Science.gov

Sample records for cell line proteome

  1. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yikwon; Han, Dohyun; Min, Hophil; Jin, Jonghwa; Yi, Eugene C.; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most fatal cancers and is associated with limited diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Currently, gemcitabine is the only effective drug and represents the preferred first-line treatment for chemotherapy. However, a high level of intrinsic or acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer to gemcitabine can contribute to the failure of gemcitabine treatment. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer, we performed label-free quantification of protein expression in intrinsic gemcitabine-resistant and - sensitive human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines using our improved proteomic strategy, combined with filter-aided sample preparation, single-shot liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, enhanced spectral counting, and a statistical method based on a power law global error model. We identified 1931 proteins and quantified 787 differentially expressed proteins in the BxPC3, PANC-1, and HPDE cell lines. Bioinformatics analysis identified 15 epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and 13 EMT-related proteins that were closely associated with drug resistance were differentially expressed. Interestingly, 8 of these proteins were involved in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism. These results suggest that proteins related to the EMT and glutathione metabolism play important roles in the development of intrinsic gemcitabine resistance by pancreatic cancer cell lines. PMID:25518923

  2. Multiplexed Quantitative Proteomics for High-Throughput Comprehensive Proteome Comparisons of Human Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Amanda; Haas, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    The proteome is the functional entity of the cell, and perturbations of a cellular system almost always cause changes in the proteome. These changes are a molecular fingerprint, allowing characterization and a greater understanding of the effect of the perturbation on the cell as a whole. Monitoring these changes has therefore given great insight into cellular responses to stress and disease states, and analytical platforms to comprehensively analyze the proteome are thus extremely important tools in biological research. Mass spectrometry has evolved as the most relevant technology to characterize proteomes in a comprehensive way. However, due to a lack of throughput capacity of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, researchers frequently use measurement of mRNA levels to approximate proteome changes. Growing evidence of substantial differences between mRNA and protein levels as well as recent improvements in mass spectrometry-based proteomics are heralding an increased use of mass spectrometry for comprehensive proteome mapping. Here we describe the use of multiplexed quantitative proteomics using isobaric labeling with tandem mass tags (TMT) for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of five cancer cell proteomes in biological duplicates in one mass spectrometry experiment.

  3. Current status of publicly available sarcoma cell lines for use in proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoqing; Yoshida, Akihiko; Kawai, Akira; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Cell lines are valuable resources for proteomic studies and can be used as tools to verify the significance of proteomic findings. Here, the authors overview the current status of the publicly available sarcoma cell lines. The authors surveyed seven major cell banks and found that the diversity observed in the sarcoma cell banks was largely insufficient; sarcoma cell lines are available for only a limited histological subtype. They also observed a number of issues with the pathological diagnosis of the cell lines, limitations in their behavioral diversity, and various unmet needs. Well characterized cell lines with accurate diagnosis based on modern diagnosis criteria should be available from public cell banks. The authors conclude that additional cell lines, along with detailed genetic and pathological analyses, should be prepared and deposited in order to promote sarcoma-specific proteomic research. The authors focused on sarcoma cell lines, but their discussion can be applied to the other cancers.

  4. Integrative proteomic profiling of ovarian cancer cell lines reveals precursor cell associated proteins and functional status

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, F.; Watters, K. M.; Curtis, M.; Eckert, M. A.; Chiang, C. Y.; Tyanova, S.; Montag, A.; Lastra, R. R.; Lengyel, E.; Mann, M.

    2016-01-01

    A cell line representative of human high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) should not only resemble its tumour of origin at the molecular level, but also demonstrate functional utility in pre-clinical investigations. Here, we report the integrated proteomic analysis of 26 ovarian cancer cell lines, HGSOC tumours, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells and fallopian tube epithelial cells via a single-run mass spectrometric workflow. The in-depth quantification of >10,000 proteins results in three distinct cell line categories: epithelial (group I), clear cell (group II) and mesenchymal (group III). We identify a 67-protein cell line signature, which separates our entire proteomic data set, as well as a confirmatory publicly available CPTAC/TCGA tumour proteome data set, into a predominantly epithelial and mesenchymal HGSOC tumour cluster. This proteomics-based epithelial/mesenchymal stratification of cell lines and human tumours indicates a possible origin of HGSOC either from the fallopian tube or from the ovarian surface epithelium. PMID:27561551

  5. Lessons from the hamster: Cricetulus griseus tissue and CHO cell line proteome comparison.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Kelley M; Hizal, Deniz Baycin; Yerganian, George S; Kumar, Amit; Can, Özge; O'Meally, Robert N; Cole, Robert; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Wu, Herren; Bowen, Michael A; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2017-09-06

    Chinese hamster ovary cells represent the dominant host for therapeutic recombinant protein production. However, few large-scale datasets have been generated to characterize this host organism and derived CHO cell lines at the proteomics level. Consequently, an extensive label-free quantitative proteomics analysis of two cell lines (CHO-S and CHO DG44) and two Chinese hamster tissues (liver and ovary) was used to identify a total of 11801 unique proteins containing at least two unique peptides. 9359 unique proteins were identified specifically in the cell lines, representing a 56% increase over previous work. Additionally, 6663 unique proteins were identified across liver and ovary tissues providing the first Chinese hamster tissue proteome. Protein expression was more conserved within cell lines during both growth phases than across cell lines, suggesting large genetic differences across cell lines. Overall, both gene ontology and KEGG pathway analysis revealed enrichment of cell cycle activity in cells. In contrast, upregulated molecular functions in tissue include glycosylation and lipid transporter activity. Furthermore, cellular components including Golgi apparatus are upregulated in both tissues. In conclusion, this large-scale proteomics analysis enables us to delineate specific changes between tissues and cells derived from these tissues, which can help explain specific tissue function and the adaptations cells incur for applications in biopharmaceutical productions.

  6. Deep proteome and transcriptome mapping of a human cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Wisniewski, Jacek R; Geiger, Tamar; Cox, Juergen; Kircher, Martin; Kelso, Janet; Pääbo, Svante; Mann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    While the number and identity of proteins expressed in a single human cell type is currently unknown, this fundamental question can be addressed by advanced mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. Online liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution MS and MS/MS yielded 166 420 peptides with unique amino-acid sequence from HeLa cells. These peptides identified 10 255 different human proteins encoded by 9207 human genes, providing a lower limit on the proteome in this cancer cell line. Deep transcriptome sequencing revealed transcripts for nearly all detected proteins. We calculate copy numbers for the expressed proteins and show that the abundances of >90% of them are within a factor 60 of the median protein expression level. Comparisons of the proteome and the transcriptome, and analysis of protein complex databases and GO categories, suggest that we achieved deep coverage of the functional transcriptome and the proteome of a single cell type. PMID:22068331

  7. Proteomics analysis of MKN45 cell line before and after treatment with Lavender aqueous extract

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Heydari-Kashal, Saeid; Kalantari, Shiva; Dailian, Sona; Zali, Hakimeh

    2012-01-01

    Aim In this study the anticancer activity of Lavender aqueous extract against MKN45 cell line was evaluated. Background Plant-based drugs are regarded as promising therapies. Lavender is a plant that has been cultivated from ancient times. An aqueous extract of Lavender has shown therapeutic effects on the nervous system in the high doses based on in-vivo studies. Gastric cancer is one of the frequent cancers in Iranian population. We therefore assessed the effect of Lavender upon a gastric cancer cell line. Patients and methods The MKN45 cancer cell line was selected for treatment with aqueous extract of Lavender. Survival of MKN45 cell line was studied in the presence of various concentrations of Lavender extract by MTT assay method. Morphological studies were performed via microscopic analyses. Flow cytometry and proteomics techniques were applied to determining pharmaceutical mechanism of lavender cytotoxic effects. Results The survival and morphological studies revealed anticancer characteristics of extract. Flow cytometry findings indicate that Lavender extract had a cytotoxic effect upon the cell line. Proteomics analysis identified a significant alternation in gastric cellular proteome expression after treating with the extract. Among 1000 spots, more than 700 spots showed changes in protein expression levels by informatics analysis. Of these proteins, expression of three cancer biomarkers, Annexin1, Anolase1 and HSP70 were suppressed by extract. Conclusion This study suggests that Lavender extract is cytotoxic and alter protein expression in a gastric cancer cell line. PMID:24834196

  8. A quantitative proteomics-based signature of platinum sensitivity in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Fu, Cexiong; Pappin, Darryl J.; Lucito, Robert; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Su, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Although DNA encodes the molecular instructions that underlie control of cell function, it is the proteins that are primarily responsible for implementing those instructions. Therefore, quantitative analyses of the proteome would be expected to yield insights into important candidates for the detection and treatment of disease. We present an iTRAQ (Isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification)-based proteomic analysis of 10 ovarian cancer cell lines and 2 normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. We profiled the abundance of 2659 cellular proteins, of which 1273 were common to all 12 cell lines. Of the 1273, 75 proteins exhibited elevated expression, and 164 proteins had diminished expression in the cancerous cells compared to the normal cell lines. The iTRAQ expression profiles allowed us to segregate cell lines based upon sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin. Importantly, we observed no substantial correlation between protein abundance and RNA expression or epigenetic, DNA methylation data. Furthermore, we could not discriminate between sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin on the basis of RNA expression and DNA methylation data alone. This study illustrates the importance of proteomics-based discovery for defining the basis for the carboplatin response in ovarian cancer and highlights candidate proteins, particularly involved in cellular redox regulation, homologous recombination and DNA damage repair, that otherwise could not have been predicted from whole genome and expression data sources alone. PMID:25406946

  9. Proteome profiling of human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line TOV-112D.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Gagné, Pierre; Hunter, Joanna M; Bonicalzi, Marie-Eve; Lemay, Jean-François; Kelly, Isabelle; Le Page, Cécile; Provencher, Diane; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Droit, Amaud; Bourgais, David; Poirier, Guy G

    2005-07-01

    A proteome profiling of the epithelial ovarian cancer cell line TOV-112D was initiated as a protein expression reference in the study of ovarian cancer. Two complementary proteomic approaches were used in order to maximise protein identification: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) protein separation coupled to matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and one-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1DE) coupled to liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS). One hundred and seventy-two proteins have been identified among 288 spots selected on two-dimensional gels and a total of 579 proteins were identified with the 1DE LC MS/MS approach. This proteome profiling covers a wide range of protein expression and identifies several proteins known for their oncogenic properties. Bioinformatics tools were used to mine databases in order to determine whether the identified proteins have previously been implicated in pathways associated with carcinogenesis or cell proliferation. Indeed, several of the proteins have been reported to be specific ovarian cancer markers while others are common to many tumorigenic tissues or proliferating cells. The diversity of proteins found and their association with known oncogenic pathways validate this proteomic approach. The proteome 2D map of the TOV-112D cell line will provide a valuable resource in studies on differential protein expression of human ovarian carcinomas while the 1DE LC MS/MS approach gives a picture of the actual protein profile of the TOV-112D cell line. This work represents one of the most complete ovarian protein expression analysis reports to date and the first comparative study of gene expression profiling and proteomic patterns in ovarian cancer.

  10. Protein expression in a transformed trabecular meshwork cell line: proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Steely, H Thomas; Dillow, Glen W; Bian, Liangqian; Grundstad, Jason; Braun, Terry A; Casavant, Thomas L; McCartney, Mitchell D; Clark, Abbot F

    2006-04-18

    Characterization of the human trabecular meshwork (TM) proteome is hindered by the small mass of intact tissue and the slow growth of cultured cell strains. We have previously characterized a transformed TM cell strain (GTM3) that demonstrates many of the same protein expression and cell signaling systems of nontransformed cell strains. The aim of this study was to initiate a proteomic survey of GTM3 cells as the initial step toward characterization of the complete human TM proteome. GTM3 cells were cultured to confluence, harvested and solubilized in urea/Nonidet. The protein extract (600 mug) was focused in immobilized isoelectric focusing (IEF) strips, separated by 10% SDS PAGE, and visualized with colloidal Coomassie Blue. Spots of interest were excised, destained, and the contained proteins subjected to in-gel reduction, derivatization, and tryptic digestion. Tryptic peptides were extracted and analyzed by electrospray LC/MS/MS. Protein identification was made using the TurboSequest search algorithm and a recent version of the nonredundant human protein database downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Eighty-seven (87) primary proteins and 93 variants of these proteins were identified. A website was created (TM proteome) that combines data such as graphic spot location within the gel, peptide sequence, apparent and calculated pI, apparent and calculated mass, percentage of coverage, and protein informatic website links. Proteomic analysis of a transformed human TM cell line has been initiated combining preparative two-dimensional PAGE separation, LC/MS/MS analysis of major proteins, and bioinformatic cataloging of the data. Further investigation of data from the transformed cell strain will be used in a comparative fashion for spot identification of analytical proteomic gels of human TM tissue and cultured normal cells. These initial data will form the base from which the characterization of protein expression in the normal

  11. Quantitative analysis of cellular proteome alterations in human influenza A virus-infected mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vester, Diana; Rapp, Erdmann; Gade, Dörte; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2009-06-01

    Over the last years virus-host cell interactions were investigated in numerous studies. Viral strategies for evasion of innate immune response, inhibition of cellular protein synthesis and permission of viral RNA and protein production were disclosed. With quantitative proteome technology, comprehensive studies concerning the impact of viruses on the cellular machinery of their host cells at protein level are possible. Therefore, 2-D DIGE and nanoHPLC-nanoESI-MS/MS analysis were used to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the dynamic cellular proteome responses of two mammalian cell lines to human influenza A virus infection. A cell line used for vaccine production (MDCK) was compared with a human lung carcinoma cell line (A549) as a reference model. Analyzing 2-D gels of the proteomes of uninfected and influenza-infected host cells, 16 quantitatively altered protein spots (at least +/-1.7-fold change in relative abundance, p<0.001) were identified for both cell lines. Most significant changes were found for keratins, major components of the cytoskeleton system, and for Mx proteins, interferon-induced key components of the host cell defense. Time series analysis of infection processes allowed the identification of further proteins that are described to be involved in protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis events. Most likely, these proteins are required for supporting functions during influenza viral life cycle or host cell stress response. Quantitative proteome-wide profiling of virus infection can provide insights into complexity and dynamics of virus-host cell interactions and may accelerate antiviral research and support optimization of vaccine manufacturing processes.

  12. Integration of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data Sets for the Analysis of a Lymphoma B-Cell Line in the Context of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; Droste, Conrad; Dégano, Rosa M; González-Muñoz, María; Ibarrola, Nieves; Pérez-Andrés, Martín; Garin-Muga, Alba; Segura, Víctor; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; LaBaer, Joshua; Orfao, Alberto; Corrales, Fernando J; De Las Rivas, Javier; Fuentes, Manuel

    2015-09-04

    A comprehensive study of the molecular active landscape of human cells can be undertaken to integrate two different but complementary perspectives: transcriptomics, and proteomics. After the genome era, proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool to simultaneously identify and characterize the compendium of thousands of different proteins active in a cell. Thus, the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is promoting a full characterization of the human proteome combining high-throughput proteomics with the data derived from genome-wide expression profiling of protein-coding genes. Here we present a full proteomic profiling of a human lymphoma B-cell line (Ramos) performed using a nanoUPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap Velos proteomic platform, combined to an in-depth transcriptomic profiling of the same cell type. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001933. Integration of the proteomic and transcriptomic data sets revealed a 94% overlap in the proteins identified by both -omics approaches. Moreover, functional enrichment analysis of the proteomic profiles showed an enrichment of several functions directly related to the biological and morphological characteristics of B-cells. In turn, about 30% of all protein-coding genes present in the whole human genome were identified as being expressed by the Ramos cells (stable average of 30% genes along all the chromosomes), revealing the size of the protein expression-set present in one specific human cell type. Additionally, the identification of missing proteins in our data sets has been reported, highlighting the power of the approach. Also, a comparison between neXtProt and UniProt database searches has been performed. In summary, our transcriptomic and proteomic experimental profiling provided a high coverage report of the expressed proteome from a human lymphoma B-cell type with a clear insight into the biological processes that characterized these cells. In this way, we demonstrated the usefulness of

  13. Analytical constraints for the analysis of human cell line secretomes by shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malard, Véronique; Chardan, Laetitia; Roussi, Stamatiki; Darolles, Carine; Sage, Nicole; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Armengaud, Jean

    2012-01-04

    Human cell line secretome represents a valuable source of therapeutic targets and candidate biomarkers. Secreted proteins found in biological fluids or culture media are by essence highly diluted. Secretome investigation with proteomic approaches is hardly compatible with the high content of proteins found in complete cell culture media. Therefore, many studies are currently done with media containing few or no protein. Such conditions may perturb cell metabolism and proliferation. Here, we compared seventeen different compositions of culture media for the human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Cell viability, proliferation rate and initial protein charge were systematically compared. We have shown that an important difficulty for the proteomic analysis is due to the presence of detergents such as Pluronic F-68 which hinders peptide mass spectrometry. The high glucose containing DMEM medium which is free of proteins was shown to preserve a good viability and proliferation of cells. With this conditioning medium, we identified 81 extracellular proteins in the secretome of BEAS-2B cells. Moreover, to illustrate this approach, we exposed BEAS-2B cells to a low toxic dose of CoCl(2,) and found 24 extracellular proteins modulated by cobalt. This study highlights the possible contribution of such proteomic approach in the field of toxicology.

  14. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic endocrine tumor cell lines treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Daniela; Donadelli, Massimo; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Scarpa, Aldo; Palmieri, Marta; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2007-05-01

    Effects of the histone-deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) on the growth of three different human pancreatic endocrine carcinoma cell lines (CM, BON, and QGP-1) have been assessed via dosage-dependent growth inhibition curves. TSA determined strong inhibition of cell growth with similar IC(50) values for the different cell lines: 80.5 nM (CM), 61.6 nM (BON), and 86 nM (QGP-1), by arresting the cell cycle in G2/M phase and inducing apoptosis. 2DE and nano-RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis revealed 34, 33, and 38 unique proteins differentially expressed after TSA treatment in the CM, BON, and QGP-1 cell lines, respectively. The most important groups of modulated proteins belong to cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis classes (such as peroxiredoxins 1 and 2, the diablo protein, and HSP27). Other proteins pertain to processes such as regulation of gene expression (nucleophosmin, oncoprotein dek), signal transduction (calcium-calmodulin), chromatin, and cytoskeleton organization (calgizzarin, dynein, and lamin), RNA splicing (nucleolin, HNRPC), and protein folding (HSP70). The present data are in agreement with previous proteomic analyses performed on pancreatic ductal carcinoma cell lines (Cecconi, D. et al.., Electrophoresis 2003; Cecconi, D. et al., J. Proteome Res. 2005) and place histone-deacetylases inhibitors among the potentially most powerful drugs for the treatment of pancreatic tumors.

  15. Proteomic analyses of brain tumor cell lines amidst the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Gomez, Joe D.; Hellwinkel, Justin E.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.; Graner, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors such as high grade gliomas are among the deadliest forms of human cancers. The tumor environment is subject to a number of cellular stressors such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation. The persistence of the stressors activates the unfolded proteins response (UPR) and results in global alterations in transcriptional and translational activity of the cell. Although the UPR is known to effect tumorigenesis in some epithelial cancers, relatively little is known about the role of the UPR in brain tumors. Here, we evaluated the changes at the molecular level under homeostatic and stress conditions in two glioma cell lines of differing tumor grade. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified proteins unique to each condition (unstressed/stressed) and within each cell line (U87MG and UPN933). Comparing the two, we find differences between both the conditions and cell lines indicating a unique profile for each. Finally, we used our proteomic data to identify the predominant pathways within these cells under unstressed and stressed conditions. Numerous predominant pathways are the same in both cell lines, but there are differences in biological and molecular classifications of the identified proteins, including signaling mechanisms, following UPR induction; we see that relatively minimal proteomic alterations can lead to signaling changes that ultimately promote cell survival. PMID:27323862

  16. The proteome profile of the human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line.

    PubMed

    Niforou, Katerina M; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Vougas, Konstantinos; Kittas, Christos; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Tsangaris, George T

    2008-01-01

    The human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line is one of the first generated cell lines and is used in various areas of biomedical research. Knowledge of its protein expression is limited and no comprehensive study on the proteome of this cell line has been reported to date. Proteomics technology was used in order to analyse the proteins of the U2OS cell line. Total protein extracts were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and MALDI--MS-MS following in-gel digestion with trypsin and, finally, protein identification was carried out by peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) and post source decay (PSD), respectively. Approximately 3,000 spots were excised from two 2-DE gels and were analysed, resulting in the identification of 237 different gene products. The majority of the identified proteins were enzymes, regulatory proteins and RNA-associated proteins, while leukocyte markers and oncogenes were also present. Our findings include 11 protooncogenes (FKBP4, SRC8, PSD10, FUBP1, PARK7, NPM, PDIA1, OXRP, SET, TCTP and GRP75) related to the cancerous state of the U2OS cell line. The U2OS 2-DE database provides the basis for future protein studies.

  17. Biological behaviors and proteomics analysis of hybrid cell line EAhy926 and its parent cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ze Jun; Ren, Ya Qiong; Wang, Guo Ping; Song, Qi; Li, Mei; Jiang, Sa Sa; Ning, Tao; Guan, Yong Song; Yang, Jin Liang; Luo, Feng

    2009-02-13

    group, while subcutaneous inflammatory focuses were found in the EAhy926 cells group. Besides, twenty-eight proteins were identified differentially expressed between in EAhy926 cells and in A549 cells by proteomics technologies. As for the biological behaviors, the ability of cell proliferation in Eahy926 cells was similar to that in A549 cells, but the ability in adhesion and migration of Eahy926 cells was higher. In addition, Eahy926 cells had weaker ability in invasion and could not form tumor mass. Furthermore, there were many differently expressed proteins between hybrid cell line Eahy926 cells and A549 cells, which might partly account for some of the differences between their biological behaviors at the molecular level. These results may help to understand the processes of tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, and to search for screening method for more targets for tumor therapy in future.

  18. A comparative proteomics study of a synovial cell line stimulated with TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Morisaka, Hironobu; Takeda, Yumiko; Aoki, Wataru; Kitano, Sachie; Kitano, Masayasu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we used proteomic analysis to determine the protein profile in a synovial cell line, MH7A, established from patients with RA. Proteins were extracted from MH7A cells that were or were not stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and then analyzed on a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a unique long monolithic silica capillary. On the basis of the results of this proteomic analysis, we identified 2650 proteins from untreated MH7A cells and 2688 proteins from MH7A cells stimulated with TNF-α. Next, we selected 269 differentially produced proteins that were detected only under TNF-α stimulation, and classified these proteins by performing gene ontology analysis by using DAVID as a functional annotation tool. In TNF-α-stimulated MH7A cells, we observed substantial production of plasminogen-activator inhibitor 2 and apoptosis-regulating proteins such as BH3-interacting domain death agonist, autophagy protein 5, apolipoprotein E, and caspase-3. These results indicate that the upregulation of plasminogen-activator inhibitor 2 and apoptosis-regulating proteins in synovial cells in response to TNF-α stimulation might represent a predominant factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of RA.

  19. Exome-driven characterization of the cancer cell lines at the proteome level: the NCI-60 case study.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Maria A; Karpov, Dmitry S; Ivanov, Mark V; Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail A; Chernobrovkin, Alexey L; Lobas, Anna A; Lisitsa, Andrey V; Archakov, Alexander I; Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Moshkovskii, Sergei A

    2014-12-05

    Cancer genome deviates significantly from the reference human genome, and thus a search against standard genome databases in cancer cell proteomics fails to identify cancer-specific protein variants. The goal of this Article is to combine high-throughput exome data [Abaan et al. Cancer Res. 2013] and shotgun proteomics analysis [Modhaddas Gholami et al. Cell Rep. 2013] for cancer cell lines from NCI-60 panel to demonstrate further that the cell lines can be effectively recognized using identified variant peptides. To achieve this goal, we generated a database containing mutant protein sequences of NCI-60 panel of cell lines. The proteome data were searched using Mascot and X!Tandem search engines against databases of both reference and mutant protein sequences. The identification quality was further controlled by calculating a fraction of variant peptides encoded by the own exome sequence for each cell line. We found that up to 92.2% peptides identified by both search engines are encoded by the own exome. Further, we used the identified variant peptides for cell line recognition. The results of the study demonstrate that proteome data supported by exome sequence information can be effectively used for distinguishing between different types of cancer cell lines.

  20. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  1. Modulation of proteomic profile in H295R adrenocortical cell line induced by mitotane.

    PubMed

    Stigliano, A; Cerquetti, L; Borro, M; Gentile, G; Bucci, B; Misiti, S; Piergrossi, P; Brunetti, E; Simmaco, M; Toscano, V

    2008-03-01

    Mitotane, 1,1-dichloro-2-(o-chlorophenyl)-2-(p-chloro-phenyl) ethane (o,p'-DDD), is a compound that represents the effective agent in the treatment of the adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC), able to block cortisol synthesis. In this type of cancer, the biological mechanism induced by this treatment remains still unknown. In this study, we have already shown a greater impairment in the first steps of the steroidogenesis and recognized a little effect on cell cycle. We also evaluated the variation of proteomic profile of the H295R ACC cell line, either in total cell extract or in mitochondria-enriched fraction after treatment with mitotane. In total cell extracts, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin II and VI, heat shock protein 27, prohibitin, histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein, and profilin-1 showed a different expression. In the mitochondrial fraction, the following proteins appeared to be down regulated: aldolase A, peroxiredoxin I, heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1, tubulin-beta isoform II, heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, and nucleotide diphosphate kinase, whereas adrenodoxin reductase, cathepsin D, and heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A were positively up-regulated. This study represents the first proteomic study on the mitotane effects on ACC. It permits to identify some protein classes affected by the drug involved in energetic metabolism, stress response, cytoskeleton structure, and tumorigenesis.

  2. Proteomic profiling of a robust Wolbachia infection in an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line

    PubMed Central

    Baldridge, Gerald D; Baldridge, Abigail S; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Higgins, LeeAnn; Markowski, Todd W; Fallon, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis a widespread vertically transmitted intracellular bacterium, provides a tool for insect control through manipulation of host-microbe interactions. We report proteomic characterization of wStr, a Wolbachia strain associated with a strong cytoplasmic incompatibility phenotype in its native host, Laodelphax striatellus. In the Aedes albopictus C/wStr1 mosquito cell line, wStr maintains a robust, persistent infection. MS/MS analyses of gel bands revealed a protein “footprint” dominated by Wolbachia-encoded chaperones, stress response and cell membrane proteins, including the surface antigen WspA, a peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein and a 73 kDa outer membrane protein. Functional classifications and estimated abundance levels of 790 identified proteins suggested that expression, stabilization and secretion of proteins predominate over bacterial genome replication and cell division. High relative abundances of cysteine desulfurase, serine/glycine hydroxymethyl transferase, and components of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in conjunction with above average abundances of glutamate dehydrogenase and proline utilization protein A support Wolbachia genome-based predictions for amino acid metabolism as a primary energy source. wStr expresses 15 Vir proteins of a Type IV secretion system and its transcriptional regulator. Proteomic characterization of a robust insect-associated Wolbachia strain provides baseline information that will inform further development of in vitro protocols for Wolbachia manipulation. PMID:25155417

  3. A proteomic study on a human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 treated with diallyl trisulfide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong Kui; Zhang, Xu Hua; Li, Jian Min; Sun, De Sheng; Yang, Qiang; Diao, Dong Mei

    2009-09-01

    Garlic is generally used as a therapeutic reagent against various diseases, and numerous studies have indicated that garlic and its derivatives can reduce the risk of various types of human cancer. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a major member of garlic derivatives, could inhibit the cell proliferation by triggering either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines as shown in many studies. However, whether DATS has the same effect on human osteosarcoma cells remains unknown. In this study, we have attempted to analyze the effects of DATS on cell proliferation, cell cycle, induction of apoptosis, global protein expression pattern in a human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 cells, and the potential molecular mechanisms of the action of DATS. Saos-2 cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, were treated with or without 25, 50, and 100 micromol/l DATS for various time intervals. The cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis were examined in this study. Then, after treatment with or without 50 micromol/l DATS for 48 h, protein add pattern in Saos-2 cells were systematically studied using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. DATS could inhibit the proliferation of Saos-2 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the percentage of apoptotic cell and cell arrest in G0/G1 phase was also dose-dependent and time-dependent upon DATS treatment. A total of 27 unique proteins in Saos-2 cells, including 18 downregulated proteins and nine upregulated proteins, were detected with significant changes in their expression levels corresponding to DATS administration. Interestingly, almost half of these proteins (13 of 27) are related to either the cell cycle or apoptosis. DATS has the ability to suppress cell proliferation of Saos-2 cells by blocking cell cycle progression and inducing apoptosis in a dose and time-dependent manner. The proteomic results presented, therefore, provide additional support to the hypothesis

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Microvesicles Released by the Human Prostate Cancer Cell Line PC-3

    PubMed Central

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Llorente, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers are invaluable tools for cancer detection, prognosis, and treatment. Recently, microvesicles have appeared as a novel source for cancer biomarkers. We present here the results from a proteomic analysis of microvesicles released to the extracellular environment by the metastatic prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Using nanocapillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry 266 proteins were identified with two or more peptide sequences. Further analysis showed that 16% of the proteins were classified as extracellular and that intracellular proteins were annotated in a variety of locations. Concerning biological processes, the proteins found in PC-3 cell-released microvesicles are mainly involved in transport, cell organization and biogenesis, metabolic process, response to stimulus, and regulation of biological processes. Several of the proteins identified (tetraspanins, annexins, Rab proteins, integrins, heat shock proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, 14–3-3 proteins) have previously been found in microvesicles isolated from other sources. However, some of the proteins seem to be more specific to the vesicular population released by the metastatic prostate cancer PC-3 cell line. Among these proteins are the tetraspanin protein CD151 and the glycoprotein CUB domain-containing protein 1. Interestingly, our results show these proteins are promising biomarkers for prostate cancer and therefore candidates for clinical validation studies in biological fluids. PMID:22457534

  5. Comparative membrane proteomics analyses of breast cancer cell lines to understand the molecular mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenjing; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Mechref, Yehia

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer in women. Breast cancer brain metastasis is currently considered an issue of concern among breast cancer patients. Membrane proteins play important roles in breast cancer brain metastasis, involving cell adhesion and penetration of blood-brain barrier. To understand the mechanism of breast cancer brain metastasis, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed in conjunction with enrichment of membrane proteins to analyze the proteomes from five different breast cancer and a brain cancer cell lines. Quantitative proteomic data of all cell lines were compared with MDA-MB-231BR which is a brain seeking breast cancer cell line, thus representing brain metastasis characteristics. Label-free proteomics of the six cell lines facilitates the identification of 1238 proteins and the quantification of 899 proteins of which more than 70% were membrane proteins. Unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) of the label-free proteomics data resulted in a distinct clustering of cell lines, suggesting quantitative differences in the expression of several proteins among the different cell lines. Unique protein expressions in 231BR were observed for 28 proteins. The up-regulation of STAU1, AT1B3, NPM1, hnRNP Q, and hnRNP K and the down-regulation of TUBB4B and TUBB5 were noted in 231BR relative to 231 (precursor cell lines from which 231BR is derived). These proteins might contribute to the breast cancer brain metastasis. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) supported the great brain metastatic propensity of 231BR and suggested the importance of the up-regulation of integrin proteins and down-regulation of EPHA2 in brain metastasis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of paclitaxel resistance-related proteins in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Hiroya; Sakai, Akiko; Tanaka, Satoru; Kimura, Kosei; Miyamoto, Akiko; Iwamoto, Mitsuhiko; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is widely used to treat various cancers; however, resistance to this drug is a major obstacle to breast cancer chemotherapy. To identify the proteins involved in paclitaxel resistance, the present study compared the proteomes of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and its paclitaxel-resistant subclone MCF-7/PTX. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, 11 upregulated and 12 downregulated proteins were identified in MCF-7/PTX cells compared with the parental cell line. These 23 proteins were functionally classified as stress-induced chaperones, metabolic enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. The anti-apoptotic proteins, stress-70 protein, 78-kD glucose-regulated protein, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (PPIA) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H3, were also upregulated in MCF-7/PTX cells. Notably, knockdown of the stress-response chaperone PPIA using small interfering RNA in MCF-7/PTX cells restored their sensitivity to paclitaxel. These findings indicated that PPIA may have an important role in paclitaxel resistance in MCF-7/PTX cells. PMID:28123557

  7. Metabolic and proteomic study of NS0 myeloma cell line following the adaptation to protein-free medium.

    PubMed

    de la Luz-Hernández, K R; Rojas-del Calvo, L; Rabasa-Legón, Y; Lage-Castellanos, A; Castillo-Vitlloch, A; Díaz, J; Gaskell, S

    2008-07-21

    Proteomics and metabolomics technologies are potentially useful tool for the study of the very complex process of cell adaptation to protein-free medium. In this work, we used the iTRAQ technology to analyze different protein levels in adapted and non-adapted NS0 myeloma cell line. Several proteins with differential expression profile were characterized and quantified. Carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and membrane transport were the principal pathways that change after the adaptation. Changes in lactate production rate with respect to glucose consumption rate were observed according to the changes observed by proteomic.

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of drug sodium iron chlorophyllin addition to Hep 3B cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wenhai; Yang, Fengying; Zhou, Xinwen; Jin, Hong; Yang, Peng-yuan

    2012-09-21

    The human hepatoma 3B cell line was chosen as an experimental model for in vitro test of drug screening. The drugs included chlorophyllin and its derivatives such as fluo-chlorophyllin, sodium copper chlorophyllin, and sodium iron chlorophyllin. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method was used in this study to obtain the primary screening results. The results showed that sodium iron chlorophyllin had the best LC(50) value. Proteomic analysis was then performed for further investigation of the effect of sodium iron chlorophyllin addition to the Hep 3B cell line. The proteins identified from a total protein extract of Hep 3B before and after the drug addition were compared by two-dimensional-gel-electrophoresis. Then 32 three-fold differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS. There are 29 unique proteins among those identified proteins. These proteins include proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), T-complex protein, heterogeneous nuclear protein, nucleophosmin, heat shock protein A5 (HspA5) and peroxiredoxin. HspA5 is one of the proteins which are involved in protecting cancer cells against stress-induced apoptosis in cultured cells, protecting them against apoptosis through various mechanisms. Peroxiredoxin has anti-oxidant function and is related to cell proliferation, and signal transduction. It can protect the oxidation of other proteins. Peroxiredoxin has a close relationship with cancer and can eventually become a disease biomarker. This might help to develop a novel treatment method for carcinoma cancer.

  9. Immunoassay-based proteome profiling of 24 pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Alhamdani, Mohamed Saiel Saeed; Youns, Mahmoud; Buchholz, Malte; Gress, Thomas M; Beckers, Marie-Claire; Maréchal, Daniel; Bauer, Andrea; Schröder, Christoph; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2012-06-27

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancers, with a mortality that is almost identical to incidence. The inability to predict, detect or diagnose the disease early and its resistance to all current treatment modalities but surgery are the prime challenges to changing the devastating prognosis. Also, relatively little is known about pancreatic carcinogenesis. In order to better understand relevant aspects of pathophysiology, differentiation, and transformation, we analysed the cellular proteomes of 24 pancreatic cancer cell lines and two controls using an antibody microarray that targets 741 cancer-related proteins. In this analysis, 72 distinct disease marker proteins were identified that had not been described before. Additionally, categorizing cancer cells in accordance to their original location (primary tumour, liver metastases, or ascites) was made possible. A comparison of the cells' degree of differentiation (well, moderately, or poorly differentiated) resulted in unique marker sets of high relevance. Last, 187 proteins were differentially expressed in primary versus metastatic cancer cells, of which the majority is functionally related to cellular movement.

  10. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQTM quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway AnalysisTM (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of paclitaxel sensitive A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line and its resistant counterpart A549-Taxol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang-Ling; Sha, Hui-Fang; Yang, Xiao-Hua; Bao, Guo-Liang; Lu, Jing; Xie, Yin-Yin

    2011-03-01

    Paclitaxel is used as the first-line chemotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), but acquired resistance becomes a critical problem. Several mechanisms have been proposed in paclitaxel resistance, but they are not sufficient to exhaustively explain this resistance emergence. To better investigate molecular resistance mechanisms, a comparative proteomic approach was carried out to identify differentially expressed proteins between human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line (paclitaxel sensitive) and A549-Taxol cell line (acquired resistant). A paclitaxel-resistant subline (A549-Taxol) derived from the parental-sensitive cell line A549 was established by stepwise selection by paclitaxel. Total proteins in the two cell lines were separated by fluorescent differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). Image analysis was carried out with the DeCyder 2D 6.5 software. Proteins associated with chemoresistance process were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS/MS). Some key molecules were valuated by Western blot. Thirty proteins were identified and grouped into eight main functional classes according to the biological processes in which they are likely to participate, i.e. signal transduction, cytoskeleton, redox reaction, energy and metabolism, and so on. Alterations of these processes might be involved in paclitaxel resistance. Most of the proteins showed mitochondrial and cytoplasm location. The up-regulation of CK8, CK18, ALDH1, CAST and ANX I in A549-Taxol cell line was verified by Western blot, in coincidence with the data obtained from proteomic analysis. For the first time, differentially expressed proteins between paclitaxel-sensitive cell line and paclitaxel-resistant one were explored by comparative proteomic approach in human lung adenocarcinoma. It may be useful for further studying of resistance mechanisms and screening of resistance biomarkers, so as to develop tailored therapeutic

  12. Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Human Pancreatic and Hepatic Stellate Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the liver and the pancreas differ; however, chronic inflammation in both organs is associated with fibrosis. Evidence suggests that fibrosis in both organs is partially regulated by organ-specific stellate cells. We explore the proteome of human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and human pancreatic stellate cells (hPaSC) using mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics to investigate pathophysiologic mechanisms. Proteins were isolated from whole cell lysates of immortalized hHSC and hPaSC. These proteins were tryptically digested, labeled with tandem mass tags (TMT), fractionated by OFFGEL, and subjected to MS. Proteins significantly different in abundance (P < 0.05) were classified via gene ontology (GO) analysis. We identified 1223 proteins and among them, 1222 proteins were quantifiable. Statistical analysis determined that 177 proteins were of higher abundance in hHSC, while 157 were of higher abundance in hPaSC. GO classification revealed that proteins of relatively higher abundance in hHSC were associated with protein production, while those of relatively higher abundance in hPaSC were involved in cell structure. Future studies using the methodologies established herein, but with further upstream fractionation and/or use of enhanced MS instrumentation will allow greater proteome coverage, achieving a comprehensive proteomic analysis of hHSC and hPaSC. PMID:23528454

  13. Assessing CMT cell line stability by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry based proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kelan; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, Stephen J; Mose Larsen, Peter; Zhang, Xumin; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-07-21

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) followed by mass spectrometric identification of the proteins in the protein spots has become a central tool in proteomics. CMT167(H), CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) cell lines, selected from a spontaneous mouse lung adenocarcinoma, with high-, middle- or low-metastatic potential have been characterized in vivo. In this study, the comprehensive protein expression profiles of the CMT cell lines were analyzed at passages 5, 15 and 35 in order to assess the cell line stability. During the passages 5 to 15, the expression profiles of CMT cells remained reasonably stable as evidenced by only 0.7%, 3.9% and 1.1% proteins changed in CMT167(H), CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) respectively. However, the number of differentially expressed proteins were considerably increased at passage 35 in CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) while CMT167(H) remained stable. Based on our selection criteria, 22, 109 and 84 spots in CMT167(H), CMT64(M) and CMT170(L) were selected for protein identification by MS and 99 unique proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that most of these proteins participate in cellular metabolism. In conclusion, proteomics was found to be a useful tool for assessing differences in cell line stability. This approach provided a tool to select the best cell line and optimal subculture period for studies of cancer related phenomena and for testing the effect of potential anticancer drugs.

  14. Monitoring changes in proteome during stepwise adaptation of a MDCK cell line from adherence to growth in suspension.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Sabine; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Scharfenberg, Klaus; Rapp, Erdmann; Reichl, Udo

    2015-08-20

    Adaptation of continuous cell lines to growth in suspension in a chemically defined medium has significant advantages for design and optimization in manufacturing of biologicals. In this work, changes in the protein expression level during a step-wise adaptation of an adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to suspension growth were analyzed. Therefore, three cell line adaptations were performed independently. Two adaptations were monitored closely to characterize short term changes in protein expression levels after serum deprivation. In addition, initial stages of suspension growth were analyzed for both adaptations. The third adaptation involved MDCK suspension cells (MDCKSUS2) grown over an extended time period to achieve robust growth characteristics. Here, cells of the final stage of adaptation were compared with their parental cell line (MDCKADH). A combination of two dimensional differential gel electrophoresis for relative protein quantification and tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification enabled insights into cellular physiology. The two closely monitored cell line adaptations followed different routes regarding specific changes in protein expression but resulted in similar proteome profiles at the initial stages of suspension growth analyzed. Compared to the MDCKADH cells more than 90% of all changes in the protein expression level were identified after serum deprivation and were related to cytoskeletal structure, genetic information processing and cellular metabolism. Myosin proteins, involved in cellular detachment by actin-myosin contractile mechanisms were also differentially expressed. Interestingly, for both of the two adaptations, proteins linked for tumorigenicity, like lactoylglutathione lyase and sulfotransferase 1A1 were differentially expressed. In contrast, none of these proteins were differentially expressed for the MDCKSUS2 cell line. Overall, proteomic monitoring allowed identification of key proteins involved in

  15. Deep Phospho- and Phosphotyrosine Proteomics Identified Active Kinases and Phosphorylation Networks in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines Resistant to Cetuximab.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuichi; Nagano, Maiko; Kuga, Takahisa; Tada, Asa; Isoyama, Junko; Adachi, Jun; Tomonaga, Takeshi

    2017-09-05

    Abnormality in cellular phosphorylation is closely related to oncogenesis. Thus, kinase inhibitors, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Genomic analyses have been used in research on TKI sensitivity, but some types of TKI resistance have been unclassifiable by genomic data. Therefore, global proteomic analysis, especially phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomic analysis, could contribute to predict TKI sensitivity and overcome TKI-resistant cancer. In this study, we conducted deep phosphoproteomic analysis to select active kinase candidates in colorectal cancer intrinsically resistant to Cetuximab. The deep phosphoproteomic data were obtained by performing immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography-based phosphoproteomic and highly sensitive pY proteomic analyses. Comparison between sensitive (LIM1215 and DLD1) and resistant cell lines (HCT116 and HT29) revealed active kinase candidates in the latter, most of which were identified by pY proteomic analysis. Remarkably, genomic mutations were not assigned in most of these kinases. Phosphorylation-based signaling network analysis of the active kinase candidates indicated that SRC-PRKCD cascade was constitutively activated in HCT116 cells. Treatment with an SRC inhibitor significantly inhibited proliferation of HCT116 cells. In summary, our results based on deep phosphoproteomic data led us to propose novel therapeutic targets against cetuximab resistance and showed the potential for anti-cancer therapy.

  16. Identification of transporters associated with Etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and methotrexate sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, Wataru; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohmine, Ken; Yamori, Takao; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-02-01

    Membrane transporter proteins may influence the sensitivity of cancer cells to anticancer drugs that can be recognized as substrates. The purpose of this study was to identify proteins that play a key role in the drug sensitivity of stomach and breast cancer cell lines by measuring the absolute protein expression levels of multiple transporters and other membrane proteins and examining their correlation to drug sensitivity. Absolute protein expression levels of 90 membrane proteins were examined by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics using liquid chromatography-linked tandem mass spectrometry. Among them, 11 and 14 membrane proteins, including transporters, were present in quantifiable amounts in membrane fraction of stomach cancer and breast cancer cell lines, respectively. In stomach cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was inversely correlated with etoposide sensitivity. MK571, an MRP inhibitor, increased both the cell-to-medium ratio of etoposide and the etoposide sensitivity of MRP1-expressing stomach cancer cell lines. In breast cancer cell lines, the protein expression level of reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) was directly correlated with methotrexate (MTX) sensitivity. Initial uptake rate and steady-state cell-to-medium ratio of [(3)H]MTX were correlated with both RFC1 expression level and MTX sensitivity. These results suggest that MRP1 modulates the etoposide sensitivity of stomach cancer cell lines and RFC1 modulates the MTX sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines. Our results indicate that absolute quantification of multiple membrane proteins could be a useful strategy for identification of candidate proteins involved in drug sensitivity.

  17. Proteomic differences between microvascular endothelial cells and the EA.hy926 cell line forming three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao; Sickmann, Albert; Pietsch, Jessica; Wildgruber, Robert; Weber, Gerhard; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Proteomic changes of two types of human endothelial cells (ECs) were determined and compared to morphological alterations occurring during the scaffold-free in vitro formation of 3D structures resembling vascular intimas. The EA.hy926 cell line and human microvascular ECs (HMVECs) were cultured on a random positioning machine or static on ground (normal gravity) for 5 and 7 days, before their morphology was examined and their protein content was analysed by MS after free-flow electrophoretic separation. A total of 1175 types of proteins were found in EA.hy926 cells and 846 in HMVEC forming 3D structures faster than the EA.hy926 cells. Five hundred and eighty-four of these kinds of proteins were present in both types of cells. They included a number of metabolic enzymes, of structure-related and stress proteins. Comparing proteins of EA.hy926 cells growing either adherently on ground or in 3D aggregates on the random positioning machine revealed that ribosomal proteins were enhanced, while tubes are formed and various components of 26S proteasomes remained prevalent in static normal gravity control cells only. The fast developing tube-like 3D structures of HMVEC suggested a transient augmentation of ribosomal proteins during the 3D assembling of ECs.

  18. The Single Cell Proteome Project - Cell-Cycle Dependent Protein Expression in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Sweedler JV: Single-neuron analysis 33. Michels D, Hu S, Schoenherr R, Eggertson MJ, Dovichi NJ: Fully using CE combined with MALDI MS and...treated to induce apoptosis. In the presence of an ionic surfactant such as sodium dodecyl These cells are -10 pm in diameter and contain 4 orders of...Jorgenson’s sequential liquid Standard Proteins. A mixture of seven proteins (myoglobin, chromatography/capillary electrophoresis separation of peptides.37-40

  19. Anticancer drug clustering based on proteomic profiles and a sensitivity database in a lung cancer cell line panel

    PubMed Central

    HINO, MITSUNORI; MATSUDA, KUNIKO; MIYANAGA, AKIHIKO; KURIBAYASI, HIDEHIKO; MIZUTANI, HIDEAKI; NORO, RINTARO; MINEGISHI, YUJI; OKANO, TETSUYA; SEIKE, MASAHIRO; KAWAKAMI, AKIKO; YOSHIMURA, AKINOBU; OGAWA, NAOKI; UESAKA, HARUKA; KUDOH, SHOJI; GEMMA, AKIHIKO

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we performed a molecular pharmacological study that applied a combination of DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling and drug sensitivity tests in vitro with a view to designing an improved chemotherapeutic strategy for advanced lung cancer. Utilizing recent key technological advances in proteomics, particularly antibody array-based methodologies, the current study aimed to examine the benefit of protein expression profiling in an analogous molecular pharmacological context. We performed protein expression analysis in a panel of lung cancer cell lines via an antibody array approach. Using a modified NCI program, we related cell line-specific proteomic profiles to the previously determined cytotoxic activity of a selection of commonly used anticancer agents, namely docetaxel, paclitaxel, gemcitabine, vinorelbine, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), SN38, cisplatin (CDDP) and carboplatin (CBDCA). In addition, we compared these results with those obtained from our prior DNA microarray-based transcriptomic study. In our expression-drug correlation analysis using antibody array, gemcitabine consistently belonged to an isolated cluster. Docetaxel, paclitaxel, 5-FU, SN38, CBDCA and CDDP were gathered together into one large cluster. These results coincided with those generated by the prior transcriptomic study. Various genes were commonly listed that differentiated gemcitabine from the others. The identified factors associated with drug sensitivities were different between both analyses. Our proteomic profiling data provided confirmation of the previous transcript expression-drug sensitivity correlation analysis. These results suggest that chemotherapy regimens that include gemcitabine should be evaluated in second-line chemotherapy in cases where the first-line chemotherapy did not include this drug. Protein expression-drug sensitivity correlations in lung cancer cells in vitro may provide useful information in determining the most appropriate therapeutic options

  20. Constructing Proteome Reference Map of the Porcine Jejunal Cell Line (IPEC-J2) by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Balolong, Marilen P; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-06-28

    In this study, the global proteome of the IPEC-J2 cell line was evaluated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole Q Exactive™ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Proteins were isolated from highly confluent IPEC-J2 cells in biological replicates and analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry prior to matching against a porcine genomic dataset. The results identified 1,517 proteins, accounting for 7.35% of all genes in the porcine genome. The highly abundant proteins detected, such as actin, annexin A2, and AHNAK nucleoprotein, are involved in structural integrity, signaling mechanisms, and cellular homeostasis. The high abundance of heat shock proteins indicated their significance in cellular defenses, barrier function, and gut homeostasis. Pathway analysis and annotation using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database resulted in a putative protein network map of the regulation of immunological responses and structural integrity in the cell line. The comprehensive proteome analysis of IPEC-J2 cells provides fundamental insights into overall protein expression and pathway dynamics that might be useful in cell adhesion studies and immunological applications.

  1. An off-line high pH reversed-phase fractionation and nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for global proteomic profiling of cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hang; Sun, Shengnan; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Si; Liu, Ping; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and first-dimensional fractionation is widely used for reducing sample complexity in large-scale proteomic profiling experiments. However, the limited number of proteins identified and the relatively long running time are a barrier to the successful application of this approach. In this study, off-line high pH reversed-phase fractionation (RPF) was combined with nano-LC-MS/MS in order to develop an improved method for global proteomic profiling of different cell lines. In the first dimensional reverse phase HPLC separation, 300 μg of digested cell protein was separated into 78 fractions under high pH conditions and condensed into 26 fractions for the second nano-LC-MS/MS analysis at low pH. The chromatographic conditions for the first and second steps were optimized, and the accuracy and reproducibility of protein quantification were investigated with an average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.94. The method was then applied in the identification of proteins in six common cell lines (DMS, MFM, HepG2, U2OS, 293T and yeast), which resulted in identification of 7300-8500 and 8956 proteins in heavy/light labeled and label-free cell samples, respectively, in 1.5 days. The performance of the developed method was compared with isoelectric focusing (IEF)-nano-LC-MS/MS and the previously reported method; and off-line high pH RPF-nano-LC-MS/MS proved advantageous in terms of the number of proteins identified and the analytical time needed to achieve a successful global proteomic profiling outcome. The RPF-nano-LC-MS/MS method identified more proteins from low abundance (150 μg) samples with an average sequence coverage for each cell line of 23.4-35.1%. RPF-nano-LC-MS/MS may therefore be an efficient alternative tool for achieving improved proteomic coverage of multiple cell lines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic analysis of the vitamin C effect on the doxorubicin cytotoxicity in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Bober, Peter; Alexovic, Michal; Talian, Ivan; Tomkova, Zuzana; Viscorova, Zuzana; Benckova, Maria; Andrasina, Igor; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Petrovic, Daniel; Adamek, Mariusz; Kruzliak, Peter; Sabo, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin is an anthracycline drug which inhibits the growth of breast cancer cell lines. However, a major factor limiting its use is a cumulative, dose-dependent cardiotoxicity, resulting in a permanent loss of cardiomyocytes. Vitamin C was found to potentiate the cytotoxic effects of a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs including doxorubicin. The aim of the study was to describe the changes in protein expression and proliferation of the MCF-7 cells induced by the vitamin C applied with doxorubicin. Label-free quantitative proteomics and real-time cell analysis methods were used to search for proteome and cell proliferation changes. These changes were induced by the pure DOX and by DOX combined with vitamin C applied on the MCF-7 cell line. From the real-time cell analysis experiments, it is clear that the highest anti-proliferative effect occurs with the addition of 200 µM of vitamin C to 1 µM of doxorubicin. By applying both the label-free protein quantification method and total ion current assay, we found statistically significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) of 26 proteins induced by the addition of vitamin C to doxorubicin on the MCF-7 cell line. These differentially expressed proteins are involved in processes such as structural molecule activity, transcription and translation, immune system process and antioxidant, cellular signalling and transport. The detected proteins may be capable of predicting response to DOX therapy. This is a key tool in the treatment of breast cancer, and the combination with vit C seems to be of particular interest due to the fact that it can potentiate anti-proliferative effect of DOX.

  3. In Vitro Phenotypic, Genomic and Proteomic Characterization of a Cytokine-Resistant Murine β-TC3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Antonina; Tomasello, Laura; Pizzolanti, Giuseppe; Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Albanese, Nadia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Cancemi, Patrizia; Pitrone, Maria; Bommarito, Alessandra; Carissimi, Elvira; Zito, Giovanni; Criscimanna, Angela; Galluzzo, Aldo; Giordano, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is caused by the selective destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. This process is mediated by cells of the immune system through release of nitric oxide, free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which induce a complex network of intracellular signalling cascades, eventually affecting the expression of genes involved in β-cell survival. The aim of our study was to investigate possible mechanisms of resistance to cytokine-induced β-cell death. To this purpose, we created a cytokine-resistant β-cell line (β-TC3R) by chronically treating the β-TC3 murine insulinoma cell line with IL-1β + IFN-γ. β-TC3R cells exhibited higher proliferation rate and resistance to cytokine-mediated cell death in comparison to the parental line. Interestingly, they maintained expression of β-cell specific markers, such as PDX1, NKX6.1, GLUT2 and insulin. The analysis of the secretory function showed that β-TC3R cells have impaired glucose-induced c-peptide release, which however was only moderately reduced after incubation with KCl and tolbutamide. Gene expression analysis showed that β-TC3R cells were characterized by downregulation of IL-1β and IFN-γ receptors and upregulation of SOCS3, the classical negative regulator of cytokines signaling. Comparative proteomic analysis showed specific upregulation of 35 proteins, mainly involved in cell death, stress response and folding. Among them, SUMO4, a negative feedback regulator in NF-kB and JAK/STAT signaling pathways, resulted hyper-expressed. Silencing of SUMO4 was able to restore sensitivity to cytokine-induced cell death in β-TC3R cells, suggesting it may play a key role in acquired cytokine resistance by blocking JAK/STAT and NF-kB lethal signaling. In conclusion, our study represents the first extensive proteomic characterization of a murine cytokine-resistant β-cell line, which might represent a useful tool for studying the mechanisms involved in resistance to cytokine-mediated β-cell

  4. Differential proteome analysis of human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293) following mycophenolic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is widely used as a post transplantation medicine to prevent acute organ rejection. In the present study we used proteomics approach to identify proteome alterations in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) after treatment with therapeutic dose of MPA. Following 72 hours MPA treatment, total protein lysates were prepared, resolved by two dimensional gel electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins were identified by QTOF-MS/MS analysis. Expressional regulations of selected proteins were further validated by real time PCR and Western blotting. Results The proliferation assay demonstrated that therapeutic MPA concentration causes a dose dependent inhibition of HEK-293 cell proliferation. A significant apoptosis was observed after MPA treatment, as revealed by caspase 3 activity. Proteome analysis showed a total of 12 protein spots exhibiting differential expression after incubation with MPA, of which 7 proteins (complement component 1 Q subcomponent-binding protein, electron transfer flavoprotein subunit beta, cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit, peroxiredoxin 1, thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12, myosin regulatory light chain 2, and profilin 1) showed significant increase in their expression. The expression of 5 proteins (protein SET, stathmin, 40S ribosomal protein S12, histone H2B type 1 A, and histone H2B type 1-C/E/F/G/I) were down-regulated. MPA mainly altered the proteins associated with the cytoskeleton (26%), chromatin structure/dynamics (17%) and energy production/conversion (17%). Both real time PCR and Western blotting confirmed the regulation of myosin regulatory light chain 2 and peroxiredoxin 1 by MPA treatment. Furthermore, HT-29 cells treated with MPA and total kidney cell lysate from MMF treated rats showed similar increased expression of myosin regulatory light chain 2. Conclusion The emerging use of MPA in diverse pathophysiological conditions demands in-depth studies to understand molecular basis of

  5. Detection of viral proteins in human cells lines by xeno-proteomics: elimination of the last valid excuse for not testing every cellular proteome dataset for viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Chernobrovkin, Alexey L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    Cell cultures used routinely in proteomic experiments may contain proteins from other species because of infection, transfection or just contamination. Since infection or contamination may affect the results of a biological experiment, it is important to test the samples for the presence of "alien" proteins. Usually cells are tested only for the most common infections, and most of the existing tests are targeting specific contaminations. Here we describe a three-step procedure for reliable untargeted detection of viral proteins using proteomics data, and recommend this or similar procedure to be applied to every proteomics dataset submitted for publication.

  6. A proteomic kinetic analysis of IGROV1 ovarian carcinoma cell line response to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Le Moguen, Karen; Lincet, Hubert; Marcelo, Paulo; Lemoisson, Edwige; Heutte, Natacha; Duval, Marilyne; Poulain, Laurent; Vinh, Joëlle; Gauduchon, Pascal; Baudin, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality by gynecological cancer. Despite good response to surgery and initial chemotherapy, essentially based on cisplatin (cis-diamino-dichloro-platinum(II) (CDDP)) compounds, frequent recurrences with chemoresistance acquisition are responsible for poor prognosis. Several mechanisms have been described as implicated in CDDP resistance, however they are not sufficient to exhaustively account for this resistance emergence. We applied a proteomic approach based on 2-DE coupled with MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF) to identify proteins associated with chemoresistance induced by CDDP. A kinetic analysis of IGROV1 cell behavior following treatment with CDDP and subsequent statistical analysis revealed time and/or concentration-dependent modifications in protein expression. We evidenced events such as decreased amino-acid and nucleotide synthesis potentially associated with cell cycle blockade, and variations that may be related to resistance acquisition, such as possible enhanced glycolysis and increased proliferating potential. Moreover, overexpressions of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 and both cytokeratins 8 and 18 were consistent with our previous findings, demonstrating that expression of these proteins was increased in cisplatin-resistant IGROV1-R10 as compared to IGROV1 parental cells. Identification of such proteins could allow improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to cell death or survival and, thus, to the acquisition of chemoresistance.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of a Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cell Line using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Urrutia, Raul; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Steen, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are emerging as key mediators in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Proteins regulating the biomolecular pathways involved in the conversion of quiescent to activated PaSC may have a significant influence in the development of chronic pancreatitis. We aim to compare differentially expressed proteins in activated and serum-starved non-proliferating PaSC using a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy. We cultured an immortalized rat PaSC cell line in media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and in serum-free media. Using gel-based mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS), we identified nearly 1500 proteins. Qualitative and quantitative proteomic analysis revealed several hundred proteins as differentially abundant between the two cell states. Proteins of greater abundance in activated PaSC included isoforms of actin (e.g., smooth muscle actin) and ribosomal proteins. Conversely, proteins more abundant in non-proliferating PaSC than in activated PaSC included signaling proteins MAP kinase 3 and Ras-related proteins. In addition, we have determined the molecular functions and biological pathways for these proteins. We are confident that the application of mass spectrometry-based strategies, such as that described herein, to investigate specific proteins in PaSC may lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in pancreatic diseases, such as chronic pancreatitis. PMID:21968429

  8. Colorectal cancer atlas: An integrative resource for genomic and proteomic annotations from colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Chisanga, David; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Pathan, Mohashin; Ariyaratne, Dinuka; Kalra, Hina; Boukouris, Stephanie; Mathew, Nidhi Abraham; Al Saffar, Haidar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Ang, Ching-Seng; Sieber, Oliver M; Mariadason, John M; Dasgupta, Ramanuj; Chilamkurti, Naveen; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-01-04

    In order to advance our understanding of colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression, biomedical researchers have generated large amounts of OMICS data from CRC patient samples and representative cell lines. However, these data are deposited in various repositories or in supplementary tables. A database which integrates data from heterogeneous resources and enables analysis of the multidimensional data sets, specifically pertaining to CRC is currently lacking. Here, we have developed Colorectal Cancer Atlas (http://www.colonatlas.org), an integrated web-based resource that catalogues the genomic and proteomic annotations identified in CRC tissues and cell lines. The data catalogued to-date include sequence variations as well as quantitative and non-quantitative protein expression data. The database enables the analysis of these data in the context of signaling pathways, protein-protein interactions, Gene Ontology terms, protein domains and post-translational modifications. Currently, Colorectal Cancer Atlas contains data for >13 711 CRC tissues, >165 CRC cell lines, 62 251 protein identifications, >8.3 million MS/MS spectra, >18 410 genes with sequence variations (404 278 entries) and 351 pathways with sequence variants. Overall, Colorectal Cancer Atlas has been designed to serve as a central resource to facilitate research in CRC. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  10. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  11. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Permenter, Matthew G; Dennis, William E; Sutto, Thomas E; Jackson, David A; Lewis, John A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  12. The proteome speciation of an immortalized cystic fibrosis cell line: New perspectives on the pathophysiology of the disease.

    PubMed

    Michele, Puglia; Claudia, Landi; Assunta, Gagliardi; Loretta, Breslin; Alessandro, Armini; Jlenia, Brunetti; Alessandro, Pini; Laura, Bianchi; Luca, Bini

    2017-09-29

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a recessively inherited disease caused by mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene. CFTR has a pivotal role in the onset of CF, and several proteins are involved in its homeostasis. To study CFTR interactors at protein species level, we used a functional proteomics approach combining 2D-DIGE, mass spectrometry and enrichment analysis. A human bronchial epithelial cell line with cystic fibrosis (CFBE41o-) and the control (16HBE14o-) were used for the comparison. 73 differentially abundant spots were identified and some validated by western-blot. Enrichment analysis highlighted molecular pathways in which ezrin, HSP70, endoplasmin and lamin A/C, in addition to CFTR, were considered central hubs in CFTR homeostasis. These proteins acquire different functions through post-translational modifications, emphasizing the importance of studying the CF proteome at protein species level. Moreover, serpin H1, prelamin A/C, protein-SET and cystatin-B were associated to CF, demonstrating the importance of heat shock response, cross-talk between the cytoskeleton and signal transduction, chronic inflammation and alteration of CFTR gating in the pathophysiology of the disease. These results open new perspectives for the understanding of the proteostasis network, characteristic of CF pathology, and could provide a springboard for new therapeutic strategies. Homeostasis of CFTR is a dynamic process managed by multiple proteostatic pathways. The used gel-based proteomic approach and enrichment analysis pointed out protein species variations among Human Bronchial (16HBE14o-) and Cystic Fibrosis Bronchial Epithelial cell lines (CFBE41o-) and specific molecular mechanisms involved in CF. In particular, we have highlighted HSP70 (HSP7C), HSP90 (endoplasmin), ERM proteins (ezrin), and lamin-A/C as central hubs of the functional analysis. Moreover, for the first time we consider serpin H1, lamin A/C, protein-SET and cystatin

  13. Proteomic Analysis of an Immortalized Mouse Pancreatic Stellate Cell Line Identifies Differentially-Expressed Proteins in Activated vs. Non-Proliferating Cell States

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Urrutia, Raul; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Steen, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PaSC) are mediators in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. Proteins regulating the biomolecular pathways involved in the conversion of activated to quiescent PaSC may have a significant influence in the development of chronic pancreatitis. We aim to compare differentially expressed proteins from an immortalized cell line of mouse PaSC in the activated and serum-starved cell states using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PaSC cultured in media supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) proliferate in the activated state, while serum starvation promotes the cellular transition to a “pseudo-quiescent” state. Using these two cell states, we performed a comparative mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. We identified over 2000 non-redundant proteins in PaSC. Qualitative and label-free quantitative analysis revealed several hundred proteins that were differentially abundant between the cell states. Proteins that were more abundant in activated PaSC included cytoskeletal proteins and ribosomal proteins, while those more abundant in pseudo-quiescent PaSC included proteins involved in protein degradation-related pathways (lysosome, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and the proteasome). Investigation of the role of PaSC in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis using the mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy described herein will lead to further insights into the molecular mechanisms associated with the disease. PMID:21838295

  14. DAMTC regulates cytoskeletal reorganization and cell motility in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line: an integrated proteomics and transcriptomics approach.

    PubMed

    Goel, A; Chhabra, R; Ahmad, S; Prasad, A K; Parmar, V S; Ghosh, B; Saini, N

    2012-10-11

    DAMTC (7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin) is a thioderivative of 4-methyl coumarin, and previously we have shown that DAMTC is a potent inhibitor of cell growth and an inducer of apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer (A549) cells. It induces apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway by modulating NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p53 pathways. Herein, we explored the genome-wide effects of DAMTC in A549 cells using the concerted approach of transcriptomics and proteomics. In addition to apoptotic pathways, which have been validated earlier, the bioinformatic analysis of microarray data identified small GTPase-mediated signal transduction among the significantly altered biological processes. Interestingly, we observed significant downregulation of some members of the Rho family GTPases in the proteomics data too. Downregulation of Rho GTPases (RhoGDIα (Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor-α, also known as ARHGDIA), Ras homolog family member A, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and cell division cycle 42) was validated by western blotting. The Rho protein family is implicated in maintaining the actin filament assembly and cell motility, and we also observed that DAMTC treatment causes actin cytoskeletal reorganization, promotes filopodia formation and inhibits cell motility in A549 cells. The effect of DAMTC treatment on cytoskeleton was reversed after the overexpression of RhoGDIα. In addition, DAMTC augmented the apoptotic effect of etoposide, a proapoptotic chemotherapeutic drug. This elucidation of the mechanism behind DAMTC-induced apoptosis and inhibition of cell motility in A549 cells may make it a potential therapeutic for lung cancer.

  15. The chicken B-cell line DT40 proteome, beadome and interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    In developing a new quantitative AP-MS method for exploring interactomes in the chicken B-cell line DT40, we also surveyed the most abundant proteins in this organism and explored the likely contaminants that bind to a variety of affinity resins that would later be confirmed quantitatively [1]. We present the ‘Top 150 abundant DT40 proteins list’, the DT40 beadomes as well as protein interaction lists for the Phosphatidyl inositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase 2β and Fanconi anaemia protein complexes. PMID:26217713

  16. Acidosis-Induced Changes in Proteome Patterns of the Prostate Cancer-Derived Tumor Cell Line AT-1.

    PubMed

    Ihling, Angelika; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea; Gekle, Michael

    2015-09-04

    Under various pathological conditions, such as inflammation, ischemia and in solid tumors, physiological parameters (local oxygen tension or extracellular pH) show distinct tissue abnormalities (hypoxia and acidosis). For tumors, the prevailing microenvironment exerts a strong influence on the phenotype with respect to proliferation, invasion, and metastasis formation and therefore influences prognosis. In this study, we investigate the impact of extracellular metabolic acidosis (pH 7.4 versus 6.6) on the proteome patterns of a prostate cancer-derived tumor cell type (AT-1) using isobaric labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis. In total, 2710 proteins were identified and quantified across four biological replicates, of which seven were significantly affected with changes >50% and used for validation. Glucose transporter 1 and farnesyl pyrophosphatase were found to be down-regulated after 48 h of acidic treatment, and metallothionein 2A was reduced after 24 h and returned to control values after 48 h. After 24 and 48 h at pH 6.6, glutathione S transferase A3 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase 1, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2, and Na-bicarbonate transporter 3 levels were found to be increased. The changes in protein levels were confirmed by transcriptome and functional analyses. In addition to the experimental in-depth investigation of proteins with changes >50%, functional profiling (statistical enrichment analysis) including proteins with changes >20% revealed that acidosis upregulates GSH metabolic processes, citric acid cycle, and respiratory electron transport. Metabolism of lipids and cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated. Our data comprise the first comprehensive report on acidosis-induced changes in proteome patterns of a tumor cell line.

  17. Integrated Proteomic Profiling of Cell Line Conditioned Media and Pancreatic Juice for the Identification of Pancreatic Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Makawita, Shalini; Smith, Chris; Batruch, Ihor; Zheng, Yingye; Rückert, Felix; Grützmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Gallinger, Steven; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths, for which serological biomarkers are urgently needed. Most discovery-phase studies focus on the use of one biological source for analysis. The present study details the combined mining of pancreatic cancer-related cell line conditioned media and pancreatic juice for identification of putative diagnostic leads. Using strong cation exchange chromatography, followed by LC-MS/MS on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer, we extensively characterized the proteomes of conditioned media from six pancreatic cancer cell lines (BxPc3, MIA-PaCa2, PANC1, CAPAN1, CFPAC1, and SU.86.86), the normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cell line HPDE, and two pools of six pancreatic juice samples from ductal adenocarcinoma patients. All samples were analyzed in triplicate. Between 1261 and 2171 proteins were identified with two or more peptides in each of the cell lines, and an average of 521 proteins were identified in the pancreatic juice pools. In total, 3479 nonredundant proteins were identified with high confidence, of which ∼40% were extracellular or cell membrane-bound based on Genome Ontology classifications. Three strategies were employed for identification of candidate biomarkers: (1) examination of differential protein expression between the cancer and normal cell lines using label-free protein quantification, (2) integrative analysis, focusing on the overlap of proteins among the multiple biological fluids, and (3) tissue specificity analysis through mining of publically available databases. Preliminary verification of anterior gradient homolog 2, syncollin, olfactomedin-4, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, and collagen alpha-1(VI) chain in plasma samples from pancreatic cancer patients and healthy controls using ELISA, showed a significant increase (p < 0.01) of these proteins in plasma from pancreatic cancer patients. The combination of these five proteins showed an improved area under the receiver

  18. Secreted proteome of the murine multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cell line DKmix.

    PubMed

    Luecke, Nina; Templin, Christian; Muetzelburg, Marika Victoria; Neumann, Detlef; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2010-03-15

    Administration of the multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) line DKmix improved cardiac function after myocardial infarction and accelerated dermal wound healing due to paracrine mechanisms. The aim of this study was to analyse the secreted proteins of DKmix cells in order to identify the responsible paracrine factors and assess their relevance to the wide spectrum of therapeutic effects. A mass spectrometry (MS)-based approach was used to identify secreted proteins of DKmix cells. Serum free culture supernatants of DKmix-conditioned medium were collected and the proteins present were separated, digested by trypsin and the resulting peptides were then analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) MS. Overall 95 different proteins were identified. Among them, secretory proteins galectin-3 and gelsolin were identified. These proteins are known to stimulate cell migration and influence wound healing and cardiac remodelling. The remaining proteins originate from intracellular compartments like cytoplasm (69%), nucleus (12%), mitochondria (4%), and cytoplasmic membrane (3%) indicating permeable or leaky DKmix cells in the conditioned medium. Additionally, a sandwich immunoassay was used to detect and quantify cytokines and chemokines. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-13 (IL-13), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-3 (MCP-3), monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) and monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1beta (MIP-1beta) were detected in low concentrations. This study identified a subset of proteins present in the DKmix-conditioned medium that act as paracrine modulators of tissue repair. Moreover, it suggests that DKmix-derived conditioned medium might have therapeutic potency by promoting tissue regeneration.

  19. Comparison of plasma membrane proteomic changes of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells (T87 Line) after cold and ABA treatment in association with freezing tolerance development.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2012-03-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) is the primary site of freezing injury in plants. To determine global changes in PM protein profiles in association with freezing tolerance development, proteome analysis of the purified PM of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells (T87 line) was conducted with label-free protein quantification technology. Freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis cells at the lag growth phase (8 d old) increased after cold acclimation (CA) or ABA treatment. Proteome analysis assigned 658 proteins in the PM in total, of which 45.3% (298 proteins) were predicted to have transmembrane domains. They were classified into several functional categories, with the primary categories being proteins in transporters, signal transduction, protein destination and storage, and cell structure. After CA, 271 proteins increased and 111 proteins decreased. ABA treatment resulted in 185 increased and 56 decreased proteins. Of these, 139 increased and 49 decreased proteins were identified in common after both CA and ABA treatment. In addition, there were proteins specifically expressed in cold- (132 increased and 62 decreased) or ABA- (46 increased and 7 decreased) treated cells. Collectively, our results clearly show that (i) responses of the PM proteome to CA and ABA treatment overlap substantially but, at the same time, some proteins exhibited different response patterns in each treatment; and (ii) the majority of ABA-responsive proteins are CA-responsive proteins but not vice versa, suggesting complex interactions of CA and ABA signaling pathways in the PM proteome responses.

  20. Characterization of cytarabine-resistant leukemic cell lines established from five different blood cell lineages using gene expression and proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Negoro, Eiju; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Nishi, Rie; Hori, Hiroki; Ueda, Takanori

    2011-04-01

    Cytarabine (ara-C) is the key drug for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Since intracellular cytarabine triphosphate (ara-CTP) is an active metabolite of ara-C, factors that reduce the amount of ara-CTP are known to induce drug resistance. However, these factors do not fully explain the development of resistance to ara-C. The present study was conducted to search for new candidate ara-C resistance factors, including those that are unrelated to ara-CTP production. For this purpose, we newly established five ara-C-resistant leukemic clones from different blood cell lineage leukemic cell lines (HL-60, K562, CEM, THP1 and U937). The resistant subclones were 5-58-fold more ara-C-resistant than their parental counterparts. All of the ara-C-resistant subclones, except for ara-C-resistant CEM cells, displayed alteration of ara-CTP-related factors such as ara-C membrane transport capacity, deoxycytidine kinase activity or cytosolic nucleotidase II activity. To identify new candidate factors, we used two comprehensive approaches: DNA microarray and proteome analyses. The DNA microarray analysis revealed eight genes (C19orf2, HSPA8, LGALS1, POU4F3, PSAP, AKT1, MBC2 and CACNA2D3) that were altered in all five ara-C-resistant lines compared to parental cells. Both proteome and DNA microarray analyses further detected a reduced protein level of stathmin1 in the ara-C-resistant CEM subclone compared to its parental line. Thus, the present findings suggested the involvement of novel multiple mechanisms in mediating the ara-C resistance of leukemic cells. The role of some of these molecules in resistance is still unclear.

  1. From Proteomic Analysis to Potential Therapeutic Targets: Functional Profile of Two Lung Cancer Cell Lines, A549 and SW900, Widely Studied in Pre-Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Vitorino, Rui; Fardilha, Margarida; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a serious health problem and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The standard use of cell lines as in vitro pre-clinical models to study the molecular mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis and access drug sensitivity/effectiveness is of undisputable importance. Label-free mass spectrometry and bioinformatics were employed to study the proteomic profiles of two representative lung cancer cell lines and to unravel the specific biological processes. Adenocarcinoma A549 cells were enriched in proteins related to cellular respiration, ubiquitination, apoptosis and response to drug/hypoxia/oxidative stress. In turn, squamous carcinoma SW900 cells were enriched in proteins related to translation, apoptosis, response to inorganic/organic substances and cytoskeleton organization. Several proteins with differential expression were related to cancer transformation, tumor resistance, proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis. Combined analysis of proteome and interactome data highlighted key proteins and suggested that adenocarcinoma might be more prone to PI3K/Akt/mTOR and topoisomerase IIα inhibitors, and squamous carcinoma to Ck2 inhibitors. Moreover, ILF3 overexpression in adenocarcinoma, and PCNA and NEDD8 in squamous carcinoma shows them as promising candidates for therapeutic purposes. This study highlights the functional proteomic differences of two main subtypes of lung cancer models and hints several targeted therapies that might assist in this type of cancer. PMID:27814385

  2. Proteomic data analysis of glioma cancer stem-cell lines based on novel nonlinear dimensional data reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespinats, Sylvain; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Wengert, Georg; Houben, Ivo; Lobbes, Marc; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Glioma-derived cancer stem cells (GSCs) are tumor-initiating cells and may be refractory to radiation and chemotherapy and thus have important implications for tumor biology and therapeutics. The analysis and interpretation of large proteomic data sets requires the development of new data mining and visualization approaches. Traditional techniques are insufficient to interpret and visualize these resulting experimental data. The emphasis of this paper lies in the application of novel approaches for the visualization, clustering and projection representation to unveil hidden data structures relevant for the accurate interpretation of biological experiments. These qualitative and quantitative methods are applied to the proteomic analysis of data sets derived from the GSCs. The achieved clustering and visualization results provide a more detailed insight into the protein-level fold changes and putative upstream regulators for the GSCs. However the extracted molecular information is insufficient in classifying GSCs and paving the pathway to an improved therapeutics of the heterogeneous glioma.

  3. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Breast Cancer Cell Lines using 18O-Labeling and an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Patwardhan, Anil J.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pallavicini, Maria

    2006-05-01

    Proteome comparison of cell lines derived from breast cancer and normal breast epithelium provide opportunities to identify differentially expressed proteins and pathways associated with specific phenotypes. We employed trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O peptide labeling, FTI-CR mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy to calculate compare the relative protein abundances of hundreds of proteins simultaneously in non-cancer and cancer cell lines derived from breast tissue. A reference panel of cell lines was created to facilitate comparisons of relative protein abundance amongst multiple cell lines and across multiple experiments. A peptide database generated from multidimensional LC separations and MS/MS analysis was used to facilitate subsequent AMT tag-based peptide identifications. This peptide database represented a total of 2,299 proteins, including 514 that were quantified using the AMT tag and 16O/18O strategies. Eighty-six proteins showed at least a 3-fold protein abundance change between cancer and non-cancer cell lines. A comparison of protein expression profiles with previously published gene expression data revealed that 21 of these proteins also had >3-fold differences between the non-cancer and cancer cell lines at the transcriptional level. Clustering of protein abundance ratios revealed that several groups of proteins were differentially expressed between the cancer cell lines

  4. Toluene Dose-Response and Preliminary Study of Proteomics for Neuronal Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    transporter activity Filament movement Intracellular cyclic nucleotide activated cation channel Complex Cation channel Transport activity Microtubule...Serine-pyruvate aminotransferse complex Lamin-2 complex ATP dependent Chloride channel Activity Double strand/ Single strand DNA junction binding tRNA...minor signs of cellular stress. The majority of modulated proteins were related to cell adhesion, gene expression, ion channel activity, migration

  5. Establishment of a new OSCC cell line derived from OLK and identification of malignant transformation-related proteins by differential proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yan; Zhao, Qun; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ma, Guowu; Liu, Caiyun; Chen, Zhuwen; Yu, Liyuan; Liu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanguang; Shao, Shujuan; Xiao, Jing; Li, Jia; Zhang, Weimin; Fu, Ming; Dong, Lijia; Yang, Xiandong; Guo, Xu; Xue, Liyan; Fang, Fei; Zhan, Qimin; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is usually preceded by the oral premalignant lesions, mainly oral leukoplakia (OLK) after repeated insults of carcinogens, tobacco. B(a)P and DMBA are key carcinogens in tobacco smoke. In the present study, for the first time we established the cancerous cell line OSCC-BD induced by B(a)P/DMBA mixture and transformed from dysplastic oral leukoplakia cell line DOK. Cell morphology, proliferation ability, migration ability, colony formation, and tumorigenicity were studied and confirmed the malignant characteristics of OSCC-BD cells. We further identified the differential proteins between DOK and OSCC-BD cells by stable isotope dimethyl labeling based quantitative proteomic method, which showed 18 proteins up-regulated and 16 proteins down-regulated with RSD < 8%. Differential proteins are mainly related to cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA replication, RNA splicing and apoptosis. Abberant binding function, catalysis activity and transportor activity of differential proteins might contribute to the malignant transformation of OLK. Of the 34 identified differential proteins with RSD < 8%, 13 novel cancer-related proteins were reported in the present study. This study might provide a new insight into the mechanism of OLK malignant transformation and the potent biomarkers for early diagnosis, meanwhile further facilitate the application of the quantification proteomics to carcinogenesis research. PMID:26234610

  6. Proteomic analysis of MCF-7 breast cancer cell line exposed to leptin.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Sastre-Serra, J; Pol, C; Miró, A M; Oliver, J; Roca, P

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known factor risk for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Circulating leptin levels are increased in obese and it has been suggested to play an important role in mammary tumor formation and progression. To contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying leptin action in breast cancer, our aim was to identify proteins regulated by leptin in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify proteins affected by leptin. Thirty proteins were found differentially expressed in MCF-7 cells after 48 h leptin exposure. Proteins regulated by leptin included proteins previously implicated in breast cancer such as catechol-o-methyltransferase, cathepsin D, hsp27, serine/threonine-protein phosphatase and regulatory proteins of the Ras signaling pathway. Proteins involved in other cellular functions such as stress response, cytosqueleton remodeling and proteins belonging to ubiquitin-proteasome system, were also identified. Furthermore, leptin-treated cells showed a substantial uptake of the serum carrier proteins albumin and alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein. This screening reveals that leptin influences the levels of key proteins involved in breast cancer which opens new avenues for the study of the molecular mechanisms linking obesity to breast cancer.

  7. Sustained productivity in recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines: proteome analysis of the molecular basis for a process-related phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability of mammalian cell lines to sustain cell specific productivity (Qp) over the full duration of bioprocess culture is a highly desirable phenotype, but the molecular basis for sustainable productivity has not been previously investigated in detail. In order to identify proteins that may be associated with a sustained productivity phenotype, we have conducted a proteomic profiling analysis of two matched pairs of monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines that differ in their ability to sustain productivity over a 10 day fed-batch culture. Results Proteomic profiling of inherent differences between the two sets of comparators using 2D-DIGE (Difference Gel Electrophoresis) and LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 89 distinct differentially expressed proteins. Overlap comparisons between the two sets of cell line pairs identified 12 proteins (AKRIB8, ANXA1, ANXA4, EIF3I, G6PD, HSPA8, HSP90B1, HSPD1, NUDC, PGAM1, RUVBL1 and CNN3) that were differentially expressed in the same direction. Conclusion These proteins may have an important role in sustaining high productivity of recombinant protein over the duration of a fed-batch bioprocess culture. It is possible that many of these proteins could be useful for future approaches to successfully manipulate or engineer CHO cells in order to sustain productivity of recombinant protein. PMID:21781345

  8. Proteomic analysis of MCF-7 breast cancer cell line exposed to mitogenic concentration of 17beta-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Malorni, Livia; Cacace, Giuseppina; Cuccurullo, Manuela; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Chambery, Angela; Farina, Annarita; Di Maro, Antimo; Parente, Augusto; Malorni, Antonio

    2006-11-01

    Estrogens are powerful mitogens that play a critical role in the onset of breast cancer and its progression. About two-thirds of all breast cancers are estrogen receptor (ER)+ at the time of diagnosis, and the ER expression is the determinant of a tumor phenotype associated with hormone responsiveness. The molecular basis of the relationship between ER expression, (anti)hormonal responsiveness, and breast cancer prognosis is still unknown. To identify the proteins affected by the presence of the hormone we used 2-D-PAGE-based bottom-up proteomics for the study of the proteome of MCF-7 cells of estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma exposed to a mitogenic concentration of 17beta-estradiol (E2) for 12, 18, 24, and 30 h. Differential expression analysis showed significant changes for 12 proteins. These include ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein of 50 kDa which was previously shown to be directly regulated by E2. Expression profiles of other proteins already implicated in the progression of breast cancer, such as stathmin, calreticulin, heat shock 71 kDa, alpha-enolase are also described. Moreover, it is observed that different unexpected proteins, translation factors, and energetic metabolism enzymes are also influenced by the presence of the hormone.

  9. Determination of differentially regulated proteins upon proteasome inhibition in AML cell lines by the combination of large‐scale and targeted quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Marcellin, Marlène; Chaoui, Karima; Bousquet‐Dubouch, Marie‐Pierre; Gonzalez‐de‐Peredo, Anne; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet‐Schiltz, Odile

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin‐proteasome pathway (UPP) plays a critical role in the degradation of proteins implicated in cell cycle control, signal transduction, DNA damage response, apoptosis and immune response. Proteasome inhibitors can inhibit the growth of a broad spectrum of human cancer cells by altering the balance of intracellular proteins. However, the targets of these compounds in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells have not been fully characterized. Herein, we combined large‐scale quantitative analysis by SILAC‐MS and targeted quantitative proteomic analysis in order to identify proteins regulated upon proteasome inhibition in two AML cell lines displaying different stages of maturation: immature KG1a cells and mature U937 cells. In‐depth data analysis enabled accurate quantification of more than 7000 proteins in these two cell lines. Several candidates were validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) measurements in a large number of samples. Despite the broad range of proteins known to be affected by proteasome inhibition, such as heat shock (HSP) and cell cycle proteins, our analysis identified new differentially regulated proteins, including IL‐32, MORF family mortality factors and apoptosis inducing factor SIVA, a target of p53. It could explain why proteasome inhibitors induce stronger apoptotic responses in immature AML cells. PMID:27709814

  10. Quantitative definition and monitoring of the host cell protein proteome using iTRAQ - a study of an industrial mAb producing CHO-S cell line.

    PubMed

    Chiverton, Lesley M; Evans, Caroline; Pandhal, Jagroop; Landels, Andrew R; Rees, Byron J; Levison, Peter R; Wright, Phillip C; Smales, C Mark

    2016-08-01

    There are few studies defining CHO host cell proteins (HCPs) and the flux of these throughout a downstream purification process. Here we have applied quantitative iTRAQ proteomics to follow the HCP profile of an antibody (mAb) producing CHO-S cell line throughout a standard downstream purification procedure consisting of a Protein A, cation and anion exchange process. We used both 6 sample iTRAQ experiment to analyze technical replicates of three samples, which were culture harvest (HCCF), Protein A flow through and Protein A eluate and an 8 sample format to analyze technical replicates of four sample types; HCCF compared to Protein A eluate and subsequent cation and anion exchange purification. In the 6 sample iTRAQ experiment, 8781 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 819 proteins (including the mAb chains). Across both the 6 and 8 sample experiments 936 proteins were identified. In the 8 sample comparison, 4187 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 219 proteins. We then used the iTRAQ data to enable estimation of the relative change of individual proteins across the purification steps. These data provide the basis for application of iTRAQ for process development based upon knowledge of critical HCPs.

  11. Proteome-Wide Effect of 17-β-Estradiol and Lipoxin A4 in an Endometriotic Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Jonathan A.; Waridel, Patrice; Gori, Ilaria; Quadroni, Manfredo; Canny, Geraldine O.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis affects approximately 10% of women of reproductive age. This chronic, gynecological inflammatory disease results in a decreased quality of life for patients, with the main symptoms including chronic pelvic pain and infertility. The steroid hormone 17-β Estradiol (E2) plays a key role in the pathology. Our previous studies showed that the anti-inflammatory lipid Lipoxin A4 (LXA4) acts as an estrogen receptor-alpha agonist in endometrial epithelial cells, inhibiting certain E2-mediated effects. LXA4 also prevents the progression of endometriosis in a mouse model via anti-proliferative mechanisms and by impacting mediators downstream of ER signaling. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine global proteomic changes evoked by E2 and LXA4 in endometriotic epithelial cells. E2 impacted a greater number of proteins in endometriotic epithelial cells than LXA4. Interestingly, the combination of E2 and LXA4 resulted in a reduced number of regulated proteins, with LXA4 mediating a suppressive effect on E2-mediated signaling. These proteins are involved in diverse pathways of relevance to endometriosis pathology and metabolism, including mRNA translation, growth, proliferation, proteolysis, and immune responses. In summary, this study sheds light on novel pathways involved in endometriosis pathology and further understanding of signaling pathways activated by estrogenic molecules in endometriotic epithelial cells. PMID:26779118

  12. Proteome-Wide Effect of 17-β-Estradiol and Lipoxin A4 in an Endometriotic Epithelial Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jonathan A; Waridel, Patrice; Gori, Ilaria; Quadroni, Manfredo; Canny, Geraldine O

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis affects approximately 10% of women of reproductive age. This chronic, gynecological inflammatory disease results in a decreased quality of life for patients, with the main symptoms including chronic pelvic pain and infertility. The steroid hormone 17-β Estradiol (E2) plays a key role in the pathology. Our previous studies showed that the anti-inflammatory lipid Lipoxin A4 (LXA4) acts as an estrogen receptor-alpha agonist in endometrial epithelial cells, inhibiting certain E2-mediated effects. LXA4 also prevents the progression of endometriosis in a mouse model via anti-proliferative mechanisms and by impacting mediators downstream of ER signaling. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine global proteomic changes evoked by E2 and LXA4 in endometriotic epithelial cells. E2 impacted a greater number of proteins in endometriotic epithelial cells than LXA4. Interestingly, the combination of E2 and LXA4 resulted in a reduced number of regulated proteins, with LXA4 mediating a suppressive effect on E2-mediated signaling. These proteins are involved in diverse pathways of relevance to endometriosis pathology and metabolism, including mRNA translation, growth, proliferation, proteolysis, and immune responses. In summary, this study sheds light on novel pathways involved in endometriosis pathology and further understanding of signaling pathways activated by estrogenic molecules in endometriotic epithelial cells.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Exosomes and Exosome-Free Conditioned Media From Human Osteosarcoma Cell Lines Reveals Secretion of Proteins Related to Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Jerez, Sofía; Araya, Héctor; Thaler, Roman; Charlesworth, M Cristine; López-Solís, Remigio; Kalergis, Alexis M; Céspedes, Pablo F; Dudakovic, Amel; Stein, Gary S; van Wijnen, Andre J; Galindo, Mario

    2017-02-01

    Osteosarcomas are the most prevalent bone tumors in pediatric patients, but can also occur later in life. Bone tumors have the potential to metastasize to lung and occasionally other vital organs. To understand how osteosarcoma cells interact with their micro-environment to support bone tumor progression and metastasis, we analyzed secreted proteins and exosomes from three human osteosarcoma cell lines. Exosome isolation was validated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immuno-blotting for characteristic biomarkers (CD63, CD9, and CD81). Exosomal and soluble proteins (less than 100 kDa) were identified by mass spectrometry analysis using nanoLC-MS/MS and classified by functional gene ontology clustering. We identified a secretome set of >3,000 proteins for both fractions, and detected proteins that are either common or unique among the three osteosarcoma cell lines. Protein ontology comparison of proteomes from exosomes and exosome-free fractions revealed differences in the enrichment of functional categories associated with different biological processes, including those related to tumor progression (i.e., angiogenesis, cell adhesion, and cell migration). The secretome characteristics of osteosarcoma cells are consistent with the pathological properties of tumor cells with metastatic potential. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 351-360, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparative proteome analysis of three mouse lung adenocarcinoma CMT cell lines with different metastatic potential by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kelan; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Stephen, J Fey; Larsen, Peter Mose; Zhang, Xumin; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Metastasis is a lethal attribute of a cancer and presents a continuing therapeutic challenge. Metastasis is a highly complex process and more knowledge about the mechanisms behind metastasis is highly desirable. Isogenic CMT cell lines were selected from a spontaneous mouse lung adenocarcinoma and characterized in vivo to have different metastatic potential. In this study, the comprehensive protein expression profiles of three of these CMT cell lines at passage 5, 15 and 35 were analyzed by 2-DE separation followed by MS identification. As a result, 82 and 40 unique proteins were found to be significantly up- or down-regulated between cell lines with different metastatic potential at passages 5 and 15, respectively. These proteins were identified by MS and most of them have previously been reported to be related to cancer development and/or metastasis. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that several of the proteins were involved in proteasome, cell-cycle and cell-communication pathways. Among them, some keratins, 14-3-3 proteins and 26S proteasome proteins were identified and their aberrant expression may be directly or indirectly involved in cancer development and metastasis. In conclusion, our comprehensive 2-DE-based proteomics studies revealed some candidate proteins, protein families and signaling pathways, which might be important in cancer development and metastasis.

  15. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Treatment Reveals Crosstalks among Proteome, Ubiquitylome and Acetylome in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level. PMID:25825284

  16. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment reveals crosstalks among proteome, ubiquitylome and acetylome in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-03-31

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level.

  17. Lobaplatin arrests cell cycle progression, induces apoptosis and alters the proteome in human cervical cancer cell Line CaSki.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqin; Ran, Li; Fang, Wen; Wang, Donghong

    2014-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecologic tumors. There is an upward trend in the incidence. The objective of this research was to explore the effect of lobaplatin on cervical cancer CaSki cells proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis and analysis of the differential expressed proteins of CaSki cells after exposed to lobaplatin. Our findings have shown that lobaplatin inhibits cell proliferations in human cervical cancer CaSki cells in dose- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry assay confirmed that lobaplatin affected cervical cancer cell survival by blocking cell cycle progression in S phase and G0/G1 phase and inducing apoptosis in dose- and time-dependent manner. Lobaplatin treatment reduced polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 2, ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, hypothetical protein, terminal uridylyltransferase 7, ubiquitin specific protease 16 and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 expression and increase zinc finger protein 91, zinc finger protein, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 precursor, stromal cell protein and laminin subunit alpha-4 expression. Some of the differentially expressed proteins may be associated with antitumor effect of lobaplatin. Lobaplatin showed a good antitumour activity in in vitro models of human cervical cancer cells. These results indicate that lobaplatin could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent in human cervical cancer treatment by inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and changing many kinds of protein molecule expression level.

  18. Proteomic Profiling of Androgen-independent Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Reveals a Role for Protein S during the Development of High Grade and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Musrap, Natasha; Cretu, Daniela; Karagiannis, George S.; Batruch, Ihor; Smith, Chris; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Trudel, Dominique; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation constitutes the principal therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancers. However, this therapeutic intervention usually results in the transition to a more aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer. The elucidation of molecular alterations during the progression to androgen independence is an integral step toward discovering more effective targeted therapies. With respect to identifying crucial mediators of this transition, we compared the proteomes of androgen-independent (PC3, DU145, PPC1, LNCaP-SF, and 22Rv1) and androgen-dependent (LNCaP and VCaP) and/or normal prostate epithelial (RWPE) cell lines using mass spectrometry. We identified more than 100 proteins that were differentially secreted in the androgen-independent cell lines. Of these, Protein S (PROS1) was elevated in the secretomes of all of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, with no detectable secretion in normal and androgen-dependent cell lines. Using quantitative PCR, we observed significantly higher (p < 0.05) tissue expression levels of PROS1 in prostate cancer samples, further indicating its importance in prostate cancer progression. Similarly, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed elevation of PROS1 in high grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥8), and further elevation in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer lesions. We also observed its significant (p < 0.05) elevation in high grade prostate cancer seminal plasma samples. Taken together, these results show that PROS1 is elevated in high grade and castration-resistant prostate cancer and could serve as a potential biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:22908226

  19. Human omental adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium alters the proteomic profile of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Dong, Weihong; Wang, Junjie; Cai, Jing; Wang, Zehua

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been reported to participate in the formation of supportive tumor stroma. The abilities of proliferation and invasion of human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells were significantly enhanced when indirectly cocultured with human omental adipose-derived MSCs (O-ADSCs) in vitro. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, EOC cells were cultured with conditioned medium (CM) from O-ADSCs (O-ADSC), and the effect of O-ADSC CM on the proteomic profile of EOC cells was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The 2-DE assays revealed a global increase in protein expression in the EOC cells treated with CM. Nine proteins were identified from 11 selected protein spots with differential expression after treatment with CM from O-ADSCs. All the nine proteins have been linked to carcinoma and apoptosis, and the migration ability of tumor cells can be regulated by these proteins. Moreover, the upregulation of prohibitin and serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 in EOC cells treated with CM was further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results suggest that O-ADSCs affect the proteomic profile of EOC cells via paracrine mechanism in favor of EOC progression. PMID:28360526

  20. Serum proteomic test in advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer treated in first line with standard chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, F; Rijavec, E; Genova, C; Barletta, G; Biello, F; Maggioni, C; Burrafato, G; Sini, C; Dal Bello, M G; Meyer, K; Roder, J; Roder, H; Grigorieva, J

    2017-01-01

    Background: VeriStrat is a blood-based proteomic test with predictive and prognostic significance in second-line treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This trial was designed to investigate the role of VeriStrat in first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC with standard chemotherapy. Here we present the results for 76 non-squamous patients treated with a combination of carboplatin or cisplatin with pemetrexed. Methods: The test-assigned classifications of VeriStrat Good or VeriStrat Poor to samples collected at baseline. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and objective response. Exploratory analyses of end points separately in carboplatin/pemetrexed and cisplatin/pemetrexed subgroups were also conducted. Results: Patients classified as VeriStrat Good had longer PFS and OS than VeriStrat Poor: 6.5 vs 1.6 months and 10.8 vs 3.4 months, respectively; the corresponding hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.36 (P<0.0001) and 0.26 (P<0.0001); they were also more likely to achieve objective response. Prognostic significance of VeriStrat was confirmed in multivariate analysis. Significant differences in OS and PFS between Veristrat classifications were also found when treatment subgroups were analysed separately. Conclusions: The trial demonstrated clinical utility of VeriStrat as a prognostic test for standard first-line chemotherapy of non-squamous advanced NSCLC. PMID:27898657

  1. Utilization of gene profiling and proteomics to determine mineral pathogenicity in a human mesothelial cell line (LP9/TERT-1)

    PubMed Central

    Hillegass, Jedd M.; Shukla, Arti; MacPherson, Maximilian B.; Bond, Jeffrey P.; Steele, Chad; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying and understanding the early molecular events that underscore mineral pathogenicity using in vitro screening tests is imperative, especially given the large number of synthetic and natural fibers and particles being introduced into the environment. The purpose of the work described here was to examine the ability of gene profiling (Affymetrix microarrays) to predict the pathogenicity of various materials in a human mesothelial cell line (LP9/TERT-1) exposed to equal surface area concentrations (15×106 or 75×106 μm2/cm2) of crocidolite asbestos, nonfibrous talc, fine titanium dioxide (TiO2), or glass beads for 8 or 24 h. Since crocidolite asbestos caused the greatest number of alterations in gene expression, multiplex analysis (Bio-Plex) of proteins released from LP9/TERT-1 cells exposed to crocidolite asbestos was also assessed to reveal if this approach might also be explored in future assays comparing various mineral types. To verify that LP9/TERT-1 cells were more sensitive than other cell types to asbestos, human ovarian epithelial cells (IOSE) were also utilized in microarray studies. Upon assessing changes in gene expression via microarrays, principal component analysis (PCA) of these data was used to identify patterns of differential gene expression. Results PCA of microarray data confirmed that LP9/TERT-1 cells were more responsive than IOSE cells to crocidolite asbestos or nonfibrous talc, and that crocidolite asbestos elicited greater responses in both cell types when compared to nonfibrous talc, TiO2, or glass beads. Bio-Plex analysis demonstrated that asbestos caused an increase in interleukin-13 (IL-13), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These responses were generally dose-dependent (bFGF and G-CSF only) and TNF-α-independent (except for G-CSF). Conclusions Microarray and Bio-Plex analyses are valuable in determining early

  2. Dual-purpose sample trap for on-line strong cation-exchange chromatography/reversed-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for shotgun proteomics. Application to the human Jurkat T-cell proteome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dukjin; Nam, Hyungwook; Kim, Yu-Sam; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2005-04-08

    A dual-purpose sample-trapping column is introduced for the capacity enhancement of proteome analysis in on-line two-dimensional nanoflow liquid chromatography (strong cation-exchange chromatography followed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography) and tandem mass spectrometry. A home-made dual trap is prepared by sequentially packing C18 reversed-phase (RP) particles and SCX resin in a silica capillary tubing (1.5 cm x 200 microm I.D. for SCX, 0.7 cm x 200 microm for RP) ended with a home-made frit and is connected to a nanoflow column having a pulled tip treated with an end frit. Without having a separate fraction collection and concentration process, digested peptide mixtures were loaded directly in the SCX part of the dual trap, and the SCX separation of peptides was performed with a salt step elution initiated by injecting only 8 microL of NH4HCO3 solution from the autosampler to the dual trap. The fractionated peptides at each salt step were directly transferred to the RP trap packed right next to the SCX part for desalting, and a nanoflow LC-MS-MS run was followed. During the sample loading-SCX fractionation-desalting, flow direction was set to bypass the analytical column to prevent contamination. The entire 2D-LC separation and MS-MS analysis were automated. Evaluation of the technique was made with an injection of 15 microg peptide mixtures from human Jurkat T-cell proteome, and the total seven salt step cycles followed by each RPLC run resulted in an identification of 681 proteins.

  3. Proteomic analysis of human U937 cell line activation mediated by Haemophilus influenzae type b P2 porin and its surface-exposed loop 7.

    PubMed

    Severino, Valeria; Chambery, Angela; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Cantisani, Marco; Galdiero, Stefania; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Malorni, Livia; Di Maro, Antimo; Parente, Augusto

    2010-02-05

    The virulence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) has been attributed to a variety of potential factors associated with its cell surface, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and major outer membrane proteins (OMPs). P2 porin, one of the best-characterized porins in terms of its functional characteristics, is the most abundant OMP in Hib and has also been shown to possess proinflammatory activity. To characterize the role played by bacterial surface components in disease onset and development, the proteomic profiling of human U937 cell line activated by H. influenzae type b P2 porin and its most active surface-exposed loop (L7) was performed by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The study provided a list of candidate proteins with potential relevance in the host immune and inflammatory response. Most of the differentially expressed proteins are involved in metabolic processes, remodelling of cytoskeleton, stress response and signal transduction pathways. The results constitute the basis for dissecting signal transduction cascades activated by P2 stimulation and gain insights into the molecular events involved in the modulation of pathogen-host cell interactions.

  4. Proteomic characterization of paired non-malignant and malignant African-American prostate epithelial cell lines distinguishes them by structural proteins.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; Vallega, Karin A; White, Jason; Yu, Kaixian; Yates, Clayton C; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2017-07-11

    While many factors may contribute to the higher prostate cancer incidence and mortality experienced by African-American men compared to their counterparts, the contribution of tumor biology is underexplored due to inadequate availability of African-American patient-derived cell lines and specimens. Here, we characterize the proteomes of non-malignant RC-77 N/E and malignant RC-77 T/E prostate epithelial cell lines previously established from prostate specimens from the same African-American patient with early stage primary prostate cancer. In this comparative proteomic analysis of RC-77 N/E and RC-77 T/E cells, differentially expressed proteins were identified and analyzed for overrepresentation of PANTHER protein classes, Gene Ontology annotations, and pathways. The enrichment of gene sets and pathway significance were assessed using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis, respectively. The gene and protein expression data of age- and stage-matched prostate cancer specimens from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed. Structural and cytoskeletal proteins were differentially expressed and statistically overrepresented between RC-77 N/E and RC-77 T/E cells. Beta-catenin, alpha-actinin-1, and filamin-A were upregulated in the tumorigenic RC-77 T/E cells, while integrin beta-1, integrin alpha-6, caveolin-1, laminin subunit gamma-2, and CD44 antigen were downregulated. The increased protein level of beta-catenin and the reduction of caveolin-1 protein level in the tumorigenic RC-77 T/E cells mirrored the upregulation of beta-catenin mRNA and downregulation of caveolin-1 mRNA in African-American prostate cancer specimens compared to non-malignant controls. After subtracting race-specific non-malignant RNA expression, beta-catenin and caveolin-1 mRNA expression levels were higher in African-American prostate cancer specimens than in Caucasian-American specimens. The "ECM-Receptor Interaction" and "Cell Adhesion Molecules", and the

  5. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  6. Genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on genetically different acute myeloid leukemia cell lines by inhibiting protein synthesis and cell proliferation while inducing apoptosis – molecular insights from an iTRAQ™ quantitative proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Teck Kwang; Port, Sarah Alexandra; Han, Jin-Hua; Chen, Chien-Shing; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a form of cancer that affects the hematopoietic precursor cells with lethal effects. We investigated the prospect of using genistein as an effective alternate therapy for AML. A two-cell line model, one possessing the FLT3 gene with the ITD mutation (MV4−11) and the other with the wildtype FLT3 gene (HL−60) has been employed. Our 8−plexed iTRAQ™−based quantitative proteomics analysis together with various functional studies demonstrated that genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on both the AML cell lines. Genistein treatment on the AML cells showed that the drug arrested the mTOR pathway leading to down−regulation of protein synthesis. Additionally, genistein treatment is found to induce cell death via apoptosis. Contrasting regulatory effects of genistein on the cell cycle of the two cell lines were also identified, with the induction of G2/M phase arrest in HL-60 cells but not in MV4−11 cells. Hence, our study highlights the potent anti-leukemic effect of genistein on AML cells irrespective of their genetic status. This suggests the potential use of genistein as an effective general drug therapy for AML patients. PMID:25859554

  7. Comparative proteomics of a model MCF10A-KRasG12V cell line reveals a distinct molecular signature of the KRasG12V cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C.; Waters, Andrew M.; Bess, Matthew; Harned, Adam; Wei, Bih-Rong; Loncarek, Jadranka; Luke, Brian T.; Orsburn, Benjamin C.; Hollinger, Bradley D.; Stephens, Robert M.; Bagni, Rachel; Martinko, Alex; Wells, James A.; Nissley, Dwight V.; McCormick, Frank; Whiteley, Gordon; Blonder, Josip

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras mutants play a major role in the etiology of most aggressive and deadly carcinomas in humans. In spite of continuous efforts, effective pharmacological treatments targeting oncogenic Ras isoforms have not been developed. Cell-surface proteins represent top therapeutic targets primarily due to their accessibility and susceptibility to different modes of cancer therapy. To expand the treatment options of cancers driven by oncogenic Ras, new targets need to be identified and characterized at the surface of cancer cells expressing oncogenic Ras mutants. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry–based method for molecular profiling of the cell surface using KRasG12V transfected MCF10A (MCF10A-KRasG12V) as a model cell line of constitutively activated KRas and native MCF10A cells transduced with an empty vector (EV) as control. An extensive molecular map of the KRas surface was achieved by applying, in parallel, targeted hydrazide-based cell-surface capturing technology and global shotgun membrane proteomics to identify the proteins on the KRasG12V surface. This method allowed for integrated proteomic analysis that identified more than 500 cell-surface proteins found unique or upregulated on the surface of MCF10A-KRasG12V cells. Multistep bioinformatic processing was employed to elucidate and prioritize targets for cross-validation. Scanning electron microscopy and phenotypic cancer cell assays revealed changes at the cell surface consistent with malignant epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation secondary to KRasG12V activation. Taken together, this dataset significantly expands the map of the KRasG12V surface and uncovers potential targets involved primarily in cell motility, cellular protrusion formation, and metastasis. PMID:27894102

  8. Comparative proteomics of a model MCF10A-KRasG12V cell line reveals a distinct molecular signature of the KRasG12V cell surface.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Waters, Andrew M; Bess, Matthew; Harned, Adam; Wei, Bih-Rong; Loncarek, Jadranka; Luke, Brian T; Orsburn, Benjamin C; Hollinger, Bradley D; Stephens, Robert M; Bagni, Rachel; Martinko, Alex; Wells, James A; Nissley, Dwight V; McCormick, Frank; Whiteley, Gordon; Blonder, Josip

    2016-12-27

    Oncogenic Ras mutants play a major role in the etiology of most aggressive and deadly carcinomas in humans. In spite of continuous efforts, effective pharmacological treatments targeting oncogenic Ras isoforms have not been developed. Cell-surface proteins represent top therapeutic targets primarily due to their accessibility and susceptibility to different modes of cancer therapy. To expand the treatment options of cancers driven by oncogenic Ras, new targets need to be identified and characterized at the surface of cancer cells expressing oncogenic Ras mutants. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based method for molecular profiling of the cell surface using KRasG12V transfected MCF10A (MCF10A-KRasG12V) as a model cell line of constitutively activated KRas and native MCF10A cells transduced with an empty vector (EV) as control. An extensive molecular map of the KRas surface was achieved by applying, in parallel, targeted hydrazide-based cell-surface capturing technology and global shotgun membrane proteomics to identify the proteins on the KRasG12V surface. This method allowed for integrated proteomic analysis that identified more than 500 cell-surface proteins found unique or upregulated on the surface of MCF10A-KRasG12V cells. Multistep bioinformatic processing was employed to elucidate and prioritize targets for cross-validation. Scanning electron microscopy and phenotypic cancer cell assays revealed changes at the cell surface consistent with malignant epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation secondary to KRasG12V activation. Taken together, this dataset significantly expands the map of the KRasG12V surface and uncovers potential targets involved primarily in cell motility, cellular protrusion formation, and metastasis.

  9. Visual exploratory analysis of integrated chromosome 19 proteomic data derived from glioma cancer stem-cell lines based on novel nonlinear dimensional data reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespinats, Sylvain; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2015-05-01

    Chromosome 19 is known to be linked to neurodegeneration and many cancers. Glioma-derived cancer stem cells (GSCs) are tumor-initiating cells and may be refractory to radiation and chemotherapy and thus have important implications for tumor biology and therapeutics. The analysis and interpretation of large proteomic data sets requires the development of new data mining and visualization approaches. Traditional techniques are insufficient to interpret and visualize these resulting experimental data. The emphasis of this paper lies in the presentation of novel approaches for the visualization, clustering and projection representation to unveil hidden data structures relevant for the accurate interpretation of biological experiments. These qualitative and quantitative methods are applied to the proteomic analysis of data sets derived from the GSCs. The achieved clustering and visualization results provide a more detailed insight into the expression patterns for chromosome 19 proteins.

  10. Proteome analysis of responses to ascochlorin in a human osteosarcoma cell line by 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Lee, In-Seon; Magae, Junji; Ando, Kunio; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Chang, Young-Chae

    2006-10-01

    Ascochlorin is a prenyl-phenol compound that was isolated from the fungus Ascochyta viciae. Ascochlorin reduces serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels, suppresses hypertension and tumor development, and ameliorates type I and II diabetes. Here, to better understand the mechanisms by which ascochlorin regulates physiological or pathological events and induces responses in the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we performed differential analysis of the proteome of the human osteosarcoma cells U2OS in response to ascochlorin. In addition, we established the first two-dimensional map of the U2OS proteome. The U2OS cell proteomes with and without treatment with ascochlorin were compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. The largest differences in expression were observed for the epidermal growth factor receptor (4-fold decrease), ribulose-5-phosphate-epimerase (13-fold decrease), ATP-dependent RNA helicase (8-fold decrease), and kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (6-fold decrease). The abundance of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L and minichromosome maintenance protein 7 increased 12- and 8.2-fold, respectively. In addition, Erk 2 was increased 3-fold in U2OS cells treated with ascochlorin. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by western blotting, zymography and RT-PCR analysis.

  11. Insulin stimulated MCF7 breast cancer cells: Proteome dataset.

    PubMed

    Sarvaiya, Hetal A; Lazar, Iulia M

    2016-12-01

    The proteome data provided in this article were acquired from MCF7 breast cancer cells stimulated with insulin, and were generated by using a 2D-SCX (strong cation exchange)/RPLC (reversed phase liquid chromatography) separation protocol followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS) detection. To facilitate data re-processing by more advanced search engines and the extraction of additional information from already existing files, both raw and processed data are provided. The sample preparation, data acquisition and processing protocols are described in detail. The raw data relate to work published in "Proteome profile of the MCF7 cancer cell line: a mass spectrometric evaluation" (Sarvaiya et al., 2006) [1] and are made available through the PRIDE (PRoteomics IDEntifications)/ProteomeXchange public repository with identifier PRIDE: PXD004051 ("2016 update of the PRIDE database and tools" (Vizcaino et al., 2016) [2]).

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for quantitative parallel reaction monitoring of peptide abundance and single-shot proteomic analysis of a human cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Mou, Si; Zhao, Yimeng; Champion, Matthew M.; Dovichi, Norman J .

    2014-01-01

    We coupled capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with an ultrasensitive electrokinetically pumped nanospray ionization source for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of complex proteomes. We first used the system for the parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) analysis of angiotensin II spiked in 0.45 mg/mL of bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. A calibration curve was generated between the loading amount of angiotensin II and intensity of angiotensin II fragment ions. CZE-PRM generated a linear calibration curve across over 4.5 orders of magnitude dynamic range corresponding to angiotensin II loading amount from 2 amole to 150 fmole. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of migration time were <4% and the RSDs of fragment ion intensity were ~20% or less except 150 fmole angiotensin II loading amount data (~36% RSD). We further applied the system for the first bottom up proteomic analysis of a human cell line using CZE-MS/MS. We generated 283 protein identifications from a 1 hour long, single-shot CZE MS/MS analysis of the MCF7 breast cancer cell line digest, corresponding to ~80 ng loading amount. The MCF7 digest was fractionated using a C18 solid phase extraction column; single-shot analysis of a single fraction resulted in 468 protein identifications, which is by far the largest number of protein identifications reported for a mammalian proteomic sample using CZE. PMID:25082526

  13. Proteomics Applications in Dental Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Tian, Weidong; Song, Jinlin

    2017-07-01

    At present, the existence of a variety of dental derived stem cells has been documented. These cells displayed promising clinical application potential not only for teeth and its surrounding tissue regeneration, but also for other tissues, such as nerve and bone regeneration. Proteomics is an unbiased, global informatics tool that provides information on all protein expression levels as well as post-translational modification in cells or tissues and is applicable to dental derived stem cells research. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made to study the global proteome, secrotome, and membrane proteome of dental derived stem cells. Here, we present an overview of the proteomics studies in the context of stem cell research. Particular attention is given to dental derived stem cell types as well as current challenges and opportunities. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1602-1610, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Exosome Proteome of U-87MG Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Sohyun; Ahn, Seunghyun; Yeom, Chang-Hwan; Park, Seyeon

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter secreted by many cell types, and are associated with a wide range of physiological and/or pathological processes. Exosomes containing proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA contribute to cell-to-cell communication and cell-to-environment regulation, however, their biological functions are not yet fully understood. In this report, exosomes in the glioblastoma cell line, U-87MG, were isolated and the proteome was investigated. In addition, exosome proteome changes in U-87MG cells exposed to a low temperature were investigated to elucidate whether the exosome proteome could respond to an external stimulus. Cell culture medium was collected, and exosomes were isolated by continuous centrifugation eliminating cell debris, nucleic acids, and other particles. The morphology of exosomes was observed by cryo-tunneling electron microscopy. According to 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, certain proteins including collagen type VI alpha 1, putative RNA-binding protein 15B chain A, substrate induced remodeling of the active site regulates HTRA1, coatomer protein complex-subunit beta 2, myosin-heavy chain 1, and keratin-type I cytoskeletal 9 showed differences between the control proteome and the low temperature-exposed proteome. PMID:27929413

  15. Integrating cell biology and proteomic approaches in plants.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Šamajová, Olga; Šamaj, Jozef

    2017-04-22

    Significant improvements of protein extraction, separation, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics nurtured advancements of proteomics during the past years. The usefulness of proteomics in the investigation of biological problems can be enhanced by integration with other experimental methods from cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, pharmacology, molecular biology and other omics approaches including transcriptomics and metabolomics. This review aims to summarize current trends integrating cell biology and proteomics in plant science. Cell biology approaches are most frequently used in proteomic studies investigating subcellular and developmental proteomes, however, they were also employed in proteomic studies exploring abiotic and biotic stress responses, vesicular transport, cytoskeleton and protein posttranslational modifications. They are used either for detailed cellular or ultrastructural characterization of the object subjected to proteomic study, validation of proteomic results or to expand proteomic data. In this respect, a broad spectrum of methods is employed to support proteomic studies including ultrastructural electron microscopy studies, histochemical staining, immunochemical localization, in vivo imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins and visualization of protein-protein interactions. Thus, cell biological observations on fixed or living cell compartments, cells, tissues and organs are feasible, and in some cases fundamental for the validation and complementation of proteomic data. Validation of proteomic data by independent experimental methods requires development of new complementary approaches. Benefits of cell biology methods and techniques are not sufficiently highlighted in current proteomic studies. This encouraged us to review most popular cell biology methods used in proteomic studies and to evaluate their relevance and potential for proteomic data validation and enrichment of purely proteomic analyses. We also provide examples of

  16. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D; Kornblum, Harley I

    2016-02-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. © 2016 by The

  17. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D.; Kornblum, Harley I.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E.; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N.; Krag, Sharon S.; Cole, Robert N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In order to complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multi-dimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most a 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using CHO genome exclusively which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. 504 of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  19. A comparative proteomic study identified LRPPRC and MCM7 as putative actors in imatinib mesylate cross-resistance in Lucena cell line

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment has improved since the introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM), cases of resistance have been reported. This resistance has been associated with the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, as a BCR-ABL independent mechanism. The classic pathway studied in MDR promotion is ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family transporters expression, but other mechanisms that drive drug resistance are largely unknown. To better understand IM therapy relapse due to the rise of MDR, we compared the proteomic profiles of K562 and Lucena (K562/VCR) cells. Results The use of 2-DE coupled with a MS approach resulted in the identification of 36 differentially expressed proteins. Differential mRNA levels of leucine-rich PPR motif-containing (LRPPRC) protein, minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (MCM7) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family B (MDR/TAP) member 1 (ABCB1) were capable of defining samples from CML patients as responsive or resistant to therapy. Conclusions Through the data presented in this work, we show the relevance of MDR to IM therapy. In addition, our proteomic approach identified candidate actors involved in resistance, which could lead to additional information on BCR-ABL-independent molecular mechanisms. PMID:22458888

  20. A Cell-type-resolved Liver Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chen; Li, Yanyan; Guo, Feifei; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Li, Dong; Yang, Dong; Xia, Xia; Liu, Wanlin; Zhao, Yan; He, Yangzhige; Li, Xianyu; Sun, Wei; Liu, Qiongming; Song, Lei; Zhen, Bei; Zhang, Pumin; Qian, Xiaohong; Qin, Jun; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Parenchymatous organs consist of multiple cell types, primarily defined as parenchymal cells (PCs) and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs). The cellular characteristics of these organs are not well understood. Proteomic studies facilitate the resolution of the molecular details of different cell types in organs. These studies have significantly extended our knowledge about organogenesis and organ cellular composition. Here, we present an atlas of the cell-type-resolved liver proteome. In-depth proteomics identified 6000 to 8000 gene products (GPs) for each cell type and a total of 10,075 GPs for four cell types. This data set revealed features of the cellular composition of the liver: (1) hepatocytes (PCs) express the least GPs, have a unique but highly homogenous proteome pattern, and execute fundamental liver functions; (2) the division of labor among PCs and NPCs follows a model in which PCs make the main components of pathways, but NPCs trigger the pathways; and (3) crosstalk among NPCs and PCs maintains the PC phenotype. This study presents the liver proteome at cell resolution, serving as a research model for dissecting the cell type constitution and organ features at the molecular level. PMID:27562671

  1. SILAC-Based Proteomic Profiling of the Human MDA-MB-231 Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Line in Response to the Two Antitumoral Lactoferrin Isoforms: The Secreted Lactoferrin and the Intracellular Delta-Lactoferrin

    PubMed Central

    Hoedt, Esthelle; Chaoui, Karima; Huvent, Isabelle; Mariller, Christophe; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Pierce, Annick

    2014-01-01

    Background Lactoferrins exhibit antitumoral activities either as a secretory lactoferrin or an intracellular delta-lactoferrin isoform. These activities involve processes such as regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. While lactoferrin has been shown to exert its function by activating different transduction pathways, delta-lactoferrin has been proven to act as a transcription factor. Like many tumor suppressors, these two proteins are under-expressed in several types of cancer, particularly in breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to compare the differential effects of the re-introduction of lactoferrin isoforms in breast cancer cells we chose the cancerous mammary gland MDA-MB-231 cell line as a model. We produced a cell line stably expressing delta-lactoferrin. We also treated these cells with fresh purified human breast lactoferrin. We performed two quantitative proteomic studies in parallel using SILAC coupled to mass spectrometry in order to compare the effects of different doses of the two lactoferrin isoforms. The proteome of untreated, delta-lactoferrin expressing and human lactoferrin treated MDA-MB-231 cells were compared. Overall, around 5300 proteins were identified and quantified using the in-house developed MFPaQ software. Among these, expression was increased by 1.5-fold or more for around 300 proteins in delta-lactoferrin expressing cells and 190 proteins in lactoferrin treated cells. At the same time, about 200 and 40 proteins were found to be downregulated (0-0.7-fold) in response to delta-lactoferrin and lactoferrin, respectively. Conclusions/Significance Re-introduction of delta-lactoferrin and lactoferrin expression in MDA-MB-231 mainly leads to modifications of protein profiles involved in processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, oxidative stress, the ubiquitin pathway, translation and mRNA quality control. Moreover, this study identified new target genes of delta-lactoferrin transcriptional activity such as SelH, GTF

  2. Poly(I:C) treatment influences the expression of calreticulin and profilin-1 in a human HNSCC cell line: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Matijević, Tanja; Pavelić, Jasminka

    2012-08-01

    Polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly (I:C)) has been formerly known to be an interferon inducer but the mechanism of its action was not revealed until the discovery of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs are members of transmembrane proteins that recognize conserved molecular motifs of viral and bacterial origin and initiate innate immune response. Recent studies have shown that they are also expressed on tumor cells, but their role in these cells is still not clear. TLR3 recognizes double-stranded RNA (poly (I:C)) and is primarily involved in the defense against viruses. TLR3 ligand binding initiates the activation of transcription factors NF-κB, IRF family members, and AP-1, which can induce wide cascading effect on the cell and consequently activate many cellular processes. Since little is known about TLR3 target genes, we have used the proteomic approach to widen the current knowledge. In this study, we have discovered 15 differentially expressed proteins, mostly connected with protein metabolic processes. Furthermore, we have confirmed by Western blot that calreticulin and profilin-1, proteins which have been shown previously to be involved in processes connected with tumor progression, are differentially expressed after poly(I:C) treatment. By using TLR3 small interfering RNA, we showed that calreticulin expression might be TLR3 dependent, unlike profilin-1.

  3. Quantitative definition and monitoring of the host cell protein proteome using iTRAQ – a study of an industrial mAb producing CHO‐S cell line

    PubMed Central

    Chiverton, Lesley M.; Evans, Caroline; Pandhal, Jagroop; Landels, Andrew R.; Rees, Byron J.; Levison, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are few studies defining CHO host cell proteins (HCPs) and the flux of these throughout a downstream purification process. Here we have applied quantitative iTRAQ proteomics to follow the HCP profile of an antibody (mAb) producing CHO‐S cell line throughout a standard downstream purification procedure consisting of a Protein A, cation and anion exchange process. We used both 6 sample iTRAQ experiment to analyze technical replicates of three samples, which were culture harvest (HCCF), Protein A flow through and Protein A eluate and an 8 sample format to analyze technical replicates of four sample types; HCCF compared to Protein A eluate and subsequent cation and anion exchange purification. In the 6 sample iTRAQ experiment, 8781 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 819 proteins (including the mAb chains). Across both the 6 and 8 sample experiments 936 proteins were identified. In the 8 sample comparison, 4187 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 219 proteins. We then used the iTRAQ data to enable estimation of the relative change of individual proteins across the purification steps. These data provide the basis for application of iTRAQ for process development based upon knowledge of critical HCPs. PMID:27214759

  4. Ultraviolet radiation effects on the proteome of skin cells.

    PubMed

    Muller, H Konrad; Woods, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic studies to date have had limited use as an investigative tool in the skin's response to UV radiation. These studies used cell lines and reconstructed skin and have shown evidence of cell injury with oxidative damage and stress induced heat shock proteins. Others changes included altered cytokeratin and cytoskeletal proteins with enhanced expression of TRIM29 as the keratinocytes regenerate. The associated DNA repair requires polη, Rad18/Rad16 and Rev1. In the whole animal these events would be associated with inflammation, remodelling of the epidermis and modulation of the immune response. Longer term changes include ageing and skin cancers such as melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. In the future proteomics will be used to explore these important aspects of photobiology. Better characterisation of the proteins involved should lead to a greater understanding of the skin's response to UV radiation.

  5. Quantitative chemical proteomics profiling differentiates erlotinib from gefitinib in EGFR wild-type non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Angélique; Lamerz, Jens; Meistermann, Hélène; Golling, Sabrina; Scheiblich, Stefan; Hermann, Johannes C; Duchateau-Nguyen, Guillemette; Tzouros, Manuel; Avila, David W; Langen, Hanno; Essioux, Laurent; Klughammer, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Although both erlotinib and gefitinib target the EGF receptor (EGFR), erlotinib is effective in patients with EGFR wild-type or mutated tumors, whereas gefitinib is only beneficial for patients with activating mutations. To determine whether these differences in clinical outcomes can be attributed to their respective protein interaction profiles, a label-free, quantitative chemical proteomics study was conducted. Using this method, 24 proteins were highlighted in the binding profiles of erlotinib and gefitinib. Unlike gefinitib, erlotinib displaced the ternary complex formed by integrin-linked kinase (ILK), α-parvin, and PINCH (IPP). The docking of erlotinib in the three-dimensional structure of ILK showed that erlotinib has the ability to bind to the ATP-binding site, whereas gefitinib is unlikely to bind with high affinity. As the IPP complex has been shown to be involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and erlotinib sensitivity has been correlated with EMT status, we used a cellular model of inducible transition and observed that erlotinib prevented EMT in a more efficient way than gefitinib by acting on E-cadherin expression as well as on IPP levels. A retrospective analysis of the MERIT trial indicated that, besides a high level of E-cadherin, a low level of ILK could be linked to clinical benefit with erlotinib. In conclusion, we propose that, in an EGFR wild-type context, erlotinib may have a complementary mode of action by inhibiting IPP complex activities, resulting in the slowing down of the metastatic process of epithelial tumors.

  6. Proteomic analysis of balding and non-balding mesenchyme-derived dermal papilla cells from androgenetic alopecia patients using on-line two-dimensional reversed phase-reversed phase LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Moon, Pyong-Gon; Kwack, Mi Hee; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Cho, Young-Eun; Park, Ji-Hwan; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Moon Kyu; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2013-06-24

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common and progressive disorder of hair loss with psychological effects. However, the exact mechanisms of baldness have not yet been elucidated. Until now, there has been no report using current proteomic approaches to examine balding and non-balding mesenchyme-derived DPCs simultaneously. To achieve the goal of identifying differentially expressed proteins in balding DPCs compared to non-balding DPCs, we present a strategy combining gel-assisted digestion and automatic on-line two-dimensional reversed phase-reversed phase (2D RP-RP) LC-MS/MS with informatics-assisted label-free protein quantitation. This strategy efficiently quantified the proteins of balding and non-balding DPCs from patients, and 128 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated proteins among 690 distinct proteins were identified in balding DPCs compared to non-balding DPCs. Up-regulated proteins belonging to these pathways in the balding DPCs, including argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1), phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase (PAICS; ADE2), cytoskeleton-associated protein 4 (CKAP4), gelsolin (GSN), Ras GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP1), and S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1), were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gelsolin (GSN), Ras GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP1), plectin-1 (PLEC1), and nonerythroid α-spectrin (SPTAN1) were confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. This proteomic approach to DPCs should help in understanding the pathogenesis of AGA. The results demonstrated the first deep proteomic approach to mesenchyme-derived dermal papilla cells (DPCs), which are a useful model system to investigate the mechanisms of baldness, from human hair and also identified differentially expressed proteins in balding DPCs compared to non-balding DPCs. This study should help in understanding the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and furthermore some proteins differentially expressed could be studied as therapeutic targets for AGA

  7. Proteomics of cell-cell interactions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Lindoso, Rafael S; Sandim, Vanessa; Collino, Federica; Carvalho, Adriana B; Dias, Juliana; da Costa, Milene R; Zingali, Russolina B; Vieyra, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell-cell communications are now under intense study by proteomic approaches. Proteomics has unraveled changes in protein profiling as the result of cell interactions mediated by ligand/receptor, hormones, soluble factors, and the content of extracellular vesicles. Besides being a brief overview of the main and profitable methodologies now available (evaluating theory behind the methods, their usefulness, and pitfalls), this review focuses on-from a proteome perspective-some signaling pathways and post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are essential for understanding ischemic lesions and their recovery in two vital organs in mammals, the heart, and the kidney. Knowledge of misdirection of the proteome during tissue recovery, such as represented by the convergence between fibrosis and cancer, emerges as an important tool in prognosis. Proteomics of cell-cell interaction is also especially useful for understanding how stem cells interact in injured tissues, anticipating clues for rational therapeutic interventions. In the effervescent field of induced pluripotency and cell reprogramming, proteomic studies have shown what proteins from specialized cells contribute to the recovery of infarcted tissues. Overall, we conclude that proteomics is at the forefront in helping us to understand the mechanisms that underpin prevalent pathological processes.

  8. Proteomic Definitions of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Martin H.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent cells isolated from the bone marrow and various other organs. They are able to proliferate and self-renew, as well as to give rise to progeny of at least the osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. Despite this functional definition, MSCs can also be defined by their expression of a distinct set of cell surface markers. In the current paper, studies investigating the proteome of human MSCs are reviewed with the aim to identify common protein markers of MSCs. The proteomic analysis of MSCs revealed a distinct set of proteins representing the basic molecular inventory, including proteins for (i) cell surface markers, (ii) the responsiveness to growth factors, (iii) the reuse of developmental signaling cascades in adult stem cells, (iv) the interaction with molecules of the extracellular matrix, (v) the expression of genes regulating transcription and translation, (vi) the control of the cell number, and (vii) the protection against cellular stress. PMID:21437194

  9. Identification of proteins differentially expressed in adriamycin-resistant (pumc-91/ADM) and parental (pumc-91) human bladder cancer cell lines by proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qian; Lei, Ting; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jin; Zhao, Xu-Hong; Zhang, Man

    2013-03-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy drugs remains a difficult problem in bladder cancer treatment. Protein expression is an important factor underlying multidrug resistance (MDR) in bladder cancer. The aim of the study was to explore differentially expressed proteins responsible for MDR between an adriamycin-resistant human bladder cancer cell line (pumc-91/ADM) and its parental cell line (pumc-91). Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combining image analysis was used to screen the differentially expressed protein spots between the pumc-91/ADM and pumc-91 cell lines. Then, the protein spots were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, annexin A2 (ANXA2) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) were then further verified using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. A total of 30 proteins, including 19 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated proteins, were successfully identified in pumc-91/ADM. According to their different functions, these 30 proteins were classified into 12 categories. Annexin A2 (ANXA2) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) were up-regulated in pumc-91/ADM compared with pumc-91. The proteins identified may have an important clinical significance in MDR, and ANXA2 and NPM1 may take part in mechanism of MDR in bladder cancer.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of paclitaxel sensitive A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cell line and its resistant counterpart A2780TC1 by 2D-DIGE: the role of ERp57.

    PubMed

    Cicchillitti, Lucia; Di Michele, Michela; Urbani, Andrea; Ferlini, Cristiano; Donat, Maria Benedetta; Scambia, Giovanni; Rotilio, Domenico

    2009-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecological cancer mortality. Despite good response to surgery and initial chemotherapy, chemoresistance occurrence represents a major obstacle to a successful therapy. To better understand biological mechanisms at the basis of paclitaxel resistance, a comparative proteomic approach based on DIGE coupled with mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF and LC-MS/MS) was applied to the human epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and its paclitaxel resistant counterpart A2780TC1. Most of the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines belong to the class of stress response (29%), metabolism (21%), and cell cycle and apoptosis (17%). We focused on proteins which were most strongly modulated by paclitaxel resistance and in particular on the disulphide isomerase ERp57, which may represent a chemoresistance biomarker. ERp57 was found to interact with class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3), involved in paclitaxel resistance in ovarian and other cancers. Moreover, we demonstrated a novel localization of this protein in cytoskeleton and described that ERp57/TUBB3 interaction occurs also in the nuclear compartment and in association with a multimeric complex formed by nucleolin, nucleophosmin, hnRNPK, and mortalin. Our data suggest that ERp57 plays an important role in chemoresistance mechanisms in ovarian cancer by modulating the attachment of microtubules to chromosomes following paclitaxel treatment through its interaction with TUBB3.

  11. Recent advances in plant cell wall proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Albenne, Cécile; Boudart, Georges; Irshad, Muhammad; Canut, Hervé; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    The plant extracellular matrix contains typical polysaccharides such as cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins that interact to form dense interwoven networks. Plant cell walls play crucial roles during development and constitute the first barrier of defense against invading pathogens. Cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to the description of the protein content of a compartment specific to plants. Around 400 cell wall proteins (CWPs) of Arabidopsis, representing about one fourth of its estimated cell wall proteome, have been described. The main points to note are that: (i) the diversity of enzymes acting on polysaccharides suggests a great plasticity of cell walls; (ii) CWPs such as proteases, polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes, and lipases may contribute to the generation of signals; (iii) proteins of unknown functions were identified, suggesting new roles for cell walls. Recently, the characterization of PTMs such as N- and O-glycosylations improved our knowledge of CWP structure. The presence of many glycoside hydrolases and proteases suggests a complex regulation of CWPs involving various types of post-translational events. The first 3-D structures to be resolved gave clues about the interactions between CWPs, or between CWPs and polysaccharides. Future work should include: extracting and identifying CWPs still recalcitrant to proteomics, describing the cell wall interactome, improving quantification, and unraveling the roles of each of the CWPs.

  12. Docosohaexanoic acid-supplemented PACA44 cell lines and over-activation of Krebs cycle: an integrated proteomic, metabolomic and interactomic overview.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; D'Amici, Gian Maria; Timperio, Anna Maria; Merendino, Nicolò; Zolla, Lello

    2011-09-06

    Recent investigations have pointed out the ability of fatty acids, in particular of docosohaexanoic acid (DHA), to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in the human PaCa-44 pancreatic cancer cell line through a series of mechanisms which has been hypothesized to mimic apoptosis. While preliminary evidences indicated the involvement of lipid-targeting oxidative stress in DHA-induced apoptotic processes, mainly through the alteration of the glutathione (GSH) homeostasis and oxidized-glutathione (GSSG) turn-over through their extra-cellular extrusion, no further molecular data have been hitherto accumulated. To this end, we hereby propose simultaneous protein-targeting and metabolite-oriented analyses, which have been integrated through the auxilium of in silico elaboration of those protein-protein interaction pathways and enrichment of biological/molecular functions. To determine the most suitable time window for the early onset of the DHA-triggered apoptosis phenomena we performed flow cytometry-based apoptotic assessment at 24, 48 and 72 h. Results indicated that the focus of apoptosis onset ranged from 48 to 72 h. From these analyses it emerges that the metabolism of control human PaCa-44 pancreatic cancer cell line mainly leans on glycolytic pathways, while it is promptly switched to Kreb's cycle activation (overexpression of Kreb's cycle enzymes in DHA-treated cells against controls) and modulation of the GSH homeostasis through an increased production of GSSG-reducing NADPH coenzyme via the shift of the glycolytic energy flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway. Interestingly, it also emerges a role for structural protein alteration in DHA-treated cells, which might be linked to cytoskeletal alterations occurring during apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell wall proteome of pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Kozik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A fast development of a wide variety of proteomic techniques supported by mass spectrometry coupled with high performance liquid chromatography has been observed in recent years. It significantly contributes to the progress in research on the cell wall, very important part of the cells of pathogenic fungi. This complicated structure composed of different polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and melanin, plays a key role in interactions with the host during infection. Changes in the set of the surface-exposed proteins under different environmental conditions provide an effective way for pathogens to respond, adapt and survive in the new niches of infection. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge on proteins, studied both qualitatively and quantitatively, and found within the cell wall of fungal pathogens for humans, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans and other medically important fungi. The described proteomic studies involved the isolation and fractionation of particular sets of proteins of interest with various techniques, often based on differences in their linkages to the polysaccharide scaffold. Furthermore, the proteinaceous contents of extracellular vesicles ("virulence bags") of C. albicans, C. neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis are compared, because their production can partially explain the problem of non-classical protein secretion by fungi. The role assigned to surface-exposed proteins in pathogenesis of fungal infections is enormously high, thus justifying the need for further investigation of cell wall proteomes.

  14. Cell line provenance.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R Ian

    2002-07-01

    Cultured cell lines have become an extremely valuable resource, both in academic research and in industrial biotechnology. However, their value is frequently compromised by misidentification and undetected microbial contamination. As detailed elsewhere in this volume, the technology, both simple and sophisticated, is available to remedy the problems of misidentification and contamination, given the will to apply it. Combined with proper records of the origin and history of the cell line, assays for authentication and contamination contribute to the provenance of the cell line. Detailed records should start from the initiation or receipt of the cell line, and should incorporate data on the donor as well as the tissue from which the cell line was derived, should continue with details of maintenance, and include any accidental as well as deliberate deviations from normal maintenance. Records should also contain details of authentication and regular checks for contamination. With this information, preferably stored in a database, and suitable backed up, the provenance of the cell line so created makes the cell line a much more valuable resource, fit for validation in industrial applications and more likely to provide reproducible experimental results when disseminated for research in other laboratories.

  15. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Fields, J G; Voogt, R D; Deng, B; Lam, Y-W; Mintz, K P

    2015-04-01

    The cell envelope of gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 27% of the predicted open reading frames in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. A total of 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, whereas others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity.

  16. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translational modifications have been characterized in cell wall proteins to date? The purpose of this review is to discuss the experimental results obtained to date using proteomics, as well as some of the new questions challenging future research.

  17. Identification of proteins enriched in rice egg or sperm cells by single-cell proteomics.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Mafumi; Furuta, Kensyo; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Fujita, Chiharu; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Okamoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms.

  18. Identification of Proteins Enriched in Rice Egg or Sperm Cells by Single-Cell Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Mafumi; Furuta, Kensyo; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Fujita, Chiharu; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki; Okamoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, female gamete differentiation, fertilization, and subsequent zygotic development occur in embryo sacs deeply embedded in the ovaries. Despite their importance in plant reproduction and development, how the egg cell is specialized, fuses with the sperm cell, and converts into an active zygote for early embryogenesis remains unclear. This lack of knowledge is partly attributable to the difficulty of direct analyses of gametes in angiosperms. In the present study, proteins from egg and sperm cells obtained from rice flowers were separated by one-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and globally identified by highly sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy. Proteome analyses were also conducted for seedlings, callus, and pollen grains to compare their protein expression profiles to those of gametes. The proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000265. A total of 2,138 and 2,179 expressed proteins were detected in egg and sperm cells, respectively, and 102 and 77 proteins were identified as preferentially expressed in egg and sperm cells, respectively. Moreover, several rice or Arabidopsis lines with mutations in genes encoding the putative gamete-enriched proteins showed clear phenotypic defects in seed set or seed development. These results suggested that the proteomic data presented in this study are foundational information toward understanding the mechanisms of reproduction and early development in angiosperms. PMID:23936051

  19. Proteomic and comparative genomic analysis of two Brassica napus lines differing in oil content.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Zhang, Chun-yu; Wang, Xiao-dong; Wang, Hao; Long, Yan; Yin, Yong-tai; Li, Dian-rong; Tian, Jian-Hua; Li, Zai-yun; Lin, Zhi-wei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Li, Mao-Teng

    2013-11-01

    Ultrastructural observations, combined with proteomic and comparative genomic analyses, were applied to interpret the differences in protein composition and oil-body characteristics of mature seed of two Brassica napus lines with high and low oil contents of 55.19% and 36.49%, respectively. The results showed that oil bodies were arranged much closer in the high than in the low oil content line, and differences in cell size and thickness of cell walls were also observed. There were 119 and 32 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) of total and oil-body proteins identified. The 119 DEPs of total protein were mainly involved in the oil-related, dehydration-related, storage and defense/disease, and some of these may be related to oil formation. The DEPs involved with dehydration-related were both detected in total and oil-body proteins for high and low oil lines and may be correlated with the number and size of oil bodies in the different lines. Some genes that corresponded to DEPs were confirmed by quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping analysis for oil content. The results revealed that some candidate genes deduced from DEPs were located in the confidence intervals of QTL for oil content. Finally, the function of one gene that coded storage protein was verified by using a collection of Arabidopsis lines that can conditionally express the full length cDNA from developing seeds of B. napus.

  20. Filter-Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) for Improved Proteome Analysis of Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Orla; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian host cell line for biopharmaceutical production because of their ability to correctly fold and posttranslationally modify recombinant proteins that are compatible with human use. Proteomics, along with other 'omic platforms, are being used to understand the biology of CHO cells with the ultimate aim of enhancing CHO cell factories for more efficient production of biopharmaceuticals. In this chapter, we will describe an efficient protocol called Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) for the extraction of proteins from CHO cells for proteomic studies. FASP uses a common ultrafiltration device whereby the membrane pores are small enough to allow contaminating detergents to pass through, while proteins are too large and are retained and concentrated in the filter unit. This method of sample preparation and protein digestion is universally applicable and can be easily employed in any proteomics facilities as standard everyday laboratory reagents and equipment are used.

  1. Proteome adaptation in cell reprogramming proceeds via distinct transcriptional networks.

    PubMed

    Benevento, Marco; Tonge, Peter D; Puri, Mira C; Hussein, Samer M I; Cloonan, Nicole; Wood, David L; Grimmond, Sean M; Nagy, Andras; Munoz, Javier; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-10

    The ectopic expression of Oct4, Klf4, c-Myc and Sox2 (OKMS) transcription factors allows reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The reprogramming process, which involves a complex network of molecular events, is not yet fully characterized. Here we perform a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis to probe in-depth dynamic proteome changes during somatic cell reprogramming. Our data reveal defined waves of proteome resetting, with the first wave occurring 48 h after the activation of the reprogramming transgenes and involving specific biological processes linked to the c-Myc transcriptional network. A second wave of proteome reorganization occurs in a later stage of reprogramming, where we characterize the proteome of two distinct pluripotent cellular populations. In addition, the overlay of our proteome resource with parallel generated -omics data is explored to identify post-transcriptionally regulated proteins involved in key steps during reprogramming.

  2. In-Depth Profiling of the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Proteome for Clinical Blood Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Končarević, Saša; Lößner, Christopher; Pike, Ian; Zucht, Hans-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are an easy accessible cellular part of the blood organ and, along with platelets, represent the only site of active gene expression in blood. These cells undergo immunophenotypic changes in various diseases and represent a peripheral source of monitoring gene expression and posttranslational modifications relevant to many diseases. Little is known about the source of many blood proteins and we hypothesise that release from PBMCs through active and passive mechanisms may account for a substantial part of the plasma proteome. The use of state-of-the-art proteomic profiling methods in PBMCs will enable minimally invasive monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment and discovery of biomarkers. To achieve this goal, detailed mapping of the PBMC proteome using a sensitive, robust, and quantitative methodological setup is required. We have applied an indepth gel-free proteomics approach using tandem mass tags (TMT), unfractionated and SCX fractionated PBMC samples, and LC-MS/MS with various modulations. This study represents a benchmark in deciphering the PBMC proteome as we provide a deep insight by identifying 4129 proteins and 25503 peptides. The identified proteome defines the scope that enables PBMCs to be characterised as cellular major biomarker pool within the blood organ. PMID:24724028

  3. In-depth profiling of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells proteome for clinical blood proteomics.

    PubMed

    Končarević, Saša; Lößner, Christopher; Kuhn, Karsten; Prinz, Thorsten; Pike, Ian; Zucht, Hans-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are an easy accessible cellular part of the blood organ and, along with platelets, represent the only site of active gene expression in blood. These cells undergo immunophenotypic changes in various diseases and represent a peripheral source of monitoring gene expression and posttranslational modifications relevant to many diseases. Little is known about the source of many blood proteins and we hypothesise that release from PBMCs through active and passive mechanisms may account for a substantial part of the plasma proteome. The use of state-of-the-art proteomic profiling methods in PBMCs will enable minimally invasive monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment and discovery of biomarkers. To achieve this goal, detailed mapping of the PBMC proteome using a sensitive, robust, and quantitative methodological setup is required. We have applied an indepth gel-free proteomics approach using tandem mass tags (TMT), unfractionated and SCX fractionated PBMC samples, and LC-MS/MS with various modulations. This study represents a benchmark in deciphering the PBMC proteome as we provide a deep insight by identifying 4129 proteins and 25503 peptides. The identified proteome defines the scope that enables PBMCs to be characterised as cellular major biomarker pool within the blood organ.

  4. The proteome of sickle cell disease: insights from exploratory proteomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Yuditskaya, Susan; Suffredini, Anthony F; J Kato, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    The expanding realm of exploratory proteomics has added a unique dimension to the study of the complex pathophysiology involved in sickle cell disease. A review of proteomic studies published on sickle cell erythrocytes and plasma shows trends of upregulation of antioxidant proteins, an increase in cytoskeletal defects, an increase in protein repair and turnover components, a decrease in lipid raft proteins and apolipoprotein dysregulation. Many of these findings are consistent with the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease, including high oxidant burden, resulting in damage to cytoskeletal and other proteins, and erythrocyte rigidity. More unexpected findings, such as a decrease in lipid raft components and apolipoprotein dysregulation, offer previously unexplored targets for future investigation and potential therapeutic intervention. Exploratory proteomic profiling is a valuable source of hypothesis generation for the cellular and molecular pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. PMID:21142886

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C.; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:28248212

  6. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-12

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  7. Cell-specific proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuet, Kai P.; Doma, Meenakshi K.; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Tirrell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of rare cells in heterogeneous environments presents difficult challenges. Systematic methods are needed to enrich, identify, and quantify proteins expressed in specific cells in complex biological systems including multicellular plants and animals. Here, we have engineered a Caenorhabditis elegans phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase capable of tagging proteins with the reactive noncanonical amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine. We achieved spatiotemporal selectivity in the labeling of C. elegans proteins by controlling expression of the mutant synthetase using cell-selective (body wall muscles, intestinal epithelial cells, neurons, and pharyngeal muscle) or state-selective (heat-shock) promoters in several transgenic lines. Tagged proteins are distinguished from the rest of the protein pool through bioorthogonal conjugation of the azide side chain to probes that permit visualization and isolation of labeled proteins. By coupling our methodology with stable-isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we successfully profiled proteins expressed in pharyngeal muscle cells, and in the process, identified proteins not previously known to be expressed in these cells. Our results show that tagging proteins with spatiotemporal selectivity can be achieved in C. elegans and illustrate a convenient and effective approach for unbiased discovery of proteins expressed in targeted subsets of cells. PMID:25691744

  8. Mass spectrometry–based proteomics in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The global analysis of protein composition, modifications, and dynamics are important goals in cell biology. Mass spectrometry (MS)–based proteomics has matured into an attractive technology for this purpose. Particularly, high resolution MS methods have been extremely successful for quantitative analysis of cellular and organellar proteomes. Rapid advances in all areas of the proteomic workflow, including sample preparation, MS, and computational analysis, should make the technology more easily available to a broad community and turn it into a staple methodology for cell biologists. PMID:20733050

  9. How well can morphology assess cell death modality? A proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Chernobrovkin, Alexey L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2016-01-01

    While the focus of attempts to classify cell death programs has finally shifted in 2010s from microscopy-based morphological characteristics to biochemical assays, more recent discoveries have put the underlying assumptions of many such assays under severe stress, mostly because of the limited specificity of the assays. On the other hand, proteomics can quantitatively measure the abundances of thousands of proteins in a single experiment. Thus proteomics could develop a modern alternative to both semiquantitative morphology assessment as well as single-molecule biochemical assays. Here we tested this hypothesis by analyzing the proteomes of cells dying after been treated with various chemical agents. The most striking finding is that, for a multivariate model based on the proteome changes in three cells lines, the regulation patterns of the 200–500 most abundant proteins typically attributed to household type more accurately reflect that of the proteins directly interacting with the drug than any other protein subset grouped by common function or biological process, including cell death. This is in broad agreement with the 'rigid cell death mechanics' model where drug action mechanism and morphological changes caused by it are bijectively linked. This finding, if confirmed, will open way for a broad use of proteomics in death modality assessment. PMID:27752363

  10. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  11. Proteomics analysis of rough endoplasmic reticulum in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Schnepp, Patricia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-05-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed ER to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by 1D SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. GO analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001081 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001081). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. CLO: The cell line ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lines have been widely used in biomedical research. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is a member of the OBO Foundry library that covers the domain of cell lines. Since its publication two years ago, significant updates have been made, including new groups joining the CLO consortium, new cell line cells, upper level alignment with the Cell Ontology (CL) and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation, and logical extensions. Construction and content Collaboration among the CLO, CL, and OBI has established consensus definitions of cell line-specific terms such as ‘cell line’, ‘cell line cell’, ‘cell line culturing’, and ‘mortal’ vs. ‘immortal cell line cell’. A cell line is a genetically stable cultured cell population that contains individual cell line cells. The hierarchical structure of the CLO is built based on the hierarchy of the in vivo cell types defined in CL and tissue types (from which cell line cells are derived) defined in the UBERON cross-species anatomy ontology. The new hierarchical structure makes it easier to browse, query, and perform automated classification. We have recently added classes representing more than 2,000 cell line cells from the RIKEN BRC Cell Bank to CLO. Overall, the CLO now contains ~38,000 classes of specific cell line cells derived from over 200 in vivo cell types from various organisms. Utility and discussion The CLO has been applied to different biomedical research studies. Example case studies include annotation and analysis of EBI ArrayExpress data, bioassays, and host-vaccine/pathogen interaction. CLO’s utility goes beyond a catalogue of cell line types. The alignment of the CLO with related ontologies combined with the use of ontological reasoners will support sophisticated inferencing to advance translational informatics development. PMID:25852852

  13. Maize (Zea mays L.) seedling leaf nuclear proteome and differentially expressed proteins between a hybrid and its parental lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Chen, Yanhong; Li, Chuan; Wang, Tianya; Wang, Rui; Wang, Bo; Hu, Sha; Du, Xiaofen; Xing, Hongyan; Song, Xiao; Yao, Yingyin; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the underlying molecular basis of leaf development in maize, a reference map of nuclear proteins in basal region of seedling leaf was established using a combination of 2DE and MALDI-TOF-MS. In total, 441 reproducible protein spots in nuclear proteome of maize leaf basal region were detected with silver staining in a pH range of 3-10, among which 203 spots corresponding to 163 different proteins were identified. As expected, proteins implicated in RNA and protein-associated functions were overrepresented in nuclear proteome. Remarkably, a high percentage (10%) of proteins was identified to be involved in cell division and growth. In addition, comparative nuclear proteomic analysis in leaf basal region of highly heterotic hybrid Mo17/B73 and its parental lines was also performed and 52 of 445 (11.69%) detected protein spots were differentially expressed between the hybrid and its parental lines, among which 16 protein spots displayed nonadditively expressed pattern. These results indicated that hybridization between two parental lines can cause changes in the expression of a variety of nuclear proteins, which may be responsible for the observed leaf size heterosis.

  14. A cell-based approach to the human proteome project.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Neil L

    2012-10-01

    The general scope of a project to determine the protein molecules that comprise the cells within the human body is framed. By focusing on protein primary structure as expressed in specific cell types, this concept for a cell-based version of the Human Proteome Project (CB-HPP) is crafted in a manner analogous to the Human Genome Project while recognizing that cells provide a primary context in which to define a proteome. Several activities flow from this articulation of the HPP, which enables the definition of clear milestones and deliverables. The CB-HPP highlights major gaps in our knowledge regarding cell heterogeneity and protein isoforms, and calls for development of technology that is capable of defining all human cell types and their proteomes. The main activities will involve mapping and sorting cell types combined with the application of beyond the state-of-the art in protein mass spectrometry.

  15. A Cell-Based Approach to the Human Proteome Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Neil L.

    2012-10-01

    The general scope of a project to determine the protein molecules that comprise the cells within the human body is framed. By focusing on protein primary structure as expressed in specific cell types, this concept for a cell-based version of the Human Proteome Project (CB-HPP) is crafted in a manner analogous to the Human Genome Project while recognizing that cells provide a primary context in which to define a proteome. Several activities flow from this articulation of the HPP, which enables the definition of clear milestones and deliverables. The CB-HPP highlights major gaps in our knowledge regarding cell heterogeneity and protein isoforms, and calls for development of technology that is capable of defining all human cell types and their proteomes. The main activities will involve mapping and sorting cell types combined with the application of beyond the state-of-the art in protein mass spectrometry.

  16. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  17. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Detection of Dichlorvos Adducts in a Hepatocyte Cell Line

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    modified targets in lysed human hepatocyte- like cells (HepaRG) using a direct liquid chromatography−mass spectrometry (LC−MS) assay of cell lysates...parasympathetic autonomic nervous system5 and the neuromuscular systems.3 Recent studies also suggest that DDVP affects non-neuronal targets in human ... human hepatocyte-like cell line (HepaRG) with DDVP. Then, we identified DDVP-modified targets in these lysates either with shotgun proteomics or with a

  19. Mitotic Spindle Proteomics in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Mary Kate; Poole, Daniel S.; Xu, Tao; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Skop, Ahna R.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis is a fundamental process in the development of all organisms. The mitotic spindle guides the cell through mitosis as it mediates the segregation of chromosomes, the orientation of the cleavage furrow, and the progression of cell division. Birth defects and tissue-specific cancers often result from abnormalities in mitotic events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1155 proteins and used Gene Ontology (GO) analysis to categorize proteins into cellular component groups. We then compared our data to the previously published CHO midbody proteome and identified proteins that are unique to the CHO spindle. Our data represent the first mitotic spindle proteome in CHO cells, which augments the list of mitotic spindle components from mammalian cells. PMID:21647379

  20. Proteome changes in tomato lines transformed with phytoene synthase-1 in the sense and antisense orientations.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Francesca P; Koistinen, P Kaisa; Gerrish, Christopher; Halket, John M; Patel, Raj K P; Fraser, Paul D; Bramley, Peter M

    2012-10-01

    The commercial cultivation of genetically engineered (GE) crops in Europe has met with considerable consumer resistance, which has led to vigorous safety assessments including the measurement of substantial equivalence between the GE and parent lines. This necessitates the identification and quantification of significant changes to the metabolome and proteome in the GE crop. In this study, the quantitative proteomic analysis of tomato fruit from lines that have been transformed with the carotenogenic gene phytoene synthase-1 (Psy-1), in the sense and antisense orientations, in comparison with a non-transformed, parental line is described. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), with tandem mass spectrometry, has been used to identify proteins, while quantification has been carried out with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Fruit from the GE plants showed significant alterations to their proteomes compared with the parental line, especially those from the Psy-1 sense transformants. These results demonstrate that MudPIT and iTRAQ are suitable techniques for the verification of substantial equivalence of the proteome in GE crops.

  1. Subcellular Fractionation Enhances Proteome Coverage of Pancreatic Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Kadiyala, Vivek; Ghoulidi, Ali; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Subcellular fractionation of whole cell lysates offers a means of simplifying protein mixtures, potentially permitting greater depth of proteomic analysis. Here we compare proteins identified from pancreatic duct cells (PaDC) following organelle enrichment to those identified from PaDC whole cell lysates to determine if the additional procedures of subcellular fractionation increases proteome coverage. Methods We used differential centrifugation to enrich for nuclear, mitochondrial, membrane, and cytosolic proteins. We then compared - via mass spectrometry-based analysis - the number of proteins identified from these four fractions with four biological replicates of PaDC whole cell lysates. Results We identified similar numbers of proteins among all samples investigated. In total, 1658 non-redundant proteins were identified in the replicate samples, while 2196 were identified in the subcellular fractionation samples, corresponding to a 30% increase. Additionally, we noted that each organelle fraction was in fact enriched with proteins specific to the targeted organelle. Conclusions Subcellular fractionation of PaDC resulted in greater proteome coverage compared to PaDC whole cell lysate analysis. Although more labor intensive and time consuming, subcellular fractionation provides greater proteome coverage, and enriches for compartmentalized sub-populations of proteins. Application of this subcellular fractionation strategy allows for a greater depth of proteomic analysis and thus a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of pancreatic disease. PMID:23352835

  2. Systematic proteomic analysis of human hepotacellular carcinoma cells reveals molecular pathways and networks involved in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Shen, Huali; Yu, Hongxiu; Zhong, Fan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Jian; Li, Hong; Chen, Jie; Liu, Yinkun; Yang, Pengyuan

    2011-06-01

    Systematic proteomic studying of the mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis remains challenging. We performed comparative proteomic and pathway analysis of four human metastatic HCC cell lines to identify metastasis-associated proteins. These HCC cell lines had a similar genetic background but with an increasing potential of metastasis. Using a combination of two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a total of 125 proteins and their post-translational modification forms or isoforms were found to be differentially expressed in the cell lines. Among them, 29 were gradually up-regulated whereas 17 were down-regulated with increasing metastatic potential. Instead of a traditional single-gene readout, global bioinformatics analysis was carried out, which revealed that the glycolysis pathway was the most significantly enriched pathway. The heat shock proteins (HSPs) centered and NF-kappaB centered networks were also enriched in the result, which may imply the key function of inflaming on metastasis. Meanwhile, knockdown of HDGF, an up-regulated protein and a target of NF-kappaB, induced cell apoptosis in the metastatic HCC cells. This work provides a demonstration that a combination of bioinformatics and comparative proteomics can help in finding out potential biomarkers associated with HCC metastasis on the level of pathways.

  3. Advancing Cell Biology Through Proteomics in Space and Time (PROSPECTS)*

    PubMed Central

    Lamond, Angus I.; Uhlen, Mathias; Horning, Stevan; Makarov, Alexander; Robinson, Carol V.; Serrano, Luis; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Werenskiold, Anne Katrin; Andersen, Jens S.; Vorm, Ole; Linial, Michal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The term “proteomics” encompasses the large-scale detection and analysis of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Driven by major improvements in mass spectrometric instrumentation, methodology, and data analysis, the proteomics field has burgeoned in recent years. It now provides a range of sensitive and quantitative approaches for measuring protein structures and dynamics that promise to revolutionize our understanding of cell biology and molecular mechanisms in both human cells and model organisms. The Proteomics Specification in Time and Space (PROSPECTS) Network is a unique EU-funded project that brings together leading European research groups, spanning from instrumentation to biomedicine, in a collaborative five year initiative to develop new methods and applications for the functional analysis of cellular proteins. This special issue of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics presents 16 research papers reporting major recent progress by the PROSPECTS groups, including improvements to the resolution and sensitivity of the Orbitrap family of mass spectrometers, systematic detection of proteins using highly characterized antibody collections, and new methods for absolute as well as relative quantification of protein levels. Manuscripts in this issue exemplify approaches for performing quantitative measurements of cell proteomes and for studying their dynamic responses to perturbation, both during normal cellular responses and in disease mechanisms. Here we present a perspective on how the proteomics field is moving beyond simply identifying proteins with high sensitivity toward providing a powerful and versatile set of assay systems for characterizing proteome dynamics and thereby creating a new “third generation” proteomics strategy that offers an indispensible tool for cell biology and molecular medicine. PMID:22311636

  4. Plasma membrane proteomics of human embryonic stem cells and human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dormeyer, Wilma; van Hoof, Dennis; Braam, Stefan R; Heck, Albert J R; Mummery, Christine L; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2008-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are of immense interest in regenerative medicine as they can self-renew indefinitely and can give rise to any adult cell type. Human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) are the malignant counterparts of hESCs found in testis tumors. hESCs that have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in culture are essentially indistinguishable from hECC. Direct comparison of karyotypically normal hESCs with hECCs could lead to understanding differences between their mechanisms of growth control and contribute to implementing safe therapeutic use of stem cells without the development of germ cell cancer. While several comparisons of hECCs and hESCs have been reported, their cell surface proteomes are largely unknown, partly because plasma membrane proteomics is still a major challenge. Here, we present a strategy for the identification of plasma membrane proteins that has been optimized for application to the relatively small numbers of stem cells normally available, and that does not require tedious cell fractionation. The method led to the identification of 237 and 219 specific plasma membrane proteins in the hESC line HUES-7 and the hECC line NT2/D1, respectively. In addition to known stemness-associated cell surface markers like ALP, CD9, and CTNNB, a large number of receptors, transporters, signal transducers, and cell-cell adhesion proteins were identified. Our study revealed that several Hedgehog and Wnt pathway members are differentially expressed in hESCs and hECCs including NPC1, FZD2, FZD6, FZD7, LRP6, and SEMA4D, which play a pivotal role in stem cell self-renewal and cancer growth. Various proteins encoded on chromosome 12p, duplicated in testicular cancer, were uniquely identified in hECCs. These included GAPDH, LDHB, YARS2, CLSTN3, CSDA, LRP6, NDUFA9, and NOL1, which are known to be upregulated in testicular cancer. Distinct HLA molecules were revealed on the surface of hESCs and hECCs, despite their low abundance. Results were

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of human mesenchymal and embryonic stem cells: towards the definition of a mesenchymal stem cell proteomic signature.

    PubMed

    Roche, Stephane; Delorme, Bruno; Oostendorp, Robert A J; Barbet, Romain; Caton, David; Noel, Daniele; Boumediene, Karim; Papadaki, Helen A; Cousin, Beatrice; Crozet, Carole; Milhavet, Ollivier; Casteilla, Louis; Hatzfeld, Jacques; Jorgensen, Christian; Charbord, Pierre; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are adult multipotential progenitors which have a high potential in regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different tissues throughout the body and their homogeneity in terms of phenotype and differentiation capacities is a real concern. To address this issue, we conducted a 2-DE gel analysis of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, synovial membrane and umbilical vein wall. We confirmed that BM and adipose tissue derived cells were very similar, which argue for their interchangeable use for cell therapy. We also compared human mesenchymal to embryonic stem cells and showed that umbilical vein wall stem cells, a neo-natal cell type, were closer to BM cells than to embryonic stem cells. Based on these proteomic data, we could propose a panel of proteins which were the basis for the definition of a mesenchymal stem cell proteomic signature.

  6. Affinity proteomics reveals human host factors implicated in discrete stages of LINE-1 retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Martin S; LaCava, John; Mita, Paolo; Molloy, Kelly R; Huang, Cheng Ran Lisa; Li, Donghui; Adney, Emily M; Jiang, Hua; Burns, Kathleen H; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P; Boeke, Jef D; Dai, Lixin

    2013-11-21

    LINE-1s are active human DNA parasites that are agents of genome dynamics in evolution and disease. These streamlined elements require host factors to complete their life cycles, whereas hosts have developed mechanisms to combat retrotransposition's mutagenic effects. As such, endogenous L1 expression levels are extremely low, creating a roadblock for detailed interactomic analyses. Here, we describe a system to express and purify highly active L1 RNP complexes from human suspension cell culture and characterize the copurified proteome, identifying 37 high-confidence candidate interactors. These data sets include known interactors PABPC1 and MOV10 and, with in-cell imaging studies, suggest existence of at least three types of compositionally and functionally distinct L1 RNPs. Among the findings, UPF1, a key nonsense-mediated decay factor, and PCNA, the polymerase-delta-associated sliding DNA clamp, were identified and validated. PCNA interacts with ORF2p via a PIP box motif; mechanistic studies suggest that this occurs during or immediately after target-primed reverse transcription.

  7. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions. PMID:23641247

  8. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions.

  9. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  10. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  11. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-03-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices.

  12. Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Human Lens Fiber Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Han, Jun; David, Larry L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The human lens fiber cell insoluble membrane fraction contains important membrane proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, and cytosolic proteins that are strongly associated with the membrane. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens fiber cell membrane proteome and phosphoproteome from human lenses. Methods. HPLC-mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), without or with phosphopeptide enrichment, was applied to study the proteome and phosphoproteome of lens fiber cell membranes, respectively. Results. In total, 951 proteins were identified, including 379 integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins. Enriched gene categories and pathways based on the proteomic analysis include carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruvate metabolism), proteasome, cell-cell signaling and communication (GTP binding, gap junction, focal adhesion), glutathione metabolism, and actin regulation. The combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and MudPIT analysis revealed 855 phosphorylation sites on 271 proteins, including 455 phosphorylation sites that have not been previously identified. PKA, PKC, CKII, p38MAPK, and RSK are predicted as the major kinases for phosphorylation on the sites identified in the human lens membrane fraction. Conclusions. The results presented herein significantly expand the characterized proteome and phosphoproteome of the human lens fiber cell and provide a valuable reference for future research in studies of lens development and disease. PMID:23349431

  13. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acquired tamoxifen resistance involves complex signaling events that are not yet fully understood. Successful therapeutic intervention to delay the onset of hormone resistance depends critically on mechanistic elucidation of viable molecular targets associated with hormone resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the global proteomic alterations in a tamoxifen resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cell line obtained by long term treatment of the wild type MCF-7 cell line with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH Tam). Methods We cultured MCF-7 cells with 4-OH Tam over a period of 12 months to obtain the resistant cell line. A gel-free, quantitative proteomic method was used to identify and quantify the proteome of the resistant cell line. Nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to analyze fractionated peptide mixtures that were isobarically labeled from the resistant and control cell lysates. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blots were used to verify selected proteomic changes. Lentiviral vector transduction was used to generate MCF-7 cells stably expressing S100P. Online pathway analysis was performed to assess proteomic signatures in tamoxifen resistance. Survival analysis was done to evaluate clinical relevance of altered proteomic expressions. Results Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed a wide breadth of signaling events during transition to acquired tamoxifen resistance. A total of 629 proteins were found significantly changed with 364 up-regulated and 265 down-regulated. Collectively, these changes demonstrated the suppressed state of estrogen receptor (ER) and ER-regulated genes, activated survival signaling and increased migratory capacity of the resistant cell line. The protein S100P was found to play a critical role in conferring tamoxifen resistance and enhanced cell motility. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the adaptive changes in the proteome of

  14. Proteomics of lung cell biology and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stewart J

    2007-10-01

    Proteomics has the goal of defining the complete protein complement of biological systems, which can then be analyzed in a comparative fashion to generate informative data regarding protein expression and function. Proteomic analyses can also facilitate the discovery of biomarkers that can be used to diagnose and monitor disease severity, activity and therapeutic response, as well as to identify new targets for drug development. A major challenge for proteomics, however, has been detecting low-abundance proteins in complex biological fluids. This review summarizes how proteomic analyses have advanced lung cell biology and facilitated the identification of new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in respiratory disorders, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, acute lung injury and sarcoidosis. The impact of nanotechnology and microfluidics, as well as studies of post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions (the interactome), are considered. Furthermore, the application of systems-biology approaches to organize and analyze data regarding the lung proteome, interactome, genome, transcriptome, metabolome, glycome and small RNAome (regulatory RNAs), should facilitate future conceptual advances regarding lung cell biology, disease pathogenesis, biomarker discovery and drug development.

  15. Plant organelle proteomics: collaborating for optimal cell function.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Bourguignon, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert; Ephritikhine, Geneviève; Ferro, Myriam; Jaquinod, Michel; Alexiou, Konstantinos G; Chardot, Thierry; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Jolivet, Pascale; Doonan, John H; Rakwal, Randeep

    2011-01-01

    Organelle proteomics describes the study of proteins present in organelle at a particular instance during the whole period of their life cycle in a cell. Organelles are specialized membrane bound structures within a cell that function by interacting with cytosolic and luminal soluble proteins making the protein composition of each organelle dynamic. Depending on organism, the total number of organelles within a cell varies, indicating their evolution with respect to protein number and function. For example, one of the striking differences between plant and animal cells is the plastids in plants. Organelles have their own proteins, and few organelles like mitochondria and chloroplast have their own genome to synthesize proteins for specific function and also require nuclear-encoded proteins. Enormous work has been performed on animal organelle proteomics. However, plant organelle proteomics has seen limited work mainly due to: (i) inter-plant and inter-tissue complexity, (ii) difficulties in isolation of subcellular compartments, and (iii) their enrichment and purity. Despite these concerns, the field of organelle proteomics is growing in plants, such as Arabidopsis, rice and maize. The available data are beginning to help better understand organelles and their distinct and/or overlapping functions in different plant tissues, organs or cell types, and more importantly, how protein components of organelles behave during development and with surrounding environments. Studies on organelles have provided a few good reviews, but none of them are comprehensive. Here, we present a comprehensive review on plant organelle proteomics starting from the significance of organelle in cells, to organelle isolation, to protein identification and to biology and beyond. To put together such a systematic, in-depth review and to translate acquired knowledge in a proper and adequate form, we join minds to provide discussion and viewpoints on the collaborative nature of organelles in

  16. Challenges and Strategies for Proteome Analysis of the Interaction of Human Pathogenic Fungi with Host Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Thomas; Luo, Ting; Schmidt, Hella; Shopova, Iordana; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic human pathogenic fungi including the saprotrophic mold Aspergillus fumigatus and the human commensal Candida albicans can cause severe fungal infections in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. The first line of defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens is the innate immune system. Phagocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils and dendritic cells are an important pillar of the innate immune response and have evolved versatile defense strategies against microbial pathogens. On the other hand, human-pathogenic fungi have sophisticated virulence strategies to counteract the innate immune defense. In this context, proteomic approaches can provide deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of host immune cells with fungal pathogens. This is crucial for the identification of both diagnostic biomarkers for fungal infections and therapeutic targets. Studying host-fungal interactions at the protein level is a challenging endeavor, yet there are few studies that have been undertaken. This review draws attention to proteomic techniques and their application to fungal pathogens and to challenges, difficulties, and limitations that may arise in the course of simultaneous dual proteome analysis of host immune cells interacting with diverse morphotypes of fungal pathogens. On this basis, we discuss strategies to overcome these multifaceted experimental and analytical challenges including the viability of immune cells during co-cultivation, the increased and heterogeneous protein complexity of the host proteome dynamically interacting with the fungal proteome, and the demands on normalization strategies in terms of relative quantitative proteome analysis. PMID:28248281

  17. Challenges and Strategies for Proteome Analysis of the Interaction of Human Pathogenic Fungi with Host Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thomas; Luo, Ting; Schmidt, Hella; Shopova, Iordana; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2015-12-14

    Opportunistic human pathogenic fungi including the saprotrophic mold Aspergillus fumigatus and the human commensal Candida albicans can cause severe fungal infections in immunocompromised or critically ill patients. The first line of defense against opportunistic fungal pathogens is the innate immune system. Phagocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils and dendritic cells are an important pillar of the innate immune response and have evolved versatile defense strategies against microbial pathogens. On the other hand, human-pathogenic fungi have sophisticated virulence strategies to counteract the innate immune defense. In this context, proteomic approaches can provide deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of host immune cells with fungal pathogens. This is crucial for the identification of both diagnostic biomarkers for fungal infections and therapeutic targets. Studying host-fungal interactions at the protein level is a challenging endeavor, yet there are few studies that have been undertaken. This review draws attention to proteomic techniques and their application to fungal pathogens and to challenges, difficulties, and limitations that may arise in the course of simultaneous dual proteome analysis of host immune cells interacting with diverse morphotypes of fungal pathogens. On this basis, we discuss strategies to overcome these multifaceted experimental and analytical challenges including the viability of immune cells during co-cultivation, the increased and heterogeneous protein complexity of the host proteome dynamically interacting with the fungal proteome, and the demands on normalization strategies in terms of relative quantitative proteome analysis.

  18. An enlarged cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Vincent; Duruflé, Harold; San Clemente, Hélène; Albenne, Cécile; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-12-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls playing many roles during development and in response to environmental constraints. Cell walls are mainly composed of polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins), but they also contain proteins which are critical players in cell wall remodeling processes. Today, the cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana, a major dicot model plant, comprises more than 700 proteins predicted to be secreted (cell wall proteins-CWPs) identified in different organs or in cell suspension cultures. However, the cell wall proteome of rosettes is poorly represented with only 148 CWPs identified after extraction by vacuum infiltration. This new study allows enlarging its coverage. A destructive method starting with the purification of cell walls has been performed and two experiments have been compared. They differ by the presence/absence of protein separation by a short 1D-electrophoresis run prior to tryptic digestion and different gradient programs for peptide separation before mass spectrometry analysis. Altogether, the rosette cell wall proteome has been significantly enlarged to 361 CWPs, among which 213 newly identified in rosettes and 57 newly described. The identified CWPs fall in four major functional classes: 26.1% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 11.1% oxido-reductases, 14.7% proteases and 11.7% proteins possibly related to lipid metabolism. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparison of 2D and 3D Colon Cancer Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Lukowski, Jessica K; Weaver, Eric M; Skube, Susan B; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-12-02

    Cell cultures are widely used model systems. Some immortalized cell lines can be grown in either two-dimensional (2D) adherent monolayers or in three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates, or spheroids. Here, the quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome of colon carcinoma HT29 cells cultures in 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids were compared with a stable isotope labeling of amino acids (SILAC) labeling strategy. Two biological replicates from each sample were examined, and notable differences in both the proteome and the phosphoproteome were determined by nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to assess how growth configuration affects molecular expression. A total of 5867 protein groups, including 2523 phosphoprotein groups and 8733 phosphopeptides were identified in the samples. The Gene Ontology analysis revealed enriched GO terms in the 3D samples for RNA binding, nucleic acid binding, enzyme binding, cytoskeletal protein binding, and histone binding for their molecular functions (MF) and in the process of cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization, and DNA metabolic process for the biological process (BP). The KEGG pathway analysis indicated that 3D cultures are enriched for oxidative phosphorylation pathways, metabolic pathways, peroxisome pathways, and biosynthesis of amino acids. In contrast, analysis of the phosphoproteomes indicated that 3D cultures have decreased phosphorylation correlating with slower growth rates and lower cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions. In sum, these results provide quantitative assessments of the effects on the proteome and phosphoproteome of culturing cells in 2D versus 3D cell culture configurations.

  20. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Johlfs, Mary G.; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T.; Fiscus, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-Iα and PKG-Iβ isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-Iβ isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems. PMID:26132171

  1. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Johlfs, Mary G; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T; Fiscus, Ronald R

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-Iα and PKG-Iβ isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-Iβ isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems.

  2. Progress toward the tomato fruit cell wall proteome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-May, Eliel; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall (CW) compartment, or apoplast, is host to a highly dynamic proteome, comprising large numbers of both enzymatic and structural proteins. This reflects its importance as the interface between adjacent cells and the external environment, the presence of numerous extracellular metabolic and signaling pathways, and the complex nature of wall structural assembly and remodeling during cell growth and differentiation. Tomato fruit ontogeny, with its distinct phases of rapid growth and ripening, provides a valuable experimental model system for CW proteomic studies, in that it involves substantial wall assembly, remodeling, and coordinated disassembly. Moreover, diverse populations of secreted proteins must be deployed to resist microbial infection and protect against abiotic stresses. Tomato fruits also provide substantial amounts of biological material, which is a significant advantage for many types of biochemical analyses, and facilitates the detection of lower abundance proteins. In this review, we describe a variety of orthogonal techniques that have been applied to identify CW localized proteins from tomato fruit, including approaches that: target the proteome of the CW and the overlying cuticle; functional "secretome" screens; lectin affinity chromatography; and computational analyses to predict proteins that enter the secretory pathway. Each has its merits and limitations, but collectively they are providing important insights into CW proteome composition and dynamics, as well as some potentially controversial issues, such as the prevalence of non-canonical protein secretion.

  3. Progress toward the tomato fruit cell wall proteome

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-May, Eliel; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall (CW) compartment, or apoplast, is host to a highly dynamic proteome, comprising large numbers of both enzymatic and structural proteins. This reflects its importance as the interface between adjacent cells and the external environment, the presence of numerous extracellular metabolic and signaling pathways, and the complex nature of wall structural assembly and remodeling during cell growth and differentiation. Tomato fruit ontogeny, with its distinct phases of rapid growth and ripening, provides a valuable experimental model system for CW proteomic studies, in that it involves substantial wall assembly, remodeling, and coordinated disassembly. Moreover, diverse populations of secreted proteins must be deployed to resist microbial infection and protect against abiotic stresses. Tomato fruits also provide substantial amounts of biological material, which is a significant advantage for many types of biochemical analyses, and facilitates the detection of lower abundance proteins. In this review, we describe a variety of orthogonal techniques that have been applied to identify CW localized proteins from tomato fruit, including approaches that: target the proteome of the CW and the overlying cuticle; functional “secretome” screens; lectin affinity chromatography; and computational analyses to predict proteins that enter the secretory pathway. Each has its merits and limitations, but collectively they are providing important insights into CW proteome composition and dynamics, as well as some potentially controversial issues, such as the prevalence of non-canonical protein secretion. PMID:23755055

  4. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mateos, Jesús; Fernández Pernas, Pablo; Fafián Labora, Juan; Blanco, Francisco; Arufe, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies. PMID:28250369

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Sun, Chengwen; Guo, Jia; Xue, Peng; Guan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia), KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC), and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer) have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO) term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer. PMID:26230496

  6. Cell biology through proteomics--ad astra per alia porci.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, John J M; Au, Catherine E; Desjardins, Michel; McPherson, Peter S; Nilsson, Tommy

    2010-06-01

    Isolated subcellular fractions have been instrumental in elucidating cell function. The use of such fractions for the identification and biochemical characterization of subcellular organelles, combined with cell- free systems, has provided key insights into the function and machineries of organelles, including those involved in vesicle transport, quality control and protein sorting. Despite their obvious utility, popular cell biology has come to regard in vitro-based approaches as inferior to in vivo-based approaches. Usual criticisms are contamination, non-representative processes and an inability to recreate the dynamic processes seen in vivo. In a similar way, proteomics has been viewed with reservation. Despite this, and building on the tradition of in vitro-based approaches, organelle proteomics based on liquid chromatography and tandem mass-spectrometry has recently made significant contributions to cell biology, and now allows the molecular machineries of organelles to be defined with high precision. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aimed to facilitate candidate biomarkers selection and improve network-based multi-target therapy, we perform comparative proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Laser capture microdissection was used to harvest purified muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells from 4 paired samples. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteome expression profile. The differential proteins were further analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared with the published literature. Results A total of 885/890 proteins commonly appeared in 4 paired samples. 295/337 of the 488/493 proteins that specific expressed in tumor/normal cells own gene ontology (GO) cellular component annotation. Compared with the entire list of the international protein index (IPI), there are 42/45 GO terms exhibited as enriched and 9/5 exhibited as depleted, respectively. Several pathways exhibit significantly changes between cancer and normal cells, mainly including spliceosome, endocytosis, oxidative phosphorylation, etc. Finally, descriptive statistics show that the PI Distribution of candidate biomarkers have certain regularity. Conclusions The present study identified the proteome expression profile of muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells, providing information for subcellular pattern research of cancer and offer candidate proteins for biomarker panel and network-based multi-target therapy. PMID:21645413

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Exosomes from Mutant KRAS Colon Cancer Cells Identifies Intercellular Transfer of Mutant KRAS*

    PubMed Central

    Demory Beckler, Michelle; Higginbotham, James N.; Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Ham, Amy-Joan; Halvey, Patrick J.; Imasuen, Imade E.; Whitwell, Corbin; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Activating mutations in KRAS occur in 30% to 40% of colorectal cancers. How mutant KRAS alters cancer cell behavior has been studied intensively, but non-cell autonomous effects of mutant KRAS are less understood. We recently reported that exosomes isolated from mutant KRAS-expressing colon cancer cells enhanced the invasiveness of recipient cells relative to exosomes purified from wild-type KRAS-expressing cells, leading us to hypothesize mutant KRAS might affect neighboring and distant cells by regulating exosome composition and behavior. Herein, we show the results of a comprehensive proteomic analysis of exosomes from parental DLD-1 cells that contain both wild-type and G13D mutant KRAS alleles and isogenically matched derivative cell lines, DKO-1 (mutant KRAS allele only) and DKs-8 (wild-type KRAS allele only). Mutant KRAS status dramatically affects the composition of the exosome proteome. Exosomes from mutant KRAS cells contain many tumor-promoting proteins, including KRAS, EGFR, SRC family kinases, and integrins. DKs-8 cells internalize DKO-1 exosomes, and, notably, DKO-1 exosomes transfer mutant KRAS to DKs-8 cells, leading to enhanced three-dimensional growth of these wild-type KRAS-expressing non-transformed cells. These results have important implications for non-cell autonomous effects of mutant KRAS, such as field effect and tumor progression. PMID:23161513

  9. Proteomic analysis of cancer stem cells in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Hyungdon; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. {yields} We confirmed CD44+ DU145 cells are more proliferative and tumorigenic than CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} We analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} Cofilin and Annexin A5 associated with cancer were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. -- Abstract: Results from recent studies support the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and formation. Here, we applied a proteome profiling approach to investigate the mechanisms of CSCs and to identify potential biomarkers in the prostate cancer cell line DU145. Using MACS, the DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. In sphere culture, CD44+ cells possessed stem cell characteristics and highly expressed genes known to be important in stem cell maintenance. In addition, they showed strong tumorigenic potential in the clonogenic assay and soft agar colony formation assay. We then analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Cofilin and Annexin A5, which are associated with proliferation or metastasis in cancer, were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. These results provide information that will be important to the development of new cancer diagnostic tools and understanding the mechanisms of CSCs although a more detailed study is necessary to investigate the roles of Cofilin and Annexin A5 in CSCs.

  10. Proteomic analysis of mesenchymal to Schwann cell transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anup D; Wiederin, Jayme; Uz, Metin; Ciborowski, Pawel; Mallapragada, Surya K; Gendelman, Howard E; Sakaguchi, Donald S

    2017-08-08

    While transplantation of Schwann cells facilitates axon regeneration, remyelination and repair after peripheral nerve injury clinical use is limited by cell bioavailability. We posit that such limitation in cell access can be overcome by the use of autologous bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). As MSCs can transdifferentiate to Schwann cell-phenotypes and accelerate nerve regeneration we undertook proteomic evaluation of the cells to uncover the protein contents that affects Schwann cell formulation. Transdifferentiated MSCs secrete significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in cell-conditioned media that facilitated neurite outgrowth. MSC proteins significantly regulated during Schwann cell transdifferentiation included, but were not limited to, GNAI2, MYL9, ACTN4, ACTN1, ACTB, CAV-1, HSPB1, PHB2, TBB4B, CTGF, TGFI1, ARF6, EZR, GELS, VIM, WNT5A, RTN4, EFNB1. These support axonal guidance, myelination, neural development and neural growth and differentiation. The results unravel the molecular events that underlie cell transdifferentiation that ultimately serve to facilitate nerve regeneration and repair in support of cell transplantation. While Schwann cells facilitate axon regeneration, remyelination and repair after peripheral nerve injury clinical use is limited by cell bioavailability. We posit that such limitation in cell access can be overcome by the use of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transdifferentiated to Schwann cell-phenotypes. In the present study, we undertook the first proteomic evaluation of these transdifferentiated cells to uncover the protein contents that affects Schwann cell formulation. Furthermore, these transdifferentiated MSCs secrete significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in cell-conditioned media that facilitated neurite outgrowth. Our results demonstrate that a number of MSC proteins were

  11. An improved protocol to study the plant cell wall proteome

    PubMed Central

    Printz, Bruno; Dos Santos Morais, Raphaël; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Sergeant, Kjell; Lutts, Stanley; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins were extracted from alfalfa stems according to a three-steps extraction procedure using sequentially CaCl2, EGTA, and LiCl-complemented buffers. The efficiency of this protocol for extracting cell wall proteins was compared with the two previously published methods optimized for alfalfa stem cell wall protein analysis. Following LC-MS/MS analysis the three-steps extraction procedure resulted in the identification of the highest number of cell wall proteins (242 NCBInr identifiers) and gave the lowest percentage of non-cell wall proteins (about 30%). However, the three protocols are rather complementary than substitutive since 43% of the identified proteins were specific to one protocol. This three-step protocol was therefore selected for a more detailed proteomic characterization using 2D-gel electrophoresis. With this technique, 75% of the identified proteins were shown to be fraction-specific and 72.7% were predicted as belonging to the cell wall compartment. Although, being less sensitive than LC-MS/MS approaches in detecting and identifying low-abundant proteins, gel-based approaches are valuable tools for the differentiation and relative quantification of protein isoforms and/or modified proteins. In particular isoforms, having variations in their amino-acid sequence and/or carrying different N-linked glycan chains were detected and characterized. This study highlights how the extracting protocols as well as the analytical techniques devoted to the study of the plant cell wall proteome are complementary and how they may be combined to elucidate the dynamism of the plant cell wall proteome in biological studies. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001927. PMID:25914713

  12. Plant cell organelle proteomics in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is one of the finest molecular techniques extensively being used for the study of protein profiling of a given plant species experiencing stressed conditions. Plants respond to a stress by alteration in the pattern of protein expression, either by up-regulating of the existing protein pool or by the synthesizing novel proteins primarily associated with plants antioxidative defense mechanism. Improved protein extraction protocols and advance techniques for identification of novel proteins have been standardized in different plant species at both cellular and whole plant level for better understanding of abiotic stress sensing and intracellular stress signal transduction mechanisms. In contrast, an in-depth proteome study of subcellular organelles could generate much detail information about the intrinsic mechanism of stress response as it correlates the possible relationship between the protein abundance and plant stress tolerance. Although a wealth of reviews devoted to plant proteomics are available, review articles dedicated to plant cell organelle proteins response under abiotic stress are very scanty. In the present review, an attempt has been made to summarize all significant contributions related to abiotic stresses and their impacts on organelle proteomes for better understanding of plants abiotic stress tolerance mechanism at protein level. This review will not only provide new insights into the plants stress response mechanisms, which are necessary for future development of genetically engineered stress tolerant crop plants for the benefit of humankind, but will also highlight the importance of studying changes in protein abundance within the cell organelles in response to abiotic stress.

  13. [Experimental estimation of proteome size for cells and human plasma].

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N; Zgoda, V G; Maynskova, M A; Ronzhina, N L; Belyakova, N V; Legina, O K; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Huge range of concentrations of different protein and insufficient sensitivity of methods for detection of proteins at a single molecule level does not yet allow obtaining the whole image of human proteome. In our investigations, we tried to evaluate the size of different proteomes (cells and plasma). The approach used is based on detection of protein spots in 2-DE after staining by protein dyes with different sensitivities. The function representing the dependence of the number of protein spots on sensitivity of protein dyes was generated. Next, by extrapolation of this function curve to theoretical point of the maximum sensitivity (detection of a single smallest polypeptide) it was calculated that a single human cell (HepG2) may contain minimum 70,000 proteoforms, and plasma--1.5 mln. Utilization of this approach to other, smaller proteomes showed the competency of this extrapolation. For instance, the size of mycoplas ma (Acholeplasma laidlawii) was estimated in 1100 proteoforms, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)--40,000, E. coli--6200, P. furiosus--3400. In hepatocytes, the amount of proteoforms was the same as in HepG2--70,000. Significance of obtained data is in possibilities to estimating the proteome organization and planning next steps in its study.

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of antimony-resistant and -susceptible Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania infantum chagasi lines.

    PubMed

    Matrangolo, Fabiana S V; Liarte, Daniel B; Andrade, Laila C; de Melo, Melina F; Andrade, Juvana M; Ferreira, Rafael F; Santiago, André S; Pirovani, Carlos P; Silva-Pereira, Rosiane A; Murta, Silvane M F

    2013-08-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant Leishmania species is a significant problem in several countries. A comparative proteomic analysis of antimony-susceptible and antimony-resistant Leishmania braziliensis (LbSbR) and Leishmania infantum chagasi (LcSbR) lines was carried out using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for protein identification. Out of 132 protein spots exclusive or up-regulated submitted to MS, we identified 80 proteins that corresponded to 57 distinct proteins. Comparative analysis of data showed that most of the protein spots with differential abundance in both species are involved in antioxidant defense, general stress response, glucose and amino acid metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization. Five proteins were commonly more abundant in both SbIII-resistant Leishmania lines: tryparedoxin peroxidase, alpha-tubulin, HSP70, HSP83, and HSP60. Analysis of the protein abundance by Western blotting assays confirmed our proteomic data. These assays revealed that cyclophilin-A is less expressed in both LbSbR and LcSbR lines. On the other hand, the expression of pteridine reductase is higher in the LbSbR line, whereas tryparedoxin peroxidase is overexpressed in both LbSbR and LcSbR lines. Together, these results show that the mechanism of antimony-resistance in Leishmania spp. is complex and multifactorial. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. New insights into autophagic cell death in the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Davide; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Quaglino, Daniela; Ottaviani, Enzo

    2009-04-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionary ancient process based on the activity of genes conserved from yeast to metazoan taxa. Whereas its role as a mechanism to provide energy during cell starvation is commonly accepted, debate continues about the occurrence of autophagy as a means specifically activated to achieve cell death. The IPLB-LdFB insect cell line, derived from the larval fat body of the lepidoptera Lymantria dispar, represents a suitable model to address this question, as both autophagic and apoptotic cell death can be induced by various stimuli. Using morphological and functional approaches, we have observed that the culture medium conditioned by IPLB-LdFB cells committed to death by the ATPase inhibitor oligomycin A stimulates autophagic cell death in untreated IPLB-LdFB cells. Moreover, proteomic analysis of the conditioned media suggests that, in IPLB-LdFB cells, oligomycin A promotes a shift towards lipid metabolism, increases oxidative stress and specifically directs the cells towards autophagic activity.

  16. Cell Surface Proteomics of N-Linked Glycoproteins for Typing of Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Haverland, Nicole A; Waas, Matthew; Ntai, Ioanna; Keppel, Theodore; Gundry, Rebekah L; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-08-18

    Lymphocytes are immune cells that are critical for the maintenance of adaptive immunity. Differentiation of lymphoid progenitors yields B-, T-, and NK-cell subtypes that individually correlate with specific forms of leukemia or lymphoma. Therefore, it is imperative a precise method of cell categorization is utilized to detect differences in distinct disease states present in patients. One viable means of classification involves evaluation of the cell surface proteome of lymphoid malignancies. Specifically, this manuscript details the use of an antibody independent approach known as Cell Surface Capture Technology, to assess N-glycoproteome of four human lymphocyte cell lines. Altogether, 404 cell surface N-glycoproteins as markers for specific cell types involved in lymphocytic malignancies, including 82 N-glycoproteins that had not been previously been described for B- or T-cells within the Cell Surface Protein Atlas. Comparative analysis, hierarchical clustering techniques, and label free quantitation was used to reveal proteins most informative for each cell type. Undoubtedly, the characterization of the cell surface proteome of lymphoid malignancies is a first step towards improving personalized diagnosis and treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomic techniques for characterisation of mesenchymal stem cell secretome.

    PubMed

    Kupcova Skalnikova, Helena

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with a substantial potential in human regenerative medicine due to their ability to migrate to sites of injury, capability to suppress immune response and accessibility in large amount from patient's own bone marrow or fat tissue. It has been increasingly observed that the transplanted MSCs did not necessarily engraft and differentiate at the site of injury but might exert their therapeutic effects through secreted trophic signals. The MSCs secrete a variety of autocrine/paracrine factors, called secretome, that support regenerative processes in the damaged tissue, induce angiogenesis, protect cells from apoptotic cell death and modulate immune system. The cell culture medium conditioned by MSCs or osteogenic, chondrogenic as well as adipogenic precursors derived from MSCs has become a subject of intensive proteomic profiling in the search for and identification of released factors and microvesicles that might be applicable in regenerative medicine. Jointly with the methods for MSC isolation, expansion and differentiation, proteomic analysis of MSC secretome was enabled recently mainly due to the extensive development in protein separation techniques, mass spectrometry, immunological methods and bioinformatics. This review describes proteomic techniques currently applied or prospectively applicable in MSC secretomics, with a particular focus on preparation of the secretome sample, protein/peptide separation, mass spectrometry and protein quantification techniques, analysis of posttranslational modifications, immunological techniques, isolation and characterisation of secreted vesicles and exosomes, analysis of cytokine-encoding mRNAs and bioinformatics.

  18. The hydrophobic proteome of mitochondrial membranes from Arabidopsis cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Brugière, Sabine; Kowalski, Solène; Ferro, Myriam; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Miras, Stéphane; Salvi, Daniel; Ravanel, Stéphane; d'Hérin, Pierre; Garin, Jérôme; Bourguignon, Jacques; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2004-06-01

    The development of mitochondria and the integration of their function within a plant cell rely on the presence of a complex biochemical machinery located within their limiting membranes. The aim of the present work was: (1) to enhance our understanding of the biochemical machinery of mitochondrial membranes and (2) to test the versatility of the procedure developed for the identification of the hydrophobic proteome of the chloroplast envelope [Molecular and Cellular Proteomics 2 (2003) 325-345]. A proteomic analysis was performed, to provide the most exhaustive view of the protein repertoire of these membranes. For this purpose, highly purified mitochondria were prepared from Arabidopsis cultured cells and membrane proteins were extracted. To get a more exhaustive array of membrane proteins from Arabidopsis mitochondria, from the most to the less hydrophobic ones, various extraction procedures (chloroform/methanol extraction, alkaline or saline treatments) were applied. LC-MS/MS analyses were then performed on each membrane subfraction, leading to the identification of more than 110 proteins. The identification of these proteins is discussed with respect to their mitochondrial localization, their physicochemical properties and their implications in the metabolism of mitochondria. In order to provide a new overview of the biochemical machinery of the plant mitochondria, proteins identified during this work were compared to the lists of proteins identified during previous proteomic analyses performed on plant and algae mitochondria (Arabidopsis, pea, Chlamydomonas, rice, etc.). A total of 502 proteins are listed. About 40% of the 114 proteins identified during this work were not identified during previous proteomic studies performed on mitochondria.

  19. Proteomics analysis of E-cadherin knockdown in epithelial breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Daniele; Simeone, Pasquale; Latorre, Dominga; Cascione, Francesca; Leporatti, Stefano; Trerotola, Marco; Giudetti, Anna Maria; Capobianco, Loredana; Lunetti, Paola; Rizzello, Antonia; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Alberti, Saverio; Maffia, Michele

    2015-05-20

    E-cadherin is the core protein of the epithelial adherens junction. Through its cytoplasmic domain, E-cadherin interacts with several signaling proteins; among them, α- and β-catenins mediate the link of E-cadherin to the actin cytoskeleton. Loss of E-cadherin expression is a crucial step of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and is involved in cancer invasion and metastatization. In human tumors, down-regulation of E-cadherin is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Despite the critical role of E-cadherin in cancer progression, little is known about proteome alterations linked with its down-regulation. To address this point, we investigated proteomics, biophysical and functional changes of epithelial breast cancer cell lines upon shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of E-cadherin expression (shEcad). shEcad cells showed a distinct proteomic signature including altered expression of enzymes and proteins involved in cytoskeletal dynamic and migration. Moreover, these results suggest that, besides their role in mechanical adhesion, loss of E-cadherin expression may contribute to cancer progression by modifying a complex network of pathways that tightly regulate fundamental processes as oxidative stress, immune evasion and cell metabolism. Altogether, these results extend our knowledge on the cellular modifications associated with E-cadherin down-regulation in breast cancer cells.

  20. The Proteome of Native Adult Müller Glial Cells From Murine Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Alexandra; Lepper, Marlen Franziska; Mayo, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    To date, the proteomic profiling of Müller cells, the dominant macroglia of the retina, has been hampered because of the absence of suitable enrichment methods. We established a novel protocol to isolate native, intact Müller cells from adult murine retinae at excellent purity which retain in situ morphology and are well suited for proteomic analyses. Two different strategies of sample preparation - an in StageTips (iST) and a subcellular fractionation approach including cell surface protein profiling were used for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) comparing Müller cell-enriched to depleted neuronal fractions. Pathway enrichment analyses on both data sets enabled us to identify Müller cell-specific functions which included focal adhesion kinase signaling, signal transduction mediated by calcium as second messenger, transmembrane neurotransmitter transport and antioxidant activity. Pathways associated with RNA processing, cellular respiration and phototransduction were enriched in the neuronal subpopulation. Proteomic results were validated for selected Müller cell genes by quantitative real time PCR, confirming the high expression levels of numerous members of the angiogenic and anti-inflammatory annexins and antioxidant enzymes (e.g. paraoxonase 2, peroxiredoxin 1, 4 and 6). Finally, the significant enrichment of antioxidant proteins in Müller cells was confirmed by measurements on vital retinal cells using the oxidative stress indicator CM-H2DCFDA. In contrast to photoreceptors or bipolar cells, Müller cells were most efficiently protected against H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species formation, which is in line with the protein repertoire identified in the proteomic profiling. Our novel approach to isolate intact glial cells from adult retina in combination with proteomic profiling enabled the identification of novel Müller glia specific proteins, which were validated as markers and for their functional impact in glial

  1. Cell-free protein synthesis: applications in proteomics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    He, Mingyue

    2008-01-01

    Protein production is one of the key steps in biotechnology and functional proteomics. Expression of proteins in heterologous hosts (such as in E. coli) is generally lengthy and costly. Cell-free protein synthesis is thus emerging as an attractive alternative. In addition to the simplicity and speed for protein production, cell-free expression allows generation of functional proteins that are difficult to produce by in vivo systems. Recent exploitation of cell-free systems enables novel development of technologies for rapid discovery of proteins with desirable properties from very large libraries. This article reviews the recent development in cell-free systems and their application in the large scale protein analysis.

  2. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Benjamin; Slijper, Monique

    2014-05-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. This makes RBCs highly sensitive to any aberration. If so, these RBCs are quickly removed from circulation, but if the RBC levels reduce extremely fast, this results in hemolytic anemia. Several causes of HA exist, and proteome analysis is the most straightforward way to obtain deeper insight into RBC functioning under the stress of disease. This should result in discovery of biomarkers, typical for each source of anemia. In this review, several challenges to generate in-depth RBC proteomes are described, like to obtain pure RBCs, to overcome the wide dynamic range in protein expression, and to establish which of the identified/quantified proteins are active in RBCs. The final challenge is to acquire and validate suited biomarkers unique for the changes that occur for each of the clinical questions; in red blood cell aging (also important for transfusion medicine), for thalassemias or sickle cell disease. Biomarkers for other hemolytic anemias that are caused by dysfunction of RBC membrane proteins (the RBC membrane defects) or RBC cytosolic proteins (the enzymopathies) are sometimes even harder to discover, in particular for the patients with RBC rare diseases with unknown cause. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  3. The quantitative proteomes of human-induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Javier; Low, Teck Y; Kok, Yee J; Chin, Angela; Frese, Christian K; Ding, Vanessa; Choo, Andre; Heck, Albert J R

    2011-11-22

    Assessing relevant molecular differences between human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is important, given that such differences may impact their potential therapeutic use. Controversy surrounds recent gene expression studies comparing hiPSCs and hESCs. Here, we present an in-depth quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis of hESCs, two different hiPSCs and their precursor fibroblast cell lines. Our comparisons confirmed the high similarity of hESCs and hiPSCS at the proteome level as 97.8% of the proteins were found unchanged. Nevertheless, a small group of 58 proteins, mainly related to metabolism, antigen processing and cell adhesion, was found significantly differentially expressed between hiPSCs and hESCs. A comparison of the regulated proteins with previously published transcriptomic studies showed a low overlap, highlighting the emerging notion that differences between both pluripotent cell lines rather reflect experimental conditions than a recurrent molecular signature.

  4. Single-cell-type Proteomics: Toward a Holistic Understanding of Plant Function*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shaojun; Chen, Sixue

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms such as plants contain different types of cells with specialized functions. Analyzing the protein characteristics of each type of cell will not only reveal specific cell functions, but also enhance understanding of how an organism works. Most plant proteomics studies have focused on using tissues and organs containing a mixture of different cells. Recent single-cell-type proteomics efforts on pollen grains, guard cells, mesophyll cells, root hairs, and trichomes have shown utility. We expect that high resolution proteomic analyses will reveal novel functions in single cells. This review provides an overview of recent developments in plant single-cell-type proteomics. We discuss application of the approach for understanding important cell functions, and we consider the technical challenges of extending the approach to all plant cell types. Finally, we consider the integration of single-cell-type proteomics with transcriptomics and metabolomics with the goal of providing a holistic understanding of plant function. PMID:22982375

  5. Single-cell-type proteomics: toward a holistic understanding of plant function.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaojun; Chen, Sixue

    2012-12-01

    Multicellular organisms such as plants contain different types of cells with specialized functions. Analyzing the protein characteristics of each type of cell will not only reveal specific cell functions, but also enhance understanding of how an organism works. Most plant proteomics studies have focused on using tissues and organs containing a mixture of different cells. Recent single-cell-type proteomics efforts on pollen grains, guard cells, mesophyll cells, root hairs, and trichomes have shown utility. We expect that high resolution proteomic analyses will reveal novel functions in single cells. This review provides an overview of recent developments in plant single-cell-type proteomics. We discuss application of the approach for understanding important cell functions, and we consider the technical challenges of extending the approach to all plant cell types. Finally, we consider the integration of single-cell-type proteomics with transcriptomics and metabolomics with the goal of providing a holistic understanding of plant function.

  6. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Reetta; Kuster, Niels; Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2010-10-18

    Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in expression of numerous proteins. However, exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 1800 MHz GSM signal had only very small effect on cell proteome, as compared with 900 MHz GSM exposure. In the present study, using as model human primary endothelial cells, we have examined whether exposure to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation can affect cell proteome. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed for 1 hour to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg. The cells were harvested immediately after the exposure and the protein expression patterns of the sham-exposed and radiation-exposed cells were examined using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis-based proteomics (2DE-DIGE). There were observed numerous differences between the proteomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (both sham-exposed). These differences are most likely representing physiological differences between endothelia in different vascular beds. However, the exposure of both types of primary endothelial cells to mobile phone radiation did not cause any statistically significant changes in protein expression. Exposure of primary human endothelial cells to the mobile phone radiation, 1800 MHz GSM signal for 1 hour at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg, does not affect protein expression, when the proteomes were examined immediately after the end of the

  7. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in expression of numerous proteins. However, exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 1800 MHz GSM signal had only very small effect on cell proteome, as compared with 900 MHz GSM exposure. In the present study, using as model human primary endothelial cells, we have examined whether exposure to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation can affect cell proteome. Results Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed for 1 hour to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg. The cells were harvested immediately after the exposure and the protein expression patterns of the sham-exposed and radiation-exposed cells were examined using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis-based proteomics (2DE-DIGE). There were observed numerous differences between the proteomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (both sham-exposed). These differences are most likely representing physiological differences between endothelia in different vascular beds. However, the exposure of both types of primary endothelial cells to mobile phone radiation did not cause any statistically significant changes in protein expression. Conclusions Exposure of primary human endothelial cells to the mobile phone radiation, 1800 MHz GSM signal for 1 hour at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg, does not affect protein expression, when the proteomes were examined

  8. Comprehensive proteomic characterization of stem cell-derived extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Ragelle, Héloïse; Naba, Alexandra; Larson, Benjamin L; Zhou, Fangheng; Prijić, Miralem; Whittaker, Charles A; Del Rosario, Amanda; Langer, Robert; Hynes, Richard O; Anderson, Daniel G

    2017-06-01

    In the stem-cell niche, the extracellular matrix (ECM) serves as a structural support that additionally provides stem cells with signals that contribute to the regulation of stem-cell function, via reciprocal interactions between cells and components of the ECM. Recently, cell-derived ECMs have emerged as in vitro cell culture substrates to better recapitulate the native stem-cell microenvironment outside the body. Significant changes in cell number, morphology and function have been observed when mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were cultured on ECM substrates as compared to standard tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). As select ECM components are known to regulate specific stem-cell functions, a robust characterization of cell-derived ECM proteomic composition is critical to better comprehend the role of the ECM in directing cellular processes. Here, we characterized and compared the protein composition of ECM produced in vitro by bone marrow-derived MSC, adipose-derived MSC and neonatal fibroblasts from different donors, employing quantitative proteomic methods. Each cell-derived ECM displayed a specific and unique matrisome signature, yet they all shared a common set of proteins. We evaluated the biological response of cells cultured on the different matrices and compared them to cells on standard TCPS. The matrices lead to differential survival and gene-expression profiles among the cell types and as compared to TCPS, indicating that the cell-derived ECMs influence each cell type in a different manner. This general approach to understanding the protein composition of different tissue-specific and cell-derived ECM will inform the rational design of defined systems and biomaterials that recapitulate critical ECM signals for stem-cell culture and tissue engineering.

  9. Proteomic analyses of methamphetamine (METH)-induced differential protein expression by immature dendritic cells (IDC).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahajan, Supriya D; Sykes, Donald E; Schwartz, Stanley A; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2007-04-01

    In the US, the increase in methamphetamine (METH) use has been associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection. Dendritic cells (DC) are the first line of defense against HIV-1. DC play a critical role in harboring HIV-1 and facilitate the infection of neighboring T cells. However, the role of METH on HIV-1 infectivity and the expression of the proteome of immature dendritic cells (IDC) has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that METH modulates the expression of a number of proteins by IDC that foster the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. We utilized LTR amplification, p24 antigen assay and the proteomic method of difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) combined with protein identification through high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to analyze the effects of METH on HIV-1 infectivity (HIV-1 IIIB; CXCR4-tropic, X4 strain) and the proteomic profile of IDC. Our results demonstrate that METH potentiates HIV-1 replication in IDC. Furthermore, METH significantly differentially regulates the expression of several proteins including CXCR3, protein disulfide isomerase, procathepsin B, peroxiredoxin and galectin-1. Identification of unique, METH-induced proteins may help to develop novel markers for diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic targeting in METH using subjects.

  10. Proteomic characterization of the internalization of Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products in human cells.

    PubMed

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Loukas, Alex; Sotillo, Javier

    2016-02-09

    The association between liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium) has been well established. Multiple mechanisms play a role in the development of CCA, but the excretory/secretory products released by O. viverrini (OvES) represent the major interface between the parasite and its host, and their uptake by biliary epithelial cells has been suggested to be responsible for proliferation of cholangiocytes, the cells that line the biliary epithelium. Despite recent progress in the study of the molecular basis of O. viverrini-host interactions, little is known about the effects that OvES induces upon internalization by host cells. In the present study we incubated non-cancerous human cholangiocytes (H69) and human colon cancer (CaCo-2) cells with OvES and performed a time-course quantitative proteomic analysis on the cells to determine the early changes induced by the parasite. Different KEGG pathways were altered in H69 cells compared to Caco-2 cells: glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, the Reactome pathway analysis showed a predominance of proteins involved in cellular pathways related to apoptosis and apoptotic execution phase in H69 cells after incubation with OvES. The present study provides the first proteomic analysis to address the molecular mechanisms by which OvES products interact with host cells, and Sheds light on the cellular processes involved in O. viverrini-induced CCA.

  11. Mitochondrial comparative proteomics of human ovarian cancer cells and their platinum-resistant sublines.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhiqin; Yin, Jie; He, Haojie; Li, Wenrui; Hou, Chunmei; Qian, Xiaohong; Mao, Ning; Pan, Lingya

    2010-11-01

    Resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy is the major obstacle to successful treatment of ovarian cancer. It is evident that mitochondrial defects and the dysfunctions of oxidative phosphorylation and energy production in ovarian cancer cells were directly related to their resistance to platinum drugs. Using 2-D DIGE, we compared mitochondrial proteins from two platinum-sensitive human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3 and A2780) with that of four platinum-resistant sublines (SKOV3/CDDP, SKOV3/CBP, A2780/CDDP, and A2780/CBP). Among the 236 differentially expressed spots, five mitochondrial proteins (ATP-α, PRDX3, PHB, ETF, and ALDH) that participate in the electron transport respiratory chain were identified through mass spectrometry. All of them are downregulated in one or two of the platinum-resistant cell lines. Three proteins (ATP-α, PRDX3, and PHB) were validated by using western blot and immunohistochemistry. There is a significant decrease of PHB in tumor tissues from ovarian cancer patients who were resistant to platinum-based chemotherapies. This is the first direct mitochondrial proteomic comparison between platinum-sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cells. These studies demonstrated that 2-D DIGE-based proteomic analysis could be a powerful tool to investigate limited mitochondrial proteins, and the association of PHB expression with platinum resistance indicates that mitochondria defects may contribute to platinum resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

  12. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes.

  13. Proteomic profiling reveals dopaminergic regulation of progenitor cell functions of goldfish radial glial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lei; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Esau, Crystal; Da Fonte, Dillon F; Trudeau, Vance L

    2016-07-20

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) are stem-like cells found in the developing and adult central nervous system. They function as both a scaffold to guide neuron migration and as progenitor cells that support neurogenesis. Our previous study revealed a close anatomical relationship between dopamine neurons and RGCs in the telencephalon of female goldfish. In this study, label-free proteomics was used to identify the proteins in a primary RGC culture and to determine the proteome response to the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 (10μM), in order to better understand dopaminergic regulation of RGCs. A total of 689 unique proteins were identified in the RGCs and these were classified into biological and pathological pathways. Proteins such as nucleolin (6.9-fold) and ependymin related protein 1 (4.9-fold) were increased in abundance while proteins triosephosphate isomerase (10-fold) and phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (5-fold) were decreased in abundance. Pathway analysis revealed that proteins that consistently changed in abundance across biological replicates were related to small molecules such as ATP, lipids and steroids, hormones, glucose, cyclic AMP and Ca(2+). Sub-network enrichment analysis suggested that estrogen receptor signaling, among other transcription factors, is regulated by D1 receptor activation. This suggests that these signaling pathways are correlated to dopaminergic regulation of radial glial cell functions. Most proteins down-regulated by SKF 38393 were involved in cell cycle/proliferation, growth, death, and survival, which suggests that dopamine inhibits the progenitor-related processes of radial glial cells. Examples of differently expressed proteins including triosephosphate isomerase, nucleolin, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and capping protein (actin filament) muscle Z-line beta were validated by qPCR and western blot, which were consistent with MS/MS data in the direction of change. This is the first study to characterize the RGC

  14. Exosomes from Osteosarcoma and normal osteoblast differ in proteomic cargo and immunomodulatory effects on T cells.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Ryan M; Ruby, Carl E; Goodall, Cheri P; Yang, Liping; Maier, Claudia S; Albarqi, Hassan A; Brady, Jacqueline V; Bathke, Kallan; Taratula, Oleh; Mourich, Dan; Bracha, Shay

    2017-09-15

    Canine osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common cancer of the appendicular skeleton and is associated with high metastatic rate to the lungs and poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown the impact of malignant-derived exosomes on immune cells and the facilitation of immune evasion. In the current study, we have characterized the proteomic profile of exosomes derived from healthy osteoblasts and osteosarcoma cell lines. We investigated the direct impact of these exosomes on healthy T cells. Proteomic cargo of the malignant exosomes was markedly different from osteoblastic exosomes and contained immunosuppressive proteins including TGF-β, α fetoprotein and heat shock proteins. OSA exosomes directly attenuated the rate of T cell proliferation, increased a regulatory (FoxP3+) CD4+ phenotype and diminished the expression of the activation marker CD25+ on CD8+ cells. Exosomes of osteoblasts also demonstrated a direct impact on T cells, but to a lesser degree. Osteosarcoma-derived exosomes compared to normal osteoblasts contain an immunomodulatory cargo, which reduced the rate of T cell proliferation and promoted T regulatory phenotype. Osteoblast-derived exosomes can also reduce T cell activity, but to lesser degree compared to OSA exosomes and without promoting a T regulatory phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteome analysis of human embryonic stem cells organelles.

    PubMed

    Shekari, Faezeh; Nezari, Hossein; Larijani, Mehran Rezaei; Han, Chia-Li; Baharvand, Hossein; Chen, Yu-Ju; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2017-06-06

    As the functions of proteins are associated with their cellular localization, the comprehensive sub-cellular proteome knowledge of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is indispensable for ensuring a therapeutic effect. Here, we have utilized a sub-cellular proteomics approach to analyze the localization of proteins in the nucleus, mitochondria, crude membrane, cytoplasm, heavy and light microsomes. Out of 2002 reproducibly identified proteins, we detected 762 proteins in a single organelle whereas 160 proteins were found in all sub-cellular fractions. We verified the localization of identified proteins through databases and discussed the consistency of the obtained results. With regards to the ambiguity in the definition of a membrane protein, we tried to clearly define the plasma membrane, peripheral membrane and membrane proteins by annotation of these proteins in databases, along with predictions of transmembrane helices. Among ten enriched signaling pathways highlighted in our results, non-canonical Wnt signaling were analyzed in greater detail. The functions of three novel hESC membrane proteins (ERBB4, GGT1 and ZDHHC13) have been assessed in terms of pluripotency. Our report is the most comprehensive for organellar proteomics of hESCs. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins using a TripleTOF 5600 from nucleus, mitochondria, crude membrane, cytoplasm, heavy and light microsomal fractions highlighted the significance of the non-canonical Wnt signaling in human embryonic stem cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Impact of the antiproliferative agent ciclopirox olamine treatment on stem cells proteome

    PubMed Central

    Dihazi, Gry H; Bibi, Asima; Jahn, Olaf; Nolte, Jessica; Mueller, Gerhard A; Engel, Wolfgang; Dihazi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proteome changes of stem cells due to ciclopirox olamine (CPX) treatment compared to control and retinoic acid treated cells. METHODS: Stem cells (SCs) are cells, which have the ability to continuously divide and differentiate into various other kinds of cells. Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs) were treated with CPX, which has been shown to have an antiproliferative effect on stem cells, and compared to stem cells treated with retinoic acid (RA), which is known to have a differentiating effect on stem cells. Classical proteomic techniques like 2-D gel electrophoresis and differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) were used to generate 2D protein maps from stem cells treated with RA or CPX as well as from non-treated stem cells. The resulting 2D gels were scanned and the digitalized images were collated with the help of Delta 2D software. The differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by a MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometer, and the identified proteins were investigated and categorized using bioinformatics. RESULTS: Treatment of stem cells with CPX, a synthetic antifungal clinically used to treat superficial mycoses, resulted in an antiproliferative effect in vitro, without impairment of pluripotency. To understand the mechanisms induced by CPX treatments which results in arrest of cell cycle without any marked effect on pluripotency, a comparative proteomics study was conducted. The obtained data revealed that the CPX impact on cell proliferation was accompanied with a significant alteration in stem cell proteome. By peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem mass spectrometry combined with searches of protein sequence databases, a set of 316 proteins was identified, corresponding to a library of 125 non-redundant proteins. With proteomic analysis of ESCs and maGSCs treated with CPX and RA, we could identify more than 90 single proteins, which were differently expressed in both cell lines. We

  17. Proteomics using mammospheres as a model system to identify proteins deregulated in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhao, F; Cui, Y

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSC) exist within many types of breast cancers, functioning to initiate tumorigenesis and augment its progression. The protein profile associated with BCSC has yet to be extensively studied. Mammospheres have been widely employed as a model system to study BCSC. We used proteomics on the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line to compare protein expression in mammosphere-derived cells to that of parental monolayer cells. We identified 34 differentially expressed proteins, seven of which were overexpressed, with the remaining downregulated in mammosphere-derived cells. These differentially expressed proteins include those involved in cell metabolism such as GAPDH and fatty acid synthase, stress response proteins like Hsp27 and FKBP4, and signal transduction related proteins like GIPC1. The expression of breast cancer tumorigenesis and progression-promoting proteins GAPDH and FKBP4 were validated through western blotting. These two proteins are especially recognized for their role in breast cancer resistance to current chemotherapies. The data generated by mammosphere proteomics suggest that this system can identify novel targets for breast cancer stem cells and may provide insights into novel therapy of breast cancer.

  18. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Proteomic definition of the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Lisa M; Mahaffey, Spencer B; Kruh, Nicole A; Dobos, Karen M

    2010-11-05

    The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is complex and diverse; composed of proteins intermingled in a matrix of peptidoglycan, mycolic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Proteomic studies of the Mtb cell wall have been limited; nonetheless, the characterization of resident and secreted proteins associated with the cell wall are critical to understanding bacterial survival and immune modulation in the host. In this study, the cell wall proteome was defined in order to better understand its unique biosynthetic and secretion processes. Mtb cell wall was subjected to extraction with organic solvents to remove noncovalently bound lipids and lipoglycans and remaining proteins were solubilized with either SDS, Guanidine-HCl, or TX-114. These extracts were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass-spectrometry and resulted in the identification of 234 total proteins. The lipoproteome of Mtb, enriched in the TX-114 extract, was further resolved by multidimensional chromatography and mass spectrometry to identify an additional 294 proteins. A query of the 528 total protein identifications against Neural Network or Hidden Markov model algorithms predicted secretion signals in 87 proteins. Classification of these 528 proteins also demonstrated that 35% are involved in small molecule metabolism and 25% are involved in macromolecule synthesis and degradation building upon evidence that the Mtb cell wall is actively engaged in mycobacterial survival and remodeling.

  20. Proteomic profiling of rice embryos from a hybrid rice cultivar and its parental lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Meng, Bo; Ge, Xiaomeng; Song, Shuhui; Yang, Yue; Yu, Xiaomin; Wang, Liguo; Hu, Songnian; Liu, Siqi; Yu, Jun

    2008-11-01

    Elite rice hybrids, when compared to their parental lines, exhibit increased yield and other favorable agronomical traits, such as pathogen- and water-stress resistances, which are described as heterosis, and the molecular mechanism of heterosis remains to be elucidated. Since genomic sequences of the paternal (9311) and maternal lines (P64S) of a major rice hybrid variety LYP9 (Liang-You-Pei-Jiu) were acquired recently, we performed a proteomic study on mature embryos of this hybrid triad based on 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS analyses, and identified 54 differentially expressed proteins involved in major biological processes including nutrient reservoir, response to stress, and metabolism. We observed that most of the storage proteins exhibit overdominance and stress-induced proteins display additivity. We compared proteomic results with transcriptomic data generated from the same embryo samples and found 28 candidate heterosis-associated genes shared by the two datasets. We further traced back to their genomic structures including protein-coding and regulatory regions and found that most of these genes have multiple copies in rice genomes as paralogous genes. Based on alignment of coding and regulation regions, we found that most of the differentially expressed genes at both protein and RNA levels are recent gene duplicates (paralogous genes) with relative little difference in protein-coding regions between orthologous genes (between genes of the two parental genomes) as compared to regulatory regions that harbor numerous indels and base substitutions.

  1. NanoLC-FT-ICR MS improves proteome coverage attainable for ~3000 laser microdissected breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Arzu; Luider, Theo N.; Foekens, J. A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana

    2007-01-29

    Genomics and proteomics assays hold great promise for unrevealing molecular events that underlie human disease. Essential to this quest is the ability to effectively analyze clinical samples, but this task is considerably complicated by tissue heterogeneity. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) can be used to selectively isolate targeted cell populations (such as tumor cells) from their native tissue environment. However, the small number of cells that are typically procured by LCM severely limits the proteome coverage and biomarker discovery potential achievable by conventional proteomics platforms. Herein, we report on the use of a nano liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion clyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (nLC-FTICR MS) platform for analyzing protein digests of approximately 3,000 LCM-derived tumor cells from breast carcinoma tissue, which corresponds to approximately 300 ng of total protein. A total of 2,836 peptides were identified by matching LC-MS data to accurate mass and time (AMT) tag databases that were previously established for the human mammary epithelium and several breast cancer cell lines. The peptide identifications correspond to 1,139 unique proteins confidently identified with 2 or more peptides. Based on categorization by Gene Ontology, identified proteins appear to cover a wide variety of biological functions and cellular compartments. This work demonstrates that a substantial number of proteins can be identified from a limited number of cells using the AMT tag approach and opens a door for high throughput in-depth proteomics analysis of clinical samples.

  2. Cell wall proteome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems.

    PubMed

    Duruflé, Harold; Clemente, Hélène San; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Plant stems carry flowers necessary for species propagation and need to be adapted to mechanical disturbance and environmental factors. The stem cell walls are different from other organs and can modify their rigidity or viscoelastic properties for the integrity and the robustness required to withstand mechanical impacts and environmental stresses. Plant cell wall is composed of complex polysaccharide networks also containing cell wall proteins (CWPs) crucial to perceive and limit the environmental effects. The CWPs are fundamental players in cell wall remodeling processes, and today, only 86 have been identified from the mature stems of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. With a destructive method, this study has enlarged its coverage to 302 CWPs. This new proteome is mainly composed of 27.5% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 16% proteases, 11.6% oxido-reductases, 11% possibly related to lipid metabolism and 11% of proteins with interacting domains with proteins or polysaccharides. Compared to stem cell wall proteomes already available (Brachypodium distachyon, Sacharum officinarum, Linum usitatissimum, Medicago sativa), that of A. thaliana stems has a higher proportion of proteins acting on polysaccharides and of proteases, but a lower proportion of oxido-reductases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  4. An orthogonal comparison of the proteome of human embryonic stem cells with that of human induced pluripotent stem cells of different genetic background.

    PubMed

    Faradonbeh, Mojtaba Zamani; Gharechahi, Javad; Mollamohammadi, Sepideh; Pakzad, Mohammad; Taei, Adeleh; Rassouli, Hassan; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2012-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an invaluable resource for drug or toxicology screening, medical research and patient-specific cell therapy. However, the potential applications of iPSCs are largely dependent on the degree of similarity between iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). In the present study, we analyzed the proteome of human ESCs and hiPSCs with different genetic background. We carried out an orthogonal contrast analysis of the proteome pattern of two human ESC lines (Royan H5 and Royan H6) and two hiPSC lines from a normal individual, three hiPSC lines from a normal individual with Bombay blood group phenotype, and two hiPSC lines from a patient with tyrosinemia. Forty-nine protein spots showed statistically significant differences between two human ESC lines and seven human iPSCs. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 48 proteins belonging to different biological processes, including cytoskeleton organization, energy and metabolic processes, protein synthesis and processing, signal transduction, cell growth and proliferation, cellular trafficking, transcription, calcium binding and immune response. Our results showed that hESCs and hiPSCs had subtle differences at the proteome level thus warranting more detailed and systematic examinations of these cells.

  5. A quantitative proteomics analysis of MCF7 breast cancer stem and progenitor cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Song; McDermott, Sean P.; Deol, Yadwinder; Tan, Zhijing; Wicha, Max S.; Lubman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that breast cancers are initiated and develop from a small population of stem-like cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are hypothesized to mediate tumor metastasis and contribute to therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular regulatory networks responsible for maintaining CSCs in an undifferentiated state have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we used CSC markers to isolate pure breast CSCs fractions (ALDH+ and CD44+CD24− cell populations) and the mature luminal cells (CD49f− EpCAM+) from the MCF7 cell line. Proteomic analysis was performed on these samples and a total of 3304 proteins were identified. A label-free quantitative method was applied to analyze differentially expressed proteins. Using the criteria of greater than twofold changes and p value <0.05, 305, 322 and 98 proteins were identified as significantly different in three pairwise comparisons of ALDH+ versus CD44+CD24−, ALDH+ versus CD49f−EpCAM+ and CD44+CD24− versus CD49f−EpCAM+, respectively. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed proteins by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed potential molecular regulatory networks that may regulate CSCs. Selected differential proteins were validated by Western blot assay and immunohistochemical staining. The use of proteomics analysis may increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of breast CSCs. This may be of importance in the future development of anti-CSC therapeutics. PMID:26332018

  6. A quantitative proteomics analysis of MCF7 breast cancer stem and progenitor cell populations.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; McDermott, Sean P; Deol, Yadwinder; Tan, Zhijing; Wicha, Max S; Lubman, David M

    2015-11-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that breast cancers are initiated and develop from a small population of stem-like cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). These cells are hypothesized to mediate tumor metastasis and contribute to therapeutic resistance. However, the molecular regulatory networks responsible for maintaining CSCs in an undifferentiated state have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we used CSC markers to isolate pure breast CSCs fractions (ALDH+ and CD44+CD24- cell populations) and the mature luminal cells (CD49f-EpCAM+) from the MCF7 cell line. Proteomic analysis was performed on these samples and a total of 3304 proteins were identified. A label-free quantitative method was applied to analyze differentially expressed proteins. Using the criteria of greater than twofold changes and p value <0.05, 305, 322 and 98 proteins were identified as significantly different in three pairwise comparisons of ALDH+ versus CD44+CD24-, ALDH+ versus CD49f-EpCAM+ and CD44+CD24- versus CD49f-EpCAM+, respectively. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed proteins by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) revealed potential molecular regulatory networks that may regulate CSCs. Selected differential proteins were validated by Western blot assay and immunohistochemical staining. The use of proteomics analysis may increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of breast CSCs. This may be of importance in the future development of anti-CSC therapeutics.

  7. The nuclear proteome and DNA-binding fraction of human Raji lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Silke; Cordwell, Stuart J; Crossett, Ben; Baker, Mark S; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-04-01

    Purification of organelles and analysis of their proteins is an important initial step for biological proteomics, simplifying the proteome prior to analysis by established techniques such as two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2-DLC) or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Nuclear proteins play a central role in regulating gene expression, but are often under-represented in proteomic studies due to their lower abundance in comparison to cellular 'housekeeping' metabolic enzymes and structural proteins. A reliable procedure for separation and proteomic analysis of nuclear proteins would be useful for investigations of cell proliferation and differentiation during disease processes (e.g., human cancer). In this study, we have purified nuclei from the human Burkitt's lymphoma B-cell line, Raji, using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The integrity and purity of the nuclei were assessed by light microscopy and proteins from the nuclear fractions were separated by 2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). A total of 124 unique proteins were identified, of which 91% (n=110) were predicted to be nuclear using PSORT. Proteins from the nuclear fraction were subjected to affinity chromatography on DNA-agarose to isolate DNA-binding proteins. From this purified fraction, 131 unique proteins were identified, of which 69% (n=90) were known or predicted DNA-binding proteins. Purification of nuclei and subsequent enrichment of DNA-binding proteins allowed identification of a total of 209 unique proteins, many involved in transcription and/or correlated with lymphoma, leukemia or cancer in general. The data obtained should be valuable for identification of biomarkers and targets for cancer therapy, and for furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphoma development and progression.

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of the shoot apical meristem in maize between a ZmCCT-associated near-isogenic line and its recurrent parent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liuji; Wang, Xintao; Wang, Shunxi; Wu, Liancheng; Tian, Lei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-07-29

    The ZmCCT, one of the most important genes affecting photoperiod response, delays flowering under long-day conditions in maize (Zea mays). In this study we used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technique-based proteomics approach to identify differentially expressed proteins between a near-isogenic line (NIL) and its recurrent parent, contrasting in alleles of ZmCCT. A total of 5,259 distinct proteins were identified. Among them, 386 proteins were differentially expressed between NIL-cml line (ZmCCT-positive) and H4 line (ZmCCT-negative). Functional categorization showed that the differentially proteins were mainly involved in energy production, photosynthesis, signal transduction, and cell organization and biogenesis. Our results showed that during shoot apical meristem (SAM) development cell division proteins, carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins, and flower inhibition-related proteins were more abundant in the ZmCCT-positive line than the ZmCCT-negative line. These results, taken together with morphological observations, showed that the effect of ZmCCT on flowering might be caused by its effect on one or all of these biological processes. Although the exact roles of these putative related proteins remain to be examined, our results obtained using the proteomics approach lead to a better understanding of the photoperiodicity mechanism in maize plants.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of the shoot apical meristem in maize between a ZmCCT-associated near-isogenic line and its recurrent parent

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Wang, Xintao; Wang, Shunxi; Wu, Liancheng; Tian, Lei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    The ZmCCT, one of the most important genes affecting photoperiod response, delays flowering under long-day conditions in maize (Zea mays). In this study we used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technique-based proteomics approach to identify differentially expressed proteins between a near-isogenic line (NIL) and its recurrent parent, contrasting in alleles of ZmCCT. A total of 5,259 distinct proteins were identified. Among them, 386 proteins were differentially expressed between NIL-cml line (ZmCCT-positive) and H4 line (ZmCCT-negative). Functional categorization showed that the differentially proteins were mainly involved in energy production, photosynthesis, signal transduction, and cell organization and biogenesis. Our results showed that during shoot apical meristem (SAM) development cell division proteins, carbohydrate metabolism–related proteins, and flower inhibition-related proteins were more abundant in the ZmCCT-positive line than the ZmCCT-negative line. These results, taken together with morphological observations, showed that the effect of ZmCCT on flowering might be caused by its effect on one or all of these biological processes. Although the exact roles of these putative related proteins remain to be examined, our results obtained using the proteomics approach lead to a better understanding of the photoperiodicity mechanism in maize plants. PMID:27468931

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Proton Beam Irradiated Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Elas, Martyna; Sowa, Urszula; Swakon, Jan; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Olko, Pawel; Romanowska-Dixon, Bozena; Urbanska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam irradiation is a form of advanced radiotherapy providing superior distributions of a low LET radiation dose relative to that of photon therapy for the treatment of cancer. Even though this clinical treatment has been developing for several decades, the proton radiobiology critical to the optimization of proton radiotherapy is far from being understood. Proteomic changes were analyzed in human melanoma cells treated with a sublethal dose (3 Gy) of proton beam irradiation. The results were compared with untreated cells. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed with mass spectrometry to identify the proteins. At the dose of 3 Gy a minimal slowdown in proliferation rate was seen, as well as some DNA damage. After allowing time for damage repair, the proteomic analysis was performed. In total 17 protein levels were found to significantly (more than 1.5 times) change: 4 downregulated and 13 upregulated. Functionally, they represent four categories: (i) DNA repair and RNA regulation (VCP, MVP, STRAP, FAB-2, Lamine A/C, GAPDH), (ii) cell survival and stress response (STRAP, MCM7, Annexin 7, MVP, Caprin-1, PDCD6, VCP, HSP70), (iii) cell metabolism (TIM, GAPDH, VCP), and (iv) cytoskeleton and motility (Moesin, Actinin 4, FAB-2, Vimentin, Annexin 7, Lamine A/C, Lamine B). A substantial decrease (2.3 x) was seen in the level of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the metastatic properties of melanoma. PMID:24392146

  11. Integrative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Profiling Reveals Dynamic Signaling Networks and Bioenergetics Pathways Underlying T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Yang, Kai; Li, Yuxin; Shaw, Timothy I; Wang, Yanyan; Blanco, Daniel Bastardo; Wang, Xusheng; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Wang, Hong; Rankin, Sherri; Guy, Cliff; Peng, Junmin; Chi, Hongbo

    2017-03-21

    The molecular circuits by which antigens activate quiescent T cells remain poorly understood. We combined temporal profiling of the whole proteome and phosphoproteome via multiplexed isobaric labeling proteomics technology, computational pipelines for integrating multi-omics datasets, and functional perturbation to systemically reconstruct regulatory networks underlying T cell activation. T cell receptors activated the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome with discrete kinetics, marked by early dynamics of phosphorylation and delayed ribosome biogenesis and mitochondrial activation. Systems biology analyses identified multiple functional modules, active kinases, transcription factors and connectivity between them, and mitochondrial pathways including mitoribosomes and complex IV. Genetic perturbation revealed physiological roles for mitochondrial enzyme COX10-mediated oxidative phosphorylation in T cell quiescence exit. Our multi-layer proteomics profiling, integrative network analysis, and functional studies define landscapes of the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome and reveal signaling and bioenergetics pathways that mediate lymphocyte exit from quiescence.

  12. Proteomic analysis of mature barley grains from C-hordein antisense lines.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Daiana; Gaziola, Salete Aparecida; Boaretto, Luis Felipe; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes

    2016-05-01

    Hordeins are the major storage proteins in barley grains and are responsible for their low nutritional quality. Previously, antisense C-hordein barley lines were generated and were shown to contain a more balanced amino acid composition and an altered storage protein profile. In the present study, a proteomic approach that combined two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry was used to (1) identify the changes in the protein profile of non-storage proteins (salt soluble fraction) in antisense C-hordein barley lines (L1, L2 and L3) and (2) map the differentially expressed proteins compared to the non-transgenic control line (Hordeum vulgare cv. Golden Promise). Moreover, the changes in the proteins were correlated with the more balanced amino acid composition of these lines, with special attention to the lysine content. The results showed that suppression of C-hordein expression does not exclusively affect hordein synthesis and accumulation. The more balanced amino acid composition observed in the transgenic lines L1, L2 and L3 was an indirect result of the profound alterations in the patterns of the non-storage proteins. The observed changes included up-regulated expression of the proteins involved in stress and detoxification (L1), defence (L2 and L3), and storage globulins (L1, L2 and L3). To a lesser extent, the proteins involved in grain metabolism were also changed. Thus, the increased essential amino acids content results from changes in distinct protein sources among the three antisense C-hordein lines analyzed, although the up-regulated expression of lysine-rich proteins was consistently observed in all lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Two traditional maize inbred lines of contrasting technological abilities are discriminated by the seed flour proteome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carla; Sergeant, Kjell; Machado, Cátia M; Renaut, Jenny; Ricardo, Cândido P

    2013-07-05

    The seed proteome of two traditional maize inbred lines (pb269 and pb369) contrasting in grain hardness and in preferable use for bread-making was evaluated. The pb269 seeds, of flint type (i.e., hard endosperm), are preferably used by manufacturers, while pb369 (dent, soft endosperm) is rejected. The hypothesis that the content and relative amounts of specific proteins in the maize flour are relevant for such discrimination of the inbred lines was tested. The flour proteins were sequentially extracted following the Osborne fractionation (selective solubilization), and the four Osborne fractions were submitted to two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE). The total amount of protein extracted from the seeds was not significantly different, but pb369 flour exhibited significantly higher proportions of salt-extracted proteins (globulins) and ethanol-extracted proteins (alcohol-soluble prolamins). The proteome analysis allowed discrimination between the two inbred lines, with pb269 demonstrating higher heterogeneity than pb369. From the 967 spots (358 common to both lines, 208 specific to pb269, and 401 specific to pb369), 588 were submitted to mass spectrometry (MS). Through the combined use of trypsin and chymotrypsin it was possible to identify proteins in 436 spots. The functional categorization in combination with multivariate analysis highlighted the most discriminant biological processes (carbohydrate metabolic process, response to stress, chitin catabolic process, oxidation-reduction process) and molecular function (nutrient reservoir activity). The inbred lines exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in these categories. Differences were also revealed in the amounts, proportions, and distribution of several groups of storage proteins, which can have an impact on the organization of the protein body and endosperm hardness. For some proteins (granule-bound starch synthase-1, cyclophilin, zeamatin), a change in the protein solubility rather than in the

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of pericycle cells of the maize primary root.

    PubMed

    Dembinsky, Diana; Woll, Katrin; Saleem, Muhammad; Liu, Yan; Fu, Yan; Borsuk, Lisa A; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Fladerer, Claudia; Madlung, Johannes; Barbazuk, Brad; Nordheim, Alfred; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2007-11-01

    Each plant cell type expresses a unique transcriptome and proteome at different stages of differentiation dependent on its developmental fate. This study compared gene expression and protein accumulation in cell-cycle-competent primary root pericycle cells of maize (Zea mays) prior to their first division and lateral root initiation. These are the only root cells that maintain the competence to divide after they leave the meristematic zone. Pericycle cells of the inbred line B73 were isolated via laser capture microdissection. Microarray experiments identified 32 genes preferentially expressed in pericycle versus all other root cells that have left the apical meristem; selective subtractive hybridization identified seven genes preferentially expressed in pericycle versus central cylinder cells of the same root region. Transcription and protein synthesis represented the most abundant functional categories among these pericycle-specific genes. Moreover, 701 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from pericycle and central cylinder cells. Among those, transcripts related to protein synthesis and cell fate were significantly enriched in pericycle versus nonpericycle cells. In addition, 77 EST clusters not previously identified in maize ESTs or genomic databases were identified. Finally, among the most abundant soluble pericycle proteins separated via two-dimensional electrophoresis, 20 proteins were identified via electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, thus defining a reference dataset of the maize pericycle proteome. Among those, two proteins were preferentially expressed in the pericycle. In summary, these pericycle-specific gene expression experiments define the distinct molecular events during the specification of cell-cycle-competent pericycle cells prior to their first division and demonstrate that pericycle specification and lateral root initiation might be controlled by a different set of genes.

  15. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Pericycle Cells of the Maize Primary Root1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dembinsky, Diana; Woll, Katrin; Saleem, Muhammad; Liu, Yan; Fu, Yan; Borsuk, Lisa A.; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Fladerer, Claudia; Madlung, Johannes; Barbazuk, Brad; Nordheim, Alfred; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S.; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Each plant cell type expresses a unique transcriptome and proteome at different stages of differentiation dependent on its developmental fate. This study compared gene expression and protein accumulation in cell-cycle-competent primary root pericycle cells of maize (Zea mays) prior to their first division and lateral root initiation. These are the only root cells that maintain the competence to divide after they leave the meristematic zone. Pericycle cells of the inbred line B73 were isolated via laser capture microdissection. Microarray experiments identified 32 genes preferentially expressed in pericycle versus all other root cells that have left the apical meristem; selective subtractive hybridization identified seven genes preferentially expressed in pericycle versus central cylinder cells of the same root region. Transcription and protein synthesis represented the most abundant functional categories among these pericycle-specific genes. Moreover, 701 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from pericycle and central cylinder cells. Among those, transcripts related to protein synthesis and cell fate were significantly enriched in pericycle versus nonpericycle cells. In addition, 77 EST clusters not previously identified in maize ESTs or genomic databases were identified. Finally, among the most abundant soluble pericycle proteins separated via two-dimensional electrophoresis, 20 proteins were identified via electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry, thus defining a reference dataset of the maize pericycle proteome. Among those, two proteins were preferentially expressed in the pericycle. In summary, these pericycle-specific gene expression experiments define the distinct molecular events during the specification of cell-cycle-competent pericycle cells prior to their first division and demonstrate that pericycle specification and lateral root initiation might be controlled by a different set of genes. PMID:17766395

  16. Quantitative proteomic approach to understand metabolic adaptation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Bernabé, Alfonso; Cortés, Roldán; Lehmann, Sylvia G; Seve, Michel; Cascante, Marta; Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine

    2014-11-07

    KRAS mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are a predictor of resistance to EGFR-targeted therapies. Because approaches to target RAS signaling have been unsuccessful, targeting lung cancer metabolism might help to develop a new strategy that could overcome drug resistance in such cancer. In this study, we applied a large screening quantitative proteomic analysis to evidence key enzymes involved in metabolic adaptations in lung cancer. We carried out the proteomic analysis of two KRAS-mutated NSCLC cell lines (A549 and NCI-H460) and a non tumoral bronchial cell line (BEAS-2B) using an iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) approach combined with two-dimensional fractionation (OFFGEL/RP nanoLC) and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analysis. Protein targets identified by our iTRAQ approach were validated by Western blotting analysis. Among 1038 proteins identified and 834 proteins quantified, 49 and 82 proteins were respectively found differently expressed in A549 and NCI-H460 cells compared to the BEAS-2B non tumoral cell line. Regarding the metabolic pathways, enzymes involved in glycolysis (GAPDH/PKM2/LDH-A/LDH-B) and pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) (G6PD/TKT/6PGD) were up-regulated. The up-regulation of enzyme expression in PPP is correlated to their enzyme activity and will be further investigated to confirm those enzymes as promising metabolic targets for the development of new therapeutic treatments or biomarker assay for NSCLC.

  17. Chapter 6. available lepidopteran insect cell lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter lists the known cell lines from Lepidoptera, largely based on previous compilations of insect cell lines published by W. Fred Hink. More than 320 lines from 65 species are listed. The official designation is given for each cell line as well as the species, tissue source, and, when kno...

  18. Proteomic characterization of Her2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hexin; Pimienta, Genaro; Gu, Yiben; Sun, Xu; Hu, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2010-11-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is an oncogene amplified in invasive breast cancer and its overexpression in mammary epithelial cell lines is a strong determinant of a tumorigenic phenotype. Accordingly, HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors are commonly indicative of a poor prognosis in patients. Several quantitative proteomic studies have employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with MS/MS, which provides only limited information about the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2/neu signaling. In the present study, we used a SILAC-based approach to compare the proteomic profile of normal breast epithelial cells with that of Her2/neu-overexpressing mammary epithelial cells, isolated from primary mammary tumors arising in mouse mammary tumor virus-Her2/neu transgenic mice. We identified 23 proteins with relevant annotated functions in breast cancer, showing a substantial differential expression. This included overexpression of creatine kinase, retinol-binding protein 1, thymosin 4 and tumor protein D52, which correlated with the tumorigenic phenotype of Her2-overexpressing cells. The differential expression pattern of two genes, gelsolin and retinol binding protein 1, was further validated in normal and tumor tissues. Finally, an in silico analysis of published cancer microarray data sets revealed a 23-gene signature, which can be used to predict the probability of metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients.

  19. Proteomic characterization of Her2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hexin; Pimienta, Genaro; Gu, Yiben; Sun, Xu; Hu, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 is an oncogene amplified in invasive breast cancer and its overexpression in mammary epithelial cell lines is a strong determinant of a tumorigenic phenotype. Accordingly, HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors are commonly indicative of a poor prognosis in patients. Several quantitative proteomic studies have employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides only limited information about the molecular mechanisms underlying HER2/neu signaling. In the present study, we used a SILAC-based approach to compare the proteomic profile of normal breast epithelial cells with that of Her2/neu-overexpressing mammary epithelial cells, isolated from primary mammary tumors arising in MMTV-Her2/neu transgenic mice. We identified 23 proteins with relevant annotated functions in breast cancer, showing a substantial differential expression. This included overexpression of creatine kinase, retinol-binding protein 1, thymosin beta 4 and tumor protein D52, which correlated with the tumorigenic phenotype of Her2-overexpressing cells. The differential expression pattern of two genes, gelsolin and retinol binding protein 1, was further validated in normal and tumor tissues. Finally, an in silico analysis of published cancer microarray datasets revealed a 23-gene signature which can be used to predict the probability of metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. PMID:20960451

  20. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. On-line Chip based 2D RP/RP LC-MS/MS Method for Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Christie; Albanese, Jenny; van Soest, Remco; Zhu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography is widely used for proteome identification and quantification using the advantage of increasing peak capacity. Herein, we developed an simplified chip based 2D-LC workflow using a high pH/RP first dimensional separation and low pH/RP secondary dimension coupled to mass spectrometer for proteomic analysis. The 2D LC separation was performed using ekspert™ nanoLC 425(Eksigent, part of AB SCIEX) system. Digested E. coli cell lysates were first loaded onto a 200μm × 15cm C18 column at pH 9.8 with a flowrate of 1 μL/min. Step gradient was used to sequentially elute peptide fractions, which were diluted to pH 2.5 before being captured by a 200μm × 6mm C18 chip trap column. Each fraction was then separated with a 75 μm × 15cm C18 chip column at 300 nL/min and analyzed with TripleTOF® 5600 (AB SCIEX). Data was processed with ProteinPilot™ Software (AB SCIEX). The preliminary result suggested the on-line 2D RP-RP method as an easy and competitive approach for proteome discovery. The comparison experiments of 1D, 2D-6 fraction and 2D-10 fraction were performed. Using ∼1ug of E. coli digested cell lysates, there are 1.8× and 2.1× increase in the identification numbers for 2D-6 and 2D-10 fractions versus the 1D configuration at the peptide level (5% local FDR). The other advantage of 2D workflow is the larger sample loading capacities on the column. When the loading amount was increased by 10×, the number of detected peptides increased by 3.3× and 4× for the 2D 6 and 10 fraction workflows, respectively, over 1D workflow. The measured retention time of peptides detected in both the 1D 1ug and 2D 10ug experiments showed very good correlation (r2 0.99, slope 1.0). Further optimization of both the first and second dimension is ongoing to further improve the peptide detection rates.

  2. [Proteomic study of retinoid acid resistant NB4R1 cells apoptosis induced by realgar].

    PubMed

    Qi, Jun; Zhang, Mei; He, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Hong-Li; Wang, Xin-Yang

    2010-11-01

    To obtain and identify the differential proteome of apoptosis induced by realgar (tetra-arsenic tetra-sulfide, As(4)S(4)) in retinoid acid (RA) resistant human acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4-R1 cells. The comparative proteomic expressive profiles of NB4-R1 cells treated with and without As(4)S(4) were obtained with the high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis system. After the analysis of ImageMaster(TM) 2D Platinum software combining artificial comparison. The differential expression proteins were screened and performed in-gel digestion and extraction of peptides, applied mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF-MS, MALDI-TOF/TOF, UPLC-MS/MS and bioinformatics to identify differential expressive proteins. Twenty-two spots with more than 2-fold (≥ 2 or ≤ 0.5) expression changes were identified and 21 known proteins obtained, including 5 down-regulated (SET/I2PP2A, RPP2, PCBP1, EIF4H-1 and ANP32A/I1PP2A) after exposed to As(4)S(4), 2 up-regulated (HSP27 and HMGB1) after exposed for 24 h, and 14 up-regulated (PHB, ERP29, DNAJC8, PSMB4, ACTB, RPP0, RhoGDI2, alpha-tubulin, transcription factor, RBM15/OTT1, eIF5A1 and H2B1M et al.) after exposed for 48 h. It is the first time to successfully obtain and identify the global proteome of apoptosis induced by As(4)S(4) in RA-resistant cells. Among them, expressional and functional regulation of target proteins SET, RPP2 and PHB might be the potential novel therapeutic target for RA-resistant APL.

  3. Development of a laser capture microscope-based single-cell-type proteomics tool for studying proteomes of individual cell layers of plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingde; Li, Hui; Bhatti, Sarabjit; Zhou, Suping; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell-type proteomics provides the capability to revealing the genomic and proteomics information at cell-level resolution. However, the methodology for this type of research has not been well-developed. This paper reports developing a workflow of laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by gel-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS/MS)-based proteomics analysis for the identification of proteomes contained in individual cell layers of tomato roots. Thin-sections (~10-μm thick, 10 sections per root tip) were prepared for root tips of tomato germinating seedlings. Epidermal and cortical cells (5000–7000 cells per tissue type) were isolated under a LCM microscope. Proteins were isolated and then separated by SDS–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel-tryptic digestion. The MS and MS/MS spectra generated using nanoLC-MS/MS analysis of the tryptic peptides were searched against ITAG2.4 tomato protein database to identify proteins contained in each single-cell-type sample. Based on the biological functions, proteins with proven functions in root hair development were identified in epidermal cells but not in the cortical cells. Several of these proteins were found in Al-treated roots only. The results demonstrated that the cell-type-specific proteome is relevant for tissue-specific functions in tomato roots. Increasing the coverage of proteomes and reducing the inevitable cross-contamination from adjacent cell layers, in both vertical and cross directions when cells are isolated from slides prepared using intact root tips, are the major challenges using the technology in proteomics analysis of plant roots. PMID:27280026

  4. Systems-wide proteomic analysis in mammalian cells reveals conserved, functional protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Cambridge, Sidney B; Gnad, Florian; Nguyen, Chuong; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Krüger, Marcus; Mann, Matthias

    2011-12-02

    The turnover of each protein in the mammalian proteome is a functionally important characteristic. Here, we employed high-resolution mass spectrometry to quantify protein dynamics in nondividing mammalian cells. The ratio of externally supplied versus endogenous amino acids to de novo protein synthesis was about 17:1. Using subsaturating SILAC labeling, we obtained accurate turnover rates of 4106 proteins in HeLa and 3528 proteins in C2C12 cells. Comparison of these human and mouse cell lines revealed a highly significant turnover correlation of protein orthologs and thus high species conservation. Functionally, we observed statistically significant trends for the turnover of phosphoproteins and gene ontology categories that showed extensive covariation between mouse and human. Likewise, the members of some protein complexes, such as the proteasome, have highly similar turnover rates. The high species conservation and the low complex variances thus imply great regulatory fine-tuning of protein turnover.

  5. Cell wall proteomic of Brachypodium distachyon grains: A focus on cell wall remodeling proteins.

    PubMed

    Francin-Allami, Mathilde; Merah, Kahina; Albenne, Cécile; Rogniaux, Hélène; Pavlovic, Marija; Lollier, Virginie; Sibout, Richard; Guillon, Fabienne; Jamet, Elisabeth; Larré, Colette

    2015-07-01

    Cell walls play key roles during plant development. Following their deposition into the cell wall, polysaccharides are continually remodeled according to the growth stage and stress environment to accommodate cell growth and differentiation. To date, little is known concerning the enzymes involved in cell wall remodeling, especially in gramineous and particularly in the grain during development. Here, we investigated the cell wall proteome of the grain of Brachypodium distachyon. This plant is a suitable model for temperate cereal crops. Among the 601 proteins identified, 299 were predicted to be secreted. These proteins were distributed into eight functional classes; the class of proteins that act on carbohydrates was the most highly represented. Among these proteins, numerous glycoside hydrolases were found. Expansins and peroxidases, which are assumed to be involved in cell wall polysaccharide remodeling, were also identified. Approximately half of the proteins identified in this study were newly discovered in grain and were not identified in the previous proteome analysis conducted using the culms and leaves of B. distachyon. Therefore, the data obtained from all organs of B. distachyon infer a global cell wall proteome consisting of 460 proteins. At present, this is the most extensive cell wall proteome of a monocot species.

  6. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-02

    Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a 'minimally perturbed' cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (

  7. Functional classification of cellular proteome profiles support the identification of drug resistance signatures in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Paulitschke, Verena; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Griss, Johannes; Berger, Walter; Mohr, Thomas; Pehamberger, Hubert; Kunstfeld, Rainer; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-07-05

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle in melanoma treatment. Recognition of specific resistance patterns, the understanding of the patho-physiology of drug resistance, and identification of remaining options for individual melanoma treatment would greatly improve therapeutic success. We performed mass spectrometry-based proteome profiling of A375 melanoma cells and HeLa cells characterized as sensitive to cisplatin in comparison to cisplatin resistant M24met and TMFI melanoma cells. Cells were fractionated into cytoplasm, nuclei and secretome and the proteome profiles classified according to Gene Ontology. The cisplatin resistant cells displayed increased expression of lysosomal as well as Ca²⁺ ion binding and cell adherence proteins. These findings were confirmed using Lysotracker Red staining and cell adhesion assays with a panel of extracellular matrix proteins. To discriminate specific survival proteins, we selected constitutively expressed proteins of resistant M24met cells which were found expressed upon challenging the sensitive A375 cells. Using the CPL/MUW proteome database, the selected lysosomal, cell adherence and survival proteins apparently specifying resistant cells were narrowed down to 47 proteins representing a potential resistance signature. These were tested against our proteomics database comprising more than 200 different cell types/cell states for its predictive power. We provide evidence that this signature enables the automated assignment of resistance features as readout from proteome profiles of any human cell type. Proteome profiling and bioinformatic processing may thus support the understanding of drug resistance mechanism, eventually guiding patient tailored therapy.

  8. Cross-Species Analysis of Nicotine-Induced Proteomic Alterations in Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; Urrutia, Raul; Kadiyala, Vivek; Banks, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxic compounds in tobacco, such as nicotine, may have adversely affect pancreatic function. We aim to determine nicotine-induced protein alterations in pancreatic cells, which may reveal a link between nicotine exposure and pancreatic disease. Methods We compared the proteomic alterations induced by nicotine treatment in cultured pancreatic cells (mouse, rat and human stellate cells and human duct cells) using mass spectrometry-based techniques, specifically GeLC-MS/MS and spectral counting. Results We identified thousands of proteins in pancreatic cells, hundreds of which were identified exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated cells. Inter-species comparisons of stellate cell proteins revealed several differentially-abundant proteins (in nicotine treated versus untreated cells) common among the 3 species. Proteins appearing in all nicotine-treated stellate cells include amyloid beta (A4), procollagen type VI alpha 1, integral membrane protein 2B,and Toll interacting protein. Conclusions Proteins which were differentially expressed upon nicotine treatment across cell lines, were enriched in certain pathways, including nAChR, cytokine, and integrin signaling. At this analytical depth, we conclude that similar pathways are affected by nicotine, but alterations at the protein level among stellate cells of different species vary. Further interrogation of such pathways will lead to insights into the potential effect of nicotine on pancreatic cells at the biomolecular level and the extension of this concept to the effect of nicotine on pancreatic disease. PMID:23456891

  9. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells -- a proteomic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Brian; Discher, Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Many cellular activities are mediated by conformational changes in proteins or else involve rearrangement of protein assemblies. These motions are now commonly investigated in vitro as well as at the single-molecule level. But we sought to develop an in-cell method to study these motions and to do so on a proteomic scale. We have been especially interested in studying molecular responses in cells under stress, and we initially developed a labeling technique in the simplest human cell, the red blood cell. The premise is to label cysteines with cell-viable, thiol-reactive fluorophores in both stressed and unstressed cells. Then, differential labeling of proteins would indicate that under stress, previously buried cysteine residues become exposed and thus accessible to the fluorescent probe. Fluorescence imaging and saparations provide initial clues to structures and proteins, but Mass Spectrometry precisely maps the sites that are exposed. Subsequent work on recombinants and in modeling is then used to explain the cell-derived findings, and the method has now been applied to several nucleated cell types.

  10. Role of Proteome Physical Chemistry in Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kingshuk; de Graff, Adam M R; Sawle, Lucas; Dill, Ken A

    2016-09-15

    We review how major cell behaviors, such as bacterial growth laws, are derived from the physical chemistry of the cell's proteins. On one hand, cell actions depend on the individual biological functionalities of their many genes and proteins. On the other hand, the common physics among proteins can be as important as the unique biology that distinguishes them. For example, bacterial growth rates depend strongly on temperature. This dependence can be explained by the folding stabilities across a cell's proteome. Such modeling explains how thermophilic and mesophilic organisms differ, and how oxidative damage of highly charged proteins can lead to unfolding and aggregation in aging cells. Cells have characteristic time scales. For example, E. coli can duplicate as fast as 2-3 times per hour. These time scales can be explained by protein dynamics (the rates of synthesis and degradation, folding, and diffusional transport). It rationalizes how bacterial growth is slowed down by added salt. In the same way that the behaviors of inanimate materials can be expressed in terms of the statistical distributions of atoms and molecules, some cell behaviors can be expressed in terms of distributions of protein properties, giving insights into the microscopic basis of growth laws in simple cells.

  11. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jahnabi; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  12. Advances in the proteomic investigation of the cell secretome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kristy J; Formolo, Catherine A; Seol, Haeri; Marathi, Ramya L; Duguez, Stephanie; An, Eunkyung; Pillai, Dinesh; Nazarian, Javad; Rood, Brian R; Hathout, Yetrib

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the cell secretome have greatly increased in recent years owing to improvements in proteomic platforms, mass spectrometry instrumentation and to the increased interaction between analytical chemists, biologists and clinicians. Several secretome studies have been implemented in different areas of research, leading to the generation of a valuable secretome catalogs. Secreted proteins continue to be an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic target discovery and are equally valuable in the field of microbiology. Several discoveries have been achieved in vitro using cell culture systems, ex vivo using human tissue specimens and in vivo using animal models. In this review, some of the most recent advances in secretome studies and the fields that have benefited the most from this evolving technology are highlighted. PMID:22809211

  13. Proteomic analysis of early germs with high-oil and normal inbred lines in maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanji; Yang, Xiaohong; Fu, Yang; Zhang, Yirong; Yan, Jianbin; Song, Tongming; Rocheford, T; Li, Jiansheng

    2009-04-01

    High-oil maize as a product of long-term selection provides a unique resource for functional genomics. In this study, the abundant soluble proteins of early developing germs from high-oil and normal lines of maize were compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) in combination with mass spectrometry (MS). More than 1100 protein spots were detected on electrophoresis maps of both high-oil and normal lines by using silver staining method. A total of 83 protein spots showed significant differential expression (>two-fold change; t-test: P < 0.05) between high-oil and normal inbred lines. Twenty-seven protein spots including 25 non-redundant proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Functional categorization of these proteins was carbohydrate metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein metabolism, stress response, and lipid metabolism. Three such proteins involved in lipid metabolism, namely putative enoyl-ACP reductase (ENR), putative stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD) and putative acetyl-CoA C-acyltransferase (ACA), had more abundant expressions in high-oil lines than in normal. At the mRNA expression level, SAD, ENR and ACA were expressed at significantly higher levels in high-oil lines than in normal. The results demonstrated that high expressions of SAD, ENR and ACA might be associated to increasing oil concentration in high-oil maize. This study represents the first proteomic analysis of high-oil maize and contributes to a better understanding of the molecular basis of oil accumulation in high-oil maize.

  14. Differential effects of Helenalin, an anti-inflammatory sesquiterpene lactone, on the proteome, metabolome and the oxidative stress response in several immune cell types.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Paula; Schultze, Nadin; Niehs, Sarah; Albrecht, Dirk; Methling, Karen; Wurster, Martina; Wachlin, Gerhild; Lalk, Michael; Lindequist, Ulrike; Haertel, Beate

    2016-12-18

    Extracts of Arnica spp. are traditionally used due to their anti-inflammatory effects for the topical treatment of e.g. haematoma or muscle distortions. One of the main active compounds is Helenalin, a sesquiterpene lactone that can be found in various Asteraceae. However, immunotoxic effects of the compound are only poorly analysed. In this study, a 2D gel electrophoresis based proteomic approach together with a membrane based proteomic assay, metabolomics and the detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) were used to investigate potential immunotoxic properties of Helenalin on the human immune cell lines Jurkat and THP-1 and on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The study revealed a dose-dependent cytotoxicity towards both tested cell lines and the PBMC. However, the cell lines were less sensitive to the Helenalin treatment than the PBMC. The proteomic assays showed strong effects on the carbohydrate metabolism and the protein folding in THP-1 cells but only weak impact on Jurkat cells. Metabolomic studies as well as iROS detection in THP-1 cells verified the results of the proteomic analysis. In summary, the approaches used in this study were able to identify target pathways of Helenalin especially in THP-1 monocytes and thus enable a risk assessment of the substance.

  15. Nascent proteomes of ischemic-injured and ischemic-tolerant neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, An; Simon, Roger P.; David, Larry

    2011-01-01

    In a recent study on ischemic rodent brains, we quantitatively characterised and compared brain proteomes under ischemic-preconditioned or injured or tolerant conditions. We discovered an enriched presence of repressive transcriptional regulator proteins with essential roles as epigenetic regulators in ischemic-tolerant brains (Stapels et al., 2010). We further showed their robust, dynamic and differential changes under different ischemic conditions in brains and in cultured neuronal cells. In the present work, using neuronal cell cultures, we aimed to characterise the nascent proteome, the proteome that presents early when the cells receive an ischemic insult. These would be the proteomic changes of newly synthesised proteins. Identification of effectors of this phase of response to ischemia bears the best promise of identifying therapeutic targets for treating acute stroke when patients present to hospital. We compared these nascent proteomes across different ischemic conditions using bioinformatic tools. PMID:21330693

  16. N-linked Glycosylation Enrichment for In-depth Cell Surface Proteomics of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Subtypes*

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Sally J.; Cox, Juergen; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Global analysis of lymphoma genome integrity and transcriptomes tremendously advanced our understanding of their biology. Technological advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics promise to complete the picture by allowing the global quantification of proteins and their post-translational modifications. Here we use N-glyco FASP, a recently developed mass spectrometric approach using lectin-enrichment, in conjunction with a super-SILAC approach to quantify N-linked glycoproteins in lymphoma cells. From patient-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines, we mapped 2383 glycosites on 1321 protein groups, which were highly enriched for cell membrane proteins. This N-glyco subproteome alone allowed the segregation of the ABC from the GCB subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which before gene expression studies had been considered one disease entity. Encouragingly, many of the glycopeptides driving the segregation belong to proteins previously characterized as segregators in a deep proteome study of these subtypes (S. J. Deeb et al. MCP 2012 PMID 22442255). This conforms to the high correlation that we observed between the expression level of the glycosites and their corresponding proteins. Detailed examination of glycosites and glycoprotein expression levels uncovered, among other interesting findings, enrichment of transcription factor binding motifs, including known NF-kappa-B related ones. Thus, enrichment of a class of post-translationally modified peptides can classify cancer types as well as reveal cancer specific mechanistic changes. PMID:24190977

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Grape Berry Cell Cultures Reveals that Developmentally Regulated Ripening Related Processes Can Be Studied Using Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharathchandra, Ramaschandra G.; Stander, Charmaine; Jacobson, Dan; Ndimba, Bongani; Vivier, Melané A.

    2011-01-01

    Background This work describes a proteomics profiling method, optimized and applied to berry cell suspensions to evaluate organ-specific cultures as a platform to study grape berry ripening. Variations in berry ripening within a cluster(s) on a vine and in a vineyard are a major impediment towards complete understanding of the functional processes that control ripening, specifically when a characterized and homogenous sample is required. Berry cell suspensions could overcome some of these problems, but their suitability as a model system for berry development and ripening needs to be established first. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report on the proteomic evaluation of the cytosolic proteins obtained from synchronized cell suspension cultures that were established from callus lines originating from green, véraison and ripe Vitis vinifera berry explants. The proteins were separated using liquid phase IEF in a Microrotofor cell and SDS PAGE. This method proved superior to gel-based 2DE. Principal component analysis confirmed that biological and technical repeats grouped tightly and importantly, showed that the proteomes of berry cultures originating from the different growth/ripening stages were distinct. A total of twenty six common bands were selected after band matching between different growth stages and twenty two of these bands were positively identified. Thirty two % of the identified proteins are currently annotated as hypothetical. The differential expression profile of the identified proteins, when compared with published literature on grape berry ripening, suggested common trends in terms of relative abundance in the different developmental stages between real berries and cell suspensions. Conclusions The advantages of having suspension cultures that accurately mimic specific developmental stages are profound and could significantly contribute to the study of the intricate regulatory and signaling networks responsible for berry

  18. Role of Proteome Physical Chemistry in Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We review how major cell behaviors, such as bacterial growth laws, are derived from the physical chemistry of the cell’s proteins. On one hand, cell actions depend on the individual biological functionalities of their many genes and proteins. On the other hand, the common physics among proteins can be as important as the unique biology that distinguishes them. For example, bacterial growth rates depend strongly on temperature. This dependence can be explained by the folding stabilities across a cell’s proteome. Such modeling explains how thermophilic and mesophilic organisms differ, and how oxidative damage of highly charged proteins can lead to unfolding and aggregation in aging cells. Cells have characteristic time scales. For example, E. coli can duplicate as fast as 2–3 times per hour. These time scales can be explained by protein dynamics (the rates of synthesis and degradation, folding, and diffusional transport). It rationalizes how bacterial growth is slowed down by added salt. In the same way that the behaviors of inanimate materials can be expressed in terms of the statistical distributions of atoms and molecules, some cell behaviors can be expressed in terms of distributions of protein properties, giving insights into the microscopic basis of growth laws in simple cells. PMID:27513457

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Silk Viability in Maize Inbred Lines and Their Corresponding Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafei; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fangfang; Tang, Jihua; Fu, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    A long period of silk viability is critical for a good seed setting rate in maize (Zea mays L.), especially for inbred lines and hybrids with a long interval between anthesis and silking. To explore the molecular mechanism of silk viability and its heterosis, three inbred lines with different silk viability characteristics (Xun928, Lx9801, and Zong3) and their two hybrids (Xun928×Zong3 and Lx9801×Zong3) were analyzed at different developmental stages by a proteomic method. The differentially accumulated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and classified into metabolism, protein biosynthesis and folding, signal transduction and hormone homeostasis, stress and defense responses, and cellular processes. Proteins involved in nutrient (methionine) and energy (ATP) supply, which support the pollen tube growth in the silk, were important for silk viability and its heterosis. The additive and dominant effects at a single locus, as well as complex epistatic interactions at two or more loci in metabolic pathways, were the primary contributors for mid-parent heterosis of silk viability. Additionally, the proteins involved in the metabolism of anthocyanins, which indirectly negatively regulate local hormone accumulation, were also important for the mid-parent heterosis of silk viability. These results also might imply the developmental dependence of heterosis, because many of the differentially accumulated proteins made distinct contributions to the heterosis of silk viability at specific developmental stages. PMID:26630375

  20. On-line digestion system for protein characterization and proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Lourette, Natacha M; Clowers, Brian; Hixson, Kim K; Heibeck, Tyler; Prior, David C; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Camp, David G; Belov, Mikhail E; Smith, Richard D

    2008-12-01

    An efficient on-line digestion system that reduces the number of sample manipulation steps has been demonstrated for high-throughput proteomics. By incorporating a pressurized sample loop into a liquid chromatography-based separation system, both sample and enzyme (e.g., trypsin) can be simultaneously introduced to produce a complete, yet rapid digestion. Both standard proteins and a complex Shewanella oneidensis global protein extract were digested and analyzed using the automated online pressurized digestion system coupled to an ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, or both. The system denatured, digested, and separated product peptides in a manner of minutes, making it amenable to on-line high-throughput applications. In addition to simplifying and expediting sample processing, the system was easy to implement and no cross-contamination was observed among samples. As a result, the online digestion system offers a powerful approach for high-throughput screening of proteins that could prove valuable in biochemical research (rapid screening of protein-based drugs).

  1. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Huh-7 cells infected with Dengue virus by label-free LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Pando-Robles, Victoria; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Rodríguez-Gandarilla, Myriam; Meneses-Romero, Erika; Burlingame, Alma L; Batista, Cesar V F

    2014-12-05

    Dengue is an important and growing public health problem worldwide with an estimated 100million new clinical cases annually. Currently, no licensed drug or vaccine is available. During natural infection in humans, liver cells constitute one of the main targets of dengue virus (DENV) replication. However, a clear understanding of dengue pathogenesis remains elusive. In order to gain a better reading of the cross talk between virus and host cell proteins, we used a proteomics approach to analyze the host response to DENV infection in a hepatic cell line Huh-7. Differences in proteome expression were assayed 24h post-infection using label-free LC-MS. Quantitative analysis revealed 155 differentially expressed proteins, 64 of which were up-regulated and 91 down-regulated. These results reveal an important decrease in the expression of enzymes involved in the glycolytic pathway, citrate cycle, and pyruvate metabolism. This study provides large-scale quantitative information regarding protein expression in the early stages of infection that should be useful for better compression of the pathogenesis of dengue. Dengue infection involves alterations in the homeostasis of the host cell. Defining the interactions between virus and cell proteins should provide a better understanding of how viruses propagate and cause disease. Here, we present for the first time the proteomic analysis of hepatocytes (Huh-7 cells) infected with DENV-2 by label-free LC-MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antiandrogens act as selective androgen receptor modulators at the proteome level in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Greg N; Gamble, Simon C; Hough, Michael A; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M; Fioretti, Flavia M; Bryan, Rosie A; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  3. Antiandrogens Act as Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators at the Proteome Level in Prostate Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Greg N.; Gamble, Simon C.; Hough, Michael A.; Begum, Shajna; Dart, D. Alwyn; Odontiadis, Michael; Powell, Sue M.; Fioretti, Flavia M.; Bryan, Rosie A.; Waxman, Jonathan; Wait, Robin; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for prostate cancer include antiandrogens, inhibitory ligands of the androgen receptor, which repress androgen-stimulated growth. These include the selective androgen receptor modulators cyproterone acetate and hydroxyflutamide and the complete antagonist bicalutamide. Their activity is partly dictated by the presence of androgen receptor mutations, which are commonly detected in patients who relapse while receiving antiandrogens, i.e. in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. To characterize the early proteomic response to these antiandrogens we used the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line, which harbors the androgen receptor mutation most commonly detected in castrate-resistant tumors (T877A), analyzing alterations in the proteome, and comparing these to the effect of these therapeutics upon androgen receptor activity and cell proliferation. The majority are regulated post-transcriptionally, possibly via nongenomic androgen receptor signaling. Differences detected between the exposure groups demonstrate subtle changes in the biological response to each specific ligand, suggesting a spectrum of agonistic and antagonistic effects dependent on the ligand used. Analysis of the crystal structures of the AR in the presence of cyproterone acetate, hydroxyflutamide, and DHT identified important differences in the orientation of key residues located in the AF-2 and BF-3 protein interaction surfaces. This further implies that although there is commonality in the growth responses between androgens and those antiandrogens that stimulate growth in the presence of a mutation, there may also be influential differences in the growth pathways stimulated by the different ligands. This therefore has implications for prostate cancer treatment because tumors may respond differently dependent upon which mutation is present and which ligand is activating growth, also for the design of selective androgen receptor modulators, which aim to elicit differential proteomic

  4. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  5. Comparative proteomics reveals novel components at the plasma membrane of differentiated HepaRG cells and different distribution in hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells.

    PubMed

    Petrareanu, Catalina; Macovei, Alina; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L; Darie, Costel C; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells.

  6. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Novel Components at the Plasma Membrane of Differentiated HepaRG Cells and Different Distribution in Hepatocyte- and Biliary-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Alisa G.; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L.; Darie, Costel C.; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells. PMID:23977166

  7. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  8. Enhanced Missing Proteins Detection in NCI60 Cell Lines Using an Integrative Search Engine Approach.

    PubMed

    Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Garin-Muga, Alba; Prieto, Gorka; Bejarano, Bartolomé; Marcilla, Miguel; Marín-Vicente, Consuelo; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Casal, J Ignacio; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Corrales, Fernando J; Segura, Victor

    2017-10-11

    The Human Proteome Project (HPP) aims deciphering the complete map of the human proteome. In the past few years, significant efforts of the HPP teams have been dedicated to the experimental detection of the missing proteins, which lack reliable mass spectrometry evidence of their existence. In this endeavor, an in depth analysis of shotgun experiments might represent a valuable resource to select a biological matrix in design validation experiments. In this work, we used all the proteomic experiments from the NCI60 cell lines and applied an integrative approach based on the results obtained from Comet, Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem. This workflow benefits from the complementarity of these search engines to increase the proteome coverage. Five missing proteins C-HPP guidelines compliant were identified, although further validation is needed. Moreover, 165 missing proteins were detected with only one unique peptide, and their functional analysis supported their participation in cellular pathways as was also proposed in other studies. Finally, we performed a combined analysis of the gene expression levels and the proteomic identifications from the common cell lines between the NCI60 and the CCLE project to suggest alternatives for further validation of missing protein observations.

  9. High-Throughput Proteomics Reveals the Unicellular Roots of Animal Phosphosignaling and Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Peña, Marcia Ivonne; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Antó, Meritxell; Gabaldón, Toni; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Sabidó, Eduard

    2016-10-24

    Cell-specific regulation of protein levels and activity is essential for the distribution of functions among multiple cell types in animals. The finding that many genes involved in these regulatory processes have a premetazoan origin raises the intriguing possibility that the mechanisms required for spatially regulated cell differentiation evolved prior to the appearance of animals. Here, we use high-throughput proteomics in Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals, to characterize the dynamic proteome and phosphoproteome profiles of three temporally distinct cell types in this premetazoan species. We show that life-cycle transitions are linked to extensive proteome and phosphoproteome remodeling and that they affect key genes involved in animal multicellularity, such as transcription factors and tyrosine kinases. The observation of shared features between Capsaspora and metazoans indicates that elaborate and conserved phosphosignaling and proteome regulation supported temporal cell-type differentiation in the unicellular ancestor of animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of embryos between a maize hybrid and its parental lines during early stages of seed germination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Chen, Yanhong; Zhang, Guiping; Xing, Jiewen; Hu, Zhaorong; Feng, Wanjun; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Du, Jinkun; Zhang, Yirong; Ni, Zhongfu; Sun, Qixin

    2013-01-01

    In spite of commercial use of heterosis in agriculture, the molecular basis of heterosis is poorly understood. It was observed that maize hybrid Zong3/87-1 exhibited an earlier onset or heterosis in radicle emergence. To get insights into the underlying mechanism of heterosis in radicle emergence, differential proteomic analysis between hybrid and its parental lines was performed. In total, the number of differentially expressed protein spots between hybrid and its parental lines in dry and 24 h imbibed seed embryos were 134 and 191, respectively, among which 47.01% (63/134) and 34.55% (66/191) protein spots displayed nonadditively expressed pattern. Remarkably, 54.55% of nonadditively accumulated proteins in 24 h imbibed seed embryos displayed above or equal to the level of the higher parent patterns. Moreover, 155 differentially expressed protein spots were identified, which were grouped into eight functional classes, including transcription & translation, energy & metabolism, signal transduction, disease & defense, storage protein, transposable element, cell growth & division and unclassified proteins. In addition, one of the upregulated proteins in F1 hybrids was ZmACT2, a homolog of Arabidopsis thaliana ACT7 (AtACT7). Expressing ZmACT2 driven by the AtACT7 promoter partially complemented the low germination phenotype in the Atact7 mutant. These results indicated that hybridization between two parental lines can cause changes in the expression of a variety of proteins, and it is concluded that the altered pattern of gene expression at translational level in the hybrid may be responsible for the observed heterosis.

  11. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL) 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC) adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2) and flotillin-1 (FLOT1), were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa) and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle). Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary hEEC and ECC-1 whilst

  12. A Targeted Quantitative Proteomics Strategy for Global Kinome Profiling of Cancer Cells and Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Kinases are among the most intensively pursued enzyme superfamilies as targets for anti-cancer drugs. Large data sets on inhibitor potency and selectivity for more than 400 human kinases became available recently, offering the opportunity to design rationally novel kinase-based anti-cancer therapies. However, the expression levels and activities of kinases are highly heterogeneous among different types of cancer and even among different stages of the same cancer. The lack of effective strategy for profiling the global kinome hampers the development of kinase-targeted cancer chemotherapy. Here, we introduced a novel global kinome profiling method, based on our recently developed isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe and a targeted proteomic method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM), for assessing simultaneously the expression of more than 300 kinases in human cells and tissues. This MRM-based assay displayed much better sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy than the discovery-based shotgun proteomic method. Approximately 250 kinases could be routinely detected in the lysate of a single cell line. Additionally, the incorporation of iRT into MRM kinome library rendered our MRM kinome assay easily transferrable across different instrument platforms and laboratories. We further employed this approach for profiling kinase expression in two melanoma cell lines, which revealed substantial kinome reprogramming during cancer progression and demonstrated an excellent correlation between the anti-proliferative effects of kinase inhibitors and the expression levels of their target kinases. Therefore, this facile and accurate kinome profiling assay, together with the kinome-inhibitor interaction map, could provide invaluable knowledge to predict the effectiveness of kinase inhibitor drugs and offer the opportunity for individualized cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24520089

  13. A targeted quantitative proteomics strategy for global kinome profiling of cancer cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-04-01

    Kinases are among the most intensively pursued enzyme superfamilies as targets for anti-cancer drugs. Large data sets on inhibitor potency and selectivity for more than 400 human kinases became available recently, offering the opportunity to design rationally novel kinase-based anti-cancer therapies. However, the expression levels and activities of kinases are highly heterogeneous among different types of cancer and even among different stages of the same cancer. The lack of effective strategy for profiling the global kinome hampers the development of kinase-targeted cancer chemotherapy. Here, we introduced a novel global kinome profiling method, based on our recently developed isotope-coded ATP-affinity probe and a targeted proteomic method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM), for assessing simultaneously the expression of more than 300 kinases in human cells and tissues. This MRM-based assay displayed much better sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy than the discovery-based shotgun proteomic method. Approximately 250 kinases could be routinely detected in the lysate of a single cell line. Additionally, the incorporation of iRT into MRM kinome library rendered our MRM kinome assay easily transferrable across different instrument platforms and laboratories. We further employed this approach for profiling kinase expression in two melanoma cell lines, which revealed substantial kinome reprogramming during cancer progression and demonstrated an excellent correlation between the anti-proliferative effects of kinase inhibitors and the expression levels of their target kinases. Therefore, this facile and accurate kinome profiling assay, together with the kinome-inhibitor interaction map, could provide invaluable knowledge to predict the effectiveness of kinase inhibitor drugs and offer the opportunity for individualized cancer chemotherapy.

  14. Cell wall proteomics contributes to explore the functional proteins of Brachypodium distachyon grains.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Ma, Huasheng

    2015-07-01

    The plant cell wall is the first barrier in response to external stimuli and cell wall proteins (CWPs) can play an important role in the modulation of plant growth and development. In the past 10 years, the plant cell wall proteomics has increasingly become a very active research filed, which provides a broader understanding of CWPs for people. The cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis, rice, and other model plants has begun to take shape, and proteomic technology has become an effective way to identify the candidate functional CWPs in large scale. The challenging work of Francin-Allami et al. (Proteomics 2015, 15, 2296-2306) is a vital step toward building the most extensive cell wall proteome of a monocot species. They identified 299 cell wall proteins in Brachypodium distachyon grains, and also compared the grain cell wall proteome with those of B. distachyon culms and leaves, which provides a new perspective for further explaining the plant cell wall structures and remodeling mechanism.

  15. LINE-1 Cultured Cell Retrotransposition Assay.

    PubMed

    Kopera, Huira C; Larson, Peter A; Moldovan, John B; Richardson, Sandra R; Liu, Ying; Moran, John V

    2016-01-01

    The Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition assay has facilitated the discovery and characterization of active (i.e., retrotransposition-competent) LINE-1 sequences from mammalian genomes. In this assay, an engineered LINE-1 containing a retrotransposition reporter cassette is transiently transfected into a cultured cell line. Expression of the reporter cassette, which occurs only after a successful round of retrotransposition, allows the detection and quantification of the LINE-1 retrotransposition efficiency. This assay has yielded insight into the mechanism of LINE-1 retrotransposition. It also has provided a greater understanding of how the cell regulates LINE-1 retrotransposition and how LINE-1 retrotransposition impacts the structure of mammalian genomes. Below, we provide a brief introduction to LINE-1 biology and then detail how the LINE-1 retrotransposition assay is performed in cultured mammalian cells.

  16. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics reveals Hendra virus sensitizes bat cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wynne, James W; Shiell, Brian J; Marsh, Glenn A; Boyd, Victoria; Harper, Jennifer A; Heesom, Kate; Monaghan, Paul; Zhou, Peng; Payne, Jean; Klein, Reuben; Todd, Shawn; Mok, Lawrence; Green, Diane; Bingham, John; Tachedjian, Mary; Baker, Michelle L; Matthews, David; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Bats are a major reservoir of emerging infectious viruses. Many of these viruses are highly pathogenic to humans however bats remain asymptomatic. The mechanism by which bats control viral replication is unknown. Here we utilize an integrated approach of proteomics informed by transcriptomics to compare the response of immortalized bat and human cells following infection with the highly pathogenic bat-borne Hendra virus (HeV). The host response between the cell lines was significantly different at both the mRNA and protein levels. Human cells demonstrated minimal response eight hours post infection, followed by a global suppression of mRNA and protein abundance. Bat cells demonstrated a robust immune response eight hours post infection, which led to the up-regulation of apoptosis pathways, mediated through the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). HeV sensitized bat cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, by up-regulating death receptor transcripts. At 48 and 72 hours post infection, bat cells demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. This is the first study to comprehensively compare the response of bat and human cells to a highly pathogenic zoonotic virus. An early induction of innate immune processes followed by apoptosis of virally infected bat cells highlights the possible involvement of programmed cell death in the host response. Our study shows for the first time a side-by-side high-throughput analysis of a dangerous zoonotic virus in cell lines derived from humans and the natural bat host. This enables a way to search for divergent mechanisms at a molecular level that may influence host pathogenesis.

  17. Proteomes of hard and soft near-isogenic wheat lines reveal that kernel hardness is related to the amplification of a stress response during endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Véronique S; Merlino, Marielle; Chambon, Christophe; Bouchet, Brigitte; Marion, Didier; Branlard, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    Wheat kernel texture, a major trait determining the end-use quality of wheat flour, is mainly influenced by puroindolines. These small basic proteins display in vitro lipid binding and antimicrobial properties, but their cellular functions during grain development remain unknown. To gain an insight into their biological function, a comparative proteome analysis of two near-isogenic lines (NILs) of bread wheat Triticum aestivum L. cv. Falcon differing in the presence or absence of the puroindoline-a gene (Pina) and kernel hardness, was performed. Proteomes of the two NILs were compared at four developmental stages of the grain for the metabolic albumin/globulin fraction and the Triton-extracted amphiphilic fraction. Proteome variations showed that, during grain development, folding proteins and stress-related proteins were more abundant in the hard line compared with the soft one. These results, taken together with ultrastructural observations showing that the formation of the protein matrix occurred earlier in the hard line, suggested that a stress response, possibly the unfolded protein response, is induced earlier in the hard NIL than in the soft one leading to earlier endosperm cell death. Quantification of the albumin/globulin fraction and amphiphilic proteins at each developmental stage strengthened this hypothesis as a plateau was revealed from the 500 °Cd stage in the hard NIL whereas synthesis continued in the soft one. These results open new avenues concerning the function of puroindolines which could be involved in the storage protein folding machinery, consequently affecting the development of wheat endosperm and the formation of the protein matrix.

  18. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  19. Proteomic analysis of salt tolerance in sugar beet monosomic addition line M14.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhu, Ning; Koh, Jin; Ma, Chunquan; Pan, Yu; Yu, Bing; Chen, Sixue; Li, Haiying

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of plant salinity tolerance can facilitate plant engineering for enhanced salt stress tolerance. Sugar beet monosomic addition line M14 obtained from the intercross between Beta vulgaris L. and Beta corolliflora Zoss exhibits tolerance to salt stress. Here we report the salt-responsive characteristics of the M14 plants under 0, 200, and 400 mM NaCl conditions using quantitative proteomics approaches. Proteins from control and the salt treated M14 plants were separated using 2D-DIGE. Eighty-six protein spots representing 67 unique proteins in leaves and 22 protein spots representing 22 unique proteins in roots were identified. In addition, iTRAQ LC-MS/MS was employed to identify and quantify differentially expressed proteins under salt stress. Seventy-five differentially expressed proteins in leaves and 43 differentially expressed proteins in roots were identified. The proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, energy, metabolism, protein folding and degradation, and stress and defense. Moreover, gene transcription data obtained from the same samples were compared to the corresponding protein data. Thirteen proteins in leaves and 12 in roots showed significant correlation in gene expression and protein levels. These results suggest the important processes for the M14 tolerance to salt stress include enhancement of photosynthesis and energy metabolism, accumulation of osmolyte and antioxidant enzymes, and regulation of methionine metabolism and ion uptake/exclusion.

  20. Changes in morphology, cell wall composition and soluble proteome in Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells exposed to chromate.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Francesca; Rinalducci, Sara; Agostiano, Angela; Zolla, Lello; De Leo, Francesca; Ceci, Luigi R; Trotta, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    The response of the carotenoidless Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutant R26 to chromate stress under photosynthetic conditions is investigated by biochemical and spectroscopic measurements, proteomic analysis and cell imaging. Cell cultures were found able to reduce chromate within 3-4 days. Chromate induces marked changes in the cellular dimension and morphology, as revealed by atomic force microscopy, along with compositional changes in the cell wall revealed by infrared spectroscopy. These effects are accompanied by significant changes in the level of several proteins: 15 proteins were found up-regulated and 15 down-regulated. The protein content found in chromate exposed cells is in good agreement with the biochemical, spectroscopic and microscopic results. Moreover at the present stage no specific chromate-reductase could be found in the soluble proteome, indicating that detoxification of the pollutant proceeds via aspecific reductants.

  1. Proteomic analyses of gastric cancer cells treated with vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dequan; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Shengtao; Hu, Hao; Li, Jingyi; Huang, Kai; Lei, Yunlong; Wang, Kui; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Rui; Li, Qiu; Wen, Yanjun; Huang, Canhua

    2011-06-01

    Gastric cancer constitutes the second leading cause of mortality worldwide and the fourth most common cancer. While chemotherapy remains the primary treatment for both resectable and advanced gastric cancer, most gastric cancers are naturally resistant to anticancer drugs, rendering new therapeutic avenues in dire need. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was proved to preferentially replicate in many types of tumor cells and eventually induce apoptosis of host cells. The vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein (MP) plays a major role in its effects. This study proved that expression of MP could effectively inhibit proliferation and induce cell death in gastric carcinoma MKN28 cells. Furthermore, we utilized a proteomics strategy to characterize proteome-wide alterations between MP-treated MKN28 lines and their untreated counterparts. A total of 97 spots were positively identified as differentially expressed, and of these 62 proteins were up-regulated, whereas 35 proteins were down-regulated. Functional analysis unraveled three significantly modified gene product subgroups: glycolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species-associated proteins and the proteins regulating RNA transport and maturation. Expression of three altered proteins was further validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR or/and western blotting. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MP expression could induce rapid intracellular ROS accumulation in MKN28 cells. These results provide evidence for the anti-cancer potential of MP, and a novel MP-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway is proposed. Our findings are considered a significant step toward a better understanding the mechanism of MP-induced anti-cancer effect.

  2. Proteome analysis of aerobically and anaerobically grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hensbergen, Paul J; Balog, Crina I A; Deelder, André M; Brandt, Raymond; Snoek, I S Ishtar; Steensma, H Yde; van Heusden, G Paul H

    2009-01-30

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to grow under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. We and others previously found that transcription levels of approximately 500 genes differed more than two-fold when cells from anaerobic and aerobic conditions were compared. Here, we addressed the effect of anaerobic growth at the post-transcriptional level by comparing the proteomes of cells isolated from steady-state glucose-limited anaerobic and aerobic cultures. Following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry we identified 110 protein spots, corresponding to 75 unique proteins, of which the levels differed more than two-fold between aerobically and anaerobically-grown cells. For 21 of the 110 spots, the intensities decreased more than two-fold whereas the corresponding mRNA levels increased or did not change significantly under anaerobic conditions. The intensities of the other 89 spots changed in the same direction as the mRNA levels of the corresponding genes, although to different extents. For some genes of glycolysis a small increase in mRNA levels, 1.5-2 fold, corresponded to a 5-10 fold increase in protein levels. Extrapolation of our results suggests that transcriptional regulation is the major but not exclusive mechanism for adaptation of S. cerevisiae to anaerobic growth conditions.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Nasal Epithelial Cells from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Papon, Jean-François; Chhuon, Cerina; Zadigue, Patricia; Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie; Amselem, Serge; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Edelman, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease remains incompletely understood. New explanations for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease may be discovered by studying the patterns of protein expression in cultured human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC). To that aim, we compared the level of protein expressions in primary cultures of HNEC from nasal polyps secondary to CF (CFNP, n = 4), primary nasal polyps (NP, n = 8) and control mucosa (CTRL, n = 4) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. The analysis of the data revealed 42 deregulated protein expressions in CFNP compared to NP and CTRL, suggesting that these alterations are related to CF. Overall, AmiGo analysis highlighted six major pathways important for cell functions that seem to be impaired: metabolism, G protein process, inflammation and oxidative stress response, protein folding, proteolysis and structural proteins. Among them, glucose and fatty acid metabolic pathways could be impaired in CF with nine deregulated proteins. Our proteomic study provides a reproducible set of differentially expressed proteins in airway epithelial cells from CF patients and reveals many novel deregulated proteins that could lead to further studies aiming to clarify the involvement of such proteins in CF pathophysiology. PMID:25268127

  4. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hoedt, Esthelle; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful approach for high-throughput quantitative proteomics. SILAC allows highly accurate protein quantitation through metabolic encoding of whole cell proteomes using stable isotope labeled amino acids. Since its introduction in 2002, SILAC has become increasingly popular. In this chapter we review the methodology and application of SILAC, with an emphasis on three research areas: dynamics of posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and protein turnover.

  5. Proteomic and genetic analysis of wheat endosperm albumins and globulins using deletion lines of cultivar Chinese Spring.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Marielle; Bousbata, Sabrina; Svensson, Birte; Branlard, Gérard

    2012-11-01

    Albumins and globulins from the endosperm of Triticum aestivum L. cv Chinese Spring (CS) were analysed to establish a proteome reference map for this standard wheat cultivar. Approximately, 1,145 Coomassie-stained spots were detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE), 410 of which were identified using mass spectrometry and data mining. Salt-soluble endosperm proteins from 67 CS deletion lines were also separated by 2DE (four gels per line). Image analysis of the 268 2DE gels as compared to the CS reference proteome allowed the detection of qualitative and quantitative variations in endosperm proteins due to chromosomal deletions. This differential analysis of spots allowed structural or regulatory genes, encoding 211 proteins, to be located on segments of the 21 wheat chromosomes. In addition, variance analysis of quantitative variations in spot volume showed that the expression of 391 proteins is controlled by one or more chromosome bins with 262 significant increases and 196 significant decreases in spot volume. The spot volume of several proteins was increased or decreased by numerous chromosomal regions and homoeologous-like regulation was revealed for some proteins. Quantitative or qualitative variation in a total of 386 proteins was influenced by genes assigned to at least one chromosomal region, while 66 % of all stained proteins were not found to be influenced by chromosome bins. Proteomics of deletion lines can, therefore, be used to simultaneously analyse the composition and genetics of a complex tissue, such as the wheat endosperm.

  6. Proteomic analysis of MOLT-4 cells treated by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Jirina; Janovská, Sylva; Rezácová, Martina; Hernychová, Lenka; Tichá, Zuzana; Vokurková, Doris; Záskodová, Darina; Lukásová, Emilie

    2007-09-01

    The effect of valproic acid (VA) on protein expression in human T-lymphocytic leukemia cells MOLT-4 was studied. VA is an inhibitor of histonedeacetylases and has a potential use as antitumor agent in leukemia treatment. The authors in this work prove that 4 h long incubation with 2 mmol/l VA causes phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and its colocalization with 53BP1 in nuclear foci. Their co-localization is typical for DSB signaling machinery. These foci were detected in cells after 4 h exposure without increase of Annexin V positive apoptotic cells. Slight increase in apoptosis (Annexin V positivity) after 24 h is accompanied by more intensive increase in phosphorylation of H2A.X and also by formation of nuclear foci containing gammaH2A.X and 53BP1. Treatment of cells with 2 mmol/l VA resulted in induction of apoptosis affecting about 30% of cells after incubation for 72 h. The changes in protein expression were examined after cell incubation with 2 mmol/l VA for 4 h. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantified using image evaluation system. Those exhibiting significant VA-induced abundance alterations were identified by mass spectrometry. Changes in expression of 22 proteins were detected, of which 15 proteins were down-regulated. Proteomic analysis resulted in successful identification of three proteins involving alfa-tubulin 3, tubulin-specific chaperone and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucloprotein F. Expression of seven proteins was up-regulated, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucloprotein A/B. Identified proteins are related to microtubular system and hnRNP family. Suppression of microtubular proteins and changes of balance among hnRNPs can contribute to proliferation arrest and apoptosis induction.

  7. Differential proteomic analysis of embryogenic lines in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq).

    PubMed

    Tan, Hooi Sin; Liddell, Susan; Ong Abdullah, Meilina; Wong, Wei Chee; Chin, Chiew Foan

    2016-06-30

    Oil palm tissue culture is one way to produce superior oil palm planting materials. However, the low rate of embryogenesis is a major hindrance for the adoption of this technology in oil palm tissue culture laboratories. In this study, we use proteomic technologies to compare differential protein profiles in leaves from palms of high and low proliferation rates in tissue culture in order to understand the underlying biological mechanism for the low level of embryogenesis. Two protein extraction methods, namely trichloroacetic acid/acetone precipitation and polyethylene glycol fractionation were used to produce total proteins and fractionated protein extracts respectively, with the aim of improving the resolution of protein species using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 40 distinct differential abundant protein spots were selected from leaf samples collected from palms with proven high and low proliferation rates. The variant proteins were subsequently identified using mass spectrometric analysis. Twelve prominent protein spots were then characterised using real-time polymerase chain reaction to compare the mRNA expression and protein abundant profiles. Three proteins, namely triosephosphate isomerase, l-ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase were identified to be potential biomarker candidates at both the protein abundant and mRNA expression levels. In this study, proteomic analysis was used to identify abundant proteins from total protein extracts. PEG fractionation was used to reveal lower abundant proteins from both high and low proliferation embryogenic lines of oil palm samples in tissue culture. A total of 40 protein spots were found to be significant in abundance and the mRNA levels of 12 of these were assessed using real time PCR. Three proteins namely, triosephosphate isomerase, l-ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were found to be concordant in their mRNA expression and protein abundance. Triosephosphate isomerase is a

  8. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  9. Lysine acetylation stoichiometry and proteomics analyses reveal pathways regulated by sirtuin 1 in human cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Jeovanis; Ramírez-Torres, Alberto; Chiappe, Diego; Luna-Peñaloza, Juan; Fernandez-Reyes, Francis C; Arcos-Encarnación, Bolivar; Contreras, Sandra; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio

    2017-09-11

    Lysine acetylation is a widespread posttranslational modification (PTM) affecting many biological pathways. Recent studies indicate that acetylated lysine residues mainly exhibit low acetylation occupancy, but challenges in sample preparation and analysis make it difficult to confidently assign these numbers, limiting understanding of their biological significance. Here, we tested three common sample preparation methods to determine their suitability for assessing acetylation stoichiometry in three human cell lines, identifying the acetylation occupancy in more than 1,300 proteins from each cell line. The stoichiometric analysis in combination with quantitative proteomics also enabled us to explore their functional roles. We found that higher abundance of the deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) correlated with lower acetylation occupancy and lower levels of ribosomal proteins including those involved in ribosome biogenesis and rRNA processing. Treatment with the SIRT1 inhibitor EX-527 confirmed SIRT1's role in the regulation of pre-rRNA synthesis and processing. Specifically, proteins involved in pre-rRNA transcription, including subunits of the Pol 1 and SL1 complexes and the RNA polymerase I specific transcription initiation factor RRN3 were up-regulated after SIRT1 inhibition. Moreover, many protein effectors and regulators of pre-rRNA processing needed for rRNA maturation were also up-regulated after EX-527 treatment, with the outcome that pre-rRNA and 28S rRNA levels also increased. More generally, we found that SIRT1 inhibition down-regulates metabolic pathways including glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism. Together, these results provide the largest dataset thus far of lysine acetylation stoichiometry (available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005903) and set the stage for further biological investigations of this central PTM. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ong, Shao-En; Mann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics is an increasingly popular approach to study changes in protein abundances in biological samples. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), one of the more widely used methods for quantitative proteomics, is a metabolic-labeling strategy that encodes whole cellular proteomes. Cells are grown in a culture medium where the natural form of an amino acid is replaced with a stable isotope form, such as arginine bearing six 13C atoms. Incorporation of the "heavy" amino acid occurs through cell growth, protein synthesis, and turnover. SILAC allows "light" and "heavy" proteomes to be distinguished by MS while avoiding any chemical derivatization and associated purification. In this chapter, we provide detailed SILAC protocols and explain how to incorporate SILAC into any experiment.

  11. Proteomics of weakly bound cell wall proteins in rice calli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiong-Yan; Kim, Sun Tae; Cho, Won Kyong; Rim, Yeonggil; Kim, Suwha; Kim, Seon-Won; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Zee Yong; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2009-05-01

    In the present work, we present a proteomic analysis of weakly bound cell wall proteins (CWPs) in rice. CWPs from rice calli were extracted with mannitol/CaCl(2), followed by back extraction with water-saturated phenol. The isolated CWPs were evaluated for contamination by cytosolic proteins by measuring the enzymatic activity of an intracellular marker (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase). This revealed the presence of low levels of intracellular proteins and a significant enrichment of CWPs, as compared to the total extract. Protein samples were digested in gels with trypsin and analyzed using the multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). A total of 292 proteins were identified, which included numerous classical CWPs and antioxidant proteins. Bioinformatics analysis showed that 72.6% of these proteins possessed a signal peptide, and a total of 198 proteins were determined to be CWPs in rice. Functional classification divided the extracellular proteins into different groups, including glycosyl hydrolases (23%), antioxidant proteins (12%), cell wall structure-related proteins (6%), metabolic pathways (9%), protein modifications (4%), defense (4%), and protease inhibitors (3%). Furthermore, comparative analysis of our identified rice CWPs with known Arabidopsis CWPs revealed 25 novel rice-specific CWPs. The study described here is an unprecedented large-scale analysis of CWPs in rice.

  12. Bicarbonate Induced Redox Proteome Changes in Arabidopsis Suspension Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zepeng; Balmant, Kelly; Geng, Sisi; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Dufresne, Craig; Dai, Shaojun; Chen, Sixue

    2017-01-01

    Climate change as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2 affects plant growth and productivity. CO2 is not only a carbon donor for photosynthesis but also an environmental signal that can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, protein redox modifications and how they function in plant CO2 response remain unclear. Here a new iodoTMTRAQ proteomics technology was employed to analyze changes in protein redox modifications in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to bicarbonate (mimic of elevated CO2) in a time-course study. A total of 47 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, transport, ROS scavenging, cell structure modulation and protein turnover. This inventory of previously unknown redox responsive proteins in Arabidopsis bicarbonate responses lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant CO2 responses.

  13. Bicarbonate Induced Redox Proteome Changes in Arabidopsis Suspension Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zepeng; Balmant, Kelly; Geng, Sisi; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Dufresne, Craig; Dai, Shaojun; Chen, Sixue

    2017-01-01

    Climate change as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2 affects plant growth and productivity. CO2 is not only a carbon donor for photosynthesis but also an environmental signal that can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, protein redox modifications and how they function in plant CO2 response remain unclear. Here a new iodoTMTRAQ proteomics technology was employed to analyze changes in protein redox modifications in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to bicarbonate (mimic of elevated CO2) in a time-course study. A total of 47 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, transport, ROS scavenging, cell structure modulation and protein turnover. This inventory of previously unknown redox responsive proteins in Arabidopsis bicarbonate responses lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant CO2 responses. PMID:28184230

  14. Novel MMP-9 substrates in cancer cells revealed by a label-free quantitative proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danmei; Suenaga, Naoko; Edelmann, Mariola J; Fridman, Rafael; Muschel, Ruth J; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2008-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is implicated in tumor metastasis as well as a variety of inflammatory and pathological processes. Although many substrates for MMP-9, including components of the extracellular matrix, soluble mediators such as chemokines, and cell surface molecules have been identified, we undertook a more comprehensive proteomics-based approach to identify new substrates to further understand how MMP-9 might contribute to tumor metastasis. Previous proteomics approaches to identify protease substrates have depended upon differential labeling of each sample. Instead we used a label-free quantitative proteomics approach based on ultraperformance LC-ESI-high/low collision energy MS. Conditioned medium from a human metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC-3ML, in which MMP-9 had been down-regulated by RNA interference was compared with that from the parental cells. From more than 200 proteins identified, 69 showed significant alteration in levels after depletion of the protease (>+/-2-fold), suggesting that they might be candidate substrates. Levels of six of these (amyloid-beta precursor protein, collagen VI, leukemia inhibitory factor, neuropilin-1, prostate cancer cell-derived growth factor (PCDGF), and protease nexin-1 (PN-1)) were tested in the conditioned media by immunoblotting. There was a strong correlation between results by ultraperformance LC-ESI-high/low collision energy MS and by immunoblotting giving credence to the label-free approach. Further information about MMP-9 cleavage was obtained by comparison of the peptide coverage of collagen VI in the presence and absence of MMP-9 showing increased sensitivity of the C- and N-terminal globular regions over the helical regions. Susceptibility of PN-1 and leukemia inhibitory factor to MMP-9 degradation was confirmed by in vitro incubation of the recombinant proteins with recombinant MMP-9. The MMP-9 cleavage sites in PN-1 were sequenced. This study provides a new label-free method for

  15. Proteomics indicates modulation of tubulin polymerization by L-menthol inhibiting human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Faridi, Uzma; Sisodia, Brijesh S; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shukla, Rakesh K; Darokar, Mahendra P; Dwivedi, Upendra N; Shasany, Ajit K

    2011-05-01

    Menthol is a naturally occurring cyclic monoterpene used in oral hygiene products, confectionary, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, pesticides, and as a flavoring agent. In the present study, we analyzed the differentially expressing proteome in L-menthol-treated Caco-2 cell line as it was found to inhibit cell proliferation. Interestingly, free tubulin proteins were observed to be limited after menthol treatment. Semiquantitative RT-PCR with α-tubulin primers showed no change in the level of RNA expression in menthol-treated cell line. However, tubulin polymerization assay with menthol indicated a trend similar to taxol in promoting microtubule assembly. Further, physical counting of apoptotic nuclei and active caspase-3 assays confirmed onset of apoptosis though the rate was slower as compared with that of taxol treatment. This study is the first report of a monoterpene L-menthol modulating tubulin polymerization and apoptosis to inhibit cancer cell proliferation.

  16. Quantitative temporal proteomic analysis of human embryonic stem cell differentiation into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaerkady, Raghothama; Letzen, Brian; Renuse, Santosh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Kumar, Praveen; All, Angelo H.; Thakor, Nitish V.; Delanghe, Bernard; Gearhart, John D.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Kerr, Candace L.

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are glial cells of the central nervous system which produce myelin. Cultured OLs provide immense therapeutic opportunities for treating a variety of neurological conditions. One of the most promising sources for such therapies is human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), as well as providing a model to study human oligodendrocyte development. For these purposes, an investigation of proteome level changes is critical for understanding the process of OL differentiation. In this report, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach was used to study multiple steps during oligodendrocyte differentiation including neural precursors (NPCs), glial precursors (GPCs), and oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPCs) compared to undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Using a 1% false discovery rate cutoff, ~3,145 proteins were quantitated and several demonstrated progressive stage-specific expression. Proteins such as TF, NCAM1, APOE, and WNT5A showed increased expression from the NPC to OPC stage. Several proteins that have demonstrated evidence or been suspected in OL maturation were also found upregulated in OPCs including FABP4, THBS1, BMP1, CRYAB, TF, TNC, COL3A1, TGFBI and EPB41L3. Thus, by providing the first extensive proteomic profiling of human embryonic stem cell differentiation into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, this study provides many novel proteins that are potentially involved in OL development. PMID:21770034

  17. Bone Proteomics experiment (BOP): the first proteomics analysis of mammalian cells cultivated in weightlessness conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costessi, A.; Vascotto, C.; Pines, A.; Romanello, M.; Schonenborg, R.; Schiller, P.; Moro, L.; Tell, G.

    Bone mass loss is a major consequence of extended periods of weightlessness Many studies have been performed on astronauts and animal models establishing that a decrease of the maturation process and of the bone synthesising activity of osteoblast cells play a key role in microgravity-dependent bone mass loss Several experiments on single cells and tissues showed that weightlessness can also influence cells cultivated in vitro Many molecular mechanisms are affected among which the cytoskeleton and intracellular signal transduction cascades However the underlying mechanisms of these changes and their molecular consequences are far from being fully understood and the cellular gravisensing machinery is still unknown In contrast to weightlessness dynamic mechanical loading increases bone density and strength and promotes osteoblast proliferation differentiation and matrix production by acting at the gene expression level However the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are converted into biochemical signalling in bone are also poorly understood A growing body of evidence points to extracellular nucleotides i e ATP and UTP as soluble factors that are released by several cell types in response to mechanical stimulation and that eventually trigger an intracellular signal We have recently demonstrated in the HOBIT osteoblast cell line that ATP and UTP treatments can activate two fundamental transcription factors that promote osteoblast differentiation and physiology Runx2 and Egr-1 as well as their target genes galectin-3 and

  18. Persistent use of false myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Hans G; Matsuo, Yoshinobu; MacLeod, Roderick A E

    2003-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplasm of a terminally differentiated B-cell. Human myeloma cell lines were shown to be suitable model systems for use in various fields of the biological sciences. Within the last 20 years more than 100 cell lines have been established. So-called 'myeloma cell lines' have been previously reported and are still widely used which are in reality Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. The presence of the EBV-genome in residual normal B-cells provides them with a selective growth advantage after explantation. Cell lines represent an extremely important resource for research in a variety of fields and disciplines. As the cell lines are used as in vitro model systems in lieu of primary material, it is crucial that the cells in the culture flasks faithfully correspond to the purported objects of study. On closer examination, the use of false cell lines may be seen to invalidate a significant percentage of scientific work, or at least cast doubts on the relevance of these in vitro results to the cell type or tumor in vivo. Ultimately, use of cross-contaminated cell lines is a waste of human and material resources. Henceforth, it should be mandatory to prove the proper derivation of each new cell line by comparing DNA fingerprints or karyotypes of the patient's primary cells and the cultured cells. The availability of well characterized and authenticated bona fide MM cell lines is of great importance for the study of the biology, etiology and treatment of the disease.

  19. Isolation of cell surface proteins for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Elschenbroich, Sarah; Kim, Yunee; Medin, Jeffrey A; Kislinger, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Defining the cell surface proteome has profound importance for understanding cell differentiation and cell-cell interactions, as well as numerous pathogenic abnormalities. Owing to their hydrophobic nature, plasma membrane proteins that reside on the cell surface pose analytical challenges and, despite efforts to overcome difficulties, remain under-represented in proteomic studies. Limitations in the classically employed ultracentrifugation-based approaches have led to the invention of more elaborate techniques for the purification of cell surface proteins. Three of these methods--cell surface coating with cationic colloidal silica beads, biotinylation and chemical capture of surface glycoproteins--allow for marked enrichment of this subcellular proteome, with each approach offering unique advantages and characteristics for different experiments. In this article, we introduce the principles of each purification method and discuss applications from the recent literature.

  20. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  1. Fast proteomic protocol for biomarker fingerprinting in cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Armenta, Jenny M; Perez, Milagros; Yang, Xu; Shapiro, Danielle; Reed, Debby; Tuli, Leepika; Finkielstein, Carla V; Lazar, Iulia M

    2010-04-23

    The advance of novel technologies that will enable the detection of large sets of biomarker proteins, to greatly improve the sensitivity and specificity of an assay, represents a major objective in biomedical research. To demonstrate the power of mass spectrometry (MS) detection for large-scale biomarker screening in cancer research, a simple, one-step approach for fast biomarker fingerprinting in complex cellular extracts is described. MCF-7 breast cancer cells were used as a model system. Fast proteomic profiling of whole cellular extracts was achieved on a linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) mass spectrometer by one of the following techniques: (a) data-dependent liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS of un-labeled cell extracts, (b) data-dependent LC-MS/MS with pulsed Q dissociation (PQD) detection of iTRAQ labeled samples, and (c) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-MS of low abundant proteins that could not be detected with data-dependent MS/MS. The data-dependent LC-MS/MS analysis of MCF-7 cells enabled the identification of 796 proteins (p<0.001) and the simultaneous detection of 156 previously reported putative cancer biomarkers. PQD detection of iTRAQ labeled cells resulted in the detection of 389 proteins and 64 putative biomarkers. MRM-MS analysis enabled the successful monitoring of a panel of low-abundance proteins in one single experiment, highlighting the utility of this technique for targeted analysis in cancer investigations. These results demonstrate that MS-based technologies relying on a one-step separation protocol have the potential to revolutionize biomarker research and screening applications by enabling fast, sensitive and reliable detection of large panels of putative biomarkers. To further stimulate the exploration of proteins that have been previously reported in the literature to be differentially expressed in a variety of cancers, an extensive list of approximately 1100 candidate biomarkers has been compiled and included in the manuscript.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of the proteome of erythroid cells differentiated from human iPSCs and adult erythroid cells by multiplex TMT labelling and nanoLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Trakarnsanga, Kongtana; Wilson, Marieangela C; Griffiths, Rebecca E; Toye, Ashley M; Carpenter, Lee; Heesom, Kate J; Parsons, Steve F; Anstee, David J; Frayne, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are an attractive progenitor source for the generation of in vitro blood products. However, before iPSC-derived erythroid cells can be considered for therapeutic use their similarity to adult erythroid cells must be confirmed. We have analysed the proteome of erythroid cells differentiated from the iPSC fibroblast derived line (C19) and showed they express hallmark RBC proteins, including all those of the ankyrin and 4.1R complex. We next compared the proteome of erythroid cells differentiated from three iPSC lines (C19, OCE1, OPM2) with that of adult and cord blood progenitors. Of the 1989 proteins quantified <3% differed in level by 2-fold or more between the different iPSC-derived erythroid cells. When compared to adult cells, 11% of proteins differed in level by 2-fold or more, falling to 1.9% if a 5-fold threshold was imposed to accommodate slight inter-cell line erythropoietic developmental variation. Notably, the level of >30 hallmark erythroid proteins was consistent between the iPSC lines and adult cells. In addition, a sub-population (10-15%) of iPSC erythroid cells in each of the iPSC lines completed enucleation. Aberrant expression of some cytoskeleton proteins may contribute to the failure of the majority of the cells to enucleate since we detected some alterations in cytoskeletal protein abundance. In conclusion, the proteome of erythroid cells differentiated from iPSC lines is very similar to that of normal adult erythroid cells, but further work to improve the induction of erythroid cells in existing iPSC lines or to generate novel erythroid cell lines is required before iPSC-derived red cells can be considered suitable for transfusion therapy.

  3. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    PubMed Central

    Mindaye, Samuel T.; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R.; Alterman, Michail A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results. PMID:26702413

  4. Proteomic Research Funding Opportunity | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    To expand the understanding of how cells sense and respond to changes in their physical environment, the NCI is seeking to perform proteomic assays on the panel of cell lines grown on a variety of substrates. These assays will provide insight into changes in protein levels or phosphorylation changes that could reflect the activity of mechano-transduction pathways.

  5. Proteomics Funding Opportunity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    To expand the understanding of how cells sense and respond to changes in their physical environment, the NCI is seeking to perform proteomic assays on the panel of cell lines grown on a variety of substrates. These assays will provide insight into changes in protein levels or phosphorylation changes that could reflect the activity of mechano-transduction pathways.

  6. Proteomic analysis identifies differentially expressed proteins after red propolis treatment in Hep-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Frozza, Caroline Olivieri da Silva; Ribeiro, Tanara da Silva; Gambato, Gabriela; Menti, Caroline; Moura, Sidnei; Pinto, Paulo Marcos; Staats, Charley Christian; Padilha, Francine Ferreira; Begnini, Karine Rech; de Leon, Priscila Marques Moura; Borsuk, Sibele; Savegnago, Lucielli; Dellagostin, Odir; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Roesch-Ely, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Here we investigated alterations in the protein profile of Hep-2 treated with red propolis using two-dimensional electrophoresis associated to mass spectrometry and apoptotic rates of cells treated with and without red propolis extracts through TUNEL and Annexin-V assays. A total of 325 spots were manually excised from the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and 177 proteins were identified using LC-MS-MS. Among all proteins identified that presented differential expression, most were down-regulated in presence of red propolis extract at a concentration of 120 μg/mL (IC50): GRP78, PRDX2, LDHB, VIM and TUBA1A. Only two up-regulated proteins were identified in this study in the non-cytotoxic (6 μg/mL) red propolis treated group: RPLP0 and RAD23B. TUNEL staining assay showed a markedly increase in the mid- to late-stage apoptosis of Hep-2 cells induced by red propolis at concentrations of 60 and 120 μg/mL when compared with non-treated cells. The increase of late apoptosis was confirmed by in situ Annexin-V analysis in which red propolis extract induced late apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The differences in tumor cell protein profiles warrant further investigations including isolation of major bioactive compounds of red propolis in different cell lines using proteomics and molecular tests to validate the protein expression here observed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved recovery and identification of membrane proteins from rat hepatic cells using a centrifugal proteomic reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥ 2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.

  8. Improved Recovery and Identification of Membrane Proteins from Rat Hepatic Cells using a Centrifugal Proteomic Reactor*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hu; Wang, Fangjun; Wang, Yuwei; Ning, Zhibin; Hou, Weimin; Wright, Theodore G.; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Zhong, Shumei; Yao, Zemin; Figeys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in many biological processes, membrane proteins are underrepresented in proteomic analysis because of their poor solubility (hydrophobicity) and often low abundance. We describe a novel approach for the identification of plasma membrane proteins and intracellular microsomal proteins that combines membrane fractionation, a centrifugal proteomic reactor for streamlined protein extraction, protein digestion and fractionation by centrifugation, and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem MS. The performance of this approach was illustrated for the study of the proteome of ER and Golgi microsomal membranes in rat hepatic cells. The centrifugal proteomic reactor identified 945 plasma membrane proteins and 955 microsomal membrane proteins, of which 63 and 47% were predicted as bona fide membrane proteins, respectively. Among these proteins, >800 proteins were undetectable by the conventional in-gel digestion approach. The majority of the membrane proteins only identified by the centrifugal proteomic reactor were proteins with ≥2 transmembrane segments or proteins with high molecular mass (e.g. >150 kDa) and hydrophobicity. The improved proteomic reactor allowed the detection of a group of endocytic and/or signaling receptor proteins on the plasma membrane, as well as apolipoproteins and glycerolipid synthesis enzymes that play a role in the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B100-containing very low density lipoproteins. Thus, the centrifugal proteomic reactor offers a new analytical tool for structure and function studies of membrane proteins involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:21749988

  9. Nascent proteomes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a novel source for biomarker discovery in human stroke.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fang; Simon, Roger P; Li, Yun; David, Larry; Wainwright, Jolita; Hall, Casey L; Frankel, Michael; Zhou, An

    2014-04-01

    The proteome of newly synthesized proteins (nascent proteome) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) can be a novel source of stroke biomarkers. Changes in the PBMC nascent proteome after stroke reflect the dynamic response-in-action not detectable in the total proteome (all existing proteins) in blood. Here, we test the application of nascent proteomics as a novel approach for stroke biomarker discovery. The PBMC nascent proteome in human blood was determined by metabolic labeling of fresh PBMC cultures with azidohomoalanine (an azide-containing methionine surrogate), followed by mass spectrometry detection and quantification of azidohomoalanine-labeled proteins. The PBMC nascent and total proteomes were compared between patients with stroke and matched controls. Both PBMC nascent and total proteomes showed differences between stroke patients and controls. Results of hierarchical clustering analysis of proteomic data revealed greater changes in the nascent than in the total PBMC proteomes, supporting the usefulness of the PBMC nascent proteome as a novel source of stroke biomarkers. Nascent proteomes in PBMC can be a novel source for biomarker discovery in human stroke.

  10. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-08-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins.

  11. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  12. Cell wall biogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana elongating cells: transcriptomics complements proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Roujol, David; San-Clemente, Hélène; Irshad, Muhammad; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2009-10-31

    Plant growth is a complex process involving cell division and elongation. Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls undergo a 100-fold length increase mainly by cell elongation. Cell enlargement implicates significant changes in the composition and structure of the cell wall. In order to understand cell wall biogenesis during cell elongation, mRNA profiling was made on half- (active elongation) and fully-grown (after growth arrest) etiolated hypocotyls. Transcriptomic analysis was focused on two sets of genes. The first set of 856 genes named cell wall genes (CWGs) included genes known to be involved in cell wall biogenesis. A significant proportion of them has detectable levels of transcripts (55.5%), suggesting that these processes are important throughout hypocotyl elongation and after growth arrest. Genes encoding proteins involved in substrate generation or in synthesis of polysaccharides, and extracellular proteins were found to have high transcript levels. A second set of 2927 genes labeled secretory pathway genes (SPGs) was studied to search for new genes encoding secreted proteins possibly involved in wall expansion. Based on transcript level, 433 genes were selected. Genes not known to be involved in cell elongation were found to have high levels of transcripts. Encoded proteins were proteases, protease inhibitors, proteins with interacting domains, and proteins involved in lipid metabolism. In addition, 125 of them encoded proteins with yet unknown function. Finally, comparison with results of a cell wall proteomic study on the same material revealed that 48 out of the 137 identified proteins were products of the genes having high or moderate level of transcripts. About 15% of the genes encoding proteins identified by proteomics showed levels of transcripts below background. Members of known multigenic families involved in cell wall biogenesis, and new genes that might participate in cell elongation were identified. Significant differences were shown in the

  13. Cell wall biogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana elongating cells: transcriptomics complements proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Roujol, David; San-Clemente, Hélène; Irshad, Muhammad; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant growth is a complex process involving cell division and elongation. Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls undergo a 100-fold length increase mainly by cell elongation. Cell enlargement implicates significant changes in the composition and structure of the cell wall. In order to understand cell wall biogenesis during cell elongation, mRNA profiling was made on half- (active elongation) and fully-grown (after growth arrest) etiolated hypocotyls. Results Transcriptomic analysis was focused on two sets of genes. The first set of 856 genes named cell wall genes (CWGs) included genes known to be involved in cell wall biogenesis. A significant proportion of them has detectable levels of transcripts (55.5%), suggesting that these processes are important throughout hypocotyl elongation and after growth arrest. Genes encoding proteins involved in substrate generation or in synthesis of polysaccharides, and extracellular proteins were found to have high transcript levels. A second set of 2927 genes labeled secretory pathway genes (SPGs) was studied to search for new genes encoding secreted proteins possibly involved in wall expansion. Based on transcript level, 433 genes were selected. Genes not known to be involved in cell elongation were found to have high levels of transcripts. Encoded proteins were proteases, protease inhibitors, proteins with interacting domains, and proteins involved in lipid metabolism. In addition, 125 of them encoded proteins with yet unknown function. Finally, comparison with results of a cell wall proteomic study on the same material revealed that 48 out of the 137 identified proteins were products of the genes having high or moderate level of transcripts. About 15% of the genes encoding proteins identified by proteomics showed levels of transcripts below background. Conclusion Members of known multigenic families involved in cell wall biogenesis, and new genes that might participate in cell elongation were identified. Significant

  14. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a ‘minimally perturbed’ cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/), an online, searchable resource. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04534.001 PMID:25555159

  15. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of polyploid giant cancer cells and budding progeny cells reveals several distinct pathways for ovarian cancer development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwu; Mercado-Uribe, Imelda; Hanash, Samir; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-01-01

    Polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are a morphologically distinct subgroup of human tumor cells with increased nuclear size or multiple nuclei, but they are generally considered unimportant because they are presumed to be nondividing and thus nonviable. We have recently shown that these large cancer cells are not only viable but also can divide asymmetrically and yield progeny cancer cells with cancer stem-like properties via budding division. To further understand the molecular events involved in the regulation of PGCCs and the generation of their progeny cancer cells, we comparatively analyzed the proteomic profiles of PGCCs, PGCCs with budding daughter cells, and regular control cancer cells from the HEY and SKOv3 human ovarian cancer cell lines with and without CoCl2. We used a high-throughput iTRAQ-based proteomic methodology coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy to determine the differentiated regulated proteins. We performed Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses to validate the differences in the expression patterns of a variety of proteins between PGCCs or budding PGCCs and regular cancer cells identified by iTRAQ approach and also a selected group of proteins from the literature. The differentially regulated proteins included proteins involved in response to hypoxia, stem cell generation, chromatin remodeling, cell-cycle regulation, and invasion and metastasis. In particular, we found that HIF-1alpha and its known target STC1 are upregulated in PGCCs. In addition, we found that a panel of stem cell-regulating factors and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition regulatory transcription factors were upregulated in budding PGCCs, whereas expression of the histone 1 family of nucleosomal linker proteins was consistently lower in PGCCs than in control cells. Thus, proteomic expression patterns provide valuable insight into the underlying mechanisms of PGCC formation and the relationship between PGCCs and

  16. Cell line fingerprinting using retroelement insertion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ustyugova, Svetlana V; Amosova, Anna L; Lebedev, Yuri B; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2005-04-01

    Human cell lines are an indispensable tool for functional studies of living entities in their numerous manifestations starting with integral complex systems such as signal pathways and networks, regulation of gene ensembles, epigenetic factors, and finishing with pathological changes and impact of artificially introduced elements, such as various transgenes, on the behavior of the cell. Therefore, it is highly desirable to have reliable cell line identification techniques to make sure that the cell lines to be used in experiments are exactly what is expected. To this end, we developed a set of informative markers based on insertion polymorphism of human retroelements (REs). The set includes 47 pairs of PCR primers corresponding to introns of the human genes with dimorphic LINE1 (L1) and Alu insertions. Using locus-specific PCR assays, we have genotyped 10 human cell lines of various origins. For each of these cell lines, characteristic fingerprints were obtained. An estimated probability that two different cell lines possess the same marker genotype is about 10-18. Therefore, the proposed set of markers provides a reliable tool for cell line identification.

  17. Monitoring Astrocytic Proteome Dynamics by Cell Type-Specific Protein Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anke; Stellmacher, Anne; Freitag, Christine E.; Landgraf, Peter; Dieterich, Daniela C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the nervous system to undergo long-term plasticity is based on changes in cellular and synaptic proteomes. While many studies have explored dynamic alterations in neuronal proteomes during plasticity, there has been less attention paid to the astrocytic counterpart. Indeed, progress in identifying cell type-specific proteomes is limited owing to technical difficulties. Here, we present a cell type-specific metabolic tagging technique for a mammalian coculture model based on the bioorthogonal amino acid azidonorleucine and the mutated Mus musculus methionyl-tRNA synthetaseL274G enabling azidonorleucine introduction into de novo synthesized proteins. Azidonorleucine incorporation resulted in cell type-specific protein labeling and retained neuronal or astrocytic cell viability. Furthermore, we were able to label astrocytic de novo synthesized proteins and identified both Connexin-43 and 60S ribosomal protein L10a upregulated upon treatment with Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in astrocytes of a neuron-glia coculture. Taken together, we demonstrate the successful dissociation of astrocytic from neuronal proteomes by cell type-specific metabolic labeling offering new possibilities for the analyses of cell type-specific proteome dynamics. PMID:26690742

  18. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates the Cell Surface Proteome and Integrin Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Thanusi; Medvedev, Sergei; Bowden, Peter; Marshall, John G.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteome controls numerous cellular functions including cell migration and adhesion, intercellular communication and nutrient uptake. Cell surface proteins are controlled by acute changes in protein abundance at the plasma membrane through regulation of endocytosis and recycling (endomembrane traffic). Many cellular signals regulate endomembrane traffic, including metabolic signaling; however, the extent to which the cell surface proteome is controlled by acute regulation of endomembrane traffic under various conditions remains incompletely understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key metabolic sensor that is activated upon reduced cellular energy availability. AMPK activation alters the endomembrane traffic of a few specific proteins, as part of an adaptive response to increase energy intake and reduce energy expenditure. How increased AMPK activity during energy stress may globally regulate the cell surface proteome is not well understood. To study how AMPK may regulate the cell surface proteome, we used cell-impermeable biotinylation to selectively purify cell surface proteins under various conditions. Using ESI-MS/MS, we found that acute (90 min) treatment with the AMPK activator A-769662 elicits broad control of the cell surface abundance of diverse proteins. In particular, A-769662 treatment depleted from the cell surface proteins with functions in cell migration and adhesion. To complement our mass spectrometry results, we used other methods to show that A-769662 treatment results in impaired cell migration. Further, A-769662 treatment reduced the cell surface abundance of β1-integrin, a key cell migration protein, and AMPK gene silencing prevented this effect. While the control of the cell surface abundance of various proteins by A-769662 treatment was broad, it was also selective, as this treatment did not change the cell surface abundance of the transferrin receptor. Hence, the cell surface proteome is subject to acute

  19. The Effects of Bifidobacterium breve on Immune Mediators and Proteome of HT29 Cells Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Borja; González-Rodríguez, Irene; Arboleya, Silvia; López, Patricia; Suárez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The use of beneficial microorganisms, the so-called probiotics, to improve human health is gaining popularity. However, not all of the probiotic strains trigger the same responses and they differ in their interaction with the host. In spite of the limited knowledge on mechanisms of action some of the probiotic effects seem to be exerted through maintenance of the gastrointestinal barrier function and modulation of the immune system. In the present work, we have addressed in vitro the response of the intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 to the strain Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004. In the array of 84 genes involved in inflammation tested, the expression of 12 was modified by the bifidobacteria. The genes of chemokine CXCL6, the chemokine receptor CCR7, and, specially, the complement component C3 were upregulated. Indeed, HT29 cells cocultivated with B. breve produced significantly higher levels of protein C3a. The proteome of HT29 cells showed increased levels of cytokeratin-8 in the presence of B. breve. Altogether, it seems that B. breve IPLA20004 could favor the recruitment of innate immune cells to the mucosa reinforcing, as well as the physical barrier of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25793196

  20. [Building Mass Spectrometry Spectral Libraries of Human Cancer Cell Lines].

    PubMed

    Faktor, J; Bouchal, P

    Cancer research often focuses on protein quantification in model cancer cell lines and cancer tissues. SWATH (sequential windowed acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra), the state of the art method, enables the quantification of all proteins included in spectral library. Spectral library contains fragmentation patterns of each detectable protein in a sample. Thorough spectral library preparation will improve quantitation of low abundant proteins which usually play an important role in cancer. Our research is focused on the optimization of spectral library preparation aimed at maximizing the number of identified proteins in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. First, we optimized the sample preparation prior entering the mass spectrometer. We examined the effects of lysis buffer composition, peptide dissolution protocol and the material of sample vial on the number of proteins identified in spectral library. Next, we optimized mass spectrometry (MS) method for spectral library data acquisition. Our thorough optimized protocol for spectral library building enabled the identification of 1,653 proteins (FDR < 1%) in 1 µg of MCF-7 lysate. This work contributed to the enhancement of protein coverage in SWATH digital biobanks which enable quantification of arbitrary protein from physically unavailable samples. In future, high quality spectral libraries could play a key role in preparing of patient proteome digital fingerprints.Key words: biomarker - mass spectrometry - proteomics - digital biobanking - SWATH - protein quantificationThis work was supported by the project MEYS - NPS I - LO1413.The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study.The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 7. 5. 2016Accepted: 9. 6. 2016.

  1. Spatially resolved proteomic mapping in living cells with the engineered peroxidase APEX2

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Victoria; Udeshi, Namrata D; Lam, Stephanie S; Loh, Ken H; Cox, Kurt J; Pedram, Kayvon; Carr, Steven A; Ting, Alice Y

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes a method to obtain spatially resolved proteomic maps of specific compartments within living mammalian cells. An engineered peroxidase, APEX2, is genetically targeted to a cellular region of interest. Upon the addition of hydrogen peroxide for 1 min to cells preloaded with a biotin-phenol substrate, APEX2 generates biotin-phenoxyl radicals that covalently tag proximal endogenous proteins. Cells are then lysed, and biotinylated proteins are enriched with streptavidin beads and identified by mass spectrometry. We describe the generation of an appropriate APEX2 fusion construct, proteomic sample preparation, and mass spectrometric data acquisition and analysis. A two-state stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) protocol is used for proteomic mapping of membrane-enclosed cellular compartments from which APEX2-generated biotin-phenoxyl radicals cannot escape. For mapping of open cellular regions, we instead use a ‘ratiometric’ three-state SILAC protocol for high spatial specificity. Isotopic labeling of proteins takes 5–7 cell doublings. Generation of the biotinylated proteomic sample takes 1 d, acquiring the mass spectrometric data takes 2–5 d and analysis of the data to obtain the final proteomic list takes 1 week. PMID:26866790

  2. Derivation and Osmotolerance Characterization of Three Immortalized Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gardell, Alison M.; Qin, Qin; Rice, Robert H.; Li, Johnathan; Kültz, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Fish cell cultures are becoming more widely used models for investigating molecular mechanisms of physiological response to environmental challenge. In this study, we derived two immortalized Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) cell lines from brain (OmB) and lip epithelium (OmL), and compared them to a previously immortalized bulbus arteriosus (TmB) cell line. The OmB and OmL cell lines were generated without or with Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor/3T3 feeder layer supplementation. Although both approaches were successful, ROCK inhibitor/feeder layer supplementation was found to offer the advantages of selecting for epithelial-like cell type and decreasing time to immortalization. After immortalization (≥ passage 5), we characterized the proteomes of the newly derived cell lines (OmB and OmL) using LCMS and identified several unique cell markers for each line. Subsequently, osmotolerance for each of the three cell lines following acute exposure to elevated sodium chloride was evaluated. The acute maximum osmotolerance of these tilapia cell lines (>700 mOsm/kg) was markedly higher than that of any other known vertebrate cell line, but was significantly higher in the epithelial-like OmL cell line. To validate the physiological relevance of these tilapia cell lines, we quantified the effects of acute hyperosmotic challenge (450 mOsm/kg and 700 mOsm/kg) on the transcriptional regulation of two enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the compatible organic osmolyte, myo-inositol. Both enzymes were found to be robustly upregulated in all three tilapia cell lines. Therefore, the newly established tilapia cells lines represent valuable tools for studying molecular mechanisms involved in the osmotic stress response of euryhaline fish. PMID:24797371

  3. Derivation and osmotolerance characterization of three immortalized tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gardell, Alison M; Qin, Qin; Rice, Robert H; Li, Johnathan; Kültz, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Fish cell cultures are becoming more widely used models for investigating molecular mechanisms of physiological response to environmental challenge. In this study, we derived two immortalized Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) cell lines from brain (OmB) and lip epithelium (OmL), and compared them to a previously immortalized bulbus arteriosus (TmB) cell line. The OmB and OmL cell lines were generated without or with Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor/3T3 feeder layer supplementation. Although both approaches were successful, ROCK inhibitor/feeder layer supplementation was found to offer the advantages of selecting for epithelial-like cell type and decreasing time to immortalization. After immortalization (≥ passage 5), we characterized the proteomes of the newly derived cell lines (OmB and OmL) using LCMS and identified several unique cell markers for each line. Subsequently, osmotolerance for each of the three cell lines following acute exposure to elevated sodium chloride was evaluated. The acute maximum osmotolerance of these tilapia cell lines (>700 mOsm/kg) was markedly higher than that of any other known vertebrate cell line, but was significantly higher in the epithelial-like OmL cell line. To validate the physiological relevance of these tilapia cell lines, we quantified the effects of acute hyperosmotic challenge (450 mOsm/kg and 700 mOsm/kg) on the transcriptional regulation of two enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the compatible organic osmolyte, myo-inositol. Both enzymes were found to be robustly upregulated in all three tilapia cell lines. Therefore, the newly established tilapia cells lines represent valuable tools for studying molecular mechanisms involved in the osmotic stress response of euryhaline fish.

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis revealing the complex network associated with waterlogging stress in maize (Zea mays L.) seedling root cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Han, Xuesong; Geng, Cunjuan; Zhao, Yanxin; Zhang, Zuxin; Qiu, Fazhan

    2015-01-01

    Soil waterlogging is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting maize grain yields. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying waterlogging tolerance in maize, the iTRAQ LC-MS/MS technique was employed to map the proteomes of seedling root cells of the A3237 (tolerant inbred) and A3239 (sensitive inbred) lines under control and waterlogging conditions. Among the 3318 proteins identified, 211 were differentially abundant proteins (DAPs), of which 81 were specific to A3237 and 57 were specific to A3239. These DAPs were categorized into 11 groups that were closely related to the plant stress response, including metabolism, energy, transport, and disease/defense. In the waterlogged A3237 root cells, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase, coproporphyrinogen III oxidase, GSH S-transferase, GSH dehydrogenase, and xyloglucan endotransglycosylase 6 were specifically accumulated to manage energy consumption, maintain pH levels, and minimize oxidative damage. The evaluations of five specific physiological parameters (alcohol dehydrogenase activity and GSH, malondialdehyde, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations) were in agreement with the proteomic results. Moreover, based on the proteomic assay, eight representative genes encoding DAPs were selected for validation at the transcriptional level. qRT-PCR revealed that the expression levels of these genes correlated with their observed protein abundance. These findings shed light on the complex mechanisms underlying waterlogging tolerance in maize. All MS data have been deposited into the ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD001125 http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001125. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. De Novo proteome analysis of genetically modified tumor cells by a metabolic labeling/azide-alkyne cycloaddition approach.

    PubMed

    Ballikaya, Seda; Lee, Jennifer; Warnken, Uwe; Schnölzer, Martina; Gebert, Johannes; Kopitz, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Activin receptor type II (ACVR2) is a member of the transforming growth factor type II receptor family and controls cell growth and differentiation, thereby acting as a tumor suppressor. ACVR2 inactivation is known to drive colorectal tumorigenesis. We used an ACVR2-deficient microsatellite unstable colon cancer cell line (HCT116) to set up a novel experimental design for comprehensive analysis of proteomic changes associated with such functional loss of a tumor suppressor. To this end we combined two existing technologies. First, the ACVR2 gene was reconstituted in an ACVR2-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line by means of recombinase-mediated cassette exchange, resulting in the generation of an inducible expression system that allowed the regulation of ACVR2 gene expression in a doxycycline-dependent manner. Functional expression in the induced cells was explicitly proven. Second, we used the methionine analog azidohomoalanine for metabolic labeling of newly synthesized proteins in our cell line model. Labeled proteins were tagged with biotin via a Click-iT chemistry approach enabling specific extraction of labeled proteins by streptavidin-coated beads. Tryptic on-bead digestion of captured proteins and subsequent ultra-high-performance LC coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL mass spectrometry identified 513 proteins, with 25 of them differentially expressed between ACVR2-deficient and -proficient cells. Among these, several candidates that had already been linked to colorectal cancer or were known to play a key role in cell growth or apoptosis control were identified, proving the utility of the presented experimental approach. In principle, this strategy can be adapted to analyze any gene of interest and its effect on the cellular de novo proteome.

  6. Metabolic changes associated with the long winter fast dominate the liver proteome in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Grabek, Katharine R; Epperson, L Elaine; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Martin, Sandra L

    2014-05-15

    Small-bodied hibernators partition the year between active homeothermy and hibernating heterothermy accompanied by fasting. To define molecular events underlying hibernation that are both dependent and independent of fasting, we analyzed the liver proteome among two active and four hibernation states in 13-lined ground squirrels. We also examined fall animals transitioning between fed homeothermy and fasting heterothermy. Significantly enriched pathways differing between activity and hibernation were biased toward metabolic enzymes, concordant with the fuel shifts accompanying fasting physiology. Although metabolic reprogramming to support fasting dominated these data, arousing (rewarming) animals had the most distinct proteome among the hibernation states. Instead of a dominant metabolic enzyme signature, torpor-arousal cycles featured differences in plasma proteins and intracellular membrane traffic and its regulation. Phosphorylated NSFL1C, a membrane regulator, exhibited this torpor-arousal cycle pattern; its role in autophagosome formation may promote utilization of local substrates upon metabolic reactivation in arousal. Fall animals transitioning to hibernation lagged in their proteomic adjustment, indicating that the liver is more responsive than preparatory to the metabolic reprogramming of hibernation. Specifically, torpor use had little impact on the fall liver proteome, consistent with a dominant role of nutritional status. In contrast to our prediction of reprogramming the transition between activity and hibernation by gene expression and then within-hibernation transitions by posttranslational modification (PTM), we found extremely limited evidence of reversible PTMs within torpor-arousal cycles. Rather, acetylation contributed to seasonal differences, being highest in winter (specifically in torpor), consistent with fasting physiology and decreased abundance of the mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Signaling Network Regulation in Renal Cell Carcinomas with Differential Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-2α Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Talamantes, Tatjana; Singhal, Jyotsana; Guo, Jia; Vatsyayan, Rit; Rauniyar, Navin; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Background The loss of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) protein function leads to highly vascular renal tumors characterized by an aggressive course of disease and refractoriness to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Loss of VHL in renal tumors also differs from tumors of other organs in that the oncogenic cascade is mediated by an increase in the levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) instead of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Methods and Principal Findings We used renal carcinoma cell lines that recapitulate the differences between mutant VHL and wild-type VHL genotypes. Utilizing a method relying on extracted peptide intensities as a label-free approach for quantitation by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, our proteomics study revealed regulation of key proteins important for cancer cell survival, proliferation and stress-resistance, and implicated differential regulation of signaling networks in VHL-mutant renal cell carcinoma. We also observed upregulation of cellular energy pathway enzymes and the stress-responsive mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein. Finding reliance on glutaminolysis in VHL-mutant renal cell carcinoma was of particular significance, given the generally predominant dependence of tumors on glycolysis. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000335. Conclusions and Significance Pathway analyses provided corroborative evidence for differential regulation of molecular and cellular functions influencing cancer energetics, metabolism and cell proliferation in renal cell carcinoma with distinct VHL genotype. Collectively, the differentially regulated proteome characterized by this study can potentially guide translational research specifically aimed at effective clinical interventions for advanced VHL-mutant, HIF2α-over-expressing tumors. PMID:23940778

  8. Evidence for copurification of micronuclei in sucrose density gradient-enriched plasma membranes from cell lines.

    PubMed

    Damaraju, Sambasivarao; Zhang, Nancy; Li, Nan; Tao, Lidan; Damaraju, Vijaya L; Dufour, Jennifer; Santos, Cheryl; Sun, Xue-Jun; Mackey, John; Wishart, David S; Cass, Carol E; Li, Liang

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient-enriched membrane preparations and membrane fraction enrichment through affinity purification techniques are commonly used in proteomic analysis. However, published proteomic profiles characterized by the above methods show the presence of nuclear proteins in addition to membrane proteins. While shuttling of nuclear proteins across cellular compartments and their transient residency at membrane interfaces could explain some of these observations, the presence of nuclear proteins in proteomic profiles generated with crude and enriched membranes could be the result of nonspecific contamination of nuclear debris during cell fractionation procedures. We hypothesized that micronuclei arising from the genomic instability inherent to cancer cells may copurify with plasma membrane fractions on sucrose gradients. Using sucrose gradient-enriched plasma membranes from breast cancer cell lines derived from the MCF-7 cell line, we provide experimental evidence to indicate that micronuclei are present in fresh preparations of plasma membranes. The origin of these micronuclei was traced to budding of nuclei in intact cells. Furthermore, mass spectrometric analysis confirmed the presence of nuclear proteins as well as membrane and associated signaling proteins in sucrose gradient-enriched preparations.

  9. Proteomic Study of the Mucin Granulae in an Intestinal Goblet Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Goblet cells specialize in producing and secreting mucus with its main component, mucins. An inducible goblet-like cell line was used for the purification of the mucus vesicles stored in these cells by density gradient ultracentrifugation, and their proteome was analyzed by nanoLC-MS and MS/MS. Although the density of these vesicles coincides with others, it was possible to reveal a number of proteins that after immunolocalization on colon tissue and functional analyses were likely to be linked to the MUC2 vesicles. Most of the proteins were associated with the vesicle membrane or their outer surface. The ATP6AP2, previously suggested to be associated with vesicular proton pumps, was colocalized with MUC2 without other V-ATPase proteins and, thus, probably has roles in mucin vesicle function yet to be discovered. FAM62B, known to be a calcium-sensitive protein involved in vesicle fusion, also colocalized with the MUC2 vesicles and is probably involved in unknown ways in the later events of the MUC2 vesicles and their secretion. PMID:22248381

  10. Alterations of protein profile in zebrafish liver cells exposed to methyl parathion: a membrane proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingyu; Huang, He-Qing

    2012-03-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is an extensively used organophosphorus pesticide, which has been associated with a wide spectrum of toxic effects on environmental organisms. The aim of this study is to investigate the alterations of membrane protein profiles in zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line exposed to MP for 24 h using proteomic approaches. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed a total of 13 protein spots, whose expression levels were significantly altered by MP. These differential proteins were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, and nine proteins were identified to be membrane proteins, among which seven were up-regulated, while two were down-regulated. In addition, the mRNA levels corresponding to these differential membrane proteins were further analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. And the differential expression of arginase-2 was specially validated via Western blotting. Regarding the physiological functions, these proteins are involved in molecular chaperon, cytoskeleton system, cell metabolism, signal transduction, transport and hormone receptor respectively, suggesting the complexity of MP-mediated toxicity to ZFL cell. These data could provide useful insights for better understanding the hepatotoxic mechanisms of MP and develop novel protein biomarkers for effectively monitoring MP contamination level in aquatic environment.

  11. Proteomic analysis using 2-D liquid separations of intact proteins from whole-cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kan; Yan, Fang; O'Neil, Kimberly A; Hamler, Rick; Lubman, David M; Lin, Linda; Barder, Timothy J

    2004-02-01

    This unit describes procedures for 2-D liquid separations of proteins from whole-cell lysates. Protocols for protein isoelectric point (pI) fractionation in the first dimension include the use of liquid isoelectric focusing (IEF) and chromatofocusing. The liquid IEF provides a pI-based fractionation using a batch-phase electrophoretic method, while chromatofocusing uses a column-based chromatographic method to generate the pH gradient. Using either method, a second-dimension fractionation is provided in the liquid phase using nonporous silica-based reversed-phase HPLC (NPS-RP-HPLC) to generate a 2-D liquid map of the protein content of the cell. The eluate of the 2-D liquid fractionation is directly coupled to a mass spectrometer for on-line detection of the intact molecular weights of proteins. As a result, a multidimensional map of protein expression is obtained that characterizes cellular proteins by pI, hydrophobicity, and intact molecular weight. Such expression maps are useful for differential proteomic comparison between different cell samples.

  12. Imaging the clear cell renal cell carcinoma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Todd M.; Seeley, Erin H.; Fadare, Oluwole; Caprioli, Richard M.; Clark, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A key barrier to identification of tissue biomarkers of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the heterogeneity of protein expression within tissue. However, by providing spectra for every 0.05 mm2 area of tissue, imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) reveals the spatial distribution of peptides. We sought to determine whether this approach could be used to identify and map protein signatures of ccRCC. Methods We constructed two tissue microarrays (TMA) with two cores each of matched tumor and normal tissue from nephrectomy specimens of 70 patients with ccRCC. Samples were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS). Peptide signatures were identified within each TMA that differentiated cancer from normal tissue and then cross-validated. MS/MS sequencing was performed to determine identities of select differentially expressed peptides, and immunohistochemistry was used for validation. Results Peptide signatures were identified that demonstrated a classification accuracy within each TMA of 94.7–98.5% for each 0.05mm2 spot (spectrum) and 96.9–100% for each tissue core. Cross-validation across TMA's revealed classification accuracies of 82.6–84.7% for each spot and 88.9–92.4% for each core. We identified vimentin, histone 2A.X, and alpha-enolase as proteins with greater expression in cancer tissue, and validated this by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions IMS was able to identify and map specific peptides that accurately distinguished malignant from normal renal tissue, demonstrating its potential as a novel, high-throughput approach to ccRCC biomarker discovery. Given the multiple pathways and known heterogeneity involved in tumors such as ccRCC, multiple peptide signatures that maintain their spatial relationships may outperform traditional protein biomarkers. PMID:23009866

  13. PROTEOMICS ANALYSIS OF ROUGH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Skallos, Patracia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M.; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by one dimensional SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. Gene ontology analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. PMID:25546123

  14. Current clinical application of genomic and proteomic profiling in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Creelan, Benjamin C; Chiappori, Alberto A

    2014-01-01

    Genomic or proteomic profiling of cancer can be broadly defined as a systematic grouping of cancer based on its genetic or protein makeup. In the management of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genomic and proteomic profiling applications have become useful in early disease detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication. We reviewed the recent literature on the applications of genomic and proteomic profiling in NSCLC. Important applications were summarized into those already adopted as standard care and those still under investigation. For genomic profiling, testing for EGFR mutation and ALK rearrangement has become routine for adenocarcinoma. Multiplex assay and malignancy-risk gene signature are both important applications in development. A test to predict outcome after treatment with an epidermal growth factor rector/tyrosine kinase inhibitor and a screening blood test for lung cancer are being investigated for use in proteomic profiling. Genomic profiling is routine in patients with NSCLC, and proteomic profiling shows promise. Additional genomic and proteomic profiling applications may also prove to be useful contributions in the care of these patients.

  15. Global Metabonomic and Proteomic Analysis of Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cells (IOBA-NHC) in Response to Hyperosmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyan; Li, Jing; Guo, Tiannan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Koh, Siew Kwan; Tian, Dechao; Zhang, Liang; Jia, Deyong; Beuerman, Roger W; Aebersold, Ruedi; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Zhou, Lei

    2015-09-04

    "Dry eye" is a multifactorial inflammatory disease affecting the ocular surface. Tear hyperosmolarity in dry eye contributes to inflammation and cell damage. Recent research efforts on dry eye have been directed toward biomarker discovery for diagnosis, response to treatment, and disease mechanisms. This study employed a spontaneously immortalized normal human conjunctival cell line, IOBA-NHC, as a model to investigate hyperosmotic stress-induced changes of metabolites and proteins. Global and targeted metabonomic analyses as well as proteomic analysis were performed on IOBA-NHC cells incubated in serum-free media at 280 (control), 380, and 480 mOsm for 24 h. Twenty-one metabolites and seventy-six iTRAQ-identified proteins showed significant changes under at least one hyperosmotic stress treatment as compared with controls. SWATH-based proteomic analysis further confirmed the involvement of inflammatory pathways such as prostaglandin 2 synthesis in IOBA-NHC cells under hyperosmotic stress. This study is the first to identify glycerophosphocholine synthesis and O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation as key activated pathways in ocular surface cells under hyperosmotic stress. These findings extend the current knowledge in metabolite markers of dry eye and provide potential therapeutic targets for its treatment.

  16. Proteome profiling of seed from inbred and mutant line of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grain sorghum is a major staple food, with fifth rank among the cereals world-wide, considering its importance for food and feed applications. Cereals are main part of human nutrition and strategic resources. In this study, we executed a comprehensive proteomic study to investigate the seed storage ...

  17. Standards for Cell Line Authentication and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Kenneth D.; Plant, Anne L.

    2016-01-01

    Different genomic technologies have been applied to cell line authentication, but only one method (short tandem repeat [STR] profiling) has been the subject of a comprehensive and definitive standard (ASN-0002). Here we discuss the power of this document and why standards such as this are so critical for establishing the consensus technical criteria and practices that can enable progress in the fields of research that use cell lines. We also examine other methods that could be used for authentication and discuss how a combination of methods could be used in a holistic fashion to assess various critical aspects of the quality of cell lines. PMID:27300367

  18. Functional Proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana Guard Cells Uncovers New Stomatal Signaling Pathways[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhixin; Zhang, Wei; Stanley, Bruce A.; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2008-01-01

    We isolated a total of 3 × 108 guard cell protoplasts from 22,000 Arabidopsis thaliana plants and identified 1734 unique proteins using three complementary proteomic methods: protein spot identification from broad and narrow pH range two-dimensional (2D) gels, and 2D liquid chromatography–matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization multidimensional protein identification technology. This extensive single-cell-type proteome includes 336 proteins not previously represented in transcriptome analyses of guard cells and 52 proteins classified as signaling proteins by Gene Ontology analysis, of which only two have been previously assessed in the context of guard cell function. THIOGLUCOSIDE GLUCOHYDROLASE1 (TGG1), a myrosinase that catalyzes the production of toxic isothiocyanates from glucosinolates, showed striking abundance in the guard cell proteome. tgg1 mutants were hyposensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) inhibition of guard cell inward K+ channels and stomatal opening, revealing that the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, previously identified as a defense against biotic invaders, is required for key ABA responses of guard cells. Our results also suggest a mechanism whereby exposure to abiotic stresses may enhance plant defense against subsequent biotic stressors and exemplify how enhanced knowledge of the signaling networks of a specific cell type can be gained by proteomics approaches. PMID:19114538

  19. Quantitative proteomic comparison of stationary/G0 phase cells and tetrads in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravinder; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    Most of the microbial cells on earth under natural conditions exist in a dormant condition, commonly known as quiescent state. Quiescent cells exhibit low rates of transcription and translation suggesting that cellular abundance of proteins may be similar in quiescent cells. Therefore, this study aim to compare the proteome of budding yeast cells from two quiescent states viz. stationary phase/G0 and tetrads. Using iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) based quantitative proteomics we identified 289 proteins, among which around 40 proteins exhibited ±1.5 fold change consistently from the four biological replicates. Proteomics data was validated by western blot and denstiometric analysis of Hsp12 and Spg4. Level of budding yeast 14-3-3 proteins was found to be similar in both the quiescent states, whereas Hsp12 and Spg4 expressed only during stress. FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis showed that budding yeast cells were arrested at G1 stages both in tetrads as well as in stationary phase. We also observed that quiescent states did not express Ime1 (inducer of meiosis). Taken together, our present study demonstrates that the cells in quiescent state may have similar proteome, and accumulation of proteins like Hsp12, Hsp26, and Spg4 may play an important role in retaining viability of the cells during dormancy. PMID:27558777

  20. Microchip-based single-cell functional proteomics for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Yang, Liu; Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui

    2017-03-29

    Cellular heterogeneity has been widely recognized but only recently have single cell tools become available that allow characterizing heterogeneity at the genomic and proteomic levels. We review the technological advances in microchip-based toolkits for single-cell functional proteomics. Each of these tools has distinct advantages and limitations, and a few have advanced toward being applied to address biological or clinical problems that traditional population-based methods fail to address. High-throughput single-cell proteomic assays generate high-dimensional data sets that contain new information and thus require developing new analytical frameworks to extract new biology. In this review article, we highlight a few biological and clinical applications in which microchip-based single-cell proteomic tools provide unique advantages. The examples include resolving functional heterogeneity and dynamics of immune cells, dissecting cell-cell interaction by creating a well-controlled on-chip microenvironment, capturing high-resolution snapshots of immune system functions in patients for better immunotherapy and elucidating phosphoprotein signaling networks in cancer cells for guiding effective molecularly targeted therapies.

  1. Mitochondrial biogenesis and proteome remodeling promotes one carbon metabolism for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Ron-Harel, Noga; Santos, Daniel; Ghergurovich, Jonathan M.; Sage, Peter T.; Reddy, Anita; Lovitch, Scott B.; Dephoure, Noah; Satterstrom, F. Kyle; Sheffer, Michal; Spinelli, Jessica B.; Gygi, Steven; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Naïve T cell stimulation activates anabolic metabolism to fuel the transition from quiescence to growth and proliferation. Here we show that naïve CD4+ T cell activation induces a unique program of mitochondrial biogenesis and remodeling. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified protein dynamics during T cell activation. We identified substantial remodeling of the mitochondrial proteome over the first 24 hr of T cell activation to generate mitochondria with a distinct metabolic signature, with one carbon metabolism as the most induced pathway. Salvage pathways and mitochondrial one carbon metabolism, fed by serine, contribute to purine and thymidine synthesis to enable T cell proliferation and survival. Genetic inhibition of the mitochondrial serine catabolic enzyme SHMT2 impaired T cell survival in culture, and antigen-specific T cell abundance in vivo. Thus, during T cell activation, mitochondrial proteome remodeling generates specialized mitochondria with enhanced one carbon metabolism that is critical for T cell activation and survival. PMID:27411012

  2. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  3. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001.

  4. Embryonic stem cell lines of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2002-06-26

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines have opened great potential and expectation for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Monkey and human ES cell lines, which are very similar to each other, have been established from monkey blastocysts and surplus human blastocysts from fertility clinics. Nonhuman primate ES cell lines provide important research tools for basic and applicative research. Firstly, they provide wider aspects of investigation of the regulative mechanisms of stem cells and cell differentiation among primate species. Secondly, their usage does not need clearance or permission from the regulative rules in many countries that are associated with the ethical aspects of human ES cells, although human and nonhuman embryos and fetuses are very similar to each other. Lastly and most importantly, they are indispensable for animal models of cell therapy to test effectiveness, safety, and immunological reaction of the allogenic transplantation in a setting similar to the treatment of human diseases. So far, ES cell lines have been established from rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), using blastocysts produced naturally or by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These cell lines seem to have very similar characteristics. They express alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 and, in most cases, SSEA-3. Their pluripotency was confirmed by the formation of embryoid bodies and differentiation into various cell types in culture and also by the formation of teratomas that contained many types of differentiated tissues including derivatives of three germ layers after transplantation into the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The noneffectiveness of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signal makes culture of primate and human ES cell lines prone to undergo spontaneous differentiation and thus it is

  5. Thyroid cancer cell lines: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Saiselet, Manuel; Floor, Sébastien; Tarabichi, Maxime; Dom, Geneviève; Hébrant, Aline; van Staveren, Wilma C. G.; Maenhaut, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Human thyroid cancer cell lines are the most used models for thyroid cancer studies. They must be used with detailed knowledge of their characteristics. These in vitro cell lines originate from differentiated and dedifferentiated in vivo human thyroid tumors. However, it has been shown that mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines were closer to dedifferentiated in vivo thyroid tumors (anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, ATC) than to differentiated ones. Here an overview of the knowledge of these models was made. The mutational status of six human thyroid cancer cell lines (WRO, FTC133, BCPAP, TPC1, K1, and 8505C) was in line with previously reported findings for 10 genes frequently mutated in thyroid cancer. However, the presence of a BRAF mutation (T1799A: V600E) in WRO questions the use of this cell line as a model for follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC). Next, to investigate the biological meaning of the modulated mRNAs in these cells, a pathway analysis on previously obtained mRNA profiles was performed on five cell lines. In five cell lines, the MHC class II pathway was down-regulated and in four of them, ribosome biosynthesis and translation pathways were up-regulated. mRNA expression profiles of the cell lines were also compared to those of the different types of thyroid cancers. Three datasets originating from different microarray platforms and derived from distinct laboratories were used. This meta-analysis showed a significant higher correlation between the profiles of the thyroid cancer cell lines and ATC, than to differentiated thyroid tumors (i.e., PTC or FTC) specifically for DNA replication. This already observed higher correlation was obtained here with an increased number of in vivo tumors and using different platforms. In summary, this would suggest that some papillary thyroid carcinoma or follicular thyroid carcinoma (PTC or FTC) cell lines (i.e., TPC-1) might have partially lost their original DNA synthesis/replication regulation mechanisms during

  6. Efficient isolation and proteomic analysis of cell plasma membrane proteins in gastric cancer reveal a novel differentiation and progression related cell surface marker, R-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Luo, Qi-Cong; Chen, Jian-Bo; Lin, Li-E; Luo, Ming-Xu; Ren, Hong-Yue; Chen, Pei-Qiong; Shi, Lian-Guo

    2016-09-01

    Cell plasma membrane proteins, playing a crucial role in cell malignant transformation and development, were the main targets of tumor detection and therapy. In this study, CyDye/biotin double-labeling proteomic approach was adopted to profile the membrane proteome of gastric cancer cell line BGC-823 and paired immortalized gastric epithelial cell GES-1. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were used to validate the differential expression of a novel identified cell surface marker R-cadherin in gastric cancer cells and tissues. Clinicopathological study and survival analysis were performed to estimate its roles in tumor progression and outcome prediction. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression level of R-cadherin in gastric cancer were significantly lower than non-cancerous epithelial cell and tissues. Clinicopathological study indicated that R-cadherin was dominantly expressed on cell surface of normal gastric epithelium, and its expression deletion in gastric cancer tissues was associated with tumor site, differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and pTNM (chi-square test, P < 0.05). Those patients with R-cadherin positive expression displayed better overall survivals than negative expression group (log-rank test, P = 0.000). Cox multivariate survival analysis revealed lacking the expression of R-cadherin was a main independent predictor for poor clinical outcome in gastric cancer (RR = 5.680, 95 % CI 2.250-14.341, P < 0.01). We have established a fundamental membrane proteome database for gastric cancer and identified R-cadherin as a tumor differentiation and progression-related cell surface marker of gastric cancer. Lacking the expression of R-cadherin indicates poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

  7. Analysis of NOD2-mediated proteome response to muramyl dipeptide in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Weichart, Dieter; Gobom, Johan; Klopfleisch, Sina; Häsler, Robert; Gustavsson, Niklas; Billmann, Susanne; Lehrach, Hans; Seegert, Dirk; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2006-01-27

    NOD2, a cytosolic receptor for the bacterial proteoglycan fragment muramyl dipeptide (MDP), plays an important role in the recognition of intracellular pathogens. Variants in the bacterial sensor domain of NOD2 are genetically associated with an increased risk for the development of Crohn disease, a human chronic inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, global protein expression changes after MDP stimulation were analyzed by two-dimensional PAGE of total protein extracts of human cultured cells stably transfected with expression constructs encoding for wild type NOD2 (NOD2(WT)) or the disease-associated NOD2 L1007fsinsC (NOD2(SNP13)) variant. Differentially regulated proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) peptide mass fingerprinting and MALDI MS/MS. The limited overlap in the responses of the NOD2-overexpressing cell lines to MDP included a down-regulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 4. A complex pro-inflammatory program regulated by NOD2(WT) that encompasses a regulation of key genes involved in protein folding, DNA repair, cellular redox homeostasis, and metabolism was observed both under normal growth conditions and after stimulation with MDP. By using the comparison of NOD2(WT) and disease-associated NOD2(SNP13) variant, we have identified a proteomic signature pattern that may further our understanding of the influence of genetic variations in the NOD2 gene in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  9. The Primary Effect on the Proteome of ARID1A-mutated Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma is Downregulation of the Mevalonate Pathway at the Post-transcriptional Level*

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Aaron R.; Bitler, Benjamin G.; Schug, Zachary; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Zhang, Rugang; Speicher, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in ARID1A, which encodes a subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, are found in over half of ovarian clear cell carcinoma cases and more broadly across most types of cancers. To identify ARID1A-dependent changes in intracellular signaling pathways, we performed proteome analyses of isogenic ovarian clear cell carcinoma cell lines with or without ARID1A expression. Knockout of ARID1A in an ovarian clear cell carcinoma cell line with wild-type ARID1A, OVCA429, primarily resulted in downregulation of the mevalonate pathway, an important metabolic pathway involved in isoprenoid synthesis, cholesterol synthesis, and other downstream pathways. In a complementary experiment, expression of wild-type ARID1A in an ovarian clear cell carcinoma cell line containing mutated ARID1A, OVISE, affected the mevalonate pathway in a reciprocal manner. A striking aspect of these analyses was that, although only 5% of the detected proteome showed significant abundance changes, most proteins in the mevalonate pathway were coordinately affected by ARID1A status. There were generally corresponding changes when comparing the proteomics data to our previously published microarray data for ectopic expression of ARID1A in the OVISE cell line. However, ARID1A-dependent changes were not detected for genes within the mevalonate pathway. This discrepancy suggests that the mevalonate pathway is not regulated directly by ARID1A-mediated transcription and may be regulated post-transcriptionally. We conclude that ARID1A status indirectly influences the mevalonate pathway and probably influences other processes including glycogen metabolism and 14-3-3-mediated signaling. Further, our findings demonstrate that changes in mRNA levels are sometimes poor indicators of signaling pathways affected by gene manipulations in cancer cells. PMID:27654507

  10. Proteomic studies in zebrafish liver cells exposed to the brominated flame retardants HBCD and TBBPA.

    PubMed

    Kling, Peter; Förlin, Lars

    2009-10-01

    Proteomic effect screening in zebrafish liver cells was performed to generate hypotheses regarding single and mixed exposure to the BFRs HBCD and TBBPA. Responses at sublethal exposure were analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF and FT-ICR protein identification. Mixing of HBCD and TBBPA at sublethal doses of individual substances seemed to increase toxicity. Proteomic analyses revealed distinct exposure-specific and overlapping responses suggesting novel mechanisms with regard to HBCD and TBBPA exposure. While distinct HBCD responses were related to decreased protein metabolism, TBBPA revealed effects related to protein folding and NADPH production. Overlapping responses suggest increased gluconeogenesis (GAPDH and aldolase) while distinct mixture effects suggest a pronounced NADPH production and changes in proteins related to cell cycle control (prohibitin and crk-like oncogene). We conclude that mixtures containing HBCD and TBBPA may result in unexpected effects highlighting proteomics as a sensitive tool for detecting and hypothesis generation of mixture effects.

  11. Integration of molecular genetics and proteomics with cell metabolism: how to proceed; how not to proceed!

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B

    2011-10-15

    There now exists a resurgence of interest in the role of intermediary metabolism in medicine; especially in relation to medical disorders. Coupled with this is the contemporary focus on molecular biology, genetics and proteomics and their integration into studies of regulation and alterations in cellular metabolism in health and disease. This is a marriage that has vast potential for elucidation of the factors and conditions that are involved in cellular metabolic and functional changes, which heretofore could not be addressed by the earlier generations of biochemists who established the major pathways of intermediary metabolism. The achievement of this present potential requires the appropriate application and interpretation of genetic and proteomic studies relating to cell metabolism and cell function. This requires knowledge and understanding of the principles, relationships, and methodology, such as biochemistry and enzymology, which are involved in the elucidation of cellular regulatory enzymes and metabolic pathways. Unfortunately, many and possibly most contemporary molecular biologists are not adequately trained and knowledgeable in these areas of cell metabolism. This has resulted in much too common inappropriate application and misinformation from genetic/proteomic studies of cell metabolism and function. This presentation describes important relationships of cellular intermediary metabolism, and provides examples of the appropriate and inappropriate application of genetics and proteomics. It calls for the inclusion of biochemistry, enzymology, cell metabolism and cell physiology in the graduate and postgraduate training of molecular biology and other biomedical researchers.

  12. Quantitative proteomics of fractionated membrane and lumen exosome proteins from isogenic metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer cells reveal differential expression of EMT factors.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Thorsen, Kasper; Whitehead, Bradley; Howard, Kenneth A; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Larsen, Martin R; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe

    2014-03-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and metastatic spread. Here, we used an in vivo metastasis model of human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 without metastatic capacity and its two isogenic derivate cell lines SLT4 and FL3, which form metastases in the lungs and liver of mice, respectively. Cultivation in CLAD1000 bioreactors rather than conventional culture flasks resulted in a 13- to 16-fold increased exosome yield and facilitated quantitative proteomics of fractionated exosomes. Exosomes from T24, SLT4, and FL3 cells were partitioned into membrane and luminal fractions and changes in protein abundance related to the gain of metastatic capacity were identified by quantitative iTRAQ proteomics. We identified several proteins linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including increased abundance of vimentin and hepatoma-derived growth factor in the membrane, and casein kinase II α and annexin A2 in the lumen of exosomes, respectively, from metastatic cells. The change in exosome protein abundance correlated little, although significant for FL3 versus T24, with changes in cellular mRNA expression. Our proteomic approach may help identification of proteins in the membrane and lumen of exosomes potentially involved in the metastatic process.

  13. A Proteomics Analysis to Evaluate Cytotoxicity in NRK-52E Cells Caused by Unmodified Nano-Fe3O4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Reng; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Wu, Chin-Jen

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized unmodified Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) with particles size from 10 nm to 100 nm. We cultured NRK-52E cell lines (rat, kidney) and treated with Fe3O4 NPs to investigate and evaluate the cytotoxicity of NPs for NRK-52E cells. Through global proteomics analysis using dimethyl labeling techniques and liquid phase chromatography coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS), we characterized 435 proteins including the programmed cell death related proteins, ras-related proteins, glutathione related proteins, and the chaperone proteins such as heat shock proteins, serpin H1, protein disulfide-isomerase A4, endoplasmin, and endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins. From the statistical data of identified proteins, we believed that NPs treatment causes cell death and promotes expression of ras-related proteins. In order to avoid apoptosis, NRK-52E cell lines induce a series of protective effects such as glutathione related proteins to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS), and chaperone proteins to recycle damaged proteins. We suggested that, in the indigenous cellular environment, Fe3O4 NPs treatment induced an antagonistic effect for cell lines to go to which avoids apoptosis. PMID:25197711

  14. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  15. The E. coli S30 lysate proteome: A prototype for cell-free protein production.

    PubMed

    Foshag, Daniel; Henrich, Erik; Hiller, Ekkehard; Schäfer, Miriam; Kerger, Christian; Burger-Kentischer, Anke; Diaz-Moreno, Irene; García-Mauriño, Sofía M; Dötsch, Volker; Rupp, Steffen; Bernhard, Frank

    2017-09-21

    Protein production using processed cell lysates is a core technology in synthetic biology and these systems are excellent to produce difficult toxins or membrane proteins. However, the composition of the central lysate of cell-free systems is still a "black box". Escherichia coli lysates are most productive for cell-free expression, yielding several mgs of protein per ml of reaction. Their preparation implies proteome fractionation, resulting in strongly biased and yet unknown lysate compositions. Many metabolic pathways are expected to be truncated or completely removed. The lack of knowledge of basic cell-free lysate proteomes is a major bottleneck for directed lysate engineering approaches as well as for assay design using non-purified reaction mixtures. This study is starting to close this gap by providing a blueprint of the S30 lysate proteome derived from the commonly used E. coli strain A19. S30 lysates are frequently used for cell-free protein production and represent the basis of most commercial E. coli cell-free expression systems. A fraction of 821 proteins was identified as the core proteome in S30 lysates, representing approximately a quarter of the known E. coli proteome. Its classification into functional groups relevant for transcription/translation, folding, stability and metabolic processes will build the framework for tailored cell-free reactions. As an example, we show that SOS response induction during cultivation results in tuned S30 lysate with better folding capacity, and improved solubility and activity of synthesized proteins. The presented data and protocols can serve as a platform for the generation of customized cell-free systems and product analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteomic analysis of ovarian cancer cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) reveals mechanisms of cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Mariana Lopes; Palma, Camila de Souza; Thomé, Carolina Hassibe; Lanfredi, Guilherme Pauperio; Poersch, Aline; Faça, Vitor Marcel

    2017-01-16

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-orchestrated process that culminates with loss of epithelial phenotype and gain of a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. EMT enhances cancer cell invasiveness and drug resistance, favoring metastasis. Dysregulation of transcription factors, signaling pathways, miRNAs and growth factors including EGF, TGF-beta and HGF can trigger EMT. In ovarian cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior. Here, the ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line Caov-3 was induced to EMT with EGF in order to identify specific mechanisms controlled by this process. Caov-3 cells induced to EMT were thoroughly validated and a combination of subcellular proteome enrichment, GEL-LC-MS/MS and SILAC strategy allowed consistent proteome identification and quantitation. Protein network analysis of differentially expressed proteins highlighted regulation of metabolism and cell cycle. Activation of relevant signaling pathways, such as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/Erk MAPK, in response to EGF-induced EMT was validated. Also, EMT did not affected the proliferation rate of Caov-3 cells, but led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase regulated by increased levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, independently of p53. Furthermore, a decrease in G1 and G2 checkpoint proteins was observed, supporting the involvement of EGF-induced EMT in cell cycle control.

  17. Riboflavin deficiency induces a significant change in proteomic profiles in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhonghao; Pu, Lingling; Gao, Weina; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Jingyu; Shi, Tala; Yao, Zhanxin; Guo, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Riboflavin deficiency is widespread in many regions over the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin deficiency on protein expression profiles in HepG2 cells in order to provide molecular information for the abnormalities induced by riboflavin deficiency. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of riboflavin. Changes of cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using a label-free shotgun method with LC–MS/MS to investigate the global changes of proteomic profiles in response to riboflavin deficiency. Immunoblotting test was used to validate the results of proteomic approach. The cell viability and apoptosis tests showed that riboflavin was vital in maintaining the cytoactivity of HepG2 cells. The label-free proteomic analysis revealed that a total of 37 proteins showing differential expression (±2 fold, p < 0.05) were identified after riboflavin deficiency. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the riboflavin deficiency caused an up-regulation of Parkinson’s disease pathway, steroid catabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic process, while the fatty acid metabolism, tricarboxylic citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and iron metabolism were down-regulated. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the effects caused by riboflavin deficiency. PMID:28367977

  18. Riboflavin deficiency induces a significant change in proteomic profiles in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhonghao; Pu, Lingling; Gao, Weina; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Jingyu; Shi, Tala; Yao, Zhanxin; Guo, Changjiang

    2017-04-03

    Riboflavin deficiency is widespread in many regions over the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin deficiency on protein expression profiles in HepG2 cells in order to provide molecular information for the abnormalities induced by riboflavin deficiency. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of riboflavin. Changes of cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using a label-free shotgun method with LC-MS/MS to investigate the global changes of proteomic profiles in response to riboflavin deficiency. Immunoblotting test was used to validate the results of proteomic approach. The cell viability and apoptosis tests showed that riboflavin was vital in maintaining the cytoactivity of HepG2 cells. The label-free proteomic analysis revealed that a total of 37 proteins showing differential expression (±2 fold, p < 0.05) were identified after riboflavin deficiency. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the riboflavin deficiency caused an up-regulation of Parkinson's disease pathway, steroid catabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic process, while the fatty acid metabolism, tricarboxylic citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and iron metabolism were down-regulated. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the effects caused by riboflavin deficiency.

  19. Microarray proteomic analysis discriminates tumorigenic mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells of divergent aggressive potential.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Ulises; Best, Lionel; Munroe, David J

    2010-12-01

    Cancer is an intrinsically heterogeneous disease. Tumors classified under the same etiology and histological type may display divergent growth and invasion properties, resulting in different progression rates and clinical outcomes. Here, we approached this subject in a syngeneic mouse model of ovarian cancer. Antibody microarrays were applied to obtain the proteomic profiles of IF5 and IG10, two spontaneously transformed mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cell lines of cognate clonal origin but different tumorigenic behavior in vivo. Repeated dye-swap allowed filter out about 40% of inconsistent signals from a total of 224 arrayed antibodies. Two-class comparison tests resulted in 31 differentially expressed proteins (adjusted p < 0.05). Proteins of the ErbB and focal adhesion signaling pathways showed higher levels in IG10, the most aggressive cell. In contrast, the less aggressive IF5 cell was enriched in proteins related to nuclear chromatin organization and cell-cycle. Additionally, comparison between protein levels and mRNA levels of MOSE cells resulted in a positive rank correlation for 50-60% of protein-mRNA pairs (p < 1.7 × 10(-5)). Importantly, the protein profile of IG10 is linked to invasion and chemotherapy response in human ovarian tumors while the IF5 profile is associated to growth control. The minimal IG10 network contained the proteins Jun, Smad4, Myc, Atf2, and Pak1 as major nodes while Chek2, Mdm2 and Ccna2 were the predominant nodes of the IF5 network. The molecular basis accounting for a high aggressive potential not necessarily related to an increased tumor growth capacity is discussed on a pathway-network basis.

  20. Prostaglandin Actions in Established Insect Cell Lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) and two other C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids that serve as biochemical signals that mediate a wide range of physiological functions in animal cells. For example, PGs influence protein expression in establish insect cell lines ...

  1. Toward the Standardization of Mitochondrial Proteomics: The Italian Mitochondrial Human Proteome Project Initiative.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Tiziana; Pieroni, Luisa; Ronci, Maurizio; Banfi, Cristina; Bongarzone, Italia; Bottoni, Patrizia; Brioschi, Maura; Caterino, Marianna; Chinello, Clizia; Cormio, Antonella; Cozzolino, Flora; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Fontana, Simona; Garavaglia, Barbara; Giusti, Laura; Greco, Viviana; Lucacchini, Antonio; Maffioli, Elisa; Magni, Fulvio; Monteleone, Francesca; Monti, Maria; Monti, Valentina; Musicco, Clara; Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Porcelli, Vito; Saletti, Rosaria; Scatena, Roberto; Soggiu, Alessio; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Zilocchi, Mara; Roncada, Paola; Urbani, Andrea; Fasano, Mauro

    2017-09-13

    The Mitochondrial Human Proteome Project aims at understanding the function of the mitochondrial proteome and its crosstalk with the proteome of other organelles. Being able to choose a suitable and validated enrichment protocol of functional mitochondria, based on the specific needs of the downstream proteomics analysis, would greatly help the researchers in the field. Mitochondrial fractions from ten model cell lines were prepared using three enrichment protocols and analyzed on seven different LC-MS/MS platforms. All data were processed using neXtProt as reference database. The data are available for the Human Proteome Project purposes through the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the identifier PXD007053. The processed data sets were analyzed using a suite of R routines to perform a statistical analysis and to retrieve subcellular and submitochondrial localizations. Although the overall number of identified total and mitochondrial proteins was not significantly dependent on the enrichment protocol, specific line to line differences were observed. Moreover, the protein lists were mapped to a network representing the functional mitochondrial proteome, encompassing mitochondrial proteins and their first interactors. More than 80% of the identified proteins resulted in nodes of this network but with a different ability in coisolating mitochondria-associated structures for each enrichment protocol/cell line pair.

  2. Filamin C, a dysregulated protein in cancer revealed by label-free quantitative proteomic analyses of human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jie; Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Chen, Si-Jie; Yao, Jun; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Peng, Gang; Fang, Cai-Yun; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-20

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth and fifth most common cancer in men and women, respectively. We identified 2,750 proteins at false discovery rates of 1.3% (protein) and 0.03% (spectrum) by comparing the proteomic profiles of three GC and a normal gastric cell lines. Nine proteins were significantly dysregulated in all three GC cell lines, including filamin C, a muscle-specific filamin and a large actin-cross-linking protein. Downregulation of filamin C in GC cell lines and tissues were verified using quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. Data-mining using public microarray datasets shown that filamin C was significantly reduced in many human primary and metastasis cancers. Transient expression or silencing of filamin C affected the proliferation and colony formation of cancer cells. Silencing of endogenous filamin C enhanced cancer cell migration and invasion, whereas ectopic expression of filamin C had opposing effects. Silencing of filamin C increased the expression of matrix metallopeptidase 2 and improved the metastasis of prostate cancer in a zebrafish model. High filamin C associated with better prognosis of prostate cancer, leukemia and breast cancer patients. These findings establish a functional role of filamin C in human cancers and these data will be valuable for further study of its mechanisms.

  3. Cancer Cell Line Panels Empower Genomics-Based Discovery of Precision Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Sung, Yeo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Since the first human cancer cell line, HeLa, was established in the early 1950s, there has been a steady increase in the number and tumor type of available cancer cell line models. Cancer cell lines have made significant contributions to the development of various chemotherapeutic agents. Recent advances in multi-omics technologies have facilitated detailed characterizations of the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic profiles of these cancer cell lines. An increasing number of studies employ the power of a cancer cell line panel to provide predictive biomarkers for targeted and cytotoxic agents, including those that are already used in clinical practice. Different types of statistical and machine learning algorithms have been developed to analyze the large-scale data sets that have been produced. However, much work remains to address the discrepancies in drug assay results from different platforms and the frequent failures to translate discoveries from cell line models to the clinic. Nevertheless, continuous expansion of cancer cell line panels should provide unprecedented opportunities to identify new candidate targeted therapies, particularly for the so-called "dark matter" group of cancers, for which pharmacologically tractable driver mutations have not been identified. PMID:26256959

  4. Cancer Cell Line Panels Empower Genomics-Based Discovery of Precision Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Seok; Sung, Yeo-Jin; Paik, Soonmyung

    2015-09-01

    Since the first human cancer cell line, HeLa, was established in the early 1950s, there has been a steady increase in the number and tumor type of available cancer cell line models. Cancer cell lines have made significant contributions to the development of various chemotherapeutic agents. Recent advances in multi-omics technologies have facilitated detailed characterizations of the genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and epigenomic profiles of these cancer cell lines. An increasing number of studies employ the power of a cancer cell line panel to provide predictive biomarkers for targeted and cytotoxic agents, including those that are already used in clinical practice. Different types of statistical and machine learning algorithms have been developed to analyze the large-scale data sets that have been produced. However, much work remains to address the discrepancies in drug assay results from different platforms and the frequent failures to translate discoveries from cell line models to the clinic. Nevertheless, continuous expansion of cancer cell line panels should provide unprecedented opportunities to identify new candidate targeted therapies, particularly for the so-called "dark matter" group of cancers, for which pharmacologically tractable driver mutations have not been identified.

  5. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  6. A Comprehensive Proteomic View of Responses of A549 Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Keyur A.; Norris, Emma L.; Bukreyev, Alexander A.; Headlam, Madeleine J.; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Singh, Toshna; Collins, Peter L.; Gorman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is a major respiratory pathogen for which there are no suitable antivirals or vaccines. A better understanding of the host cell response to this virus may redress this problem. The present report concerns analysis of multiple independent biological replicates of control and 24 h infected lysates of A549 cells by two different proteomic workflows. One workflow involved fractionation of lysates by in-solution protein IEF and individual fractions were digested using trypsin prior to capillary HPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapXL-MS/MS. A second workflow involved digestion of whole cell lysates and analysis by nanoUltraHPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapElite-MS/MS. Both workflows resulted in the quantification of viral proteins exclusively in lysates of infected cells in the relative abundances anticipated from previous studies. Unprecedented numbers (3247 - 5010) of host cell protein groups were also quantified and the infection-specific regulation of a large number (191) of these protein groups was evident based on a stringent false discovery rate cut-off (<1%). Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most of the regulated proteins were potentially regulated by type I, II, and III interferon, TNF-α and noncanonical NF-κB2 mediated antiviral response pathways. Regulation of specific protein groups by infection was validated by quantitative Western blotting and the cytokine-/key regulator-specific nature of their regulation was confirmed by comparable analyses of cytokine treated A549 cells. Overall, it is evident that the workflows described herein have produced the most comprehensive proteomic characterization of host cell responses to human respiratory syncytial virus published to date. These workflows will form the basis for analysis of the impacts of specific genes of human respiratory syncytial virus responses of A549 and other cell lines using a gene-deleted version of the virus. They should also prove valuable for the analysis of the impact of other infectious

  7. A comprehensive proteomic view of responses of A549 type II alveolar epithelial cells to human respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dave, Keyur A; Norris, Emma L; Bukreyev, Alexander A; Headlam, Madeleine J; Buchholz, Ursula J; Singh, Toshna; Collins, Peter L; Gorman, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is a major respiratory pathogen for which there are no suitable antivirals or vaccines. A better understanding of the host cell response to this virus may redress this problem. The present report concerns analysis of multiple independent biological replicates of control and 24 h infected lysates of A549 cells by two different proteomic workflows. One workflow involved fractionation of lysates by in-solution protein IEF and individual fractions were digested using trypsin prior to capillary HPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapXL-MS/MS. A second workflow involved digestion of whole cell lysates and analysis by nanoUltraHPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapElite-MS/MS. Both workflows resulted in the quantification of viral proteins exclusively in lysates of infected cells in the relative abundances anticipated from previous studies. Unprecedented numbers (3247 - 5010) of host cell protein groups were also quantified and the infection-specific regulation of a large number (191) of these protein groups was evident based on a stringent false discovery rate cut-off (<1%). Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most of the regulated proteins were potentially regulated by type I, II, and III interferon, TNF-α and noncanonical NF-κB2 mediated antiviral response pathways. Regulation of specific protein groups by infection was validated by quantitative Western blotting and the cytokine-/key regulator-specific nature of their regulation was confirmed by comparable analyses of cytokine treated A549 cells. Overall, it is evident that the workflows described herein have produced the most comprehensive proteomic characterization of host cell responses to human respiratory syncytial virus published to date. These workflows will form the basis for analysis of the impacts of specific genes of human respiratory syncytial virus responses of A549 and other cell lines using a gene-deleted version of the virus. They should also prove valuable for the analysis of the impact of other infectious

  8. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  9. Proteomic Signatures of Human Oral Epithelial Cells in HIV-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yohannes, Elizabeth; Ghosh, Santosh K.; Jiang, Bin; McCormick, Thomas S.; Weinberg, Aaron; Hill, Edward; Faddoul, Faddy; Chance, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    The oral epithelium, the most abundant structural tissue lining the oral mucosa, is an important line of defense against infectious microorganisms. HIV infected subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are susceptible to comorbid viral, bacterial and fungal infections in the oral cavity. To provide an assessment of the molecular alterations of oral epithelia potentially associated with susceptibility to comorbid infections in such subjects, we performed various proteomic studies on over twenty HIV infected and healthy subjects. In a discovery phase two Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) analyses of human oral gingival epithelial cell (HOEC) lysates were carried out; this identified 61 differentially expressed proteins between HIV-infected on HAART subjects and healthy controls. Down regulated proteins in HIV-infected subjects include proteins associated with maintenance of protein folding and pro- and anti-inflammatory responses (e.g., heat-shock proteins, Cryab, Calr, IL-1RA, and Galectin-3-binding protein) as well as proteins involved in redox homeostasis and detoxification (e.g., Gstp1, Prdx1, and Ero1). Up regulated proteins include: protein disulfide isomerases, proteins whose expression is negatively regulated by Hsp90 (e.g., Ndrg1), and proteins that maintain cellular integrity (e.g., Vimentin). In a verification phase, proteins identified in the protein profiling experiments and those inferred from Ingenuity Pathway Analysis were analyzed using Western blotting analysis on separate HOEC lysate samples, confirming many of the discovery findings. Additionally in HIV-infected patient samples Heat Shock Factor 1 is down regulated, which explains the reduced heat shock responses, while activation of the MAPK signal transduction cascade is observed. Overall, HAART therapy provides an incomplete immune recovery of the oral epithelial cells of the oral cavity for HIV-infected subjects, and the toxic side effects of HAART and

  10. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    PubMed

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  11. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  12. Comparative proteomic profiling identifies potential prognostic factors for human clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Zhang, Hongwei; Luo, Longhua; Zhong, Kezhao; Ma, Yushui; Fan, Linlin; Fu, Da; Wan, Lijuan

    2016-12-01

    The identification of markers for disease diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive purposes will have a great effect in improving patient management. Proteomic‑based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis on four patients including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and paired adjacent non‑cancerous renal tissues using label‑free quantitative proteomics and liquid chromatography‑tandem mass spectrometry (LC‑MS/MS) to identify differentially expressed proteins. Among 3,061 identified non‑redundant proteins, we found that 210 proteins were differentially expressed (83 overexpressed and 127 underexpressed) in ccRCC tissue when compared with normal kidney tissues. Two most significantly dysregulated proteins (PCK1 and SNRPF) were chosen to be confirmed by western blotting. Pathway analysis of 210 differentially expressed proteins showed that dysregulated proteins are related to many cancer‑related biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and amino acid synthetic pathways. Online survival analysis indicated the prognostic value of these dysregulated proteins. In conclusion, we identified some potential diagnostic biomarkers for ccRCC and an in‑depth understanding of their involved biological pathways may help pave the way to discover new therapeutic strategies for ccRCC.

  13. Hexavalent Chromium-Induced Alteration of Proteomic Landscape in Human Skin Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] generated during industrial processes is carcinogenic. Although much is known about the deleterious effects caused by reactive oxygen species generated during the reduction of Cr(VI) after its absorption by biological systems, the precise mechanisms underlying Cr(VI) cytotoxicity remain poorly defined. Here, we analyzed, at the global proteome scale, the perturbation of protein expression in GM00637 human skin fibroblast cells upon exposure to potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). We were able to quantify ~ 4600 unique proteins, among which ~ 400 exhibited significant alterations in expression levels upon a 24-hr treatment with 0.5 μM K2Cr2O7. Pathway analysis revealed the Cr(VI)-induced perturbation of cholesterol biosynthesis, G-protein signaling, inflammatory response, and selenoprotein pathways. In particular, we discovered that the K2Cr2O7 treatment led to pronouncedly elevated expression of a large number of enzymes involved in de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. Real-time PCR analysis revealed the increased mRNA expression of selected genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Consistently, K2Cr2O7 treatment resulted in marked increases in cellular cholesterol level in multiple cell lines. Moreover, the Cr(VI)-induced growth inhibition of cultured human cells could be rescued by a cholesterol-lowering drug, lovastatin. Together, we demonstrated, for the first time, that Cr(VI) may exert its cytotoxic effect, at least partly, through the up-regulation of enzymes involved in de novo cholesterol biosynthesis and the resultant increase of cholesterol level in cells. PMID:23718831

  14. Proteomic analysis of temporally stimulated ovarian cancer cells for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Marzinke, Mark A; Choi, Caitlin H; Chen, Li; Shih, Ie-Ming; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    While ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the United States, there are no biomarkers available that are able to predict therapeutic responses to ovarian malignancies. One major hurdle in the identification of useful biomarkers has been the ability to obtain enough ovarian cancer cells from primary tissues diagnosed in the early stages of serous carcinomas, the most deadly subtype of ovarian tumor. In order to detect ovarian cancer in a state of hyperproliferation, we analyzed the implications of molecular signaling cascades in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 in a temporal manner, using a mass-spectrometry-based proteomics approach. OVCAR3 cells were treated with EGF(1), and the time course of cell progression was monitored based on Akt phosphorylation and growth dynamics. EGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation was detected at 12 h post-treatment, but an effect on proliferation was not observed until 48 h post-exposure. Growth-stimulated cellular lysates were analyzed for protein profiles between treatment groups and across time points using iTRAQ labeling and mass spectrometry. The protein response to EGF treatment was identified via iTRAQ analysis in EGF-stimulated lysates relative to vehicle-treated specimens across the treatment time course. Validation studies were performed on one of the differentially regulated proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), in human tissue lysates and ovarian tumor tissue sections. Further, tissue microarray analysis was performed to demarcate LAMP-1 expression across different stages of epithelial ovarian cancers. These data support the use of this approach for the efficient identification of tissue-based markers in tumor development related to specific signaling pathways. LAMP-1 is a promising biomarker for studies of the progression of EGF-stimulated ovarian cancers and might be useful in predicting treatment responses involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors or EGF receptor

  15. Proteomic profiling of eggs from a hybrid abalone and its parental lines: Haliotis discus hannai Ino and Haliotis gigantea.

    PubMed

    Di, Guilan; Luo, Xuan; Huang, Miaoqin; Chen, Jun; Kong, Xianghui; Miao, Xiulian; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic analysis was performed on the eggs of hybrid abalone and their corresponding parental lines. A total of 915 ± 19 stained protein spots were detected from Haliotis discus hannai♀ × H. discus hannai♂ (DD), 935 ± 16 from H. gigantea♀ × H. gigantea♂ (GG) and 923 ± 13 from H. gigantea♀ × H. discus hannai♂ (GD). The spots from DD and GD were clustered together. The distance between DD and GG was maximal by hierarchical cluster analysis. A total of 112 protein gel spots were identified; of these, 59 were abalone proteins. The proteins were involved in major biological processes including energy metabolism, proliferation, apoptosis, signal transduction, immunity, lipid metabolism, electron carrier proteins, protein biosynthesis and decomposition, and cytoskeletal structure. Three of 20 differential expression protein spots involved in energy metabolism exhibited as upregulated in GD, 13 spots exhibited additivity, and four spots exhibited as downregulated in the offspring. Eleven protein spots were expressed at the highest level in DD. The proteins involved in stress responses included superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin 6, thioredoxin peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Two of seven differential expression protein spots involved in response to stress exhibited as upregulated in GD, three exhibited additivity, and two exhibited as downregulated. These results might suggest that proteomic approaches are suitable for the analysis of hybrids and the functional prediction of abalone hybridization.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling the Molecular Signatures of Annexin A5 in Lung Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gong, Linlin; Qi, Xiaoyu; Li, Huizhen; Wang, Faming; Chi, Xinming; Jiang, Yulin; Shao, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cancer killer around the world. It’s crucial to identify newer mechanism-based targets to effectively manage lung cancer. Annexin A5 (ANXA5) is a protein kinase C inhibitory protein and calcium dependent phospholipid-binding protein, which may act as an endogenous regulator of various pathophysiological processes. However, its molecular mechanism in lung cancer remains poorly understood. This study was designed to determine the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer with a hope to obtain useful information to provide a new therapeutic target. We used a stable isotope dimethyl labeling based quantitative proteomic method to identify differentially expressed proteins in NSCLC cell lines after ANXA5 transfection. Out of 314 proteins, we identified 26 and 44 proteins that were down- and up-regulated upon ANXA5 modulation, respectively. The IPA analysis revealed that glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were the predominant pathways modulated by ANXA5. Multiple central nodes, namely HSPA5, FN1, PDIA6, ENO1, ALDOA, JUP and KRT6A appeared to occupy regulatory nodes in the protein-protein networks upon ANXA5 modulation. Taken together, ANXA5 appears to have pleotropic effects, as it modulates multiple key signaling pathways, supporting the potential usefulness of ANXA5 as a potential target in lung cancer. This study might provide a new insight into the mechanism of ANXA5 in lung cancer. PMID:27684953

  17. Identification of serum proteome components associated with progression of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska, Monika; Jelonek, Karol; Michalak, Malwina; Roś, Małgorzata; Rodziewicz, Paweł; Chmielewska, Klaudia; Polański, Krzysztof; Polańska, Joanna; Gdowicz-Kłosok, Agnieszka; Giglok, Monika; Suwiński, Rafał; Tarnawski, Rafał; Dziadziuszko, Rafał; Rzyman, Witold; Widłak, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform comparative analysis of serum from patients with different stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using the three complementary proteomic approaches to identify proteome components associated with the progression of cancer. Serum samples were collected before any treatment from 200 patients with NSCLC, including 103 early stage, 64 locally advanced and 33 metastatic cancer samples, and from 200 donors without malignancy. The low-molecular-weight fraction of serum proteome was MALDI-profiled in all samples. Serum proteins were characterized using 2D-PAGE and LC-MS/MS approaches in a representative group of 30 donors. Several significant differences were detected between serum samples collected from patients with early stage cancer and patients with locally advanced cancer, as well as between patients with metastatic cancer and patients with local disease. Of note, serum components discriminating samples from early stage cancer and healthy persons were also detected. In general, about 70 differentiating serum proteins were identified, including inflammatory and acute phase proteins already reported to be associated with the progression of lung cancer (serum amyloid A or haptoglobin). Several differentiating proteins, including apolipoprotein H or apolipoprotein A1, were not previously associated with NSCLC. No significant differences in patterns of serum proteome components were detected between patients with adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. In conclusion, we identified the biomarker candidates with potential importance for molecular proteomic staging of NSCLC. Additionally, several serum proteome components revealed their potential applicability in early detection of the lung cancer.

  18. Refractory lining for electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Cook, Glenn M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contcat with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  19. Deciphering diatom biochemical pathways via whole-cell proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Brook L; Aker, Jocelyn R; Shaffer, Scott A; Tsai, Shannon; Strzepek, Robert F; Boyd, Philip W; Freeman, Theodore Larson; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Malmström, Lars; Goodlett, David R

    2009-06-03

    Diatoms play a critical role in the oceans' carbon and silicon cycles; however, a mechanistic understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success remains elusive. Completion of the Thalassiosira pseudonana genome provided 'blueprints' for the potential biochemical machinery of diatoms, but offers only a limited insight into their biology under various environmental conditions. Using high-throughput shotgun proteomics, we identified a total of 1928 proteins expressed by T. pseudonana cultured under optimal growth conditions, enabling us to analyze this diatom's primary metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Of the proteins identified, 70% are involved in cellular metabolism, while 11% are involved in the transport of molecules. We identified all of the enzymes involved in the urea cycle, thereby describing the complete pathway to convert ammonia to urea, along with urea transporters, and the urea-degrading enzyme urease. Although metabolic exchange between these pathways remains ambiguous, their constitutive presence suggests complex intracellular nitrogen recycling. In addition, all C(4) related enzymes for carbon fixation have been identified to be in abundance, with high protein sequence coverage. Quantification of mass spectra acquisitions demonstrated that the 20 most abundant proteins included an unexpectedly high expression of clathrin, which is the primary structural protein involved in endocytic transport. This result highlights a previously overlooked mechanism for the inter- and intra-cellular transport of nutrients and macromolecules in diatoms, potentially providing a missing link to organelle communication and metabolite exchange. Our results demonstrate the power of proteomics, and lay the groundwork for future comparative proteomic studies and directed analyses of specifically expressed proteins and biochemical pathways of oceanic diatoms.

  20. Deciphering diatom biochemical pathways via whole-cell proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Brook L.; Aker, Jocelyn R.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Tsai, Shannon; Strzepek, Robert F.; Boyd, Philip W.; Freeman, Theodore Larson; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Malmström, Lars; Goodlett, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms play a critical role in the oceans’ carbon and silicon cycles; however, a mechanistic understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success remains elusive. Completion of the Thalassiosira pseudonana genome provided ‘blueprints’ for the potential biochemical machinery of diatoms, but offers only a limited insight into their biology under various environmental conditions. Using high-throughput shotgun proteomics, we identified a total of 1928 proteins expressed by T. pseudonana cultured under optimal growth conditions, enabling us to analyze this diatom’s primary metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Of the proteins identified, 70% are involved in cellular metabolism, while 11% are involved in the transport of molecules. We identified all of the enzymes involved in the urea cycle, thereby describing the complete pathway to convert ammonia to urea, along with urea transporters, and the urea-degrading enzyme urease. Although metabolic exchange between these pathways remains ambiguous, their constitutive presence suggests complex intracellular nitrogen recycling. In addition, all C4 related enzymes for carbon fixation have been identified to be in abundance, with high protein sequence coverage. Quantification of mass spectra acquisitions demonstrated that the 20 most abundant proteins included an unexpectedly high expression of clathrin, which is the primary structural protein involved in endocytic transport. This result highlights a previously overlooked mechanism for the inter- and intra-cellular transport of nutrients and macromolecules in diatoms, potentially providing a missing link to organelle communication and metabolite exchange. Our results demonstrate the power of proteomics, and lay the groundwork for future comparative proteomic studies and directed analyses of specifically expressed proteins and biochemical pathways of oceanic diatoms. PMID:19829762

  1. High-resolution proteome maps of Bacillus licheniformis cells growing in minimal medium.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Birgit; Albrecht, Dirk; Sievers, Susanne; Becher, Dörte; Bongaerts, Johannes; Evers, Stefan; Schweder, Thomas; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Hecker, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus licheniformis is an important host for the industrial production of enzymes mainly because of its ability to secrete large amounts of protein. We analyzed the proteome of B. licheniformis cells growing in a minimal medium. Beside the cytosolic proteome, the membrane and the extracellular proteome were studied. We could identify 1470 proteins; 1168 proteins were classified as cytosolic proteins, 195 proteins with membrane-spanning domains were classified as membrane proteins, and 107 proteins, with either putative signals peptides or flagellin-like sequences, were classified as secreted proteins. The identified proteins were grouped into functional categories and used to reconstruct cellular functions and metabolic pathways of growing B. licheniformis cells. The largest group was proteins with functions in basic metabolic pathways such as carbon metabolism, amino acid and nucleotide synthesis and synthesis of fatty acids and cofactors. Many proteins detected were involved in DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Furthermore, a high number of proteins employed in the transport of a wide variety of compounds were found to be expressed in the cells. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000791 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000791).

  2. Proteomic and biomarker studies and neurological complications of pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lance, Eboni I; Casella, James F; Everett, Allen D; Barron-Casella, Emily

    2014-12-01

    Biomarker analysis and proteomic discovery in pediatric sickle cell disease has the potential to lead to important discoveries and improve care. The aim of this review article is to describe proteomic and biomarker articles involving neurological and developmental complications in this population. A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant research publications. Articles were selected for children under the age of 21 years with the most common subtypes of sickle cell disease. Included articles focused on growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor), intra and extracellular brain proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor), and inflammatory and coagulation markers (interleukin-1β, l-selectin, thrombospondin-1, erythrocyte, and platelet-derived microparticles). Positive findings include increases in plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and platelet-derived growth factor with elevated transcranial Dopplers velocities, increases in platelet-derived growth factor isoform AA with overt stroke, and increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein with acute brain injury. These promising potential neuro-biomarkers provide insight into pathophysiologic processes and clinical events, but their clinical utility is yet to be established. Additional proteomics research is needed, including broad-based proteomic discovery of plasma constituents and blood cell proteins, as well as urine and cerebrospinal fluid components, before, during and after neurological and developmental complications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Proteomic peptide profiling for preemptive diagnosis of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weissinger, E M; Metzger, J; Dobbelstein, C; Wolff, D; Schleuning, M; Kuzmina, Z; Greinix, H; Dickinson, A M; Mullen, W; Kreipe, H; Hamwi, I; Morgan, M; Krons, A; Tchebotarenko, I; Ihlenburg-Schwarz, D; Dammann, E; Collin, M; Ehrlich, S; Diedrich, H; Stadler, M; Eder, M; Holler, E; Mischak, H; Krauter, J; Ganser, A

    2014-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is one curative treatment for hematological malignancies, but is compromised by life-threatening complications, such as severe acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD). Prediction of severe aGvHD as early as possible is crucial to allow timely initiation of treatment. Here we report on a multicentre validation of an aGvHD-specific urinary proteomic classifier (aGvHD_MS17) in 423 patients. Samples (n=1106) were collected prospectively between day +7 and day +130 and analyzed using capillary electrophoresis coupled on-line to mass spectrometry. Integration of aGvHD_MS17 analysis with demographic and clinical variables using a logistic regression model led to correct classification of patients developing severe aGvHD 14 days before any clinical signs with 82.4% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. Multivariate regression analysis showed that aGvHD_MS17 positivity was the only strong predictor for aGvHD grade III or IV (P<0.0001). The classifier consists of 17 peptides derived from albumin, β2-microglobulin, CD99, fibronectin and various collagen α-chains, indicating inflammation, activation of T cells and changes in the extracellular matrix as early signs of GvHD-induced organ damage. This study is currently the largest demonstration of accurate and investigator-independent prediction of patients at risk for severe aGvHD, thus allowing preemptive therapy based on proteomic profiling.

  4. Cell Line Data Base: structure and recent improvements towards molecular authentication of human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Romano, Paolo; Manniello, Assunta; Aresu, Ottavia; Armento, Massimiliano; Cesaro, Michela; Parodi, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The Cell Line Data Base (CLDB) is a well-known reference information source on human and animal cell lines including information on more than 6000 cell lines. Main biological features are coded according to controlled vocabularies derived from international lists and taxonomies. HyperCLDB (http://bioinformatics.istge.it/hypercldb/) is a hypertext version of CLDB that improves data accessibility by also allowing information retrieval through web spiders. Access to HyperCLDB is provided through indexes of biological characteristics and navigation in the hypertext is granted by many internal links. HyperCLDB also includes links to external resources. Recently, an interest was raised for a reference nomenclature for cell lines and CLDB was seen as an authoritative system. Furthermore, to overcome the cell line misidentification problem, molecular authentication methods, such as fingerprinting, single-locus short tandem repeat (STR) profile and single nucleotide polymorphisms validation, were proposed. Since this data is distributed, a reference portal on authentication of human cell lines is needed. We present here the architecture and contents of CLDB, its recent enhancements and perspectives. We also present a new related database, the Cell Line Integrated Molecular Authentication (CLIMA) database (http://bioinformatics.istge.it/clima/), that allows to link authentication data to actual cell lines.

  5. Cell Line Data Base: structure and recent improvements towards molecular authentication of human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Paolo; Manniello, Assunta; Aresu, Ottavia; Armento, Massimiliano; Cesaro, Michela; Parodi, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The Cell Line Data Base (CLDB) is a well-known reference information source on human and animal cell lines including information on more than 6000 cell lines. Main biological features are coded according to controlled vocabularies derived from international lists and taxonomies. HyperCLDB (http://bioinformatics.istge.it/hypercldb/) is a hypertext version of CLDB that improves data accessibility by also allowing information retrieval through web spiders. Access to HyperCLDB is provided through indexes of biological characteristics and navigation in the hypertext is granted by many internal links. HyperCLDB also includes links to external resources. Recently, an interest was raised for a reference nomenclature for cell lines and CLDB was seen as an authoritative system. Furthermore, to overcome the cell line misidentification problem, molecular authentication methods, such as fingerprinting, single-locus short tandem repeat (STR) profile and single nucleotide polymorphisms validation, were proposed. Since this data is distributed, a reference portal on authentication of human cell lines is needed. We present here the architecture and contents of CLDB, its recent enhancements and perspectives. We also present a new related database, the Cell Line Integrated Molecular Authentication (CLIMA) database (http://bioinformatics.istge.it/clima/), that allows to link authentication data to actual cell lines. PMID:18927105

  6. Proteomic analysis of estrogen response of premalignant human breast cells using a 2-D liquid separation/mass mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Kan; Lubman, David M; Miller, Fred R; Shekhar, Malthy P V; Gerard, Brigitte; Barder, Timothy J

    2006-07-01

    A 2-D liquid-phase separation method based on chromatofocusing and nonporous silica RP-HPLC followed by ESI-TOF-MS was used to analyze proteins in whole cell lysates from estrogen-treated and untreated premalignant, estrogen-responsive cell line MCF10AT1 cells. 2-D mass maps in the pH range 4.6-6.0 were generated with good correlation to theoretical M(r) values for intact proteins. Proteins were identified based on intact M(r), pI and PMF, or MS/MS sequencing. About 300 unique proteins were identified and 120 proteins in mass range 5-75 kDa were quantified upon treatment of estrogen. Around 40 proteins were found to be more highly expressed (>four-fold) and 17 were down-regulated (>four-fold) in treated cells. In our study, we found that many altered proteins have characteristics consistent with the development of a malignant phenotype. Some of them have a role in the ras pathway or play an important role in signal pathways. These changed proteins might be essential in the estrogen regulation mechanism. Our study highlights the use of the MCF10AT1 cell line to examine estrogen-induced changes in premalignant breast cells and the ability of the 2-D mass mapping technique to quantitatively study protein expression changes on a proteomic scale.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of the Action of the Mycobacterium ulcerans Toxin Mycolactone: Targeting Host Cells Cytoskeleton and Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Gama, José B.; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Martins, Teresa G.; Fraga, Alexandra G.; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Carvalho, Maria A.; Proença, Fernanda; Silva, Manuel T.; Pedrosa, Jorge; Ludovico, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The tissue damage characteristic of BU lesions is known to be driven by the secretion of the potent lipidic exotoxin mycolactone. However, the molecular action of mycolactone on host cell biology mediating cytopathogenesis is not fully understood. Here we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify the mechanisms of mycolactone's cellular action in the L929 mouse fibroblast proteome. This revealed 20 changed spots corresponding to 18 proteins which were clustered mainly into cytoskeleton-related proteins (Dync1i2, Cfl1, Crmp2, Actg1, Stmn1) and collagen biosynthesis enzymes (Plod1, Plod3, P4ha1). In line with cytoskeleton conformational disarrangements that are observed by immunofluorescence, we found several regulators and constituents of both actin- and tubulin-cytoskeleton affected upon exposure to the toxin, providing a novel molecular basis for the effect of mycolactone. Consistent with these cytoskeleton-related alterations, accumulation of autophagosomes as well as an increased protein ubiquitination were observed in mycolactone-treated cells. In vivo analyses in a BU mouse model revealed mycolactone-dependent structural changes in collagen upon infection with M. ulcerans, associated with the reduction of dermal collagen content, which is in line with our proteomic finding of mycolactone-induced down-regulation of several collagen biosynthesis enzymes. Our results unveil the mechanisms of mycolactone-induced molecular cytopathogenesis on exposed host cells, with the toxin compromising cell structure and homeostasis by inducing cytoskeleton alterations, as well as disrupting tissue structure, by impairing the extracellular matrix biosynthesis. PMID:25101965

  8. Quantitative Proteomics of the Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Cell Envelope and Membrane Vesicles for the Discovery of Potential Therapeutic Targets*

    PubMed Central

    Zielke, Ryszard A.; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Weber, Jacob V.; Gafken, Philip R.; Sikora, Aleksandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) is a human-specific pathogen, and the agent of a sexually transmitted disease, gonorrhea. There is a critical need for new approaches to study and treat GC infections because of the growing threat of multidrug-resistant isolates and the lack of a vaccine. Despite the implied role of the GC cell envelope and membrane vesicles in colonization and infection of human tissues and cell lines, comprehensive studies have not been undertaken to elucidate their constituents. Accordingly, in pursuit of novel molecular therapeutic targets, we have applied isobaric tagging for absolute quantification coupled with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry for proteome quantitative analyses. Mining the proteome of cell envelopes and native membrane vesicles revealed 533 and 168 common proteins, respectively, in analyzed GC strains FA1090, F62, MS11, and 1291. A total of 22 differentially abundant proteins were discovered including previously unknown proteins. Among those proteins that displayed similar abundance in four GC strains, 34 were found in both cell envelopes and membrane vesicles fractions. Focusing on one of them, a homolog of an outer membrane protein LptD, we demonstrated that its depletion caused loss of GC viability. In addition, we selected for initial characterization six predicted outer membrane proteins with unknown function, which were identified as ubiquitous in the cell envelopes derived from examined GC isolates. These studies entitled a construction of deletion mutants and analyses of their resistance to different chemical probes. Loss of NGO1985, in particular, resulted in dramatically decreased GC viability upon treatment with detergents, polymyxin B, and chloramphenicol, suggesting that this protein functions in the maintenance of the cell envelope permeability barrier. Together, these findings underscore the concept that the cell envelope and membrane vesicles contain crucial, yet under-explored determinants of GC

  9. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types. PMID:27327609

  10. Prion Protein Deficiency Causes Diverse Proteome Shifts in Cell Models That Escape Detection in Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Brethour, Dylan; Williams, Declan; Wang, Hansen; Arnould, Hélène; Schneider, Benoit; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2016-01-01

    A popular method for studying the function of a given protein is to generate and characterize a suitable model deficient for its expression. For the prion protein (PrP), best known for its role in several invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases, a natural choice, therefore, would be to undertake such studies with brain samples. We recently documented the surprising observation that PrP deficiency caused a loss or enhancement of NCAM1 polysialylation, dependent on the cell model used. To identify possible causes for this disparity, we set out to systematically investigate the consequence of PrP deficiency on the global proteome in brain tissue and in four distinct cell models. Here we report that PrP deficiency causes robust but surprisingly divergent changes to the global proteomes of cell models but has no discernible impact on the global brain proteome. Amongst >1,500 proteins whose levels were compared in wild-type and PrP-deficient models, members of the MARCKS protein family exhibited pronounced, yet cell model-dependent changes to their steady-state levels. Follow-up experiments revealed that PrP collaborates with members of the MARCKS protein family in its control of NCAM1 polysialylation. We conclude that the physiological function of PrP may be masked in analyses of complex brain samples but its cell-type specific influence on a lipid raft-based NCAM1-related cell biology comes to the fore in investigations of specific cell types.

  11. Insights on Neoplastic Stem Cells from Gel-Based Proteomics of Childhood Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, William E.; Eedala, Sruthi; Jadhav, Y.L. Avinash; Labhan, Manbir S.; Pericherla, Vidya C.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Childhood germ cell tumors (cGCTs), believed to arise from transformed primordial germ cells by an unknown mechanism, provide a unique model system for investigating cell signaling, pluripotency and the microenvironment of neoplastic stem cells (NSCs) in vivo. This is the first report of proteomics of cGCTs. Procedure Four dysgerminomas (DYSs) and four childhood endodermal sinus tumors (cESTs), resembling self-renewing and differentiating NSCs, respectively, were selected. Proteomic studies were performed by 2-DE, SDS-PAGE and cLC/MS/MS with protein database searching. Results 2-DE: 9 of 941spots were differentially regulated with greater than a 2-fold change in spot volume for at least 3 of 4 gels in each group. 2 of 9 spots had p-values for the t-test analysis of comparisons less than 0.001, while the remaining spots had p-values from 0.013 to 0.191. Top-ranked proteins were identified in 9 of 9 spots with 4.0 to 38% sequence coverage. APOA1, CRK and PDIA3 were up-regulated in cESTs. TFG, TYMP, VCP, RBBP, FKBP4 and BiP were up-regulated in DYSs. SDS-PAGE: Up-regulation of NF45 and FKBP4 was observed in 4 of 4 cESTs and DYSs, respectively. The fold-changes observed correspond with characteristic genetic changes. Conclusion Differential regulation of FKBP4 and NF45, combined with previous research on immunosuppressant binding, suggests that glucocorticoid receptor signaling merits further investigation in cGCTs and NSCs. PMID:21793190

  12. N-linked glycan profiling in neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunli; Mayampurath, Anoop; Khan, Saira; Cohen, Joanna K; Mechref, Yehia; Volchenboum, Samuel L

    2015-05-01

    Although MYCN amplification has been associated with aggressive neuroblastoma, the molecular mechanisms that differentiate low-risk, MYCN-nonamplified neuroblastoma from high-risk, MYCN-amplified disease are largely unknown. Genomic and proteomic studies have been limited in discerning differences in signaling pathways that account for this heterogeneity. N-Linked glycosylation is a common protein modification resulting from the attachment of sugars to protein residues and is important in cell signaling and immune response. Aberrant N-linked glycosylation has been routinely linked to various cancers. In particular, glycomic markers have often proven to be useful in distinguishing cancers from precancerous conditions. Here, we perform a systematic comparison of N-linked glycomic variation between MYCN-nonamplified SY5Y and MYCN-amplified NLF cell lines with the aim of identifying changes in sugar abundance linked to high-risk neuroblastoma. Through a combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis, we identified 16 glycans that show a statistically significant change in abundance between NLF and SY5Y samples. Closer examination revealed the preference for larger (in terms of total monosaccharide count) and more sialylated glycan structures in the MYCN-amplified samples in comparison to smaller, nonsialylated glycans that are more dominant in the MYCN-nonamplified samples. These results offer clues for deriving marker candidates for accurate neuroblastoma risk diagnosis.

  13. Time line of redox events in aging postmitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, Nicolas; Tienson, Heather; Lindemann, Antje; Vitvitsky, Victor; Reichmann, Dana; Banerjee, Ruma; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    The precise roles that oxidants play in lifespan and aging are still unknown. Here, we report the discovery that chronologically aging yeast cells undergo a sudden redox collapse, which affects over 80% of identified thiol-containing proteins. We present evidence that this redox collapse is not triggered by an increase in endogenous oxidants as would have been postulated by the free radical theory of aging. Instead it appears to be instigated by a substantial drop in cellular NADPH, which normally provides the electron source for maintaining cellular redox homeostasis. This decrease in NADPH levels occurs very early during lifespan and sets into motion a cascade that is predicted to down-regulate most cellular processes. Caloric restriction, a near-universal lifespan extending measure, increases NADPH levels and delays each facet of the cascade. Our studies reveal a time line of events leading up to the system-wide oxidation of the proteome days before cell death. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00306.001 PMID:23390587

  14. Critical Points in Tumorigenesis: A Carcinogen-Initiated Phase Transition Analyzed via Single-Cell Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Poovathingal, Suresh Kumar; Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Levine, Raphael David; Heath, James R

    2016-03-01

    A kinetic, single-cell proteomic study of chemically induced carcinogenesis is interpreted by treating the single-cell data as fluctuations of an open system transitioning between different steady states. In analogy to a first-order transition, phase coexistence and the loss of degrees of freedom are observed. The transition is detected well before the appearance of the traditional biomarker of the carcinogenic transformation.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Pathogenic Fungi Reveals Highly Expressed Conserved Cell Wall Proteins.

    PubMed

    Champer, Jackson; Ito, James I; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A; Kalkum, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We are presenting a quantitative proteomics tally of the most commonly expressed conserved fungal proteins of the cytosol, the cell wall, and the secretome. It was our goal to identify fungi-typical proteins that do not share significant homology with human proteins. Such fungal proteins are of interest to the development of vaccines or drug targets. Protein samples were derived from 13 fungal species, cultured in rich or in minimal media; these included clinical isolates of Aspergillus, Candida, Mucor, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides species. Proteomes were analyzed by quantitative MS(E) (Mass Spectrometry-Elevated Collision Energy). Several thousand proteins were identified and quantified in total across all fractions and culture conditions. The 42 most abundant proteins identified in fungal cell walls or supernatants shared no to very little homology with human proteins. In contrast, all but five of the 50 most abundant cytosolic proteins had human homologs with sequence identity averaging 59%. Proteomic comparisons of the secreted or surface localized fungal proteins highlighted conserved homologs of the Aspergillus fumigatus proteins 1,3-β-glucanosyltransferases (Bgt1, Gel1-4), Crf1, Ecm33, EglC, and others. The fact that Crf1 and Gel1 were previously shown to be promising vaccine candidates, underlines the value of the proteomics data presented here.

  16. Suspension-cultured plant cells as a tool to analyze the extracellular proteome.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Jara, Ana B; Almagro, Lorena; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Martínez-Esteso, María J; Youssef, Sabry M; Casado-Vela, Juan; Vera-Urbina, Juan C; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Pedreño, María A

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cells (SCC) are generally considered the most suitable cell systems to carry out scientific studies, including the extracellular proteome (secretome). SCC are initiated by transferring friable callus fragments into flasks containing liquid culture medium for cell biomass growth, and they are maintained in an orbital shaker to supply the sufficient oxygen that allows cell growth. SCC increase rapidly during the exponential phase and after 10-20 days (depending on the cell culture nature), the growth rate starts to decrease due to limitation of nutrients, and to maintain for decades these kinds of cell cultures is needed to transfer a portion of these SCC into a fresh culture medium. Despite the central role played by extracellular proteins in most processes that control growth and development, the secretome has been less well characterized than other subcellular compartments, meaning that our understanding of the cell wall physiology is still very limited. Useful proteomic tools have emerged in recent years to unravel metabolic network that occurs in cell walls. With the recent progress made in mass spectrometry technology, it has become feasible to identify proteins from a given organ, tissue, cells, or even a subcellular compartment. Compared with other methods used to isolate cell wall proteins, the spent medium of SCC provides a convenient, continuous, and reliable and unique source of extracellular proteins. Therefore, this biological system could be used as a large-scale cell culture from which these proteins can be secreted, easily separated from cells without cell disruption, and so, without any cytosolic contamination, easily recovered from the extracellular medium. This nondestructive cell wall proteome approach discloses a set of proteins that are specifically expressed in the remodelling of the cell wall architecture and stress defense.

  17. Alternative fluorescent labeling strategies for characterizing gram-positive pathogenic bacteria: Flow cytometry supported counting, sorting, and proteome analysis of Staphylococcus aureus retrieved from infected host cells.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Petra; Surmann, Kristin; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Normann, Nicole; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen that is able to cause a broad range of infectious diseases in humans. Furthermore, S. aureus is able to survive inside nonprofessional phagocytic host cell which serve as a niche for the pathogen to hide from the immune system and antibiotics therapies. Modern OMICs technologies provide valuable tools to investigate host-pathogen interactions upon internalization. However, these experiments are often hampered by limited capabilities to retrieve bacteria from such an experimental setting. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a labeling strategy allowing fast detection and quantitation of S. aureus in cell lysates or infected cell lines by flow cytometry for subsequent proteome analyses. Therefore, S. aureus cells were labeled with the DNA stain SYTO(®) 9, or Vancomycin BODIPY(®) FL (VMB), a glycopeptide antibiotic binding to most Gram-positive bacteria which was conjugated to a fluorescent dye. Staining of S. aureus HG001 with SYTO 9 allowed counting of bacteria from pure cultures but not in cell lysates from infection experiments. In contrast, with VMB it was feasible to stain bacteria from pure cultures as well as from samples of infection experiments. VMB can also be applied for histocytochemistry analysis of formaldehyde fixed cell layers grown on coverslips. Proteome analyses of S. aureus labeled with VMB revealed that the labeling procedure provoked only minor changes on proteome level and allowed cell sorting and analysis of S. aureus from infection settings with sensitivity similar to continuous gfp expression. Furthermore, VMB labeling allowed precise counting of internalized bacteria and can be employed for downstream analyses, e.g., proteomics, of strains not easily amendable to genetic manipulation such as clinical isolates. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of benzo(a)pyrene-transformed 16HBE cells serum-free culture supernatant and xenografted nude mice sera.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Fu, Juanling; Yao, Biyun; Jia, Yongrui; Zhang, Hongtao; Li, Xuehui; Dong, Lisha; Gao, Ya; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Wen; Zhou, Zongcan

    2016-02-05

    To screen potential biomarkers of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-induced lung cancer, the proteomic profiles of BaP-transformed 16HBE cell line T-16HBE-C1 cells serum-free culture supernatant and xenografted nude mice sera were compared with those of 16HBE group by utilizing label-free quantitative proteomic strategy. By employing nano-LC-MS/MS technology followed by MaxQuant and Perseus processing, 489 differentially expressed proteins were identified between T-16HBE-C1 and 16HBE cells serum-free culture supernatant, and 49 significantly up-regulated proteins were identified in T-16HBE-C1 xenografted nude mice sera. Three proteins neuropilin-2 (NRP2), clusterin (CLU) and A-kinase anchor protein 12 (AKAP12) were up-regulated in the serum-free culture supernatant of T-16HBE-C1 cells. These 3 human proteins were present in the sera of nude mice xenografted with T-16HBE-C1 cells, but were undetectable in mice xenografted with 16HBE cells. The proteomic results of NRP2 and AKAP12 were confirmed by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. Moreover, the serum NRP2 levels were significantly elevated at the 4th day after tumor cell implantation and showed good positive correlation with tumor growth characterized by tumor volume. In conclusion, serum NRP2, CLU and AKAP12 could be potential biomarkers of BaP-induced lung cancer. The proteomic results will gain deeper insights into the mechanisms of BaP-induced carcinogenesis.

  19. Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kashkolinejad-Koohi, Tahere; Saadat, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation) were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer. PMID:27486356

  20. Deep-proteome mapping of WM-266-4 human metastatic melanoma cells: From oncogenic addiction to druggable targets

    PubMed Central

    Litou, Zoi I.; Konstandi, Ourania A.; Giannopoulou, Aikaterini F.; Anastasiadou, Ema; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E.; Tsangaris, George Th.; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a malignant tumor of skin melanocytes that are pigment-producing cells located in the basal layer (stratum basale) of epidermis. Accumulation of genetic mutations within their oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes compels melanocytes to aberrant proliferation and spread to distant organs of the body, thereby resulting in severe and/or lethal malignancy. Metastatic melanoma’s heavy mutational load, molecular heterogeneity and resistance to therapy necessitate the development of novel biomarkers and drug-based protocols that target key proteins involved in perpetuation of the disease. To this direction, we have herein employed a nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) proteomics technology to profile the deep-proteome landscape of WM-266-4 human metastatic melanoma cells. Our advanced melanoma-specific catalogue proved to contain 6,681 unique proteins, which likely constitute the hitherto largest single cell-line-derived proteomic collection of the disease. Through engagement of UNIPROT, DAVID, KEGG, PANTHER, INTACT, CYTOSCAPE, dbEMT and GAD bioinformatics resources, WM-266-4 melanoma proteins were categorized according to their sub-cellular compartmentalization, function and tumorigenicity, and successfully reassembled in molecular networks and interactomes. The obtained data dictate the presence of plastically inter-converted sub-populations of non-cancer and cancer stem cells, and also indicate the oncoproteomic resemblance of melanoma to glioma and lung cancer. Intriguingly, WM-266-4 cells seem to be subjected to both epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) and mesenchymal-to-epithelial (MET) programs, with 1433G and ADT3 proteins being identified in the EMT/MET molecular interface. Oncogenic addiction of WM-266-4 cells to autocrine/paracrine signaling of IL17-, DLL3-, FGF(2/13)- and OSTP-dependent sub-routines suggests their critical contribution to the metastatic melanoma chemotherapeutic refractoriness. Interestingly, the

  1. Radiation sensitivity of Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.H.; Ramsay, J.R.; Birrell, G.W.

    1995-07-30

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), being a small cell carcinoma, would be expected to be sensitive to radiation. Clinical analysis of patients at our center, especially those with macroscopic disease, would suggest the response is quite variable. We have recently established a number of MCC cell lines from patients prior to radiotherapy, and for the first time are in a position to determine their sensitivity under controlled conditions. Some of the MCC lines grew as suspension cultures and could not be single cell cloned; therefore, it was not possible to use clonogenic survival for all cell lines. A tetrazolium based (MTT) assay was used for these lines, to estimate cell growth after {gamma} irradiation. Control experiments were conducted on lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the adherent MCC line, MCC13, to demonstrate that the two assays were comparable under the conditions used. We have examined cell lines from MCC, small cell lung cancer (SCLC), malignant melanomas, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) transformed lymphocytes (LCL), and skin fibroblasts for their sensitivity to {gamma} irradiation using both clonogenic cell survival and MTT assays. The results show that the tumor cell lines have a range of sensitivities, with melanoma being more resistant (surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) 0.57 and 0.56) than the small cell carcinoma lines, MCC (SF2 range 0.21-0.45, mean SF2 0.30, n = 8) and SCLC (SF2 0.31). Fibroblasts were the most sensitive (SF2 0.13-0.20, mean 0.16, n = 5). The MTT assay, when compared to clonogenic assay for the MCC13 adherent line and the LCL, gave comparable results under the conditions used. Both assays gave a range of SF2 values for the MCC cell lines, suggesting that these cancers would give a heterogeneous response in vivo. The results with the two derivative clones of MCC14 (SF2 for MCC14/1 0.38, MCC14/2 0.45) would further suggest that some of them may develop resistance during clonogenic evolution. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Proteomics analysis of A375 human malignant melanoma cells in response to arbutin treatment.

    PubMed

    Nawarak, Jiraporn; Huang-Liu, Rosa; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liao, Hsien-Hua; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Cheng, Sun-Long

    2009-02-01

    Although the toxicogenomics of A375 human malignant melanoma cells treated with arbutin have been elucidated using DNA microarray, the proteomics of the cellular response to this compound are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed proteomic analyses to investigate the anticancer effect of arbutin on the protein expression profile in A375 cells. After treatment with arbutin (8 microg/ml) for 24, 48 and 72 h, the proteomic profiles of control and arbutin-treated A375 cells were compared, and 26 differentially expressed proteins (7 upregulated and 19 downregulated proteins) were identified by MALDI-Q-TOF MS and MS/MS. Among these proteins, 13 isoforms of six identical proteins were observed. Bioinformatic tools were used to search for protein function and to predict protein interactions. The interaction network of 14 differentially expressed proteins was found to be correlated with the downstream regulation of p53 tumor suppressor and cell apoptosis. In addition, three upregulated proteins (14-3-3G, VDAC-1 and p53) and five downregulated proteins (ENPL, ENOA, IMDH2, PRDX1 and VIME) in arbutin-treated A375 cells were validated by RT-PCR analysis. These proteins were found to play important roles in the suppression of cancer development.

  3. Rapid Myeloid Cell Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Periodontopathogenic Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Nares, Salvador; Moutsopoulos, Niki M.; Angelov, Nikola; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Sinha, Neha; Wahl, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Long-lived monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) are Toll-like receptor-expressing, antigen-presenting cells derived from a common myeloid lineage that play key roles in innate and adaptive immune responses. Based on immunohistochemical and molecular analyses of inflamed tissues from patients with chronic destructive periodontal disease, these cells, found in the inflammatory infiltrate, may drive the progressive periodontal pathogenesis. To investigate early transcriptional signatures and subsequent proteomic responses to the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, donor-matched human blood monocytes, differentiated DCs, and macrophages were exposed to P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gene expression levels were measured by oligonucleotide microarrays. In addition to striking differences in constitutive transcriptional profiles between these myeloid populations, we identify a P. gingivalis LPS-inducible convergent, transcriptional core response of more than 400 annotated genes/ESTs among these populations, reflected by a shared, but quantitatively distinct, proteomic response. Nonetheless, clear differences emerged between the monocytes, DCs, and macrophages. The finding that long-lived myeloid inflammatory cells, particularly DCs, rapidly and aggressively respond to P. gingivalis LPS by generating chemokines, proteases, and cytokines capable of driving T-helper cell lineage polarization without evidence of corresponding immunosuppressive pathways highlights their prominent role in host defense and progressive tissue pathogenesis. The shared, unique, and/or complementary transcriptional and proteomic profiles may frame the context of the host response to P. gingivalis, contributing to the destructive nature of periodontal inflammation. PMID:19264901

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals tanshinone IIA enhances apoptosis of advanced cervix carcinoma CaSki cells through mitochondria intrinsic and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tai-Long; Wang, Pei-Wen; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Huang, Chun-Hsun; Rau, Kun-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Cervix cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, whereas paclitaxel, the first line chemotherapeutic drug used to treat cervical cancer, shows low chemosensitivity on the advanced cervical cancer cell line. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) exhibited strong growth inhibitory effect on CaSki cells (IC50 = 5.51 μM) through promoting caspase cascades with concomitant upregulating the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK signaling. Comprehensive proteomics revealed the global protein changes and the network analysis implied that Tan IIA treatment would activate ER stress pathways that finally lead to apoptotic cell death. Moreover, ER stress inhibitor could alleviate Tan IIA caused cell growth inhibition and ameliorate C/EBP-homologous protein as well as apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediated cell death. The therapeutic interventions targeting the mitochondrial-related apoptosis and ER stress responses might be promising strategies to conquer paclitaxel resistance.

  5. Proteomic profiling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells upon TGF-beta stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Park, Jennifer S.; Chu, Julia S.F.; Ari, Krakowski; Luo, Kunxin; Chen, David J.; Li, Song

    2004-08-08

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different types of cells, and have tremendous potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}) plays an important role in cell differentiation and vascular remodeling. We showed that TGF-{beta} induced cell morphology change and an increase in actin fibers in MSCs. To determine the global effects of TGF-{beta} on MSCs, we employed a proteomic strategy to analyze the effect of TGF-{beta} on the human MSC proteome. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and electrospray ionization coupled to Quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometers, we have generated a proteome reference map of MSCs, and identified {approx}30 proteins with an increase or decrease in expression or phosphorylation in response to TGF-{beta}. The proteins regulated by TGF-{beta} included cytoskeletal proteins, matrix synthesis proteins, membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes, etc. TGF-{beta} increased the expression of smooth muscle (SM) {alpha}-actin and decreased the expression of gelsolin. Over-expression of gelsolin inhibited TGF-{beta}-induced assembly of SM {alpha}-actin; on the other hand, knocking down gelsolin expression enhanced the assembly of {alpha}-actin and actin filaments without significantly affecting {alpha}-actin expression. These results suggest that TGF-{beta} coordinates the increase of {alpha}-actin and the decrease of gelsolin to promote MSC differentiation. This study demonstrates that proteomic tools are valuable in studying stem cell differentiation and elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms.

  6. A Cell Wall Proteome and Targeted Cell Wall Analyses Provide Novel Information on Hemicellulose Metabolism in Flax.

    PubMed

    Chabi, Malika; Goulas, Estelle; Leclercq, Celine C; de Waele, Isabelle; Rihouey, Christophe; Cenci, Ugo; Day, Arnaud; Blervacq, Anne-Sophie; Neutelings, Godfrey; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lerouge, Patrice; Hausman, Jean-François; Renaut, Jenny; Hawkins, Simon

    2017-09-01

    Experimentally-generated (nanoLC-MS/MS) proteomic analyses of four different flax organs/tissues (inner-stem, outer-stem, leaves and roots) enriched in proteins from 3 different sub-compartments (soluble-, membrane-, and cell wall-proteins) was combined with publically available data on flax seed and whole-stem proteins to generate a flax protein database containing 2996 nonredundant total proteins. Subsequent multiple analyses (MapMan, CAZy, WallProtDB and expert curation) of this database were then used to identify a flax cell wall proteome consisting of 456 nonredundant proteins localized in the cell wall and/or associated with cell wall biosynthesis, remodeling and other cell wall related processes. Examination of the proteins present in different flax organs/tissues provided a detailed overview of cell wall metabolism and highlighted the importance of hemicellulose and pectin remodeling in stem tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of proteins in the cell wall proteome revealed an important paralogy in the class IIIA xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) family associated with xyloglucan endo-hydrolase activity.Immunolocalisation, FT-IR microspectroscopy, and enzymatic fingerprinting indicated that flax fiber primary/S1 cell walls contained xyloglucans with typical substituted side chains as well as glucuronoxylans in much lower quantities. These results suggest a likely central role of xyloglucans and endotransglucosylase/hydrolase activity in flax fiber formation and cell wall remodeling processes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These intracellular bacteria establish infection by affecting cell function in both the vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Previous studies have characterized the tick transcriptome and proteome in response to A. phagocytophilum infection. However, in the postgenomic era, the integration of omics datasets through a systems biology approach allows network-based analyses to describe the complexity and functionality of biological systems such as host–pathogen interactions and the discovery of new targets for prevention and control of infectious diseases. This study reports the first systems biology integration of metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data to characterize essential metabolic pathways involved in the tick response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The ISE6 tick cells used in this study constitute a model for hemocytes involved in pathogen infection and immune response. The results showed that infection affected protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and glucose metabolic pathways in tick cells. These results supported tick–Anaplasma co-evolution by providing new evidence of how tick cells limit pathogen infection, while the pathogen benefits from the tick cell response to establish infection. Additionally, ticks benefit from A. phagocytophilum infection by increasing survival while pathogens guarantee transmission. The results suggested that A. phagocytophilum induces protein misfolding to limit the tick cell response and facilitate infection but requires protein degradation to prevent ER stress and cell apoptosis to survive in infected cells. Additionally, A. phagocytophilum may benefit from the tick cell's ability to limit bacterial infection through PEPCK inhibition leading to decreased glucose metabolism, which also results in the inhibition of cell apoptosis that increases infection of tick cells. These

  8. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-12-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These intracellular bacteria establish infection by affecting cell function in both the vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Previous studies have characterized the tick transcriptome and proteome in response to A. phagocytophilum infection. However, in the postgenomic era, the integration of omics datasets through a systems biology approach allows network-based analyses to describe the complexity and functionality of biological systems such as host-pathogen interactions and the discovery of new targets for prevention and control of infectious diseases. This study reports the first systems biology integration of metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data to characterize essential metabolic pathways involved in the tick response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The ISE6 tick cells used in this study constitute a model for hemocytes involved in pathogen infection and immune response. The results showed that infection affected protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and glucose metabolic pathways in tick cells. These results supported tick-Anaplasma co-evolution by providing new evidence of how tick cells limit pathogen infection, while the pathogen benefits from the tick cell response to establish infection. Additionally, ticks benefit from A. phagocytophilum infection by increasing survival while pathogens guarantee transmission. The results suggested that A. phagocytophilum induces protein misfolding to limit the tick cell response and facilitate infection but requires protein degradation to prevent ER stress and cell apoptosis to survive in infected cells. Additionally, A. phagocytophilum may benefit from the tick cell's ability to limit bacterial infection through PEPCK inhibition leading to decreased glucose metabolism, which also results in the inhibition of cell apoptosis that increases infection of tick cells. These results

  9. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of the matrix microenvironment in pluripotent stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Chris; Radan, Lida; Chang, Wing Y; Stanford, William L; Betts, Dean H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Lajoie, Gilles A

    2012-12-01

    The cellular microenvironment comprises soluble factors, support cells, and components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that combine to regulate cellular behavior. Pluripotent stem cells utilize interactions between support cells and soluble factors in the microenvironment to assist in the maintenance of self-renewal and the process of differentiation. However, the ECM also plays a significant role in shaping the behavior of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, it has recently been observed that deposited factors in a hESC-conditioned matrix have the potential to contribute to the reprogramming of metastatic melanoma cells. Therefore, the ECM component of the pluripotent stem cell microenvironment necessitates further analysis. In this study we first compared the self-renewal and differentiation properties of hESCs grown on Matrigel™ pre-conditioned by hESCs to those on unconditioned Matrigel™. We determined that culture on conditioned Matrigel™ prevents differentiation when supportive growth factors are removed from the culture medium. To investigate and identify factors potentially responsible for this beneficial effect, we performed a defined SILAC MS-based proteomics screen of hESC-conditioned Matrigel™. From this proteomics screen, we identified over 80 extracellular proteins in matrix conditioned by hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells. These included matrix-associated factors that participate in key stem cell pluripotency regulatory pathways, such as Nodal/Activin and canonical Wnt signaling. This work represents the first investigation of stem-cell-derived matrices from human pluripotent stem cells using a defined SILAC MS-based proteomics approach.

  10. Proteomics-based identification of plasma biomarkers in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Lin, Szu-Ting; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Hwan-Chung; Tung, Chung-Liang; Huang, Kao-Jean; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lee, Ying-Ray; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-03-05

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is an aggressive cancer and its occurrence is closely related to betel nut chewing in Taiwan. However, there are few prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers for this disease especially for its association with betel nut chewing. Recent progresses in quantitative proteomics have offered opportunities to discover plasma proteins as biomarkers for tracking the progression and for understanding the molecular mechanisms of OSCC. In present study, plasma samples from OSCC patients with at least 5-year history of betel nut chewing and healthy donors were analyzed by fluorescence 2D-DIGE-based proteomic analysis. Totally, 38 proteins have been firmly identified representing 13 unique gene products. These proteins mainly function in inflammatory responses (such as fibrinogen gamma chain) and transport (Apolipoprotein A-I). Additionally, the current quantitative proteomic approach has identified numerous OSCC biomarkers including fibrinogen (alpha/beta/gamma) chain, haptoglobin, leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein and ribosomal protein S6 kinase alpha-3 (RSK2) which have not been reported and may be associated with the progression and development of the disease. In summary, this study reports a comprehensive patient-based proteomic approach for the identification of potential plasma biomarkers in OSCC. The potential of utilizing these markers for screening and treating OSCC warrants further investigations.

  11. Technological advances for deciphering the complexity of psychiatric disorders: merging proteomics with cell biology.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Guest, Paul C; Lago, Santiago G; Bahn, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Proteomic studies have increased our understanding of the molecular pathways affected in psychiatric disorders. Mass spectrometry and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses of post-mortem brain samples from psychiatric patients have revealed effects on synaptic, cytoskeletal, antioxidant and mitochondrial protein networks. Multiplex immunoassay profiling studies have found alterations in hormones, growth factors, transport and inflammation-related proteins in serum and plasma from living first-onset patients. Despite these advances, there are still difficulties in translating these findings into platforms for improved treatment of patients and for discovery of new drugs with better efficacy and side effect profiles. This review describes how the next phase of proteomic investigations in psychiatry should include stringent replication studies for validation of biomarker candidates and functional follow-up studies which can be used to test the impact on physiological function. All biomarker candidates should now be tested in series with traditional and emerging cell biological approaches. This should include investigations of the effects of post-translational modifications, protein dynamics and network analyses using targeted proteomic approaches. Most importantly, there is still an urgent need for development of disease-relevant cellular models for improved translation of proteomic findings into a means of developing novel drug treatments for patients with these life-altering disorders.

  12. Reference proteome of highly purified human Th1 cells reveals strong effects on metabolism and protein ubiquitination upon differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Massimiliano; Rockstroh, Maxie; Schuster, Maj; Rossetti, Grazisa; Moro, Monica; Crosti, Mariacristina; Tomm, Janina M

    2015-11-01

    The differentiation of human CD4(+) T cells into T helper cell subtypes and regulatory T cells is crucial to the immune response. Among subtypes, Th1 cells are dominant, representing approximately 50% of all lymphocytes. Thus far, most global proteomic studies have used only partially purified T helper cell subpopulations and/or have employed artificial protocols for inducing specific T helper cell subtypes and/or used gel-based approaches. These studies have shed light on molecular details of certain aspects of the proteome; nevertheless a global analysis of high purity primary naïve and Th1 cells by LC-MS/MS is required to provide a reference dataset for proteome-based T cell subtype characterization. The utilization of highly purified Th1 cells for a global proteome assessment and the bioinformatic comparison to naïve cells reveals changes in cell metabolism and the ubiquitination pathway upon T cell differentiation. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001066 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001066). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  14. A proteomic study of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    Maia, Leandro; de Moraes, Carolina Nogueira; Dias, Marianne Camargos; Martinez, Julia Bauzá; Caballol, Antonia Odena; Testoni, Giorgia; de Queiroz, Carla Martins; Peña, Ramón Díaz; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda C; de Oliveira, Eliandre

    2017-09-15

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study describing the proteome of equine umbilical cord intervascular matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCIM-MSCs) in a global and functional manner. The aim of this work was to analyze the proteome of previously characterized UCIM-MSCs to determine protein abundance and classify the identified proteins according to Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Protein classification analysis according to biological process, molecular function and cellular component was performed using the PANTHER (Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships) Classification System, which revealed enrichment for 42 biological processes, 23 molecular functions and 18 cellular components. Protein abundance was estimated according to the emPAI method (Exponential Modified Protein Abundance Index). The two most abundant proteins in the proteome of UCIM-MSCs were the cytoskeletal proteins actin and vimentin, which have important roles in cell stability and motility. Additionally, we identified 14 cell surface antigens. Three of them, CD44, CD90 and CD105, had been previously validated by flow cytometry. In the present study, we also identified important information about the biological properties of UCIM-MSCs such as differentiation potential, low immunogenicity (low MHC-II expression) and chromosomal stability, which reinforces their use for cell therapy. Together with the proteomic findings, this information allowed us to infer the functional relevance of several activities related to primary metabolic processes, protein synthesis, production of vesicle coats, vesicle-mediated transport and antioxidant activity. In addition, the identification of different cell surface markers may help establish an immunophenotypic panel suitable for the characterization of MSCs from equine fetal membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Gho, Yong Song

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastatic derivatives (SW620). Using label-free quantitation, we identified 803 and 787 proteins in SW480 EVs and SW620 EVs, respectively. Based on comparison between the estimated abundance of EV proteins, we identified 368 SW480 EV-enriched and 359 SW620 EV-enriched proteins. SW480 EV-enriched proteins played a role in cell adhesion, but SW620 EV-enriched proteins were associated with cancer progression and functioned as diagnostic indicators of metastatic cancer; they were overexpressed in metastatic colorectal cancer and played roles in multidrug resistance. As the first proteomic analysis comparing primary and metastatic cancer-derived EVs, this study increases our understanding of the pathological function of EVs in the metastatic process and provides useful biomarkers for cancer metastasis.

  16. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  17. Investigating citrullinated proteins in tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of arginine into citrulline, termed citrullination, has important consequences for the structure and function of proteins. Studies have found PADI4, an enzyme performing citrullination, to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumours and have shown that PADI4 participates in the process of tumorigenesis. However, as citrullinated proteins have not been systematically investigated in tumours, the present study aimed to identify novel citrullinated proteins in tumours by 2-D western blotting (2-D WB). Methods Two identical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels were prepared using extracts from ECA, H292, HeLa, HEPG2, Lovo, MCF-7, PANC-1, SGC, and SKOV3 tumour cell lines. The expression profiles on a 2-DE gel were trans-blotted to PVDF membranes, and the blots were then probed with an anti-citrulline antibody. By comparing the 2-DE profile with the parallel 2-D WB profile at a global level, protein spots with immuno-signals were collected from the second 2-DE gel and identified using mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitation was used to verify the expression and citrullination of the targeted proteins in tumour cell lines. Results 2-D WB and mass spectrometry identified citrullinated α-enolase (ENO1), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), keratin 8 (KRT8), tubulin beta (TUBB), T cell receptor chain and vimentin in these cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses verified the expression and citrullination of ENO1, HSP60, KRT8, and TUBB in the total protein lysates of the tumour cell lines. Conclusions The citrullination of these proteins suggests a new mechanism in the tumorigenic process. PMID:24099319

  18. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated canine mast cell tumour cells identifies potentially kit signaling-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine mast cell tumour proliferation depends to a large extent on the activity of KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Inhibitors of the KIT tyrosine kinase have recently been introduced and successfully applied as a therapeutic agent for this tumour type. However, little is known on the downstream target genes of this signaling pathway and molecular changes after inhibition. Results Transcriptome analysis of the canine mast cell tumour cell line C2 treated for up to 72 hours with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor masitinib identified significant changes in the expression levels of approximately 3500 genes or 16% of the canine genome. Approximately 40% of these genes had increased mRNA expression levels including genes associated with the pro-proliferative pathways of B- and T-cell receptors, chemokine receptors, steroid hormone receptors and EPO-, RAS and MAP kinase signaling. Proteome analysis of C2 cells treated for 72 hours identified 24 proteins with changed expression levels, most of which being involved in gene transcription, e.g. EIA3, EIA4, TARDBP, protein folding, e.g. HSP90, UCHL3, PDIA3 and protection from oxidative stress, GSTT3, SELENBP1. Conclusions Transcriptome and proteome analysis of neoplastic canine mast cells treated with masitinib confirmed the strong important and complex role of KIT in these cells. Approximately 16% of the total canine genome and thus the majority of the active genes were significantly transcriptionally regulated. Most of these changes were associated with reduced proliferation and metabolism of treated cells. Interestingly, several pro-proliferative pathways were up-regulated, which may represent attempts of masitinib treated cells to activate alternative pro-proliferative pathways. These pathways may contain hypothetical targets for a combination therapy with masitinib to further improve its therapeutic effect. PMID:22747577

  19. Proteomics of loosely bound cell wall proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Jauneau, Alain; Boudart, Georges; Monsarrat, Bernard; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Boudet, Alain; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2003-10-01

    The complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allows the use of the recently developed mass spectrometry techniques to identify the cell wall proteins (CWPs). Most proteomic approaches depend on the quality of sample preparation. Extraction of CWPs is particularly complex since the proteins may be free in the apoplast or are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix where they are retained by Van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic or ionic interactions, or cross-linked by covalent bonds. Specific and sequential extraction procedures thus need to be developed. We report on the sequential extraction of loosely bound CWPs from living A. thaliana cells in culture. Different salts and chelating agents were used for releasing the proteins from the wall. Their effects on the extraction of CWPs and on the integrity of the plasma membrane were evaluated. Bioinformatic software was used to identify proteins and to predict their sub-cellular localization. The obtained data show that the plasma membrane of cells in culture was easily damaged by some steps of the extraction procedure, leading to the release of increasing amounts of intracellular proteins. Nevertheless, we identified fifty CWPs among which thirteen were new proteins for the cell wall. In addition, 76% of these CWPs were basic proteins not resolved in two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. The existence of two hypothetical proteins was confirmed. The structure of three proteins could be confirmed using mass spectrometry data.

  20. Proteome Changes during Transition from Human Embryonic to Vascular Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsolis, Konstantinos C; Bagli, Eleni; Kanaki, Katerina; Zografou, Sofia; Carpentier, Sebastien; Bei, Ekaterini S; Christoforidis, Savvas; Zervakis, Michalis; Murphy, Carol; Fotsis, Theodore; Economou, Anastassios

    2016-06-03

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are promising in regenerative medicine (RM) due to their differentiation plasticity and proliferation potential. However, a major challenge in RM is the generation of a vascular system to support nutrient flow to newly synthesized tissues. Here we refined an existing method to generate tight vessels by differentiating hESCs in CD34(+) vascular progenitor cells using chemically defined media and growth conditions. We selectively purified these cells from CD34(-) outgrowth populations also formed. To analyze these differentiation processes, we compared the proteomes of the hESCs with those of the CD34(+) and CD34(-) populations using high resolution mass spectrometry, label-free quantification, and multivariate analysis. Eighteen protein markers validate the differentiated phenotypes in immunological assays; nine of these were also detected by proteomics and show statistically significant differential abundance. Another 225 proteins show differential abundance between the three cell types. Sixty-three of these have known functions in CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells. CD34(+) cells synthesize proteins implicated in endothelial cell differentiation and smooth muscle formation, which support the bipotent phenotype of these progenitor cells. CD34(-) cells are more heterogeneous synthesizing muscular/osteogenic/chondrogenic/adipogenic lineage markers. The remaining >150 differentially abundant proteins in CD34(+) or CD34(-) cells raise testable hypotheses for future studies to probe vascular morphogenesis.

  1. Semi-quantitative proteomics of mammalian cells upon short-term exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Laffeber, Charlie; Eppink, Berina; Bezstarosti, Karel; Dekkers, Dick; Woelders, Henri; Zwamborn, A. Peter M.; Demmers, Jeroen; Lebbink, Joyce H. G.; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The potential effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), such as those emitted by power-lines (in extremely low frequency range), mobile cellular systems and wireless networking devices (in radio frequency range) on human health have been intensively researched and debated. However, how exposure to these EMFs may lead to biological changes underlying possible health effects is still unclear. To reveal EMF-induced molecular changes, unbiased experiments (without a priori focusing on specific biological processes) with sensitive readouts are required. We present the first proteome-wide semi-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of human fibroblasts, osteosarcomas and mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to three types of non-ionizing EMFs (ELF 50 Hz, UMTS 2.1 GHz and WiFi 5.8 GHz). We performed controlled in vitro EMF exposures of metabolically labeled mammalian cells followed by reliable statistical analyses of differential protein- and pathway-level regulations using an array of established bioinformatics methods. Our results indicate that less than 1% of the quantitated human or mouse proteome responds to the EMFs by small changes in protein abundance. Further network-based analysis of the differentially regulated proteins did not detect significantly perturbed cellular processes or pathways in human and mouse cells in response to ELF, UMTS or WiFi exposure. In conclusion, our extensive bioinformatics analyses of semi-quantitative mass spectrometry data do not support the notion that the short-time exposures to non-ionizing EMFs have a consistent biologically significant bearing on mammalian cells in culture. PMID:28234898

  2. Semi-quantitative proteomics of mammalian cells upon short-term exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kuzniar, Arnold; Laffeber, Charlie; Eppink, Berina; Bezstarosti, Karel; Dekkers, Dick; Woelders, Henri; Zwamborn, A Peter M; Demmers, Jeroen; Lebbink, Joyce H G; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The potential effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMFs), such as those emitted by power-lines (in extremely low frequency range), mobile cellular systems and wireless networking devices (in radio frequency range) on human health have been intensively researched and debated. However, how exposure to these EMFs may lead to biological changes underlying possible health effects is still unclear. To reveal EMF-induced molecular changes, unbiased experiments (without a priori focusing on specific biological processes) with sensitive readouts are required. We present the first proteome-wide semi-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of human fibroblasts, osteosarcomas and mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to three types of non-ionizing EMFs (ELF 50 Hz, UMTS 2.1 GHz and WiFi 5.8 GHz). We performed controlled in vitro EMF exposures of metabolically labeled mammalian cells