is to become a paradigm in cancer therapy.

  3. Can Nanomedicines Kill Cancer Stem Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Alakhova, Daria Y.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Most tumors are heterogeneous and many cancers contain small population of highly tumorigenic and intrinsically drug resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). Like normal stem cell, CSCs have ability to self-renew and differentiate to other tumor cell types. They are believed to be a source for drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. CSCs often overexpress drug efflux transporters, spend most of their time in non-dividing G0 cell cycle state, and therefore, can escape the conventional chemotherapies. Thus, targeting CSCs is essential for developing novel therapies to prevent cancer relapse and emerging of drug resistance. Nanocarrier-based therapeutic agents (nanomedicines) have been used to achieve longer circulation times, better stability and bioavailability over current therapeutics. Recently, some groups have successfully applied nanomedicines to target CSCs to eliminate the tumor and prevent its recurrence. These approaches include 1) delivery of therapeutic agents (small molecules, siRNA, antibodies) that affect embryonic signaling pathways implicated in self-renewal and differentiation in CSCs, 2) inhibiting drug efflux transporters in an attempt to sensitize CSCs to therapy, 3) targeting metabolism in CSCs through nanoformulated chemicals and field-responsive magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, and 4) disruption of multiple pathways in drug resistant cells using combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with amphiphilic Pluronic block copolymers. Despite clear progress of these studies the challenges of targeting CSCs by nanomedicines still exist and leave plenty of room for improvement and development. This review summarizes biological processes that are related to CSCs, overviews the current state of anti-CSCs therapies, and discusses state-of-the-art nanomedicine approaches developed to kill CSCs. PMID:24120657

  4. Lectin-activated CD4+CD45RA+ T-lymphocytes have no ability to kill monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pryjma, J; Baran, J; Zembala, M

    1996-01-01

    Monocytes are eliminated from cell culture by antigen or mitogen activated cytotoxic CD4+ T-lymphocytes. In this report we asked the question whether CD4+CD45RA+ and CD4+CD45RO+ subpopulations differ in the ability to kill monocytes in pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-activated cultures. Data are presented that although CD4+CD45RA+ vigorously proliferate in the presence of PWM, they do not kill monocytes or secrete IFN gamma.

  5. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  6. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  7. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  8. Drug repurposing screen identifies lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill breast cancer associated gene-1 mutant and wild type breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a devastating disease that results in approximately 40,000 deaths each year in the USA. Current drug screening and chemopreventatitive methods are suboptimal, due in part to the poor specificity of compounds for cancer cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated therapy is a promising approach for familial breast cancers caused by mutations of breast cancer-associated gene-1 and -2 (BRCA1/2), yet drug resistance frequently occurs during the treatment. Moreover, PARPis exhibit very little effect on cancers that are proficient for DNA repair and clinical efficacy for PARPis as single-agent therapies has yet to be illustrated. Methods Using a quantitative high-throughput screening approach, we screened a library containing 2,816 drugs, most of which are approved for human or animal use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or other countries, to identify compounds that sensitize breast cancer cells to PARPi. After initial screening, we performed further cellular and molecular analysis on lestaurtinib, which is an orally bioavailable multikinase inhibitor and has been used in clinical trials for myeloproliferative disorders and acute myelogenous leukemia. Results Our study indicated that lestaurtinib is highly potent against breast cancers as a mono-treatment agent. It also strongly enhanced the activity of the potent PARPi AG14361 on breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The inhibition of cancer growth is measured by increased apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation. Consistent with this, the treatment results in activation of caspase 3/7, and accumulation of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, irrespective of their BRCA1 status. Finally, we demonstrated that AG14361 inhibits NF-κB signaling, which is further enhanced by lestaurtinib treatment. Conclusions Lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the PARP1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer

  9. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  10. Univalent antibodies kill tumour cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, M. J.; Stevenson, G. T.

    1982-02-01

    Antibody molecules are bivalent, or less often multivalent, with each antibody site within a single molecule having the same specificity. Bivalency must enhance the tenacity of antibody attachment to cell surfaces, as dissociation will require simultaneous release at both sites. However, the bivalency of the antibody sometimes induces a target cell to undergo antigenic modulation1-3, thereby offering the cell a means of evading complement and the various effector cells recruited by the antibody. We have investigated the attack by univalent antibodies, which, despite removal of one antibody site, retain their Fc zones and hence their ability to recruit the killing agents, on neoplastic B lymphocytes of the guinea pig L2C line. Rabbit antibodies raised against surface immunoglobulin of these cells were partially digested with papain to yield the univalent Fab/c derivatives4,5. We report here that these derivatives showed enhanced cell killing both in vitro and in vivo, and that this enhancement appeared to derive from avoiding antigenic modulation.

  11. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Panozzo, J.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  12. Specifically targeting ERK1 or ERK2 kills Melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Overcoming the notorious apoptotic resistance of melanoma cells remains a therapeutic challenge given dismal survival of patients with metastatic melanoma. However, recent clinical trials using a BRAF inhibitor revealed encouraging results for patients with advanced BRAF mutant bearing melanoma, but drug resistance accompanied by recovery of phospho-ERK (pERK) activity present challenges for this approach. While ERK1 and ERK2 are similar in amino acid composition and are frequently not distinguished in clinical reports, the possibility they regulate distinct biological functions in melanoma is largely unexplored. Methods Rather than indirectly inhibiting pERK by targeting upstream kinases such as BRAF or MEK, we directly (and near completely) reduced ERK1 and ERK2 using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to achieve sustained inhibition of pERK1 and/or pERK2. Results and discussion Using A375 melanoma cells containing activating BRAFV600E mutation, silencing ERK1 or ERK2 revealed some differences in their biological roles, but also shared roles by reduced cell proliferation, colony formation in soft agar and induced apoptosis. By contrast, chemical mediated inhibition of mutant BRAF (PLX4032) or MEK (PD0325901) triggered less killing of melanoma cells, although they did inhibit proliferation. Death of melanoma cells by silencing ERK1 and/or ERK2 was caspase dependent and accompanied by increased levels of Bak, Bad and Bim, with reduction in p-Bad and detection of activated Bax levels and loss of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Rare treatment resistant clones accompanied silencing of either ERK1 and/or ERK2. Unexpectedly, directly targeting ERK levels also led to reduction in upstream levels of BRAF, CRAF and pMEK, thereby reinforcing the importance of silencing ERK as regards killing and bypassing drug resistance. Conclusions Selectively knocking down ERK1 and/or ERK2 killed A375 melanoma cells and also increased the ability of PLX4032 to kill A375 cells

  13. 131-iodine conjugated antibody cell kill enhanced by bromodeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Morstyn, G.; Miller, R.; Russo, A.; Mitchell, J.

    1984-08-01

    /sup 131/I-conjugated monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are being administered in vivo to kill human tumor cells. Although these conjugates deliver relatively large doses of radiation to tumors (10 to 50 Gy), the rate of dose delivery is low (0.05 to 0.2 Gy/hour). To determine whether the cell kill produced by low dose rate radiation is enhanced by a radiation sensitizer (bromodeoxyuridine, BUdR) the authors studied the cell kill produced by an /sup 131/I-conjugated polyclonal antibody against Chinese hamster V79 cells. Cells not containing BUdR were also studied. The /sup 131/I-conjugated antibody produced up to 40% cell kill and BUdR increased the fraction of cells killed to 75%. These studies demonstrate that cells frozen at -196/sup 0/C are useful for the investigation of the cell kill produced by isotopes that deliver radiation at low dose rates and that the cell kill caused by /sup 131/I-conjugated antibodies can be enhanced by BUdR.

  14. Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.; Sidell N.; Hagiwara, S.

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K/sup +/) current in NK cells. The K/sup +/ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd/sup 2 +/. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard /sup 51/Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd/sup 2 +/, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K/sup +/ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K/sup +/ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process.

  15. Trogocytosis by Entamoeba histolytica contributes to cell killing and tissue invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.; Solga, Michael D.; Mackey-Lawrence, Nicole M.; Somlata; Bhattacharya, Alok; Petri, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary paragraph Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a potentially fatal diarrheal disease in the developing world. The parasite was named “histolytica” for its ability to destroy host tissues, which is most likely driven by direct killing of human cells. The mechanism of human cell killing has been unclear, though the accepted model was that the parasites use secreted toxic effectors to kill cells prior to ingestion1. Here we report the surprising discovery that amoebae kill by biting off and ingesting distinct pieces of living human cells, resulting in intracellular calcium elevation and eventual cell death. After cell killing, amoebae detach and cease ingestion. Ingestion of bites is required for cell killing, and also contributes to invasion of intestinal tissue. The internalization of bites of living human cells is reminiscent of trogocytosis (Greek trogo–, nibble) observed between immune cells2–6, but amoebic trogocytosis differs since it results in death. The ingestion of live cell material and the rejection of corpses illuminate a stark contrast to the established model of dead cell clearance in multicellular organisms7. These findings change the paradigm for tissue destruction in amoebiasis and suggest an ancient origin of trogocytosis as a form of intercellular exchange. PMID:24717428

  16. Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell

  17. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  18. Individual motile CD4+ T cells can participate in efficient multi-killing through conjugation to multiple tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liadi, Ivan; Singh, Harjeet; Romain, Gabrielle; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Adolacion, Jay R T.; Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Qiu, Peng; Roysam, Badrinath; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Varadarajan, Navin

    2015-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) for the investigational treatment of B-cell malignancies comprise a heterogeneous population, and their ability to persist and participate in serial killing of tumor cells is a predictor of therapeutic success. We implemented Timelapse Imaging Microscopy In Nanowell Grids (TIMING) to provide direct evidence that CD4+CAR+ T cells (CAR4 cells) can engage in multi-killing via simultaneous conjugation to multiple tumor cells. Comparisons of the CAR4 cells and CD8+CAR+ T cells (CAR8 cells) demonstrate that while CAR4 cells can participate in killing and multi-killing, they do so at slower rates, likely due to the lower Granzyme B content. Significantly, in both sets of T cells, a minor sub-population of individual T cells identified by their high motility, demonstrated efficient killing of single tumor cells. By comparing both the multi-killer and single killer CAR+ T cells it appears that the propensity and kinetics of T-cell apoptosis was modulated by the number of functional conjugations. T cells underwent rapid apoptosis, and at higher frequencies, when conjugated to single tumor cells in isolation and this effect was more pronounced on CAR8 cells. Our results suggest that the ability of CAR+ T cells to participate in multi-killing should be evaluated in the context of their ability to resist activation induced cell death (AICD). We anticipate that TIMING may be utilized to rapidly determine the potency of T-cell populations and may facilitate the design and manufacture of next-generation CAR+ T cells with improved efficacy. PMID:25711538

  19. Human phagocytes lack the ability to kill Mycobacterium gordonae, a non-pathogenic mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruvalcaba, David; González-Cortés, Carolina; Rivero-Lezcano, Octavio M

    2008-02-15

    Non-pathogenic mycobacteria, like Mycobacterium gordonae, are rarely associated to disease. The analysis of the mechanisms which are successful against them in the human host may provide useful information to understand why they fail against the pathogenic M. tuberculosis. We have developed an infection model to test the ability of human phagocytes to kill two strains of M. gordonae, HL184G and an attenuated variety, HL184Gat. As controls we included a strain of M. tuberculosis (HL186T) and another one of L. pneumophila (ATCC13151). We observed that human phagocytes lack the intrinsic ability to eliminate either M. gordonae or M. tuberculosis, but they can kill the attenuated strain. We found a relationship between pathogenicity and the pattern of cytokine production. Thus, both the pathogenic M. tuberculosis and Legionella pneumophila, but not the non-pathogenic M. gordonae, induced the production of significantly different levels of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha in monocytes and IL-8 in neutrophils. Although both monocytes and neutrophils killed HL184Gat, but not HL184G, the patterns of cytokine production induced by either strain were identical. Addition of INF-gamma and/or TNF-alpha did not enhance the antimycobacterial activity of phagocytes.

  20. Antigen specific killing assay using CFSE labeled target cells.

    PubMed

    Durward, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2010-11-09

    Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) can be used to easily and quickly label a cell population of interest for in vivo investigation. This labeling has classically been used to study proliferation and migration. In the method presented here, we have shortened the timeline after adoptive transfer to look at survival and killing of epitope specific CFSE labeled target cells. The level of specific killing of a CD8 + T cell clone can indicate the quality of the response, as their quantity may be misleading. Specific CD8+ T cells can become functionally exhausted over time with a decline in cytokine production and killing. Also, certain CD8 + T cell clones may not kill as well as others with differing TCR specificities. For effective Cell Mediated Immunity (CMI), antigens must be identified that produce not only adequate numbers of responding T cells, but also functionally robust responding T cells. Here we assess the percent cell specific killing of two peptide specific T cell clones in BALB/c mice.

  1. Diversity and decay ability of basidiomycetes isolated from lodgepole pines killed by the mountain pine beetle.

    PubMed

    Son, E; Kim, J-J; Lim, Y W; Au-Yeung, T T; Yang, C Y H; Breuil, C

    2011-01-01

    When lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Louden var. latifolia Engelm. ex S. Watson) that are killed by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and its fungal associates are not harvested, fungal decay can affect wood and fibre properties. Ophiostomatoids stain sapwood but do not affect the structural properties of wood. In contrast, white or brown decay basidiomycetes degrade wood. We isolated both staining and decay fungi from 300 lodgepole pine trees killed by mountain pine beetle at green, red, and grey stages at 10 sites across British Columbia. We retained 224 basidiomycete isolates that we classified into 34 species using morphological and physiological characteristics and rDNA large subunit sequences. The number of basidiomycete species varied from 4 to 14 species per site. We assessed the ability of these fungi to degrade both pine sapwood and heartwood using the soil jar decay test. The highest wood mass losses for both sapwood and heartwood were measured for the brown rot species Fomitopsis pinicola and the white rot Metulodontia and Ganoderma species. The sap rot species Trichaptum abietinum was more damaging for sapwood than for heartwood. A number of species caused more than 50% wood mass losses after 12 weeks at room temperature, suggesting that beetle-killed trees can rapidly lose market value due to degradation of wood structural components. PMID:21217795

  2. Diversity and decay ability of basidiomycetes isolated from lodgepole pines killed by the mountain pine beetle.

    PubMed

    Son, E; Kim, J-J; Lim, Y W; Au-Yeung, T T; Yang, C Y H; Breuil, C

    2011-01-01

    When lodgepole pines (Pinus contorta Douglas ex Louden var. latifolia Engelm. ex S. Watson) that are killed by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and its fungal associates are not harvested, fungal decay can affect wood and fibre properties. Ophiostomatoids stain sapwood but do not affect the structural properties of wood. In contrast, white or brown decay basidiomycetes degrade wood. We isolated both staining and decay fungi from 300 lodgepole pine trees killed by mountain pine beetle at green, red, and grey stages at 10 sites across British Columbia. We retained 224 basidiomycete isolates that we classified into 34 species using morphological and physiological characteristics and rDNA large subunit sequences. The number of basidiomycete species varied from 4 to 14 species per site. We assessed the ability of these fungi to degrade both pine sapwood and heartwood using the soil jar decay test. The highest wood mass losses for both sapwood and heartwood were measured for the brown rot species Fomitopsis pinicola and the white rot Metulodontia and Ganoderma species. The sap rot species Trichaptum abietinum was more damaging for sapwood than for heartwood. A number of species caused more than 50% wood mass losses after 12 weeks at room temperature, suggesting that beetle-killed trees can rapidly lose market value due to degradation of wood structural components.

  3. Memory CD8+ T Cells Protect Dendritic Cells from CTL Killing1

    PubMed Central

    Watchmaker, Payal B.; Urban, Julie A.; Berk, Erik; Nakamura, Yutaro; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Watkins, Simon C.; van Ham, S. Marieke; Kalinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have been shown to be capable of either suppressing or promoting immune responses. To reconcile these contrasting regulatory functions, we compared the ability of human effector and memory CD8+ T cells to regulate survival and functions of dendritic cells (DC). We report that, in sharp contrast to the effector cells (CTLs) that kill DCs in a granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanism, memory CD8+ T cells enhance the ability of DCs to produce IL-12 and to induce functional Th1 and CTL responses in naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations. Moreover, memory CD8+ T cells that release the DC-activating factor TNF-α before the release of cytotoxic granules induce DC expression of an endogenous granzyme B inhibitor PI-9 and protect DCs from CTL killing with similar efficacy as CD4+ Th cells. The currently identified DC-protective function of memory CD8+ T cells helps to explain the phenomenon of CD8+ T cell memory, reduced dependence of recall responses on CD4+ T cell help, and the importance of delayed administration of booster doses of vaccines for the optimal outcome of immunization. PMID:18322193

  4. DNA damage and cell killing. Cause and effect

    SciTech Connect

    Elkind, M.M.

    1985-11-15

    The evidence supporting a cause and effect relationship between DNA damage and cell killing is examined in the light of what is currently known about the organization and replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells and the radio-energetics of DNA breakage. A large disparity is identified between characteristic doses for cell killing and for the production of DNA lesions (i.e., single- or double-strand breaks). In contrast, the sensitive phase of the inhibition of DNA synthesis has a dependence on dose quantitatively similar to that of cell killing. A model is developed in which single- and double-strand breaks are associated with the inhibition of replicon initiation, whereas only double-strand breaks are primarily responsible for strand elongation. Furthermore, the model points to the replisome and the region of replicated DNA just downstream from the fork as the locus of radiation action.

  5. Bacteria-killing ability of fresh blood plasma compared to frozen blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anne C; Fair, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the bacteria-killing assay (BKA) has become a popular technique among ecoimmunologists. New variations of that assay allow researchers to use smaller volumes of blood, an important consideration for those working on small-bodied animals. However, this version of the assay requires access to a lab with a nanodrop spectrophotometer, something that may not be available in the field. One possible solution is to freeze plasma for transport; however, this assumes that frozen plasma samples will give comparable results to fresh ones. We tested this assumption using plasma samples from three species of birds: chickens (Gallus gallus), ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), and western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana). Chicken plasma samples lost most or all of their bacterial killing ability after freezing. This did not happen in flycatchers and bluebirds; however, frozen plasma did not produce results comparable to those obtained using fresh plasma. We caution researchers using the BKA to use fresh samples whenever possible, and to validate the use of frozen samples on a species-by-species basis.

  6. Human polymorphonuclear neutrophils specifically recognize and kill cancerous cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Kloecker, Goetz; Fleming, Chris; Bousamra, Michael; Hansen, Richard; Hu, Xiaoling; Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Xiang, Dong; Donninger, Howard; Eaton, John W; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the main effectors of the innate immune system, have rarely been considered as an anticancer therapeutic tool. However, recent investigations using animal models and preliminary clinical studies have highlighted the potential antitumor efficacy of PMNs. In the current study, we find that PMNs from some healthy donors naturally have potent cancer-killing activity against 4 different human cancer cell lines. The killing activity appears to be cancer cell-specific since PMNs did not kill primary normal epithelial cells or an immortalized breast epithelial cell line. Transfecting the immortalized mammary cells with plasmids expressing activated forms of the rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Ras) and teratocarcinoma oncogene 21 (TC21) oncogenes was sufficient to provoke aggressive attack by PMNs. However, transfection with activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac1) was ineffective, suggesting specificity in PMN-targeting of neoplastic cells. Furthermore, PMNs from lung cancer patients were also found to exhibit relatively poor cancer-killing activity compared to the cytolytic activity of the average healthy donor. Taken together, our results suggest that PMN-based treatment regimens may represent a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy that may be easily introduced into the clinic to benefit a subset of patients with PMN-vulnerable tumors. PMID:25610737

  7. Morphological effect of oscillating magnetic nanoparticles in killing tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Forced oscillation of spherical and rod-shaped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via low-power and low-frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) was firstly used to kill cancer cells in vitro. After being loaded by human cervical cancer cells line (HeLa) and then exposed to a 35-kHz AMF, MNPs mechanically damaged cell membranes and cytoplasm, decreasing the cell viability. It was found that the concentration and morphology of the MNPs significantly influenced the cell-killing efficiency of oscillating MNPs. In this preliminary study, when HeLa cells were pre-incubated with 100 μg/mL rod-shaped MNPs (rMNP, length of 200 ± 50 nm and diameter of 50 to 120 nm) for 20 h, MTT assay proved that the cell viability decreased by 30.9% after being exposed to AMF for 2 h, while the cell viability decreased by 11.7% if spherical MNPs (sMNP, diameter of 200 ± 50 nm) were used for investigation. Furthermore, the morphological effect of MNPs on cell viability was confirmed by trypan blue assay: 39.5% rMNP-loaded cells and 15.1% sMNP-loaded cells were stained after being exposed to AMF for 2 h. It was also interesting to find that killing tumor cells at either higher (500 μg/mL) or lower (20 μg/mL) concentration of MNPs was less efficient than that achieved at 100 μg/mL concentration. In conclusion, the relatively asymmetric morphological rod-shaped MNPs can kill cancer cells more effectively than spherical MNPs when being exposed to AMF by virtue of their mechanical oscillations. PMID:24872797

  8. Improving the selective cancer killing ability of ZnO nanoparticles using Fe doping.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Aaron; Wingett, Denise G; Rasmussen, John W; Layne, Janet; Johnson, Lydia; Tenne, Dmitri A; Zhang, Jianhui; Hanna, Charles B; Punnoose, Alex

    2012-06-01

    This work reports a new method to improve our recent demonstration of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) selectively killing certain human cancer cells, achieved by incorporating Fe ions into the NPs. Thoroughly characterized cationic ZnO NPs (∼6 nm) doped with Fe ions (Zn(1-x )Fe (x) O, x = 0-0.15) were used in this work, applied at a concentration of 24 μg/ml. Cytotoxicity studies using flow cytometry on Jurkat leukemic cancer cells show cell viability drops from about 43% for undoped ZnO NPs to 15% for ZnO NPs doped with 7.5% Fe. However, the trend reverses and cell viability increases with higher Fe concentrations. The non-immortalized human T cells are markedly more resistant to Fe-doped ZnO NPs than cancerous T cells, confirming that Fe-doped samples still maintain selective toxicity to cancer cells. Pure iron oxide samples displayed no appreciable toxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated with NP introduction to cells increased with increasing Fe up to 7.5% and decreased for >7.5% doping. PMID:21635174

  9. How Taxol/paclitaxel kills cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Beth A

    2014-09-15

    Taxol (generic name paclitaxel) is a microtubule-stabilizing drug that is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer, as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. It is used off-label to treat gastroesophageal, endometrial, cervical, prostate, and head and neck cancers, in addition to sarcoma, lymphoma, and leukemia. Paclitaxel has long been recognized to induce mitotic arrest, which leads to cell death in a subset of the arrested population. However, recent evidence demonstrates that intratumoral concentrations of paclitaxel are too low to cause mitotic arrest and result in multipolar divisions instead. It is hoped that this insight can now be used to develop a biomarker to identify the ∼50% of patients that will benefit from paclitaxel therapy. Here I discuss the history of paclitaxel and our recently evolved understanding of its mechanism of action.

  10. Association of a bovine CXCR2 gene polymorphism with neutrophil survival and killing ability.

    PubMed

    Rambeaud, M; Clift, R; Pighetti, G M

    2006-06-15

    Recent research in our lab has demonstrated a significant association between the incidence of subclinical mastitis and specific polymorphisms of the CXCR2 gene in Holstein dairy cows. This gene encodes a receptor for interleukin-8 (IL-8), a key regulator of neutrophil migration, killing and survival. Because of the importance of this gene in neutrophil function, we hypothesized that differences in neutrophil killing and survival may exist among the CXCR2 genotypes and potentially contribute to the observed variation in intramammary infections. To test this hypothesis, neutrophils were isolated from cows representing each CXCR2 +777 genotype (GG, GC or CC) and tested for suppression of apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, glutathione levels, and bactericidal activity. A significant increase in survival was observed in neutrophils from cows with a CC genotype when compared to those with a GG genotype in response to IL-8, but not dexamethasone. In contrast, a significant reduction in neutrophil ROS generation in response to phorbol-13-myristate-12 acetate (PMA) was observed in cows with a CC genotype when compared to those with a GG genotype. However, no differences in bactericidal activity or glutathione levels were observed among genotypes. The functional activity of neutrophils from cows heterozygous for this polymorphism was intermediate between those with homozygous genotypes for those assays where differences were observed among homozygous genotypes. In summary, our results suggest that neutrophils from Holstein cows with different CXCR2 genotypes vary in their ability to suppress apoptosis and produce ROS. These differences have the potential to influence overall neutrophil function and may partially explain the variation observed with respect to mastitis in vivo. These results provide a foundation for future research aimed at better understanding the basic differences between dairy cows genetically more or less susceptible to mastitis and has

  11. Comparison between three adjuvants for a vaccine against canine leishmaniasis: In vitro evaluation of macrophage killing ability.

    PubMed

    Trotta, T; Fasanella, A; Scaltrito, D; Gradoni, L; Mitolo, V; Brandonisio, O; Acquafredda, A; Panaro, M A

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in terms of dog macrophage killing ability in vitro, a vaccine based on Leishmania infantum promastigote soluble antigen (LSA) formulated with three different adjuvants (BCG, AdjuPrime, MPL/TDM/CWS). A significant increase of the macrophage killing ability was observed in dogs vaccinated with LSA+MPL/TDM/CWS after 1 month from vaccination. A similar increase of macrophage parasitocidal ability was present only after 5 months in dogs vaccinated with LSA+BCG or LSA+AdjuPrime. In all dogs the augmented killing percentage was still present after 12 months from vaccination. Therefore, in particular LSA+MPL/TDM/CWS vaccine seems promising for further studies in dogs.

  12. Chew on this: Amoebic trogocytosis and host cell killing by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica was named “histolytica” (histo-: tissue; lytic-: dissolving) for its ability to destroy host tissues. Direct killing of host cells by the amoebae is likely to be the driving factor that underlies tissue destruction, but the mechanism was unclear. We recently showed that after attaching to host cells, amoebae bite off and ingest distinct host cell fragments, and that this contributes to cell killing. Here we review this process, termed “amoebic trogocytosis” (trogo-: nibble), and how this process interplays with phagocytosis, or whole cell ingestion, in this organism. “Nibbling” processes have been described in other microbes and in multicellular organisms. The discovery of amoebic trogocytosis in E. histolytica may also shed light on an evolutionarily conserved process for intercellular exchange. PMID:26070402

  13. Targeted cytotoxic therapy kills persisting HIV infected cells during ART.

    PubMed

    Denton, Paul W; Long, Julie M; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Sykes, Craig; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Snyder, Olivia D; Perkey, Katherine; Archin, Nancie M; Choudhary, Shailesh K; Yang, Kuo; Hudgens, Michael G; Pastan, Ira; Haase, Ashley T; Kashuba, Angela D; Berger, Edward A; Margolis, David M; Garcia, J Victor

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce HIV levels in plasma to undetectable levels, but rather little is known about the effects of ART outside of the peripheral blood regarding persistent virus production in tissue reservoirs. Understanding the dynamics of ART-induced reductions in viral RNA (vRNA) levels throughout the body is important for the development of strategies to eradicate infectious HIV from patients. Essential to a successful eradication therapy is a component capable of killing persisting HIV infected cells during ART. Therefore, we determined the in vivo efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill infected cells that persist despite long-term ART. For this purpose, we first characterized the impact of ART on HIV RNA levels in multiple organs of bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) humanized mice and found that antiretroviral drug penetration and activity was sufficient to reduce, but not eliminate, HIV production in each tissue tested. For targeted cytotoxic killing of these persistent vRNA(+) cells, we treated BLT mice undergoing ART with an HIV-specific immunotoxin. We found that compared to ART alone, this agent profoundly depleted productively infected cells systemically. These results offer proof-of-concept that targeted cytotoxic therapies can be effective components of HIV eradication strategies.

  14. Combination of Antiretroviral Drugs and Radioimmunotherapy Specifically Kills Infected Cells from HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tsukrov, Dina; McFarren, Alicia; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Dolce, Eugene; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Berman, Joan W.; Schoenbaum, Ellie; Zingman, Barry S.; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Eliminating virally infected cells is an essential component of any HIV eradication strategy. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT), a clinically established method for killing cells using radiolabeled antibodies, was recently applied to target HIV-1 gp41 antigen expressed on the surface of infected cells. Since gp41 expression by infected cells is likely downregulated in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), we evaluated the ability of RIT to kill ART-treated infected cells using both in vitro models and lymphocytes isolated from HIV-infected subjects. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were infected with HIV and cultured in the presence of two clinically relevant ART combinations. Scatchard analysis of the 2556 human monoclonal antibody to HIV gp41 binding to the infected and ART-treated cells demonstrated sufficient residual expression of gp41 on the cell surface to warrant subsequent RIT. This is the first time the quantification of gp41 post-ART is being reported. Cells were then treated with Bismuth-213-labeled 2556 antibody. Cell survival was quantified by Trypan blue and residual viremia by p24 ELISA. Cell surface gp41 expression was assessed by Scatchard analysis. The experiments were repeated using PBMCs isolated from blood specimens obtained from 15 HIV-infected individuals: 10 on ART and 5 ART-naïve. We found that 213Bi-2556 killed ART-treated infected PBMCs and reduced viral production to undetectable levels. ART and RIT co-treatment was more effective at reducing viral load in vitro than either therapy alone, indicating that gp41 expression under ART was sufficient to allow 213Bi-2556 to deliver cytocidal doses of radiation to infected cells. This study provides proof of concept that 213Bi-2556 may represent an innovative and effective targeting method for killing HIV-infected cells treated with ART and supports continued development of 213Bi-2556 for co-administration with ART toward an HIV eradication strategy. PMID:27725930

  15. Nexavar/Stivarga and Viagra Interact to Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tavallai, Mehrad; Hamed, Hossein A.; Roberts, Jane L.; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Chuckalovcak, John; Poklepovic, Andrew; Booth, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    We determined whether the multi‐kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors such as Viagra (sildenafil) to kill tumor cells. PDE5 and PDGFRα/β were over‐expressed in liver tumors compared to normal liver tissue. In multiple cell types in vitro sorafenib/regorafenib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death, regardless of whether cells were grown in 10 or 100% human serum. Knock down of PDE5 or of PDGFRα/β recapitulated the effects of the individual drugs. The drug combination increased ROS/RNS levels that were causal in cell killing. Inhibition of CD95/FADD/caspase 8 signaling suppressed drug combination toxicity. Knock down of ULK‐1, Beclin1, or ATG5 suppressed drug combination lethality. The drug combination inactivated ERK, AKT, p70 S6K, and mTOR and activated JNK. The drug combination also reduced mTOR protein expression. Activation of ERK or AKT was modestly protective whereas re‐expression of an activated mTOR protein or inhibition of JNK signaling almost abolished drug combination toxicity. Sildenafil and sorafenib/regorafenib interacted in vivo to suppress xenograft tumor growth using liver and colon cancer cells. From multiplex assays on tumor tissue and plasma, we discovered that increased FGF levels and ERBB1 and AKT phosphorylation were biomarkers that were directly associated with lower levels of cell killing by ‘rafenib + sildenafil. Our data are now being translated into the clinic for further determination as to whether this drug combination is a useful anti‐tumor therapy for solid tumor patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2281–2298, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25704960

  16. Nexavar/Stivarga and viagra interact to kill tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Tavallai, Mehrad; Hamed, Hossein A; Roberts, Jane L; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Chuckalovcak, John; Poklepovic, Andrew; Booth, Laurence; Dent, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We determined whether the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors such as Viagra (sildenafil) to kill tumor cells. PDE5 and PDGFRα/β were over-expressed in liver tumors compared to normal liver tissue. In multiple cell types in vitro sorafenib/regorafenib and PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death, regardless of whether cells were grown in 10 or 100% human serum. Knock down of PDE5 or of PDGFRα/β recapitulated the effects of the individual drugs. The drug combination increased ROS/RNS levels that were causal in cell killing. Inhibition of CD95/FADD/caspase 8 signaling suppressed drug combination toxicity. Knock down of ULK-1, Beclin1, or ATG5 suppressed drug combination lethality. The drug combination inactivated ERK, AKT, p70 S6K, and mTOR and activated JNK. The drug combination also reduced mTOR protein expression. Activation of ERK or AKT was modestly protective whereas re-expression of an activated mTOR protein or inhibition of JNK signaling almost abolished drug combination toxicity. Sildenafil and sorafenib/regorafenib interacted in vivo to suppress xenograft tumor growth using liver and colon cancer cells. From multiplex assays on tumor tissue and plasma, we discovered that increased FGF levels and ERBB1 and AKT phosphorylation were biomarkers that were directly associated with lower levels of cell killing by 'rafenib + sildenafil. Our data are now being translated into the clinic for further determination as to whether this drug combination is a useful anti-tumor therapy for solid tumor patients. PMID:25704960

  17. Th-1 lymphocytes induce dendritic cell tumor killing activity by an IFN-γ-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    LaCasse, Collin J; Janikashvili, Nona; Larmonier, Claire B; Alizadeh, Darya; Hanke, Neale; Kartchner, Jessica; Situ, Elaine; Centuori, Sara; Har-Noy, Michael; Bonnotte, Bernard; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) encompass a heterogeneous population of cells capable of orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses. The ability of DCs to act as professional APCs has been the foundation for the development and use of these cells as vaccines in cancer immunotherapy. DCs are also endowed with the nonconventional property of directly killing tumor cells. The current study investigates the regulation of murine DC cytotoxic function by T lymphocytes. We provide evidence that CD4(+) Th-1, but not Th-2, Th-17 cells, or regulatory T cells, are capable of inducing DC cytotoxic function. IFN-γ was identified as the major factor responsible for Th-1-induced DC tumoricidal activity. Tumor cell killing mediated by Th-1-activated killer DCs was dependent on inducible NO synthase expression and NO production. Importantly, Th-1-activated killer DCs were capable of presenting the acquired Ags from the killed tumor cells to T lymphocytes in vitro or in vivo. These observations offer new possibilities for the application of killer DCs in cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Colicin Killing: Foiled Cell Defense and Hijacked Cell Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zamaroczy, Miklos; Chauleau, Mathieu

    The study of bacteriocins, notably those produced by E. coli (and named colicins), was initiated in 1925 by Gratia, who first discovered "un remarquable exemple d'antagonisme entre deux souches de colibacilles". Since this innovating observation, the production of toxic exoproteins has been widely reported in all major lineages of Eubacteria and in Archaebacteria. Bacteriocins belong to the most abundant and most diverse group of these bacterial defense systems. Paradoxically, these antimicrobial cytotoxins are actually powerful weapons in the intense battle for bacterial survival. They are also biotechnologically useful since several bacteriocins are used as preservatives in the food industry or as antibiotics or as potential antitumor agents in human health care. Most colicins kill bacteria in one of two ways. The first type is those that form pores in the phospholipid bilayer of the inner membrane. They are active immediately after their translocation across the outer membrane. The translocation pathway requires generally either the BtuB receptor and the Tol (OmpF/TolABQR) complex, or the FepA, FhuA, or Cir receptor and the Ton (TonB/ExbBD) system. The second type of colicins encodes specific endonuclease activities that target DNA, rRNA, or tRNAs in the cytoplasm. To be active, these colicins require translocation across both the outer and inner membranes. The molecular mechanisms implicated in the complex cascade of interactions, required for the transfers of colicin molecules from the extracellular medium through the different "cellular compartments" (outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, and cytoplasm), are still incompletely understood. It is clear, however, that the colicins "hijack" specific cellular functions to facilitate access to their target. In this chapter, following a general presentation of colicin biology, we describe, compare, and update several of the concepts related to colicin toxicity and discuss recent, often unexpected findings

  19. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  20. Epirubicin-Adsorbed Nanodiamonds Kill Chemoresistant Hepatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a primary cause of treatment failure in cancer and a common property of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. Overcoming mechanisms of chemoresistance, particularly in cancer stem cells, can markedly enhance cancer therapy and prevent recurrence and metastasis. This study demonstrates that the delivery of Epirubicin by nanodiamonds is a highly effective nanomedicine-based approach to overcoming chemoresistance in hepatic cancer stem cells. The potent physical adsorption of Epirubicin to nanodiamonds creates a rapidly synthesized and stable nanodiamond–drug complex that promotes endocytic uptake and enhanced tumor cell retention. These attributes mediate the effective killing of both cancer stem cells and noncancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Enhanced treatment of both tumor cell populations results in an improved impairment of secondary tumor formation in vivo compared with treatment by unmodified chemotherapeutics. On the basis of these results, nanodiamond-mediated drug delivery may serve as a powerful method for overcoming chemoresistance in cancer stem cells and markedly improving overall treatment against hepatic cancers. PMID:25437772

  1. Cloned transgenic farm animals produce a bispecific antibody for T cell-mediated tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Müller, Sigrid; Minoia, Rosa; Wolf, Eckhard; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wenigerkind, Hendrik; Lassnig, Caroline; Besenfelder, Urban; Müller, Mathias; Lytton, Simon D; Jung, Gundram; Brem, Gottfried

    2004-05-01

    Complex recombinant antibody fragments for modulation of immune function such as tumor cell destruction have emerged at a rapid pace and diverse anticancer strategies are being developed to benefit patients. Despite improvements in molecule design and expression systems, the quantity and stability, e.g., of single-chain antibodies produced in cell culture, is often insufficient for treatment of human disease, and the costs of scale-up, labor, and fermentation facilities are prohibitive. The ability to yield mg/ml levels of recombinant antibodies and the scale-up flexibility make transgenic production in plants and livestock an attractive alternative to mammalian cell culture as a source of large quantities of biotherapeutics. Here, we report on the efficient production of a bispecific single-chain antibody in the serum of transgenic rabbits and a herd of nine cloned, transgenic cattle. The bispecific protein, designated r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan and the human CD28 molecule on T cells. Purified from the serum of transgenic animals, the protein is stable and fully active in mediating target cell-restricted T cell stimulation and tumor cell killing.

  2. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  3. Scheduling Chemotherapy: Catch 22 between Cell Kill and Resistance Evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Shea N.

    2000-01-01

    Dose response curves show that prolonged drug exposure at a low concentration may kill more cells than short exposures at higher drug concentrations, particularly for cell cycle phase specific drugs. Applying drugs at low concentrations for prolonged periods, however, allows cells with partial resistance to evolve higher levels of resistance through stepwise processes such as gene amplification. Models are developed for cell cycle specific (CS) and cell cycle nonspecific (CNS) drugs to identify the schedule of drug application that balances this tradeoff. The models predict that a CS drug may be applied most effectively by splitting the cumulative dose intomore » many (>40) fractions applied by long-term chemotherapy, while CNS drugs may be better applied in fewer than 10 fractions applied over a shorter term. The model suggests that administering each fraction by continuous infusion may be more effective than giving the drug as a bolus, whether the drug is CS or CNS. In addition, tumors with a low growth fraction or slow rate of cell division are predicted to be controlled more easily with CNS drugs, while those with a high proliferative fraction or fast cell division rate may respond better to CS drugs.« less

  4. Imaging burst kinetics and spatial coordination during serial killing by single natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Paul J; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2013-04-16

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes eliminate virus-infected and cancerous cells by immune recognition and killing through the perforin-granzyme pathway. Traditional killing assays measure average target cell lysis at fixed times and high effector:target ratios. Such assays obscure kinetic details that might reveal novel physiology. We engineered target cells to report on granzyme activity, used very low effector:target ratios to observe potential serial killing, and performed low magnification time-lapse imaging to reveal time-dependent statistics of natural killer (NK) killing at the single-cell level. Most kills occurred during serial killing, and a single NK cell killed up to 10 targets over a 6-h assay. The first kill was slower than subsequent kills, especially on poor targets, or when NK signaling pathways were partially inhibited. Spatial analysis showed that sequential kills were usually adjacent. We propose that NK cells integrate signals from the previous and current target, possibly by simultaneous contact. The resulting burst kinetics and spatial coordination may control the activity of NK cells in tissues.

  5. IAP antagonists sensitize murine osteosarcoma cells to killing by TNFα

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Tanmay M.; Miles, Mark A.; Gupte, Ankita; Taylor, Scott; Tascone, Brianna; Walkley, Carl R.; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for patients diagnosed with the bone cancer osteosarcoma have not improved significantly in the last four decades. Only around 60% of patients and about a quarter of those with metastatic disease survive for more than five years. Although DNA-damaging chemotherapy drugs can be effective, they can provoke serious or fatal adverse effects including cardiotoxicity and therapy-related cancers. Better and safer treatments are therefore needed. We investigated the anti-osteosarcoma activity of IAP antagonists (also known as Smac mimetics) using cells from primary and metastatic osteosarcomas that arose spontaneously in mice engineered to lack p53 and Rb expression in osteoblast-derived cells. The IAP antagonists SM-164, GDC-0152 and LCL161, which efficiently target XIAP and cIAPs, sensitized cells from most osteosarcomas to killing by low levels of TNFα but not TRAIL. RIPK1 expression levels and activity correlated with sensitivity. RIPK3 levels varied considerably between tumors and RIPK3 was not required for IAP antagonism to sensitize osteosarcoma cells to TNFα. IAP antagonists, including SM-164, lacked mutagenic activity. These data suggest that drugs targeting XIAP and cIAP1/2 may be effective for osteosarcoma patients whose tumors express abundant RIPK1 and contain high levels of TNFα, and would be unlikely to provoke therapy-induced cancers in osteosarcoma survivors. PMID:27129149

  6. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  7. The pro-oxidative drug WF-10 inhibits serial killing by primary human cytotoxic T-cells.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, G H; Balta, E; Schindler, S; Kirchgessner, H; Jahraus, B; Meuer, S; Samstag, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) play an important role in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Targeting cytotoxicity of CTLs would allow to interfere with immune-mediated tissue destruction. Here we demonstrate that WF-10, a pro-oxidative compound, inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. WF-10 did not influence early steps of target-cell killing, but impaired the ability of CTLs to detach from the initial target cell and to move to a second target cell. This reduced serial killing was accompanied by stronger enrichment of the adhesion molecule LFA-1 in the cytolytic immune synapse. LFA-1 clustering requires activation of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and was accordingly diminished in L-plastin knockdown cells. Interestingly, WF-10 likely acts through regulating L-plastin: (I) It induced L-plastin activation through phosphorylation leading to enhanced LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, and, importantly, (II) WF-10 lost its influence on target-cell killing in L-plastin knockdown cells. Finally, we demonstrate that WF-10 can improve immunosuppression by conventional drugs. Thus, while cyclosporine A alone had no significant effect on cytotoxicity of CTLs, a combination of cyclosporine A and WF-10 blocked target-cell killing synergistically. Together, our findings suggest that WF-10 - either alone or in combination with conventional immunosuppressive drugs - may be efficient to control progression of diseases, in which CTLs are crucially involved. PMID:27551545

  8. The pro-oxidative drug WF-10 inhibits serial killing by primary human cytotoxic T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Wabnitz, G H; Balta, E; Schindler, S; Kirchgessner, H; Jahraus, B; Meuer, S; Samstag, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) play an important role in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Targeting cytotoxicity of CTLs would allow to interfere with immune-mediated tissue destruction. Here we demonstrate that WF-10, a pro-oxidative compound, inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. WF-10 did not influence early steps of target-cell killing, but impaired the ability of CTLs to detach from the initial target cell and to move to a second target cell. This reduced serial killing was accompanied by stronger enrichment of the adhesion molecule LFA-1 in the cytolytic immune synapse. LFA-1 clustering requires activation of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and was accordingly diminished in L-plastin knockdown cells. Interestingly, WF-10 likely acts through regulating L-plastin: (I) It induced L-plastin activation through phosphorylation leading to enhanced LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, and, importantly, (II) WF-10 lost its influence on target-cell killing in L-plastin knockdown cells. Finally, we demonstrate that WF-10 can improve immunosuppression by conventional drugs. Thus, while cyclosporine A alone had no significant effect on cytotoxicity of CTLs, a combination of cyclosporine A and WF-10 blocked target-cell killing synergistically. Together, our findings suggest that WF-10 – either alone or in combination with conventional immunosuppressive drugs – may be efficient to control progression of diseases, in which CTLs are crucially involved. PMID:27551545

  9. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A; Varadarajan, Navin

    2014-11-20

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  10. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25232058

  11. Antibody Fc engineering improves frequency and promotes kinetic boosting of serial killing mediated by NK cells.

    PubMed

    Romain, Gabrielle; Senyukov, Vladimir; Rey-Villamizar, Nicolas; Merouane, Amine; Kelton, William; Liadi, Ivan; Mahendra, Ankit; Charab, Wissam; Georgiou, George; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, Dean A; Varadarajan, Navin

    2014-11-20

    The efficacy of most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting tumor antigens results primarily from their ability to elicit potent cytotoxicity through effector-mediated functions. We have engineered the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) mAb, HuM195, targeting the leukemic antigen CD33, by introducing the triple mutation Ser293Asp/Ala330Leu/Ile332Glu (DLE), and developed Time-lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids to analyze antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity kinetics of thousands of individual natural killer (NK) cells and mAb-coated target cells. We demonstrate that the DLE-HuM195 antibody increases both the quality and the quantity of NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity by endowing more NK cells to participate in cytotoxicity via accrued CD16-mediated signaling and by increasing serial killing of target cells. NK cells encountering targets coated with DLE-HuM195 induce rapid target cell apoptosis by promoting simultaneous conjugates to multiple target cells and induce apoptosis in twice the number of target cells within the same period as the wild-type mAb. Enhanced target killing was also associated with increased frequency of NK cells undergoing apoptosis, but this effect was donor-dependent. Antibody-based therapies targeting tumor antigens will benefit from a better understanding of cell-mediated tumor elimination, and our work opens further opportunities for the therapeutic targeting of CD33 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:25232058

  12. Nanotechnology for the detection and kill of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a surrogate biomarker of hematogenous metastases and thus could be considered as a ‘liquid biopsy’ which reveals metastasis in action. But it is absolutely a challenge to detect CTCs due to their extreme rarity. At present, the most common principle is to take advantage of the epithelial surface markers of CTCs which attach to a specific antibody. Antibody-magnetic nanobeads combine with the epithelial surface markers, and then the compound is processed by washing, separation, and detection. However, a proportion of CTC antigen expressions are down-regulated or lost in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus, this part of CTCs cannot be detected by classical detection methods such as CellSearch. To resolve this problem, some multiple-marker CTC detections have been developed rapidly. Additionally, nanotechnology is a promising approach to kill CTCs with high efficiency. Implantable nanotubes coated with apoptosis-promoting molecules improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. The review introduces some novel CTC detection techniques and therapeutic methods by virtue of nanotechnology to provide a better knowledge of the progress about CTC study. PMID:25258614

  13. Nanotechnology for the detection and kill of circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Yuan, Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent a surrogate biomarker of hematogenous metastases and thus could be considered as a `liquid biopsy' which reveals metastasis in action. But it is absolutely a challenge to detect CTCs due to their extreme rarity. At present, the most common principle is to take advantage of the epithelial surface markers of CTCs which attach to a specific antibody. Antibody-magnetic nanobeads combine with the epithelial surface markers, and then the compound is processed by washing, separation, and detection. However, a proportion of CTC antigen expressions are down-regulated or lost in the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and thus, this part of CTCs cannot be detected by classical detection methods such as CellSearch. To resolve this problem, some multiple-marker CTC detections have been developed rapidly. Additionally, nanotechnology is a promising approach to kill CTCs with high efficiency. Implantable nanotubes coated with apoptosis-promoting molecules improve the disease-free survival and overall survival. The review introduces some novel CTC detection techniques and therapeutic methods by virtue of nanotechnology to provide a better knowledge of the progress about CTC study.

  14. Glioma Stemlike Cells Enhance the Killing of Glioma Differentiated Cells by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Chiusolo, Valentina; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Riccadonna, Cristina; Walker, Paul R; Martinvalet, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, is maintained by a subpopulation of glioma cells with self-renewal properties that are able to recapitulate the entire tumor even after surgical resection or chemo-radiotherapy. This typifies the vast heterogeneity of this tumor with the two extremes represented on one end by the glioma stemlike cells (GSC) and on the other by the glioma differentiated cells (GDC). Interestingly, GSC are more sensitive to immune effector cells than the GDC counterpart. However, how GSC impact on the killing on the GDC and vice versa is not clear. Using a newly developed cytotoxicity assay allowing to simultaneously monitor cytotoxic lymphocytes-mediated killing of GSC and GDC, we found that although GSC were always better killed and that their presence enhanced the killing of GDC. In contrast, an excess of GDC had a mild protective effect on the killing of GSC, depending on the CTL type. Overall, our results suggest that during combination therapy, immunotherapy would be the most effective after prior treatment with conventional therapies. PMID:27073883

  15. Intracellular killing of mastitis pathogens by penethamate hydriodide following internalization into mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R A; Patel, D; Friton, G M; Oliver, S P

    2007-04-01

    Penethamate hydriodide was highly effective in killing Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus that internalized mammary epithelial cells. At higher concentrations (32 microg/mL to 32 mg/mL), killing rates ranged from 85% to 100%. At lower concentrations (0.032 microg/mL to 3.2 microg/mL), killing rates ranged from 0 to 80%. Results of this proof-of-concept study demonstrated that: (1) penethamate hydriodide is capable of entering mammary epithelial cells and killing intracellular mastitis pathogens without affecting mammary epithelial cell viability, (2) the in vitro model used is capable of quantifying the fate of mastitis pathogens internalized into mammary epithelial cells, and (3) this in vitro model can be used to determine the effectiveness of antibiotics at killing bacteria within the cytoplasm of mammary epithelial cells.

  16. Comparison of two mathematical models for describing heat-induced cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Roti Roti, J.L.; Henle, K.J.

    1980-03-01

    A computer-based minimization algorithm is utilized to obtain the optimum fits of two models to hyperthermic cell killing data. The models chosen are the multitarget, single-hit equation, which is in general use, and the linear-quadratic equation, which has been applied to cell killing by ionizing irradiation but not to heat-induced cell killing. The linear-quadratic equation fits hyperthermic cell killing data as well as the multitarget, single-hit equation. Both parameters of the linear-quadratic equation obey the Arrhenius law, whereas only one of the two parameters of the multitarget, single-hit equation obeys the Arrhenius law. Thus the linear-quadratic function can completely define cell killing as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, the linear-quadratic model will provide a simplified approach to the study of the synergism between heat and X irradiation.

  17. Cell killing and mutation induction on Chinese hamster cells by photoradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, C.K.C.

    1982-11-01

    Applying radiation directly on cells, far-uv is more effective than black light, and black light is more effective than white light in inducing proliferative death and in inducing resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG), ouabain and diptheria toxin (DT). Gold light has no killing and mutagenic effects on CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells. Use of filters showed that a small percentage of shorter wavelengths in the far-uv region is responsible for most of the killing and mutagenic effects in the unfiltered broad spectra of black and white light.

  18. Studies on the mechanisms of mammalian cell killing by a freeze-thaw cycle: conditions that prevent cell killing using nucleated freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Shier, W.T.

    1988-04-01

    Normally a freeze-thaw cycle is a very efficient method of killing mammalian cells. However, this report describes conditions that prevent killing of cultured mammalian cells by nucleated freezing at -24 degrees C. Optimal protection from cell killing at -24 degrees C was obtained in isotonic solutions containing an organic cryoprotectant such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; 10%, v/v), a saccharide such as sucrose over a broad concentration range from 50 to 150 mM, and glucose. Glycerol was also an effective cryoprotectant but other organic solvents were ineffective, although in some cases they appeared to protect cell membranes, while not protecting other vital components. A wide variety of saccharide structures were effective at protecting cells from freeze-thaw killing, with trehalose being particularly effective. The degree of resistance to killing by a freeze-thaw cycle under these conditions varied widely among different cell lines. If toxicity of DMSO was responsible for this variability of cryoprotection, it must have been due to short-term, not longer term, toxicity of DMSO. Studies on the mechanism by which cells are protected from killing under these conditions indicated that neither vitrification of the medium nor the concentrating of components during freezing were involved. One model not eliminated by the mechanistic studies proposes that the organic solvent cryoprotectant component acts by fluidizing membranes under the thawing conditions, so that any holes produced by ice crystals propagating through membranes can reseal during the thawing process. In this model one of the mechanisms by which the saccharide component could act is by entering the cells and stabilizing vital intracellular components. Consistent with this, a freeze-thaw cycle promoted the uptake of labeled sucrose into cultured cells.

  19. IL12-mediated sensitizing of T-cell receptor-dependent and -independent tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Braun, Matthias; Ress, Marie L; Yoo, Young-Eun; Scholz, Claus J; Eyrich, Matthias; Schlegel, Paul G; Wölfl, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL12) is a key inflammatory cytokine critically influencing Th1/Tc1-T-cell responses at the time of initial antigen encounter. Therefore, it may be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we investigated how IL12, and other inflammatory cytokines, shape effector functions of human T-cells. Using a defined culture system, we followed the gradual differentiation and function of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells from their initial activation as naïve T cells through their expansion phase as early memory cells to full differentiation as clonally expanded effector T cells. The addition of IL12 8 days after the initial priming event initiated two mechanistically separate events: First, IL12 sensitized the T-cell receptor (TCR) for antigen-specific activation, leading to an approximately 10-fold increase in peptide sensitivity and, in consequence, enhanced tumor cell killing. Secondly, IL12 enabled TCR/HLA-independent activation and cytotoxicity: this "non-specific" effect was mediated by the NK cell receptor DNAM1 (CD226) and dependent on ligand expression of the target cells. This IL12 regulated, DNAM1-mediated killing is dependent on src-kinases as well as on PTPRC (CD45) activity. Thus, besides enhancing TCR-mediated activation, we here identified for the first time a second IL12 mediated mechanism leading to activation of a receptor-dependent killing pathway via DNAM1. PMID:27622043

  20. Innate Immune Memory: Activation of Macrophage Killing Ability by Developmental Duties.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David; Tate, Ann Thomas

    2016-06-20

    Innate immune systems in many taxa exhibit hallmarks of memory in response to previous microbial exposure. A new study demonstrates that innate immune memory in Drosophila embryonic macrophages can also be induced by the successful engulfment of apoptotic cells, highlighting the importance of early exposure events for developing responsive immune systems.

  1. Interactive effects of Na and K in killing by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.C.; MacCoubrey, I.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Contact-mediated lysis by human natural killer cells is inhibited by a number of drugs that block the predominant K channel. In this study the authors have further examined the role of the K channel and the interactions between passive K and Na transport in killing. Low external Na-inhibited killing and inhibition were not due to reduced inward current through the Na channels in the target cell. A role for the Na/H antiport is suggested since amiloride inhibited killing in a dose-dependent manner that was competitive with external Na. Depolarizing the killer cell with elevated external K did not inhibit killing. On the contrary, high K{sub 0} reduced the inhibition caused by low Na{sub 0} and by the K-channel blockers quinidine, verapamil, and retinoic acid. Hyperpolarizing the killer cell with low K{sub 0} or valinomycin inhibited killing. Hence, the primary role of the K channels during killing is not to maintain the negative membrane potential. On the contrary, depolarization may promote killing under conditions where killing is submaximal.

  2. Cytotoxic T Cells Use Mechanical Force to Potentiate Target Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Basu, Roshni; Whitlock, Benjamin M; Husson, Julien; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Jin, Weiyang; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Dotiwala, Farokh; Giannone, Gregory; Hivroz, Claire; Biais, Nicolas; Lieberman, Judy; Kam, Lance C; Huse, Morgan

    2016-03-24

    The immunological synapse formed between a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and an infected or transformed target cell is a physically active structure capable of exerting mechanical force. Here, we investigated whether synaptic forces promote the destruction of target cells. CTLs kill by secreting toxic proteases and the pore forming protein perforin into the synapse. Biophysical experiments revealed a striking correlation between the magnitude of force exertion across the synapse and the speed of perforin pore formation on the target cell, implying that force potentiates cytotoxicity by enhancing perforin activity. Consistent with this interpretation, we found that increasing target cell tension augmented pore formation by perforin and killing by CTLs. Our data also indicate that CTLs coordinate perforin release and force exertion in space and time. These results reveal an unappreciated physical dimension to lymphocyte function and demonstrate that cells use mechanical forces to control the activity of outgoing chemical signals. PMID:26924577

  3. Cytotoxic T Cells Use Mechanical Force to Potentiate Target Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Basu, Roshni; Whitlock, Benjamin M; Husson, Julien; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Jin, Weiyang; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Dotiwala, Farokh; Giannone, Gregory; Hivroz, Claire; Biais, Nicolas; Lieberman, Judy; Kam, Lance C; Huse, Morgan

    2016-03-24

    The immunological synapse formed between a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and an infected or transformed target cell is a physically active structure capable of exerting mechanical force. Here, we investigated whether synaptic forces promote the destruction of target cells. CTLs kill by secreting toxic proteases and the pore forming protein perforin into the synapse. Biophysical experiments revealed a striking correlation between the magnitude of force exertion across the synapse and the speed of perforin pore formation on the target cell, implying that force potentiates cytotoxicity by enhancing perforin activity. Consistent with this interpretation, we found that increasing target cell tension augmented pore formation by perforin and killing by CTLs. Our data also indicate that CTLs coordinate perforin release and force exertion in space and time. These results reveal an unappreciated physical dimension to lymphocyte function and demonstrate that cells use mechanical forces to control the activity of outgoing chemical signals.

  4. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of heat killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) on various human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Menaga; In, Lionel L A; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2016-01-28

    Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) is a non-pathogenic mycobacterium, which has been tested on several cancer types like lung and bladder where tumour regression and complete recovery was observed. In discovering the potential cytotoxic elements, a preliminary test was carried out using four different fractions consisting of live bacteria, culture supernatant, heat killed bacteria and heat killed culture supernatant of MIP against two human cancer cells A549 and CaSki by 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was investigated in MCF-7 and ORL-115 cancer cells by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation assays. Among four MIP fractions, only heat killed MIP fraction (HKB) showed significant cytotoxicity in various cancer cells with inhibitory concentration, IC50 in the range 5.6-35.0 μl/(1.0 × 10(6) MIP cells/ml), while cytotoxicity effects were not observed in the remaining fractions. HKB did not show cytotoxic effects on non-cancerous cells contrary to cancerous cells, suggesting its safe usage and ability to differentially recognize between these cells. Evaluation on PARP assay further suggested that cytotoxicity in cancer cells were potentially induced via caspase-mediated apoptosis. The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of MIP HKB have indicated that this fraction can be a good candidate to further identify effective anti-cancer agents.

  5. T helper-1 lymphocytes induce dendritic cell tumor killing activity by an interferon-γ-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    LaCasse, Collin J.; Janikashvili, Nona; Larmonier, Claire B.; Alizadeh, Darya; Hanke, Neale; Kartchner, Jessica; Situ, Elaine; Centuori, Sara; Har-Noy, Michael; Bonnotte, Bernard; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) encompass a heterogeneous population of cells capable of orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses. The ability of DCs to act as professional antigen presenting cells has been the foundation for the development and utilization of these cells as vaccines in cancer immunotherapy. DCs are also endowed with the non-conventional property of directly killing tumor cells. The current study investigates the regulation of murine DC cytotoxic function by T lymphocytes. We provide evidence that CD4+ Th-1, but not Th-2, Th-17 cells or Treg are capable of inducing DC cytotoxic function. IFN-γ was identified as the major factor responsible for Th-1-induced DC tumoricidal activity. Tumor cell killing mediated by Th-1-activated killer DCs (Th-1 KDCs) was dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production. Importantly, Th-1 KDCs were capable of presenting the acquired antigens from the killed tumor cells to T lymphocytes in vitro or in vivo. These observations open new possibilities for the application of KDCs in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22075702

  6. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of heat killed Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) on various human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Menaga; In, Lionel L A; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP) is a non-pathogenic mycobacterium, which has been tested on several cancer types like lung and bladder where tumour regression and complete recovery was observed. In discovering the potential cytotoxic elements, a preliminary test was carried out using four different fractions consisting of live bacteria, culture supernatant, heat killed bacteria and heat killed culture supernatant of MIP against two human cancer cells A549 and CaSki by 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was investigated in MCF-7 and ORL-115 cancer cells by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA fragmentation assays. Among four MIP fractions, only heat killed MIP fraction (HKB) showed significant cytotoxicity in various cancer cells with inhibitory concentration, IC50 in the range 5.6–35.0 μl/(1.0 × 106 MIP cells/ml), while cytotoxicity effects were not observed in the remaining fractions. HKB did not show cytotoxic effects on non-cancerous cells contrary to cancerous cells, suggesting its safe usage and ability to differentially recognize between these cells. Evaluation on PARP assay further suggested that cytotoxicity in cancer cells were potentially induced via caspase-mediated apoptosis. The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of MIP HKB have indicated that this fraction can be a good candidate to further identify effective anti-cancer agents. PMID:26817684

  7. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  8. Tryptophan biosynthesis protects mycobacteria from CD4 T cell-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanjia J.; Reddy, Manchi C.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Rothchild, Alissa C.; Dartois, Veronique; Schuster, Brian M.; Trauner, Andrej; Wallis, Deeann; Galaviz, Stacy; Huttenhower, Curtis; Sacchettini, James C.; Behar, Samuel M.; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacteria that cause disease rely on their ability to counteract and overcome host defenses. Here we present a genome-scale study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that uncovers the bacterial determinants of surviving host immunity, sets of genes we term “counteractomes.” Through this, we find that CD4 T cells attempt to starve Mtb of tryptophan through a mechanism that limits Chlamydia and Leishmania infections. In those cases, tryptophan starvation works well, since those pathogens are natural tryptophan auxotrophs. Mtb, however, can synthesize tryptophan, and thus starvation fails as an Mtb-killing mechanism. We then describe a small molecule inhibitor of Mtb tryptophan synthesis, which turns Mtb into a tryptophan auxotroph and restores the efficacy of a failed host defense. Together, our findings demonstrate that the Mtb determinants for surviving host immunity—Mtb’s immune counteractomes—serve as probes of host immunity, uncovering immune-mediated stresses that can be leveraged for therapeutic discovery. PMID:24315099

  9. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Deborah; Zhang, Fengqiu; Guirnalda, Patrick; Haynes, Carole; Bockstal, Viki; Radwanska, Magdalena; Magez, Stefan; Black, Samuel J

    2016-07-01

    After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/-) retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i) B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/-) and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/-) C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii) administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136) but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144) prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii) splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv) purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v) adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi) degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei infected mice

  10. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Deborah; Guirnalda, Patrick; Haynes, Carole; Bockstal, Viki; Magez, Stefan; Black, Samuel J.

    2016-01-01

    After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/-) retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i) B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/-) and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/-) C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii) administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136) but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144) prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii) splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv) purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v) adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi) degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei infected mice

  11. Trypanosoma brucei Co-opts NK Cells to Kill Splenic B2 B Cells.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Deborah; Zhang, Fengqiu; Guirnalda, Patrick; Haynes, Carole; Bockstal, Viki; Radwanska, Magdalena; Magez, Stefan; Black, Samuel J

    2016-07-01

    After infection with T. brucei AnTat 1.1, C57BL/6 mice lost splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed poor parasite-specific antibody responses, lost weight, became anemic and died with fulminating parasitemia within 35 days. In contrast, infected C57BL/6 mice lacking the cytotoxic granule pore-forming protein perforin (Prf1-/-) retained splenic B2 B cells and lymphoid follicles, developed high-titer antibody responses against many trypanosome polypeptides, rapidly suppressed parasitemia and did not develop anemia or lose weight for at least 60 days. Several lines of evidence show that T. brucei infection-induced splenic B cell depletion results from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity: i) B2 B cells were depleted from the spleens of infected intact, T cell deficient (TCR-/-) and FcγRIIIa deficient (CD16-/-) C57BL/6 mice excluding a requirement for T cells, NKT cell, or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; ii) administration of NK1.1 specific IgG2a (mAb PK136) but not irrelevant IgG2a (myeloma M9144) prevented infection-induced B cell depletion consistent with a requirement for NK cells; iii) splenic NK cells but not T cells or NKT cells degranulated in infected C57BL/6 mice co-incident with B cell depletion evidenced by increased surface expression of CD107a; iv) purified NK cells from naïve C57BL/6 mice killed purified splenic B cells from T. brucei infected but not uninfected mice in vitro indicating acquisition of an NK cell activating phenotype by the post-infection B cells; v) adoptively transferred C57BL/6 NK cells prevented infection-induced B cell population growth in infected Prf1-/- mice consistent with in vivo B cell killing; vi) degranulated NK cells in infected mice had altered gene and differentiation antigen expression and lost cytotoxic activity consistent with functional exhaustion, but increased in number as infection progressed indicating continued generation. We conclude that NK cells in T. brucei infected mice

  12. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence. PMID:26039751

  13. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  14. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-07-28

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy.

  15. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  16. Efficient Killing of High Risk Neuroblastoma Using Natural Killer Cells Activated by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cordeau, Martine; Belounis, Assila; Lelaidier, Martin; Cordeiro, Paulo; Sartelet, Hervé; Duval, Michel

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma (NB) remains a major therapeutic challenge despite the recent advent of disialoganglioside (GD2)-antibody treatment combined with interleukin (IL)-2 and granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Indeed, more than one third of the patients still die from this disease. Here, we developed a novel approach to improve the current anti-GD2 immunotherapy based on NK cell stimulation using toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). We demonstrated that this strategy led to the efficient killing of NB cells. When the expression of GD2 was heterogeneous on NB cells, the combination of pDC-mediated NK-cell activation and anti-GD2 treatment significantly increased the cytotoxicity of NK cells against NB cells. Activation by pDCs led to a unique NK-cell phenotype characterized by increased surface expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), with increased expression of CD69 on CD56dim cytotoxic cells, and strong interferon-γ production. Additionally, NB-cell killing was mediated by the TRAIL death-receptor pathway, as well as by the release of cytolytic granules via the DNAX accessory molecule 1 pathway. NK-cell activation and lytic activity against NB was independent of cell contact, depended upon type I IFN produced by TLR-9-activated pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α stimulation alone. Collectively, these results highlighted the therapeutic potential of activated pDCs for patients with high-risk NB. PMID:27716850

  17. Chemical Induction of Unfolded Protein Response Enhances Cancer Cell Killing through Lytic Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vibhu; Suomalainen, Maarit; Pennauer, Mirjam; Yakimovich, Artur; Andriasyan, Vardan; Hemmi, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer cells are susceptible to oncolytic viruses, albeit variably. Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are widely used oncolytic agents that have been engineered to produce progeny within the tumor and elicit bystander effects. We searched for host factors enhancing bystander effects and conducted a targeted RNA interference screen against guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) of small GTPases. We show that the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is readily inducible in aggressive tumor cells, enhances melanoma or epithelial cancer cell killing upon HAdV infection. UPR was triggered by knockdown of Golgi-specific brefeldin A-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (GBF-1) or the GBF-1 inhibitor golgicide A (GCA) and stimulated HAdV infection. GBF-1 is a GEF for ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi apparatus and intra-Golgi apparatus membrane transport. Cells treated with GCA enhanced HAdV-induced cytopathic effects in epithelial and melanoma cancer cells but not normal cells, if the drug was applied several hours prior to HAdV inoculation. This was shown by real-time label-free impedance measurements using the xCELLigence system. GCA-treated cells contained fewer incoming HAdVs than control cells, but GCA treatment boosted HAdV titers and spreading in cancer cells. GCA enhanced viral gene expression or transgene expression from the cytomegalovirus promoter of B- or C-species HAdVs but did not enhance viral early region 1A (E1A) expression in uninfected cell lines or cells transfected with plasmid reporter DNA. The UPR-enhanced cell killing required the nuclease activity of the UPR sensor inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1) and X box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), which alleviate ER stress. The collective results show that chemical UPR induction and viruses boost tumor cell killing by enhancing oncolytic viral efficacy. IMPORTANCE Cancer is difficult to combat. A wide range of oncolytic viruses show promise for

  18. Irradiation Can Selectively Kill Tumor Cells while Preserving Erythrocyte Viability in a Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun-Qing; Tang, Li-Hui; Wang, Yin; Wang, Lie-Ju; Zhang, Feng-Jiang; Yan, Min

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of how to safely apply intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) in cancer surgery has not yet been obtained. Here, we investigated the optimal dose of 137Cs gamma-ray irradiation for killing human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2), gastrocarcinoma (SGC7901), and colonic carcinoma (SW620) tumor cells while preserving co-cultured erythrocytes obtained from 14 healthy adult volunteers. HepG2, SGC7901, or SW620 cells were mixed into the aliquots of erythrocytes. After the mixed cells were treated with 137Cs gamma-ray irradiation (30, 50, and 100 Gy), tumor cells and erythrocytes were separated by density gradient centrifugation in Percoll with a density of 1.063 g/ml. The viability, clonogenicity, DNA synthesis, tumorigenicity, and apoptosis of the tumor cells were determined by MTT assay, plate colony formation, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation, subcutaneous xenograft implantation into immunocompromised mice, and annexin V/7-AAD staining, respectively. The ATP concentration, 2,3-DPG level, free Hb concentration, osmotic fragility, membrane phosphatidylserine externalization, blood gas variables, reactive oxygen species levels, and superoxide dismutase levels in erythrocytes were analyzed. We found that 137Cs gamma-ray irradiation at 50 Gy effectively inhibited the viability, proliferation, and tumorigenicity of HepG2, SGC7901, and SW620 cells without markedly damaging the oxygen-carrying ability or membrane integrity or increasing the oxidative stress of erythrocytes in vitro. These results demonstrated that 50 Gy irradiation in a standard 137Cs blood irradiator might be a safe and effective method of inactivating HepG2, SGC7901, and SW620 cells mixed with erythrocytes, which might help to safely allow IBS in cancer surgery. PMID:26018651

  19. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  20. Irradiation Can Selectively Kill Tumor Cells while Preserving Erythrocyte Viability in a Co-Culture System.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ming; Yang, Jin-Ting; Liu, Yun-Qing; Tang, Li-Hui; Wang, Yin; Wang, Lie-Ju; Zhang, Feng-Jiang; Yan, Min

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of how to safely apply intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) in cancer surgery has not yet been obtained. Here, we investigated the optimal dose of 137Cs gamma-ray irradiation for killing human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2), gastrocarcinoma (SGC7901), and colonic carcinoma (SW620) tumor cells while preserving co-cultured erythrocytes obtained from 14 healthy adult volunteers. HepG2, SGC7901, or SW620 cells were mixed into the aliquots of erythrocytes. After the mixed cells were treated with 137Cs gamma-ray irradiation (30, 50, and 100 Gy), tumor cells and erythrocytes were separated by density gradient centrifugation in Percoll with a density of 1.063 g/ml. The viability, clonogenicity, DNA synthesis, tumorigenicity, and apoptosis of the tumor cells were determined by MTT assay, plate colony formation, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation, subcutaneous xenograft implantation into immunocompromised mice, and annexin V/7-AAD staining, respectively. The ATP concentration, 2,3-DPG level, free Hb concentration, osmotic fragility, membrane phosphatidylserine externalization, blood gas variables, reactive oxygen species levels, and superoxide dismutase levels in erythrocytes were analyzed. We found that 137Cs gamma-ray irradiation at 50 Gy effectively inhibited the viability, proliferation, and tumorigenicity of HepG2, SGC7901, and SW620 cells without markedly damaging the oxygen-carrying ability or membrane integrity or increasing the oxidative stress of erythrocytes in vitro. These results demonstrated that 50 Gy irradiation in a standard 137Cs blood irradiator might be a safe and effective method of inactivating HepG2, SGC7901, and SW620 cells mixed with erythrocytes, which might help to safely allow IBS in cancer surgery. PMID:26018651

  1. Effects of reactive nitrogen scavengers on NK-cell-mediated killing of K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yili; Huang, Qinmiao; Zheng, Meizhu; Guo, Jianxin; Pan, Jingxin

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the effects of reactive nitrogen metabolites (RNMS) on natural-killer- (NK-) cell-mediated killing of K562 cells and the influence of RNM scavengers, such as tiopronin (TIP), glutamylcysteinylglycine (GSH), and histamine dihydrochloride (DHT), on reversing the suppressing effect of RNM. We administered exogenous and endogenous RNM in the NK + K562 culture system and then added RNM scavengers. The concentrations of RNM, TNF-β and IFN-γ, and NK-cell cytotoxicity (NCC) and the percentage of living NK cells were then examined. We found that both exogenous and endogenous RNM caused the KIR to decrease (P < 0.01); however, RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH rescued this phenomenon dose dependently. In conclusion, our data suggests that RNM scavengers such as TIP and GSH enhance the antineoplasmic activity of NK cells.

  2. HAMLET kills tumor cells by apoptosis: structure, cellular mechanisms, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Pettersson, Jenny; Fischer, Walter; Aronsson, Annika; Svanborg, Catharina

    2005-05-01

    New cancer treatments should aim to destroy tumor cells without disturbing normal tissue. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) offers a new molecular approach to solving this problem, because it induces apoptosis in tumor cells but leaves normal differentiated cells unaffected. After partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid, alpha-lactalbumin forms the HAMLET complex, which enters tumor cells and freezes their metabolic machinery. The cells proceed to fragment their DNA, and they disintegrate with apoptosis-like characteristics. HAMLET kills a wide range of malignant cells in vitro and maintains this activity in vivo in patients with skin papillomas. In addition, HAMLET has striking effects on human glioblastomas in a rat xenograft model. After convection-enhanced delivery, HAMLET diffuses throughout the brain, selectively killing tumor cells and controlling tumor progression without apparent tissue toxicity. HAMLET thus shows great promise as a new therapeutic with the advantage of selectivity for tumor cells and lack of toxicity.

  3. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R; Zhang, Xiaolong; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-09-23

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers and the bottom one functionalized with double-stranded DNA. The results show that the top hydrogel layer was able to catch target cells with high efficiency and specificity, and that the bottom hydrogel layer could sequester doxorubicin (Dox) for sustained drug release. Importantly, the released Dox could kill 90% of the cells after 1-h residence of the cells on the hydrogel. After the cell release, this bifunctional hydrogel could be regenerated for continuous cell catching and killing. Therefore, the data presented in this study has successfully demonstrated the potential of developing a material system with the functions of attracting, catching and killing diseased cells (e.g., circulating tumor cells) or even invading microorganisms (e.g., bacteria).

  4. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R.; Zhang, Xiaolong; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers and the bottom one functionalized with double-stranded DNA. The results show that the top hydrogel layer was able to catch target cells with high efficiency and specificity, and that the bottom hydrogel layer could sequester doxorubicin (Dox) for sustained drug release. Importantly, the released Dox could kill 90% of the cells after 1-h residence of the cells on the hydrogel. After the cell release, this bifunctional hydrogel could be regenerated for continuous cell catching and killing. Therefore, the data presented in this study has successfully demonstrated the potential of developing a material system with the functions of attracting, catching and killing diseased cells (e.g., circulating tumor cells) or even invading microorganisms (e.g., bacteria). PMID:26396063

  5. A Drosera-bioinspired hydrogel for catching and killing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R; Zhang, Xiaolong; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A variety of bioinspired materials have been successfully synthesized to mimic the sophisticated structures or functions of biological systems. However, it is still challenging to develop materials with multiple functions that can be performed synergistically or sequentially. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate a novel bioinspired hydrogel that can interact with cancer cells, functionally similar to Drosera in catching and killing prey. This hydrogel had two layers with the top one functionalized with oligonucleotide aptamers and the bottom one functionalized with double-stranded DNA. The results show that the top hydrogel layer was able to catch target cells with high efficiency and specificity, and that the bottom hydrogel layer could sequester doxorubicin (Dox) for sustained drug release. Importantly, the released Dox could kill 90% of the cells after 1-h residence of the cells on the hydrogel. After the cell release, this bifunctional hydrogel could be regenerated for continuous cell catching and killing. Therefore, the data presented in this study has successfully demonstrated the potential of developing a material system with the functions of attracting, catching and killing diseased cells (e.g., circulating tumor cells) or even invading microorganisms (e.g., bacteria). PMID:26396063

  6. Killed but metabolically active Leishmania infantum as a novel whole-cell vaccine for visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Kevin W; Birnbaum, Ron; Haskell, Jacquelyn; Vanchinathan, Veena; Greger, Stephanie; Narayan, Rupa; Chang, Pei-Lin; Tran, Thu Anh; Hickerson, Suzanne M; Beverley, Stephen M; Wilson, Mary E; Craft, Noah

    2012-04-01

    There are currently no effective vaccines for visceral leishmaniasis, the second most deadly parasitic infection in the world. Here, we describe a novel whole-cell vaccine approach using Leishmania infantum chagasi promastigotes treated with the psoralen compound amotosalen (S-59) and low doses of UV A radiation. This treatment generates permanent, covalent DNA cross-links within parasites and results in Leishmania organisms termed killed but metabolically active (KBMA). In this report, we characterize the in vitro growth characteristics of both KBMA L. major and KBMA L. infantum chagasi. Concentrations of S-59 that generate optimally attenuated parasites were identified. Like live L. infantum chagasi, KBMA L. infantum chagasi parasites were able to initially enter liver cells in vivo after intravenous infection. However, whereas live L. infantum chagasi infection leads to hepatosplenomegaly in mice after 6 months, KBMA L. infantum chagasi parasites were undetectable in the organs of mice at this time point. In vitro, KBMA L. infantum chagasi retained the ability to enter macrophages and induce nitric oxide production. These characteristics of KBMA L. infantum chagasi correlated with the ability to prophylactically protect mice via subcutaneous vaccination at levels similar to vaccination with live, virulent organisms. Splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either live L. infantum chagasi or KBMA L. infantum chagasi displayed similar cytokine patterns in vitro. These results suggest that KBMA technology is a potentially safe and effective novel vaccine strategy against the intracellular protozoan L. infantum chagasi. This approach may represent a new method for whole-cell vaccination against other complex intracellular pathogens.

  7. Controlled cell killing by a recombinant nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Parks, Griffith D; Young, Virginia A; Koumenis, Constantinos; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Layer, Jennifer L; Cooke, Kelly M

    2002-02-01

    In most tissue culture cell lines tested, infection with the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) results in very little cell death. To determine if SV5 could be used as a vector for controlled killing of tumor cells, a recombinant SV5 (rSV5-TK) was constructed to encode the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene. MDBK cells infected with rSV5-TK showed a time-dependent loss of viability when infected cells were cultured in the presence of the prodrug acyclovir (ACV) or ganciclovir (GCV) while no significant toxicity was observed in the absence of prodrug. Cells infected with a control rSV5 expressing GFP and cultured with prodrug showed only a slight reduction in growth rate and little cell death. Time-lapse video microscopy of rSV5-TK-infected MDBK cells that were cultured in the presence of ACV showed an accumulation of cells with morphological effects characteristic of apoptotic cell death. An MDBK cell line persistently infected with rSV5-TK retained long-term expression of TK and sensitivity to prodrug-mediated cell killing that were comparable to those found in an acute infection. Titration experiments showed that the rSV5-TK plus GCV combination resulted in cell death for all mouse and human cell lines tested, although the kinetics and efficiency of cell death varied between cell types. Our results demonstrating controlled cell killing by a recombinant paramyxovirus support the use of negative-strand RNA viruses as therapeutic vectors for targeted killing of cancer cells.

  8. Anti-β₂M monoclonal antibodies kill myeloma cells via cell- and complement-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Qian, Jianfei; Lan, Yongsheng; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Yi, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies showed that anti-β2M monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) at high doses have direct apoptotic effects on myeloma cells, suggesting that anti-β2M mAbs might be developed as a novel therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigated the ability of the mAbs at much lower concentrations to indirectly kill myeloma cells by utilizing immune effector cells or molecules. Our results showed that anti-β2M mAbs effectively lysed MM cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), which were correlated with and dependent on the surface expression of β2M on MM cells. The presence of MM bone marrow stromal cells or addition of IL-6 did not attenuate anti-β2M mAb-induced ADCC and CDC activities against MM cells. Furthermore, anti-β2M mAbs only showed limited cytotoxicity toward normal B cells and nontumorous mesenchymal stem cells, indicating that the ADCC and CDC activities of the anti-β2M mAbs were more prone to the tumor cells. Lenalidomide potentiated in vitro ADCC activity against MM cells and in vivo tumor inhibition capacity induced by the anti-β2M mAbs by enhancing the activity of NK cells. These results support clinical development of anti-β2M mAbs, both as a monotherapy and in combination with lenalidomide, to improve MM patient outcome.

  9. Effective killing of Gleevec-resistant CML cells with T315I mutation by a natural compound PEITC through redox-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Trachootham, D; Lu, W; Carew, J; Giles, FJ; Keating, MJ; Arlinghaus, RB; Huang, P

    2008-01-01

    Mutation of Bcr-Abl is an important mechanism by which chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells become resistant to Gleevec. The T315I mutation is clinically significant since CML cells harboring this mutation are insensitive to Gleevec and other Bcr-Abl-targeted drugs. Identification of new agents capable of effectively killing CML cells with T315I mutation would have important therapeutic implications in Gleevec-resistant CML. Here, we showed that β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in vegetables, is effective in killing CML cells expressing T315I BCR-ABL. Treatment of leukemia cell lines harboring wild-type or mutant Bcr-Abl with 10 μm PEITC resulted in an elevated ROS stress and a redox-mediated degradation of the BCR-ABL protein, leading to massive death of the leukemia cells. Antioxidant NAC attenuated the PEITC-induced oxidative stress in CML cells and prevented the degradation of BCR-ABL, caspase-3 activation and cell death. We further showed that the ROS-induced degradation of BCR-ABL was mediated partially by caspase-3 and the proteasome pathway. The ability of PEITC to effectively kill T315I-positive CML cells was further confirmed using primary leukemia cells isolated from CML patients. Our results suggest that PEITC is a promising compound capable of killing Gleevec-resistant CML cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism and warrants further investigations. PMID:18385754

  10. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins.

  11. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  12. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  13. Too Much Protein May Kill Brain Cells As Parkinson's Progresses

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS (NS038377, NS072187), the JPB Foundation, the Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund (2007-MSCRFI-0420-00, 2009-MSCRFII-0125- ... 2013-MSCRFII-0105-00), and the New York Stem Cell Foundation. For more information ... leading funder of research on the brain and nervous system. The mission ...

  14. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26970825

  15. In Vivo Killing Capacity of Cytotoxic T Cells Is Limited and Involves Dynamic Interactions and T Cell Cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten Anja; Stahl, Felix Rolf; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Zheng, Xiang; Galla, Melanie; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heller, Katrin; Boelter, Jasmin; Wagner, Karen; Bischoff, Yvonne; Martens, Rieke; Braun, Asolina; Werth, Kathrin; Uvarovskii, Alexey; Kempf, Harald; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Arens, Ramon; Kremer, Melanie; Sutter, Gerd; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2016-02-16

    According to in vitro assays, T cells are thought to kill rapidly and efficiently, but the efficacy and dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus-infected cells in vivo remains elusive. We used two-photon microscopy to quantify CTL-mediated killing in mice infected with herpesviruses or poxviruses. On average, one CTL killed 2-16 virus-infected cells per day as determined by real-time imaging and by mathematical modeling. In contrast, upon virus-induced MHC class I downmodulation, CTLs failed to destroy their targets. During killing, CTLs remained migratory and formed motile kinapses rather than static synapses with targets. Viruses encoding the calcium sensor GCaMP6s revealed strong heterogeneity in individual CTL functional capacity. Furthermore, the probability of death of infected cells increased for those contacted by more than two CTLs, indicative of CTL cooperation. Thus, direct visualization of CTLs during killing of virus-infected cells reveals crucial parameters of CD8(+) T cell immunity. PMID:26872694

  16. In Vivo Killing Capacity of Cytotoxic T Cells Is Limited and Involves Dynamic Interactions and T Cell Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten Anja; Stahl, Felix Rolf; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Zheng, Xiang; Galla, Melanie; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heller, Katrin; Boelter, Jasmin; Wagner, Karen; Bischoff, Yvonne; Martens, Rieke; Braun, Asolina; Werth, Kathrin; Uvarovskii, Alexey; Kempf, Harald; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Arens, Ramon; Kremer, Melanie; Sutter, Gerd; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    Summary According to in vitro assays, T cells are thought to kill rapidly and efficiently, but the efficacy and dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus-infected cells in vivo remains elusive. We used two-photon microscopy to quantify CTL-mediated killing in mice infected with herpesviruses or poxviruses. On average, one CTL killed 2–16 virus-infected cells per day as determined by real-time imaging and by mathematical modeling. In contrast, upon virus-induced MHC class I downmodulation, CTLs failed to destroy their targets. During killing, CTLs remained migratory and formed motile kinapses rather than static synapses with targets. Viruses encoding the calcium sensor GCaMP6s revealed strong heterogeneity in individual CTL functional capacity. Furthermore, the probability of death of infected cells increased for those contacted by more than two CTLs, indicative of CTL cooperation. Thus, direct visualization of CTLs during killing of virus-infected cells reveals crucial parameters of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:26872694

  17. Endocytosis of Cytotoxic Granules Is Essential for Multiple Killing of Target Cells by T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Fang; Bzeih, Hawraa; Schirra, Claudia; Chitirala, Praneeth; Halimani, Mahantappa; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Krause, Elmar; Rettig, Jens; Pattu, Varsha

    2016-09-15

    CTLs are serial killers that kill multiple target cells via exocytosis of cytotoxic granules (CGs). CG exocytosis is tightly regulated and has been investigated in great detail; however, whether CG proteins are endocytosed following exocytosis and contribute to serial killing remains unknown. By using primary CTLs derived from a knock-in mouse of the CG membrane protein Synaptobrevin2, we show that CGs are endocytosed in a clathrin- and dynamin-dependent manner. Following acidification, endocytosed CGs are recycled through early and late, but not recycling endosomes. CGs are refilled with granzyme B at the late endosome stage and polarize to subsequent synapses formed between the CTL and new target cells. Importantly, inhibiting CG endocytosis in CTLs results in a significant reduction of their cytotoxic activity. Thus, our data demonstrate that continuous endocytosis of CG membrane proteins is a prerequisite for efficient serial killing of CTLs and identify key events in this process.

  18. Combatting bacterial infections by killing persister cells with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Brian W; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    Persister cells are a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation of bacteria that contribute to chronic and recalcitrant clinical infections such as cystic fibrosis and tuberculosis. Persisters are metabolically dormant, so they are highly tolerant to all traditional antibiotics which are mainly effective against actively growing cells. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug mitomycin C (MMC) eradicates persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. MMC is passively transported and bioreductively activated, leading to spontaneous cross-linking of DNA, which we verify in both active and dormant cells. We find MMC effectively eradicates cells grown in numerous different growth states (e.g. planktonic cultures and highly robust biofilm cultures) in both rich and minimal media. Additionally, MMC is a potent bactericide for a broad range of bacterial persisters, including commensal Escherichia coli K-12 as well as pathogenic species of E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also demonstrate the efficacy of MMC in an animal model and a wound model, substantiating the clinical applicability of MMC against bacterial infections. Therefore, MMC is the first broad-spectrum compound capable of eliminating persister cells, meriting investigation as a new approach for the treatment of recalcitrant infections. PMID:25858802

  19. Combatting bacterial infections by killing persister cells with mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Brian W; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    Persister cells are a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation of bacteria that contribute to chronic and recalcitrant clinical infections such as cystic fibrosis and tuberculosis. Persisters are metabolically dormant, so they are highly tolerant to all traditional antibiotics which are mainly effective against actively growing cells. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug mitomycin C (MMC) eradicates persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. MMC is passively transported and bioreductively activated, leading to spontaneous cross-linking of DNA, which we verify in both active and dormant cells. We find MMC effectively eradicates cells grown in numerous different growth states (e.g. planktonic cultures and highly robust biofilm cultures) in both rich and minimal media. Additionally, MMC is a potent bactericide for a broad range of bacterial persisters, including commensal Escherichia coli K-12 as well as pathogenic species of E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also demonstrate the efficacy of MMC in an animal model and a wound model, substantiating the clinical applicability of MMC against bacterial infections. Therefore, MMC is the first broad-spectrum compound capable of eliminating persister cells, meriting investigation as a new approach for the treatment of recalcitrant infections.

  20. Killing of human tumor cells in culture with adriamycin conjugates of human transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, C.J.; Faulk, W.P.

    1984-07-01

    Receptors for human transferrin (Trf) in high density are found on reticulocytes and syncytiotrophoblast, but most unstimulated, normal adult cells do not bind Trf. In contrast, leukemia and breast adenocarcinoma cells have been shown to manifest Trf receptors, raising the possibility that these receptors might be employed to bind cytotoxic Trf conjugates. Trf was conjugated with adriamycin (Adr) and it was shown that the conjugates are bound by Trf receptors on plasma membranes of Daudi and HL-60 cells, following which Adr is identified in the nuclei of these cells. The biological effect of Adr is quantitated by the inhibition of tritiated thymidine uptake, and subsequent cell death is measured by trypan blue exclusion. The killing correlates directly with both the time of exposure and the amount of conjugate employed. These results suggest that such cytotoxic Trf conjugates hold promise for selective in vivo killing of some malignant cells.

  1. Residual chromatin breaks as biodosimetry for cell killing by carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Kase, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kanai, T.; Ando, K.

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the relationship between cell killing and the induction of residual chromatin breaks on various human cell lines and primary cultured cells obtained by biopsy from patients irradiated with either X-rays or heavy-ion beams to identify potential bio-marker of radiosensitivity for radiation-induced cell killing. The carbon-ion beams were accelerated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). Six primary cultures obtained by biopsy from 6 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were irradiated with two different mono-LET beams (LET = 13 keV/μm, 76 keV/μm) and 200kV X rays. Residual chromatin breaks were measured by counting the number of non-rejoining chromatin fragments detected by the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique after a 24 hour post-irradiation incubation period. The induction rate of residual chromatin breaks per cell per Gy was the highest for 76 keV/μm beams on all of the cells. Our results indicated that cell which was more sensitive to the cell killing was similarly more susceptible to induction of residual chromatin breaks. Furthermore there is a good correlation between these two end points in various cell lines and primary cultured cells. This suggests that the detection of residual chromatin breaks by the PCC technique may be useful as a predictive assay of tumor response to cancer radiotherapy.

  2. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  3. Cell kill by megavoltage protons with high LET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, Vadim Y.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop a radiobiological model which describes the effect of linear energy transfer (LET) on cell survival and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of megavoltage protons. By assuming the existence of critical sites within a cell, analytical expression for cell survival S as a function of LET is derived. The obtained results indicate that in cases where dose per fraction is small, \\ln (S) is a linear–quadratic (LQ) function of dose while both alpha and beta radio-sensitivities are non-linearly dependent on LET. In particular, in the current model alpha increases with increasing LET while beta decreases. Conversely, in the case of large dose per fraction, the LQ dependence of \\ln (S) on dose is invalid. The proposed radiobiological model predicts cell survival probability and RBE which, in general, deviate from the results obtained by using conventional LQ formalism. The differences between the LQ model and that described in the current study are reflected in the calculated RBE of protons.

  4. Cell kill by megavoltage protons with high LET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperman, Vadim Y.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the current study is to develop a radiobiological model which describes the effect of linear energy transfer (LET) on cell survival and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of megavoltage protons. By assuming the existence of critical sites within a cell, analytical expression for cell survival S as a function of LET is derived. The obtained results indicate that in cases where dose per fraction is small, \\ln (S) is a linear-quadratic (LQ) function of dose while both alpha and beta radio-sensitivities are non-linearly dependent on LET. In particular, in the current model alpha increases with increasing LET while beta decreases. Conversely, in the case of large dose per fraction, the LQ dependence of \\ln (S) on dose is invalid. The proposed radiobiological model predicts cell survival probability and RBE which, in general, deviate from the results obtained by using conventional LQ formalism. The differences between the LQ model and that described in the current study are reflected in the calculated RBE of protons.

  5. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  6. Modeling of oxygen transport and cell killing in type-II photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chunmei; Lu, Jun Q; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) provides an effective option for treatment of tumors and other diseases in superficial tissues and attracts attention for in vitro study with cells. In this study, we present a significantly improved model of in vitro cell killing through Type-II PDT for simulation of the molecular interactions and cell killing in time domain in the presence of oxygen transport within a spherical cell. The self-consistency of the approach is examined by determination of conditions for obtaining positive definitive solutions of molecular concentrations. Decay constants of photosensitizers and unoxidized receptors are extracted as the key indices of molecular kinetics with different oxygen diffusion constants and permeability at the cell membrane. By coupling the molecular kinetics to cell killing, we develop a modeling method of PDT cytotoxicity caused by singlet oxygen and obtain the cell survival ratio as a function of light fluence or initial photosensitizer concentration with different photon density or irradiance of incident light and other parameters of oxygen transport. The results show that the present model of Type-II PDT yields a powerful tool to quantitate various events underlying PDT at the molecular and cellular levels and to interpret experimental results of in vitro cell studies.

  7. Cardiomyocytes display low mitochondrial priming and are highly resistant toward cytotoxic T‐cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiang; Halle, Stephan; Yu, Kai; Mishra, Pooja; Scherr, Michaela; Pietzsch, Stefan; Willenzon, Stefanie; Janssen, Anika; Boelter, Jasmin; Hilfiker‐Kleiner, Denise; Eder, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Following heart transplantation, alloimmune responses can cause graft rejection by damaging donor vascular and parenchymal cells. However, it remains unclear whether cardiomyocytes are also directly killed by immune cells. Here, we used two‐photon microscopy to investigate how graft‐specific effector CD8+ T cells interact with cardiomyocytes in a mouse heart transplantation model. Surprisingly, we observed that CD8+ T cells are completely impaired in killing cardiomyocytes. Even after virus‐mediated preactivation, antigen‐specific CD8+ T cells largely fail to lyse these cells although both cell types engage in dynamic interactions. Furthermore, we established a two‐photon microscopy‐based assay using intact myocardium to determine the susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis. This feature, also known as mitochondrial priming reveals an unexpected weak predisposition of cardiomyocytes to undergo apoptosis in situ. These observations together with the early exhaustion phenotype of graft‐infiltrating specific T cells provide an explanation why cardiomyocytes are largely protected from direct CD8+ T‐cell‐mediated killing. PMID:26970349

  8. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O.; Coughlin, Jason J.; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E.; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P.; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R.; Befus, A. Dean; Bleackley, R. Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24 h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1 ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 {mu}g/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo.

  9. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7) is essential for target cell killing in a natural killer cell line.

    PubMed

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Coughlin, Jason J; Garofoli, Daniella; Ewen, Catherine; Davidson, Courtney E; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Kane, Kevin P; Lacy, Paige; Logan, Michael R; Befus, A Dean; Bleackley, R Chris; Moqbel, Redwan

    2008-02-15

    Natural killer cells recognize and induce apoptosis in foreign, transformed or virus-infected cells through the release of perforin and granzymes from secretory lysosomes. Clinically, NK-cell mediated killing is a major limitation to successful allo- and xenotransplantation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the fusion of granzyme B-containing secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane in activated NK cells, prior to target cell killing, are not fully understood. Using the NK cell line YT-Indy as a model, we have investigated the expression of SNAP REceptors (SNAREs), both target (t-) and vesicular (v-) SNAREs, and their function in granzyme B-mediated target cell killing. Our data showed that YT-Indy cells express VAMP-7 and SNAP-23, but not VAMP-2. VAMP-7 was associated with granzyme B-containing lysosomal granules. Using VAMP-7 small interfering RNA (siRNA), we successfully knocked down the expression of VAMP-7 protein in YT-Indy to less than 10% of untreated cells in 24h. VAMP7-deficient YT-Indy cells activated via co-culture with Jurkat cells released <1ng/mL of granzyme B, compared to 1.5-2.5 microg/mL from controls. Using Jurkat cells as targets, we showed a 7-fold reduction in NK cell-mediated killing by VAMP-7 deficient YT-Indy cells. Our results show that VAMP-7 is a crucial component of granzyme B release and target cell killing in the NK cell line YT-Indy. Thus, targeting VAMP-7 expression specifically with siRNA, following transplantation, may be a viable strategy for preventing NK cell-mediated transplant rejection, in vivo.

  10. Engineered Protease-resistant Antibodies with Selectable Cell-killing Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R.; Grugan, Katharine D.; Soring, Keri L.; Heeringa, Katharine A.; McCarthy, Stephen G.; Bannish, Gregory; Perpetua, Meredith; Lynch, Frank; Jordan, Robert E.; Strohl, William R.; Brezski, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly engineered antibodies with fit-for-purpose properties will differentiate next generation antibody therapeutics from traditional IgG1 scaffolds. One requirement for engineering the most appropriate properties for a particular therapeutic area is an understanding of the intricacies of the target microenvironment in which the antibody is expected to function. Our group and others have demonstrated that proteases secreted by invasive tumors and pathological microorganisms are capable of cleaving human IgG1, the most commonly adopted isotype among monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Specific cleavage in the lower hinge of IgG1 results in a loss of Fc-mediated cell-killing functions without a concomitant loss of antigen binding capability or circulating antibody half-life. Proteolytic cleavage in the hinge region by tumor-associated or microbial proteases is postulated as a means of evading host immune responses, and antibodies engineered with potent cell-killing functions that are also resistant to hinge proteolysis are of interest. Mutation of the lower hinge region of an IgG1 resulted in protease resistance but also resulted in a profound loss of Fc-mediated cell-killing functions. In the present study, we demonstrate that specific mutations of the CH2 domain in conjunction with lower hinge mutations can restore and sometimes enhance cell-killing functions while still retaining protease resistance. By identifying mutations that can restore either complement- or Fcγ receptor-mediated functions on a protease-resistant scaffold, we were able to generate a novel protease-resistant platform with selective cell-killing functionality. PMID:23986451

  11. Candida albicans Is Phagocytosed, Killed, and Processed for Antigen Presentation by Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Simon L.; Holly, Angela

    2001-01-01

    Candida albicans is a component of the normal flora of the alimentary tract and also is found on the mucocutaneous membranes of the healthy host. Candida is the leading cause of invasive fungal disease in premature infants, diabetics, and surgical patients, and of oropharyngeal disease in AIDS patients. As the induction of cell-mediated immunity to Candida is of critical importance in host defense, we sought to determine whether human dendritic cells (DC) could phagocytose and degrade Candida and subsequently present Candida antigens to T cells. Immature DC obtained by culture of human monocytes in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 phagocytosed unopsonized Candida in a time-dependent manner, and phagocytosis was not enhanced by opsonization of Candida in serum. Like macrophages (Mφ), DC recognized Candida by the mannose-fucose receptor. Upon ingestion, DC killed Candida as efficiently as human Mφ, and fungicidal activity was not enhanced by the presence of fresh serum. Although phagocytosis of Candida by DC stimulated the production of superoxide anion, inhibitors of the respiratory burst (or NO production) did not inhibit killing of Candida, even when phagocytosis was blocked by preincubation of DC with cytochalasin D. Further, although apparently only modest phagolysosomal fusion occurred upon DC phagocytosis of Candida, killing of Candida under anaerobic conditions was almost equivalent to killing under aerobic conditions. Finally, DC stimulated Candida-specific lymphocyte proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner after phagocytosis of both viable and heat-killed Candida cells. These data suggest that, in vivo, such interactions between DC and C. albicans may facilitate the induction of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:11598054

  12. Hyperoxygenation enhances the direct tumor cell killing of photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Shakil, Abdus; Chen, Hua; Beckers, Jill; Shapiro, Howard; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or as a result of oxygen bleaching during Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) light irradiation, can significantly reduce the effectiveness of PDT induced cell killing. To overcome the effect of tumor hypoxia and improve tumor cell killing, we propose using supplemental hyperoxygenation during Photofrin PDT. Our previous study has demonstrated that, in an in vivo model, tumor control can be improved by normobaric or hyperbaric 100% oxygen supply. The mechanism for the tumor cure enhancement of the hyperoxygenation-PDT combined therapy is investigated in this study by using an in vivo/in vitro technique. A hypoxic tumor model was established by implanting mammary adenocarcinoma (MCA) in hind legs of C3H mice. Light irradiation (200 J/cm2 at either 75 or 150 mW/cm2), under various oxygen supplemental conditions (room air or carbogen or 100% normobaric or hyperbaric 100% oxygen), was delivered through an optical fiber with a microlens to animals who received 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin 24 hours prior to light irradiation. Tumors treated with PDT were harvested and grown in vitro for colony formation analysis. Treated tumors were also analyzed histologically. The results show that, when combined with hyperoxygenation, the cell killing rate immediately after a PDT treatment is significantly improved over that treated without hyperoxygenation, suggesting an enhanced direct cell killing. This study further confirms our earlier observation that when a PDT treatment is combined with hyperoxygenation, it can be more effective in controlling hypoxic tumors. H&E stain revealed that PDT induced tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. In conclusion, by using an in vivo/in vitro assay, we have shown that PDT combined with hyper-oxygenation can enhance direct cell killing and improve tumor cure.

  13. Licensed to Kill: Mitochondria, Chloroplasts, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, Olivier; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is crucial in plant organogenesis and survival. In this review the involvement of mitochondria and chloroplasts in PCD execution is critically assessed. Recent findings support a central role for mitochondria in PCD, with newly identified components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC), FOF1 ATP synthase, cardiolipins, and ATPase AtOM66. While chloroplasts received less attention, their contribution to PCD is well supported, suggesting that they possibly contribute by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of light or even contribute through cytochrome f release. Finally we discuss two working models where mitochondria and chloroplasts could cooperatively execute PCD: mitochondria initiate the commitment steps and recruit chloroplasts for swift execution or, alternatively, mitochondria and chloroplasts could operate in parallel.

  14. Visible tumor surface response to physical plasma and apoptotic cell kill in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Matthias; Seebauer, Christian; Rutkowski, Rico; Hauschild, Anna; Podmelle, Fred; Metelmann, Camilla; Metelmann, Bibiana; von Woedtke, Thomas; Hasse, Sybille; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Metelmann, Hans-Robert

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to learn, whether clinical application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is able to cause (i) visible tumor surface effects and (ii) apoptotic cell kill in squamous cell carcinoma and (iii) whether CAP-induced visible tumor surface response occurs as often as CAP-induced apoptotic cell kill. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer and infected ulcerations received locally CAP followed by palliative treatment. Four of them revealed tumor surface response appearing 2 weeks after intervention. The tumor surface response expressed as a flat area with vascular stimulation (type 1) or a contraction of tumor ulceration rims forming recesses covered with scabs, in each case surrounded by tumor tissue in visible progress (type 2). In parallel, 9 patients with the same kind of cancer received CAP before radical tumor resection. Tissue specimens were analyzed for apoptotic cells. Apoptotic cells were detectable and occurred more frequently in tissue areas previously treated with CAP than in untreated areas. Bringing together both findings and placing side by side the frequency of clinical tumor surface response and the frequency of analytically proven apoptotic cell kill, detection of apoptotic cells is as common as clinical tumor surface response. There was no patient showing signs of an enhanced or stimulated tumor growth under influence of CAP. CAP was made applicable by a plasma jet, kINPen(®) MED (neoplas tools GmbH, Greifswald, Germany). PMID:27499516

  15. Irradiated human endothelial progenitor cells induce bystander killing in human non-small cell lung and pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Turchan, William T; Shapiro, Ronald H; Sevigny, Garrett V; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Pruden, Benjamin; Mendonca, Marc S

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To investigate whether irradiated human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC) could induce bystander killing in the A549 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and help explain the improved radiation-induced tumor cures observed in A549 tumor xenografts co-injected with hEPC. Materials and methods We investigated whether co-injection of CBM3 hEPC with A549 NSCLC cells would alter tumor xenograft growth rate or tumor cure after a single dose of 0 or 5 Gy of X-rays. We then utilized dual chamber Transwell dishes, to test whether medium from irradiated CBM3 and CBM4 hEPC would induce bystander cell killing in A549 cells, and as an additional control, in human pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells. The CBM3 and CBM4 hEPC were plated into the upper Transwell chamber and the A549 or MIA PaCa-2 cells were plated in the lower Transwell chamber. The top inserts with the CBM3 or CBM4 hEPC cells were subsequently removed, irradiated, and then placed back into the Transwell dish for 3 h to allow for diffusion of any potential bystander factors from the irradiated hEPC in the upper chamber through the permeable membrane to the unirradiated cancer cells in the lower chamber. After the 3 h incubation, the cancer cells were re-plated for clonogenic survival. Results We found that co-injection of CBM3 hEPC with A549 NSCLC cells significantly increased the tumor growth rate compared to A549 cells alone, but paradoxically also increased A549 tumor cure after a single dose of 5 Gy of X-rays (p < 0.05). We hypothesized that irradiated hEPC may be inducing bystander killing in the A549 NSCLC cells in tumor xenografts, thus improving tumor cure. Bystander studies clearly showed that exposure to the medium from irradiated CBM3 and CBM4 hEPC induced significant bystander killing and decreased the surviving fraction of A549 and MIA PaCa-2 cells to 0.46 (46%) ± 0.22 and 0.74 ± 0.07 (74%) respectively (p < 0.005, p < 0.0001). In addition, antibody depletion

  16. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  17. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Peter J. Johnston; Dr. George D. Wilson

    2003-10-15

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program.

  18. Agonist antibody that induces human malignant cells to kill one another

    PubMed Central

    Yea, Kyungmoo; Zhang, Hongkai; Xie, Jia; Jones, Teresa M.; Lin, Chih-Wei; Francesconi, Walter; Berton, Fulvia; Fallahi, Mohammad; Sauer, Karsten; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    An attractive, but as yet generally unrealized, approach to cancer therapy concerns discovering agents that change the state of differentiation of the cancer cells. Recently, we discovered a phenomenon that we call “receptor pleiotropism” in which agonist antibodies against known receptors induce cell fates that are very different from those induced by the natural agonist to the same receptor. Here, we show that one can take advantage of this phenomenon to convert acute myeloblastic leukemic cells into natural killer cells. Upon induction with the antibody, these leukemic cells enter into a differentiation cascade in which as many as 80% of the starting leukemic cells can be differentiated. The antibody-induced killer cells make large amounts of perforin, IFN-γ, and granzyme B and attack and kill other members of the leukemic cell population. Importantly, induction of killer cells is confined to transformed cells, in that normal bone marrow cells are not induced to form killer cells. Thus, it seems possible to use agonist antibodies to change the differentiation state of cancer cells into those that attack and kill other members of the malignant clone from which they originate. PMID:26487683

  19. Loss of DNAM-1 ligand expression by acute myeloid leukemia cells renders them resistant to NK cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Conor J; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Darcy, Phillip K; Oliaro, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with poor natural killer (NK) cell function through aberrant expression of NK-cell-activating receptors and their ligands on tumor cells. These alterations are thought to promote formation of inhibitory NK-target cell synapses, in which killer cell degranulation is attenuated. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be effective in treating AML, through restoration of NK cell lytic activity. Similarly, agents that augment NK-cell-activating signals within the immunological synapse may provide some therapeutic benefit. However, the receptor-ligand interactions that critically dictate NK cell function in AML remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CD112/CD155 expression is required for DNAM-1-dependent killing of AML cells. Indeed, the low, or absent, expression of CD112/CD155 on multiple AML cell lines resulted in failure to stimulate optimal NK cell function. Importantly, isolated clones with low CD112/155 expression were resistant to NK cell killing while those expressing abundant levels of CD112/155 were highly susceptible. Attenuated NK cell killing in the absence of CD112/CD155 originated from decreased NK-target cell conjugation. Furthermore, we reveal by time-lapse microscopy, a significant increase in NK cell 'failed killing' in the absence of DNAM-1 ligands. Consequently, NK cells preferentially lysed ligand-expressing cells within heterogeneous populations, driving clonal selection of CD112/CD155-negative blasts upon NK cell attack. Taken together, we identify reduced CD155 expression as a major NK cell escape mechanism in AML and an opportunity for targeted immunotherapy. PMID:27622064

  20. Polysaccharide nano-vesicular multidrug carriers for synergistic killing of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod, P. S.; Shah, Ruchira; Chaphekar, Sonali; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2014-09-01

    Multi-drug delivery based on polymer nano-scaffolds is an essential protocol to be developed for better administration of anticancer drugs to enhance their therapeutic efficacies against cancer cells. Here, we report dual delivery polysaccharide nano-vesicles that are capable of loading and delivering both water soluble and water insoluble drugs together in a single polymer scaffold. The selective rupture of the nano-vesicular assembly under intracellular enzyme conditions allowed the simultaneous delivery of a hydrophobic drug camptothecin (CPT) and hydrophilic drug doxorubicin (DOX) supporting their synergistic killing of breast and colon cancer cells. The polysaccharide nano-vesicles have allowed us to address a few important questions regarding the need for multiple drug administration in cancer cells including (a) the role of simultaneous drug release, (b) antagonistic versus synergistic effects of drug combinations and (c) how these are affected by the ratio of drugs. Further, evaluation of the role of caveolae in endocytosis of these polymer scaffolds was also made. The vesicular scaffolds were found to preserve and deliver DOX resulting in 50-60% better killing of cancer cells than the free drug. Additionally, dual loaded nano-vesicles when compared to drug cocktails with individual drugs in separate nano-vesicles (at comparable molar ratios) suggest the relative drug concentration following release and mode of delivery to be both important in cancer cell killing. Results from these experiments have revealed newly developed polysaccharide nano-vesicles loaded with DOX and CPT drugs as potential candidates for improved breast cancer cell killing. Thus, these custom-designed polysaccharide nano-vesicles provide a new perspective on multi-anticancer drug delivery systems and their efficacy.Multi-drug delivery based on polymer nano-scaffolds is an essential protocol to be developed for better administration of anticancer drugs to enhance their therapeutic

  1. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 kills cancer cells through Bax/Bak-regulated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng; Forveille, Sabrina; Sauvat, Allan; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Durand, Sylvère; Müller, Kevin; Liu, Peng; Zitvogel, Laurence; Rekdal, Øystein; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-09-29

    LTX-315 has been developed as an amphipathic cationic peptide that kills cancer cells. Here, we investigated the putative involvement of mitochondria in the cytotoxic action of LTX-315. Subcellular fractionation of LTX-315-treated cells, followed by mass spectrometric quantification, revealed that the agent was enriched in mitochondria. LTX-315 caused an immediate arrest of mitochondrial respiration without any major uncoupling effect. Accordingly, LTX-315 disrupted the mitochondrial network, dissipated the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, and caused the release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins into the cytosol. LTX-315 was relatively inefficient in stimulating mitophagy. Cells lacking the two pro-apoptotic multidomain proteins from the BCL-2 family, BAX and BAK, were less susceptible to LTX-315-mediated killing. Moreover, cells engineered to lose their mitochondria (by transfection with Parkin combined with treatment with a protonophore causing mitophagy) were relatively resistant against LTX-315, underscoring the importance of this organelle for LTX-315-mediated cytotoxicity. Altogether, these results support the notion that LTX-315 kills cancer cells by virtue of its capacity to permeabilize mitochondrial membranes.

  2. Phagocyte roulette in Salmonella killing.

    PubMed

    Fenlon, Luke A; Slauch, James M

    2014-01-15

    Salmonella propagates in macrophages to cause life-threatening infections, but the role of neutrophils in combating Salmonella has been controversial. In this issue, Burton et al. (2014) use single cell analyses and modeling to explain the ability of Salmonella to survive in macrophages while being killed by neutrophils.

  3. Killing Range

    PubMed Central

    Asal, Victor; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Horgan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Provisional Irish Republican Army's (PIRA) brigade level behavior during the Northern Ireland Conflict (1970-1998) and identifies the organizational factors that impact a brigade's lethality as measured via terrorist attacks. Key independent variables include levels of technical expertise, cadre age, counter-terrorism policies experienced, brigade size, and IED components and delivery methods. We find that technical expertise within a brigade allows for careful IED usage, which significantly minimizes civilian casualties (a specific strategic goal of PIRA) while increasing the ability to kill more high value targets with IEDs. Lethal counter-terrorism events also significantly affect a brigade's likelihood of killing both civilians and high-value targets but in different ways. Killing PIRA members significantly decreases IED fatalities but also significantly decreases the possibility of zero civilian IED-related deaths in a given year. Killing innocent Catholics in a Brigade's county significantly increases total and civilian IED fatalities. Together the results suggest the necessity to analyze dynamic situational variables that impact terrorist group behavior at the sub-unit level. PMID:25838603

  4. Failed CTL/NK cell killing and cytokine hypersecretion are directly linked through prolonged synapse time.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Misty R; Rudd-Schmidt, Jesse A; Lopez, Jamie A; Ramsbottom, Kelly M; Mannering, Stuart I; Andrews, Daniel M; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Trapani, Joseph A

    2015-03-01

    Failure of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) or natural killer (NK) cells to kill target cells by perforin (Prf)/granzyme (Gzm)-induced apoptosis causes severe immune dysregulation. In familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Prf-deficient infants suffer a fatal "cytokine storm" resulting from macrophage overactivation, but the link to failed target cell death is not understood. We show that prolonged target cell survival greatly amplifies the quanta of inflammatory cytokines secreted by CTLs/NK cells and that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) directly invokes the activation and secondary overproduction of proinflammatory IL-6 from naive macrophages. Furthermore, using live cell microscopy to visualize hundreds of synapses formed between wild-type, Prf-null, or GzmA/B-null CTLs/NK cells and their targets in real time, we show that hypersecretion of IL-2, TNF, IFN-γ, and various chemokines is linked to failed disengagement of Prf- or Gzm-deficient lymphocytes from their targets, with mean synapse time increased fivefold, from ∼8 to >40 min. Surprisingly, the signal for detachment arose from the dying target cell and was caspase dependent, as delaying target cell death with various forms of caspase blockade also prevented their disengagement from fully competent CTLs/NK cells and caused cytokine hypersecretion. Our findings provide the cellular mechanism through which failed killing by lymphocytes causes systemic inflammation involving recruitment and activation of myeloid cells. PMID:25732304

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans enters the endolysosomal pathway of dendritic cells and is killed by lysosomal components.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Karen L; Levitz, Stuart M

    2008-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that primarily causes disease in immunocompromised individuals. Dendritic cells (DCs) can phagocytose C. neoformans, present cryptococcal antigen, and kill C. neoformans. However, early events following C. neoformans phagocytosis by DCs are not well defined. We hypothesized that C. neoformans traffics to the endosome and the lysosome following phagocytosis by DCs and is eventually killed in the lysosome. Murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) or human monocyte-derived DCs (HDCs) were incubated with live, encapsulated C. neoformans yeast cells and opsonizing antibody. Following incubation, DCs were intracellularly stained with antibodies against EEA1 (endosome) and LAMP-1 (late endosome/lysosome). As assessed by confocal microscopy, C. neoformans trafficked to endosomal compartments of DCs within 10 min and to lysosomal compartments within 30 min postincubation. For HDCs, the studies were repeated using complement-sufficient autologous plasma for the opsonization of C. neoformans. These data showed results similar to those for antibody opsonization, with C. neoformans localized to endosomes within 20 min and to lysosomes within 60 min postincubation. Additionally, the results of live real-time imaging studies demonstrated that C. neoformans entered lysosomal compartments within 20 min following the initiation of phagocytosis. The results of scanning and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated conventional zipper phagocytosis of C. neoformans by DCs. Finally, lysosomal extracts were purified from BMDCs and incubated with C. neoformans to determine their potential to kill C. neoformans. The extracts killed C. neoformans in a dose-dependent manner. This study shows that C. neoformans enters into endosomal and lysosomal pathways following DC phagocytosis and can be killed by lysosomal components.

  6. Gene expression profile of THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhi-De; Wei, Ting-Ting; Tang, Qing-Qin; Ma, Ning; Wang, Li-Li; Qin, Bao-Dong; Yin, Jian-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mechanisms under immune response against Candida albicans (C. albicans) remain largely unknown. To better understand the mechanisms of innate immune response against C. albicans, we analyzed the gene expression profile of THP-1 cells stimulated with heat-killed C. albicans. Methods THP-1 cells were stimulated with heat-killed C. albicans for 9 hours at a ratio of 1:1, and gene expression profile of the cells was analyzed using Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were defined as change folds more than 2 and with statistical significance. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis were used to systematically identify biological connections of differentially expressed genes, as well as the pathways associated with the immune response against C. albicans. Results A total of 355 genes were up-regulated and 715 genes were down-regulated significantly. The up-regulated genes were particularly involved in biological process of RNA processing and pathway of the spliceosome. In case of down-regulated genes, the particularly involved immune-related pathways were G-protein coupled receptor signaling pathway, calcium signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway and Ras pathway. Conclusions We depict the gene expression profile of heat-killed C. albicans stimulated THP-1 cells, and identify the major pathways involved in immune response against C. albicans. These pathways are potential candidate targets for developing anti-C. albicans agent. PMID:27275483

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance CD4 T Cell Susceptibility to NK Cell Killing but Reduce NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Matthew; Williams, James; Kurioka, Ayako; Gerry, Andrew B.; Jakobsen, Bent; Klenerman, Paul; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie

    2016-01-01

    In the search for a cure for HIV-1 infection, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being investigated as activators of latently infected CD4 T cells to promote their targeting by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). However, HDACi may also inhibit CTL function, suggesting different immunotherapy approaches may need to be explored. Here, we study the impact of different HDACi on both Natural Killer (NK) and CTL targeting of HIV-1 infected cells. We found HDACi down-regulated HLA class I expression independently of HIV-1 Nef which, without significantly compromising CTL function, led to enhanced targeting by NK cells. HDACi-treated HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells were also more effectively cleared than untreated controls during NK co-culture. However, HDACi impaired NK function, reducing degranulation and killing capacity. Depending on the HDACi and dose, this impairment could counteract the benefit gained by treating infected target cells. These data suggest that following HDACi-induced HLA class I down-regulation NK cells kill HIV-1-infected cells, although HDACi-mediated NK cell inhibition may negate this effect. Our data emphasize the importance of studying the effects of potential interventions on both targets and effectors. PMID:27529554

  8. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of BCL6 Kills DLBCL Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchietti, L.C.; Ghetu, A.F.; Zhu, X.; Da Silva, G.F.; Zhong, S.; Matthews, M.; Bunting, K.L.; Polo, J.M.; Fares, C.; Arrowsmith, C.H.; Yang, S.N.; Garcia, M.; Coop, A.; Mackerell, A.D.; Prive, G.G.; Melnick, A.

    2010-09-22

    The BCL6 transcriptional repressor is the most frequently involved oncogene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We combined computer-aided drug design with functional assays to identify low-molecular-weight compounds that bind to the corepressor binding groove of the BCL6 BTB domain. One such compound disrupted BCL6/corepressor complexes in vitro and in vivo, and was observed by X-ray crystallography and NMR to bind the critical site within the BTB groove. This compound could induce expression of BCL6 target genes and kill BCL6-positive DLBCL cell lines. In xenotransplantation experiments, the compound was nontoxic and potently suppressed DLBCL tumors in vivo. The compound also killed primary DLBCLs from human patients.

  9. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O’Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  10. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O'Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  11. Adenanthin targets peroxiredoxin I/II to kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, J-K; Huang, Y; He, W; Yan, Z-W; Fan, L; Liu, M-H; Xiao, W-L; Sun, H-D; Chen, G-Q

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthin, a natural diterpenoid isolated from the leaves of Isodon adenanthus, has recently been reported to induce leukemic cell differentiation by targeting peroxiredoxins (Prx) I and II. On the other hand, increasing lines of evidence propose that these Prx proteins would become potential targets to screen drugs for the prevention and treatment of solid tumors. Therefore, it is of significance to explore the potential activities of adenanthin on solid tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate that Prx I protein is essential for the survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and adenanthin can kill these malignant liver cells in vitro and xenografts. We also show that the cell death-inducing activity of adenanthin on HCC cells is mediated by the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Furthermore, the silencing of Prx I or Prx II significantly enhances the cytotoxic activity of adenanthin on HCC, whereas the ectopic expression of Prx I and Prx II but not their mutants of adenanthin-bound cysteines can rescue adenanthin-induced cytotoxicity in Prxs-silenced HCC cells. Taken together, our results propose that adenanthin targets Prx I/II to kill HCC cells and its therapeutic significance warrants to be further explored in HCC patients. PMID:25188510

  12. Adenanthin targets peroxiredoxin I/II to kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, J-K; Huang, Y; He, W; Yan, Z-W; Fan, L; Liu, M-H; Xiao, W-L; Sun, H-D; Chen, G-Q

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthin, a natural diterpenoid isolated from the leaves of Isodon adenanthus, has recently been reported to induce leukemic cell differentiation by targeting peroxiredoxins (Prx) I and II. On the other hand, increasing lines of evidence propose that these Prx proteins would become potential targets to screen drugs for the prevention and treatment of solid tumors. Therefore, it is of significance to explore the potential activities of adenanthin on solid tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate that Prx I protein is essential for the survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, and adenanthin can kill these malignant liver cells in vitro and xenografts. We also show that the cell death-inducing activity of adenanthin on HCC cells is mediated by the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Furthermore, the silencing of Prx I or Prx II significantly enhances the cytotoxic activity of adenanthin on HCC, whereas the ectopic expression of Prx I and Prx II but not their mutants of adenanthin-bound cysteines can rescue adenanthin-induced cytotoxicity in Prxs-silenced HCC cells. Taken together, our results propose that adenanthin targets Prx I/II to kill HCC cells and its therapeutic significance warrants to be further explored in HCC patients. PMID:25188510

  13. Induction of the Lytic Cycle Sensitizes Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected B Cells to NK Cell Killing That Is Counteracted by Virus-Mediated NK Cell Evasion Mechanisms in the Late Lytic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Luke R.; Quinn, Laura L.; Rowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) persists for the lifetime of the infected host despite eliciting strong immune responses. This persistence requires a fine balance between the host immune system and EBV immune evasion. Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for natural killer (NK) cells in this balance. NK cells can kill EBV-infected cells undergoing lytic replication in vitro, and studies in both humans and mice with reconstituted human immune systems have shown that NK cells can limit EBV replication and prevent infectious mononucleosis. We now show that NK cells, via NKG2D and DNAM-1 interactions, recognize and kill EBV-infected cells undergoing lytic replication and that expression of a single EBV lytic gene, BZLF1, is sufficient to trigger sensitization to NK cell killing. We also present evidence suggesting the possibility of the existence of an as-yet-unidentified DNAM-1 ligand which may be particularly important for killing lytically infected normal B cells. Furthermore, while cells entering the lytic cycle become sensitized to NK cell killing, we observed that cells in the late lytic cycle are highly resistant. We identified expression of the vBcl-2 protein, BHRF1, as one effective mechanism by which EBV mediates this protection. Thus, contrary to the view expressed in some reports, EBV has evolved the ability to evade NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE This report extends our understanding of the interaction between EBV and host innate responses. It provides the first evidence that the susceptibility to NK cell lysis of EBV-infected B cells undergoing lytic replication is dependent upon the phase of the lytic cycle. Induction of the lytic cycle is associated with acquired sensitization to NK cell killing, while progress through the late lytic cycle is associated with acquired resistance to killing. We provide mechanistic explanations for this novel observation, indicating important roles for the BZLF1 immediate early transactivator, the BHRF1 vBcl-2

  14. Impact of Prolonged Fraction Delivery Times Simulating IMRT on Cultured Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Killing

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Xiaokang; Chen Longhua; Wang Wenjun; Ye Feng; Liu Jiabing; Li Qisheng; Sun Henwen

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of prolonged fraction delivery times (FDTs) simulating intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on cultured nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell killing. Methods and Material: Cultured NPC cell lines CNE1 and CNE2 were used in this study. The biological effectiveness of fractionated irradiation protocols simulating conventional external beam radiotherapy and IMRT (FDT of 15, 36, and 50 minutes) was estimated with standard colony assay, and the differences in cell surviving fractions after irradiation with different protocols were tested by use of the paired t test. The impact degree of prolonged FDTs (from 8 to 50 minutes) on cell killing was also assessed by the dose-modifying factors, which were estimated by comparing the effectiveness of intermittently delivered 2 Gy with that of continuously delivered 1.5 to 2 Gy. Results: The cell surviving fractions of both CNE1 and CNE2 after fractionated irradiation simulating IMRT were higher than those simulating conventional external beam radiotherapy (p < 0.05). The dose-modifying factors for a fraction dose of 2 Gy increased from 1.05 to 1.18 for CNE1 and from 1.05 to 1.11 for CNE2 with the FDT being prolonged from 15 to 50 minutes. Conclusions: This study showed that the prolonged FDTs simulating IMRT significantly decreased the cell killing in both CNE1 and CNE2 cell lines, and these negative effects increased with the FDT being prolonged from 15 to 50 minutes. These effects, if confirmed by in vivo and clinical studies, need to be considered in designing IMRT treatments for NPC.

  15. Simultaneous Targeting of FcγRs and FcαRI Enhances Tumor Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Arianne M; Ten Broeke, Toine; Nederend, Maaike; Meulenbroek, Laura A P M; van Tetering, Geert; Meyer, Saskia; Jansen, J H Marco; Beltrán Buitrago, M Alejandra; Nagelkerke, Sietse Q; Németh, István; Ubink, Ruud; Rouwendal, Gerard; Lohse, Stefan; Valerius, Thomas; Leusen, Jeanette H W; Boross, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Efficacy of anticancer monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is limited by the exhaustion of effector mechanisms. IgG mAbs mediate cellular effector functions through FcγRs expressed on effector cells. IgA mAbs can also induce efficient tumor killing both in vitro and in vivo. IgA mAbs recruit FcαRI-expressing effector cells and therefore initiate different effector mechanisms in vivo compared with IgG. Here, we studied killing of tumor cells coexpressing EGFR and HER2 by the IgG mAbs cetuximab and trastuzumab and their IgA variants. In the presence of a heterogeneous population of effector cells (leukocytes), the combination of IgG and IgA mAbs to two different tumor targets (EGFR and HER2) led to enhanced cytotoxicity compared with each isotype alone. Combination of two IgGs or two IgAs or IgG and IgA against the same target did not enhance cytotoxicity. Increased cytotoxicity relied on the presence of both the peripheral blood mononuclear cell and the polymorphonuclear (PMN) fraction. Purified natural killer cells were only cytotoxic with IgG, whereas cytotoxicity induced by PMNs was strong with IgA and poor with IgG. Monocytes, which coexpress FcγRs and FcαRI, also displayed increased cytotoxicity by the combination of IgG and IgA in an overnight killing assay. Coinjection of cetuximab and IgA2-HER2 resulted in increased antitumor effects compared with either mAb alone in a xenograft model with A431-luc2-HER2 cells. Thus, the combination of IgG and IgA isotypes optimally mobilizes cellular effectors for cytotoxicity, representing a promising novel strategy to improve mAb therapy. PMID:26407589

  16. T lymphocytes expressing a CD16 signaling receptor exert antibody-dependent cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Ko; Imai, Chihaya; Lorenzini, Paolo; Kamiya, Takahiro; Kono, Koji; Davidoff, Andrew M; Chng, Wee Joo; Campana, Dario

    2014-01-01

    To expand applications for T-cell-based immunotherapy in cancer, we designed a receptor that binds the Fc portion of human immunoglobulins and delivers activation signals. The construct included the high-affinity CD16 (FCGR3A) V158 variant, CD8α hinge, and transmembrane domains, along with signaling domains from CD3ζ and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9), forming a chimeric receptor termed CD16V-BB-ζ. After retrovirus-mediated expression in human T cells, CD16V-BB-ζ bound humanized antibodies with higher affinity than a control receptor containing the more common F158 variant. Engagement of CD16V-BB-ζ provoked T-cell activation, exocytosis of lytic granules, and sustained proliferation, with a mean cell recovery after 4-week coculture with Daudi lymphoma cells and rituximab of nearly 70-fold relative to input cells. In contrast, unbound antibody alone produced no effect. CD16V-BB-ζ T cells specifically killed lymphoma cells and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in combination with rituximab at a low effector:target ratio, even when assayed on mesenchymal cells. Trastuzumab triggered CD16V-BB-ζ-mediated killing of HER2 (ERBB2)(+) breast and gastric cancer cells; similar results were obtained with an anti-GD2 antibody in neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma cells. Furthermore, coadministration of CD16V-BB-ζ T cells with immunotherapeutic antibodies exerted considerable antitumor activity in vivo. Signaling mediated by 4-1BB-CD3ζ induced higher T-cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxicity than CD3ζ or FcεRIγ, and the receptor was expressed effectively after mRNA electroporation without viral vectors, facilitating clinical translation. Our results offer preclinical proof of concept for CD16V-BB-ζ as a universal, next-generation chimeric receptor with the potential to augment the efficacy of antibody therapies for cancer.

  17. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  18. Dynamic visualization the whole process of cytotoxic T lymphocytes killing the B16 tumor cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) played a key role in the immune system to destroy the tumor cells. Although some mechanisms of CTLs killing the tumor cells are revealed already, the dynamic information of CTLs interaction with tumor cells are still not known very clearly. Here we used confocal microscopy to visualize the whole process of CTLs killing the tumor cells in vitro. The imaging data showed that CTLs destroyed the target tumor cells rapidly and efficiently. Several CTLs surrounded one or some tumor cells and the average time for CTLs destroying one tumor cell is just a few minutes in vitro. The study displayed the temporal events of CTLs interacting with tumor cells at the beginning and finally killing them and directly presented the efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity of the CTLs. The results helped us to deeply understand the mechanism of the CTLs destroying the tumor cells and to develop the cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  20. TH17 cells promote microbial killing and innate immune sensing of DNA via interleukin 26

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Stephan; Domizio, Jeremy Di; Voo, Kui S; Friedrich, Heike C; Chamilos, Georgios; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Conrad, Curdin; Gregorio, Josh; Roy, Didier Le; Roger, Thierry; Ladbury, John E; Homey, Bernhard; Watowich, Stanley; Modlin, Robert L; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Liu, Yong-Jun; Arold, Stefan T; Gilliet, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 17–producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) have a major role in protection against infections and in mediating autoimmune diseases, yet the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. We found that interleukin 26 (IL-26), a human TH17 cell–derived cytokine, is a cationic amphipathic protein that kills extracellular bacteria via membrane-pore formation. Furthermore, TH17 cell–derived IL-26 formed complexes with bacterial DNA and self-DNA released by dying bacteria and host cells. The resulting IL-26–DNA complexes triggered the production of type I interferon by plasmacytoid dendritic cells via activation of Toll-like receptor 9, but independently of the IL-26 receptor. These findings provide insights into the potent antimicrobial and proinflammatory function of TH17 cells by showing that IL-26 is a natural human antimicrobial that promotes immune sensing of bacterial and host cell death. PMID:26168081

  1. Killing of targets by effector CD8 T cells in the mouse spleen follows the law of mass action

    SciTech Connect

    Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with antibody-based vaccines, it has been difficult to measure the efficacy of T cell-based vaccines and to correlate the efficacy of CD8 T cell responses with protection again viral infections. In part, this difficulty is due to poor understanding of the in vivo efficacy of CD8 T cells produced by vaccination. Using a: recently developed experimental method of in vivo cytotoxicity we have investigated quantitative aspects of killing of peptide-pulsed targets by effector and memory CD8 T cells, specific to three epitopes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), in the mouse spleen. By analyzing data on killing of targets with varying number of epitope-specific effector and memory CD8 T cells, we find that killing of targets by effectors follows the law of mass-action, that is the death rate of peptide-pulsed targets is proportional to the frequency of CTLs in the spleen. In contrast, killing of targets by memory CD8 T cells does not follow the mass action law because the death rate of targets saturates at high frequencies of memory CD8 T cells. For both effector and memory cells, we also find little support for the killing term that includes the decrease of the death rate of targets with target cell density. Interestingly, our analysis suggests that at low CD8 T cell frequencies, memory CD8 T cells on the per capita basis are more efficient at killing peptide-pulsed targets than effectors, but at high frequencies, effectors are more efficient killers than memory T cells. Comparison of the estimated killing efficacy of effector T cells with the value that is predicted from theoretical physics and based on motility of T cells in lymphoid tissues, suggests that limiting step in the killing of peptide-pulsed targets is delivering the lethal hit and not finding the target. Our results thus form a basis for quantitative understanding of the process of killing of virus-infected cells by T cell responses in tissues and can be used to correlate the

  2. Tumor cell-specific photothermal killing by SELEX-derived DNA aptamer-targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya; Lee, Alexander Sheng Wei; Yap, Lim Wei; Jans, David A.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal counterpart (MCF10A). GNRs conjugated to KW16-13 were readily internalized by the MCF10CA1h tumour cells with minimal uptake by MCF10A normal cells. Upon near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, tumour cell death of >96%, could be effected, compared to <1% in the normal cells or cells incubated with GNRs alone, our KW16-13 aptamer-targeted GNRs thus showing >71-fold tumor cell death than GNRs-targeted with a previously described aptamer. This demonstrates the significant potential for aptamer functionalised-GNRs to be used effective and above all selective anti-cancer photothermal therapeutics.Despite widespread availability of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents, the killing of tumour cells without affecting healthy surrounding tissue remains elusive, although recent developments in terms of plasmonic nanoparticles capable of photothermal killing have some promise. Here we describe novel DNA aptamer-tethered gold nanorods (GNRs) that act as efficient photothermal therapeutics against tumour cells, but not their isogenic normal cell counterparts. A modified Cell-SELEX process was developed to select a novel DNA aptamer (KW16-13) that specifically recognised and was internalised by cells of the MCF10CA1h human breast ductal carcinoma line but not by those of its isogenic normal

  3. DNA transfer and cell killing in epidermoid cells by diagnostic ultrasound activation of contrast agent gas bodies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Song, Jianming

    2003-04-01

    DNA transfer by sonoporation and cell killing in monolayer cells were examined by contrast-aided low-power diagnostic ultrasound (US). Culture chambers with epidermoid cell monolayers were scanned at about 1 mm/s with a 1.5-MHz scan head aimed upward at the chamber in a 37 degrees C water bath. For DNA transfer tests, plasmids coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP) were added to the medium, and GFP expression was assessed by flow cytometry after 2 days. In separate tests, cell killing was determined immediately after treatment. GFP-positive cell counts were 0.4% (0.7% SD) for shams and 3.7% (1.2% SD) of cells for exposure at 2.3 MPa with 2% Optison contrast agent. The fraction of dead cells was 3.4% (1.7% SD) in shams and 28.6% (6.3% SD) in exposed chambers. Both effects increased for increasing Optison concentration and increasing peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. Contrast-aided diagnostic US has a potential therapeutic application for gene transfer, but a trade-off appears to exist with cell killing.

  4. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity

    PubMed Central

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-01-01

    Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension) than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted.

  5. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity

    PubMed Central

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2016-01-01

    Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension) than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted. PMID:27656243

  6. Troxerutin, a natural flavonoid binds to DNA minor groove and enhances cancer cell killing in response to radiation.

    PubMed

    Panat, Niranjan A; Singh, Beena G; Maurya, Dharmendra K; Sandur, Santosh K; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2016-05-01

    Troxerutin, a flavonoid best known for its radioprotective and antioxidant properties is of considerable interest of study due to its broad pharmacological activities. The present study on troxerutin highlights its abilities to bind DNA and enhance cancer cell killing in response to radiation. Troxerutin showed strong binding with calf thymus DNA in vitro. Troxerutin-DNA interaction was confirmed by CD spectropolarimetry. The mode of binding of troxerutin to DNA was assessed by competing troxerutin with EtBr or DAPI, known DNA intercalator and a minor groove binder, respectively. DAPI fluorescence was drastically reduced with linear increase in troxerutin concentration suggesting possible binding of troxerutin to DNA minor groove. Further, computational studies of docking of troxerutin molecule on mammalian DNA also indicated possible troxerutin-DNA interaction at minor groove of DNA. Troxerutin was found to mainly localize in the nucleus of prostate cancer cells. It induced cytotoxicity in radioresistant (DU145) and sensitive (PC3) prostate cancer cells. When troxerutin pre-treated DU145 and PC3 cells were exposed to γ-radiation, cytotoxicity as estimated by MTT assay, was found to be further enhanced. In addition, the % subG1 population detected by propidium iodide staining also showed similar response when combined with radiation. A similar trend was observed in terms of ROS generation and DNA damage in DU145 cells when troxerutin and radiation were combined. DNA binding at minor groove by troxerutin may have contributed to strand breaks leading to increased radiation induced cell death.

  7. An Aqueous Extract of Marine Microalgae Exhibits Antimetastatic Activity through Preferential Killing of Suspended Cancer Cells and Anticolony Forming Activity.

    PubMed

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Sorensen, Poul H; Wang, Yuzhuo; Cheng, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Research on marine natural products as potential anticancer agents is still limited. In the present study, an aqueous extract of a Canadian marine microalgal preparation was assessed for anticancer activities using various assays and cell lines of human cancers, including lung, prostate, stomach, breast, and pancreatic cancers, as well as an osteosarcoma. In vitro, the microalgal extract exhibited marked anticolony forming activity. In addition, it was more toxic, as indicated by increased apoptosis, to nonadherent cells (grown in suspension) than to adherent cells. In vivo, an antimetastatic effect of the extract was observed in NOD-SCID mice carrying subrenal capsule xenografts of PC3 prostate cancer cells. The results of the present study suggest that the antimetastatic effect of the aqueous microalgal extract is based on inhibition of colony forming ability of cancer cells and the preferential killing of suspended cancer cells. Further research aimed at identification of the molecular basis of the anticancer activities of the microalgal extract appears to be warranted. PMID:27656243

  8. Vitamin d deficiency reduces the immune response, phagocytosis rate, and intracellular killing rate of microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Marija; Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  9. Vitamin D Deficiency Reduces the Immune Response, Phagocytosis Rate, and Intracellular Killing Rate of Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Marie Luise; Schütze, Sandra; Redlich, Sandra; Götz, Alexander; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Bertsch, Thomas; Ribes, Sandra; Hanenberg, Andrea; Schneider, Simon; Bollheimer, Cornelius; Sieber, Cornel; Nau, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Escherichia coli are associated with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. A high prevalence of neurological disorders has been observed in geriatric populations at risk of hypovitaminosis D. Vitamin D has potent effects on human immunity, including induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and suppression of T-cell proliferation, but its influence on microglial cells is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the phagocytosis rate, intracellular killing, and immune response of murine microglial cultures after stimulation with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl-cysteine (TLR1/2), poly(I·C) (TLR3), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (TLR9). Upon stimulation with high concentrations of TLR agonists, the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) was decreased in vitamin D-deficient compared to that in vitamin D-sufficient microglial cultures. Phagocytosis of E. coli K1 after stimulation of microglial cells with high concentrations of TLR3, -4, and -9 agonists and intracellular killing of E. coli K1 after stimulation with high concentrations of all TLR agonists were lower in vitamin D-deficient microglial cells than in the respective control cells. Our observations suggest that vitamin D deficiency may impair the resistance of the brain against bacterial infections. PMID:24686054

  10. Enhanced radiation-induced killing of Chinese hamster cells by dideoxythymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Hur, E.

    1981-10-01

    Incubation of cultured Chinese hamster cells in the presence of the DNA chain terminator 2',3'-dideoxythymidine (ddThd) following ..gamma.. irradiation enhances cell killing. Maximum enhancement is obtained with 10 )g/ml ddThd and incubation for 90 min. If the addition of ddThd is delayed for 1 hr after irradiation, no enhancement is observed. Although the drug kills S-phase cells which are more radiation resistant, this is not the main reason for the observed enhancement of radiation response. The magnitude of the effect in cells synchronized at the Gr-S interface is similar to that in asynchronous population. When ddThd treatment is combined with other treatments that enhance radiation response, i.e., BUdR substitution and hyperthermia, the effects are less than additive. It is suggested that repair of radiation-induced DNA damage is interfered with by ddThd either by incorporation into gaps formed during excision of damage and/or by inhibition of DNA polymerase ..beta.. which is involved with excision repair.

  11. L-arginine-dependent reactive nitrogen intermediates as mediators of tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Geiges, M; Keist, R

    1990-03-01

    The capacities of lymphokines and of various microbes to induce in a pure population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes tumoricidal activity and/or the production of L-arginine-dependent reactive nitrogen intermediates, measured by the release of nitrite, were comparatively assessed. These parameters were found to be closely correlated in a variety of experimental situations, i.e., enhanced by a surplus of L-arginine and abrogated by N-monomethyl-L-arginine, a selective inhibitor of L-arginine-dependent effector mechanisms. In other macrophage/tumor cell combinations, such correlation was less obvious or not at all detectable, suggesting that, in these models, L-arginine-dependent reactive nitrogen intermediates are not or not alone responsible for the mediation of tumoricidal activity by activated macrophages. Collectively, the present findings suggest that the mechanism of tumor cell killing by activated macrophages may differ, depending on the tumor cell type and the pathway of macrophage activation. Among the various effector mechanisms considered to be involved in tumor cell killing by activated macrophages, L-arginine-dependent reactive nitrogen intermediates appear to hold a major role.

  12. Design Parameters for Granzyme-Mediated Cytotoxic Lymphocyte Target-Cell Killing and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Woodsworth, Daniel J; Dunsing, Valentin; Coombs, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key elements of the immune system that are primarily responsible for targeting cells infected with intracellular pathogens, or cells that have become malignantly transformed. Target cells are killed mainly via lymphocyte exocytosis of specialized lysosomes containing perforin, a pore-forming protein, and granzymes, which are proteases that induce apoptosis. Due to its central role in lymphocyte biology, as well as its implication in a host of pathologies from cancer to autoimmunity, the granzyme-perforin pathway has been the subject of extensive investigation. Nevertheless, the details of exactly how granzyme and perforin cooperate to induce target-cell death remain controversial. To further investigate this system, we developed a biophysical model of the immunological synapse between a cytotoxic lymphocyte and a target cell using a spatial stochastic simulation algorithm. We used this model to calculate the spatiotemporal evolution of granzyme B and perforin from the time of their exocytosis to granzyme internalization by the target cell. We used a metric of granzyme internalization to delineate which biological processes were critical for successful target-cell lysis. We found that the high aspect ratio of the immunological synapse was insufficient in this regard, and that molecular crowding within the synapse is critical to preserve sufficient concentrations of perforin and granzyme for consistent pore formation and granzyme transfer to target cells. However, even when pore formation occurs in our model, a large amount of both granzyme and perforin still escape from the synapse. We argue that a tight seal between the cytotoxic lymphocyte and its target cell is not required to avoid bystander killing. Instead, we propose that the requirement for spatiotemporal colocalization of granzyme and perforin acts as an effective bimolecular filter to ensure target specificity. PMID:26244730

  13. Killing of human lung cancer cells using a new ( sup 111 In)bleomycin complex ( sup 111 In)BLMC

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, D.Y.; Hamburger, A.W.; Beach, J.L.; Maruyama, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of a ({sup 111}In)bleomycin complex (({sup 111}In)BLMC) to kill five cell lines of human lung cancer (small cell lung cancer) was investigated. Cells were exposed to either 0.9% NaCl, ({sup 111}In)Cl3, BLM, ({sup 111}In)BLMC, nonradioactive InCl3, or In-BLMC for 60 minutes, plated in soft agarose, and assessed for colony formation. ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40-200 microCi carried by 15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) was more cytotoxic than BLM (15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) by a factor of 1.6-5.3 for five cell lines. The percent survival of N417 cells was 28.4 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40 microCi/15 micrograms BLM/ml) and 54.3 for BLM (15 micrograms/ml); 1.9 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (200 microCi/25 micrograms BLM/ml), and 10.0 for BLM (25 micrograms/ml). {sup 111}InCl3 (200 microCi/ml) and nonradioactive InCl3 failed to inhibit colony formation. The new ({sup 111}In)BLMC may be useful for therapy of some lung cancer patients.

  14. A high-throughput, homogeneous microplate assay for agents that kill mammalian tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Michael; Wang, Chunwei; Rebentisch, Matt; Endo, Mark; Stump, Mark; Kamb, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    Screens for cytostasis/cytoxicity have considerable value for the discovery of therapeutic agents and the investigation of the biology of apoptosis. For instance, genetic screens for proteins, protein fragments, peptides, RNAs, or chemicals that kill tissue culture cells may aid in identifying new cancer therapeutic targets. A microplate assay for cell death is needed to achieve throughputs sufficient to sift through thousands of agents from expression or chemical libraries. The authors describe a homogeneous assay for cell death in tissue culture cells compatible with 96- or 384-well plates. In combination with a previously described system for retroviral packaging and transduction, nearly 6000 expression library clones could be screened per week in a 96-well plate format. The screening system may also prove useful for chemical screens.

  15. Development of small-molecule probes that selectively kill cells induced to express mutant RAS

    PubMed Central

    Weïwer, Michel; Bittker, Joshua A.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Shimada, Kenichi; Yang, Wan Seok; MacPherson, Lawrence; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Palmer, Michelle; Stockwell, Brent R.; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic lethal screening is a chemical biology approach to identify small molecules that selectively kill oncogene-expressing cell lines with the goal of identifying pathways that provide specific targets against cancer cells. We performed a high-throughput screen of 303,282 compounds from the National Institutes of Health-Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (NIH-MLSMR) against immortalized BJ fibroblasts expressing HRASG12V followed by a counterscreen of lethal compounds in a series of isogenic cells lacking the HRASG12V oncogene. This effort led to the identification of two novel molecular probes (PubChem CID 3689413, ML162 and CID 49766530, ML210) with nanomolar potencies and 4–23 fold selectivities, which can potentially be used for identifying oncogene-specific pathways and targets in cancer cells. PMID:22297109

  16. Measurement of DNA damage and cell killing in Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated with aluminum characteristic ultrasoft X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Prise, K.M.; Folkard, M.; Davies, S.; Michael, B.D.

    1989-03-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were irradiated with 1.487 keV aluminum characteristic X rays produced using a cold-cathode discharge tube. Under aerobic conditions a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 2.18 for cell killing in comparison to 250-kVp X rays was measured using cells grown in suspension and irradiated on membrane filters. DNA damage in the form of single-strand (ssb) and double-strand breaks (dsb) was measured using the filter elution technique. The aerobic RBEs are 1.64 for dsb induction and 0.49 for ssb induction, consistent with the view that dsb are more closely related to cell kill than ssb. A reduced oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for cell killing was measured for Al-K X rays, but the OER for dsb induction was similar to that measured for 250-kVp X rays. A curvilinear relationship between dsb induction and dose is observed, similar to that seen for 250-kVp X rays. This agrees with the concept that ultrasoft X rays produce critical lesions similar to hard X rays but with a greater efficiency per unit dose.

  17. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaini, Ramesh R.; Hu, Chien-An A.

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  18. Sticky Patches on Lipid Nanoparticles Enable the Selective Targeting and Killing of Untargetable Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sempkowski, Michelle; Zhu, Charles; Menzenski, Monica Zofia; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2016-08-23

    Effective targeting by uniformly functionalized nanoparticles is limited to cancer cells expressing at least two copies of targeted receptors per nanoparticle footprint (approximately ≥2 × 10(5) receptor copies per cell); such a receptor density supports the required multivalent interaction between the neighboring receptors and the ligands from a single nanoparticle. To enable selective targeting below this receptor density, ligands on the surface of lipid vesicles were displayed in clusters that were designed to form at the acidic pH of the tumor interstitium. Vesicles with clustered HER2-targeting peptides within such sticky patches (sticky vesicles) were compared to uniformly functionalized vesicles. On HER2-negative breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 {expressing (8.3 ± 0.8) × 10(4) and (5.4 ± 0.9) × 10(4) HER2 copies per cell, respectively}, only the sticky vesicles exhibited detectable specific targeting (KD ≈ 49-69 nM); dissociation (0.005-0.009 min(-1)) and endocytosis rates (0.024-0.026 min(-1)) were independent of HER2 expression for these cells. MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 were killed only by sticky vesicles encapsulating doxorubicin (32-40% viability) or α-particle emitter (225)Ac (39-58% viability) and were not affected by uniformly functionalized vesicles (>80% viability). Toxicities on cardiomyocytes and normal breast cells (expressing HER2 at considerably lower but not insignificant levels) were not observed, suggesting the potential of tunable clustered ligand display for the selective killing of cancer cells with low receptor densities. PMID:27468779

  19. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Piscaglia, Anna Chiara; Samengo, Daniela; Barba, Marta; Bernardini, Camilla; Scatena, Roberto; Pontoglio, Alessandro; Castellini, Laura; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Pani, Giovambattista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to SFB, we measured oxygen consumption, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP content in rat LCSC (Liver Cancer Stem Cells) -2 cells exposed to the drug. Genome wide analysis of gene expression was performed by Affymetrix technology. SFB cytotoxicity was evaluated by multiple assays in the presence or absence of metabolic inhibitors, or in cells genetically depleted of mitochondria. We found that low concentrations (2.5–5 μM) of SFB had a relatively modest effect on LCSC-2 or 293 T cell growth, but damaged mitochondria and increased intracellular ROS. Gene expression profiling of SFB-treated cells was consistent with a shift toward aerobic glycolysis and, accordingly, SFB cytotoxicity was dramatically increased by glucose withdrawal or the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG. Under metabolic stress, activation of the AMP dependent Protein Kinase (AMPK), but not ROS blockade, protected cells from death. We conclude that mitochondrial damage and ROS drive cell killing by SFB, while glycolytic cell reprogramming may represent a resistance strategy potentially targetable by combination therapies. PMID:25779766

  20. Decitabine Treatment of Glioma-Initiating Cells Enhances Immune Recognition and Killing.

    PubMed

    Riccadonna, Cristina; Yacoub Maroun, Céline; Vuillefroy de Silly, Romain; Boehler, Margaux; Calvo Tardón, Marta; Jueliger, Simone; Taverna, Pietro; Barba, Leticia; Marinari, Eliana; Pellegatta, Serena; Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Martinvalet, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Walker, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are aggressive brain tumours with very poor prognosis. The majority of glioma cells are differentiated (glioma-differentiated cells: GDCs), whereas the smaller population (glioma-initiating cells, GICs) is undifferentiated and resistant to conventional therapies. Therefore, to better target this pool of heterogeneous cells, a combination of diverse therapeutic approaches is envisaged. Here we investigated whether the immunosensitising properties of the hypomethylating agent decitabine can be extended to GICs. Using the murine GL261 cell line, we demonstrate that decitabine augments the expression of the death receptor FAS both on GDCs and GICs. Interestingly, it had a higher impact on GICs and correlated with an enhanced sensitivity to FASL-mediated cell death. Moreover, the expression of other critical molecules involved in cognate recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, MHCI and ICAM-1, was upregulated by decitabine treatment. Consequently, T-cell mediated killing of both GDCs and GICs was enhanced, as was T cell proliferation after reactivation. Overall, although GICs are described to resist classical therapies, our study shows that hypomethylating agents have the potential to enhance glioma cell recognition and subsequent destruction by immune cells, regardless of their differentiation status. These results support the development of combinatorial treatment modalities including epigenetic modulation together with immunotherapy in order to treat heterogenous malignancies such as glioblastoma. PMID:27579489

  1. Decitabine Treatment of Glioma-Initiating Cells Enhances Immune Recognition and Killing.

    PubMed

    Riccadonna, Cristina; Yacoub Maroun, Céline; Vuillefroy de Silly, Romain; Boehler, Margaux; Calvo Tardón, Marta; Jueliger, Simone; Taverna, Pietro; Barba, Leticia; Marinari, Eliana; Pellegatta, Serena; Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Martinvalet, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Walker, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are aggressive brain tumours with very poor prognosis. The majority of glioma cells are differentiated (glioma-differentiated cells: GDCs), whereas the smaller population (glioma-initiating cells, GICs) is undifferentiated and resistant to conventional therapies. Therefore, to better target this pool of heterogeneous cells, a combination of diverse therapeutic approaches is envisaged. Here we investigated whether the immunosensitising properties of the hypomethylating agent decitabine can be extended to GICs. Using the murine GL261 cell line, we demonstrate that decitabine augments the expression of the death receptor FAS both on GDCs and GICs. Interestingly, it had a higher impact on GICs and correlated with an enhanced sensitivity to FASL-mediated cell death. Moreover, the expression of other critical molecules involved in cognate recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, MHCI and ICAM-1, was upregulated by decitabine treatment. Consequently, T-cell mediated killing of both GDCs and GICs was enhanced, as was T cell proliferation after reactivation. Overall, although GICs are described to resist classical therapies, our study shows that hypomethylating agents have the potential to enhance glioma cell recognition and subsequent destruction by immune cells, regardless of their differentiation status. These results support the development of combinatorial treatment modalities including epigenetic modulation together with immunotherapy in order to treat heterogenous malignancies such as glioblastoma.

  2. Selective killing of methotrexate-resistant cells carrying amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Urlaub, G.; Landzberg, M.; Chasin, L.A.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the selective killing of methotrexate (MTX)-resistant cells has been developed. The selection is based on the incorporation of tritiated deoxyuridine into the DNA of MTX-resistant cells but not normal MTX-sensitive cells in the presence of the drug. A Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant that overproduces dihydrofolate reductase was used as an example of a MTX-resistant cell line. In this system, a 10,000-fold enrichment for wild-type MTX-sensitive cells could be achieved after 24 hr of exposure to the drug combination. This selection technique was applied to the isolation of MTX-sensitive segregants from hybrid cells formed between the MTX-resistant mutant and wild-type cells. The loss of MTX resistance and dihydrofolate reductase overproduction was always accompanied by the loss of a homogeneously staining region on chromosome 2 of the resistant parent that contains the amplified genes specifying this enzyme. While this region is always lost, other parts of chromosome 2 are almost always retained, suggesting that deletion rather than chromosome loss underlies marker segregation in this case. When the selection was applied to the resistant mutant itself, no MTX-sensitive revertants were obtained among 10(5) cells screened, attesting to the stability of gene amplification in this clone. It is suggested that this combination of drugs may be useful for the elimination of MTX-resistant tumor cells that develop after MTX chemotherapy.

  3. The multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib enhances glycolysis and synergizes with glycolysis blockade for cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Piscaglia, Anna Chiara; Samengo, Daniela; Barba, Marta; Bernardini, Camilla; Scatena, Roberto; Pontoglio, Alessandro; Castellini, Laura; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Pani, Giovambattista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-03-17

    Although the only effective drug against primary hepatocarcinoma, the multikinase inhibitor Sorafenib (SFB) usually fails to eradicate liver cancer. Since SFB targets mitochondria, cell metabolic reprogramming may underlie intrinsic tumor resistance. To characterize cancer cell metabolic response to SFB, we measured oxygen consumption, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ATP content in rat LCSC (Liver Cancer Stem Cells) -2 cells exposed to the drug. Genome wide analysis of gene expression was performed by Affymetrix technology. SFB cytotoxicity was evaluated by multiple assays in the presence or absence of metabolic inhibitors, or in cells genetically depleted of mitochondria. We found that low concentrations (2.5-5 μM) of SFB had a relatively modest effect on LCSC-2 or 293 T cell growth, but damaged mitochondria and increased intracellular ROS. Gene expression profiling of SFB-treated cells was consistent with a shift toward aerobic glycolysis and, accordingly, SFB cytotoxicity was dramatically increased by glucose withdrawal or the glycolytic inhibitor 2-DG. Under metabolic stress, activation of the AMP dependent Protein Kinase (AMPK), but not ROS blockade, protected cells from death. We conclude that mitochondrial damage and ROS drive cell killing by SFB, while glycolytic cell reprogramming may represent a resistance strategy potentially targetable by combination therapies.

  4. Decitabine Treatment of Glioma-Initiating Cells Enhances Immune Recognition and Killing

    PubMed Central

    Riccadonna, Cristina; Yacoub Maroun, Céline; Vuillefroy de Silly, Romain; Boehler, Margaux; Calvo Tardón, Marta; Jueliger, Simone; Taverna, Pietro; Barba, Leticia; Marinari, Eliana; Pellegatta, Serena; Bassoy, Esen Yonca; Martinvalet, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Walker, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are aggressive brain tumours with very poor prognosis. The majority of glioma cells are differentiated (glioma-differentiated cells: GDCs), whereas the smaller population (glioma-initiating cells, GICs) is undifferentiated and resistant to conventional therapies. Therefore, to better target this pool of heterogeneous cells, a combination of diverse therapeutic approaches is envisaged. Here we investigated whether the immunosensitising properties of the hypomethylating agent decitabine can be extended to GICs. Using the murine GL261 cell line, we demonstrate that decitabine augments the expression of the death receptor FAS both on GDCs and GICs. Interestingly, it had a higher impact on GICs and correlated with an enhanced sensitivity to FASL-mediated cell death. Moreover, the expression of other critical molecules involved in cognate recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, MHCI and ICAM-1, was upregulated by decitabine treatment. Consequently, T-cell mediated killing of both GDCs and GICs was enhanced, as was T cell proliferation after reactivation. Overall, although GICs are described to resist classical therapies, our study shows that hypomethylating agents have the potential to enhance glioma cell recognition and subsequent destruction by immune cells, regardless of their differentiation status. These results support the development of combinatorial treatment modalities including epigenetic modulation together with immunotherapy in order to treat heterogenous malignancies such as glioblastoma. PMID:27579489

  5. Tumor-selective gene transduction and cell killing with an oncotropic autonomous parvovirus-based vector.

    PubMed

    Dupont, F; Avalosse, B; Karim, A; Mine, N; Bosseler, M; Maron, A; Van den Broeke, A V; Ghanem, G E; Burny, A; Zeicher, M

    2000-05-01

    A recombinant MVMp of the fibrotropic strain of minute virus of mice (MVMp) expressing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was used to infect a series of biologically relevant cultured cells, normal or tumor-derived, including normal melanocytes versus melanoma cells, normal mammary epithelial cells versus breast adenocarcinoma cells, and normal neurons or astrocytes versus glioma cells. As a reference cell system we used normal human fibroblasts versus the SV40-transformed fibroblast cell line NB324K. After infection, we observed good expression of the reporter gene in the different tumor cell types, but only poor expression if any in the corresponding normal cells. We also constructed a recombinant MVMp expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene and assessed by flow cytometry the efficiency of gene transduction into the different target cells. At a multiplicity of infection of 30, we observed substantial transduction of the gene into most of the tumor cell types tested, but only marginal transduction into normal cells under the same experimental conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that a recombinant MVMp expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene can, in vitro, cause efficient killing of most tumor cell types in the presence of ganciclovir, whilst affecting normal proliferating cells only marginally if at all. However, in the same experimental condition, breast tumor cells appeared to be resistant to GCV-mediated cytotoxicity, possibly because these cells are not susceptible to the bystander effect. Our data suggest that MVMp-based vectors could prove useful as selective vehicles for anticancer gene therapy, particularly for in vivo delivery of cytotoxic effector genes into tumor cells.

  6. Phenotypic and functional analysis of HL-60 cells used in opsonophagocytic-killing assay for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Seoh, Ju Young; Cho, Su Jin

    2015-02-01

    Differentiated HL-60 is an effector cell widely used for the opsonophagocytic-killing assay (OPKA) to measure efficacy of pneumococcal vaccines. We investigated the correlation between phenotypic expression of immunoreceptors and phagocytic ability of HL-60 cells differentiated with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), or 1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VitD3) for 5 days. Phenotypic change was examined by flow cytometry with specific antibodies to CD11c, CD14, CD18, CD32, and CD64. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using 7-aminoactinomycin D. Function was evaluated by a standard OPKA against serotype 19F and chemiluminescence-based respiratory burst assay. The expression of CD11c and CD14 gradually increased upon exposure to all three agents, while CD14 expression increased abruptly after VitD3. The expression of CD18, CD32, and CD64 increased during differentiation with all three agents. Apoptosis remained less than 10% until day 3 but increased after differentiation by DMF or ATRA. Differentiation with ATRA or VitD3 increased the respiratory burst after day 4. DMF differentiation showed a high OPKA titer at day 1 which sustained thereafter while ATRA or VitD3-differentiated cells gradually increased. Pearson analysis between the phenotypic changes and OPKA titers suggests that CD11c might be a useful differentiation marker for HL-60 cells for use in pneumococcal OPKA.

  7. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  8. Cells surviving fractional killing by TRAIL exhibit transient but sustainable resistance and inflammatory phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Roux, Jérémie; Spencer, Sabrina L.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    When clonal populations of human cells are exposed to apoptosis-inducing agents, some cells die and others survive. This fractional killing arises not from mutation but from preexisting, stochastic differences in the levels and activities of proteins regulating apoptosis. Here we examine the properties of cells that survive treatment with agonists of two distinct death receptors, tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and anti-FasR antibodies. We find that “survivor” cells are highly resistant to a second ligand dose applied 1 d later. Resistance is reversible, resetting after several days of culture in the absence of death ligand. “Reset” cells appear identical to drug-naive cells with respect to death ligand sensitivity and gene expression profiles. TRAIL survivors are cross-resistant to activators of FasR and vice versa and exhibit an NF-κB–dependent inflammatory phenotype. Remarkably, reversible resistance is induced in the absence of cell death when caspase inhibitors are present and can be sustained for 1 wk or more, also without cell death, by periodic ligand exposure. Thus stochastic differences in cell state can have sustained consequences for sen­sitivity to prodeath ligands and acquisition of proinflammatory phenotypes. The important role played by periodicity in TRAIL exposure for induction of opposing apoptosis and survival mechanisms has implications for the design of optimal therapeutic agents and protocols. PMID:23699397

  9. Killing of cancer cells through the use of eukaryotic expression vectors harbouring genes encoding nucleases and ribonuclease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2015-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy vectors are promising tools for killing cancer cells with the purpose of eradicating malignant tumours entirely. Different delivery methods of vectors into the cancer cells, including both non-viral and viral, as well as promoters for the targeted expression of genes encoding anticancer proteins were developed for effective and selective killing of cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Many vectors have been created to kill cancer cells, and some vectors suppress malignant tumours with high efficiency. This review is focused on vectors bearing genes for nucleases such as deoxyribonucleases (caspase-activated DNase, deoxyribonuclease I-like 3, endonuclease G) and ribonucleases (human polynucleotide phosphorylase, ribonuclease L, α-sarcin, barnase), as well as vectors harbouring gene encoding ribonuclease inhibitor. The data concerning the functionality and the efficacy of such vectors are presented.

  10. Dendritic cell exosomes directly kill tumor cells and activate natural killer cells via TNF superfamily ligands

    PubMed Central

    Munich, Stephan; Sobo-Vujanovic, Andrea; Buchser, William J.; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Vujanovic, Nikola L.

    2012-01-01

    Autocrine and paracrine cell communication can be conveyed by multiple mediators, including membrane-associate proteins, secreted proteins and exosomes. Exosomes are 30–100 nm endosome-derived vesicles consisting in cytosolic material surrounded by a lipid bilayer containing transmembrane proteins. We have previously shown that dendritic cells (DCs) express on their surface multiple TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFLs), by which they can induce the apoptotic demise of tumor cells as well as the activation of natural killer (NK) cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that, similar to DCs, DC-derived exosomes (DCex) express on their surface TNF, FasL and TRAIL, by which they can trigger caspase activation and apoptosis in tumor cells. We also show that DCex activate NK cells and stimulate them to secrete interferonγ (IFNγ) upon the interaction of DCex TNF with NK-cell TNF receptors. These data demonstrate that DCex can mediate essential innate immune functions that were previously ascribed to DCs. PMID:23170255

  11. Sorafenib/Regorafenib and Lapatinib interact to kill CNS tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Hossein A.; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present studies were to determine whether the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib or its derivative regorafenib interacted with the ERBB1/ERBB2 inhibitor lapatinib to kill CNS tumor cells. In multiple CNS tumor cell types sorafenib and lapatinib interacted in a greater than additive fashion to cause tumor cell death. Tumor cells lacking PTEN, and anoikis or lapatinib resistant cells were as sensitive to the drug combination as cells expressing PTEN or parental cells, respectively. Similar data were obtained using regorafenib. Treatment of brain cancer cells with [sorafenib + lapatinib] enhanced radiation toxicity. The drug combination increased the numbers of LC3-GFP vesicles; this correlated with a reduction in endogenous LC3II, and p62 and LAMP2 degradation. Knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 significantly suppressed drug combination lethality. Expression of c-FLIP-s, BCL-XL or dominant negative caspase 9 reduced drug combination toxicity; knock down of FADD or CD95 was protective. Expression of both activated AKT and activated MEK1 or activated mTOR was required to strongly suppress drug combination lethality. As both lapatinib and sorafenib are FDA approved agents, our data argue for further determination as to whether lapatinib and sorafenib is a useful glioblastoma therapy. PMID:24911215

  12. The role of DNA repair on cell killing by charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Murakami, M.; Itsukaichi, H.; Fukutsu, K.; Kanai, T.; Furusawa, Y.; Sato, K.; Ohara, H.; Yatagai, F.

    It can be noted that it is not simple double strand breaks (dsb) but the non-reparable breaks that are associated with high biological effectiveness in the cell killing effect for high LET radiation. Here, we have examined the effectiveness of fast neutrons and low (initial energy = 12 MeV/u) or high (135 MeV/u) energy charged particles on cell death in 19 mammalian cell lines including radiosensitive mutants. Some of the radiosensitive lines were deficient in DNA dsb repair such as LX830, M10, V3, and L5178Y-S cells and showed lower values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for fast neutrons if compared with their parent cell lines. The other lines of human ataxia-telangiectasia fibroblasts, irs 1, irs 2, irs 3 and irs1SF cells, which were also radiosensitive but known as proficient in dsb repair, showed moderate RBEs. Dsb repair deficient mutants showed low RBE values for heavy ions. These experimental findings suggest that the DNA repair system does not play a major role against the attack of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. Therefore, we hypothesize that a main cause of cell death induced by high LET radiations is due to non-reparable dsb, which are produced at a higher rate compared to low LET radiations.

  13. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression

    PubMed Central

    KAGIYA, GO; OGAWA, RYOHEI; CHOUDHURI, RAJANI; COOK, JOHN A; HATASHITA, MASANORI; TANAKA, YOSHIKAZU; KODA, KANA; YAMASHITA, KEI; KUBO, MAKOTO; KAWAKAMI, FUMITAKA; MITCHELL, JAMES B

    2015-01-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  14. Selective enhancement of hypoxic cell killing by tempol-regulated suicide gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kagiya, Go; Ogawa, Ryohei; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Hatashita, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Koda, Kana; Yamashita, Kei; Kubo, Makoto; Kawakami, Fumitaka; Mitchell, James B

    2015-08-01

    The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is caused by an imbalance between cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Such regions may facilitate the onset of recurrence after radiation therapy and chemotherapy, as hypoxic cells show resistance to these treatments. We found that tempol, a nitroxide, strongly induces the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, particularly under conditions of hypoxia. We, therefore, evaluated whether tempol enhances the gene expression via HIF-1α, potentially leading to various applications for cancer gene therapy targeting hypoxic cells. Consequently, following treatment with tempol under hypoxia, the luciferase (Luc) activity in the cells transfected with the plasmid containing the luc gene with the oxygen-dependent degradation domain and a promoter composed of hypoxia-responsive elements increased up to approximately 10-fold compared to that observed in cells treated identically with the exception of tempol. The plasmid constructed by replacing the luc gene with the fcy::fur fusion gene as a suicide gene, strongly induced the accumulation of the Fcy::Fur fusion protein, only when incubated in the presence of the hypoxic mimic CoCl2 and tempol. The transfected cells were successfully killed with the addition of 5-fluorocytosine to the cell culture according to the fcy::fur fusion gene expression. As similar but lesser enhancement of the Luc activity was also observed in solid tumor tissues in nude mice, this strategy may be applied for hypoxic cancer eradication. PMID:26034980

  15. Enhancing effects of gamma interferon on phagocytic cell association with and killing of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirth, J. J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Zlotnik, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the influence gamma interferon (GIFN) and interleukin 2 (IL2) have on the capability of P388D1 cells and mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (MPM) to attach to the blood-resident parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and kill them. Cultures of trypomastigote forms of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi grown in bovine serum were introduced into peritoneal cells of mice, along with P388D1 cells incubated with GIFN, IL2 and both. Control cells were also maintained. Statistical analysis were then performed on data on counts of the number of dead T. Cruzi cells. The GIFN enhanced the interaction of MPM and P388D1 cells with the surface of T. Cruzi, provided the interaction was given over 12 hr to take place. A depression of the cytotoxicity of P388D1 cells was attributed to mediation by H2O2, an effect partially offset by incubation with the lymphokine GIFN.

  16. A numerical investigation of the electric and thermal cell kill distributions in electroporation-based therapies in tissue.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Davalos, Rafael V; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation-based therapies are powerful biotechnological tools for enhancing the delivery of exogeneous agents or killing tissue with pulsed electric fields (PEFs). Electrochemotherapy (ECT) and gene therapy based on gene electrotransfer (EGT) both use reversible electroporation to deliver chemotherapeutics or plasmid DNA into cells, respectively. In both ECT and EGT, the goal is to permeabilize the cell membrane while maintaining high cell viability in order to facilitate drug or gene transport into the cell cytoplasm and induce a therapeutic response. Irreversible electroporation (IRE) results in cell kill due to exposure to PEFs without drugs and is under clinical evaluation for treating otherwise unresectable tumors. These PEF therapies rely mainly on the electric field distributions and do not require changes in tissue temperature for their effectiveness. However, in immediate vicinity of the electrodes the treatment may results in cell kill due to thermal damage because of the inhomogeneous electric field distribution and high current density during the electroporation-based therapies. Therefore, the main objective of this numerical study is to evaluate the influence of pulse number and electrical conductivity in the predicted cell kill zone due to irreversible electroporation and thermal damage. Specifically, we simulated a typical IRE protocol that employs ninety 100-µs PEFs. Our results confirm that it is possible to achieve predominant cell kill due to electroporation if the PEF parameters are chosen carefully. However, if either the pulse number and/or the tissue conductivity are too high, there is also potential to achieve cell kill due to thermal damage in the immediate vicinity of the electrodes. Therefore, it is critical for physicians to be mindful of placement of electrodes with respect to critical tissue structures and treatment parameters in order to maintain the non-thermal benefits of electroporation and prevent unnecessary damage to

  17. Merocyanine 540 and Photofrin II as photosensitizers for in vitro killing of duck hepatitis B virus and human hepatoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Shien, Yong-Shau; Kao, Ming-Chien

    1994-03-01

    The feasibility of using merocyanine 540 (MC 540) and Photofrin II (PII) as effective photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents for killing hepatoma cells and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) in vitro was investigated. Cultured duck hepatocytes infected with DHBV and hepatoma cells, Hep 3B and HCC 36, were used as models. MC 540 and PII effectively inhibits the DHBV growth by 90 - 99% in a dose- and light-dependent manner. Photodynamic killing of MC 540 in the two hepatoma cell lines results in 94 - 99% growth inhibition. However, both photosensitizers exhibit dark cytotoxicity (37 - 56%). The present results suggest that MC 540 and PII could be promising and effective photodynamic agents for killing HBV and hepatoma cells.

  18. Radiation quality dependence of signal transmission and bystander induced cell killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Bertolotti, Alessia; Facoetti, Angelica; Grande, Sveva; Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Ranza, Elena; Simone, Giustina; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria

    Low dose radiobiological studies have shown effects, observable in cells that are in the vicinity of irradiated cells, which are due to the release by irradiated cells of several cellular mediators among which Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS, NRS), and cytokines are likely to play a key role. Despite the large number in the literature of studies on bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation the results are still conflicting, and further studies are therefore needed on the possible underlying mechanisms. The dependence on radiation quality deserve particular attention because bystander mechanisms are probably more important with high-LET irradi-ations, where many cells are not hit (bystander). Moreover, due to the different patterns of energy deposition, the cellular response to low LET and high LET radiation can be different. Understanding whether these cells can contribute to the adverse effects of low radiation doses in a radiation quality-dependent fashion might have important implications in risk estimates for both cancer induction and non-cancer diseases. In this context, we addressed to the study of the bystander induced cell killing after incubation with "conditioned medium" from primary human fibroblasts irradiated with 0.1 and 0.5 Gy of α-particles or γ-rays. Medium transfer was performed after 1h incubation from irradiation. The results have confirmed a reduction in clonogenic survival after incubation with medium from α-irradiated cells, independently of the dose; similar results were obtained after γ-irradiation, although in this case a slight dose depen-dence could be envisaged. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were measured in the conditioned medium collected up to 20 hours after irradiation with α-particles and γ-rays in the dose-range of 0.1-1.0 Gy, in parallel with evaluation of their receptor expression in irradi-ated and bystander cells. Concerning IL-6, we observed the strongest modulation of its release

  19. Transformation-specific cell killing by a cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor and cellular binding

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, Daniel K.; Isselbacher, Kurt J.

    1982-01-01

    Cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor (CAGA glycoprotein), a small glycoprotein purified from human malignant effusion that selectively kills transformed cells, was tritiated by reductive methylation in the presence of NaB3H4. CAGA-glycoprotein-sensitive cells (baby-hamster kidney cells transformed by polyoma virus and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus grown at 37°C, the permissive temperature) bound 3–5-fold more 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein than did their CAGA-glycoprotein-resistant non-transformed counterparts. The Rous-sarcoma-virus-infected chick-embryo fibroblasts grown at non-permissive temperature (41°C) bound an intermediate amount of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein; however, this intermediate amount appeared to be sufficient to induce inhibition of cell growth when the infected chick-embryo fibroblasts treated at 41°C were switched to 37°C. Binding of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was time- and temperature-dependent and was not inhibited by monosaccharide. Binding was completely inhibited by the oligosaccharide liberated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment or by exhaustive Pronase digestion of intact CAGA glycoprotein. However, the isolated oligosaccharide failed to demonstrate the growth-inhibition characteristics of the intact glycopeptide. Binding of 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was unaffected by co-incubation with the peptide core released by endoglucosaminidase H treatment. 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein bound to intact cells could be removed by trypsin treatment up to 4h after addition of the glycoprotein but not thereafter. This time course paralleled the decreasing reversibility of growth inhibition. However, all 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was found in the supernatant when cells were first disrupted by sonication followed by trypsin treatment for up to 12h. 3H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein linked to Sepharose 4B failed to cause growth inhibition in CAGA

  20. Transformation-specific cell killing by a cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor and cellular binding.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, D K; Isselbacher, K J

    1982-11-15

    Cancer-associated galactosyltransferase acceptor (CAGA glycoprotein), a small glycoprotein purified from human malignant effusion that selectively kills transformed cells, was tritiated by reductive methylation in the presence of NaB(3)H(4). CAGA-glycoprotein-sensitive cells (baby-hamster kidney cells transformed by polyoma virus and chick-embryo fibroblasts infected with Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant of Rous sarcoma virus grown at 37 degrees C, the permissive temperature) bound 3-5-fold more (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein than did their CAGA-glycoprotein-resistant non-transformed counterparts. The Rous-sarcoma-virus-infected chick-embryo fibroblasts grown at non-permissive temperature (41 degrees C) bound an intermediate amount of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein; however, this intermediate amount appeared to be sufficient to induce inhibition of cell growth when the infected chick-embryo fibroblasts treated at 41 degrees C were switched to 37 degrees C. Binding of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was time- and temperature-dependent and was not inhibited by monosaccharide. Binding was completely inhibited by the oligosaccharide liberated by endoglucosaminidase H treatment or by exhaustive Pronase digestion of intact CAGA glycoprotein. However, the isolated oligosaccharide failed to demonstrate the growth-inhibition characteristics of the intact glycopeptide. Binding of (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was unaffected by co-incubation with the peptide core released by endoglucosaminidase H treatment. (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein bound to intact cells could be removed by trypsin treatment up to 4h after addition of the glycoprotein but not thereafter. This time course paralleled the decreasing reversibility of growth inhibition. However, all (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein was found in the supernatant when cells were first disrupted by sonication followed by trypsin treatment for up to 12h. (3)H-labelled CAGA glycoprotein linked to Sepharose 4B failed to cause

  1. Bipolar nanosecond electric pulses are less efficient at electropermeabilization and killing cells than monopolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Ullery, Jody; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Roth, Caleb C.; Semenov, Iurri; Beier, Hope T.; Tarango, Melissa; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that bipolar (BP) electric pulses in the microsecond range are more effective at permeabilizing cells while maintaining similar cell survival rates as compared to monopolar (MP) pulse equivalents. In this paper, we investigated whether the same advantage existed for BP nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) as compared to MP nsPEF. To study permeabilization effectiveness, MP or BP pulses were delivered to single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and the response of three dyes, Calcium Green-1, Propidium Iodide (PI), and FM1-43, was measured by confocal microscopy. Results show that BP pulses were less effective at increasing intracellular calcium concentration or PI uptake and cause less membrane reorganization (FM1-43) than MP pulses. Twenty-four hour survival was measured in three cell lines (Jurkat, U937, CHO) and over ten times more BP pulses were required to induce death as compared to MP pulses of similar magnitude and duration. Flow cytometry analysis of CHO cells after exposure (15 minutes) revealed that to achieve positive FITC-Annexin V and PI expression, ten times more BP pulses were required than MP pulses. Overall, unlike longer pulse exposures, BP nsPEF exposures proved far less effective at both membrane permeabilization and cell killing than MP nsPEF. PMID:24332942

  2. Selective killing effect of oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole on A549 or Hela cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guihua

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the selective killing effect of oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole on A549 or Hela cells. Methods Proliferation assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, apoptosis detecting, flow cytometry and western blot were performed. Results It was found that treatment with propafenone at the concentration of 0.014 g/L or higher for 48 h could induce apoptosis in Hela cells greatly, while it was not observed in oxytetracycline and metamizole at the concentration of 0.20 g/L for 48 h. Oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizole all displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of A549 cells. The results of LDH assay demonstrated that the drugs at the test range of concentration did not cause necrosis in the cells. Propafenone could elevate the protein level of P53 effectively (P<0.01). Conclusions Oxytetracycline, propafenone and metamizol (dipyrone) all displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of A549 cells. Propafenone also displayed evident inhibitory effects on the proliferation of Hela cells. PMID:24385693

  3. Bipolar nanosecond electric pulses are less efficient at electropermeabilization and killing cells than monopolar pulses.

    PubMed

    Ibey, Bennett L; Ullery, Jody C; Pakhomova, Olga N; Roth, Caleb C; Semenov, Iurii; Beier, Hope T; Tarango, Melissa; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2014-01-10

    Multiple studies have shown that bipolar (BP) electric pulses in the microsecond range are more effective at permeabilizing cells while maintaining similar cell survival rates as compared to monopolar (MP) pulse equivalents. In this paper, we investigated whether the same advantage existed for BP nanosecond-pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) as compared to MP nsPEF. To study permeabilization effectiveness, MP or BP pulses were delivered to single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and the response of three dyes, Calcium Green-1, propidium iodide (PI), and FM1-43, was measured by confocal microscopy. Results show that BP pulses were less effective at increasing intracellular calcium concentration or PI uptake and cause less membrane reorganization (FM1-43) than MP pulses. Twenty-four hour survival was measured in three cell lines (Jurkat, U937, CHO) and over ten times more BP pulses were required to induce death as compared to MP pulses of similar magnitude and duration. Flow cytometry analysis of CHO cells after exposure (at 15 min) revealed that to achieve positive FITC-Annexin V and PI expression, ten times more BP pulses were required than MP pulses. Overall, unlike longer pulse exposures, BP nsPEF exposures proved far less effective at both membrane permeabilization and cell killing than MP nsPEF.

  4. PKA Knockdown Enhances Cell Killing In Response To Radiation And Androgen Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Harvey H.; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Hachem, Paul; Mu, Zhaomei; Stoyanova, Radka; Khor, Li-Yan; Agrawal, Sudhir; Pollack, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of Gem®231, a second generation antisense molecule targeted to the RIα subunit of PKARIα (AS-PKA), administered in combination with androgen deprivation (AD) and radiation therapy (RT), was examined in androgen sensitive (LNCaP) and insensitive (PC3) cell lines. Apoptosis was assayed by Caspase 3+7 activity and AnnexinV binding. AS-PKA significantly increased apoptosis in vitro from RT (both lines), with further increases in LNCaP cells grown in AD medium. In LNCaP cells, AD increased phosphorylated map-kinase (pMAPK), which was reduced by AS-PKA relative to the MM controls. AS-PKA also reduced pMAPK levels in PC3 cells. Cell death was measured by clonogenic survival assays. In vivo, LNCaP cells were grown orthotopically in nude mice. Tumor kinetics were measured by magnetic resonance imaging and serum prostate-specific antigen. PC3 cells were grown subcutaneously and tumor volume assessed by caliper measurements. In PC3 xenografts, AS-PKA caused a significant increase in tumor doubling time relative to MM controls as a monotherapy or in combination with RT. In orthotopic LNCaP tumors, AS-PKA was ineffective as a monotherapy; however it caused a statistically significant increase in tumor doubling time relative to MM controls when used in combination with AD, with or without RT. PKARIα levels in tumors were quantified via immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and image analysis. IHC measurements in LNCaP cells showed that AS-PKA reduced PKARIα levels in vivo. We demonstrate for the first time that AS-PKA enhances cell killing androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells to AD±RT and androgen insensitive cells to RT. PMID:20960462

  5. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius Kills Streptococcus pneumoniae Planktonic Cells and Pneumococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Talekar, Sharmila J.; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P.; Quave, Cassandra L.; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC’s, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms. PMID:24823499

  6. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Sharmila J; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P; Quave, Cassandra L; Vidal, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  7. IL-17A promotes migration and tumor killing capability of B cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin; Weng, Chengyin; Mao, Haibo; Fang, Xisheng; Liu, Xia; Wu, Yong; Cao, Xiaofei; Li, Baoxiu; Chen, Xiaojun; Gan, Qinquan; Xia, Jianchuan; Liu, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that the accumulation of IL-17-producing cells could mediate tumor protective immunity by promoting the migration of NK cells, T cells and dendritic cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. However, there were no reports concerning the effect of IL-17A on tumor infiltrating B cells. In this study, we investigated the accumulation of CD20+ B cells in the ESCC tumor nests and further addressed the effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells. There was positive correlation between the levels of CD20+ B cells and IL-17+ cells. IL-17A could promote the ESCC tumor cells to produce more chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL13, which were associated with the migration of B cells. In addition, IL-17A enhanced the IgG-mediated antibody and complement mediated cytotoxicity of B cells against tumor cells. IL-17A-stimulated B cells gained more effective direct killing capability through enhanced expression of Granzyme B and FasL. The effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells was IL-17A pathway dependent, which could be inhibited by IL-17A inhibitor. This study provides further understanding of the roles of IL-17A in humoral response, which may contribute to the development of novel tumor immunotherapy strategy. PMID:26942702

  8. IL-17A promotes migration and tumor killing capability of B cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Weng, Chengyin; Mao, Haibo; Fang, Xisheng; Liu, Xia; Wu, Yong; Cao, Xiaofei; Li, Baoxiu; Chen, Xiaojun; Gan, Qinquan; Xia, Jianchuan; Liu, Guolong

    2016-04-19

    We have previously reported that the accumulation of IL-17-producing cells could mediate tumor protective immunity by promoting the migration of NK cells, T cells and dendritic cells in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. However, there were no reports concerning the effect of IL-17A on tumor infiltrating B cells. In this study, we investigated the accumulation of CD20+ B cells in the ESCC tumor nests and further addressed the effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells. There was positive correlation between the levels of CD20+ B cells and IL-17+ cells. IL-17A could promote the ESCC tumor cells to produce more chemokines CCL2, CCL20 and CXCL13, which were associated with the migration of B cells. In addition, IL-17A enhanced the IgG-mediated antibody and complement mediated cytotoxicity of B cells against tumor cells. IL-17A-stimulated B cells gained more effective direct killing capability through enhanced expression of Granzyme B and FasL. The effect of IL-17A on the migration and cytotoxicity of B cells was IL-17A pathway dependent, which could be inhibited by IL-17A inhibitor. This study provides further understanding of the roles of IL-17A in humoral response, which may contribute to the development of novel tumor immunotherapy strategy.

  9. Tanshinone IIA enhances bystander cell killing of cancer cells expressing Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase in nuclei and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyang; Zhao, Lei; Dong, Xiaoshen; He, Anning; Zheng, Caiwei; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna; Zheng, Xinyu

    2015-09-01

    Heterologous expression of the Drosophila melanogaster multi-substrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to several cytotoxic nucleoside analogs. Thus, it may be used as a suicide gene in combined gene/chemotherapy treatment of cancer. To further characterize this potential suicide gene, we constructed two retroviral vectors that enabled the expression of Dm-dNK in cancer cells. One vector harbored the wild‑type enzyme that localized to the nucleus. The other vector harbored a mitochondrial localized mutant enzyme that was constructed by deleting the nuclear localization signal and fusing it to a mitochondrial import signal of cytochrome c oxidase. A thymidine kinase-deficient osteosarcoma cell line was transduced with the recombinant viruses. The sensitivity and bystander cell killing in the presence of pyrimidine nucleoside analogs (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)‑2'‑deoxyuridine and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylthymine were investigated. Tanshinone IIA is a constituent of Danshen; a traditional Chinese medicine used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This study also looked at the influence of Tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect and the underlying mechanisms. We showed that sensitivity of the osteosarcoma cell line to the nucleoside analogs and the efficiency of bystander cell killing were independent of the subcellular localization of Dm-dNK. The enhanced effect of tanshinone IIA on the bystander effect was related to the increased expression of Cx43 and Cx26.

  10. PIM Kinase Inhibitors Kill Hypoxic Tumor Cells by Reducing Nrf2 Signaling and Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Noel A; Sainz, Alva G; Song, Jin H; Kraft, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Intratumoral hypoxia is a significant obstacle to the successful treatment of solid tumors, and it is highly correlated with metastasis, therapeutic resistance, and disease recurrence in cancer patients. As a result, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapies that target hypoxic cells within the tumor microenvironment. The Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) kinases represent a prosurvival pathway that is upregulated in response to hypoxia, in a HIF-1-independent manner. We demonstrate that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of PIM kinases is significantly more toxic toward cancer cells in hypoxia as compared with normoxia. Xenograft studies confirm that PIM kinase inhibitors impede tumor growth and selectively kill hypoxic tumor cells in vivo Experiments show that PIM kinases enhance the ability of tumor cells to adapt to hypoxia-induced oxidative stress by increasing the nuclear localization and activity of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which functions to increase the expression of antioxidant genes. Small molecule PIM kinase inhibitors prevent Nrf2 from accumulating in the nucleus, reducing the transcription of cytoprotective genes and leading to the build-up of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to toxic levels in hypoxic tumor cells. This toxic effect of PIM inhibitors can be successfully blocked by ROS scavengers, including N-acetyl cystine and superoxide dismutase. Thus, inhibition of PIM kinases has the potential to oppose hypoxia-mediated therapeutic resistance and induce cell death in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1637-47. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196781

  11. Reduction of radiation-induced cell cycle blocks by caffeine does not necessarily lead to increased cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of caffeine upon the radiosensitivities of three human tumor lines was examined and correlated with its action upon the radiation-induced S-phase and G2-phase blocks. Caffeine was found to reduce at least partially the S-phase and G2-phase blocks in all the cell lines examined but potentiated cytotoxicity in only one of the three tumor lines. That reductions have been demonstrated to occur in the absence of increased cell killing provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that reductions may not be causal in those cases when potentiation of radiation-induced cytotoxicity is observed in the presence of caffeine.

  12. Novel antioxidants are not toxic to normal tissues but effectively kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Aladedunye, Felix; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Li, Dongping; Thomas, James; Kovalchuk, Olga; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-10-01

    Free radicals are formed as a result of cellular processes and play a key role in predisposition to and development of numerous diseases and of premature aging. Recently, we reported the syntheses of a number of novel phenolic antioxidants for possible application in food industry. In the present study, analyses of the cellular processes and molecular gene expression effects of some of the novel antioxidants in normal human tissues and in cancer cells were undertaken. Results indicated that whereas the examined antioxidants showed no effects on morphology and gene expression of normal human oral and gingival epithelial tissues, they exerted a profound cell killing effect on breast cancer cells, including on chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer cells and on oral squamous carcinoma cells. Among the tested antioxidants, N-decyl-N-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide and N-decyl-N-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide were the most promising, with excellent potential for cancer treatment. Moreover, our gene expression databases can be used as a roadmap for future analysis of mechanisms of antioxidant action.

  13. Nanovectorization of TRAIL with single wall carbon nanotubes enhances tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Al Batoul; Picaud, Fabien; Rattier, Thibault; Pudlo, Marc; Dufour, Florent; Saviot, Lucien; Chassagnon, Rémi; Lherminier, Jeannine; Gharbi, Tijani; Micheau, Olivier; Herlem, Guillaume

    2015-02-11

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or Apo2L) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily. This type II transmembrane protein is able to bound specifically to cancer cell receptors (i.e., TRAIL-R1 (or DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (or DR5)) and to induce apoptosis without being toxic for healthy cells. Because membrane-bound TRAIL induces stronger receptor aggregation and apoptosis than soluble TRAIL, we proposed here to vectorize TRAIL using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to mimic membrane TRAIL. Owing to their exceptional and revolutional properties, carbon nanotubes, especially SWCNTs, are used in a wide range of physical or, now, medical applications. Indeed due to their high mechanical resistance, their high flexibility and their hydrophobicity, SWCNTs are known to rapidly diffuse in an aqueous medium such as blood, opening the way of development of new drug nanovectors (or nanocarriers). Our TRAIL-based SWCNTs nanovectors proved to be more efficient than TRAIL alone death receptors in triggering cancer cell killing. These NPTs increased TRAIL pro-apoptotic potential by nearly 20-fold in different Human tumor cell lines including colorectal, nonsmall cell lung cancer, or hepatocarcinomas. We provide thus a proof-of-concept that TRAIL nanovector derivatives based on SWCNT may be useful to future nanomedicine therapies.

  14. Lack of a correlation between hyperthermic cell killing, thermotolerance, and membrane lipid fluidity

    SciTech Connect

    Lepock, J.R.; Massicotte-Nolan, P.; Rule, G.S.; Kruuv, J.

    1981-08-01

    Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is an effective membrane lipid perturber. Uptake studies using (/sup 3/H)BHT showed that it is effectively taken up by V79 Chinese hamster lung cells. The correlation time of rotation (tau/sub c/) of the spin label 2,2-dimethyl-5-dodecyl-5-methyloxazolidine-N-oxide (2N14) was decreased 4.0 and 12.9% by addition of 0.03 and 0.07 mM BHT, respectively. This corresponds to increases in membrane fluidity produced by temperature increases of 1.8 and 6.0/sup 0/C, respectively. Neither BHT treatment sensitized the cells to hyperthermia. Also no decrease in membrane lipid fluidity, again as measured with the spin label 2N14, was found in thermotolerant V79 cells compared to control cells. Thermotolerance was induced by a 20-min exposure to 44.5/sup 0/C and the membrane fluidity measurements were made 16 hour later, when the maximum level of thermotolerance was observed. Thus no evidence was found for a correlation between membrane lipid fluidity and hyperthermic killing of V79 cells.

  15. A designed equine herpes thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK) variant improves ganciclovir-induced cell-killing.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Theresa; Ort, Stephan; Monnerjahn, Christian; Konrad, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    The limitations of the ganciclovir (GCV)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system as a suicide gene therapy approach have been extensively studied over the years. In our study, we focused on improving the cytotoxic profile of the GCV/equine herpes virus-4 thymidine kinase (EHV4 TK: EC 2.7.1.21) system. Our approach involved the structure-guided mutagenesis of EHV4 TK in order to switch its ability to preferentially phosphorylate the natural substrate deoxythymidine (dT) to that of GCV. We performed steady-state kinetic analysis, genetic complementation in a thymidine kinase-deficient Escherichia coli strain, isothermal titration calorimetry, and analysis of GCV-induced cell killing through generation of HEK 293 stable cell-lines expressing EHV4 TK mutants and wild-type EHV4 TK. We found that the EHV4 TK S144H-GFP mutant preferentially phosphorylates GCV and confers increased GCV-induced cytotoxicity compared to wild-type EHV4 TK.

  16. Two-stage model of radon-induced malignant lung tumors in rats: effects of cell killing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebeck, E. G.; Curtis, S. B.; Cross, F. T.; Moolgavkar, S. H.

    1996-01-01

    A two-stage stochastic model of carcinogenesis is used to analyze lung tumor incidence in 3750 rats exposed to varying regimens of radon carried on a constant-concentration uranium ore dust aerosol. New to this analysis is the parameterization of the model such that cell killing by the alpha particles could be included. The model contains parameters characterizing the rate of the first mutation, the net proliferation rate of initiated cells, the ratio of the rates of cell loss (cell killing plus differentiation) and cell division, and the lag time between the appearance of the first malignant cell and the tumor. Data analysis was by standard maximum likelihood estimation techniques. Results indicate that the rate of the first mutation is dependent on radon and consistent with in vitro rates measured experimentally, and that the rate of the second mutation is not dependent on radon. An initial sharp rise in the net proliferation rate of initiated cell was found with increasing exposure rate (denoted model I), which leads to an unrealistically high cell-killing coefficient. A second model (model II) was studied, in which the initial rise was attributed to promotion via a step function, implying that it is due not to radon but to the uranium ore dust. This model resulted in values for the cell-killing coefficient consistent with those found for in vitro cells. An "inverse dose-rate" effect is seen, i.e. an increase in the lifetime probability of tumor with a decrease in exposure rate. This is attributed in large part to promotion of intermediate lesions. Since model II is preferable on biological grounds (it yields a plausible cell-killing coefficient), such as uranium ore dust. This analysis presents evidence that a two-stage model describes the data adequately and generates hypotheses regarding the mechanism of radon-induced carcinogenesis.

  17. Importance of antibody and complement for oxidative burst and killing of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella by blood cells in Africans.

    PubMed

    Gondwe, Esther N; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Goodall, Margaret; Graham, Stephen M; Mastroeni, Pietro; Drayson, Mark T; MacLennan, Calman A

    2010-02-16

    Bacteremia caused by nontyphoidal strains of Salmonella is endemic among African children. Case-fatality rates are high and antibiotic resistance increasing, but no vaccine is currently available. T cells are important for clearance of Salmonella infection within macrophages, but in Africa, invasive Salmonella disease usually manifests in the blood and affects children between 4 months and 2 y of age, when anti-Salmonella antibody is absent. We have previously found a role for complement-fixing bactericidal antibody in protecting these children. Here we show that opsonic activity of antibody and complement is required for oxidative burst and killing of Salmonella by blood cells in Africans. Induction of neutrophil oxidative burst correlated with anti-Salmonella IgG and IgM titers and C3 deposition on bacteria and was significantly lower in African children younger than 2 y compared with older children. Preopsonizing Salmonella with immune serum overcame this deficit, indicating a requirement for antibody and/or complement. Using different opsonization procedures, both antibody and complement were found to be necessary for optimal oxidative burst, phagocytosis and killing of nontyphoidal Salmonella by peripheral blood cells in Africans. Although most strains of African nontyphoidal Salmonella can be killed with antibody and complement alone, phagocytes in the presence of specific antibody and complement can kill strains resistant to killing by immune serum. These findings increase the likelihood that an antibody-inducing vaccine will protect against invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in African children.

  18. Pro-Oxidant Activity of Amine-Pyridine-Based Iron Complexes Efficiently Kills Cancer and Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Bártulos, Marta; Aceves-Luquero, Clara; Qualai, Jamal; Cussó, Olaf; Martínez, Mª Angeles; Fernández de Mattos, Silvia; Menéndez, Javier A.; Villalonga, Priam; Costas, Miquel; Ribas, Xavi; Massaguer, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Differential redox homeostasis in normal and malignant cells suggests that pro-oxidant-induced upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) should selectively target cancer cells without compromising the viability of untransformed cells. Consequently, a pro-oxidant deviation well-tolerated by nonmalignant cells might rapidly reach a cell-death threshold in malignant cells already at a high setpoint of constitutive oxidative stress. To test this hypothesis, we took advantage of a selected number of amine-pyridine-based Fe(II) complexes that operate as efficient and robust oxidation catalysts of organic substrates upon reaction with peroxides. Five of these Fe(II)-complexes and the corresponding aminopyridine ligands were selected to evaluate their anticancer properties. We found that the iron complexes failed to display any relevant activity, while the corresponding ligands exhibited significant antiproliferative activity. Among the ligands, none of which were hemolytic, compounds 1, 2 and 5 were cytotoxic in the low micromolar range against a panel of molecularly diverse human cancer cell lines. Importantly, the cytotoxic activity profile of some compounds remained unaltered in epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT)-induced stable populations of cancer stem-like cells, which acquired resistance to the well-known ROS inducer doxorubicin. Compounds 1, 2 and 5 inhibited the clonogenicity of cancer cells and induced apoptotic cell death accompanied by caspase 3/7 activation. Flow cytometry analyses indicated that ligands were strong inducers of oxidative stress, leading to a 7-fold increase in intracellular ROS levels. ROS induction was associated with their ability to bind intracellular iron and generate active coordination complexes inside of cells. In contrast, extracellular complexation of iron inhibited the activity of the ligands. Iron complexes showed a high proficiency to cleave DNA through oxidative-dependent mechanisms, suggesting a likely mechanism of

  19. Selective imaging and killing of cancer cells with protein-activated near-infrared fluorescing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rungta, Parul; Bandera, Yuriy P; Roeder, Ryan D; Li, Yangchun; Baldwin, William S; Sharma, Deepti; Sehorn, Michael G; Luzinov, Igor; Foulger, Stephen H

    2011-07-01

    We present a general approach for the selective imaging and killing of cancer cells using protein-activated near-infrared emitting and cytotoxic oxygen generating nanoparticles. Poly(propargyl acrylate) (PA) particles were surface modified through the copper-catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition of azide-terminated indocyanine green (azICG), a near-infrared emitter, and poly(ethylene glycol) (azPEG) chains of various molecular weights. The placement of azICG onto the surface of the particles allowed for the chromophores to complex with bovine serum albumin when dispersed in PBS that resulted in an enhancement of the dye emission. In addition, the inclusion of azPEG with the chromophores onto the particle surface resulted in a synergistic ninefold enhancement of the fluorescence intensity, with azPEGs of increasing molecular weight amplifying the response. Human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) overexpress albumin proteins and could be employed to activate the fluorescence of the nanoparticles. Preliminary PDT studies with HepG2 cells combined with the modified particles indicated that a minor exposure of 780 nm radiation resulted in a statistically significant reduction in cell growth.

  20. DNA lesions in hyperthermic cell killing: effects of thermotolerance, procaine, and erythritol

    SciTech Connect

    Jorritsma, J.B.; Konings, A.W.

    1986-04-01

    When HeLa S3 cells were subjected to 45 degrees C hyperthermia, DNA lesions were detected by the use of the alkaline unwinding/hydroxylapatite method. The number of lesions formed was not affected when the cells were made thermotolerant by either an acute (15 min 44 degrees C + 5 h 37 degrees C) or a chronic (5 h 42 degrees C) pretreatment before 45 degrees C hyperthermia. The presence of 10 mM procaine (heat sensitizer) or 0.5 M erythritol (heat protector) during hyperthermia also had no effect on the rate of formation of heat-induced alkali labile DNA lesions. These observations do not support a concept where DNA lesions are considered to be the ultimate cause of hyperthermic cell killing. Both drugs, however, influenced the rate of repair of radiation-induced strand breaks when present during preirradiation heat treatment. We conclude that the initial number of heat-induced alkali labile DNA lesions is not directly related to cell survival. It cannot be excluded, however, that differences in posthyperthermic repair of these lesions may lead to a positive correlation between residual DNA damage and survival after the different experimental conditions.

  1. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  2. Mammalian cells are not killed by DNA single-strand breaks caused by hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.F.; Blakely, W.F.; Joner, E.I.

    1985-09-01

    Cell killing by ionizing radiation has been shown to be caused by hydroxyl free radicals formed by water radiolysis. The authors have previously suggested that the killing is not caused by individual OH free radicals but by the interaction of volumes of high radical density with DNA to cause locally multiple damaged sites (LMDS). Here they test this hypothesis using hydrogen dioxide as an alternate source of OH radicals. The route to OH production from H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is expected to cause singly damaged sites rather than LMDS. Chinese hamster V79-171 cells were treated with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at varying concentrations for varying times at 0/sup 0/C. The yield of DNA damage produced increases with increasing concentration of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and with time of exposure. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is efficient in producing single-strand breaks; treatment with 50 ..mu..M for 30 min produces damage equivalent to that formed by 10 Gy of ..cap alpha.. irradiation. In the presence of a hydroxyl radical scavenger, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the yield of damage decreases with increasing DMSO concentration consistent with the scavenging of hydroxyl radicals. In contrast to DNA damage production, cell killing by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ treatment at 0/sup 0/C is inefficient. The conclusion drawn is that individual DNA damage sites are ineffectual in killing cells. Mechanisms are suggested for killing at 0/sup 0/C at high concentrations and for the efficient cell killing by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C at much lower concentrations.

  3. Entamoeba histolytica: target cells killed by trophozoites undergo DNA fragmentation which is not blocked by Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Ragland, B D; Ashley, L S; Vaux, D L; Petri, W A

    1994-11-01

    Amebic destruction of neutrophils and macrophages is contact-dependent. Adherence is mediated by a galactose-specific surface lectin on the amebic membrane. The pathway by which contact-dependent cytolysis of the target cell occurs is unknown. We hypothesized that target cell death is due to the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death) by the amebae. The purpose of this study was to determine whether target cell DNA is fragmented into a ladder pattern characteristic of apoptosis and to test whether overexpression of Bcl-2, a protein that confers resistance to apoptotic death from some stimuli, blocks target cell killing. The murine myeloid cell line FDC-P1 transfected with a retrovirus construct expressing the Bcl-2 protein was shown to be resistant to the apoptotic death that the parental line undergoes upon growth factor deprivation. 51Cr-labeled FDC-P1 control or bcl-2-transfected cells were incubated with Entamoeba histolytica (4:1 cell/ameba ratio) and killing of the cells was assessed by 51Cr release. Both cell lines were susceptible to contact-dependent killing. Death induced by the amebae in the bcl-2-transfected cells resulted in a DNA ladder fragmentation pattern (using [125I]iododeoxyuridine-labeled target cell DNA) identical to that seen in the control cells undergoing apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Target cell DNA fragmentation was inhibited by blocking adherence with galactose. Our data suggest that target cell killing by E. histolytica can occur via Bcl-2-independent apoptotic mechanism. PMID:7957763

  4. Obatoclax kills anaplastic thyroid cancer cells by inducing lysosome neutralization and necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Champa, Devora; Orlacchio, Arturo; Patel, Bindi; Ranieri, Michela; Shemetov, Anton A; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Di Cristofano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are very aggressive, almost invariably lethal neoplasms for which no effective treatment exists. These tumors are intrinsically resistant to cell death, even when their driver oncogenic signaling pathways are inhibited. We have undertaken a detailed analysis, in mouse and human thyroid cancer cells, of the mechanism through which Obatoclax, a pan-inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic proteins of the BCL2 family, effectively reduces tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that Obatoclax does not induce apoptosis, but rather necrosis of thyroid cancer cells, and that non-transformed thyroid cells are significantly less affected by this compound. Surprisingly, we show that Obatoclax rapidly localizes to the lysosomes and induces loss of acidification, block of lysosomal fusion with autophagic vacuoles, and subsequent lysosomal permeabilization. Notably, prior lysosome neutralization using different V-ATPase inhibitors partially protects cancer cells from the toxic effects of Obatoclax. Although inhibition of autophagy does not affect Obatoclax-induced cell death, selective down-regulation of ATG7, but not of ATG5, partially impairs Obatoclax effects, suggesting the existence of autophagy-independent functions for ATG7. Strikingly, Obatoclax killing activity depends only on its accumulation in the lysosomes, and not on its interaction with BCL2 family members. Finally, we show that also other lysosome-targeting compounds, Mefloquine and LLOMe, readily induce necrosis in thyroid cancer cells, and that Mefloquine significantly impairs tumor growth in vivo, highlighting a clear vulnerability of these aggressive, apoptosis-resistant tumors that can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:27144341

  5. Metformin-Induced Killing of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells is Mediated by Reduction in Fatty Acid Synthase via miRNA-193b

    PubMed Central

    Wahdan-Alaswad, Reema S.; Cochrane, Dawn R.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Howe, Erin N.; Edgerton, Susan M.; Anderson, Steven M.; Thor, Ann D.; Richer, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-diabetic drug metformin (1,1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride) reduces both the incidence and mortality of several types of cancer. Metformin has been shown to selectively kill cancer stem cells and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines are more sensitive to the effects of metformin. However, the mechanism underlying the enhanced susceptibility of TNBC to metformin had not been elucidated. Expression profiling of metformin-treated TNBC lines revealed fatty acid synthase (FASN) as one of the genes most significantly downregulated following 24 hours of treatment and a decrease in FASN protein was also observed. Since FASN is critical for de novo fatty acid synthesis, and is important for survival of TNBC, we hypothesized that FASN downregulation facilitates metformin-induced apoptosis. Profiling studies also exposed a rapid metformin-induced increase in miR-193 family members, and miR-193b was found to directly target the FASN 3′UTR. Addition of exogenous miR-193b mimic to untreated TNBC cells resulted in decreased FASN protein expression and increased apoptosis of TNBC cells, while spontaneously immortalized, non-transformed breast epithelial cells remained unaffected. Conversely, antagonizing miR-193 activity impaired the ability of metformin to decrease FASN and cause cell death. Further, the metformin-stimulated increase in miR-193 resulted in reduced mammosphere formation by TNBC lines. These studies provide mechanistic insight into the metformin-induced killing of TNBC. PMID:25213330

  6. Hypofractionation Results in Reduced Tumor Cell Kill Compared to Conventional Fractionation for Tumors With Regions of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David J.; Keall, Paul J.; Loo, Billy W.; Chen, Zhe J.; Brown, J. Martin

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Results: Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10{sup 5} over a distance of 130 {mu}m. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of {approx}10{sup 3} as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia.

  7. 40 CFR 180.1325 - Heat-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... A396 cells and spent fermentation media exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1325 Section...-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media exemption from the requirement of...-killed Burkholderia spp. strain A396 cells and spent fermentation media in or on all food...

  8. High vancomycin MICs within the susceptible range in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia isolates are associated with increased cell wall thickness and reduced intracellular killing by human phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Rocío; Martínez, Alba; Albert, Eliseo; Madrid, Silvia; Oltra, Rosa; Giménez, Estela; Soriano, Mario; Vinuesa, Víctor; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María Luisa; Navarro, David

    2016-05-01

    Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) at the upper end of the susceptible range for Staphylococcus aureus have been associated with poor clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections. We tested the hypothesis that high vancomycin MICs in S. aureus bacteraemia isolates are associated with increased cell wall thickness and suboptimal bacterial internalisation or lysis by human phagocytes. In total, 95 isolates were evaluated. Original vancomycin MICs were determined by Etest. The susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to killing by phagocytes was assessed in a human whole blood assay. Internalisation of bacterial cells by phagocytes was investigated by flow cytometry. Cell wall thickness was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Genotypic analysis of S. aureus isolates was performed using a DNA microarray system. Vancomycin MICs were significantly higher (P=0.006) in isolates that were killed suboptimally (killing index <60%) compared with those killed efficiently (killing index >70%) and tended to correlate inversely (P=0.08) with the killing indices. Isolates in both killing groups were internalised by human neutrophils and monocytes with comparable efficiency. The cell wall was significantly thicker (P=0.03) in isolates in the low killing group. No genotypic differences were found between the isolates in both killing groups. In summary, high vancomycin MICs in S. aureus bacteraemia isolates were associated with increased cell wall thickness and reduced intracellular killing by phagocytes. PMID:27056298

  9. How the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola kills plant cells remains an enigma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yangrae

    2015-04-01

    Alternaria species are mainly saprophytic fungi, but some are plant pathogens. Seven pathotypes of Alternaria alternata use secondary metabolites of host-specific toxins as pathogenicity factors. These toxins kill host cells prior to colonization. Genes associated with toxin synthesis reside on conditionally dispensable chromosomes, supporting the notion that pathogenicity might have been acquired several times by A. alternata. Alternaria brassicicola, however, seems to employ a different mechanism. Evidence on the use of host-specific toxins as pathogenicity factors remains tenuous, even after a diligent search aided by full-genome sequencing and efficient reverse-genetics approaches. Similarly, no individual genes encoding lipases or cell wall-degrading enzymes have been identified as strong virulence factors, although these enzymes have been considered important for fungal pathogenesis. This review describes our current understanding of toxins, lipases, and cell wall-degrading enzymes and their roles in the pathogenesis of A. brassicicola compared to those of other pathogenic fungi. It also describes a set of genes that affect pathogenesis in A. brassicicola. They are involved in various cellular functions that are likely important in most organisms and probably indirectly associated with pathogenesis. Deletion or disruption of these genes results in weakly virulent strains that appear to be sensitive to the defense mechanisms of host plants. Finally, this review discusses the implications of a recent discovery of three important transcription factors associated with pathogenesis and the putative downstream genes that they regulate.

  10. How the Necrotrophic Fungus Alternaria brassicicola Kills Plant Cells Remains an Enigma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Alternaria species are mainly saprophytic fungi, but some are plant pathogens. Seven pathotypes of Alternaria alternata use secondary metabolites of host-specific toxins as pathogenicity factors. These toxins kill host cells prior to colonization. Genes associated with toxin synthesis reside on conditionally dispensable chromosomes, supporting the notion that pathogenicity might have been acquired several times by A. alternata. Alternaria brassicicola, however, seems to employ a different mechanism. Evidence on the use of host-specific toxins as pathogenicity factors remains tenuous, even after a diligent search aided by full-genome sequencing and efficient reverse-genetics approaches. Similarly, no individual genes encoding lipases or cell wall-degrading enzymes have been identified as strong virulence factors, although these enzymes have been considered important for fungal pathogenesis. This review describes our current understanding of toxins, lipases, and cell wall-degrading enzymes and their roles in the pathogenesis of A. brassicicola compared to those of other pathogenic fungi. It also describes a set of genes that affect pathogenesis in A. brassicicola. They are involved in various cellular functions that are likely important in most organisms and probably indirectly associated with pathogenesis. Deletion or disruption of these genes results in weakly virulent strains that appear to be sensitive to the defense mechanisms of host plants. Finally, this review discusses the implications of a recent discovery of three important transcription factors associated with pathogenesis and the putative downstream genes that they regulate. PMID:25681268

  11. Stochastic Threshold Microdose Model for Cell Killing by Insoluble Metallic Nanomaterial Particles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel microdosimetric model for metallic nanomaterial-particles (MENAP)-induced cytotoxicity. The focus is on the engineered insoluble MENAP which represent a significant breakthrough in the design and development of new products for consumers, industry, and medicine. Increased production is rapidly occurring and may cause currently unrecognized health effects (e.g., nervous system dysfunction, heart disease, cancer); thus, dose-response models for MENAP-induced biological effects are needed to facilitate health risk assessment. The stochastic threshold microdose (STM) model presented introduces novel stochastic microdose metrics for use in constructing dose-response relationships for the frequency of specific cellular (e.g., cell killing, mutations, neoplastic transformation) or subcellular (e.g., mitochondria dysfunction) effects. A key metric is the exposure-time-dependent, specific burden (MENAP count) for a given critical target (e.g., mitochondria, nucleus). Exceeding a stochastic threshold specific burden triggers cell death. For critical targets in the cytoplasm, the autophagic mode of death is triggered. For the nuclear target, the apoptotic mode of death is triggered. Overall cell survival is evaluated for the indicated competing modes of death when both apply. The STM model can be applied to cytotoxicity data using Bayesian methods implemented via Markov chain Monte Carlo. PMID:21191483

  12. Combined inhibition of glycolysis and AMPK induces synergistic breast cancer cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Mcghee, Eva; Lee, Sangkyu

    2015-01-01

    Targeting glycolysis for cancer treatment has been investigated as a therapeutic method but has not offered a feasible chemotherapeutic strategy. Our aim was to examine whether AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a conditional oncogene, rescues the energetic stress and cytotoxicity induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, and the related mechanisms. Luciferin/luciferase adenosine triphosphate (ATP) determination, Western analysis, qRT-PCR analyses, MTT growth assay, clonogenic assay, and statistical analysis were performed in this study. 2-DG decreased ATP levels and subsequently activated AMPK, which contribute to intracellular ATP recovery in MCF-7 cells thus exhibiting no apparent cytotoxicity. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, further potentiates 2-DG-induced decrease in ATP levels and inhibits their recovery. 2-DG, via AMPK activation, stimulated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and activity and promoted nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-beta (PGC-1β) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) protein expression, leading to augmented mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) genes including PPARα, MCAD, CPT1C, and ACO. This metabolic adaptation elicited by AMPK counteracts the ATP-depleting and cancer cell-killing effect of 2-DG. However, 2-DG in combination with AMPK antagonists or small interfering RNA caused a dramatic increase in cytotoxicity in MCF-7 but not in MCF-10A cells. Similarly, when combined with inhibition of CREB/PGC-1β/ERRα pathway, 2-DG saliently suppressed mitochondrial biogenesis and the expression of FAO genes, depleted ATP production, and enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Collectively, the combination of 2-DG and AMPK inhibition synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic potential in breast cancer cells with a relative nontoxicity to normal cells and may offer a promising, safe, and effective breast cancer therapeutic strategy

  13. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Neff, C. Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S.; Palmer, Brent E.; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells. PMID:26484769

  14. Selective killing of B-cell hybridomas targeting proteinase 3, Wegener's autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Reiners, Katrin S; Hansen, Hinrich P; Krüssmann, Anne; Schön, Gisela; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Engert, Andreas; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge

    2004-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a rare disease characterized by granulomatous lesions, small vessel vasculitis and the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCAs) in the sera of affected patients. Their main target antigen is proteinase 3 (PR3), a neutrophil and monocyte-derived neutral serine protease. Since the standard treatment of this severe autoimmune disease, with cyclophosphamide and corticosteroids, is associated with potential side-effects, the development of a more specific immunotherapeutic agent is warranted. The key role of ANCA in the pathogenesis of vasculitis and the effectiveness of anti-CD20 antibodies in patients with refractory WG points towards the importance of B cells in WG. We thus evaluated a new approach to selectively eliminate PR3-specific autoreactive B cells by targeting the B-cell receptor. For this purpose we used a bifunctional recombinant fusion protein consisting of the antigen PR3 and a toxin. The cytotoxic component of this novel fusion protein was the ribonuclease angiogenin, a human toxin with low immunogenicity. The toxin was stabilized by exchanging the catalytically relevant histidine in position 44 with glutamine to eliminate the autoproteolytic activity. PR3H44Q was fused either to the N terminus or to the C terminus of angiogenin. The recombinant proteins were expressed in 293T cells. Binding assays demonstrated the appropriate size and recognition by anti-PR3 antibodies. Using TUNEL technology, we demonstrated that these autoantigen toxins kill proteinase 3-specific B-cell hybridomas selectively by inducing apoptosis. The data indicate that autoantigen-toxins are promising tools in the treatment or co-treatment of autoimmune diseases in which the antigen is known. PMID:15147566

  15. The respiratory burst is not required for killing of intracellular and extracellular parasites by a lymphokine-activated macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Scott, P; James, S; Sher, A

    1985-06-01

    The macrophage cell line, IC-21, was found to be incapable of producing the oxygen products associated with the respiratory burst. However, IC-21 cells were activated by lymphokine (LK) to kill intracellular (Leishmania donovani amastigotes) and extracellular (Schistosoma mansoni larvae) parasites, as well as tumor cells. In each case, the cytotoxicity exhibited by activated IC-21 cells and activated peritoneal macrophages was indistinguishable. However, nonactivated IC-21 cells were unable to kill L. donovani log-growth phase promastigotes, while nonactivated peritoneal macrophages destroyed greater than 90% of the initial infection. These results indicate that amastigotes and schistosome larvae are susceptible to killing by nonoxidative cytotoxic mechanism induced by lymphokine activation but, on the other hand, support the concept that the killing of log-growth phase promastigotes by nonactivated cells is dependent upon the respiratory burst. We propose that the IC-21 cell line may be a useful model for studying nonoxidative killing functions of activated macrophages. PMID:2988973

  16. Efficient killing of CD22{sup +} tumor cells by a humanized diabody-RNase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Juergen . E-mail: juergen.krauss@uni-essen.de; Arndt, Michaela A.E.; Vu, Bang K.; Newton, Dianne L.; Seeber, Siegfried; Rybak, Susanna M.

    2005-06-03

    We report on the generation of a dimeric immunoenzyme capable of simultaneously delivering two ribonuclease (RNase) effector domains on one molecule to CD22{sup +} tumor cells. As targeting moiety a diabody derived from the previously humanized scFv SGIII with grafted specificity of the murine anti-CD22 mAb RFB4 was constructed. Further engineering the interface of this construct (V{sub L}36{sub Leu{yields}}{sub Tyr}) resulted in a highly robust bivalent molecule that retained the same high affinity as the murine mAb RFB4 (K{sub D} 0.2 nM). A dimeric immunoenzyme comprising this diabody and Rana pipiens liver ribonuclease I (rapLRI) was generated, expressed as soluble protein in bacteria, and purified to homogeneity. The dimeric fusion protein killed several CD22{sup +} tumor cell lines with high efficacy (IC{sub 50} = 3-20 nM) and exhibited 9- to 48-fold stronger cytotoxicity than a monovalent rapLRI-scFv counterpart. Our results demonstrate that engineering of dimeric antibody-ribonuclease fusion proteins can markedly enhance their biological efficacy.

  17. Cross-linking of membrane immunoglobulin D, in the absence of T cell help, kills mature B cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In vivo experiments were performed to determine whether the cross- linking of membrane immunoglobulin (mIg) D on mature B cells, in the absence of T cell help, leads to B cell death. Mice were injected with either a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that cross-links mIgD effectively or a mAb that binds to mIgD avidly but cross-links it to a limited extent, and effects on B cell number and B cell Ia, mIgM, and mIgD expression were observed. In most experiments, mice were pretreated with anti- interleukin 7 mAb to prevent the generation of new bone marrow B cells, and with anti-CD4 mAb to prevent the generation of T cell help. In some experiments, mice also received anti-Fc gamma RII mAb to prevent cross- linking of mIgD with Fc gamma RII, and cobra venom factor to prevent possible mIg-complement receptor interactions and complement-mediated killing of B cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that (a) even limited cross-linking of mIgD on mature B cells can lead to B cell death; (b) increased cross-linking of mIgD leads to increased B cell death; (c) the loss of B cells is first detected 2 d after anti-IgD mAb injection and increases during the subsequent 3 d; (d) sustained modulation of mIgD may be necessary to cause B cell death; (e) mIgMdull but not mIgMbright B cells are lost in mice injected with anti-IgD mAbs; and (f) T cell help prevents or minimizes B cell death. PMID:7836908

  18. Mechanical cell competition kills cells via induction of lethal p53 levels

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Laura; Goschorska, Maja; Kozyrska, Kasia; Duclos, Guillaume; Kucinski, Iwo; Chessel, Anatole; Hampton-O'Neil, Lea; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Allen, George E.; Rawlins, Emma L.; Silberzan, Pascal; Carazo Salas, Rafael E.; Piddini, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a quality control mechanism that eliminates unfit cells. How cells compete is poorly understood, but it is generally accepted that molecular exchange between cells signals elimination of unfit cells. Here we report an orthogonal mechanism of cell competition, whereby cells compete through mechanical insults. We show that MDCK cells silenced for the polarity gene scribble (scribKD) are hypersensitive to compaction, that interaction with wild-type cells causes their compaction and that crowding is sufficient for scribKD cell elimination. Importantly, we show that elevation of the tumour suppressor p53 is necessary and sufficient for crowding hypersensitivity. Compaction, via activation of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the stress kinase p38, leads to further p53 elevation, causing cell death. Thus, in addition to molecules, cells use mechanical means to compete. Given the involvement of p53, compaction hypersensitivity may be widespread among damaged cells and offers an additional route to eliminate unfit cells. PMID:27109213

  19. Killing and conformal Killing tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Konstantin; Moroianu, Andrei; Semmelmann, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    We introduce an appropriate formalism in order to study conformal Killing (symmetric) tensors on Riemannian manifolds. We reprove in a simple way some known results in the field and obtain several new results, like the classification of conformal Killing 2-tensors on Riemannian products of compact manifolds, Weitzenböck formulas leading to non-existence results, and construct various examples of manifolds with conformal Killing tensors.

  20. Killing Coyotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Presents different viewpoints concerning the federal government's Animal Damage Control (ADC) Program cited as responsible for killing millions of predators. Critics provide evidence of outdated and inhumane methods exemplified in the coyote killings. The ADC emphasizes new, nonlethal methods of controlling animals cited as "noxious." (MCO)

  1. Ascorbic acid kills Epstein-Barr virus positive Burkitt lymphoma cells and Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-cells in vitro, but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shatzer, Amber N; Espey, Michael Graham; Chavez, Mayra; Tu, Hongbin; Levine, Mark; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2013-05-01

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to kill various cancer cell lines at pharmacologic concentrations. We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells were more susceptible to ascorbic acid-induced cell killing than EBV-negative BL cells or EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Ascorbic acid did not induce apoptosis in any of the tested cells but did induce the production of reactive oxygen species and cell death. Previously, we showed that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induces cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. We found that ascorbic acid is strongly antagonistic for bortezomib-induced cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. Finally, ascorbic acid did not prolong survival of severe combined immunodefiency mice inoculated with LCLs either intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Thus, while ascorbic acid was highly effective at killing EBV-positive BL cells and LCLs in vitro, it antagonized cell killing by bortezomib and was ineffective in an animal model.

  2. Complete sucrose hydrolysis by heat-killed recombinant Pichia pastoris cells entrapped in calcium alginate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An ideal immobilized biocatalyst for the industrial-scale production of invert sugar should stably operate at elevated temperatures (60-70°C) and high sucrose concentrations (above 60%, w/v). Commercial invertase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is thermolabile and suffers from substrate inhibition. Thermotoga maritima β-fructosidase (BfrA) is the most thermoactive and thermostable sucrose-hydrolysing enzyme so far identified and allows complete inversion of the substrate in highly concentrated solutions. Results In this study, heat-killed Pichia pastoris cells bearing N-glycosylated BfrA in the periplasmic space were entrapped in calcium alginate beads. The immobilized recombinant yeast showed maximal sucrose hydrolysis at pH 5–7 and 90°C. BfrA was 65% active at 60°C and had no activity loss after incubation without the substrate at this temperature for 15 h. Complete inversion of cane sugar (2.04 M) at 60°C was achieved in batchwise and continuous operation with respective productivities of 4.37 and 0.88 gram of substrate hydrolysed per gram of dry beads per hour. The half-life values of the biocatalyst were 14 and 20 days when operated at 60°C in the stirred tank and the fixed-bed column, respectively. The reaction with non-viable cells prevented the occurrence of sucrose fermentation and the formation of by-products. Six-month storage of the biocatalyst in 1.46 M sucrose (pH 5.5) at 4°C caused no reduction of the invertase activity. Conclusions The features of the novel thermostable biocatalyst developed in this study are more attractive than those of immobilized S. cerevisiae cells for application in the enzymatic manufacture of inverted sugar syrup in batch and fixed-bed reactors. PMID:24943124

  3. Targeting SOD1 induces synthetic lethal killing in BLM- and CHEK2-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sajesh, Babu V; McManus, Kirk J

    2015-09-29

    Cancer is a major cause of death throughout the world, and there is a large need for better and more personalized approaches to combat the disease. Over the past decade, synthetic lethal approaches have been developed that are designed to exploit the aberrant molecular origins (i.e. defective genes) that underlie tumorigenesis. BLM and CHEK2 are two evolutionarily conserved genes that are somatically altered in a number of tumor types. Both proteins normally function in preserving genome stability through facilitating the accurate repair of DNA double strand breaks. Thus, uncovering synthetic lethal interactors of BLM and CHEK2 will identify novel candidate drug targets and lead chemical compounds. Here we identify an evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between SOD1 and both BLM and CHEK2 in two distinct cell models. Using quantitative imaging microscopy, real-time cellular analyses, colony formation and tumor spheroid models we show that SOD1 silencing and inhibition (ATTM and LCS-1 treatments), or the induction of reactive oxygen species (2ME2 treatment) induces selective killing within BLM- and CHEK2-deficient cells relative to controls. We further show that increases in reactive oxygen species follow SOD1 silencing and inhibition that are associated with the persistence of DNA double strand breaks, and increases in apoptosis. Collectively, these data identify SOD1 as a novel candidate drug target in BLM and CHEK2 cancer contexts, and further suggest that 2ME2, ATTM and LCS-1 are lead therapeutic compounds warranting further pre-clinical study. PMID:26318585

  4. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  5. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML.

  6. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  7. Piperlongumine selectively kills hepatocellular carcinoma cells and preferentially inhibits their invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Ju Mei; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Lan, Shu Jue; Jin, Si; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are highly malignant and aggressive tumors lack of effective therapeutic drugs. Piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from longer pepper plants, is recently identified as a potent cytotoxic compound highly selective to cancer cells. Here, we reported that PL specifically suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway. PL selectively killed HCC cells but not normal hepatocytes with an IC50 of 10-20 μM while PL at much lower concentrations only suppressed HCC cell migration/invasion. PL selectively elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCC cells, which activated or up-regulated downstream PERK/Ire 1α/Grp78, p38/JNK/Erk and CHOP subsequently. Administration of antioxidants completely abolished PL's effects on cell death and migration/invasion. However, pharmacological inhibition of ER stress-responses or MAPKs signaling pathways with corresponding specific inhibitors only reversed PL's effect on cell migration/invasion but not on cell death. Consistently, knocking-down of CHOP by RNA interference only reversed PL-suppressed HCC cell migration. Finally, PL significantly suppressed HCC development and activated the ER-MAPKs-CHOP signaling pathway in HCC xenografts in vivo. Taken together, PL selectively killed HCC cells and preferentially inhibited HCC cell migration/invasion via ROS-ER-MAPKs-CHOP axis, suggesting a novel therapeutic strategy for the highly malignant and aggressive HCC clinically. PMID:25788268

  8. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T. C.; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F. T.; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light–inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation–dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell–depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  9. Mathematical analysis and simulations involving chemotherapy and surgery on large human tumours under a suitable cell-kill functional response.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Diego Samuel; de Arruda Mancera, Paulo Fernando

    2013-02-01

    Dosage and frequency of treatment schedules are important for successful chemotherapy. However, in this work we argue that cell-kill response and tumoral growth should not be seen as separate and therefore are essential in a mathematical cancer model. This paper presents a mathematical model for sequencing of cancer chemotherapy and surgery. Our purpose is to investigate treatments for large human tumours considering a suitable cell-kill dynamics. We use some biological and pharmacological data in a numerical approach, where drug administration occurs in cycles (periodic infusion) and surgery is performed instantaneously. Moreover, we also present an analysis of stability for a chemotherapeutic model with continuous drug administration. According to Norton and Simon [22], our results indicate that chemotherapy is less efficient in treating tumours that have reached a plateau level of growing and that a combination with surgical treatment can provide better outcomes.

  10. Caspase-, cathepsin-, and PERK-dependent regulation of MDA-7/IL-24-induced cell killing in primary human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Adly; Park, Margaret A.; Gupta, Pankaj; Rahmani, Mohammed; Zhang, Guo; Hamed, Hossein; Hanna, David; Sarkar, Devanand; Lebedeva, Irina V.; Emdad, Luni; Sauane, Moira; Vozhilla, Nicollaq; Spiegel, Sarah; Koumenis, Costas; Graf, Martin; Curiel, David T.; Grant, Steven; Fisher, Paul B.; Dent, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24) is a novel cytokine displaying selective apoptosis-inducing activity in transformed cells without harming normal cells. The present studies focused on defining the mechanism(s) by which a GST-MDA-7 fusion protein inhibits cell survival of primary human glioma cells in vitro. GST-MDA-7 killed glioma cells with diverse genetic characteristics that correlated with inactivation of ERK1/2 and activation of JNK1-3. Activation of JNK1-3 was dependent on protein kinase R–like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), and GST-MDA-7 lethality was suppressed in PERK−/− cells. JNK1-3 signaling activated BAX, whereas inhibition of JNK1-3, deletion of BAX, or expression of dominant-negative caspase-9 suppressed lethality. GST-MDA-7 also promoted a PERK-, JNK-, and cathepsin B–dependent cleavage of BID; loss of BID function promoted survival. GST-MDA-7 suppressed BAD and BIM phosphorylation and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression. GST-MDA-7 caused PERK-dependent vacuolization of LC3-expressing endosomes whose formation was suppressed by incubation with 3-methylade-nine, expression of HSP70 or BiP/GRP78, or knockdown of ATG5 or Beclin-1 expression but not by inhibition of the JNK1-3 pathway. Knockdown of ATG5 or Beclin-1 expression or overexpression of HSP70 reduced GST-MDA-7 lethality. Our data show that GST-MDA-7 induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response that is causal in the activation of multiple proapoptotic pathways, which converge on the mitochondrion and highlight the complexity of signaling pathways altered by mda-7/IL-24 in glioma cells that ultimately culminate in decreased tumor cell survival. PMID:18281515

  11. Hyperthermic killing and hyperthermic radiosensitization in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of pH and thermal tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holahan, E.V.; Highfield, D.P.; Holahan, P.K.; Dewey, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    To quantitatively relate heat killing and heat radiosensitization, asynchronous or G/sub 1/ Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) at pH 7.1 or 6.75 were heated and/or X-irradiated 10 min. later. Since no progression of G/sub 1/cells into S phase occurred during the heat and radiation treatments, cell cycle artifacts were minimized. Hyperthermic radiosensitizaiton was expressed as the thermal enhancement factor (TEF), defined as the ratio of the D/sub 0/ of the radiation survival curve to that of the D/sub 0/ radiation survival curve for heat plus radiation. The TEF increased continuously with increased of the heat killing at 45.5/sup 0/ C, and for a given amount of heat killing, the amount of heat radiosensitization was the same for both pH's. When cells were heated chronically at 42.4/sup 0/ C at pH 7.4, the TEF increased initially to 2.0-2.5 and then returned to near 1.0 during continued heating as thermal tolerance developed for both heat killing and heat radiosensitization. However, the shoulder (D/sub q/) of the radiation survival curve for heat plus radiation did not manifest thermal tolerance. These results suggest that heat killing and heat radiosensitization have a target(s) in common (TEF results), along with either a different target(s) or a difference in the manifestation of heat damage (D/sub q/ results). Since low pH reduced the rate of development of thermal tolerance during heating at low temperatures, low pH enhanced heat killing more at 42-42.5/sup 0/ C than at 45.5 C where thermal tolerance did not develop. These findings agree with animal experiments suggesting that in the clinic, a therapeutic gain for tumor cells at low pH may be greater for temperatures of 42-42.5/sup 0/ C than of 45.5/sup 0/ C.

  12. Structural basis for the killing of human beta cells by CD8(+) T cells in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bulek, Anna M; Cole, David K; Skowera, Ania; Dolton, Garry; Gras, Stephanie; Madura, Florian; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Drijfhout, Jan W; Knight, Robin R; Huang, Guo C; Lissin, Nikolai; Molloy, Peter E; Wooldridge, Linda; Jakobsen, Bent K; Rossjohn, Jamie; Peakman, Mark; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Sewell, Andrew K

    2012-03-01

    The structural characteristics of the engagement of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted self antigens by autoreactive T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) is established, but how autoimmune TCRs interact with complexes of self peptide and MHC class I has been unclear. Here we examined how CD8(+) T cells kill human islet beta cells in type 1 diabetes via recognition of a human leukocyte antigen HLA-A*0201-restricted glucose-sensitive preproinsulin peptide by the autoreactive TCR 1E6. Rigid 'lock-and-key' binding underpinned the 1E6-HLA-A*0201-peptide interaction, whereby 1E6 docked similarly to most MHC class I-restricted TCRs. However, this interaction was extraordinarily weak because of limited contacts with MHC class I. TCR binding was highly peptide centric, dominated by two residues of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) loops that acted as an 'aromatic-cap' over the complex of peptide and MHC class I (pMHCI). Thus, highly focused peptide-centric interactions associated with suboptimal TCR-pMHCI binding affinities might lead to thymic escape and potential CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoreactivity. PMID:22245737

  13. Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis enhance X-ray killing of log-phase Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Hur, E.; Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1984-03-01

    Postirradiation incubation of V79 Chinese hamster cells with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis was found to potentiate the killing of cells by X rays. Potentiation increased with incubation time and with concentration of the inhibitor. Preirradiation incubation had only a small effect. The enhanced response correlated well with the known extent of the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. A radiation-sensitive line, V79-AL162/S-10, was affected to a lesser extent than the normal cells. Cells repaired the radiation damage with which the inhibitors interacted within 1 hr, a process that has similar kinetics to what is observed when a postirradiation treatment with hypertonic buffer is used. However, the sectors of damage affected by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis and hypertonic buffer do not entirely overlap. The inhibitor nicotinamide enhanced the killing mainly of late S-phase cells and did not affect cells at the G/sub 1//S border. It is concluded that the repair process(es) involving poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is important for cell survival in repair-competent cells and that the radiation-sensitive cells that were examined are partially deficient in a repair pathway in which poly(ADP-ribose) participates.

  14. Dendritic cells accumulate in the bone marrow of myeloma patients where they protect tumor plasma cells from CD8+ T-cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Patrizia; Berardi, Simona; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Ria, Roberto; De Re, Valli; Cicco, Sebastiano; Battaglia, Stefano; Ditonno, Paolo; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have speculated that the clinical progression from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to multiple myeloma (MM) is driven by defects in dendritic cell (DC) function. However, evidence supporting this assumption is controversial, and no mechanism for the putative DC dysfunction has been demonstrated thus far. We studied DC subsets from the bone marrow of MM patients compared with those of MGUS patients and control subjects. We found that myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) accumulate in the bone marrow during the MGUS-to-MM progression. After engulfment of apoptotic tumor plasma cells via CD91, bone marrow mDCs and pDCs mature and are able to activate tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. However, by interacting directly with CD28 on live (nonapoptotic) tumor plasma cells, bone marrow mDCs downregulate the expression of proteasome subunits in these cells, thus enabling their evasion from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I–restricted CD8+ T-cell killing. These results suggest that DCs play a dual, but opposing, role in MM: for one, DCs activate CD8+ T cells against tumor plasma cells and, for the other, DCs protect tumor plasma cells from CD8+ T-cell killing. This information should be taken into account in designing immunotherapy approaches to enhance immune surveillance in MGUS and to break down immune tolerance in MM. PMID:26185130

  15. Sorafenib/regorafenib and phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase/thymoma viral proto-oncogene inhibition interact to kill tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan B; Hamed, Hossein A; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Booth, Laurence; Tavallai, Seyedmehrad; Syed, Jahangir; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine whether the multikinase inhibitors sorafenib/regorafenib cooperated with clinically relevant , phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K)-thymoma viral proto-oncogene (AKT) inhibitors to kill tumor cells. In liver, colorectal, lung, breast, kidney, and brain cancer cells, at clinically achievable doses, sorafenib/regorafenib and the PI3K inhibitor acetic acid (1S,4E,10R,11R,13S,14R)-[4-diallylaminomethylene-6-hydroxy-1-methoxymethyl-10,13-dimethyl-3,7,17-trioxo-1,3,4,7,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17-dodecahydro-2-oxa-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-11-yl ester (PX-866) cooperated in a greater than additive fashion to kill tumor cells. Cells lacking phosphatase and tensin homolog were as sensitive to the drug combination as cells expressing the protein. Similar data were obtained using the AKT inhibitors perifosine and 8-[4-(1-aminocyclobutyl)phenyl]-9-phenyl-1,2,4-triazolo[3,4-f] [1,6]naphthyridin-3(2H)-one hydrochloride (MK2206). PX-866 treatment abolished AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) phosphorylation, and cell killing correlated with reduced activity of AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Expression of activated AKT and to a lesser extent activated mTOR reduced drug combination lethality. Expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra large or dominant negative caspase 9, but not cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1b-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein short, protected cells from the drug combination. Treatment of cells with PX-866 increased protein levels of p62, lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2), and microtubule-associated protein light chain (LC) 3 and LC3II that correlated with a large increase in LC3-green fluorescent protein (GFP) vesicle numbers. Exposure of PX-866 treated cells to sorafenib reduced p62 and LAMP2 levels, decreased the ratio of LC3 to LC3II, and reduced LC3-GFP vesicle levels. Knockdown of Beclin1 or autophagy-related 5 suppressed drug toxicity by ∼40%. In vivo, sorafenib and PX-866 or

  16. Melatonin Protects Human Cells from Clustered DNA Damages, Killing and Acquisition of Soft Agar Growth Induced by X-rays or 970 MeV/n Fe ions

    SciTech Connect

    Das, B.; Sutherland, B.; Bennett, P. V.; Cutter, N. C.; Sutherland, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the ability of melatonin (N-acetyl-5 methoxytryptamine), a highly effective radical scavenger and human hormone, to protect DNA in solution and in human cells against induction of complex DNA clusters and biological damage induced by low or high linear energy transfer radiation (100 kVp X-rays, 970 MeV/nucleon Fe ions). Plasmid DNA in solution was treated with increasing concentrations of melatonin (0.0-3.5 mM) and were irradiated with X-rays. Human cells (28SC monocytes) were also irradiated with X-rays and Fe ions with and without 2 mM melatonin. Agarose plugs containing genomic DNA were subjected to Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electrophoretic Field (CHEF) followed by imaging and clustered DNA damages were measured by using Number Average length analysis. Transformation experiments on human primary fibroblast cells using soft agar colony assay were carried out which were irradiated with Fe ions with or without 2 mM melatonin. In plasmid DNA in solution, melatonin reduced the induction of single- and double-strand breaks. Pretreatment of human 28SC cells for 24 h before irradiation with 2 mM melatonin reduced the level of X-ray induced double-strand breaks by {approx}50%, of abasic clustered damages about 40%, and of Fe ion-induced double-strand breaks (41% reduction) and abasic clusters (34% reduction). It decreased transformation to soft agar growth of human primary cells by a factor of 10, but reduced killing by Fe ions only by 20-40%. Melatonin's effective reduction of radiation-induced critical DNA damages, cell killing, and striking decrease of transformation suggest that it is an excellent candidate as a countermeasure against radiation exposure, including radiation exposure to astronaut crews in space travel.

  17. Modulation of MICA on the surface of Chlamydia trachomatis-infected endocervical epithelial cells promotes NK cell-mediated killing

    PubMed Central

    Ibana, Joyce Altamarino; Aiyar, Ashok; Quayle, Alison Jane; Schust, Danny Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis serovars D-K are obligate intracellular bacteria that have tropism for the columnar epithelial cells of the genital tract. Chlamydia trachomatis infection has been reported to induce modifications in immune cell ligand expression on epithelial host cells. In this study, we used an in vitro infection model that resulted in a partial infection of C. trachomatis-exposed primary-like immortalized endocervical epithelial cells (A2EN). Using this model, we demonstrated that expression of the natural killer (NK) cell activating ligand, MHC class I-related protein A (MICA), was upregulated on C. trachomatis-infected, but not on noninfected bystander cells. MICA upregulation was concomitant with MHC class I downregulation and impacted the susceptibility of C. trachomatis-infected cells to NK cell activity. The specificity of MICA upregulation was reflected by a higher cytolytic activity of an NK cell line (NK92MI) against C. trachomatis-infected cells compared with uninfected control cells. Significantly, data also indicated that NK cells exerted a partial, but incomplete sterilizing effect on C. trachomatis as shown by the reduction in recoverable inclusion forming units (IFU) when cocultured with C. trachomatis-infected cells. Taken together, our data suggest that NK cells may play a significant role in the ability of the host to counter C. trachomatis infection. PMID:22251247

  18. Cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with accelerated 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, M.; Piao, C.; Hall, E. J.; Hei, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We examined cell killing and chromatid damage in primary human bronchial epithelial cells irradiated with high-energy 56Fe ions. Cells were irradiated with graded doses of 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon) accelerated with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The survival curves for cells plated 1 h after irradiation (immediate plating) showed little or no shoulder. However, the survival curves for cells plated 24 h after irradiation (delayed plating) had a small initial shoulder. The RBE for 56Fe ions compared to 137Cs gamma rays was 1.99 for immediate plating and 2.73 for delayed plating at the D10. The repair ratio (delayed plating/immediate plating) was 1.67 for 137Cs gamma rays and 1.22 for 56Fe ions. The dose-response curves for initially measured and residual chromatid fragments detected by the Calyculin A-mediated premature chromosome condensation technique showed a linear response. The results indicated that the induction frequency for initially measured fragments was the same for 137Cs gamma rays and 56Fe ions. On the other hand, approximately 85% of the fragments induced by 137Cs gamma rays had rejoined after 24 h of postirradiation incubation; the corresponding amount for 56Fe ions was 37%. Furthermore, the frequency of chromatid exchanges induced by gamma rays measured 24 h after irradiation was higher than that induced by 56Fe ions. No difference in the amount of chromatid damage induced by the two types of radiations was detected when assayed 1 h after irradiation. The results suggest that high-energy 56Fe ions induce a higher frequency of complex, unrepairable damage at both the cellular and chromosomal levels than 137Cs gamma rays in the target cells for radiation-induced lung cancers.

  19. Effect of biocides on S. cerevisiae: relationship between short-term membrane affliction and long-term cell killing.

    PubMed

    Chládková, K; Hendrych, T; Gásková, D; Goroncy-Bermes, P; Sigler, K

    2004-01-01

    The long-term action of recommended (RC) and near-recommended concentrations of several commercial biocides (Lonzabac 12.100, Genamin CS302D, benzalkonium chloride and 2-phenoxyethanol) on cells of S. cerevisiae wild-type strain DTXII was described using plating tests while short-term effects were determined using the potentiometric fluorescent probe diS-C3(3) that detects both changes in membrane potential and impairment of membrane integrity. A 2-d plating of cells exposed to 0.5xRC of benzalkonium chloride and Genamin CS302D for 15 min showed a complete long-term cell killing, with 2-phenoxyethanol the killing was complete only at 2xRC and Lonzabac caused complete killing at RC but not at 0.5xRC. The diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay performed immediately after a 10-min biocide exposure revealed several concentration-dependent modes of action: Lonzabac at 0.5xRC caused a mere depolarization, higher concentrations causing gradually increasing cell damage; benzalkonium chloride and Genamin CS302D rapidly damaged the membrane of some cells and depolarized the rest whereas 2-phenoxyethanol, which had the lowest effect in the plating test, produced a concentration-dependent fraction of cells with impaired membranes. Cell staining slightly increased during the diS-C3(3) assay; addition of a protonophore showed that part of the remaining undamaged cells retained their membrane potential. Comparison of short-term and long-term data implies that membrane depolarization alone is not sufficient for complete long-term killing of yeast cells under the action of a biocide unless it is accompanied by perceptible impairment of membrane integrity. The results show that the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay, which reflects the short-term effects of a biocide on cell membranes, can be successfully used to assess the microbicidal efficiency of biocides.

  20. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm‑2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin.

  1. Photodynamic killing of cancer cells by a Platinum(II) complex with cyclometallating ligand

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Rachel E.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; McKenzie, Luke K.; Stasheuski, Alexander S.; Coyle, Rachel; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Bottomley, Sarah; Weinstein, Julia A.; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy that uses photosensitizers which only become toxic upon light-irradiation provides a strong alternative to conventional cancer treatment due to its ability to selectively target tumour material without affecting healthy tissue. Transition metal complexes are highly promising PDT agents due to intense visible light absorption, yet the majority are toxic even without light. This study introduces a small, photostable, charge-neutral platinum-based compound, Pt(II) 2,6-dipyrido-4-methyl-benzenechloride, complex 1, as a photosensitizer, which works under visible light. Activation of the new photosensitizer at low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) by comparatively low dose of 405 nm light (3.6 J cm−2) causes significant cell death of cervical, colorectal and bladder cancer cell lines, and, importantly, a cisplatin resistant cell line EJ-R. The photo-index of the complex is 8. We demonstrate that complex 1 induces irreversible DNA single strand breaks following irradiation, and that oxygen is essential for the photoinduced action. Neither light, nor compound alone led to cell death. The key advantages of the new drug include a remarkably fast accumulation time (diffusion-controlled, minutes), and photostability. This study demonstrates a highly promising new agent for photodynamic therapy, and attracts attention to photostable metal complexes as viable alternatives to conventional chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. PMID:26940077

  2. Release of ATP during host cell killing by enteropathogenic E. coli and its role as a secretory mediator.

    PubMed

    Crane, John K; Olson, Ruth A; Jones, Heather M; Duffey, Michael E

    2002-07-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) causes severe, watery diarrhea in children. We investigated ATP release during EPEC-mediated killing of human cell lines and whether released adenine nucleotides function as secretory mediators. EPEC triggered a release of ATP from all human cell lines tested: HeLa, COS-7, and T84 (colon cells) as measured using a luciferase kit. Accumulation of ATP in the supernatant medium was enhanced if an inhibitor of 5'-ectonucleotidase was included and was further enhanced if an ATP-regenerating system was added. In the presence of the inhibitor/regenerator, ATP concentrations in the supernatant medium reached 1.5-2 microM 4 h after infection with wild-type EPEC strains. In the absence of the inhibitor/regenerator system, extracellular ATP was rapidly broken down to ADP, AMP, and adenosine. Conditioned medium from EPEC-infected cells triggered a brisk chloride secretory response in intestinal tissues studied in the Ussing chamber (rabbit distal colon and T84 cell monolayers), whereas conditioned medium from uninfected cells and sterile filtrates of EPEC bacteria did not. The short-circuit current response to EPEC-conditioned medium was completely reversed by adenosine receptor blockers, such as 8-(p-sulfophenyl)-theophylline and MRS1754. EPEC killing of host cells releases ATP, which is broken down to adenosine, which in turn stimulates secretion via apical adenosine A2b receptors. These findings provide new insight into how EPEC causes watery diarrhea. PMID:12065294

  3. Cell killing by simian virus 40: impairment of membrane formation and function.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C

    1977-03-01

    Simian virus 40 infection of the CV-1 line of green monkey kidney cells results in the release of mitochondrial malic dehydrogenase as early as 24 h. Released malic dehydrogenase is detected in the cytoplasm prior to its appearance in the overlay medium. Infected cells lose the ability to consume oxygen between 48 and 56 h, and damage to the elctron transport system is indicated. Nevertheless, cellular ATP levels remain high as late as 72 h. Infection leads to a stimulation of membrane phospholipid synthesis, which reaches a peak at about 32 h. This is followed by a severe decline in new membrane synthesis, which correlates in time with the release of cytoplasmic lactic dehydrogenase into the overlay media. Lactic dehydrogenase release precedes the accumulation of trypan blue-stainable cells by about 6 h. Infection had no effect on the turnover of prelabeled membrane phospholipids. An early simian virus 40 mutant, tsA58, and a late mutant, tsB11, are both less effective than wild-type virus at causing reduced levels of phospholipid synthesis, enzyme release, and the accumulation of trypan blue-stainable cells. Another late mutant, tsB8, is similar to wild-type virus in these respects. At 64 h, there is no detectable cell-associated lactic dehydrogenase and nearly all the cells are trypan blue stainable. Nevertheless, at concentrations of deoxyglucose in the medium below the transport Km, deoxyglucose uptake was similar in infected and control cultures. With higher concentrations of deoxyglucose in the medium, uptake by the infected cultures exceeded that by the control cultures.

  4. An evolved ribosome-inactivating protein targets and kills human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Few treatment options exist for patients with metastatic melanoma, resulting in poor prognosis. One standard treatment, dacarbazine (DTIC), shows low response rates ranging from 15 to 25 percent with an 8-month median survival time. The development of targeted therapeutics with novel mechanisms of action may improve patient outcome. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) such as Shiga-like Toxin 1 (SLT-1) represent powerful scaffolds for developing selective anticancer agents. Here we report the discovery and properties of a single chain ribosome-inactivating protein (scRIP) derived from the cytotoxic A subunit of SLT-1 (SLT-1A), harboring the 7-amino acid peptide insertion IYSNKLM (termed SLT-1AIYSNKLM) allowing the toxin variant to selectively target and kill human melanoma cells. Results SLT-1AIYSNKLM was able to kill 7 of 8 human melanoma cell lines. This scRIP binds to 518-A2 human melanoma cells with a dissociation constant of 18 nM, resulting in the blockage of protein synthesis and apoptosis in such cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies of radiolabeled SLT-1AIYSNKLM administered intravenously into SCID mice bearing a human melanoma xenograft indicate that SLT-1AIYSNKLM readily accumulates at the tumor site as opposed to non-target tissues. Furthermore, the co-administration of SLT-1AIYSNKLM with DTIC resulted in tumor regression and greatly increased survival in this mouse xenograft model in comparison to DTIC or SLT-1AIYSNKLM treatment alone (115 day median survival versus 46 and 47 days respectively; P values < 0.001). SLT-1AIYSNKLM is stable in serum and its intravenous administration resulted in modest immune responses following repeated injections in CD1 mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the evolution of a scRIP template can lead to the discovery of novel cancer cell-targeted compounds and in the case of SLT-1AIYSNKLM can specifically kill human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20128926

  5. Real-time dynamic optical imaging of ACC-M tumor cells killed by HSV-tk/ACV system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjin; Li, Zhiyang; Xie, Xiangmo; Lu, Lisha

    2013-01-01

    HSV-tk/ACV induced and killed human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell (ACC-M) in vivo and in vitro, which were observed through optical imaging and green fluorescence protein (GFP) tagging technique. ACC-M was transfected with TK-GFP, and the single clone cell ACC-M-TK-GFP was selected by G418. With fluorescent stereomicroscope, whole-body fluorescent imaging system and fluorescent microscope, we could observe ACV treated ACC-M-TK-GFP cells in cell level and nude mice. The therapies of tumor were visualized clearly with optical imaging. This study proves that optical imaging is a very good approach for studying the effect of HSV-tk/ACV on the ACC-M tumor cells and decreasing the amount of vessel about tumors cell. Optical imaging will become a visual groundwork for monitoring tumor growth and evaluating in vivo curative effect of antitumor drugs.

  6. B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib in combination with temozolomide and fotemustine in the killing response of malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Krumm, Andrea; Merz, Stephanie; Switzeny, Olivier Jérôme; Christmann, Markus; Loquai, Carmen; Kaina, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of metastatic melanoma, a highly therapy-refractory cancer, alkylating agents are used and, for the subgroup of BRAFV600E cancers, the B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib. Although vemurafenib is initially beneficial, development of drug resistance occurs leading to tumor relapse, which necessitates the requirement for combined or sequential therapy with other drugs, including genotoxic alkylating agents. This leads to the question whether vemurafenib and alkylating agents act synergistically and whether chronic vemurafenib treatment alters the melanoma cell response to alkylating agents. Here we show that a) BRAFV600E melanoma cells are killed by vemurafenib, driving apoptosis, b) BRAFV600E melanoma cells are neither more resistant nor sensitive to temozolomide/fotemustine than non-mutant cells, c) combined treatment with vemurafenib plus temozolomide or fotemustine has an additive effect on cell kill, d) acquired vemurafenib resistance of BRAFV600E melanoma cells does not affect MGMT, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2 and MLH1, nor does it affect the resistance to temozolomide and fotemustine, e) metastatic melanoma biopsies obtained from patients prior to and after vemurafenib treatment did not show a change in the MGMT promoter methylation status and MGMT expression level. The data suggest that consecutive treatment with vemurafenib and alkylating drugs is a reasonable strategy for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:25557167

  7. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Are Targets for Allogeneic and Autologous Natural Killer (NK) Cells and Killing Is Partly Mediated by the Activating NK Receptor DNAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Monecke, Sebastian; Cyganek, Lukas; Elsner, Leslie; Hübscher, Daniela; Walter, Lutz; Streckfuss-Bömeke, Katrin; Guan, Kaomei; Dressel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) could be used to generate autologous cells for therapeutic purposes, which are expected to be tolerated by the recipient. However, iPSC-derived grafts are at risk of giving rise to teratomas in the host, if residuals of tumorigenic cells are not rejected by the recipient. We have analyzed the susceptibility of hiPSC lines to allogeneic and autologous natural killer (NK) cells. IL-2-activated, in contrast to resting NK cells killed hiPSC lines efficiently (P=1.69x10-39). Notably, the specific lysis of the individual hiPSC lines by IL-2-activated NK cells was significantly different (P=1.72x10-6) and ranged between 46 % and 64 % in 51Cr-release assays when compared to K562 cells. The hiPSC lines were killed by both allogeneic and autologous NK cells although autologous NK cells were less efficient (P=8.63x10-6). Killing was partly dependent on the activating NK receptor DNAM-1 (P=8.22x10-7). The DNAM-1 ligands CD112 and CD155 as well as the NKG2D ligands MICA and MICB were expressed on the hiPSC lines. Low amounts of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I proteins, which serve as ligands for inhibitory and activating NK receptors were also detected. Thus, the susceptibility to NK cell killing appears to constitute a common feature of hiPSCs. Therefore, NK cells might reduce the risk of teratoma formation even after autologous transplantations of pluripotent stem cell-derived grafts that contain traces of pluripotent cells. PMID:25950680

  8. Glycoprotein isolated from Solanum nigrum L. kills HT-29 cells through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2005-01-01

    apoptosis by its ability to modulate anti-apoptotic signals. We suggest that SNL glycoprotein is a natural anti-cancer agent due to its potential to induce apoptosis in HT-29 cells. PMID:16117614

  9. Cationic amphipathic peptides KT2 and RT2 are taken up into bacterial cells and kill planktonic and biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anunthawan, Thitiporn; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of two tryptophan-rich antibacterial peptides (KT2 and RT2) obtained in a previous optimization screen for increased killing of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens. At their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), these peptides completely killed cells of multidrug-resistant, enterohemorrhagic pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 within 1-5 min. In addition, both peptides exhibited anti-biofilm activity at sub-MIC levels. Indeed, these peptides prevented biofilm formation and triggered killing of cells in mature E. coli O157:H7 biofilms at 1 μM. Both peptides bound to bacterial surface LPS as assessed using the dansyl-polymyxin displacement assay, and were able to interact with the lipids of liposomes as determined by observing a tryptophan blue shift. Interestingly, even though these peptides were highly antimicrobial, they did not induce pore formation or aggregates in bacterial cell membranes. Instead these peptides readily penetrated into bacterial cells as determined by confocal microscopy of labeled peptides. DNA binding assays indicated that both peptides bound to DNA with higher affinity than the positive control peptide buforin II. We propose that cationic peptides KT2 and RT2 bind to negatively-charged LPS to enable self-promoted uptake and, subsequently interact with cytoplasmic membrane phospholipids through their hydrophobic domains enabling translocation across the bacterial membrane and entry into cells within minutes and binding to DNA and other cytoplasmic membrane. Due to their dual antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities, these peptides may find use as an alternative to (or in conjunction with) conventional antibiotics to treat acute infections caused by planktonic bacteria and chronic, biofilm-related infections. PMID:25767037

  10. Cationic amphipathic peptides KT2 and RT2 are taken up into bacterial cells and kill planktonic and biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anunthawan, Thitiporn; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of two tryptophan-rich antibacterial peptides (KT2 and RT2) obtained in a previous optimization screen for increased killing of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria pathogens. At their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), these peptides completely killed cells of multidrug-resistant, enterohemorrhagic pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 within 1-5 min. In addition, both peptides exhibited anti-biofilm activity at sub-MIC levels. Indeed, these peptides prevented biofilm formation and triggered killing of cells in mature E. coli O157:H7 biofilms at 1 μM. Both peptides bound to bacterial surface LPS as assessed using the dansyl-polymyxin displacement assay, and were able to interact with the lipids of liposomes as determined by observing a tryptophan blue shift. Interestingly, even though these peptides were highly antimicrobial, they did not induce pore formation or aggregates in bacterial cell membranes. Instead these peptides readily penetrated into bacterial cells as determined by confocal microscopy of labeled peptides. DNA binding assays indicated that both peptides bound to DNA with higher affinity than the positive control peptide buforin II. We propose that cationic peptides KT2 and RT2 bind to negatively-charged LPS to enable self-promoted uptake and, subsequently interact with cytoplasmic membrane phospholipids through their hydrophobic domains enabling translocation across the bacterial membrane and entry into cells within minutes and binding to DNA and other cytoplasmic membrane. Due to their dual antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities, these peptides may find use as an alternative to (or in conjunction with) conventional antibiotics to treat acute infections caused by planktonic bacteria and chronic, biofilm-related infections.

  11. Differential ganciclovir-mediated cell killing by glutamine 125 mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Drake, R R; Wilbert, T N; Hinds, T A; Gilbert, K M

    1999-12-24

    The therapeutic combination of the herpesvirus simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) gene and the prodrug, ganciclovir (GCV), has found great utility for the treatment of many types of cancer. After initial phosphorylation of GCV by HSV-1 TK, cellular kinases generate the toxic GCV-triphosphate metabolite that is incorporated into DNA and eventually leads to tumor cell death. The cellular and pharmacological mechanisms by which metabolites of GCV lead to cell death are still poorly defined. To begin to address these mechanisms, different mutated forms of HSV-1 TK at residue Gln-125 that have distinct substrate properties were expressed in mammalian cell lines. It was found that expression of the Asn-125 HSV-1 TK mutant in two cell lines, NIH3T3 and HCT-116, was equally effective as wild-type HSV-1 TK for metabolism and sensitivity to GCV, bystander effect killing and induction of apoptosis. The major difference between the two enzymes was the lack of deoxypyrimidine metabolism in the Asn-125 TK-expressing cells. In HCT-116 cells expressing the Glu-125 TK mutant, GCV metabolism was greatly attenuated, yet at higher GCV concentrations, cell sensitivity to the drug and bystander effect killing were diminished but still effective. Cell cycle analysis, 4', 6'-diamidine-2'-phenylindoledihydrochloride staining, and caspase 3 activation assays indicated different cell death responses in the Glu-125 TK-expressing cells as compared with the wild-type HSV-1 TK or Asn-125 TK-expressing cells. A mechanistic hypothesis to explain these results based on the differences in GCV-triphosphate metabolite levels is presented.

  12. Immune evasion of mantle cell lymphoma: expression of B7-H1 leads to inhibited T-cell response to and killing of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijuan; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Bao, Hanying; He, Donghua; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Li, Yi; Neelapu, Sattva; Yang, Jing; Kwak, Larry W.; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials of immunotherapy in mantle cell lymphoma have not yet delivered desirable results, partly because of the inhibitory machinery of the tumor and its microenvironment. Here we investigated the role of B7-H1, a member of the B7 family of co-stimulatory/co-inhibitory ligands, in mantle cell lymphoma-mediated immunosuppression. Allogeneic CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were purified and co-cultured with irradiated mantle cell lymphoma cells. Mantle cell lymphoma-reactive T-cell lines from HLA-A*0201+ healthy blood donors were generated after in vitro restimulation, and were subjected to functional tests. We found that B7-H1 expressed on mantle cell lymphoma cells was able to inhibit T-cell proliferation induced by the tumor cells, impair the generation of antigen-specific T-cell responses, and render mantle cell lymphoma cells resistant to T-cell-mediated cytolysis. Blocking or knocking down B7-H1 on mantle cell lymphoma cells enhanced T-cell responses and restored tumor-cell sensitivity to T-cell-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. Knocking down B7-H1 on mantle cell lymphoma cells primed more CD4+ or CD8+ memory effector T cells. Our study demonstrates for the first time that lymphoma cell-expressed B7-H1 may lead to the suppression of host anti-tumor immune responses in mantle cell lymphoma and targeting tumor cell B7-H1 may represent a novel approach to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:23508008

  13. Selective killing of hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells by three-dimensional nanographene nanoparticles based on triptycene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoqin; Gan, Lu; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chun; Yong, Tuying; Wang, Ziyi; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon-based materials have been widely used in the biomedical fields including drug delivery and cancer therapies. In this paper, a recently synthesized three-dimensional nanographene (NG) based on triptycene self-assembles into nanoparticles which selectively kill human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells as compared to human normal liver HL7702 cells. Obvious differences in cellular accumulation, the endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking of NG nanoparticles are observed in HepG2 cells and HL7702 cells. Further studies reveal that NG nanoparticles significantly increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, but not in HL7702 cells. NG nanoparticle-induced ROS result in apoptosis induction and the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Moreover, IKK/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling is found to be activated by NG nanoparticle-induced ROS and serves to antagonize NG nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Our studies show that the distinct behaviors of cellular uptake and ROS-mediated cytotoxicity are responsible for the selective killing of HepG2 cells. This study provides a foundation for understanding the mechanism of selective induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by NG nanoparticles and designing more effective chemotherapeutical agents.Carbon-based materials have been widely used in the biomedical fields including drug delivery and cancer therapies. In this paper, a recently synthesized three-dimensional nanographene (NG) based on triptycene self-assembles into nanoparticles which selectively kill human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells as compared to human normal liver HL7702 cells. Obvious differences in cellular accumulation, the endocytic pathway and intracellular trafficking of NG nanoparticles are observed in HepG2 cells and HL7702 cells. Further studies reveal that NG nanoparticles significantly increase the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HepG2 cells, but not in HL7702

  14. NADPH oxidase of human dendritic cells: role in Candida albicans killing and regulation by interferons, dectin-1 and CD206.

    PubMed

    Donini, Marta; Zenaro, Elena; Tamassia, Nicola; Dusi, Stefano

    2007-05-01

    Human monocyte-derived DC express the enzyme NADPH oxidase, responsible for ROS production. We show that Candida albicans did not activate NADPH oxidase in DC, and was poorly killed by these cells. However, Candida-killing activity increased upon DC stimulation with the NADPH oxidase activator PMA and was further enhanced by DC treatment with IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma. This fungicidal activity took place at high DC-to-Candida ratio, but decreased at low DC-to-yeast ratio, when Candida inhibited the NADPH oxidase by contrasting the assembly of the enzyme on DC plasma membrane. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium chloride abrogated the PMA-dependent DC candidacidal capacity. Engagement of beta-glucan receptor dectin-1 induced NADPH oxidase activation in DC that was depressed by mannose-binding receptor CD206 co-stimulation. Candida was internalized by DC through mannose-binding receptors, but not through dectin-1, thus explaining why Candida did not elicit NADPH oxidase activity. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase is involved in DC Candida-killing activity, which is increased by IFN. However, Candida escapes the oxidative damage by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and by entering DC through receptors not involved in NADPH oxidase activation. PMID:17407098

  15. Identification and structural analysis of an L-asparaginase enzyme from guinea pig with putative tumor cell killing properties.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Amanda M; Nguyen, Hien-Anh; Rigouin, Coraline; Lavie, Arnon

    2014-11-28

    The initial observation that guinea pig serum kills lymphoma cells marks the serendipitous discovery of a new class of anti-cancer agents. The serum cell killing factor was shown to be an enzyme with L-asparaginase (ASNase) activity. As a direct result of this observation, several bacterial L-asparaginases were developed and are currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of the subset of hematological malignancies that are dependent on the extracellular pool of the amino acid asparagine. As drugs, these enzymes act to hydrolyze asparagine to aspartate, thereby starving the cancer cells of this amino acid. Prior to the work presented here, the precise identity of this guinea pig enzyme has not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We discovered that the guinea pig enzyme annotated as H0W0T5_CAVPO, which we refer to as gpASNase1, has the required low Km property consistent with that possessed by the cell-killing guinea pig serum enzyme. Elucidation of the ligand-free and aspartate complex gpASNase1 crystal structures allows a direct comparison with the bacterial enzymes and serves to explain the lack of L-glutaminase activity in the guinea pig enzyme. The structures were also used to generate a homology model for the human homolog hASNase1 and to help explain its vastly different kinetic properties compared with gpASNase1, despite a 70% sequence identity. Given that the bacterial enzymes frequently present immunogenic and other toxic side effects, this work suggests that gpASNase1 could be a promising alternative to these bacterial enzymes.

  16. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP)-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals. PMID:26919318

  17. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP)-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  18. Polyaniline shell cross-linked Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for heat activated killing of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rana, Suman; Jadhav, Neena V; Barick, K C; Pandey, B N; Hassan, P A

    2014-08-28

    Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles are appealing materials for heat activated killing of cancer cells. Here, we report a novel method to enhance the heat activated killing of cancer cells under an AC magnetic field (AMF) by introducing a polyaniline impregnated shell onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These polyaniline shell cross-linked magnetic nanoparticles (PSMN) were prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline hydrochloride on the surface of carboxyl PEGylated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. XRD and TEM analyses revealed the formation of single phase inverse spinel Fe3O4 nanoparticles of a size of about 10 nm. The successful growth of the polyaniline shell on the surface of carboxyl PEGylated magnetic nanoparticles (CPMN) is evident from FTIR spectra, DLS, TGA, zeta-potential and magnetic measurements. Both CPMN and PSMN show good colloidal stability, superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and excellent heating efficacy under AMF. It has been observed that the heating efficacy of PSMN under AMF was slightly reduced as compared to that of CPMN. The enhanced toxicity of PSMN to cancer cells under AMF suggests their strong potential for magnetic hyperthermia. Furthermore, PSMN shows high loading affinity for an anticancer drug (doxorubicin), its sustained release and substantial internalization in tumor cells. PMID:24948377

  19. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y; Heery, Christopher R; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W

    2016-06-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC.

  20. Enhanced killing of chordoma cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity employing the novel anti-PD-L1 antibody avelumab

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Rika; Friedman, Eitan R.; Richards, Jacob; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Heery, Christopher R.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Chordoma, a rare bone tumor derived from the notochord, has been shown to be resistant to conventional therapies. Checkpoint inhibition has shown great promise in immune-mediated therapy of diverse cancers. The anti-PD-L1 mAb avelumab is unique among checkpoint inhibitors in that it is a fully human IgG1 capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of PD-L1-expressing tumor cells. Here, we investigated avelumab as a potential therapy for chordoma. We examined 4 chordoma cell lines, first for expression of PD-L1, and in vitro for ADCC killing using NK cells and avelumab. PD-L1 expression was markedly upregulated by IFN-γ in all 4 chordoma cell lines, which significantly increased sensitivity to ADCC. Brachyury is a transcription factor that is uniformly expressed in chordoma. Clinical trials are ongoing in which chordoma patients are treated with brachyury-specific vaccines. Co-incubating chordoma cells with brachyury-specific CD8+ T cells resulted in significant upregulation of PD-L1 on the tumor cells, mediated by the CD8+ T cells' IFN-γ production, and increased sensitivity of chordoma cells to avelumab-mediated ADCC. Residential cancer stem cell subpopulations of chordoma cells were also killed by avelumab-mediated ADCC to the same degree as non-cancer stem cell populations. These findings suggest that as a monotherapy for chordoma, avelumab may enable endogenous NK cells, while in combination with T-cell immunotherapy, such as a vaccine, avelumab may enhance NK-cell killing of chordoma cells via ADCC. PMID:27172898

  1. Anti-tumor activity of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 on Meth-A tumor cells in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoichi; Itoh, Yukie; Kataoka, Motoyuki; Iino-Miura, Shiori; Miura, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeo; Fujisawa, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    Probiotics exert numerous effects on human well-being. Here, heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum BF-LP284 (H-Lp) was isolated as a potent immuno-modulator among 15 strains of lactobacilli in terms of TNF-α induction ability in peritoneal macrophages. In vitro TNF-α and IFN-γ induction in Peyer's patch (PP) cells was higher when incubated with H-Lp than with live L. plantarum BF-LP284 (L-Lp). Suppression of syngeneic Meth-A tumors in a murine model by oral administration of H-Lp was also greater than that of L-Lp and of controls. H-Lp stimulated IFN-γ production in spleen cells, which displayed inhibited tumor growth in Winn assays when treated with H-Lp. Moreover, H-Lp increased the ratio of CD3(+ )cells among peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Meth-A tumor-bearing mice, suggesting an H-Lp-mediated anti-tumor mechanism whereby immune cells that are activated by H-Lp in PP and acquire anti-tumor activity in the spleen migrate to tumor sites through lymphocyte homing to inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27198983

  2. Rapid dimerization of quercetin through an oxidative mechanism in the presence of serum albumin decreases its ability to induce cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Anh; Bortolazzo, Anthony; White, J. Brandon

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin cannot be detected intracellularly despite killing MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin forms a heterodimer through oxidation in media with serum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quercetin heterodimer does not kill MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascorbic acid stabilizes quercetin increasing cell death in quercetin treated cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin, and not a modified form, is responsible for apoptosis and cell death. -- Abstract: Quercetin is a member of the flavonoid family and has been previously shown to have a variety of anti-cancer activities. We and others have reported anti-proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis of cancer cells after treatment with quercetin. Quercetin has also been shown to undergo oxidation. However, it is unclear if quercetin or one of its oxidized forms is responsible for cell death. Here we report that quercetin rapidly oxidized in cell culture media to form a dimer. The quercetin dimer is identical to a dimer that is naturally produced by onions. The quercetin dimer and quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside are unable to cross the cell membrane and do not kill MDA-MB-231 cells. Finally, supplementing the media with ascorbic acid increases quercetin's ability to induce cell death probably by reduction oxidative dimerization. Our results suggest that an unmodified quercetin is the compound that elicits cell death.

  3. Cell-killing Effect by Sonodynamic therapy in vitro and their Clinical use for Patients with Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yuichi

    2005-03-01

    Inhibition of tumour growth by a combination of porphyrins and ultrasound in experimental studies is well known. However, intracellular change after this treatment has not been investigated yet. Heat-shock proteins were used in this experimental study to evaluate cell damage. This treatment was then tested clinically in 3 patients with recurrent cancer. In the in vitro study, SDT induced dose-dependent cancer cell damage, and exhibited expression of HSP at low doses range. In the clinical study, none of the side effects of SDT were observed. Two of the three patients showed reduction of tumour volume or slight decrement of serum CEA level, and the remaining patient showed a change in tumour shape after SDT. Thus, enhancement of cell killing by ultrasound in the presence of porphyrin was showed. Expression of heat shock protein indicated that the cell damaging effect of DST was immediate. Further investigation is necessary for the clinical use of SDT.

  4. Clinical-scale laser-based scanning and processing of live cells: selective photothermal killing of fluorescent tumor targets for autologous stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Manfred R.; Hanania, Elie G.; Eisfeld, Timothy; O'Neal, Robert A.; Khovananth, Kevin M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2001-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, is widely used for the treatment of cancer. However, contaminating tumor cells within HSC harvests continue to be of major concern since re-infused tumor cells have proven to contribute to disease relapse. Many tumor purging methods have been evaluated, but all leave detectable tumor cells in the transplant and result in significant loss of HSCs. These shortcomings cause engraftment delays and compromise the therapeutic value of purging. A novel approach integrating automated scanning cytometry, image analysis, and selective laser-induced killing of labeled cells within a cell mixture is described here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cells were spiked into cell mixtures, and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to label tumor cells within the mixture. Cells were then allowed to settle on a surface, and as the surface was scanned with a fluorescence excitation source, a laser pulse was fired at every detected tumor cell using high-speed beam steering mirrors. Tumor cells were selectively killed with little effect on adjacent non-target cells, demonstrating the feasibility of this automated cell processing approach. This technology has many potential research and clinical applications, one example of which is tumor cell purging for autologous HSC transplantation.

  5. [Influence of the sickle cell trait heterozygote on energy abilities].

    PubMed

    Bitanga, E; Rouillon, J D

    1998-01-01

    The sickle cell trait (SCT) is a genetic abnormality of the red blood cell which mainly affects people of African descent. It is due to the mutation of only one parental gene (one glutamic acid of the chain beta of the globin is substituted by one valin). The prevalence of SCT in the black US population is within the range of 8-9%. It is increasing in Europe and in Africa where it may reach up to 40% in some regions. The rate of prevalence of SCT in athletic populations was found to be similar to that of the general sedentary population in west African countries. SCT is usually asymptomatic. However, SCT has been associated with a higher risk of sudden death during exercise. In fact, the substitution of one amino-acid modifies the properties of haemoglobin and produces physiological disorders such as sickling, less solubility of the deoxidized form and the reduction of affinity for oxygen. The sickling phenomenon (formation of sickle cells) mainly occurs in some conditions related to the practise of sport (intense and/or prolonged exercise, exercise in hypoxic conditions, exercise in heat conditions). These sickled red blood cells reduce the speed of capillary flow or obstruct the blood vessels which, because of the lack of oxygen, become altered. The physical ability of sickle cell trait carriers (HbAS) who practise sport should be different from the physical ability of subjects with normal haemoglobin (HbAA) because of: 1) potential risks due to their haemoglobinopathy and 2) the eventual modification of their performance ability. These two aspects have caused controversies among many researchers particularly in line with their investigation methods. Nevertheless, the following results seem to be established: 1) the ability to perform sprint exercises is not altered in the HbAS subjects. Their performances in these events are similar to those of HbAA subjects; 2) The ability of HbAS subjects to perform intense and prolonged exercise is decreased. Our former

  6. [Influence of the sickle cell trait heterozygote on energy abilities].

    PubMed

    Bitanga, E; Rouillon, J D

    1998-01-01

    The sickle cell trait (SCT) is a genetic abnormality of the red blood cell which mainly affects people of African descent. It is due to the mutation of only one parental gene (one glutamic acid of the chain beta of the globin is substituted by one valin). The prevalence of SCT in the black US population is within the range of 8-9%. It is increasing in Europe and in Africa where it may reach up to 40% in some regions. The rate of prevalence of SCT in athletic populations was found to be similar to that of the general sedentary population in west African countries. SCT is usually asymptomatic. However, SCT has been associated with a higher risk of sudden death during exercise. In fact, the substitution of one amino-acid modifies the properties of haemoglobin and produces physiological disorders such as sickling, less solubility of the deoxidized form and the reduction of affinity for oxygen. The sickling phenomenon (formation of sickle cells) mainly occurs in some conditions related to the practise of sport (intense and/or prolonged exercise, exercise in hypoxic conditions, exercise in heat conditions). These sickled red blood cells reduce the speed of capillary flow or obstruct the blood vessels which, because of the lack of oxygen, become altered. The physical ability of sickle cell trait carriers (HbAS) who practise sport should be different from the physical ability of subjects with normal haemoglobin (HbAA) because of: 1) potential risks due to their haemoglobinopathy and 2) the eventual modification of their performance ability. These two aspects have caused controversies among many researchers particularly in line with their investigation methods. Nevertheless, the following results seem to be established: 1) the ability to perform sprint exercises is not altered in the HbAS subjects. Their performances in these events are similar to those of HbAA subjects; 2) The ability of HbAS subjects to perform intense and prolonged exercise is decreased. Our former

  7. Triptolide Induces Cell Killing in Multidrug-Resistant Tumor Cells via CDK7/RPB1 Rather than XPB or p44.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jun-Mei; Huan, Xia-Juan; Song, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of tumor treatment failure; therefore, drugs that can avoid this outcome are urgently needed. We studied triptolide, which directly kills MDR tumor cells with a high potency and a broad spectrum of cell death. Triptolide did not inhibit P-glycoprotein (P-gp) drug efflux and reduced P-gp and MDR1 mRNA resulting from transcription inhibition. Transcription factors including c-MYC, SOX-2, OCT-4, and NANOG were not correlated with triptolide-induced cell killing, but RPB1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, was critical in mediating triptolide's inhibition of MDR cells. Triptolide elicited antitumor and anti-MDR activity through a universal mechanism: by activating CDK7 by phosphorylating Thr170 in both parental and MDR cell lines and in SK-OV-3 cells. The CDK7-selective inhibitor BS-181 partially rescued cell killing induced by 72-hour treatment of triptolide, which may be due to partial rescue of RPB1 degradation. We suggest that a precise phosphorylation site on RPB1 (Ser1878) was phosphorylated by CDK7 in response to triptolide. In addition, XPB and p44, two transcription factor TFIIH subunits, did not contribute to triptolide-driven RPB1 degradation and cell killing, although XPB was reported to covalently bind to triptolide. Several clinical trials are underway to test triptolide and its analogues for treating cancer and other diseases, so our data may help expand potential clinical uses of triptolide, as well as offer a compound that overcomes tumor MDR. Future investigations into the primary molecular target(s) of triptolide responsible for RPB1 degradation may suggest novel anti-MDR target(s) for therapeutic development. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1495-503. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197304

  8. Smart Plasmonic Glucose Nanosensors as Generic Theranostic Agents for Targeting-Free Cancer Cell Screening and Killing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Limei; Li, Haijuan; He, Haili; Wu, Haoxi; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-07-01

    Fast and accurate identification of cancer cells from healthy normal cells in a simple, generic way is very crucial for early cancer detection and treatment. Although functional nanoparticles, like fluorescent quantum dots and plasmonic Au nanoparticles (NPs), have been successfully applied for cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy, they suffer from the main drawback of needing time-consuming targeting preparation for specific cancer cell detection and selective ablation. The lack of a generic and effective method therefore limits their potential high-throughput cancer cell preliminary screening and theranostic applications. We report herein a generic in vitro method for fast, targeting-free (avoiding time-consuming preparations of targeting moiety for specific cancer cells) visual screening and selective killing of cancer cells from normal cells, by using glucose-responsive/-sensitive glucose oxidase-modified Ag/Au nanoshells (Ag/Au-GOx NSs) as a smart plasmonic theranostic agent. The method is generic to some extent since it is based on the distinct localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) responses (and colors) of the smart nanoprobe with cancer cells (typically have a higher glucose uptake level) and normal cells.

  9. Cell penetrating synthetic antimicrobial peptides (SAMPs) exhibiting potent and selective killing of mycobacterium by targeting its DNA.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Pohane, Amol Arunrao; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash; Jain, Vikas; Srivastava, Aasheesh

    2015-02-23

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are powerful defence tools to tackle pathogenic microbes. However, limited natural production and high synthetic costs in addition to poor selectivity limit large-scale use of AMPs in clinical settings. Here, we present a series of synthetic AMPs (SAMPs) that exhibit highly selective and potent killing of Mycobacterium (minimum inhibitory concentration <20 μg mL(-1)) over E. coli or mammalian cells. These SAMPs are active against rapidly multiplying as well as growth saturated Mycobacterium cultures. These SAMPs are not membrane-lytic in nature, and are readily internalized by Mycobacterium and mammalian cells; whereas in E. coli, the lipopolysaccharide layer inhibits their cellular uptake, and hence, their antibacterial action. Upon internalization, these SAMPs interact with the unprotected genomic DNA of mycobacteria, and impede DNA-dependent processes, leading to bacterial cell death.

  10. Hyaluronic Acid-Modified Multifunctional Q-Graphene for Targeted Killing of Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanan; Cai, Xiaoli; Li, He; Lin, Yuehe; Du, Dan

    2016-02-17

    Considering the urgent need to explore multifunctional drug delivery system for overcoming multidrug resistance, we prepared a new nanocarbon material Q-Graphene as a nanocarrier for killing drug-resistant lung cancer cells. Attributing to the introduction of hyaluronic acid and rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC), the Q-Graphene-based drug delivery system was endowed with dual function of targeted drug delivery and fluorescence imaging. Additionally, doxorubicin (DOX) as a model drug was loaded on the surface of Q-Graphene via π-π stacking. Interestingly, the fluorescence of DOX was quenched by Q-Graphene due to its strong electron-accepting capability, and a significant recovery of fluorescence was observed, while DOX was released from Q-Graphene. Because of the RBITC labeling and the effect of fluorescence quenching/restoring of Q-Graphene, the uptake of nanoparticles and intracellular DOX release can be tracked. Overall, a highly promising multifunctional nanoplatform was developed for tracking and monitoring targeted drug delivery for efficiently killing drug-resistant cancer cells. PMID:26785717

  11. Requirements regarding dose rate and exposure time for killing of tumour cells in beta particle radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Veronika; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify combinations of dose rate and exposure time that have the potential to provide curative treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy applying low dose rate beta irradiation. Methods Five tumour cell lines, U-373MG and U-118MG gliomas, HT-29 colon carcinoma, A-431 cervical squamous carcinoma and SKBR-3 breast cancer, were used. An experimental model with 105 tumour cells in each sample was irradiated with low dose rate beta particles. The criterion for successful treatment was absence of recovery of cells during a follow-up period of 3 months. The initial dose rates were in the range 0.1–0.8 Gy/h, and the cells were continuously exposed for 1, 3 or 7 days. These combinations covered dose rates and doses achievable in targeted radionuclide therapy. Results Continuous irradiation with dose rates of 0.2–0.3 and 0.4–0.6 Gy/h for 7 and 3 days, respectively, could kill all cells in each tumour cell sample. These treatments gave total radiation doses of 30–40 Gy. However, when exposed for just 24 h with about 0.8 Gy/h, only the SKBR-3 cells were successfully treated; all the other cell types recovered. There were large cell type-dependent variations in the growth delay patterns for the cultures that recovered. The U-118MG cells were most resistant and the U-373MG and SKBR-3 cells most sensitive to the treatments. The HT-29 and A-431 cells were intermediate. Conclusion The results serve as a guideline for the combinations of dose rate and exposure time necessary to kill tumour cells when applying low dose rate beta irradiation. The shift from recovery to “cure” fell within a narrow range of dose rate and exposure time combinations. PMID:16718515

  12. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26869716

  13. Stimulating the RIG-I pathway to kill cells in the latent HIV reservoir following viral reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Lampiris, Harry W.; Kim, Peggy; Yukl, Steven A.; Havlir, Diane V.; Greene, Warner C.; Wong, Joseph K.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of latent HIV proviruses in long-lived CD4+ T cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART)1–3 is a major obstacle to viral eradication4–6. Because current candidate latency-reversing agents (LRAs) induce HIV transcription but fail to clear these cellular reservoirs,7–8 new approaches for killing these reactivated latent HIV reservoir cells are urgently needed. HIV latency depends upon transcriptional quiescence of the integrated provirus and circumvention of immune defense mechanisms4–6,9. These defenses include cell-intrinsic innate responses that use pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) to detect viral pathogens and subsequently induce apoptosis of the infected cell10. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) forms one class of pattern-recognition receptors that mediates apoptosis and elimination of infected cells after recognition of viral RNA11–14. Here we show that acitretin, an FDA-approved retinoic-acid derivative, enhances RIG-I signaling ex vivo, increases HIV transcription, and induces preferential apoptosis of HIV-infected cells. These effects are abrogated by RIG-I knockdown. Acitretin also decreases proviral DNA levels in CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected subjects on suppressive ART, an effect amplified by combination with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Pharmacologic enhancement of an innate cellular defense network could provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in the latent HIV reservoir. PMID:27294875

  14. Paramecium species ingest and kill the cells of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    FRAGER, SHALOM Z.; CHRISMAN, CARA J.; SHAKKED, RACHEL; CASADEVALL, ARTURO

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in the field of medical mycology is the origin of virulence in those fungal pathogens acquired directly from the environment. In recent years, it was proposed that the virulence of certain environmental animal-pathogenic microbes, such as Cryptococcus neoformans , originated from selection pressures caused by species-specific predation. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of C. neoformans with three Paramecium spp., all of which are ciliated mobile protists. In contrast to the interaction with amoebae, some Paramecium spp. rapidly ingested C. neoformans and killed the fungus. This study establishes yet another type of protist-fungal interaction supporting the notion that animal-pathogenic fungi in the environment are under constant selection by predation. PMID:20233022

  15. Paramecium species ingest and kill the cells of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Frager, Shalom Z; Chrisman, Cara J; Shakked, Rachel; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-08-01

    A fundamental question in the field of medical mycology is the origin of virulence in those fungal pathogens acquired directly from the environment. In recent years, it was proposed that the virulence of certain environmental animal-pathogenic microbes, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, originated from selection pressures caused by species-specific predation. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of C. neoformans with three Paramecium spp., all of which are ciliated mobile protists. In contrast to the interaction with amoebae, some Paramecium spp. rapidly ingested C. neoformans and killed the fungus. This study establishes yet another type of protist-fungal interaction supporting the notion that animal-pathogenic fungi in the environment are under constant selection by predation.

  16. Cytokine-induced killer cells efficiently kill stem-like cancer cells of nasopharyngeal carcinoma via the NKG2D-ligands recognition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Rong, Xiao-Xiang; Xie, Rao-Ying; Jia, Li-Ting; Wang, Hui-Yan; Qin, Yu-Juan; Chen, Lin; Shen, Hong-Fen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Jie; Yang, Sheng; Hao, Wei-Chao; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Sheng-Jun; Zhou, Hui-Rong; Lin, Tao-Yan; Chen, Yu-Shuang; Sun, Yan; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2015-10-27

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be the root cause for cancer treatment failure. Thus, there remains an urgent need for more potent and safer therapies against CSCs for curing cancer. In this study, the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against putative CSCs of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) was fully evaluated in vitro and in vivo. To visualize putative CSCs in vitro by fluorescence imaging, and image and quantify putative CSCs in tumor xenograft-bearing mice by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, NPC cells were engineered with CSC detector vector encoding GFP and luciferase (Luc) under control of Nanog promoter. Our study reported in vitro intense tumor-killing activity of CIK cells against putative CSCs of NPC, as revealed by percentage analysis of side population cells, tumorsphere formation assay and Nanog-promoter-GFP-Luc reporter gene strategy plus time-lapse recording. Additionally, time-lapse imaging firstly illustrated that GFP-labeled or PKH26-labeled putative CSCs or tumorspheres were usually attacked simultaneously by many CIK cells and finally killed by CIK cells, suggesting the necessity of achieving sufficient effector-to-target ratios. We firstly confirmed that NKG2D blockade by anti-NKG2D antibody significantly but partially abrogated CIK cell-mediated cytolysis against putative CSCs. More importantly, intravenous infusion of CIK cells significantly delayed tumor growth in NOD/SCID mice, accompanied by a remarkable reduction in putative CSC number monitored by whole-body bioluminescence imaging. Taken together, our findings suggest that CIK cells demonstrate the intense tumor-killing activity against putative CSCs of NPC, at least in part, by NKG2D-ligands recognition. These results indicate that CIK cell-based therapeutic strategy against CSCs presents a promising and safe approach for cancer treatment. PMID:26418951

  17. Heat-killed and γ-irradiated Brucella strain RB51 stimulates enhanced dendritic cell activation, but not function compared with the virulent smooth strain 2308.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Naveen; Hiltbold, Elizabeth M; Heid, Bettina; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Boyle, Stephen M; Zimmerman, Kurt L; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2010-11-01

    Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause abortion in livestock and undulant fever in humans worldwide. Brucella abortus strain 2308 is a pathogenic strain that affects cattle and humans. Currently, there are no efficacious human vaccines available. However, B. abortus strain RB51, which is approved by the USDA, is a live-attenuated rough vaccine against bovine brucellosis. Live strain RB51 induces protection via CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity. To generate an optimal T-cell response, strong innate immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial. Because of safety concerns, the use of live vaccine strain RB51 in humans is limited. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the differential ability of the same doses of live, heat-killed (HK) and γ-irradiated (IR) strain RB51 in inducing DC activation and function. Smooth strain 2308, live strain RB51 and lipopolysaccharide were used as controls. Studies using mouse bone marrow-derived DCs revealed that, irrespective of viability, strain RB51 induced greater DC activation than smooth strain 2308. Live strain RB51 induced significantly (P≤0.05) higher DC maturation than HK and IR strains, and only live strain RB51-infected DCs (at multiplicity of infection 1:100) induced significant (P≤0.05) tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 secretion.

  18. Recognition and killing of cancer stem-like cell population in hepatocellular carcinoma cells by cytokine-induced killer cells via NKG2d-ligands recognition

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xiao-Xiang; Wei, Fang; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Qin, Yu-Juan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Hui-Yan; Shen, Hong-Fen; Jia, Li-Ting; Xie, Rao-Ying; Lin, Tao-Yan; Hao, Wei-Chao; Yang, Jie; Yang, Sheng; Cheng, Yu-Shuang; Huang, Wen-Hua; Li, Ai-min; Sun, Yan; Luo, Rong-Cheng; Xiao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is an urgent need for more potent and safer approaches to eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs) for curing cancer. In this study, we investigate cancer-killing activity (CKA) of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against CSCs of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To visualize CSCs in vitro by fluorescence imaging, and image and quantify CSCs in tumor xenograft-bearing mice by bioluminescence imaging, HCC cells were engineered with CSC detector vector encoding GFP and luciferase controlled by Nanog promoter. We found that CIK cells have a strong CKA in vitro against putative CSCs of HCC, as shown by tumorsphere formation and time-lapse imaging. Additionally, time-lapse recording firstly revealed that putative CSCs were attacked simultaneously by many CIK cells and finally eradicated by CIK cells, indicating the necessity of achieving sufficient effector-to-target ratios. We firstly illustrated that anti-NKG2D antibody blocking partially but significantly inhibited CKA of CIK cells against putative CSCs. More importantly, intravenous infusion of CIK cells remarkably delayed tumor growth in mice with a significant decrease in putative CSC number monitored by bioluminescence imaging. Taken together, these findings demonstrate CKA of CIK cells against putative CSCs of HCC, at least in part, by NKG2D-ligands recognition. PMID:27141341

  19. Mast cell toll-like receptor 2 signaling is crucial for effective killing of Francisella tularensis1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Guentzel, M. N.; Navara, Christopher S.; Klose, Karl E.; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Chambers, James P.; Berton, Michael T.; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is critical for early host defense against pathogens, but the contribution of mast cell TLR-mediated mechanisms and subsequent effector functions during pulmonary infection is largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated that mast cells, through the production of IL-4, effectively control Francisella tularensis replication. In this study, the highly human virulent strain of F. tularensis SCHU S4 and the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) were utilized to investigate the contribution of mast cell-TLR regulation of Francisella. Mast cells required TLR2 for effective bacterial killing, regulation of the hydrolytic enzyme cathepsin L, and for coordination and trafficking of MHCII and lysosomal associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2). Infected TLR2−/− mast cells, in contrast to WT and TLR4−/−, lacked detectable IL-4 and displayed increased cell death with a 2–3 log increase of F. tularensis replication, but could be rescued with recombinant IL-4 treatment. Importantly, MHCII and LAMP2 localization with labeled F. tularensis in the lungs was greater in WT than in TLR2−/− mice. These results provide evidence for the important effector contribution of mast cells and TLR2-mediated signaling on early innate processes in the lung following pulmonary F. tularensis infection and provide additional insight into possible mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens modulate respiratory immune defenses. PMID:22529298

  20. GP73-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses possess potent killing effect on human liver cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Liu, Tao; Yang, Yu; Xie, Wenjie; Liu, Xianglei; Huang, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are highly metastatic, chemo-resistant and tumorigenic, and are critical for cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. Oncolytic adenovirus could targetedly kill CSCs and has been acted as a promising anticancer agent. Currently, a novel GP73-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 was constructed to specifically treat liver cancer and exhibited obvious cytotoxicity effect. However, there remains to be confirmed that whether GD55 could effectively eliminate liver CSCs. We first utilized the suspension culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, which acquires the properties of liver CSCs in self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, chemo-resistance and tumorigenicity. The results indicated that GD55 elicited more significant cytotoxicity and stronger oncolytic effect in liver CSC-like cells compared to common oncolytic virus ZD55. Additionally, GD55 possessed the greater efficacy in suppressing the growth of implanted tumors derived from liver CSC-like cells than ZD55. Furthermore, GD55 induced remarkable apoptosis of liver CSC-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the propogation of cells and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor tissues. Thus, GD55 may virtually represent an attractive therapeutic agent for targeting liver CSCs to achieve better clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:27121064

  1. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Interact with Melanoma Differentiation Associated-7/Interleukin-24 to Kill Primary Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Hossein A.; Yacoub, Adly; Park, Margaret A.; Archer, Kellie; Das, Swadesh K.; Sarkar, Devanand; Grant, Steven; Fisher, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    We presently demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) enhance toxicity of melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin 24 (mda-7/IL-24) in invasive primary human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells. Additionally, a method is described to augment the efficacy of adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 in these cells. HDACIs synergized with melanoma differentiation-associated (MDA)-7/IL-24 killing GBM cells. Enhanced lethality correlated with increased autophagy that was dependent on the expression of ceramide synthase 6. HDACIs interacted with MDA-7/IL-24 prolonging generation of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+. Quenching of reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ blocked HDACI and MDA-7/IL-24 killing. In vivo MDA-7/IL-24 prolonged the survival of animals carrying orthotopic tumors, and HDACIs enhanced survival further. A serotype 5/3 adenovirus more effectively delivers mda-7/IL-24 to GBM tumors than a serotype 5 virus. Hence, we constructed a serotype 5/3 adenovirus that conditionally replicates in tumor cells expressing MDA-7/IL-24, in which the adenoviral early region 1A (E1A) gene was driven by the cancer-specific promoter progression elevated gene-3 [Ad.5/3 (INGN 241)-PEG-E1A-mda-7; also called Ad.5/3-CTV (cancer terminator virus)]. Ad.5/3-CTV increased the survival of mice carrying GBM tumors to a significantly greater extent than did a nonreplicative virus Ad.5/3-mda-7. Ad.5/3-CTV exhibited no toxicity in the brains of Syrian hamsters. Collectively our data demonstrate that HDACIs enhance MDA-7/IL-24 lethality, and adenoviral delivery of mda-7/IL-24 combined with tumor-specific viral replication is an effective preclinical GBM therapeutic. PMID:23661648

  2. Enhanced and selective killing of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with an engineered BCR-ABL binding protein and imatinib.

    PubMed

    Constance, Jonathan E; Woessner, David W; Matissek, Karina J; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S

    2012-11-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl stimulates prosurvival pathways and suppresses apoptosis from its exclusively cytoplasmic locale, but when targeted to the mitochondrial compartment of leukemia cells, Bcr-Abl was potently cytotoxic. Therefore, we designed a protein construct to act as a mitochondrial chaperone to move Bcr-Abl to the mitochondria. The chaperone (i.e., the 43.6 kDa intracellular cryptic escort (iCE)) contains an EGFP tag and two previously characterized motifs: (1) an optimized Bcr-Abl binding motif that interacts with the coiled-coil domain of Bcr (ccmut3; 72 residues), and (2) a cryptic mitochondrial targeting signal (cMTS; 51 residues) that selectively targets the mitochondria in oxidatively stressed cells (i.e., Bcr-Abl positive leukemic cells) via phosphorylation at a key residue (T193) by protein kinase C. While the iCE colocalized with Bcr-Abl, it did not relocalize to the mitochondria. However, the iCE was selectively toxic to Bcr-Abl positive K562 cells as compared to Bcr-Abl negative Cos-7 fibroblasts and 1471.1 murine breast cancer cells. The toxicity of the iCE to leukemic cells was equivalent to 10 μM imatinib at 48 h and the iCE combined with imatinib potentiated cell death beyond imatinib or the iCE alone. Substitution of either the ccmut3 or the cMTS with another Bcr-Abl binding domain (derived from Ras/Rab interaction protein 1 (RIN1; 295 residues)) or MTS (i.e., the canonical IMS derived from Smac/Diablo; 49 residues) did not match the cytotoxicity of the iCE. Additionally, a phosphorylation null mutant of the iCE also abolished the killing effect. The mitochondrial toxicity of Bcr-Abl and the iCE in Bcr-Abl positive K562 leukemia cells was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of 7-AAD, TUNEL, and annexin-V staining. DNA segmentation and cell viability were assessed by microscopy. Subcellular localization of constructs was determined using confocal microscopy (including statistical colocalization analysis). Overall, the iCE was highly

  3. Mechanisms of selective killing of neuroblastoma cells by natural killer cells and lymphokine activated killer cells. Potential for residual disease eradication.

    PubMed

    Foreman, N K; Rill, D R; Coustan-Smith, E; Douglass, E C; Brenner, M K

    1993-05-01

    Widely disseminated neuroblastoma in children older than infancy remains a very poor prognosis disease. Even the introduction of marrow ablative chemotherapy with autologous rescue has not significantly improved the outlook for these children, presumably because of a failure to eradicate minimal residual disease. One additional approach which may hold promise is the use of immunomodulation with cytokines such as IL2 in the setting of minimal residual disease (MDR), for example after intensive chemotherapy and ABMT. However, considerable variability in the susceptibility of neuroblastoma cells to natural killer (NK) and lymphokine-activated (LAK) killing has been observed, and it is presently unclear how NK and LAK cells recognise neuroblastoma cells. In this paper we examine expression of cell adhesion molecules on neuroblastoma to determine which of these modify interaction with NK and LAK cells. We find that LFA-3 (CD58), the ligand for CD2 is of predominant importance in predicting susceptibility of neuroblastoma to the cytotoxic actions of NK and LAK cells, while expression of ICAM-1 (CD54) may also modify susceptibility. These findings were confirmed by blocking experiments in which co-culture of target cells with ICAM-1 and LFA-3 reduced LAK and NK cytotoxicity. Study of the immunophenotypic features of each patient's neuroblastoma cells before induction of MRD may be valuable in determining the likely effect of IL2 in predicting disease reactivation.

  4. CTLs are targeted to kill β cells in patients with type 1 diabetes through recognition of a glucose-regulated preproinsulin epitope

    PubMed Central

    Skowera, Ania; Ellis, Richard J.; Varela-Calviño, Ruben; Arif, Sefina; Huang, Guo Cai; Van-Krinks, Cassie; Zaremba, Anna; Rackham, Chloe; Allen, Jennifer S.; Tree, Timothy I.M.; Zhao, Min; Dayan, Colin M.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Unger, Wendy; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Ossendorp, Ferry; Roep, Bart O.; Peakman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The final pathway of β cell destruction leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and clinical type 1 diabetes is unknown. Here we show that circulating CTLs can kill β cells via recognition of a glucose-regulated epitope. First, we identified 2 naturally processed epitopes from the human preproinsulin signal peptide by elution from HLA-A2 (specifically, the protein encoded by the A*0201 allele) molecules. Processing of these was unconventional, requiring neither the proteasome nor transporter associated with processing (TAP). However, both epitopes were major targets for circulating effector CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, cloned preproinsulin signal peptide–specific CD8+ T cells killed human β cells in vitro. Critically, at high glucose concentration, β cell presentation of preproinsulin signal epitope increased, as did CTL killing. This study provides direct evidence that autoreactive CTLs are present in the circulation of patients with type 1 diabetes and that they can kill human β cells. These results also identify a mechanism of self-antigen presentation that is under pathophysiological regulation and could expose insulin-producing β cells to increasing cytotoxicity at the later stages of the development of clinical diabetes. Our findings suggest that autoreactive CTLs are important targets for immune-based interventions in type 1 diabetes and argue for early, aggressive insulin therapy to preserve remaining β cells. PMID:18802479

  5. CTLs are targeted to kill beta cells in patients with type 1 diabetes through recognition of a glucose-regulated preproinsulin epitope.

    PubMed

    Skowera, Ania; Ellis, Richard J; Varela-Calviño, Ruben; Arif, Sefina; Huang, Guo Cai; Van-Krinks, Cassie; Zaremba, Anna; Rackham, Chloe; Allen, Jennifer S; Tree, Timothy I M; Zhao, Min; Dayan, Colin M; Sewell, Andrew K; Unger, Wendy W; Unger, Wendy; Drijfhout, Jan W; Ossendorp, Ferry; Roep, Bart O; Peakman, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The final pathway of beta cell destruction leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia, and clinical type 1 diabetes is unknown. Here we show that circulating CTLs can kill beta cells via recognition of a glucose-regulated epitope. First, we identified 2 naturally processed epitopes from the human preproinsulin signal peptide by elution from HLA-A2 (specifically, the protein encoded by the A*0201 allele) molecules. Processing of these was unconventional, requiring neither the proteasome nor transporter associated with processing (TAP). However, both epitopes were major targets for circulating effector CD8+ T cells from HLA-A2+ patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, cloned preproinsulin signal peptide-specific CD8+ T cells killed human beta cells in vitro. Critically, at high glucose concentration, beta cell presentation of preproinsulin signal epitope increased, as did CTL killing. This study provides direct evidence that autoreactive CTLs are present in the circulation of patients with type 1 diabetes and that they can kill human beta cells. These results also identify a mechanism of self-antigen presentation that is under pathophysiological regulation and could expose insulin-producing beta cells to increasing cytotoxicity at the later stages of the development of clinical diabetes. Our findings suggest that autoreactive CTLs are important targets for immune-based interventions in type 1 diabetes and argue for early, aggressive insulin therapy to preserve remaining beta cells.

  6. Anticancer compound Oplopantriol A kills cancer cells through inducing ER stress and BH3 proteins Bim and Noxa

    PubMed Central

    Jin, H R; Liao, Y; Li, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, J; Wang, C-Z; Huang, W-H; Li, S-P; Yuan, C-S; Du, W

    2014-01-01

    Oplopantriol-A (OPT) is a natural polyyne from Oplopanax horridus. We show here that OPT preferentially kills cancer cells and inhibits tumor growth. We demonstrate that OPT-induced cancer cell death is mediated by excessive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Decreasing the level of ER stress either by inactivating components of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway or by expression of ER chaperone protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) decreases OPT-induced cell death. We show that OPT induces the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and the stabilization of unstable proteins, suggesting that OPT functions, at least in part, through interfering with the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In support of this, inhibition of protein synthesis significantly decreased the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, which is correlated with significantly decreased OPT-induced ER stress and cell death. Finally, we show that OPT treatment significantly induced the expression of BH3-only proteins, Noxa and Bim. Knockdown of both Noxa and Bim significantly blocked OPT-induced cell death. Taken together, our results suggest that OPT is a potential new anticancer agent that induces cancer cell death through inducing ER stress and BH3 proteins Noxa and Bim. PMID:24763047

  7. Beyond killing

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Pedro F.; McNally, Luke; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea; King, Kayla C.; Popat, Roman; Domingo-Sananes, Maria R.; Allen, Judith E.; Soares, Miguel P.; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic pipeline is running dry and infectious disease remains a major threat to public health. An efficient strategy to stay ahead of rapidly adapting pathogens should include approaches that replace, complement or enhance the effect of both current and novel antimicrobial compounds. In recent years, a number of innovative approaches to manage disease without the aid of traditional antibiotics and without eliminating the pathogens directly have emerged. These include disabling pathogen virulence-factors, increasing host tissue damage control or altering the microbiota to provide colonization resistance, immune resistance or disease tolerance against pathogens. We discuss the therapeutic potential of these approaches and examine their possible consequences for pathogen evolution. To guarantee a longer half-life of these alternatives to directly killing pathogens, and to gain a full understanding of their population-level consequences, we encourage future work to incorporate evolutionary perspectives into the development of these treatments. PMID:27016341

  8. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  9. Repair-deficient 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase homozygous mutant mouse cells have increased sensitivity to alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cell killing.

    PubMed Central

    Engelward, B P; Dreslin, A; Christensen, J; Huszar, D; Kurahara, C; Samson, L

    1996-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the repair of 3-methyladenine (3MeA) DNA lesions prevents alkylation-induced cell death because unrepaired 3MeA blocks DNA replication. Whether this lesion is cytotoxic to mammalian cells has been difficult to establish in the absence of 3MeA repair-deficient cell lines. We previously isolated and characterized a mouse 3MeA DNA glycosylase cDNA (Aag) that provides resistance to killing by alkylating agents in E. coli. To determine the in vivo role of Aag, we cloned a large fragment of the Aag gene and used it to create Aag-deficient mouse cells by targeted homologous recombination. Aag null cells have no detectable Aag transcripts or 3MeA DNA glycosylase activity. The loss of Aag renders cells significantly more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate-induced chromosome damage, and to cell killing induced by two methylating agents, one of which produces almost exclusively 3MeAs. Aag null embryonic stem cells become sensitive to two cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents, namely 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea and mitomycin C, indicating that Aag status is an important determinant of cellular resistance to these agents. We conclude that this mammalian 3MeA DNA glycosylase plays a pivotal role in preventing alkylation-induced chromosome damage and cytotoxicity. Images PMID:8631315

  10. Murine cytomegalovirus stimulates natural killer cell function but kills genetically resistant mice treated with radioactive strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, A.; Bennett, M.

    1981-12-01

    Treatment of C3H/St mice with 100 microCi of 89Sr weakened their genetic resistance to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. The criteria utilized to detect increased susceptibility were: (i) survival of mice; (ii) numbers of MCMV-infected cells in the spleens and liver; and (iii) serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels. The natural killer (NK) cell activity of spleen cells from mice treated with 89Sr is very low. However, the NK activities of spleen cells of both normal and 89Sr-treated mice were greatly augmented 3 days after infection with MCMV. These NK cells lysed a variety of tumor cells and shared several features with conventional NK cells, but were not lysed by anti-Nk-1.2 serum (specific for NK cells) plus complement. Splenic adherent cells did not lyse tumor cells themselves but were necessary for the stimulation of NK cells by MCMV. The paradox of high NK cell function and poor survival in 89Sr-treated mice infected with MCMV was a surprise. We conclude that these augmented NK cells, of themselves, cannot account for the genetic resistance of C3H/St mice to infection with MCMV.

  11. The radioresistance to killing of A1-5 cells derives from activation of the Chk1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, B.; Zhou, X. Y.; Wang, X.; Zeng, Z. C.; Iliakis, G.; Wang, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Checkpoints respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for facilitating repair. In mammalian cells, the G(2) checkpoint prevents the Cdc25C phosphatase from removing inhibitory phosphate groups from the mitosis-promoting kinase Cdc2. Both Chk1 and Chk2, the checkpoint kinases, can phosphorylate Cdc25C and inactivate its in vitro phosphatase activity. Therefore, both Chk1 and Chk2 are thought to regulate the activation of the G(2) checkpoint. Here we report that A1-5, a transformed rat embryo fibroblast cell line, shows much more radioresistance associated with a much stronger G(2) arrest response when compared with its counterpart, B4, although A1-5 and B4 cells have a similar capacity for nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair. These phenotypes of A1-5 cells are accompanied by a higher Chk1 expression and a higher phosphorylation of Cdc2. On the other hand, Chk2 expression increases slightly following radiation; however, it has no difference between A1-5 and B4 cells. Caffeine or UCN-01 abolishes the extreme radioresistance with the strong G(2) arrest and at the same time reduces the phosphorylation of Cdc2 in A1-5 cells. In addition, Chk1 but not Chk2 antisense oligonucleotide sensitizes A1-5 cells to radiation-induced killing and reduces the G(2) arrest of the cells. Taken together these results suggest that the Chk1/Cdc25C/Cdc2 pathway is the major player for the radioresistance with G(2) arrest in A1-5 cells.

  12. A H(+)-triggered bubble-generating nanosystem for killing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wen, Zuhuang; Long, Yijuan; Huang, Ning; Cheng, Yuan; Zhao, Li; Zheng, Huzhi

    2016-09-18

    We constructed a H(+)-triggered bubble-generating nanosystem (BGNS), which generated CO2 bubbles in the acidic environment of lysosomes after being internalized by cancer cells. The quickly generated bubbles caused enhanced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. As expected, H(+)-triggered BGNS possessed remarkable cytotoxicity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and successfully overcame the multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells.

  13. Killing Cancer Cells with the Help of Infrared Light – Photoimmunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy uses an antibody–photoabsorber conjugate that binds to cancer cells. When near-infrared light is applied, the cells swell and then burst, causing the cancer cell to die. Photoimmunotherapy is in clinical trials in patients with inoperable tumors.

  14. Zika Kills Vital Nervous System Cells in Adult Mice, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the Zika-related changes in neural stem cell numbers in mice. However, research with animals often doesn't translate to similar findings in humans. SOURCE: Cell Stem Cell , news release, Aug. 18, 2016 HealthDay Copyright ( ...

  15. Oxidative stress contributes to the tamoxifen-induced killing of breast cancer cells: implications for tamoxifen therapy and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Raie T.; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Liu, Rong-Zong; Tang, Xiaoyun; Mi, Si; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Mackey, John R.; Godbout, Roseline; Curtis, Jonathan M.; McMullen, Todd P. W.; Brindley, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the accepted therapy for patients with estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer. However, clinical resistance to tamoxifen, as demonstrated by recurrence or progression on therapy, is frequent and precedes death from metastases. To improve breast cancer treatment it is vital to understand the mechanisms that result in tamoxifen resistance. This study shows that concentrations of tamoxifen and its metabolites, which accumulate in tumors of patients, killed both ERα-positive and ERα-negative breast cancer cells. This depended on oxidative damage and anti-oxidants rescued the cancer cells from tamoxifen-induced apoptosis. Breast cancer cells responded to tamoxifen-induced oxidation by increasing Nrf2 expression and subsequent activation of the anti-oxidant response element (ARE). This increased the transcription of anti-oxidant genes and multidrug resistance transporters. As a result, breast cancer cells are able to destroy or export toxic oxidation products leading to increased survival from tamoxifen-induced oxidative damage. These responses in cancer cells also occur in breast tumors of tamoxifen-treated mice. Additionally, high levels of expression of Nrf2, ABCC1, ABCC3 plus NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone-1 in breast tumors of patients at the time of diagnosis were prognostic of poor survival after tamoxifen therapy. Therefore, overcoming tamoxifen-induced activation of the ARE could increase the efficacy of tamoxifen in treating breast cancer. PMID:26883574

  16. Preliminary studies on LED-activated pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester killing cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yong; Xu, Chuan Shan; Xia, Xin Shu; Yu, He Ping; Bai, Ding Qun; He, Yong; Xu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xin Na; Leung, Albert Wing Nang

    2009-05-01

    In the present study, a novel LED source was applied for activating pyropheophorbids-a methyl ester (MPPa) in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cell line COC1/DDP cells. MPPa concentration was 2 μM and light energy from 0.125-8 J/cm2. Cytotoxicity was investigated 24 h using MTT reduction assay and light microscopy after treatment. Cellular ultrastructure was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nuclear chromatin by fluorescent microscope with Hoechst33258 staining. MTT reduction assay showed that the cytotoxicity of LED-activated MPPa in the COC1/DDP cells increased along with the light dose of LED source and LED-activated MPPa resulted in light-dependent cytotoxicity. The observations from light microscopy reinforced the above results. TEM showed that necrotic cells with the disruption of karyotheca, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis of nucleus and apoptotic cells, especially the apoptotic body, can be seen post LED-activated MPPa. Hoechst33258 staining showed that condensation of chromatin and nuclear fragmentations could be found in many treated cells and some of them formed the structure of apoptotic bodies when COC1/DDP cells were exposed to 2 μM MPPa for 20 h and then 1 J/cm2 irradiation of LED source. The findings demonstrated that the novel LED source could efficiently activated MPPa and LED-activated MPPa could significantly kill cisplatin-resistant ovarian cell line COC1/DDP cells through two major pathways including necrosis and apoptosis, suggesting that LED is a novel and efficient light source and LED-activated MPPa might be potential therapeutic modality for treating cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma.

  17. Comparison of immune responses to a killed bivalent whole cell oral cholera vaccine between endemic and less endemic settings.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sachin N; Akalu, Zenebe; Teferi, Mekonnen; Manna, Byomkesh; Teshome, Samuel; Park, Ju Yeon; Yang, Jae Seung; Kim, Deok Ryun; Kanungo, Suman; Digilio, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Studies on safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the killed, bivalent whole cell oral cholera vaccine (Shanchol) have been conducted in historically endemic settings of Asia. Recent cholera vaccination campaigns in Haiti and Guinea have also demonstrated favourable immunogenicity and effectiveness in nonendemic outbreak settings. We performed a secondary analysis, comparing immune responses of Shanchol from two randomised controlled trials performed in an endemic and a less endemic area (Addis Ababa) during a nonoutbreak setting. While Shanchol may offer some degree of immediate protection in primed populations living in cholera endemic areas, as well as being highly immunogenic in less endemic settings, understanding the characteristics of immune responses in each of these areas is vital in determining ideal dosing strategies that offer the greatest public health impact to populations from areas with varying degrees of cholera endemicity.

  18. Formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcus vaccine - effect of aluminum adjuvants on the antibody and IL-17 response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae causes widespread morbidity and mortality. Current vaccines contain free polysaccharides or protein-polysaccharide conjugates, and do not induce protection against serotypes that are not included in the vaccines. An affordable and broadly protective vaccine is very desirable. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcal vaccine with aluminum-containing adjuvants for intramuscular injection. Methods Four aluminium-containing adjuvants were prepared with different levels of surface phosphate groups resulting in different adsorptive capacities and affinities for the vaccine antigens. Mice were immunized three times and the antigen-specific antibody titers and IL-17 responses in blood were analyzed. Results Although all adjuvants induced significantly higher antibody titers than antigen without adjuvant, the vaccine containing aluminum phosphate adjuvant (AP) produced the highest antibody response when low doses of antigen were used. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant (AH) induced an equal or better antibody response at high doses compared with AP. Vaccines formulated with AH, but not with AP, induced an IL-17 response. The vaccine formulated with AH was stable and retained full immunogenicity when stored at 4°C for 4 months. Conclusions Antibodies are important for protection against systemic streptococcal disease and IL-17 is critical in the prevention of nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae in the mouse model. The formulation of the whole killed bacterial cells with AH resulted in a stable vaccine that induced both antibodies and an IL-17 response. These experiments underscore the importance of formulation studies with aluminium containing adjuvants for the development of stable and effective vaccines. PMID:21801401

  19. A H(+)-triggered bubble-generating nanosystem for killing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Wen, Zuhuang; Long, Yijuan; Huang, Ning; Cheng, Yuan; Zhao, Li; Zheng, Huzhi

    2016-09-18

    We constructed a H(+)-triggered bubble-generating nanosystem (BGNS), which generated CO2 bubbles in the acidic environment of lysosomes after being internalized by cancer cells. The quickly generated bubbles caused enhanced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. As expected, H(+)-triggered BGNS possessed remarkable cytotoxicity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and successfully overcame the multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. PMID:27488856

  20. Influence of caffeine on X-ray-induced killing and mutation in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, S.B.; Bhattacharyya, N.; Chatterjee, S.

    1987-02-01

    Effects produced by caffeine on X-irradiated Chinese hamster V79 cells depended on the growth conditions of the cells. For exponentially growing cells, nontoxic concentrations of caffeine decreased the shoulder width from the survival curve, but the slope remained unchanged. The yield of mutants under the same conditions also remained unaffected. In case of density-inhibited cells, delaying trypsinization for 24 h after X irradiation increased the survival and decreased the yield of mutants. The presence of caffeine during this incubation period inhibited such recovery and significantly increased the yield of X-ray-induced mutants.

  1. ABT-737, a Bcl-2 Selective Inhibitor, and Chloroquine Synergistically Kill Renal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Pei; Jia, Jinpeng; Li, Jijun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yiyan; Chen, Fengkun

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common malignancy in the kidney in the world, and the 5-year overall survival for patients remains poor due to the lack of effective treatment strategies. Although ABT-737, as a Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor, has recently emerged as a novel cancer therapeutic reagent, apoptosis induced by ABT-737 is often blocked in several types of cancer cells. This study investigated whether the combination of the small-molecule BH3 mimetic ABT-737 and the lysosome inhibitor chloroquine was an effective strategy for treating renal cancer cells. We found that the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine synergistically decreased cell viability when compared to treatment with either single reagent. Cell apoptosis induced by a combined treatment was markedly inhibited by the caspase inhibitors z-DEVD-FMK and z-VAD-FMK. It was also inhibited by cathepsin inhibitor E-64 and CTSI (cathepsin inhibitor), which suggested that apoptosis was dependent on the cascade of caspase activation and cathepsins released from lysosomes. Furthermore, we found that ABT-737 could increase the cell level of ROS, which triggers cathepsin-mediated cell death and augments the role of chloroquine in cell death. So the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine was an effective strategy for the treatment of renal cancer cells, and this combined strategy may widen the therapeutic window of ABT-737 and chloroquine as well as enhance the clinical efficacy of synergistic drug combinations. PMID:27178823

  2. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. IV. Progression delays and enhanced cell killing at high caffeine concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmach, L.J.; Busse, P.M.

    1980-05-01

    The response of x-irradiated and unirradiated HeLa S3 cells to treatment with caffeine at concentrations between 1 and 10 nM has been examined with respect to both delay in progression through the cell generation cycle and enhancement of the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage. Progression is delayed in a concentration-dependent fashion: the generation time is doubled at about 4 mM. The duration of G/sub 1/ is lengthened, and the rate of DNA synthesis is reduced, although the kinetics are different in the two phases; the rate of DNA synthesis is usually unaffected at 1 or 2 mM, while there is no concentration threshold for the slowing of progression through G/sub 1/. Progression through G/sub 2/ appears to be unaffected by concentrations up to at least 10 mM. Killing of irradiated cells in G/sub 2/ is somewhat greater after treatment with the higher caffeine concentrations than reported previously for 1 mM. Moreover, an additional mode of killing is observed in irradiated G/sub 1/ cells which had been found previously to be only slightly affected by 1 mM caffeine; they suffer extensive killing at concentrations above 5 mM. The time-survival curves for irradiated, caffeine-treated G/sub 1/ and G/sub 2/ cells have characteristically different shapes. The dose-survival curves for cells treated with the higher caffeine concentrations display steeper terminal slopes and narrower shoulders.

  3. Rapid and transient activation of γδ T cells to IFN-γ production, NK cell-like killing, and antigen processing during acute virus infection.

    PubMed

    Toka, Felix N; Kenney, Mary A; Golde, William T

    2011-04-15

    γδ T cells are the majority peripheral blood T cells in young cattle. The role of γδ T cells in innate responses against infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus was analyzed on consecutive 5 d following infection. Before infection, bovine WC1(+) γδ T cells expressed a nonactivated phenotype relative to CD62L, CD45RO, and CD25 expression and did not produce IFN-γ ex vivo. Additionally, CD335 expression was lacking and no spontaneous target cell lysis could be detected in vitro, although perforin was detectable at a very low level. MHC class II and CD13 expression were also lacking. Following infection with foot-and-mouth disease virus, expression of CD62L and CD45RO was greatly reduced on WC1(+) γδ T cells, and unexpectedly, CD45RO expression did not recover. A transient increase in expression of CD25 correlated with production of IFN-γ. Expression of CD335 and production of perforin were detected on a subset of γδ T cells, and this correlated with an increased spontaneous killing of xenogeneic target cells. Furthermore, increased MHC class II expression was detected on WC1(+) γδ T cells, and these cells processed protein Ags. These activities are rapidly induced, within 3 d, and wane by 5 d following infection. All of these functions, NK-like killing, Ag processing, and IFN-γ production, have been demonstrated for these cells in various species. However, these results are unique in that all these functions are detected in the same samples of WC1(+) γδ T cells, suggesting a pivotal role of these cells in controlling virus infection.

  4. Analyses of CD20 Monoclonal Antibody–Mediated Tumor Cell Killing Mechanisms: Rational Design of Dosing Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lindorfer, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Since approval of rituximab for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for cancer treatment and elucidation of their cytotoxic mechanisms have been subject to intense investigations. Compelling evidence indicates that rituximab and another CD20 mAb, ofatumumab, must use the body’s cellular and humoral immune effector functions to kill malignant cells. Other U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved mAbs, including obinutuzumab, cetuximab, and trastuzumab, require, in part, these effector mechanisms to eliminate tumor cells. Although gram quantities of mAbs can be administered to patients, our investigations of CD20 mAb-based therapies for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), including correlative measurements in clinical trials and studies with primary cells and cell lines, indicate that effector mechanisms necessary for mAb activity can be saturated or exhausted if tumor burdens are high, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of high-dose mAb therapy. Under these conditions, another reaction (trogocytosis) predominates in which bound CD20 mAb and CD20 are removed from targeted cells by effector cells that express Fcγ receptors, thereby allowing malignant cells to escape unharmed and continue to promote disease pathology. To address this problem, we propose that a low-dose strategy, based on administering 30–50 mg of CD20 mAb three times per week, may be far more effective for CLL than standard dosing because it will minimize effector function saturation and reduce trogocytosis. This approach may have general applicability to other mAbs that use immune effector functions, and could be formulated into a subcutaneous treatment strategy that would be more accessible and possibly more efficacious for patients. PMID:24944188

  5. Depletion of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 activity enhances etoposide-mediated double-strand break formation and cell killing.

    PubMed

    Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Dutta, Arijit; Mallisetty, Apurva; Mathew, Jeena; Minas, Tsion; Kraus, Christina; Dhopeshwarkar, Priyanka; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Mitra, Sankar; Üren, Aykut; Adhikari, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    DNA topoisomerase 2 (Top2) poisons, including common anticancer drugs etoposide and doxorubicin kill cancer cells by stabilizing covalent Top2-tyrosyl-DNA 5'-phosphodiester adducts and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Proteolytic degradation of the covalently attached Top2 leaves a 5'-tyrosylated blocked termini which is removed by tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2), prior to DSB repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Thus, TDP2 confers resistance of tumor cells to Top2-poisons by repairing such covalent DNA-protein adducts, and its pharmacological inhibition could enhance the efficacy of Top2-poisons. We discovered NSC111041, a selective inhibitor of TDP2, by optimizing a high throughput screening (HTS) assay for TDP2's 5'-tyrosyl phosphodiesterase activity and subsequent validation studies. We found that NSC111041 inhibits TDP2's binding to DNA without getting intercalated into DNA and enhanced etoposide's cytotoxicity synergistically in TDP2-expressing cells but not in TDP2 depleted cells. Furthermore, NSC111041 enhanced formation of etoposide-induced γ-H2AX foci presumably by affecting DSB repair. Immuno-histochemical analysis showed higher TDP2 expression in a sub-set of different type of tumor tissues. These findings underscore the feasibility of clinical use of suitable TDP2 inhibitors in adjuvant therapy with Top2-poisons for a sub-set of cancer patients with high TDP2 expression. PMID:27235629

  6. A novel, native-format bispecific antibody triggering T-cell killing of B-cells is robustly active in mouse tumor models and cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric J.; Olson, Kara; Haber, Lauric J.; Varghese, Bindu; Duramad, Paurene; Tustian, Andrew D.; Oyejide, Adelekan; Kirshner, Jessica R.; Canova, Lauren; Menon, Jayanthi; Principio, Jennifer; MacDonald, Douglas; Kantrowitz, Joel; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Stahl, Neil; Yancopoulos, George D.; Thurston, Gavin; Davis, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies, while showing great therapeutic potential, pose formidable challenges with respect to their assembly, stability, immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics. Here we describe a novel class of bispecific antibodies with native human immunoglobulin format. The design exploits differences in the affinities of the immunoglobulin isotypes for Protein A, allowing efficient large-scale purification. Using this format, we generated a bispecific antibody, REGN1979, targeting the B cell marker, CD20, and the CD3 component of the T cell receptor, which triggers redirected killing of B cells. In mice, this antibody prevented growth of B cell tumors and also caused regression of large established tumors. In cynomolgus monkeys, low doses of REGN1979 caused prolonged depletion of B cells in peripheral blood with a serum half-life of approximately 14 days. Further, the antibody induced a deeper depletion of B cells in lymphoid organs than rituximab. This format has broad applicability for development of clinical bispecific antibodies. PMID:26659273

  7. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  8. Tumor cell hyperresistance to photodynamic killing arising from nitric oxide preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niziolek-Kierecka, Magdalena; Korytowski, Witold; Girotti, Albert W.

    2007-02-01

    Relatively little is known about how nitric oxide (NO) generated by tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves might affect the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Using a breast tumor epithelial line (COH-BR1) metabolically sensitized with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) by pre-treating with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), we have recently shown that NO from chemical donors can elicit both an immediate (NO-now) and delayed (NO-then) hyperresistance to photokilling. Cell death was mainly apoptotic when PpIX was confined to mitochondria, but mainly necrotic when it was allowed to diffuse to the cell periphery. We found that NO-now operates primarily by scavenging lipid-derived free radicals, whereas NO-then "preconditions" cells by some other mechanism. In addressing this, we have used a biologically relevant NO donor/tumor target model, viz. RAW 264.7 macrophages grown on microporous membrane inserts and COH-BR1 cells grown in culture plate wells. The RAW cells were activated with lipopolysaccharide, and 15 h later (when NO output was ~ 2 μM/h) placed over the tumor cells for 20 h, after which the latter were ALA-treated and then irradiated. Prior exposure to activated RAW macrophages reduced tumor cell photokilling by >50 %. This effect was completely lost when the RAW cells were pre-treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, confirming that NO was involved in the hyperresistance. Results from other experiments suggest that heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin play a role in the preconditioning effect described. These studies provide new insights into how NO might modulate PDT efficacy.

  9. Perforin facilitates beta cell killing and regulates autoreactive CD8+ T-cell responses to antigen in mouse models of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Prerak; Graham, Kate L; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramaninan; Fynch, Stacey; Slattery, Robyn M; Kay, Thomas W H; Thomas, Helen E

    2016-04-01

    In type 1 diabetes, cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs) directly interact with pancreatic beta cells through major histocompatibility complex class I. An immune synapse facilitates delivery of cytotoxic granules, comprised mainly of granzymes and perforin. Perforin deficiency protects the majority of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice from autoimmune diabetes. Intriguingly perforin deficiency does not prevent diabetes in CD8(+) T-cell receptor transgenic NOD8.3 mice. We therefore investigated the importance of perforin-dependent killing via CTL-beta cell contact in autoimmune diabetes. Perforin-deficient CTL from NOD mice or from NOD8.3 mice were significantly less efficient at adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes into NODRag1(-/-) mice, confirming that perforin is essential to facilitate beta cell destruction. However, increasing the number of transferred in vitro-activated perforin-deficient 8.3 T cells reversed the phenotype and resulted in diabetes. Perforin-deficient NOD8.3 T cells were present in increased proportion in islets, and proliferated more in response to antigen in vivo indicating that perforin may regulate the activation of CTLs, possibly by controlling cytokine production. This was confirmed when we examined the requirement for direct interaction between beta cells and CD8(+) T cells in NOD8.3 mice, in which beta cells specifically lack major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I through conditional deletion of β2-microglobulin. Although diabetes was significantly reduced, 40% of these mice developed diabetes, indicating that NOD8.3 T cells can kill beta cells in the absence of direct interaction. Our data indicate that although perforin delivery is the main mechanism that CTL use to destroy beta cells, they can employ alternative mechanisms to induce diabetes in a perforin-independent manner.

  10. Perforin facilitates beta cell killing and regulates autoreactive CD8+ T-cell responses to antigen in mouse models of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Prerak; Graham, Kate L; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramaninan; Fynch, Stacey; Slattery, Robyn M; Kay, Thomas W H; Thomas, Helen E

    2016-04-01

    In type 1 diabetes, cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs) directly interact with pancreatic beta cells through major histocompatibility complex class I. An immune synapse facilitates delivery of cytotoxic granules, comprised mainly of granzymes and perforin. Perforin deficiency protects the majority of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice from autoimmune diabetes. Intriguingly perforin deficiency does not prevent diabetes in CD8(+) T-cell receptor transgenic NOD8.3 mice. We therefore investigated the importance of perforin-dependent killing via CTL-beta cell contact in autoimmune diabetes. Perforin-deficient CTL from NOD mice or from NOD8.3 mice were significantly less efficient at adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes into NODRag1(-/-) mice, confirming that perforin is essential to facilitate beta cell destruction. However, increasing the number of transferred in vitro-activated perforin-deficient 8.3 T cells reversed the phenotype and resulted in diabetes. Perforin-deficient NOD8.3 T cells were present in increased proportion in islets, and proliferated more in response to antigen in vivo indicating that perforin may regulate the activation of CTLs, possibly by controlling cytokine production. This was confirmed when we examined the requirement for direct interaction between beta cells and CD8(+) T cells in NOD8.3 mice, in which beta cells specifically lack major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I through conditional deletion of β2-microglobulin. Although diabetes was significantly reduced, 40% of these mice developed diabetes, indicating that NOD8.3 T cells can kill beta cells in the absence of direct interaction. Our data indicate that although perforin delivery is the main mechanism that CTL use to destroy beta cells, they can employ alternative mechanisms to induce diabetes in a perforin-independent manner. PMID:26446877

  11. Engineered metal nanoparticles in the sub-nanomolar levels kill cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Daniels, Yasmine; Pustovyy, Oleg; MacCrehan, William A; Muramoto, Shin; Stan, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Background Small metal nanoparticles obtained from animal blood were observed to be toxic to cultured cancer cells, whereas noncancerous cells were much less affected. In this work, engineered zinc and copper metal nanoparticles were produced from bulk metal rods by an underwater high-voltage discharge method. The metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal nanoparticles, with estimated diameters of 1 nm–2 nm, were determined to be more than 85% nonoxidized. A cell viability assay and high-resolution light microscopy showed that exposure of RG2, cultured rat brain glioma cancer cells, to the zinc and copper nanoparticles resulted in cell morphological changes, including decreased cell adherence, shrinking/rounding, nuclear condensation, and budding from cell bodies. The metal-induced cell injuries were similar to the effects of staurosporine, an active apoptotic reagent. The viability experiments conducted for zinc and copper yielded values of dissociation constants of 0.22±0.08 nmol/L (standard error [SE]) and 0.12±0.02 nmol/L (SE), respectively. The noncancerous astrocytes were not affected at the same conditions. Because metal nanoparticles were lethal to the cancer cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, they are potentially important as nanomedicine. Purpose Lethal concentrations of synthetic metal nanoparticles reported in the literature are a few orders of magnitude higher than the natural, blood-isolated metal nanoparticles; therefore, in this work, engineered metal nanoparticles were examined to mimic the properties of endogenous metal nanoparticles. Materials and methods RG2, rat brain glioma cells CTX TNA2 brain rat astrocytes, obtained from the American Type Culture Collection, high-voltage discharge, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution light microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium

  12. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  13. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  14. Potentiation of a tumor cell susceptibility to autologous CTL killing by restoration of wild-type p53 function.

    PubMed

    Thiery, Jérôme; Dorothée, Guillaume; Haddada, Hedi; Echchakir, Hamid; Richon, Catherine; Stancou, Rodica; Vergnon, Isabelle; Benard, Jean; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2003-06-15

    Inactivation of p53 has been implicated in many types of tumors particularly in non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common cancers in which p53 mutation has been frequently identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of p53 status on the regulation of tumor susceptibility to specific CTL-mediated cell death. For this purpose, we used a cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone, Heu127, able to lyse the human autologous lung carcinoma cell line, IGR-Heu, in a HLA-A2-restricted manner. Direct genomic DNA sequencing revealed that IGR-Heu expresses a mutated p53 at codon 132 of the exon 5 which results in the loss of p53 capacity to induce the expression of the p53-regulated gene product p21(waf/CIP1). Initial experiments demonstrated that IGR-Heu was resistant to Fas, TNF, and TRAIL apoptotic pathways. This correlated with the lack of p55 TNFRI, Fas, DR4, and DR5 expression. The effect of wild-type (wt) p53 restoration on the sensitization of IGR-Heu to autologous CTL clone lysis was investigated following infection of the tumor cell line with a recombinant adenovirus encoding the wt p53 (Adwtp53). We demonstrate that the restoration of wt p53 expression and function resulted in a significant potentiation of target cell susceptibility to CTL-mediated lysis. The wt p53-induced optimization of tumor cell killing by specific CTL involves at least in part Fas-mediated pathway via induction of CD95 expression by tumor cells but does not appear to interfere with granzyme B cytotoxic pathway. PMID:12794118

  15. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via

  16. Cisplatin combined with hyperthermia kills HepG2 cells in intraoperative blood salvage but preserves the function of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-ting; Tang, Li-hui; Liu, Yun-qing; Wang, Yin; Wang, Lie-ju; Zhang, Feng-jiang; Yan, Min

    2015-05-01

    The safe use of intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) in cancer surgery remains controversial. Here, we investigated the killing effect of cisplatin combined with hyperthermia on human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells and erythrocytes from IBS in vitro. HepG2 cells were mixed with concentrated erythrocytes and pretreated with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) alone at 37 °C for 60 min and cisplatin (25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia at 42 °C for 60 min. After pretreatment, the cell viability, colony formation and DNA metabolism in HepG2 and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentration, free hemoglobin (Hb) level, osmotic fragility, membrane phosphatidylserine externalization, and blood gas variables in erythrocytes were determined. Pretreatment with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability, and completely inhibited colony formation and DNA metabolism when the HepG2 cell concentration was 5×10(4) ml(-1) in the erythrocyte (P<0.01). Erythrocytic Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, 2,3-DPG level, phosphatidylserine externalization, and extra-erythrocytic free Hb were significantly altered by hyperthermia plus high concentrations of cisplatin (100 and 200 μg/ml) (P<0.05), but not by hyperthermia plus 50 μg/ml cisplatin (P>0.05). In conclusion, pretreatment with cisplatin (50 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min effectively eliminated HepG2 cells from IBS but did not significantly affect erythrocytes in vitro. PMID:25990057

  17. Drug Redeployment to Kill Leukemia and Lymphoma Cells by Disrupting SCD1-Mediated Synthesis of Monounsaturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Southam, Andrew D; Khanim, Farhat L; Hayden, Rachel E; Constantinou, Julia K; Koczula, Katarzyna M; Michell, Robert H; Viant, Mark R; Drayson, Mark T; Bunce, Chris M

    2015-06-15

    The redeployed drug combination of bezafibrate and medroxyprogesterone acetate (designated BaP) has potent in vivo anticancer activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) patients; however, its mechanism-of-action is unclear. Given that elevated fatty acid biosynthesis is a hallmark of many cancers and that these drugs can affect lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that BaP exerts anticancer effects by disrupting lipogenesis. We applied mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and gene and protein expression measurements of key lipogenic enzymes [acetyl CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1)] to AML and eBL cell lines treated with BaP. BaP treatment decreased fatty acid and phospholipid biosynthesis from (13)C D-glucose. The proportion of phospholipid species with saturated and monounsaturated acyl chains was also decreased after treatment, whereas those with polyunsaturated chains increased. BaP decreased SCD1 protein levels in each cell line (0.46- to 0.62-fold; P < 0.023) and decreased FASN protein levels across all cell lines (0.87-fold decrease; P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Changes to ACC1 protein levels were mostly insignificant. Supplementation with the SCD1 enzymatic product, oleate, rescued AML and e-BL cells from BaP cell killing and decreased levels of BaP-induced reactive oxygen species, whereas supplementation with the SCD1 substrate (and FASN product), palmitate, did not rescue cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that the critical anticancer actions of BaP are decreases in SCD1 levels and monounsaturated fatty acid synthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first time that clinically available antileukemic and antilymphoma drugs targeting SCD1 have been reported. PMID:25943877

  18. Selective killing of cancer cells by small molecules targeting heat shock stress response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daniel; Zhang, Bin

    2016-09-30

    HSF1 heat shock response has emerged as a valuable non-oncogenetic intervention point in targeted cancer therapy. Current reporter based high throughput screening has led to the discovery of several compounds or chemotypes that are effective in the growth inhibition of multiple cancer cell lines and relevant animal tumor models. However, some intrinsic limitations of reporter based assays can potentially lead to biased results. Using a previously validated high content image based assay, we performed a phenotypic screen targeting HSF1 heat shock pathway with a chemically diversified library of over 100,000 compounds. Several novel functional inhibitors of HSF1 pathway were identified with different chemotypes. Western blot analysis confirmed that selective compounds inhibit phosphorylation of HSF1, followed by reduced expression of HSP proteins. Moreover, HeLa cells stably transfected with HSF1 shRNA were more resistant to the compound treatment under lethal temperature than cells containing HSF1, validating HSF1 dependent mechanism of action. These compounds demonstrate nanomolar potency toward multiple cancer cell lines with relatively low cytotoxicity to normal cells. Further SAR and target identification study will pave the way for the potential development of next generation anticancer drugs. PMID:27553278

  19. Non-genetic cancer cell plasticity and therapy-induced stemness in tumour relapse: 'What does not kill me strengthens me'.

    PubMed

    Pisco, A O; Huang, S

    2015-05-26

    Therapy resistance and tumour relapse after drug therapy are commonly explained by Darwinian selection of pre-existing drug-resistant, often stem-like cancer cells resulting from random mutations. However, the ubiquitous non-genetic heterogeneity and plasticity of tumour cell phenotype raises the question: are mutations really necessary and sufficient to promote cell phenotype changes during tumour progression? Cancer therapy inevitably spares some cancer cells, even in the absence of resistant mutants. Accumulating observations suggest that the non-killed, residual tumour cells actively acquire a new phenotype simply by exploiting their developmental potential. These surviving cells are stressed by the cytotoxic treatment, and owing to phenotype plasticity, exhibit a variety of responses. Some are pushed into nearby, latent attractor states of the gene regulatory network which resemble evolutionary ancient or early developmental gene expression programs that confer stemness and resilience. By entering such stem-like, stress-response states, the surviving cells strengthen their capacity to cope with future noxious agents. Considering non-genetic cell state dynamics and the relative ease with which surviving but stressed cells can be tipped into latent attractors provides a foundation for exploring new therapeutic approaches that seek not only to kill cancer cells but also to avoid promoting resistance and relapse that are inherently linked to the attempts to kill them.

  20. Genetically modified T cells targeting interleukin-11 receptor α-chain kill human osteosarcoma cells and induce the regression of established osteosarcoma lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangxiong; Yu, Ling; Cooper, Laurence J N; Hollomon, Mario; Huls, Helen; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases remains a challenge. T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), which recognizes a tumor-associated antigen, have shown activity against hematopoietic malignancies in clinical trials, but this requires the identification of a specific receptor on the tumor cell. In the current study, we found that interleukin (IL)-11Rα was selectively expressed on 14 of 16 osteosarcoma patients' lung metastases and four different human osteosarcoma cell lines, indicating that IL-11Rα may be a novel target for CAR-specific T-cell therapy. IL-11Rα expression was absent or low in normal organ tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal tract. IL-11Rα-CAR-specific T cells were obtained by non-viral gene transfer of Sleeping Beauty DNA plasmids and selectively expanded ex vivo using artificial antigen-presenting cells derived from IL-11Rα + K562 cells genetically modified to coexpress T-cell costimulatory molecules. IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells killed all four osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro; cytotoxicity correlated with the level of IL-11Rα expression on the tumor cells. Intravenous injection of IL-11Rα-CAR(+) T cells into mice resulted in the regression of osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases with no organ toxicity. Together, the data suggest that IL-11Rα-CAR T cells may represent a new therapy for patients with osteosarcoma pulmonary metastases. PMID:22075555

  1. Ag nanoparticles generated using bio-reduction and -coating cause microbial killing without cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Gade, Aniket; Adams, Joshua; Britt, David W; Shen, Fen-Ann; McLean, Joan E; Jacobson, Astrid; Kim, Young-Cheol; Anderson, Anne J

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective "green" methods of producing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are being examined because of the potential of these NPs as antimicrobials. Ag NPs were generated from Ag ions using extracellular metabolites from a soil-borne Pythium species. The NPs were variable in size, but had one dimension less than 50 nm and were biocoated; aggregation and coating changed with acetone precipitation. They had dose-dependent lethal effects on a soil pseudomonad, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6, and were about 30-fold more effective than Ag(+) ions. A role of reactive oxygen species in cell death was demonstrated by use of fluorescent dyes responsive to superoxide anion and peroxide accumulation. Also mutants of the pseudomonad, defective in enzymes that protect against oxidative stress, were more sensitive than the wild type strain; mutant sensitivity differed between exposure to Ag NPs and Ag(+) ions demonstrating a nano-effect. Imaging of bacterial cells treated with the biocoated Ag NPs revealed no cell lysis, but there were changes in surface properties and cell height. These findings support that biocoating the NPs results in limited Ag release and yet they retained potent antimicrobial activity. PMID:26805711

  2. Rapid and efficient cancer cell killing mediated by high-affinity death receptor homotrimerizing TRAIL variants

    PubMed Central

    Reis, C R; van der Sloot, A M; Natoni, A; Szegezdi, E; Setroikromo, R; Meijer, M; Sjollema, K; Stricher, F; Cool, R H; Samali, A; Serrano, L; Quax, W J

    2010-01-01

    The tumour necrosis factor family member TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells through the activation of death receptors 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5) and is considered a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. As apoptosis seems to occur primarily via only one of the two death receptors in many cancer cells, the introduction of DR selectivity is thought to create more potent TRAIL agonists with superior therapeutic properties. By use of a computer-aided structure-based design followed by rational combination of mutations, we obtained variants that signal exclusively via DR4. Besides an enhanced selectivity, these TRAIL-DR4 agonists show superior affinity to DR4, and a high apoptosis-inducing activity against several TRAIL-sensitive and -resistant cancer cell lines in vitro. Intriguingly, combined treatment of the DR4-selective variant and a DR5-selective TRAIL variant in cancer cell lines signalling by both death receptors leads to a significant increase in activity when compared with wild-type rhTRAIL or each single rhTRAIL variant. Our results suggest that TRAIL induced apoptosis via high-affinity and rapid-selective homotrimerization of each DR represent an important step towards an efficient cancer treatment. PMID:21368856

  3. Overexpressed human metallothionein IIA gene protects Chinese hamster ovary cells from killing by alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kaina, B.; Lohrer, H.; Karin, M.; Herrlich, P. )

    1990-04-01

    Experiments were designed to detect survival advantages that cells gain by overexpressing metallothionein (MT). Chinese hamster ovary K1-2 cells and an x-ray-sensitive derivative were transfected with a bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-linked construct carrying the human metallothionein IIA (hMT-IIA) gene. Transfectants survived 40-fold higher levels of cadmium chloride, harbored at least 30 copies of hMT-IIA, and contained 25- to 166-fold more MT than the parent cells. Even under conditions of reduced glutathione synthesis, the transfectants were not more resistant to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and bleomycin than the parent cells. Thus free radicals generated by these agents cannot be scavenged efficiently by MT in vivo. The hMT-IIA transfectants, however, but not control transfectants harboring a BPV-MT promoter-neo construct, tolerated significantly higher doses of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Resistance and MT overexpression occurred irrespective of selection and cultivation in cadmium and zinc. There was no increase in resistance to methyl methanesulfonate and N-hydroxyethyl-N-chloroethylnitrosourea. MT did not affect the degree of overall DNA methylation after N-methyl-N-nitrosourea treatment nor the level of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. The results suggest that MT participates as a cofactor or regulatory element in repair or tolerance of toxic alkylation lesions.

  4. Theory and Experimental Validation of a Spatio-temporal Model of Chemotherapy Transport to Enhance Tumor Cell Kill

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhihui; Chuang, Yao-Li; Dogra, Prashant; Butner, Joseph D.; Day, Armin; Xu, Rong; Shen, Haifa; Simbawa, Eman; AL-Fhaid, A. S.; Mahmoud, S. R.; Curley, Steven A.; Ferrari, Mauro; Cristini, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuously releasing drug molecules into the tumor over an extended period of time may significantly improve the chemotherapeutic efficacy by overcoming physical transport limitations of conventional bolus drug treatment. In this paper, we present a generalized space- and time-dependent mathematical model of drug transport and drug-cell interactions to quantitatively formulate this hypothesis. Model parameters describe: perfusion and tissue architecture (blood volume fraction and blood vessel radius); diffusion penetration distance of drug (i.e., a function of tissue compactness and drug uptake rates by tumor cells); and cell death rates (as function of history of drug uptake). We performed preliminary testing and validation of the mathematical model using in vivo experiments with different drug delivery methods on a breast cancer mouse model. Experimental data demonstrated a 3-fold increase in response using nano-vectored drug vs. free drug delivery, in excellent quantitative agreement with the model predictions. Our model results implicate that therapeutically targeting blood volume fraction, e.g., through vascular normalization, would achieve a better outcome due to enhanced drug delivery. Author Summary Cancer treatment efficacy can be significantly enhanced through the elution of drug from nano-carriers that can temporarily stay in the tumor vasculature. Here we present a relatively simple yet powerful mathematical model that accounts for both spatial and temporal heterogeneities of drug dosing to help explain, examine, and prove this concept. We find that the delivery of systemic chemotherapy through a certain form of nano-carriers would have enhanced tumor kill by a factor of 2 to 4 over the standard therapy that the patients actually received. We also find that targeting blood volume fraction (a parameter of the model) through vascular normalization can achieve more effective drug delivery and tumor kill. More importantly

  5. A human coronavirus responsible for the common cold massively kills dendritic cells but not monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Millet, Jean; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Law, Helen; Vabret, Astrid; Lorin, Valérie; Escriou, Nicolas; Albert, Matthew L; Nal, Béatrice; Tangy, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    Human coronaviruses are associated with upper respiratory tract infections that occasionally spread to the lungs and other organs. Although airway epithelial cells represent an important target for infection, the respiratory epithelium is also composed of an elaborate network of dendritic cells (DCs) that are essential sentinels of the immune system, sensing pathogens and presenting foreign antigens to T lymphocytes. In this report, we show that in vitro infection by human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) induces massive cytopathic effects in DCs, including the formation of large syncytia and cell death within only few hours. In contrast, monocytes are much more resistant to infection and cytopathic effects despite similar expression levels of CD13, the membrane receptor for HCoV-229E. While the differentiation of monocytes into DCs in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 requires 5 days, only 24 h are sufficient for these cytokines to sensitize monocytes to cell death and cytopathic effects when infected by HCoV-229E. Cell death induced by HCoV-229E is independent of TRAIL, FasL, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and caspase activity, indicating that viral replication is directly responsible for the observed cytopathic effects. The consequence of DC death at the early stage of HCoV-229E infection may have an impact on the early control of viral dissemination and on the establishment of long-lasting immune memory, since people can be reinfected multiple times by HCoV-229E.

  6. HAMLET kills tumor cells by an apoptosis-like mechanism--cellular, molecular, and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Catharina; Agerstam, Helena; Aronson, Annika; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Düringer, Caroline; Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Leijonhuvud, Irene; Linse, Sara; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Nilsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Jenny; Svensson, Malin

    2003-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex that induces apoptosis-like death in tumor cells, but leaves fully differentiated cells unaffected. This review summarizes the information on the in vivo effects of HAMLET in patients and tumor models on the tumor cell biology, and on the molecular characteristics of the complex. HAMLET limits the progression of human glioblastomas in a xenograft model and removes skin papillomas in patients. This broad anti-tumor activity includes >40 different lymphomas and carcinomas and apoptosis is independent of p53 or bcl-2. In tumor cells HAMLET enters the cytoplasm, translocates to the perinuclear area, and enters the nuclei where it accumulates. HAMLET binds strongly to histones and disrupts the chromatin organization. In the cytoplasm, HAMLET targets ribosomes and activates caspases. The formation of HAMLET relies on the propensity of alpha-lactalbumin to alter its conformation when the strongly bound Ca2+ ion is released and the protein adopts the apo-conformation that exposes a new fatty acid binding site. Oleic acid (C18:1,9 cis) fits this site with high specificity, and stabilizes the altered protein conformation. The results illustrate how protein folding variants may be beneficial, and how their formation in peripheral tissues may depend on the folding change and the availability of the lipid cofactor. One example is the acid pH in the stomach of the breast-fed child that promotes the formation of HAMLET. This mechanism may contribute to the protective effect of breastfeeding against childhood tumors. We propose that HAMLET should be explored as a novel approach to tumor therapy.

  7. Neocognitron trained with winner-kill-loser rule.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kunihiko

    2010-09-01

    The neocognitron, which was proposed by Fukushima (1980), is a hierarchical multi-layered neural network capable of robust visual pattern recognition. It acquires the ability to recognize patterns through learning. This paper proposes a new rule for competitive learning, named winner-kill-loser, and apply it to the neocognitron. The winner-kill-loser rule resembles the winner-take-all rule. Every time when a training stimulus is presented, non-silent cells compete with each other. The winner, however, not only takes all, but also kills losers. In other words, the winner learns the training stimulus, and losers are removed from the network. If all cells are silent, a new cell is generated and it learns the training stimulus. Thus feature-extracting cells gradually come to distribute uniformly in the feature space. The use of winner-kill-loser rule is not limited to the neocognitron. It is useful for various types of competitive learning, in general. This paper also proposes several improvements made on the neocognitron: such as, disinhibition to the inhibitory surround in the connections to C-cells (or complex cells) from S-cells (or simple cells); and square root shaped saturation in the input-to-output characteristics of C-cells. As a result of these improvements, the recognition rate of the neocognitron has been largely increased.

  8. Hypersensitivity of skin fibroblasts from basal cell nevus syndrome patients to killing by ultraviolet B but not by ultraviolet C radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Goldberg, L.H.; Ley, R.D.; Ananthaswamy, H.N. )

    1990-02-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which the afflicted individuals are extremely susceptible to sunlight-induced skin cancers, particularly basal cell carcinomas. However, the cellular and molecular basis for BCNS is unknown. To ascertain whether there is any relationship between genetic predisposition to skin cancer and increased sensitivity of somatic cells from BCNS patients to killing by UV radiation, we exposed skin fibroblasts established from unexposed skin biopsies of several BCNS and age- and sex-matched normal individuals to either UV-B (280-320 nm) or UV-C (254 nm) radiation and determined their survival. The results indicated that skin fibroblasts from BCNS patients were hypersensitive to killing by UV-B but not UV-C radiation as compared to skin fibroblasts from normal individuals. DNA repair studies indicated that the increased sensitivity of BCNS skin fibroblasts to killing by UV-B radiation was not due to a defect in the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that there is an association between hypersensitivity of somatic cells to killing by UV-B radiation and the genetic predisposition to skin cancer in BCNS patients. In addition, these results suggest that DNA lesions (and repair processes) other than the pyrimidine dimer are also involved in the pathogenesis of sunlight-induced skin cancers in BCNS patients. More important, the UV-B sensitivity assay described here may be used as a diagnostic tool to identify presymptomatic individuals with BCNS.

  9. Ab-IL2 fusion proteins mediate NK cell immune synapse formation by polarizing CD25 to the target cell-effector cell interface.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Jennifer A A; Gadbaw, Brian; Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Horibata, Sachi; Kapur, Arvinder K; Patel, Dhara; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M; Patankar, Manish S; Connor, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    The huKS-IL2 immunocytokine (IC) consists of IL2 fused to a mAb against EpCAM, while the hu14.18-IL2 IC recognizes the GD2 disialoganglioside. They are under evaluation for treatment of EpCAM(+) (ovarian) and GD2(+) (neuroblastoma and melanoma) malignancies because of their proven ability to enhance tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and by antitumor cytotoxic T cells. Here, we demonstrate that huKS-IL2 and hu14.18-IL2 bind to tumor cells via their antibody components and increase adhesion and activating immune synapse (AIS) formation with NK cells by engaging the immune cells' IL-2 receptors (IL2R). The NK leukemia cell line, NKL (which expresses high affinity IL2Rs), shows fivefold increase in binding to tumor targets when treated with IC compared to matching controls. This increase in binding is effectively inhibited by blocking antibodies against CD25, the α-chain of the IL2R. NK cells isolated from the peritoneal environment of ovarian cancer patients, known to be impaired in mediating ADCC, bind to huKS-IL2 via CD25. The increased binding between tumor and effector cells via ICs is due to the formation of AIS that are characterized by the simultaneous polarization of LFA-1, CD2 and F-actin at the cellular interface. AIS formation of peritoneal NK and NKL cells is inhibited by anti-CD25 blocking antibody and is 50-200% higher with IC versus the parent antibody. These findings demonstrate that the IL-2 component of the IC allows IL2Rs to function not only as receptors for this cytokine but also as facilitators of peritoneal NK cell binding to IC-coated tumor cells.

  10. Curcumin a potent cancer preventive agent: Mechanisms of cancer cell killing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is no doubt that diet could effectively improve health and halt cancers. Dietary phytochemical compounds and their derivatives represent a cornucopia of effectively anticancer compounds. This review discusses existing data on the anticancer activities of curcumin, and then offers possible explanations for and mechanisms of its cancer-preventive action. This review also offers insights into the molecular mechanism and targets through which curcumin modulates cell cycle, apoptotic signals, anti-apoptotic proteins, miRNAs, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, protein kinases, nuclear factor-κB, proteasome activation, epigenetic regulation including DNA methylation and histone modification. Finally, this review provides explanations for how curcumin reverses the multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. PMID:25598986

  11. Near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy in combination with gene therapy using upconversion nanoparticles for effective cancer cell killing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Kai; Yang, Guangbao; Cheng, Liang; He, Lu; Liu, Yumeng; Li, Yonggang; Guo, Liang; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-08-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have drawn much attention in cancer imaging and therapy in recent years. Herein, we for the first time report the use of UCNPs with carefully engineered surface chemistry for combined photodynamic therapy (PDT) and gene therapy of cancer. In our system, positively charged NaGdF4:Yb,Er UCNPs with multilayered polymer coatings are synthesized via a layer by layer strategy, and then loaded simultaneously with Chlorin e6 (Ce6), a photosensitizing molecule, and small interfering RNA (siRNA), which targets the Plk1 oncogene. On the one hand, under excitation by a near-infrared (NIR) light at 980 nm, which shows greatly improved tissue penetration compared with visible light, cytotoxic singlet oxygen can be generated via resonance energy transfer from UCNPs to photosensitizer Ce6, while the residual upconversion luminescence is utilized for imaging. On the other hand, the silencing of Plk1 induced by siRNA delivered with UCNPs could induce significant cancer cell apoptosis. As the result of such combined photodynamic and gene therapy, a remarkably enhanced cancer cell killing effect is realized. Our work thus highlights the promise of UCNPs for imaging guided combination therapy of cancer.

  12. A deficiency in the B cell response of C57BL/6 mice correlates with loss of macrophage-mediated killing of Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N.; Boggiatto, Paola M.; Mukbel, Rami M.; Petersen, Christine A.; Jones, Douglas E.

    2010-01-01

    Infection of C3HeB/FeJ and C57BL/6 mice with Leishmania major stimulates a healing cell-mediated immune response, while Leishmania amazonensis infection leads to chronic disease. Here we show C3HeB/FeJ mice co-infected with both species of Leishmania heal, while co-infected C57BL/6 mice do not. Using an in vitro killing assay we determined B cells from infected C57BL/6 mice are ineffective in promoting parasite killing compared with B cells from infected C3HeB/FeJ mice. Furthermore, infected C57BL/6 mice produce less antigen-specific antibodies compared with infected C3HeB/FeJ mice. These findings suggest B cells play a required role in the cell-mediated immune response against L. amazonensis. PMID:20004204

  13. Melittin peptide kills Trypanosoma cruzi parasites by inducing different cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Adade, Camila M; Oliveira, Isabelle R S; Pais, Joana A R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs

    2013-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are components of the innate immune response that represent desirable alternatives to conventional pharmaceuticals, as they have a fast mode of action, a low likelihood of resistance development and can act in conjunction with existing drug regimens. AMPs exhibit strong inhibitory activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, viruses, metazoans and other parasites, such as the protozoan Leishmania. Melittin is a naturally occurring AMP, which comprises 40-50% of the dry weight of Apis mellifera venom. Our group has recently shown that crude A. mellifera venom is lethal to Trypanosoma cruzi, the Chagas disease etiologic agent, and generates a variety of cell death phenotypes among treated parasites. Here, we demonstrate that the melittin affected all of T. cruzi developmental forms, including the intracellular amastigotes. The ultrastructural changes induced by melittin suggested the occurrence of different programmed cell death pathways, as was observed in A. mellifera-treated parasites. Autophagic cell death appeared to be the main death mechanism in epimastigotes. In contrast, melittin-treated trypomastigotes appeared to be dying via an apoptotic mechanism. Our findings confirm the great potential of AMPs, including melittin, as a potential source of new drugs for the treatment of neglected diseases, such as Chagas disease. PMID:23562368

  14. NK Cells and Their Ability to Modulate T Cells during Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Kevin D.; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Whitmire, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in protection against virus infections, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to thwart NK cell activity. NK cells respond to inflammatory signals at an early stage of virus infection, resulting in proliferation, cytokine production, and cytolytic activity that can reduce virus loads. Moreover, the rapid kinetics of the NK cell response enables NK cells to influence other populations of innate immune cells, affect the inflammatory milieu, and guide adaptive immune responses to infection. Early NK cell interactions with other leukocytes can have long-lasting effects on the number and quality of memory T cells, as well as impact the exhaustion of T cells during chronic infections. The ability of NK cells to modulate T cell responses can be mediated through direct T-NK interactions, cytokine production, or indirectly through dendritic cells and other cell types. Herein, we summarize our current understanding of how NK cells interact with T cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and other cell types involved in adaptive immune responses to virus infection. We outline several mechanisms by which NK cells enhance or suppress adaptive immune response and long-lived immunological memory. PMID:25404045

  15. Rapid dimerization of quercetin through an oxidative mechanism in the presence of serum albumin decreases its ability to induce cytotoxicity in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh; Bortolazzo, Anthony; White, J Brandon

    2012-10-19

    Quercetin is a member of the flavonoid family and has been previously shown to have a variety of anti-cancer activities. We and others have reported anti-proliferation, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis of cancer cells after treatment with quercetin. Quercetin has also been shown to undergo oxidation. However, it is unclear if quercetin or one of its oxidized forms is responsible for cell death. Here we report that quercetin rapidly oxidized in cell culture media to form a dimer. The quercetin dimer is identical to a dimer that is naturally produced by onions. The quercetin dimer and quercetin-3-O-glucopyranoside are unable to cross the cell membrane and do not kill MDA-MB-231 cells. Finally, supplementing the media with ascorbic acid increases quercetin's ability to induce cell death probably by reduction oxidative dimerization. Our results suggest that an unmodified quercetin is the compound that elicits cell death. PMID:23000408

  16. Supraagonistic, bispecific single-chain antibody purified from the serum of cloned, transgenic cows induces T-cell-mediated killing of glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Wick, Wolfgang; Minoia, Rosa; Weller, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Brem, Gottfried; Jung, Gundram

    2005-12-20

    Here we characterize the antitumor activity of a recombinant bispecific single-chain antibody isolated from the serum of cloned transgenic cows. The antibody, termed r28M, is directed to a melanoma-associated proteoglycan, also expressed on glioblastoma cells, and to human CD28. Bound to tumor cells, r28M induced exceedingly efficient supraagonistic T-cell activation via the CD28 molecule without an additional stimulus via the TCR/CD3 complex. In vitro, T cells and NK cells contributed to tumor cell killing after r28M-mediated activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, NK activity depended on T-cell-derived cytokines. In vivo, r28M markedly inhibited the growth of human glioblastoma cells in nude mice. The serum half-life of the protein after i.v. injection was approximately 6 hr. Thus, r28M is unique not only in inducing supraagonistic CD28-mediated T-cell activation against tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, it also meets 2 additional requirements that are critical for clinical application: a relatively long serum half-life and the possibility of obtaining large amounts of active material from cloned transgenic livestock.

  17. The Effect of Latency Reversal Agents on Primary CD8+ T Cells: Implications for Shock and Kill Strategies for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Eradication.

    PubMed

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Tarwater, Patrick M; Blankson, Joel N

    2016-06-01

    Shock and kill strategies involving the use of small molecules to induce viral transcription in resting CD4+ T cells (shock) followed by immune mediated clearance of the reactivated cells (kill), have been proposed as a method of eliminating latently infected CD4+ T cells. The combination of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor romidepsin and protein kinase C (PKC) agonist bryostatin-1 is very effective at reversing latency in vitro. However, we found that primary HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cells were not able to eliminate autologous resting CD4+ T cells that had been reactivated with these drugs. We tested the hypothesis that the drugs affected primary CD8+ T cell function and found that both agents had inhibitory effects on the suppressive capacity of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells from patients who control viral replication without antiretroviral therapy (elite suppressors/controllers). The inhibitory effect was additive and multi-factorial in nature. These inhibitory effects were not seen with prostratin, another PKC agonist, either alone or in combination with JQ1, a bromodomain-containing protein 4 inhibitor. Our results suggest that because of their adverse effects on primary CD8+ T cells, some LRAs may cause immune-suppression and therefore should be used with caution in shock and kill strategies. PMID:27428432

  18. D-polyglutamine amyloid recruits L-polyglutamine monomers and kills cells

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Karunakar; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Wetzel, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) amyloid fibrils are observed in disease tissue and have been implicated as toxic agents responsible for neurodegeneration in expanded CAG repeat diseases like Huntington’s disease (HD). Despite intensive efforts, the mechanism of amyloid toxicity remains unknown. As a novel approach to probing polyQ toxicity, we investigate here how some cellular and physical properties of polyQ amyloid vary with the chirality of the glutamine residues in the polyQ. We challenged PC12 cells with small amyloid fibrils composed of either L- or D-polyQ peptides and found that D-fibrils are as cytotoxic as L-fibrils. We also found using fluorescence microscopy that both aggregates effectively seed the aggregation of cell-produced L-polyQ proteins, suggesting a surprising lack of stereochemical restriction in seeded elongation of polyQ amyloid. To investigate this effect further, we studied chemically synthesized D- and L-polyQ in vitro. We found that, as expected, D-polyQ monomers are not recognized by proteins that recognize L-polyQ monomers. However, amyloid fibrils prepared from D-polyQ peptides can efficiently seed the aggregation of L-polyQ monomers in vitro, and vice versa. This result is consistent with our cell results on polyQ recruitment, but is inconsistent with previous literature reports on the chiral specificity of amyloid seeding. This chiral cross-seeding can be rationalized by a model for seeded elongation featuring a “rippled β-sheet” interface between seed fibril and docked monomers of opposite chirality. The lack of chiral discrimination in polyQ amyloid cytotoxicity is consistent with several toxicity mechanisms, including recruitment of cellular polyQ proteins. PMID:24291210

  19. The development of gamma ray damage in chromosomes in relation to cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Loucas, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    Virtually every important biological effect of ionizing radiation (IR) relates to the induction of chromosomal aberrations (CA). Study of their development is essential for understanding the biological effects of IR. Potentially lethal damage (PLD) has been defined in terms of changes in survival brought about by the manipulation of conditions to which cells are exposed after IR. One form of PLD is expressed after treatment with anisotonic salt solutions following IR. Changes in cell survival have been attributed to changes in the balance between damage repair and fixation. This study explored the possibility that the decrease in survival found after treatment with hypertonic solutions was caused by an increase in the amount of damage expressed immediately after treatment as interphase chromosome breaks (CB) and therefore, an increase in the amount of PLD available for processing by fixation' and repair.' The premature chromosome condensation technique (PCC) was used to determine that hypertonic treatment given immediately before, during, or immediately after IR did cause an increase in the number of CB measured directly after treatment compared to the same dose given without treatment. Treatment with [beta]-ara-A, a known inhibitor of chromosome rejoining, also showed an increase in CB immediately after hypertonic treatment, indicating that [beta]-ara-A was not simply acting as an inhibition of rejoining. These changes in initial PCC breakage frequency were correlated to increases in CA and decrease in cell survival. Agents, such as IR, known to produce DNA double-strand breaks promptly after treatment have also been shown to produce breaks in interphase chromatin immediately after treatment. Preliminary studies were conducted using restriction endonucleases which produce only DNA double-strand breaks to establish that such DNA breaks can cause CB observed as excess PCC fragments soon after treatment.

  20. WE-G-BRE-05: Nanoparticle-Aided Microwave Hyperthermia Is Accompanied By Free Radical Generation and Enhanced Cell Kill

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, N; Shvydka, D; Karpov, V; Findsen, E; Parsai, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperthermia, an established method of cancer treatment used in adjuvant to radiation and chemotherapy, can utilize metallic nanoparticles (NPs) for tumor heating with a microwave electromagnetic field. The high surface-area-to-volume ratio of nanoparticles makes them effective catalysts for free radical generation, thus amplifying the cell-killing effect of hyperthermia. We explore the effect of gold and platinum NPs in generating free radicals in aqueous media under a microwave field. Methods: Spin trap 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) was mixed separately with 3.2 nm Mesogold and Mesoplatinum colloidal nanoparticle suspensions in deionized water to trap radicals. The mixtures were injected into a number of glass capillaries and exposed to the 9.68GHz microwave field of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The microwave radiation from the spectrometer served to both generate and detect the trapped radicals. Each sample was scanned at 12mW microwave power to obtain the initial signal of hydroxyl radicals (OH.), then at 39.8mW followed by 79.8 or 125mW, and finally re-scanned at 12mW. Radical signal intensities obtained by double integration of EPR spectra from the initial and the final scans were then compared. Results: Nanoparticle samples had no intentionally-added free radicals before the initial measurement. While samples with DMPO-water solution showed no OH. signal, all those with AuNPs or PtNPs developed an OH. signal during their first exposure to the microwave field. Depending upon the applied microwave power and time interval between the initial and the final EPR scans, an OH. intensity increase of ∼10-60% was found. This contradicts the typical trend of exponential decay of the OH. signal with time. Conclusion: The consistent increase in OH. intensity establishes that gold and platinum nanoparticles facilitate free radical generation under microwave irradiation. Our results suggest that NP-aided hyperthermia is

  1. Chaperone-targeting cytotoxin and endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing drug synergize to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Backer, Joseph M; Krivoshein, Arcadius V; Hamby, Carl V; Pizzonia, John; Gilbert, Kenneth S; Ray, Yonaton S; Brand, Harrison; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Backer, Marina V

    2009-11-01

    Diverse physiological and therapeutic insults that increase the amount of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) induce the unfolded protein response, an evolutionarily conserved protective mechanism that manages ER stress. Glucose-regulated protein 78/immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding protein (GRP78/BiP) is an ER-resident protein that plays a central role in the ER stress response and is the only known substrate of the proteolytic A subunit (SubA) of a novel bacterial AB(5) toxin. Here, we report that an engineered fusion protein, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-SubA, combining EGF and SubA, is highly toxic to growing and confluent epidermal growth factor receptor-expressing cancer cells, and its cytotoxicity is mediated by a remarkably rapid cleavage of GRP78/BiP. Systemic delivery of EGF-SubA results in a significant inhibition of human breast and prostate tumor xenografts in mouse models. Furthermore, EGF-SubA dramatically increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to the ER stress-inducing drug thapsigargin, and vice versa, demonstrating the first example of mechanism-based synergism in the action of a cytotoxin and an ER-targeting drug.

  2. Killing of naive T cells by CD95L-transfected dendritic cells (DC): in vivo study using killer DC-DC hybrids and CD4(+) T cells from DO11.10 mice.

    PubMed

    Kusuhara, Masahiro; Matsue, Keiko; Edelbaum, Dale; Loftus, Julie; Takashima, Akira; Matsue, Hiroyuki

    2002-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play the dual task of initiating cellular immunity against potentially harmful foreign antigens (Ag), while maintaining immunological tolerance to self-Ag and environmental Ag. As an approach to induce Ag-specific suppression, we and others introduced CD95 ligand (L) cDNA into DC. The resulting "killer" DC delivered apoptotic signals, instead of activation signals, to primed CD4(+) T cells in vitro and induced Ag-specific immunosuppression in vivo. To study the impact of killer DC on naive T cells, the fate of Ag-reactive T cells and the extent of their depletion after killer DC treatment, we performed in vitro and in vivo reconstitution experiments using: (a) killer DC-DC hybrids created between CD95L-transduced XS106 DC clone (A/J origin) and splenic DC from BALB/c mice, (b) CD4(+) T cells isolated from DO11.10 transgenic mice (BALB/c background), and (c) OVA(323-339) peptide as relevant Ag. Ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed killer DC-DC hybrids inhibited DO11.10 T cell activation triggered by conventional DC, instead of inducing their activation. Rapid apoptosis of T cells was observed after co-culture with OVA-pulsed killer DC-DC hybrids, but not with non-pulsed killer DC-DC hybrids or OVA-pulsed control DC-DC hybrids. For in vivo reconstitution, (BALB/cxA/J)F1 mice received subcutaneous administration of killer DC-DC hybrids, followed by intravenous inoculation of DO11.10 T cells. Killer DC-DC hybrids migrated preferentially to draining lymph nodes albeit with relatively low efficiency (0.5-1% recovery) and they induced significant, but incomplete (30-40%) killing of DO11.10 T cells in this location. These results document the abilities of CD95L-transduced DC to trigger apoptosis of naive T cells in an Ag-specific manner, to overrule T cell activation signals delivered by conventional DC, and to reduce local frequencies of Ag-reactive T cells in vivo. Our data also uncover two major limitations (relatively low homing efficiency and incomplete

  3. Phloroglucinol suppresses metastatic ability of breast cancer cells by inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Suh, Yongjoon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Hwang, Eunji; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kang, Ju-Seop; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Young Yiul; Lee, Su-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a challenging clinical problem and the primary cause of death in breast cancer patients. However, there is no therapeutic agent against metastasis of breast cancer cells. Here we report that phloroglucinol, a natural phlorotannin component of brown algae suppresses metastatic ability of breast cancer cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol effectively inhibited mesenchymal phenotypes of basal type breast cancer cells through downregulation of SLUG without causing a cytotoxic effect. Importantly, phloroglucinol decreased SLUG through inhibition of PI3K/AKT and RAS/RAF-1/ERK signaling. In agreement with in vitro data, phloroglucinol was also effective against in vivo metastasis of breast cancer cells, drastically suppressing their metastatic ability to lungs, and extending the survival time of mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a novel anticancer activity of phloroglucinol against metastasis of breast cancer cells, implicating its clinical relevance. PMID:25456733

  4. Cancer-associated fibroblast suppresses killing activity of natural killer cells through downregulation of poliovirus receptor (PVR/CD155), a ligand of activating NK receptor

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Tomoko; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Kawana, Kei; Taguchi, Ayumi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Asaha; Tomio, Kensuke; Yamashita, Aki; Eguchi, Satoko; Nishida, Haruka; Nakamura, Hiroe; Sato, Masakazu; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Arimoto, Takahide; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play an important role in cancer expansion and progression in tumor microenvironment (TME), via both direct and indirect interactions. Natural killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in anticancer immunity. We investigated the inhibitory effects of CAFs on NK cell activity. CAFs were isolated from endometrial cancer tissue, while normal endometrial fibroblasts (NEFs) were obtained from normal endometrium with no pathological abnormality. NK cells were obtained from allogenic healthy volunteers. CAFs or NEFs were co-cultured at an NK/fibroblast ratio of 1:1 with or without inserted membrane. For NK cell activity, K562 cells were cultured as target cells. NK cell-killing activity was determined by calculating the ratio of PI-positive K562 cells in the presence of NK cells co-cultured with fibroblasts versus NK cells alone. To examine whether NK cell activity was suppressed by IDO pathway, we inhibited IDO activity using the IDO inhibitor 1-MT. We demonstrated that CAFs derived from endometrial cancer induced greater suppression of the killing activity of allogenic NK cells compared with normal endometrial fibroblasts (NEFs). The suppression of NK cell activity by CAFs was inhibited when a membrane was inserted between the CAFs and NK cells, but not by 1-MT, an inhibitor of IDO. We focused on receptor-ligand interactions between CAFs and NK cell and found that cell-surface poliovirus receptor (PVR/CD155), a ligand of activating NK receptor DNAM-1, was downregulated in the CAFs compared with NEFs. To confirm whether PVR downregulation results in the decrease of NK cell-killing activity, PVR expression in NEFs was knocked down using siRNA against PVR (PVRsi). NK cell activity was suppressed by co-culture with PVR-knockdown NEFs, to a similar extent than CAF-induced suppression. CAFs showed increased suppression of NK cell-killing activity compared with NEFs, due to decreased PVR cell surface expression, a ligand of an NK activating

  5. Mammalian cell killing by ultrasoft X rays and high-energy radiation: an extension of the MK model.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Roland B

    2006-08-01

    An alternate formulation of the microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is presented that applies to irradiation of mammalian cells with ultrasoft X rays as well as high-energy radiations of variable linear energy transfer (LET). Survival and DNA double-strand break measurements for V79 cells from the literature are examined to illustrate application of the model. It is demonstrated that the linear component of the linear-quadratic survival relationship (alpha) is enhanced because repairable potentially lethal lesions formed from a single ultrasoft X-ray energy deposition event, when closer on average than for a single high-energy radiation event, are more likely to combine to form a lethal lesion. The quadratic component (beta) of the linear-quadratic survival relationship is increased because the potentially lethal lesions formed by ultrasoft X rays are created with greater efficiency than those of high-energy radiation. In addition, potentially lethal lesions from very low-energy carbon K-shell X rays may be enriched in structural forms that favor combination to form lethal lesions instead of repair. These features account for the increased effectiveness of killing of V79 cells by ultrasoft X rays compared to cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The importance of pairwise combination of potentially lethal lesions to form exchange chromosome aberrations that become lethal lesions is discussed. The extended MK model explains and reconciles differences between the MK model and the theory of dual radiation action on the one hand, and on the other, the view that variation in the RBE with radiation quality is explained by differences in energy deposition in nanometer- rather than micrometer-size volumes.

  6. Bacteriophage-derived CHAP domain protein, P128, kills Staphylococcus cells by cleaving interpeptide cross-bridge of peptidoglycan.

    PubMed

    Sundarrajan, Sudarson; Raghupatil, Junjappa; Vipra, Aradhana; Narasimhaswamy, Nagalakshmi; Saravanan, Sanjeev; Appaiah, Chemira; Poonacha, Nethravathi; Desai, Srividya; Nair, Sandhya; Bhatt, Rajagopala Narayana; Roy, Panchali; Chikkamadaiah, Ravisha; Durgaiah, Murali; Sriram, Bharathi; Padmanabhan, Sriram; Sharma, Umender

    2014-10-01

    P128 is an anti-staphylococcal protein consisting of the Staphylococcus aureus phage-K-derived tail-associated muralytic enzyme (TAME) catalytic domain (Lys16) fused with the cell-wall-binding SH3b domain of lysostaphin. In order to understand the mechanism of action and emergence of resistance to P128, we isolated mutants of Staphylococcus spp., including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), resistant to P128. In addition to P128, the mutants also showed resistance to Lys16, the catalytic domain of P128. The mutants showed loss of fitness as shown by reduced rate of growth in vitro. One of the mutants tested was found to show reduced virulence in animal models of S. aureus septicaemia suggesting loss of fitness in vivo as well. Analysis of the antibiotic sensitivity pattern showed that the mutants derived from MRSA strains had become sensitive to meticillin and other β-lactams. Interestingly, the mutant cells were resistant to the lytic action of phage K, although the phage was able to adsorb to these cells. Sequencing of the femA gene of three P128-resistant mutants showed either a truncation or deletion in femA, suggesting that improper cross-bridge formation in S. aureus could be causing resistance to P128. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion peptides as substrates it was found that both P128 and Lys16 were capable of cleaving a pentaglycine sequence, suggesting that P128 might be killing S. aureus by cleaving the pentaglycine cross-bridge of peptidoglycan. Moreover, peptides corresponding to the reported cross-bridge of Staphylococcus haemolyticus (GGSGG, AGSGG), which were not cleaved by lysostaphin, were cleaved efficiently by P128. This was also reflected in high sensitivity of S. haemolyticus to P128. This showed that in spite of sharing a common mechanism of action with lysostaphin, P128 has unique properties, which allow it to act on certain lysostaphin-resistant Staphylococcus strains.

  7. Selenium-Containing Amphiphiles Reduced and Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles: Kill Cancer Cells via Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyu; Li, Feng; Xiang, Wentian; Yi, Yu; Chen, Yuyan; Cheng, Liang; Liu, Zhuang; Xu, Huaping

    2016-08-31

    Selenium has attracted increasing interest in recent decades because of the function of regulating the redox balance in the human body. However, biomedical studies of selenium are still limited. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), typically prepared by a first reduction step followed by a second stabilization step, are widely applied in biomedical studies. However, their own anticancer activity is less studied. Here, we report 2 nm AuNPs with significant anticancer activity (IC50 = 20 μM) that is stabilized by a selenium-containing amphiphile EGSe-tMe. The AuNPs are prepared by simply mixing chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) with EGSe-tMe, which acts as both a reducing agent and a stabilizer. In contrast to AuNPs prepared by EGSe-tMe, EGSe-tMe alone and typically prepared AuNPs show little anticancer activity even at concentrations up to 250 μM. Mechanistic studies suggest that selenium in cooperation with AuNPs can induce high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells, leading to cellular apoptosis. PMID:27517121

  8. "Kill" the messenger: Targeting of cell-derived microparticles in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Rasmussen, Niclas S; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-07-01

    Immune complex (IC) deposition in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a key early pathogenic event in lupus nephritis (LN). The clarification of the mechanisms behind IC deposition will enable targeted therapy in the future. Circulating cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been proposed as major sources of extracellular autoantigens and ICs and triggers of autoimmunity in LN. The overabundance of galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) along with immunoglobulins and a few other proteins specifically distinguish circulating MPs in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and this is most pronounced in patients with active LN. G3BP co-localizes with deposited ICs in renal biopsies from LN patients supporting a significant presence of MPs in the IC deposits. G3BP binds strongly to glomerular basement membrane proteins and integrins. Accordingly, MP surface proteins, especially G3BP, may be essential for the deposition of ICs in kidneys and thus for the ensuing formation of MP-derived electron dense structures in the GBM, and immune activation in LN. This review focuses on the notion of targeting surface molecules on MPs as an entirely novel treatment strategy in LN. By targeting MPs, a double hit may be achieved by attenuating both the autoantigenic fueling of immune complexes and the triggering of the adaptive immune system. Thereby, early pathogenic events may be blocked in contrast to current treatment strategies that primarily target and modulate later events in the cellular and humoral immune response.

  9. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P.; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K+) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K+ channel expression. Inhibition of human K+ channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K+ protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K+ channel activation and K+ efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K+ efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K+ channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:26346926

  10. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K(+)) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K(+) channel expression. Inhibition of human K(+) channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K(+) protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K(+) channel activation and K(+) efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K(+) efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K(+) channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:26346926

  11. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A

    2015-09-08

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K(+)) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K(+) channel expression. Inhibition of human K(+) channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K(+) protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K(+) channel activation and K(+) efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K(+) efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K(+) channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  12. Measurement of bacterial ingestion and killing by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Campbell, P A; Canono, B P; Drevets, D A

    2001-05-01

    This unit presents fairly simple assays for measuring the binding of bacteria to macrophages, internalization of bacteria (also called ingestion or phagocytosis), and bacterial killing by macrophages. The first basic protocol describes how to measure the ability of macrophages to ingest bacteria. Because it is critical to remove residual extracellular organisms, the protocol presents two alternative steps to accomplish this: a washing procedure and a more stringent method in which cells are sedimented through sucrose. In addition, it is important to distinguish those bacteria truly ingested by a macrophage from those that are bound to, but not internalized by, the cell. A simple but effective way to do this is described in an alternate protocol. The unit also presents two ways to measure the ability of a macrophage to kill bacteria it has internalized. The first is a straightforward assay in which bacterial colonies are enumerated before and after a killing period; a subsequent colony count will indicate whether the bacteria grew within or were killed by the macrophage. The second protocol describes a way to measure bacterial viability based on bacterial metabolism, in which the ability of bacterial dehydrogenases to mediate the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to purple formazan is monitored by measuring absorbance spectrophotometrically.

  13. Antibacterial Surface Design of Titanium-Based Biomaterials for Enhanced Bacteria-Killing and Cell-Assisting Functions Against Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxing; Li, Jinhua; Qian, Shi; Guo, Geyong; Wang, Qiaojie; Tang, Jin; Shen, Hao; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhang, Xianlong; Chu, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the formidable and recalcitrant complications after orthopedic surgery, and inhibiting biofilm formation on the implant surface is considered crucial to prophylaxis of PJI. However, it has recently been demonstrated that free-floating biofilm-like aggregates in the local body fluid and bacterial colonization on the implant and peri-implant tissues can coexist and are involved in the pathogenesis of PJI. An effective surface with both contact-killing and release-killing antimicrobial capabilities can potentially abate these concerns and minimize PJI caused by adherent/planktonic bacteria. Herein, Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are embedded in titania (TiO2) nanotubes by anodic oxidation and plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) to form a contact-killing surface. Vancomycin is then incorporated into the nanotubes by vacuum extraction and lyophilization to produce the release-killing effect. A novel clinical PJI model system involving both in vitro and in vivo use of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST239 is established to systematically evaluate the antibacterial properties of the hybrid surface against planktonic and sessile bacteria. The vancomycin-loaded and Ag-implanted TiO2 nanotubular surface exhibits excellent antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects against planktonic/adherent bacteria without appreciable silver ion release. The fibroblasts/bacteria cocultures reveal that the surface can help fibroblasts to combat bacteria. We first utilize the nanoarchitecture of implant surface as a bridge between the inorganic bactericide (Ag NPs) and organic antibacterial agent (vancomycin) to achieve total victory in the battle of PJI. The combination of contact-killing and release-killing together with cell-assisting function also provides a novel and effective strategy to mitigate bacterial infection and biofilm formation on biomaterials and has large potential in orthopedic applications. PMID:27054673

  14. Adenoviral E4orf3 and E4orf6 Proteins, But Not E1B55K, Increase Killing of Cancer Cells by Radiotherapy in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Dias, Joao D.; Nokisalmi, Petri; Sloniecka, Marta; Kangasniemi, Lotta; Rajecki, Mari; Dobner, Thomas; Tenhunen, Mikko; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Ahtiainen, Laura Ph.D.; Hemminki, Akseli

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used for treatment of many tumor types, but it can damage normal tissues. It has been proposed that cancer cells can be selectively sensitized to radiation by adenovirus replication or by using radiosensitizing transgenes. Adenoviral proteins E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 play a role in radiosensitization, by targeting the Mre11, Rad50, and NBS1 complex (MRN) and inhibiting DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. We hypothesize that combined with irradiation, these adenoviral proteins increase cell killing through the impairment of DSB repair. Methods and Materials: We assessed the radiosensitizing/additive potential of replication-deficient adenoviruses expressing E1B55K, E4orf3, and E4orf6 proteins. Combination treatments with low-dose external photon beam radiotherapy were studied in prostate cancer (PC-3MM2 and DU-145), breast cancer (M4A4-LM3), and head and neck cancer (UT-SCC8) cell lines. We further demonstrated radiosensitizing or additive effects in mice with PC-3MM2 tumors. Results: We show enhanced cell killing with adenovirus and radiation combination treatment. Co-infection with several of the viruses did not further increase cell killing, suggesting that both E4orf6 and E4orf3 are potent in MRN inhibition. Our results show that adenoviral proteins E4orf3 and E4orf6, but not E1B55K, are effective also in vivo. Enhanced cell killing was due to inhibition of DSB repair resulting in persistent double-strand DNA damage, indicated by elevated phospho-H2AX levels at 24 h after irradiation. Conclusions: This knowledge can be applied for improving the treatment of malignant tumors, such as prostate cancer, for development of more effective combination therapies and minimizing radiation doses and reducing side effects.

  15. Prolonged early G1 arrest by selective CDK4/CDK6 inhibition sensitizes myeloma cells to cytotoxic killing through cell cycle–coupled loss of IRF4

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiangao; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Jayabalan, David; Liang, Jun; Ely, Scott; Bretz, Jamieson; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Louie, Tracey; Chen, Isan; Randolph, Sophia; Hahn, William C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Moore, Malcolm A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 by gain of function or loss of inhibition is common in human cancer, including multiple myeloma, but success in targeting CDK with broad-spectrum inhibitors has been modest. By selective and reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, we have developed a strategy to both inhibit proliferation and enhance cytotoxic killing of cancer cells. We show that induction of prolonged early-G1 arrest (pG1) by CDK4/CDK6 inhibition halts gene expression in early-G1 and prevents expression of genes programmed for other cell-cycle phases. Removal of the early-G1 block leads to S-phase synchronization (pG1-S) but fails to completely restore scheduled gene expression. Consequently, the IRF4 protein required to protect myeloma cells from apoptosis is markedly reduced in pG1 and further in pG1-S in response to cytotoxic agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. The coordinated loss of IRF4 and gain of Bim sensitize myeloma tumor cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in pG1 in the absence of Noxa and more profoundly in pG1-S in cooperation with Noxa in vitro. Induction of pG1 and pG1-S by reversible CDK4/CDK6 inhibition further augments tumor-specific bortezomib killing in myeloma xenografts. Reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 in sequential combination therapy thus represents a novel mechanism-based cancer therapy. PMID:22718837

  16. Cell killing, nuclear damage and apoptosis in Chinese hamster V79 cells after irradiation with heavy-ion beams of (16)O, (12)C and (7)Li.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rupak; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Sarma, Asiti; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2007-08-15

    Chinese hamster V79 cells were exposed to high LET (linear energy transfer) (16)O-beam (625keV/mum) radiation in the dose range of 0-9.83Gy. Cell survival, micronuclei (MN), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and induction of apoptosis were studied as a follow up of our earlier study on high LET radiations ((7)Li-beam of 60keV/mum and (12)C-beam of 295keV/mum) as well as (60)Co gamma-rays. Dose dependent decline in surviving fraction was noticed along with the increase of MN frequency, CA frequency as well as percentage of apoptosis as detected by nuclear fragmentation assay. The relative intensity of DNA ladder, which is a useful marker for the determination of the extent of apoptosis induction, was also increased in a dose dependent manner. Additionally, expression of tyrosine kinase lck-1 gene, which plays an important role in response to ionizing radiation induced apoptosis, was increased with the increase of radiation doses and also with incubation time. The present study showed that all the high LET radiations were generally more effective in cell killing and inflicting other cytogenetic damages than that of low LET gamma-rays. The dose response curves revealed that (7)Li-beam was most effective in cell killing as well as inducing other nuclear damages followed by (12)C, (16)O and (60)Co gamma-rays, in that order. The result of this study may have some application in biological dosimetry for assessment of genotoxicity in heavy ion exposed subjects and in determining suitable doses for radiotherapy in cancer patients where various species of heavy ions are now being generally used.

  17. Adult stem cells and their ability to differentiate.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski, Maciej; Sieron, Aleksander L

    2006-08-01

    This is a review of the current status of knowledge on adult stem cells as well as the criteria and evidence for their potential to transform into different cell types and cell lineages. Reports on stem cell sources, focusing on tissues from adult subjects, were also investigated. Numerous reports have been published on the search for early markers of both stem cells and the precursors of various cell lineages. The question is still open about the characteristics of the primary stem cell. The existing proofs and hypotheses have not yielded final solutions to this problem. From a practical point of view it is also crucial to find a minimal set of markers determining the phenotypes of the precursor cells of a particular cell lineage. Several lines of evidence seem to bring closer the day when we will be able to detect the right stem cell niche and successfully isolate precursor cells that are needed for the treatment of a particular disorder. Recent reports on cases of cancer in patients subjected to stem cell therapy are yet another controversial issue looked into in this review, although the pros and cons emerging from the results of published studies still do not provide satisfying evidence to fully understand this issue.

  18. Distinct Roles of Ape1 Protein, an Enzyme Involved in DNA Repair, in High or Low Linear Energy Transfer Ionizing Radiation-induced Cell Killing*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Yu, David S.; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S.; Doetsch, Paul W.; Wang, Ya

    2014-01-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy. PMID:25210033

  19. The IKK-neutralizing compound Bay11 kills supereffector CD8 T cells by altering caspase-dependent activation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Long, Meixiao; Adler, Adam J; Mittler, Robert S; Vella, Anthony T

    2009-01-01

    Antigen with dual costimulation through CD137 and CD134 induces powerful CD8 T cell responses. These effector T cells are endowed with an intrinsic survival program resulting in their accumulation in vivo, but the signaling components required for survival are unknown. We tested a cadre of pathway inhibitors and found one preclinical compound, Bay11-7082 (Bay11), which prevented survival. Even the gammac cytokine family members IL-2, -4, -7, and -15 could not block death, nor could pretreatment with IL-7. We found that dual costimulation caused loading of phosphorylated IkappaBalpha (p-IkappaBalpha) and high basal levels of NF-kappaB activity in the effector CD8 T cells. Bay11 trumped both events by reducing the presence of p-IkappaBalpha and ensuing NF-kappaB activity. Not all pathways were impacted to this degree, however, as mitogen-mediated ERK phosphorylation was evident during NF-kappaB inhibition. Nonetheless, Bay11 blocked TCR-stimulated cytokine synthesis by rapidly accentuating activation-induced cell death through elicitation of a caspase-independent pathway. Thus, in effector CD8 T cells, Bay11 forces a dominant caspase-independent death signal that cannot be overcome by an intrinsic survival program nor by survival-inducing cytokines. Therefore, Bay11 may be a useful tool to deliberately kill death-resistant effector T cells for therapeutic benefit.

  20. Enhanced Expression of T-Cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin Domain Protein 3 in Endothelial Cells Facilitates Intracellular Killing of Rickettsia heilongjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaomei; Jiao, Jun; Han, Gencheng; Gong, Wenping; Wang, Pengcheng; Xiong, Xiaolu; Wen, Bohai

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia heilongjiangensis is the pathogen of Far eastern spotted fever, and T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) is expressed in human vascular endothelial cells, the major target cells of rickettsiae. In the present study, we investigated the effects of altered Tim-3 expression in vivo in mice and in vitro in human endothelial cells, on day 3 after R. heilongjiangensis infection. Compared with corresponding controls, rickettsial burdens both in vivo and in vitro were significantly higher with blocked Tim-3 signaling or silenced Tim-3 and significantly lower with overexpressed Tim-3. Additionally, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and interferon γ in endothelial cells with blocked Tim-3 signaling or silenced Tim-3 was significantly lower, while the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, interferon γ, and tumor necrosis factor α in transgenic mice with Tim-3 overexpression was significantly higher. These results reveal that enhanced Tim-3 expression facilitates intracellular rickettsial killing in a nitric oxide-dependent manner in endothelial cells during the early phase of rickettsial infection.

  1. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, B. A.; Lau, B.; Jackson, S. E.; Wills, M. R.; Sinclair, J. H.; Poole, E.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  2. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens. PMID:27091512

  3. Transient activation of human cytomegalovirus lytic gene expression during latency allows cytotoxic T cell killing of latently infected cells.

    PubMed

    Krishna, B A; Lau, B; Jackson, S E; Wills, M R; Sinclair, J H; Poole, E

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latency in the myeloid lineage is maintained by repressive histone modifications around the major immediate early promoter (MIEP), which results in inhibition of the lytic viral life cycle. We now show that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) relieves this repression of the MIEP and induces transient expression of the viral lytic immediate early (IE) antigens but, importantly, not full virus reactivation. In turn, these latently infected cells now become targets for IE-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) which are present at high frequency in all normal healthy HCMV positive carriers but would normally be unable to target latent (lytic antigen-negative) cells. This approach of transiently inducing viral lytic gene expression by HDAC inhibition, in otherwise latently infected cells, offers a window of opportunity to target and purge the latent myeloid cell reservoir by making these normally immunologically undetectable cells visible to pre-existing host immune responses to viral lytic antigens.

  4. Major histocompatibility complex class I-specific and -restricted killing of beta 2-microglobulin-deficient cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Glas, R; Franksson, L; Ohlén, C; Höglund, P; Koller, B; Ljunggren, H G; Kärre, K

    1992-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) recognize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules, normally composed of a heavy chain, a beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m), and peptide antigens. beta 2m is considered essential for the assembly and intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules as well as their peptide presentation to CTLs. Contrary to this dogma, we now report the generation of allospecific and restricted CD8+ and TCR alpha beta+ CTLs (where TCR is T-cell receptor) capable of killing beta 2m-deficient cells. Such CTLs were obtained by priming mice with live allogeneic beta 2m- spleen cells or mutant lymphoma cells producing MHC class I protein but no detectable beta 2m. Although both beta 2m- and beta 2m-expressing lymphoma cells were rejected in allogeneic mice, only the former were efficient inducers of CTLs recognizing beta 2m- cells. These CTLs were MHC class I (H-2Kb or Db)-specific and CD8-dependent and did not require serum as a source of external beta 2m in the culture. They could be induced across major and minor histocompatibility barriers. The H-2-restricted CTLs generated in the latter case failed to kill the antigen-processing-deficient target RMA-S cells. The results show that MHC class I heavy chains in beta 2m- cells can be transported to the cell surface and act as antigens or antigen-presenting molecules to allospecific and MHC-restricted CTLs. PMID:1454824

  5. Guanylate-Binding Protein-1 protects ovarian cancer cell lines but not breast cancer cell lines from killing by paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Aaron R; Nyabuto, Geoffrey O; Trendel, Jill A; Mazur, Travis M; Wilson, John P; Wadi, Suzan; Justinger, Jacob S; Moore, Garret L; Nguyen, Peter T; Vestal, Deborah J

    2016-09-30

    Forced expression of the cytokine-induced large GTPase, human Guanylate-Binding Protein-1 (hGBP-1), in ovarian cancer cell lines increases resistance to paclitaxel. Elevated hGBP-1 RNA in ovarian tumors correlates with shorter recurrence-free survival. In contract, hGBP-1 is part of a gene signature predicting improved prognosis in all subtypes of breast cancers. hGBP-1 does not confer paclitaxel resistance on MCF-7 and TMX2-28 breast cancer cells. Expression of the isotype of the hGBP-1-interacting protein, PIM1, which may contribute to paclitaxel resistance when associated with hGBP-1, is different in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines. Breast cancer cell lines express the 44 kDa isoform of PIM-1, and ovarian cancer cell lines express the 33 kDa isoform. PMID:27590579

  6. Antiestrogen Resistant Cell Lines Expressing Estrogen Receptor α Mutations Upregulate the Unfolded Protein Response and are Killed by BHPI

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chengjian; Livezey, Mara; Kim, Ji Eun; Shapiro, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Outgrowth of metastases expressing ERα mutations Y537S and D538G is common after endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive breast cancer. The effect of replacing wild type ERα in breast cancer cells with these mutations was unclear. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing system and homology directed repair to isolate and characterize 14 T47D cell lines in which ERαY537S or ERαD538G replace one or both wild-type ERα genes. In 2-dimensional, and in quantitative anchorage-independent 3-dimensional cell culture, ERαY537S and ERαD538G cells exhibited estrogen-independent growth. A progestin further increased their already substantial proliferation in micromolar 4-hydroxytamoxifen and fulvestrant/ICI 182,780 (ICI). Our recently described ERα biomodulator, BHPI, which hyperactivates the unfolded protein response (UPR), completely blocked proliferation. In ERαY537S and ERαD538G cells, estrogen-ERα target genes were constitutively active and partially antiestrogen resistant. The UPR marker sp-XBP1 was constitutively activated in ERαY537S cells and further induced by progesterone in both cell lines. UPR-regulated genes associated with tamoxifen resistance, including the oncogenic chaperone BiP/GRP78, were upregulated. ICI displayed a greater than 2 fold reduction in its ability to induce ERαY537S and ERαD538G degradation. Progestins, UPR activation and perhaps reduced ICI-stimulated ERα degradation likely contribute to antiestrogen resistance seen in ERαY537S and ERαD538G cells. PMID:27713477

  7. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.211 Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  8. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.211 Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  9. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.203 Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  10. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.211 Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  11. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.210 Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  12. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.203 Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  13. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.210 Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  14. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.210 Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  15. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.203 Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  16. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  17. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  18. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  19. 9 CFR 113.203 - Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.203 Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Panleukopenia Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  20. 9 CFR 113.211 - Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.211 Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  1. 9 CFR 113.210 - Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.210 Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus. Feline Calicivirus Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed...

  2. 9 CFR 113.216 - Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.216 Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Vaccine, Killed Virus, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master...

  3. Comparative analysis of cell killing and autosomal mutation in mouse kidney epithelium exposed to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in vitro or in situ.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Connolly, Lanelle; Dan, Cristian; Lasarev, Michael; Turker, Mitchell S

    2009-11-01

    Astronauts receive exposures to high-energy heavy ions from galactic cosmic radiation. Although high-energy heavy ions are mutagenic and carcinogenic, their mutagenic potency in epithelial cells, where most human cancers develop, is poorly understood. Mutations are a critical component of human cancer, and mutations involving autosomal loci predominate. This study addresses the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in mouse kidney epithelium. Mutant fractions were measured for an endogenous autosomal locus (Aprt) that detects all types of mutagenic events contributing to human cancer. Results for kidneys irradiated in situ are compared with results for kidney cells from the same strain exposed in vitro. The results demonstrate dose-dependent cell killing in vitro and for cells explanted 3-4 months postirradiation in situ, but in situ exposures were less likely to result in cell death than in vitro exposures. Prolonged incubation in situ (8-9 months) further attenuated cell killing at lower doses. Iron ions were mutagenic to cells in vitro and for irradiated kidneys. No sparing was seen for mutant frequency with a long incubation period in situ. In addition, the degree of mutation induction (relative increase over background) was similar for cells exposed in vitro or in situ. We speculate that the latent effects of iron-ion exposure contribute to the maintenance of an elevated mutation burden in an epithelial tissue. PMID:19883222

  4. Construction of photodynamic-effect immunofluorescence probes by a complex of quantum dots, immunoglobulin G and chlorin e6 and their application in HepG2 cell killing.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Li-Li; Fei, Meng-Ying; Liu, Xin-Ying; Su, Yi-Long; Du, Qing-Qing; Wu, Sheng-Mei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, tri-functional immunofluorescent probes (Ce6-IgG-QDs) based on covalent combinations of quantum dots (QDs), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and chlorin e6 (Ce6) were developed and their photodynamic ability to induce the death of cancer cells was demonstrated. Strategically, one type of second-generation photosensitizer, Ce6, was first coupled with anti-IgG antibody using the EDC/NHS cross-linking method to construct the photosensitive immunoconjugate Ce6-IgG. Then, a complex of Ce6-IgG-QDs immunofluorescent probes was obtained in succession by covalently coupling Ce6-IgG to water soluble CdTe QDs. The as-manufactured Ce6-IgG-QDs maintained the bio-activities of both the antigen-antibody-based tumour targeting effects of IgG and the photodynamic-related anticancer activities of Ce6. By way of polyclonal antibody interaction with rabbit anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR antibody, N-terminus), Ce6-IgG-QDs were labelled indirectly onto the surface of human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells in cell recognition and killing experiments. The results indicated that the Ce6-IgG-QDs probes have excellent tumour cell selectivity and higher photosensitivity in photodynamic therapy (PDT) compared with Ce6 alone, due to their antibody-based specific recognition and location of HepG2 cells and the photodynamic effects of Ce6 killed cells based on efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer between QDs and Ce6. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26553415

  5. The specificity of immune priming in silkworm, Bombyx mori, is mediated by the phagocytic ability of granular cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Li, Mei; Liu, Yi; Ding, Ying; Yi, Yunhong

    2015-10-01

    In the past decade, the phenomenon of immune priming was documented in many invertebrates in a large number of studies; however, in most of these studies, behavioral evidence was used to identify the immune priming. The underlying mechanism and the degree of specificity of the priming response remain unclear. We studied the mechanism of immune priming in the larvae of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and analyzed the specificity of the priming response using two closely related Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria (Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 and P. luminescens H06) and one Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium (Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1). Primed with heat-killed bacteria, the B. mori larvae were more likely to survive subsequent homologous exposure (the identical bacteria used in the priming and in the subsequent challenge) than heterologous (different bacteria used in the priming and subsequent exposure) exposure to live bacteria. This result indicated that the B. mori larvae possessed a strong immune priming response and revealed a degree of specificity to TT01, H06 and HD-1 bacteria. The degree of enhanced immune protection was positively correlated with the level of phagocytic ability of the granular cells and the antibacterial activity of the cell-free hemolymph. Moreover, the granular cells of the immune-primed larvae increased the phagocytosis of a previously encountered bacterial strain compared with other bacteria. Thus, the enhanced immune protection of the B. mori larvae after priming was mediated by the phagocytic ability of the granular cells and the antibacterial activity of the hemolymph; the specificity of the priming response was primarily attributed to the phagocytosis of bacteria by the granular cells.

  6. The specificity of immune priming in silkworm, Bombyx mori, is mediated by the phagocytic ability of granular cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Li, Mei; Liu, Yi; Ding, Ying; Yi, Yunhong

    2015-10-01

    In the past decade, the phenomenon of immune priming was documented in many invertebrates in a large number of studies; however, in most of these studies, behavioral evidence was used to identify the immune priming. The underlying mechanism and the degree of specificity of the priming response remain unclear. We studied the mechanism of immune priming in the larvae of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and analyzed the specificity of the priming response using two closely related Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria (Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 and P. luminescens H06) and one Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium (Bacillus thuringiensis HD-1). Primed with heat-killed bacteria, the B. mori larvae were more likely to survive subsequent homologous exposure (the identical bacteria used in the priming and in the subsequent challenge) than heterologous (different bacteria used in the priming and subsequent exposure) exposure to live bacteria. This result indicated that the B. mori larvae possessed a strong immune priming response and revealed a degree of specificity to TT01, H06 and HD-1 bacteria. The degree of enhanced immune protection was positively correlated with the level of phagocytic ability of the granular cells and the antibacterial activity of the cell-free hemolymph. Moreover, the granular cells of the immune-primed larvae increased the phagocytosis of a previously encountered bacterial strain compared with other bacteria. Thus, the enhanced immune protection of the B. mori larvae after priming was mediated by the phagocytic ability of the granular cells and the antibacterial activity of the hemolymph; the specificity of the priming response was primarily attributed to the phagocytosis of bacteria by the granular cells. PMID:26159492

  7. Comparative analysis of cell killing and autosomal mutation in mouse kidney epithelium exposed to 1 GeV protons in vitro or in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Amy; Gauny, Stacey; Kwoh, Ely; Grossi, Gianfranco; Dan, Cristian; Grygoryev, Dmytro; Lasarev, Michael; Turker, Mitchell S

    2013-05-01

    Human exposure to high-energy protons occurs in space flight scenarios or, where necessary, during radiotherapy for cancer or benign conditions. However, few studies have assessed the mutagenic effectiveness of high-energy protons, which may contribute to cancer risk. Mutations cause cancer and most cancer-associated mutations occur at autosomal loci. This study addresses the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of 1 GeV protons in mouse kidney epithelium. Mutant fractions were measured for an endogenous autosomal locus (Aprt) that detects all types of mutagenic events. Results for kidneys irradiated in vivo are compared with the results for kidney cells from the same strain exposed in vitro. The results demonstrate dose-dependent cell killing in vitro and for cells explanted 3-4 months postirradiation in vivo. Incubation in vivo for longer periods (8-9 months) further attenuates proton-induced cell killing. Protons are mutagenic to cells in vitro and for in vivo irradiated kidneys. The dose-response for Aprt mutation is curvilinear after in vitro or in vivo exposure, bending upward at the higher doses. While the absolute mutant fractions are higher in vivo, the fold-increase over background is similar for both in vitro and in situ exposures. Results are also presented for a limited study on the effect of dose fractionation on the induction of Aprt mutations in kidney epithelial cells. Dose-fractionation reduces the fraction of proton-induced Aprt mutants in vitro and in vivo and also results in less cell killing. Taken together, the mutation burden in the epithelium is slightly reduced by dose-fractionation. Autosomal mutations accumulated during clinical exposure to high-energy protons may contribute to the risk of treatment-associated neoplasms, thereby highlighting the need for rigorous treatment planning to reduce the dose to normal tissues. For low dose exposures that occur during most space flight scenarios, the mutagenic effects of protons appear to be modest.

  8. Cloning and characterization of the 2B4 gene encoding a molecule associated with non-MHC-restricted killing mediated by activated natural killer cells and T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, P.A.; Garni-Wagner, B.A.; Land, K.; Takashima, A.; Stoneman, E.; Bennett, M.; Kumar, V. )

    1993-11-15

    The authors have recently described a signal transducing molecule, 2B4, expressed on all NK and T cells that mediate non-MHC-restricted killing. The gene encoding this molecule was cloned and its nucleotide sequence determined. The encoded protein of 398 amino acids has a leader peptide of 18 amino acids and a transmembrane region of 24 amino acids. The predicted protein has eight N-linked glycosylation sites, suggesting that it is highly glycosylated. Comparison of 2B4 with sequences in the databanks indicates that 2B4 is a member of the Ig supergene family, and it shows homology to murine and rat CD48 and human LFA-3. Northern blot analysis has shown at least three transcripts for 2B4 in adherent lymphokine-activated killer cells of several mouse strains and TCR-[gamma]/[delta] dendritic epidermal T cell lines but not in allospecific T cell clones. These three mRNA are the products of differential splicing of heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from several mouse strains revealed that 2B4 belongs to a family of closely related genes. The 2B4 gene has been mapped to mouse chromosome 1 by analysis of 2B4 expression in recombinant inbred mouse strains. 48 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy sensitizes prostate cancer cells to T-cell killing through androgen receptor dependent modulation of the apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ardiani, Andressa; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kwilas, Anna R; Donahue, Renee N; Hodge, James W

    2014-10-15

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and management, prostrate cancer remains the second most common cause of death from cancer in American men, after lung cancer. Failure of chemotherapies and hormone-deprivation therapies is the major cause of death in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Currently, the androgen inhibitors enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic CRPC. Here we show for the first time that both enzalutamide and abiraterone render prostate tumor cells more sensitive to T cell-mediated lysis through immunogenic modulation, and that these immunomodulatory activities are androgen receptor (AR)-dependent. In studies reported here, the NAIP gene was significantly down-regulated in human prostate tumor cells treated in vitro and in vivo with enzalutamide. Functional analysis revealed that NAIP played a critical role in inducing CTL sensitivity. Amplification of AR is a major mechanism of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Here, we show that enzalutamide enhances sensitivity to immune-mediated killing of prostate tumor cells that overexpress AR. The immunomodulatory properties of enzalutamide and abiraterone provide a rationale for their use in combination with immunotherapeutic agents in CRPC, especially for patients with minimal response to enzalutamide or abiraterone alone, or for patients who have developed resistance to ADT. PMID:25344864

  10. A combination of curcumin with either gramicidin or ouabain selectively kills cells that express the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Rao, Divya K; Liu, Haiyan; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Mayer, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces a strategy to kill selectively multidrug-resistant cells that express the ABCG2 transporter (also called breast cancer resistance protein, or BCRP). The approach is based on specific stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by ABCG2 transporters with subtoxic doses of curcumin combined with stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with subtoxic doses of gramicidin A or ouabain. After 72 h of incubation with the drug combinations, the resulting overconsumption of ATP by both pathways inhibits the efflux activity of ABCG2 transporters, leads to depletion of intracellular ATP levels below the viability threshold, and kills resistant cells selectively over cells that lack ABCG2 transporters. This strategy, which was also tested on a clinically relevant human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7/FLV1), exploits the overexpression of ABCG2 transporters and induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death selectively in resistant cells. This work thus introduces a novel strategy to exploit collateral sensitivity (CS) with a combination of two clinically used compounds that individually do not exert CS. Collectively, this work expands the current knowledge on ABCG2-mediated CS and provides a potential strategy for discovery of CS drugs against drug-resistant cancer cells.

  11. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  12. Ellipsoidal Polyaspartamide Polymersomes with Enhanced Cell-Targeting Ability.

    PubMed

    Lai, Mei-Hsiu; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Devolder, Ross J; Brockman, Christopher; Schroeder, Charles; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2012-08-01

    Nano-sized polymersomes functionalized with peptides or proteins are being increasingly studied for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic molecules. Earlier computational studies have suggested that ellipsoidal nanoparticles, compared to spherical ones, display enhanced binding efficiency with target cells, but this has not yet been experimentally validated. We hypothesize that hydrophilic polymer chains coupled to vesicle-forming polymers would result in ellipsoidal polymersomes. In addition, ellipsoidal polymersomes modified with cell adhesion peptides bind with target cells more actively than spherical ones. We examine this hypothesis by substituting polyaspartamide with octadecyl chains and varying numbers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains. Increasing the degree of substitution of PEG from 0.5 to 1.0 mol% drives the polymer to self-assemble into an ellipsoidal polymersome with an aspect ratio of 2.1. Further modification of these ellipsoidal polymersomes with peptides containing an Arg-Gly-Asp sequence (RGD peptides) lead to a significant increase in the rate of association and decrease in the rate of dissociation with a substrate coated with αvβ3 integrins. In addition, in a circulation-mimicking flow, the ellipsoidal polymersomes linked with RGD peptides adhere to target tissues more favorably than their spherical equivalents do. Overall, the results of this study will greatly serve to improve the efficiency of targeted delivery of a wide array of polymersomes loaded with various biomedical modalities.

  13. Extracellular Electron Transfer from Aerobic Bacteria to Au-Loaded TiO2 Semiconductor without Light: A New Bacteria-Killing Mechanism Other than Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance or Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guomin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Ang; Hao, Qi; Jin, Weihong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Wan; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K

    2016-09-21

    Titania loaded with noble metal nanoparticles exhibits enhanced photocatalytic killing of bacteria under light illumination due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property. It has been shown recently that loading with Au or Ag can also endow TiO2 with the antibacterial ability in the absence of light. In this work, the antibacterial mechanism of Au-loaded TiO2 nanotubes (Au@TiO2-NT) in the dark environment is studied, and a novel type of extracellular electron transfer (EET) between the bacteria and the surface of the materials is observed to cause bacteria death. Although the EET-induced bacteria current is similar to the LSPR-related photocurrent, the former takes place without light, and no reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the process. The EET is also different from that commonly attributed to microbial fuel cells (MFC) because it is dominated mainly by the materials' surface, but not the bacteria, and the environment is aerobic. EET on the Au@TiO2-NT surface kills Staphylococcus aureus, but if it is combined with special MFC bacteria, the efficiency of MFC may be improved significantly. PMID:27580379

  14. Extracellular Electron Transfer from Aerobic Bacteria to Au-Loaded TiO2 Semiconductor without Light: A New Bacteria-Killing Mechanism Other than Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance or Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guomin; Feng, Hongqing; Gao, Ang; Hao, Qi; Jin, Weihong; Peng, Xiang; Li, Wan; Wu, Guosong; Chu, Paul K

    2016-09-21

    Titania loaded with noble metal nanoparticles exhibits enhanced photocatalytic killing of bacteria under light illumination due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) property. It has been shown recently that loading with Au or Ag can also endow TiO2 with the antibacterial ability in the absence of light. In this work, the antibacterial mechanism of Au-loaded TiO2 nanotubes (Au@TiO2-NT) in the dark environment is studied, and a novel type of extracellular electron transfer (EET) between the bacteria and the surface of the materials is observed to cause bacteria death. Although the EET-induced bacteria current is similar to the LSPR-related photocurrent, the former takes place without light, and no reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during the process. The EET is also different from that commonly attributed to microbial fuel cells (MFC) because it is dominated mainly by the materials' surface, but not the bacteria, and the environment is aerobic. EET on the Au@TiO2-NT surface kills Staphylococcus aureus, but if it is combined with special MFC bacteria, the efficiency of MFC may be improved significantly.

  15. Cytokine responses in the Japanese pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) head kidney cells induced with heat-killed probiotics isolated from the Mongolian dairy products.

    PubMed

    Biswas, G; Korenaga, H; Nagamine, R; Takayama, H; Kawahara, S; Takeda, S; Kikuchi, Y; Dashnyam, B; Kono, T; Sakai, M

    2013-05-01

    Cytokine responses in the Japanese pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) head kidney (HK) cells to heat-killed lactic acid bacteria probiotics isolated from the Mongolian dairy products were investigated by transcriptomic examination. The HK cells were incubated with two heat-killed bacteria, namely Lactobacillus paracasei spp. paracasei (strain 06TCa22) and L. plantarum (strain 06CC2) and the responses of 16 cytokine genes at 0 (control), 1, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h post-stimulation were assayed by multiplex RT-PCR analysis (GenomeLab Genetic Analysis System, GeXPS; Beckman Coulter, Inc.). The 16 genes included in the assay were pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A/F-3, TNF-α and TNF-N), cell-mediated immune regulators (IL-12p35, IL-12p40 and IL-18), antiviral (I-IFN-1 and IFN-γ) and other regulatory (IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, IL-21, IL-10 and TGF-β1) cytokines. Despite the differences in the transcriptional profiles, expression of all the cytokines tested here was significantly elevated by both the probiotic bacterial stimulants compared with the unstimulated control. Therefore, this in vitro study has demonstrated the modulation of cytokine defense mechanisms in the HK cells by the two heat-killed probiotics indicating their potentiality as novel immunostimulants to fish. However, strain-dependent varied expression of important cytokines (cell-mediated immune regulators, antiviral and anti-inflammatory cytokines) suggests better efficacy of L. paracasei spp. paracasei strain as fish immunostimulant. Further in vivo studies to elucidate the cytokine regulation networks will validate our present observations. A careful evaluation of ant-inflammatory properties may be undertaken using single strain to affirm the immunostimulatory capability. Moreover, application timings and frequency to assess the longevity of immunostimulant effects and to make the application cost-effective need to be evaluated before any practical use in aquaculture.

  16. A comparison of the response to hyperthermia of murine haemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and L1210 leukaemia cells: enhanced killing of leukaemic cells in presence of normal marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, R. P.; Wheldon, T. E.; Clarke, B.; Bailey, G.

    1981-01-01

    When the clonogenic survival of mouse haemopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) and leukaemia L1210 cells growth as ascites tumours are compared after being heated in vitro and assayed in vivo by spleen-colony assay, there is no significant difference in the terminal slopes of the survival curves. The shoulders of the survival curves differ, but this may be explained by differences in cell kinetics. By contrast, L1210 leukaemic marrow cells are considerably more susceptible to the lethal effects of hyperthermia (43 degrees C) than either normal marrow stem cells or L1210 leukaemic cells grown as ascites tumours. Moreover, the killing of L1210 ascites cells by hyperthermia can be enhanced by heating L1210 ascites cells with an equal number of normal marrow cells, or as upernatant removed from heated marrow cells. Most cells in lukaemic marrow are normal, and it is postulated that the increased thermal sensitivity of L1210 cells in leukaemic marrow is caused by diffusible factors (e.g. lysosomal enzymes) released by heating normal marrow cells. Images Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7317271

  17. Combining Heavy Ion Radiation and Artificial MicroRNAs to Target the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene Efficiently Kills Human Tumor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Zhiming; Wang Ping; Wang Hongyan; Zhang Xiangming; Wang Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang Ya

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Previously, we demonstrated that heavy ions kill more cells at the same dose than X-rays because DNA-clustered lesions produced by heavy ions affect nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair but not homologous recombination repair (HRR). We have also shown that our designed artificial microRNAs (amiRs) could efficiently target XRCC4 (an essential factor for NHEJ) or XRCC2 (an essential factor for HRR) and sensitize human tumor cells to X-rays. Based on these data, we were interested in testing the hypothesis that combining heavy ions and amiRs to target HRR but not NHEJ should more efficiently kill human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human tumor cell lines (U87MG, a brain tumor cell line, and A549, a lung cancer cell line) and their counterparts, overexpressed with amiR to target XRCC2, XRCC4 or both, were used in this study. Survival sensitivities were examined using a clonogenic assay after these cells were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. In addition, these cell lines were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to form xenografts and the tumor size was compared after the tumor areas were exposed to X-rays or heavy ions. Results: Although targeting either XRCC4 (NHEJ factor) or XRCC2 (HRR factor) sensitized the human tumor cells to X-rays, in vitro and the xenograft animal model, targeting only XRCC2 but not XRCC4 sensitized the human tumor cells to heavy ions in vitro and in the xenograft animal model. Conclusions: Combining heavy ions with targeting the HRR pathway, but not the NHEJ pathway, could significantly improve the efficiency of tumor cell death.

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells primed with Paclitaxel attract and kill leukaemia cells, inhibit angiogenesis and improve survival of leukaemia-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Augusto; Coccè, Valentina; Pascucci, Luisa; Bonomi, Arianna; Cavicchini, Loredana; Sisto, Francesca; Ferrari, Maura; Ciusani, Emilio; Crovace, Antonio; Falchetti, Maria Laura; Zicari, Sonia; Caruso, Arnaldo; Navone, Stefania; Marfia, Giovanni; Benetti, Anna; Ceccarelli, Piero; Parati, Eugenio; Alessandri, Giulio

    2013-03-01

    Current leukaemia therapy focuses on increasing chemotherapy efficacy. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been proposed for carrying and delivery drugs to improve killing of cancer cells. We have shown that MSCs loaded with Paclitaxel (PTX) acquire a potent anti-tumour activity. We investigated the effect of human MSCs (hMSCs) and mouse SR4987 loaded with PTX (hMSCsPTX and SR4987PTX) on MOLT-4 and L1210, two leukaemia cell (LCs) lines of human and mouse origin, respectively. SR4987PTX and hMSCsPTX showed strong anti-LC activity. hMSCsPTX, co-injected with MOLT-4 cells or intra-tumour injected into established subcutaneous MOLT-4 nodules, strongly inhibited growth and angiogenesis. In BDF1-mice-bearing L1210, the intraperitoneal administration of SR4987PTX doubled mouse survival time. In vitro, both hMSCs and hMSCsPTX released chemotactic factors, bound and formed rosettes with LCs. In ultrastructural analysis of rosettes, hMSCsPTX showed no morphological alterations while the attached LCs were apoptotic and necrotic. hMSCs and hMSCsPTX released molecules that reduced LC adhesion to microvascular endothelium (hMECs) and down-modulated ICAM1 and VCAM1 on hMECs. Priming hMSCs with PTX is a simple procedure that does not require any genetic cell manipulation. Once the effectiveness of hMSCsPTX on established cancers in mice is proven, this procedure could be proposed for leukaemia therapy in humans.

  19. How to kill creativity.

    PubMed

    Amabile, T M

    1998-01-01

    In today's knowledge economy, creativity is more important than ever. But many companies unwittingly employ managerial practices that kill it. How? By crushing their employees' intrinsic motivation--the strong internal desire to do something based on interests and passions. Managers don't kill creativity on purpose. Yet in the pursuit of productivity, efficiency, and control--all worthy business imperatives--they undermine creativity. It doesn't have to be that way, says Teresa Amabile. Business imperatives can comfortably coexist with creativity. But managers will have to change their thinking first. Specifically, managers will need to understand that creativity has three parts: expertise, the ability to think flexibly and imaginatively, and motivation. Managers can influence the first two, but doing so is costly and slow. It would be far more effective to increase employees' intrinsic motivation. To that end, managers have five levers to pull: the amount of challenge they give employees, the degree of freedom they grant around process, the way they design work groups, the level of encouragement they give, and the nature of organizational support. Take challenge as an example. Intrinsic motivation is high when employees feel challenged but not overwhelmed by their work. The task for managers, therefore, becomes matching people to the right assignments. Consider also freedom. Intrinsic motivation--and thus creativity--soars when managers let people decide how to achieve goals, not what goals to achieve. Managers can make a difference when it comes to employee creativity. The result can be truly innovative companies in which creativity doesn't just survive but actually thrives.

  20. A potent tumoricidal co-drug ‘Bet-CA' - an ester derivative of betulinic acid and dichloroacetate selectively and synergistically kills cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Selective targeting of cancer cells employing multiple combinations as co-drug holds promise for new generation therapeutics. Betulinic acid (BA), a plant secondary metabolite kills cancer cells and Dichloroacetate (DCA) is capable of reversing the Warburg phenotype by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). Here, we report synthesis, characterization and tumoricidal potential of a co-drug Bet-CA, where a DCA molecule has been appended on C-3 hydroxyl group of BA to generate an ester derivative for increased solubility and subsequent cleavage by internal esterase(s) to release one unit each of BA and DCA. In vitro studies revealed pronounced synergistic cytotoxicity of Bet-CA against a broad spectrum of cancer cells and it selectively killed them when co-cultured with human fibroblasts. Bet-CA treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, significantly altered mitochondrial membrane potential gradient (ΔΨm); followed by the release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) which prompted cells to undergo mitochondria mediated apoptosis. In vivo experimentation expectedly exhibited tumor inhibitory potential of Bet-CA and clinically achievable doses did not produce any apparent toxicity. Taken together, results suggestively raise an important corollary hypothesis stating that Bet-CA selectively and synergistically combats cancer without producing toxic manifestations and emerges to be the prospect for the new generation therapeutics. PMID:25585916

  1. Transferrin-Targeted Polymeric Micelles Co-Loaded with Curcumin and Paclitaxel: Efficient Killing of Paclitaxel-Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.; Sarisozen, Can

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to successfully treat advanced forms of cancer remains a challenge due to chemotherapy resistance. Numerous studies indicate that NF-κB, a protein complex that controls the expression of numerous genes, as being a key factor in producing chemo-resistant tumors. In this study, the therapeutic potential of transferrin (TF)-targeted mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin (CUR), a potent NF-κB inhibitor, and paclitaxel (PCL), was examined. Methods The cytotoxicity of non-targeted and TF-targeted CUR and PCL micelles as a single agent or in combination was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant (MDR) version SK-OV-3-PCL-resistant (SK-OV-3TR) cells in vitro. Results Our results indicated that the TF-targeted combination micelles were able to improve the net cytotoxic effect of CUR and PCL to clear synergistic one against the SK-OV-3 cells. In addition, even though the non-targeted combination treatment demonstrated a synergistic effect against the SK-OV-3TR cells, the addition of the TF-targeting moiety significantly increased this cytotoxic effect. While keeping CUR constant at 5 and 10 μM and varying the PCL concentration, the PCL IC50 decreased from ~ 1.78 and 0.68 μM for the non-targeted formulations to ~ 0.74 and 0.1 μM for the TF-targeted ones, respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate that such co-loaded targeted mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer and provide a clear rational for further in vivo investigation. PMID:24522815

  2. HecA, a member of a class of adhesins produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria, contributes to the attachment, aggregation, epidermal cell killing, and virulence phenotypes of Erwinia chrysanthemi EC16 on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Clemencia M.; Ham, Jong Hyun; Deng, Wen-Ling; Doyle, Jeff J.; Collmer, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is representative of a broad class of bacterial pathogens that are capable of inducing necrosis in plants. The E. chrysanthemi EC16 hecA gene predicts a 3,850-aa member of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin family of adhesins. A hecA∷Tn7 mutant was reduced in virulence on Nicotiana clevelandii seedlings after inoculation without wounding. Epifluorescence and confocal laser-scanning microscopy observations of hecA and wild-type cells expressing the green fluorescent protein revealed that the mutant is reduced in its ability to attach and then form aggregates on leaves and to cause an aggregate-associated killing of epidermal cells. Cell killing also depended on production of the major pectate lyase isozymes and the type II, but not the type III, secretion pathway in E. chrysanthemi. HecA homologs were found in bacterial pathogens of plants and animals and appear to be unique to pathogens and universal in necrogenic plant pathogens. Phylogenetic comparison of the conserved two-partner secretion domains in the proteins and the 16S rRNA sequences in respective bacteria revealed the two datasets to be fundamentally incongruent, suggesting horizontal acquisition of these genes. Furthermore, hecA and its two homologs in Yersinia pestis had a G+C content that was 10% higher than that of their genomes and similar to that of plant pathogenic Ralstonia, Xylella, and Pseudomonas spp. Our data suggest that filamentous hemagglutinin-like adhesins are broadly important virulence factors in both plant and animal pathogens. PMID:12271135

  3. Effects of the oral administration of viable and heat-killed Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells to pre-sensitized BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Aline D; Fernandes, Kenner M; Dias, Roberto S; Rocha, Alípio S; de Oliveira, Leandro L; Neves, Clóvis A; de Paula, Sérgio O; Mantovani, Hilário C

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been suggested as an alternative to classical antibiotics in livestock production and bacteriocin-producing bacteria could be added to animal feeds to deliver bacteriocins in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of ruminant and monogastric animals. In this study, viable (V) and heat-killed (HK) Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells were orally administered to pre-sensitized mice in order to assess the effects of a bacteriocin-producing bacteria on histological parameters and the immune response of the GI tract of monogastric animals. The administration of V and HK S. bovis HC5 cells during 58 days to BALB/c mice did not affect weight gain, but an increase in gut permeability was detected in animals receiving the HK cells. Viable and heat killed cells caused similar morphological alterations in the GI tract of the animals, but the most prominent effects were detected in the small intestine. The oral administration of S. bovis HC5 also influenced cytokine production in the small intestine, and the immune-mediated activity differed between V and HK cells. The relative expression of IL-12 and INF-γ was significantly higher in the small intestine of mice treated with V cells, while an increase in IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α expression was only detected in mice treated with HK cells. Considering that even under a condition of severe challenge (pre-sensitization followed by daily exposure to the same bacterial immunogen) the general health of the animals was maintained, it appears that oral administration of S. bovis HC5 cells could be a useful route to deliver bacteriocin in the GI tract of livestock animals.

  4. Effects of the Oral Administration of Viable and Heat-Killed Streptococcus bovis HC5 Cells to Pre-Sensitized BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Aline D.; Fernandes, Kenner M.; Dias, Roberto S.; Rocha, Alípio S.; de Oliveira, Leandro L.; Neves, Clóvis A.; de Paula, Sérgio O.; Mantovani, Hilário C.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been suggested as an alternative to classical antibiotics in livestock production and bacteriocin-producing bacteria could be added to animal feeds to deliver bacteriocins in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of ruminant and monogastric animals. In this study, viable (V) and heat-killed (HK) Streptococcus bovis HC5 cells were orally administered to pre-sensitized mice in order to assess the effects of a bacteriocin-producing bacteria on histological parameters and the immune response of the GI tract of monogastric animals. The administration of V and HK S. bovis HC5 cells during 58 days to BALB/c mice did not affect weight gain, but an increase in gut permeability was detected in animals receiving the HK cells. Viable and heat killed cells caused similar morphological alterations in the GI tract of the animals, but the most prominent effects were detected in the small intestine. The oral administration of S. bovis HC5 also influenced cytokine production in the small intestine, and the immune-mediated activity differed between V and HK cells. The relative expression of IL-12 and INF-γ was significantly higher in the small intestine of mice treated with V cells, while an increase in IL-5, IL-13 and TNF-α expression was only detected in mice treated with HK cells. Considering that even under a condition of severe challenge (pre-sensitization followed by daily exposure to the same bacterial immunogen) the general health of the animals was maintained, it appears that oral administration of S. bovis HC5 cells could be a useful route to deliver bacteriocin in the GI tract of livestock animals. PMID:23144752

  5. Prime, Shock, and Kill: Priming CD4 T Cells from HIV Patients with a BCL-2 Antagonist before HIV Reactivation Reduces HIV Reservoir Size

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Sainski, Amy M.; Dai, Haiming; Natesampillai, Sekar; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Bren, Gary D.; de Araujo Correia, Maria Cristina Miranda; Sampath, Rahul; Rizza, Stacey A.; O'Brien, Daniel; Yao, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding how some HIV-infected cells resist the cytotoxicity of HIV replication is crucial to enabling HIV cure efforts. HIV killing of CD4 T cells that replicate HIV can involve HIV protease-mediated cleavage of procaspase 8 to generate a fragment (Casp8p41) that directly binds and activates the mitochondrial proapoptotic protein BAK. Here, we demonstrate that Casp8p41 also binds with nanomolar affinity to the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, which sequesters Casp8p41 and prevents apoptosis. Further, we show that central memory CD4 T cells (TCM) from HIV-infected individuals have heightened expression of BCL-2 relative to procaspase 8, possibly explaining the persistence of HIV-infected TCM despite generation of Casp8p41. Consistent with this hypothesis, the selective BCL-2 antagonist venetoclax induced minimal killing of uninfected CD4 T cells but markedly increased the death of CD4 T cells and diminished cell-associated HIV DNA when CD4 T cells from antiretroviral therapy (ART)-suppressed HIV patients were induced with αCD3/αCD28 to reactivate HIV ex vivo. Thus, priming CD4 T cells from ART suppressed HIV patients with a BCL-2 antagonist, followed by HIV reactivation, achieves reductions in cell-associated HIV DNA, whereas HIV reactivation alone does not. IMPORTANCE HIV infection is incurable due to a long-lived reservoir of HIV+ memory CD4 T cells, and no clinically relevant interventions have been identified that reduce the number of these HIV DNA-containing cells. Since postintegration HIV replication can result in HIV protease generation of Casp8p41, which activates BAK, causing infected CD4 T cell death, we sought to determine whether this occurs in memory CD4 T cells. Here, we demonstrate that memory CD4 T cells can generate Casp8p41 and yet are intrinsically resistant to death induced by diverse stimuli, including Casp8p41. Furthermore, BCL-2 expression is relatively increased in these cells and directly binds and inhibits Casp8p41's

  6. Chemotherapy of non-small cell lung carcinoma guided by an in vitro drug resistance assay measuring total tumour cell kill.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, D. W.; Camacho, E. S.; Hilliard, D. A.; Dill, P. L.; Weisenthal, L. M.

    1992-01-01

    Specimens from 45 patients with previously-untreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were tested for in vitro chemosensitivity to ten drugs utilising the DiSC assay, which measures cell kill in the total (largely non-dividing) tumour cell population. Thirty-five assays were successful and 25 patients with advanced disease subsequently received chemotherapy with the 'best' three drugs selected by the assay. Six patients were Karnofsky performance status 60 or less and the median pretreatment weight loss was 8.5%. Nine patients had a partial response (response rate = 36%; 95% confidence interval = 17-55%) and the median survival of all patients was 202 days. Specimens from responding patients were significantly more sensitive in the assay to drugs in general (especially to etoposide and to 'natural product' drugs) and to the drugs used in treatment than were specimens from non-responding patients. In vitro drug resistance differences between responding and non-responding patients were of greater significance than were differences between other clinical and laboratory measurements. Assay results classified patients into two cohorts, having relatively high and low probabilities of responding to chemotherapy. Assay results also identified patient cohorts with above average and below average durations of survival. Five patients (20%) were found to have tumours with extreme drug resistance (EDR), defined as assay results for the average of all ten tested drugs falling greater than one standard deviation more resistant than the median for all tumours assayed, and none of these patients with EDR responded to chemotherapy. PMID:1310250

  7. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H. Jia, R.F.; Yu, L.; Zhao, M.J.; Shao, C.L.; Cheng, W.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) {sup 125}I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR {sup 125}I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), {gamma}H2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with {sup 125}I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of {gamma}H2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p <0.05), although they did not increase with irradiation dose. However, the proportion of bystander NCI-H446 cells with MN numbers {>=}3 and {gamma}H2AX foci numbers 15-19 and 20-24 was higher than that of bystander A549 cells. In addition, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment could completely suppress the bystander MN of NCI-H446 cells, but it suppressed only partly the bystander MN of A549 cells, indicating that reactive oxygen species are involved in the bystander response to NCI-H446 cells, but other signaling factors may contribute to the bystander response of A549 cells. Conclusions: Continuous LDR irradiation of {sup 125}I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes.

  8. Aryl-Alkyl-Lysines: Agents That Kill Planktonic Cells, Persister Cells, Biofilms of MRSA and Protect Mice from Skin-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandradhish; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Konai, Mohini M.; Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Hoque, Jiaul; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Development of synthetic strategies to combat Staphylococcal infections, especially those caused by methicillin resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA), needs immediate attention. In this manuscript we report the ability of aryl-alkyl-lysines, simple membrane active small molecules, to treat infections caused by planktonic cells, persister cells and biofilms of MRSA. A representative compound, NCK-10, did not induce development of resistance in planktonic cells in multiple passages and retained activity in varying environments of pH and salinity. At low concentrations the compound was able to depolarize and permeabilize the membranes of S. aureus persister cells rapidly. Treatment with the compound not only eradicated pre-formed MRSA biofilms, but also brought down viable counts in bacterial biofilms. In a murine model of MRSA skin infection, the compound was more effective than fusidic acid in bringing down the bacterial burden. Overall, this class of molecules bears potential as antibacterial agents against skin-infections. PMID:26669634

  9. Plasmin Promotes Keratinocyte Migration and Phagocytic-killing Accompanied by Suppression of Cell Proliferation which may Facilitate Re-epithelialization of Wound Beds

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Imre; Simon, Miklos; Hunyadi, Janos

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Keratinocytes were shown to induce the activation of plasminogen activator resulting in the formation of plasmin and the initiation of proteolysis in vitro. Activation of surface bound plasminogen may localize protease activity in the pericellular microenvironment and play a role in inducing both a conformational change and cell locomotion. Plasmin, however, can induce non-proteolytic effects on certain cell functions in a variety of cell lineages. In the present study we examined the effects of plasmin on keratinocytes with a focus on its role in the process of re-epithelialization, which included studies of cell migration, phagocytic-killing and cell proliferation. Migration of freshly isolated human epidermal keratinocytes was analyzed utilizing the agarose gel assay in the presence of 10% human serum. Plasmin at the concentration of 25 U/l induced a 160% increase in the chemotactic migration of keratinocytes that was completely blocked by the plasmin inhibitor α2-antiplasmin (Serpin). In the absence of serum, plasmin also induced a reversible chemotactic migration of HaCaT keratinocytes as determined utilizing the microchemotaxis assay. Dose-response analysis showed a bi-phasic effect of plasmin with a maximum increase of 52% in keratinocyte chemotaxis at a concentration of 25 U/l. HaCaT cells on the other hand, showed no detectable in vitro chemokinesis by plasmin. Phagocytic-killing of Candida albicans by freshly isolated epidermal keratinocytes was enhanced in the presence of 25 U/l plasmin which was also reversible by the addition of Serpin. Spontaneous proliferation of HaCaT keratinocytes as determined by 3H-Thymidine uptake on the other hand, was reduced by 47 and 13% in cultures with 25 U/l plasmin for 24 and 48 h respectively, in a Serpin reversible manner. These data suggest that plasmin-induced chemotactic migration of epidermal keratinocytes is accompanied by enhanced phagocytic-killing coupled with suppression of proliferation of these

  10. Critical high-dimensional state transitions in cell populations or why cancers follow the principle ``What does not kill me makes me stronger''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sui

    Transitions between high-dimensional attractor states in the quasi-potential landscape of the gene regulatory network, induced by environmental perturbations and/or facilitated by mutational rewiring of the network, underlie cell phenotype switching in development as well as in cancer progression, including acquisition of drug-resistant phenotypes. Considering heterogeneous cell populations as statistical ensembles of cells, and single-cell resolution gene expression profiling of cell populations undergoing a cell phenotype shift allow us now to map the topography of the landscape and its distortion. From snapshots of single-cell expression patterns of a cell population measured during major transitions we compute a quantity that identifies symmetry-breaking destabilization of attractors (bifurcation) and concomitant dimension-reduction of the state space manifold (landscape distortion) which precede critical transitions to new attractor states. The model predicts, and we show experimentally, the almost inevitable generation of aberrant cells associated with such critical transitions in multi-attractor landscapes: therapeutic perturbations which seek to push cancer cells to the apoptotic state, almost always produce ``rebellious'' cells which move in the ``opposite direction'': instead of dying they become more stem-cell-like and malignant. We show experimentally that the inadvertent generation of more malignant cancer cells by therapy indeed results from transition of surviving (but stressed) cells into unforeseen attractor states and not simply from selection of inherently more resistant cells. Thus, cancer cells follow not so much Darwin, as generally thought (survival of the fittest), but rather Nietzsche (What does not kill me makes me stronger). Supported by NIH (NCI, NIGMS), Alberta Innovates.

  11. Water disinfection using silver nanoparticle impregnated activated carbon: Escherichia coli cell-killing in batch and continuous packed column operation over a long duration.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Pritam; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) were selectively impregnated on the external surface of plasma treated activated carbon (AC) granules (referred to as Ag-AC hybrid, having 0.8 wt% of Ag), for achieving continuous disinfection of water in a single flow-column set-up. First, Ag-NPs (28 nm mean size) were synthesized by UV reduction. Subsequently, Escherichia coli cell-killing experiments were performed in both shake flask (i. e. batch-mode) and flow-column (i. e. continuous-mode) operations, using E. coli K12 (MTCC 1302) as a model organism. Batch results using 8 mg Ag-AC hybrid/ml of cell suspension showed that, 10(4) CFU/ml of cells were killed within 25 min contact time, with cell concentration decaying exponentially in time. Maintaining almost the same contact time as in the batch experiments, three columns packed with Ag-AC (all having a height of 25 cm but increasing diameters of 1, 5 and 8 cm, respectively) were used for monitoring cell-killing performance over a long duration. For all columns, inlet water having 10(4) CFU/ml E. coli could be completely disinfected to produce treated, outlet water having zero cell count. Specifically for the 8 cm diameter column, a maximum throughput of treating 1.62 L of contaminated water per hour could be maintained for at least up to 16 days. Moreover, the Ag concentration in the outlet water was only up to 29.8 μg/L at steady state, which is well within the recommended limit of 100 μg/L for drinking water. Hence, water disinfection for potable quality water (zero E. coli count and <100 μg/L Ag) can be achieved in a continuous manner over a long duration, with our packed Ag-AC column. PMID:27179597

  12. Water disinfection using silver nanoparticle impregnated activated carbon: Escherichia coli cell-killing in batch and continuous packed column operation over a long duration.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Pritam; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) were selectively impregnated on the external surface of plasma treated activated carbon (AC) granules (referred to as Ag-AC hybrid, having 0.8 wt% of Ag), for achieving continuous disinfection of water in a single flow-column set-up. First, Ag-NPs (28 nm mean size) were synthesized by UV reduction. Subsequently, Escherichia coli cell-killing experiments were performed in both shake flask (i. e. batch-mode) and flow-column (i. e. continuous-mode) operations, using E. coli K12 (MTCC 1302) as a model organism. Batch results using 8 mg Ag-AC hybrid/ml of cell suspension showed that, 10(4) CFU/ml of cells were killed within 25 min contact time, with cell concentration decaying exponentially in time. Maintaining almost the same contact time as in the batch experiments, three columns packed with Ag-AC (all having a height of 25 cm but increasing diameters of 1, 5 and 8 cm, respectively) were used for monitoring cell-killing performance over a long duration. For all columns, inlet water having 10(4) CFU/ml E. coli could be completely disinfected to produce treated, outlet water having zero cell count. Specifically for the 8 cm diameter column, a maximum throughput of treating 1.62 L of contaminated water per hour could be maintained for at least up to 16 days. Moreover, the Ag concentration in the outlet water was only up to 29.8 μg/L at steady state, which is well within the recommended limit of 100 μg/L for drinking water. Hence, water disinfection for potable quality water (zero E. coli count and <100 μg/L Ag) can be achieved in a continuous manner over a long duration, with our packed Ag-AC column.

  13. Antibodies against invasive phenotype-specific antigens increase Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis translocation across a polarized epithelial cell model and enhance killing by bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Everman, Jamie L; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a severe chronic enteritis which affects large populations of ruminants globally. Prevention strategies to combat the spread of Johne's disease among cattle herds involve adhering to strict calving practices to ensure young susceptible animals do not come in contact with MAP-contaminated colostrum, milk, or fecal material. Unfortunately, the current vaccination options available are associated with high cost and suboptimal efficacy. To more successfully combat the spread of Johne's disease to young calves, an efficient method of protection is needed. In this study, we examined passive immunization as a mode of introducing protective antibodies against MAP to prevent the passage of the bacterium to young animals via colostrum and milk. Utilizing the infectious MAP phenotype developed after bacterial exposure to milk, we demonstrate that in vitro opsonization with serum from Johne's-positive cattle results in enhanced translocation across a bovine MDBK polarized epithelial cell monolayer. Furthermore, immune serum opsonization of MAP results in a rapid host cell-mediated killing by bovine macrophages in an oxidative-, nitrosative-, and extracellular DNA trap-independent manner. This study illustrates that antibody opsonization of MAP expressing an infectious phenotype leads to the killing of the bacterium during the initial stage of macrophage infection.

  14. Antibodies against invasive phenotype-specific antigens increase Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis translocation across a polarized epithelial cell model and enhance killing by bovine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Everman, Jamie L.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a severe chronic enteritis which affects large populations of ruminants globally. Prevention strategies to combat the spread of Johne's disease among cattle herds involve adhering to strict calving practices to ensure young susceptible animals do not come in contact with MAP-contaminated colostrum, milk, or fecal material. Unfortunately, the current vaccination options available are associated with high cost and suboptimal efficacy. To more successfully combat the spread of Johne's disease to young calves, an efficient method of protection is needed. In this study, we examined passive immunization as a mode of introducing protective antibodies against MAP to prevent the passage of the bacterium to young animals via colostrum and milk. Utilizing the infectious MAP phenotype developed after bacterial exposure to milk, we demonstrate that in vitro opsonization with serum from Johne's-positive cattle results in enhanced translocation across a bovine MDBK polarized epithelial cell monolayer. Furthermore, immune serum opsonization of MAP results in a rapid host cell-mediated killing by bovine macrophages in an oxidative-, nitrosative-, and extracellular DNA trap-independent manner. This study illustrates that antibody opsonization of MAP expressing an infectious phenotype leads to the killing of the bacterium during the initial stage of macrophage infection. PMID:26301206

  15. Antibodies against invasive phenotype-specific antigens increase Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis translocation across a polarized epithelial cell model and enhance killing by bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Everman, Jamie L; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a severe chronic enteritis which affects large populations of ruminants globally. Prevention strategies to combat the spread of Johne's disease among cattle herds involve adhering to strict calving practices to ensure young susceptible animals do not come in contact with MAP-contaminated colostrum, milk, or fecal material. Unfortunately, the current vaccination options available are associated with high cost and suboptimal efficacy. To more successfully combat the spread of Johne's disease to young calves, an efficient method of protection is needed. In this study, we examined passive immunization as a mode of introducing protective antibodies against MAP to prevent the passage of the bacterium to young animals via colostrum and milk. Utilizing the infectious MAP phenotype developed after bacterial exposure to milk, we demonstrate that in vitro opsonization with serum from Johne's-positive cattle results in enhanced translocation across a bovine MDBK polarized epithelial cell monolayer. Furthermore, immune serum opsonization of MAP results in a rapid host cell-mediated killing by bovine macrophages in an oxidative-, nitrosative-, and extracellular DNA trap-independent manner. This study illustrates that antibody opsonization of MAP expressing an infectious phenotype leads to the killing of the bacterium during the initial stage of macrophage infection. PMID:26301206

  16. The toxicity of bovine α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells is highly dependent on oleic acid and induces killing in cancer cell lines and noncancer-derived primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Christel Rothe; Heegaard, Christian Würtz; Petersen, Torben Ellebæk; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-01

    A complex between α-lactalbumin and oleic acid (C18:1, 9 cis) has been reported to be cytotoxic to cancer cells. We have prepared such complexes and tested their activity against both cancer cell lines and noncancer-derived primary cells. Unexpectedly, some primary cell types were more sensitive to treatment than cancer cell lines. We found the complex to be cytotoxic to all of the tested cells, with a 46-fold difference between the most sensitive and the least sensitive cell type. Oleic acid by itself exhibited a remarkably similar activity. The cell-killing mechanisms of the complex and of oleic acid alone were examined by flow cytometry, testing for apoptosis- and necrosis- inducing activity. The T-cell leukemia-derived Jurkat cells primarily underwent cell death resembling apoptosis, whereas the monocytic leukemia-derived THP1 cells adopted a more necrotic-like cell death. Erythrocytes were sensitive to lysis by the complex and oleic acid. We conclude that oleic acid is cytotoxic by itself and that, in contrast to the literature, a complex of α-lactalbumin and oleic acid has cytotoxic activity against primary cells, as well as cancer cells.

  17. Mechanisms of Bacterial (Serratia marcescens) Attachment to, Migration along, and Killing of Fungal Hyphae.

    PubMed

    Hover, Tal; Maya, Tal; Ron, Sapir; Sandovsky, Hani; Shadkchan, Yana; Kijner, Nitzan; Mitiagin, Yulia; Fichtman, Boris; Harel, Amnon; Shanks, Robert M Q; Bruna, Roberto E; García-Véscovi, Eleonora; Osherov, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We have found a remarkable capacity for the ubiquitous Gram-negative rod bacterium Serratia marcescens to migrate along and kill the mycelia of zygomycete molds. This migration was restricted to zygomycete molds and several basidiomycete species. No migration was seen on any molds of the phylum Ascomycota. S. marcescens migration did not require fungal viability or surrounding growth medium, as bacteria migrated along aerial hyphae as well.S. marcescens did not exhibit growth tropism toward zygomycete mycelium. Bacterial migration along hyphae proceeded only when the hyphae grew into the bacterial colony. S. marcescens cells initially migrated along the hyphae, forming attached microcolonies that grew and coalesced to generate a biofilm that covered and killed the mycelium. Flagellum-defective strains of S. marcescens were able to migrate along zygomycete hyphae, although they were significantly slower than the wild-type strain and were delayed in fungal killing. Bacterial attachment to the mycelium does not necessitate type 1 fimbrial adhesion, since mutants defective in this adhesin migrated equally well as or faster than the wild-type strain. Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which S. marcescens binds to, spreads on, and kills fungal hyphae might serve as an excellent model system for such interactions in general; fungal killing could be employed in agricultural fungal biocontrol.

  18. Mechanisms of Bacterial (Serratia marcescens) Attachment to, Migration along, and Killing of Fungal Hyphae

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Tal; Maya, Tal; Ron, Sapir; Sandovsky, Hani; Shadkchan, Yana; Kijner, Nitzan; Mitiagin, Yulia; Fichtman, Boris; Harel, Amnon; Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Bruna, Roberto E.; García-Véscovi, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    We have found a remarkable capacity for the ubiquitous Gram-negative rod bacterium Serratia marcescens to migrate along and kill the mycelia of zygomycete molds. This migration was restricted to zygomycete molds and several basidiomycete species. No migration was seen on any molds of the phylum Ascomycota. S. marcescens migration did not require fungal viability or surrounding growth medium, as bacteria migrated along aerial hyphae as well. S. marcescens did not exhibit growth tropism toward zygomycete mycelium. Bacterial migration along hyphae proceeded only when the hyphae grew into the bacterial colony. S. marcescens cells initially migrated along the hyphae, forming attached microcolonies that grew and coalesced to generate a biofilm that covered and killed the mycelium. Flagellum-defective strains of S. marcescens were able to migrate along zygomycete hyphae, although they were significantly slower than the wild-type strain and were delayed in fungal killing. Bacterial attachment to the mycelium does not necessitate type 1 fimbrial adhesion, since mutants defective in this adhesin migrated equally well as or faster than the wild-type strain. Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which S. marcescens binds to, spreads on, and kills fungal hyphae might serve as an excellent model system for such interactions in general; fungal killing could be employed in agricultural fungal biocontrol. PMID:26896140

  19. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  20. High viral burden and rapid CD4+ cell depletion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected SCID-hu mice suggest direct viral killing of thymocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, B D; Uittenbogaart, C H; Schmid, I; Zack, J A

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of CD4+ cell loss in lymphoid organs is unknown. In this study, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of human fetal thymus/liver implants in severe combined immunodeficient mice was used to investigate the mechanism of HIV-induced depletion of CD4-bearing cells in vivo. The implants were assessed for depletion of CD4+ thymocytes, apoptosis, and viral burden. We detected two phases of CD4 cell depletion, an initial rapid phase and a more gradual later phase. Compared to mock-infected implants, HIV-infected implants did not demonstrate detectable increases in the levels of apoptosis while severe depletion of CD4-bearing cells was ongoing. During peak loss of CD4+ cells, high viral burden was observed, suggesting that loss of CD4+ cells in this in vivo system is due to direct killing of infected thymocytes. Increased levels of apoptosis were observed during the later phase of thymocyte depletion; however, these apoptotic cells lacked CD4. This finding suggests that a second indirect mechanism may be responsible for the destruction of CD4- CD8+ thymocytes in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that CD4+ and CD4- cells may die by different mechanism(s). PMID:9343176

  1. Hybrid Theranostic Platform for Second Near-IR Window Light Triggered Selective Two-Photon Imaging and Photothermal Killing of Targeted Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Christine; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Viraka Nellore, Bhanu Priya; Pramanik, Avijit; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Jones, Stacy; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-23

    Despite advances in the medical field, even in the 21st century cancer is one of the leading causes of death for men and women in the world. Since the second near-infrared (NIR) biological window light between 950 and 1350 nm offers highly efficient tissue penetration, the current article reports the development of hybrid theranostic platform using anti-GD2 antibody attached gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) for second near-IR light triggered selective imaging and efficient photothermal therapy of human melanoma cancer cell. Reported results demonstrate that due to strong plasmon-coupling, two-photon luminescence (TPL) intensity from theranostic GNP attached SWCNT materials is 6 orders of magnitude higher than GNP or SWCNT alone. Experimental and FDTD simulation data indicate that the huge enhancement of TPL intensity is mainly due to strong resonance enhancement coupled with the stronger electric field enhancement. Due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic material serves as a local nanoantennae to enhance the photothermal capability via strong optical energy absorption. Reported data show that theranostic SWCNT can be used for selective two-photon imaging of melanoma UACC903 cell using 1100 nm light. Photothermal killing experiment with 1.0 W/cm(2) 980 nm laser light demonstrates that 100% of melanoma UACC903 cells can be killed using theranostic SWCNT bind melanoma cells after just 8 min of exposure. These results demonstrate that due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic GNP attached SWCNT material serves as a two-photon imaging and photothermal source for cancer cells in biological window II.

  2. Hybrid Theranostic Platform for Second Near-IR Window Light Triggered Selective Two-Photon Imaging and Photothermal Killing of Targeted Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Christine; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Viraka Nellore, Bhanu Priya; Pramanik, Avijit; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Jones, Stacy; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-23

    Despite advances in the medical field, even in the 21st century cancer is one of the leading causes of death for men and women in the world. Since the second near-infrared (NIR) biological window light between 950 and 1350 nm offers highly efficient tissue penetration, the current article reports the development of hybrid theranostic platform using anti-GD2 antibody attached gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) for second near-IR light triggered selective imaging and efficient photothermal therapy of human melanoma cancer cell. Reported results demonstrate that due to strong plasmon-coupling, two-photon luminescence (TPL) intensity from theranostic GNP attached SWCNT materials is 6 orders of magnitude higher than GNP or SWCNT alone. Experimental and FDTD simulation data indicate that the huge enhancement of TPL intensity is mainly due to strong resonance enhancement coupled with the stronger electric field enhancement. Due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic material serves as a local nanoantennae to enhance the photothermal capability via strong optical energy absorption. Reported data show that theranostic SWCNT can be used for selective two-photon imaging of melanoma UACC903 cell using 1100 nm light. Photothermal killing experiment with 1.0 W/cm(2) 980 nm laser light demonstrates that 100% of melanoma UACC903 cells can be killed using theranostic SWCNT bind melanoma cells after just 8 min of exposure. These results demonstrate that due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic GNP attached SWCNT material serves as a two-photon imaging and photothermal source for cancer cells in biological window II. PMID:26327304

  3. Safety of the Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit, Killed Whole-Cell (rBS-WC) Oral Cholera Vaccine in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Ramadhan; Khatib, Ahmed M.; Enwere, Godwin; Park, Jin Kyung; Reyburn, Rita; Ali, Mohammad; Chang, Na Yoon; Kim, Deok Ryun; Ley, Benedikt; Thriemer, Kamala; Lopez, Anna Lena; Clemens, John D.; Deen, Jacqueline L.; Shin, Sunheang; Schaetti, Christian; Hutubessy, Raymond; Aguado, Maria Teresa; Kieny, Marie Paule; Sack, David; Obaro, Stephen; Shaame, Attiye J.; Ali, Said M.; Saleh, Abdul A.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Jiddawi, Mohamed S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mass vaccinations are a main strategy in the deployment of oral cholera vaccines. Campaigns avoid giving vaccine to pregnant women because of the absence of safety data of the killed whole-cell oral cholera (rBS-WC) vaccine. Balancing this concern is the known higher risk of cholera and of complications of pregnancy should cholera occur in these women, as well as the lack of expected adverse events from a killed oral bacterial vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings From January to February 2009, a mass rBS-WC vaccination campaign of persons over two years of age was conducted in an urban and a rural area (population 51,151) in Zanzibar. Pregnant women were advised not to participate in the campaign. More than nine months after the last dose of the vaccine was administered, we visited all women between 15 and 50 years of age living in the study area. The outcome of pregnancies that were inadvertently exposed to at least one oral cholera vaccine dose and those that were not exposed was evaluated. 13,736 (94%) of the target women in the study site were interviewed. 1,151 (79%) of the 1,453 deliveries in 2009 occurred during the period when foetal exposure to the vaccine could have occurred. 955 (83%) out of these 1,151 mothers had not been vaccinated; the remaining 196 (17%) mothers had received at least one dose of the oral cholera vaccine. There were no statistically significant differences in the odds ratios for birth outcomes among the exposed and unexposed pregnancies. Conclusions/Significance We found no statistically significant evidence of a harmful effect of gestational exposure to the rBS-WC vaccine. These findings, along with the absence of a rational basis for expecting a risk from this killed oral bacterial vaccine, are reassuring but the study had insufficient power to detect infrequent events. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00709410 PMID:22848772

  4. Streptococcus uberis-specific T cells are present in mammary gland secretions of cows and can be activated to kill S. uberis.

    PubMed

    Denis, Michel; Lacy-Hulbert, S Jane; Buddle, Bryce M; Williamson, John H; Wedlock, D Neil

    2011-03-01

    The presence, phenotype and function of Streptococcus uberis-specific T cells in the mammary gland secretion (MGS) and blood of cows exposed to S. uberis were assessed. MGS T cells in the udder were purified and incubated with autologous blood monocytes as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Most cows, irrespective of prior S. uberis infection status and lactation status, were shown to have S. uberis-specific T cells both in MGS and in the blood. When cells from a subgroup of cows were studied, it was found that the S. uberis-specific T cells produced high levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), but low levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10). A high percentage of responding T cells were of the CD8(+) memory (CD45RO) subset. T cells from the MGS specific for S. uberis were propagated from animals during the drying off period and expanded in vitro using interleukin-2 (IL-2) and S. uberis antigens. This led to the accumulation of T cells of the CD8(+) subset bearing memory cell markers (CD45A(-), CD45RO(+)), which released high levels of IFN-γ. Four of the five T cell lines derived from the MGS of three animals had substantial direct killing activity towards S. uberis in vitro. It is concluded that there is an emergence of S. uberis-specific bactericidal T cells in the MGS of cows after infection or environmental exposure to S. uberis. Vaccines aimed at activating and expanding this T cell population in the mammary glands of cattle may offer an avenue for the prevention of mastitis caused by S. uberis.

  5. Microchip-Based Single-Cell Imaging Reveals That CD56dimCD57-KIR-NKG2A+ NK Cells Have More Dynamic Migration Associated with Increased Target Cell Conjugation and Probability of Killing Compared to CD56dimCD57-KIR-NKG2A- NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Elin; Sohlberg, Ebba; Enqvist, Monika; Olofsson, Per E; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Önfelt, Björn

    2015-10-01

    NK cells are functionally educated by self-MHC specific receptors, including the inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and the lectin-like CD94/NKG2A heterodimer. Little is known about how NK cell education influences qualitative aspects of cytotoxicity such as migration behavior and efficacy of activation and killing at the single-cell level. In this study, we have compared the behavior of FACS-sorted CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(+) (NKG2A(+)) and CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(-) (lacking inhibitory receptors; IR(-)) human NK cells by quantifying migration, cytotoxicity, and contact dynamics using microchip-based live cell imaging. NKG2A(+) NK cells displayed a more dynamic migration behavior and made more contacts with target cells than IR(-) NK cells. NKG2A(+) NK cells also more frequently killed the target cells once a conjugate had been formed. NK cells with serial killing capacity were primarily found among NKG2A(+) NK cells. Conjugates involving IR(-) NK cells were generally more short-lived and IR(-) NK cells did not become activated to the same extent as NKG2A(+) NK cells when in contact with target cells, as evident by their reduced spreading response. In contrast, NKG2A(+) and IR(-) NK cells showed similar dynamics in terms of duration of conjugation periods and NK cell spreading response in conjugates that led to killing. Taken together, these observations suggest that the high killing capacity of NKG2A(+) NK cells is linked to processes regulating events in the recognition phase of NK-target cell contact rather than events after cytotoxicity has been triggered. PMID:26320254

  6. Microchip-Based Single-Cell Imaging Reveals That CD56dimCD57-KIR-NKG2A+ NK Cells Have More Dynamic Migration Associated with Increased Target Cell Conjugation and Probability of Killing Compared to CD56dimCD57-KIR-NKG2A- NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Elin; Sohlberg, Ebba; Enqvist, Monika; Olofsson, Per E; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Önfelt, Björn

    2015-10-01

    NK cells are functionally educated by self-MHC specific receptors, including the inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and the lectin-like CD94/NKG2A heterodimer. Little is known about how NK cell education influences qualitative aspects of cytotoxicity such as migration behavior and efficacy of activation and killing at the single-cell level. In this study, we have compared the behavior of FACS-sorted CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(+) (NKG2A(+)) and CD56(dim)CD57(-)KIR(-)NKG2A(-) (lacking inhibitory receptors; IR(-)) human NK cells by quantifying migration, cytotoxicity, and contact dynamics using microchip-based live cell imaging. NKG2A(+) NK cells displayed a more dynamic migration behavior and made more contacts with target cells than IR(-) NK cells. NKG2A(+) NK cells also more frequently killed the target cells once a conjugate had been formed. NK cells with serial killing capacity were primarily found among NKG2A(+) NK cells. Conjugates involving IR(-) NK cells were generally more short-lived and IR(-) NK cells did not become activated to the same extent as NKG2A(+) NK cells when in contact with target cells, as evident by their reduced spreading response. In contrast, NKG2A(+) and IR(-) NK cells showed similar dynamics in terms of duration of conjugation periods and NK cell spreading response in conjugates that led to killing. Taken together, these observations suggest that the high killing capacity of NKG2A(+) NK cells is linked to processes regulating events in the recognition phase of NK-target cell contact rather than events after cytotoxicity has been triggered.

  7. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  8. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE PAGES

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  9. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-10-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  10. Modeling the Effects of Vorinostat In Vivo Reveals both Transient and Delayed HIV Transcriptional Activation and Minimal Killing of Latently Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Furthermore, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo. PMID:26496627

  11. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  12. [MIP-1α promotes the migration ability of Jurkat cell through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yi-Yang; Song, Qian; Hao, Yi-Wen

    2014-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia resulting from brain metastasis of human acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) cells and the role of MIP-1α in migration of Jurkat cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). The real-time PCR, siRNA test, transendothelial migration test, endothelial permeability assay and cell adhesion assay were used to detect MIP-1α expression, penetration and migration ability as well as adhesion capability respectively. The results showed that the MIP-1α expression in Jurkat cells was higher than that in normal T cells and CCRF-HSB2, CCRF-CEM , SUP-T1 cells. The MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells enhanced the ability of Jurkat cells to penetrate through HBMEC, the ability of Jurkat cells treated by MIP-1α siRNA to adhere to HBMEC and to migrate trans endothelial cells decreased. It is concluded that the MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells participates in process of penetrating the Jurkat cells through HBMEC monolayer.

  13. Apoptotic Killing of Breast Cancer Cells by IgYs Produced Against a Small 21 Aminoacid Epitope of the Human TRAIL-2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Amirijavid1, Shaghayegh; Entezari, Maliheh; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Mosavi-Jarahi, Alireza; Dehghani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    TRAIL, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand belongs to one of important cytokine superfamilIES, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) . TRAIL-2 receptor agonists activate several cell signaling pathways in cells in different manners and could lead to apoptosis or necrosis. Agonistic egg yolk antibodies like IgY which have been developed in a selective manner could activate TRAIL death receptors such as TRAIL-2 (DR5) and thus apoptosis signaling. We here investigated induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cells (MCF7 cell line) by an IgY produced against an 21 aminoacid epitope of the human TRAIL-2 receptor. As the first step a small peptide of 21 aminoacids choosen from the extracellular domain of DR5 protein was produced with a peptide synthesizer. After control assays and confirmation of the correct amino acid sequence, it was injected to hens immunized to achieve high affinity IgYs. At the next step, the produced IgYs were extracted and examined for specificity against DR5 protein by ELISA assay. Subsequently, the anticancer effect of such IgYs was determined by MTT assay in the MCF7 human breast cancer cell line. The produced peptides successfully immunized hens and the produced antibodies which accumulated in egg yolk specifically recognized the DR5 protein. IgYs exerted significant toxicity and killed MCF7 cells as shown by MTT assay. PMID:27165241

  14. Enhanced killing of breast cancer cells by a d-amino acid analog of the winter flounder-derived pleurocidin NRC-03.

    PubMed

    Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Pinto, Devanand M; Hancock, Robert E W; Hoskin, David W

    2015-12-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) defend against pathogens and, in some cases, exhibit potent anticancer activities. We previously reported that the pleurocidin NRC-03 causes lysis of breast cancer and multiple myeloma cells. NRC-03 also reduces the EC50 of other cytotoxic compounds and prevents tumor growth in vivo. However, the therapeutic utility of NRC-03 may be limited by its susceptibility to degradation by proteases. The goal of this study was to characterize the anticancer activities of a d-amino acid analog of NRC-03 ([D]-NRC-03) that was predicted to be resistant to proteolytic degradation. Unlike NRC-03, [D]-NRC-03 was not degraded by human serum or trypsin and, in comparison to NRC-03, showed increased killing of breast cancer cells, including multidrug-resistant cells; however, [D]-NRC-03 was somewhat more cytotoxic than NRC-03 for several types of normal cells. Importantly, [D]-NRC-03 was more effective than NRC-03 in vivo since 4-fold less peptide was required for an equivalent inhibitory effect on the growth of breast cancer cell xenografts in immune-deficient mice. These findings demonstrate that a d-amino acid analog of NRC-03 overcomes a major limitation to the therapeutic use of NRC-03, namely peptide stability. Further modification of [D]-NRC-03 is required to improve its selectivity for cancer cells.

  15. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  16. Effect of Bisphenol A on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Yuan-Zhen; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Teng; Qu, Xin-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a kind of environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) that interfere embryo implantation. Trophoblast invasion plays a crucial role during embryo implantation. In this study, the effects of BPA on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo and its possible mechanism were investigated. BeWo cells were exposed to BPA and co-cultured with human endometrial cells to mimic embryo implantation in transwell model. The proliferation and invasion capability of BeWo cells were detected. The expression of E-cadherin, DNMT1, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were also analyzed. The results showed that the invasion capability of BeWo was reduced after daily exposure to BPA. BPA had biphasic effect on E-cadherin expression level in BeWo cells and expression level of DNMT1 was decreased when treated with BPA. Moreover, BPA treatment also changed the balance of MMPs/TIMPs in BeWo cells by down-regulating MMP-2, MMP-9 and up-regulating TIMP-1, TIMP-2 with increasing BPA concentration. Taken together, these results showed that BPA treatment could reduce the invasion ability of BeWo cells and alter the expression level of E-cadherin, DNMT1, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Our study would help us to understand the possible mechanism of BPA effect on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo. PMID:26823751

  17. Enhanced binding and killing of target tumor cells by drug-loaded liposomes modified with tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; D’Souza, Gerard GM; Bedi, Deepa; Fagbohun, Olusegun A; Potturi, L Prasanna; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Aim To explore cancer cell-specific phage fusion pVIII coat protein, identified using phage display, for targeted delivery of drug-loaded liposomes to MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Material & methods An 8-mer landscape library f8/8 and a biopanning protocol against MCF-7 cells were used to select a landscape phage protein bearing MCF-7-specific peptide. Size and morphology of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes modified with the tumor-specific phage fusion coat protein (phage–Doxil) were determined by dynamic light scattering and freeze-fraction electron microscopy. Topology of the phage protein in liposomes was examined by western blot. Association of phage–Doxil with MCF-7 cells was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrometry. Selective targeting to MCF-7 was shown by FACS using a coculture model with target and nontarget cells. Phage–Doxil-induced tumor cell killing and apoptosis were confirmed by CellTiter-Blue® Assay and caspase-3/CPP32 fluorometric assay. Results A chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 cells, identified from a phage landscape library, was directly incorporated into the liposomal bilayer of doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®) without additional conjugation with lipophilic moieties. Western blotting confirmed the presence of both targeting peptide and pVIII coat protein in the phage–Doxil, which maintained the liposomal morphology and retained a substantial part of the incorporated drug after phage protein incorporation. The binding activity of the phage fusion pVIII coat protein was retained after incorporation into liposomes, and phage–Doxil strongly and specifically targeted MCF-7 cells, demonstrating significantly increased cytotoxicity towards target cells in vitro. Conclusion We present a novel and straightforward method for making tumor-targeted nanomedicines by anchoring specific phage proteins (substitute antibodies) on their surface. PMID:20528452

  18. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein.

    PubMed

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Agerstam, Helena; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Rissler, Marianne; Lassen, Carin; Olofsson, Tor; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Richter, Johan; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-09-14

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34(+) cells and also in cord blood CD34(+) cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test whether IL1RAP expression distinguishes normal (Ph(-)) and leukemic (Ph(+)) cells within the CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cell compartment, we established a unique protocol for conducting FISH on small numbers of sorted cells. By using this method, we sorted cells directly into drops on slides to investigate their Ph-chromosome status. Interestingly, we found that the CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(+) cells were Ph(+), whereas CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(-) cells were almost exclusively Ph(-). By performing long-term culture-initiating cell assays on the two cell populations, we found that Ph(+) and Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells could be prospectively separated. In addition, by generating an anti-IL1RAP antibody, we provide proof of concept that IL1RAP can be used as a target on CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This study thus identifies IL1RAP as a unique cell surface biomarker distinguishing Ph(+) from Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells and opens up a previously unexplored avenue for therapy of CML. PMID:20805474

  19. Biology of cell killing by 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosin