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Sample records for cell lines hct-116

  1. Inositol Pyrophosphate Profiling of Two HCT116 Cell Lines Uncovers Variation in InsP8 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunfang; Wilson, Miranda S. C.; Jessen, Henning J.; Saiardi, Adolfo; Shears, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    The HCT116 cell line, which has a pseudo-diploid karotype, is a popular model in the fields of cancer cell biology, intestinal immunity, and inflammation. In the current study, we describe two batches of diverged HCT116 cells, which we designate as HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL. Using both gel electrophoresis and HPLC, we show that HCT116UCL cells contain 6-fold higher levels of InsP8 than HCT116NIH cells. This observation is significant because InsP8 is one of a group of molecules collectively known as ‘inositol pyrophosphates’ (PP-InsPs)—highly ‘energetic’ and conserved regulators of cellular and organismal metabolism. Variability in the cellular levels of InsP8 within divergent HCT116 cell lines could have impacted the phenotypic data obtained in previous studies. This difference in InsP8 levels is more remarkable for being specific; levels of other inositol phosphates, and notably InsP6 and 5-InsP7, are very similar in both HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL lines. We also developed a new HPLC procedure to record 1-InsP7 levels directly (for the first time in any mammalian cell line); 1-InsP7 comprised <2% of total InsP7 in HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL lines. The elevated levels of InsP8 in the HCT116UCL lines were not due to an increase in expression of the PP-InsP kinases (IP6Ks and PPIP5Ks), nor to a decrease in the capacity to dephosphorylate InsP8. We discuss how the divergent PP-InsP profiles of the newly-designated HCT116NIH and HCT116UCL lines should be considered an important research opportunity: future studies using these two lines may uncover new features that regulate InsP8 turnover, and may also yield new directions for studying InsP8 function. PMID:27788189

  2. [Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Affects U0126-Induced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT116)].

    PubMed

    Ljujic, M; Mijatovic, S; Bulatovic, M Z; Mojic, M; Maksimovic-Ivanic, D; Radojkovic, D; Topic, A

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), an acute phase protein, is the principal circulatory anti-protease. This multifunctional protein is encoded by the SERPINA1 gene. Although AAT was recognised as a potential tumour marker, its role in cancer biology remains unknown. Given that it has been demonstrated that AAT has an anti-apoptotic property against non-malignant cells, we aimed to investigate whether AAT affects apoptosis in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116). The presence of AAT in the HCT116 cell culture antagonized cytotoxicity of blockers of MEK1/2, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as NF-κB. The dominantly recovered cell viability was observed in the co-treatment with MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. In addition, it was revealed that AAT almost completely abolished U0126-induced apoptosis through maintenance of the autophagy process. Our study revealed for the first time that the observed cyto-protection triggered by AAT was accompanied by sustained autophagy which opposed apoptosis. These results may contribute to understanding of the role of AAT in cancer development and evaluation of efficacy of cancer therapy.

  3. In situ Proteomic Profiling of Curcumin Targets in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Wong, Yin Kwan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    To date, the exact targets and mechanism of action of curcumin, a natural product with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties, remain elusive. Here we synthesized a cell permeable curcumin probe (Cur-P) with an alkyne moiety, which can be tagged with biotin for affinity enrichment, or with a fluorescent dye for visualization of the direct-binding protein targets of curcumin in situ. iTRAQTM quantitative proteomics approach was applied to distinguish the specific binding targets from the non-specific ones. In total, 197 proteins were confidently identified as curcumin binding targets from HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Gene Ontology analysis showed that the targets are broadly distributed and enriched in the nucleus, mitochondria and plasma membrane, and they are involved in various biological functions including metabolic process, regulation, response to stimulus and cellular process. Ingenuity Pathway AnalysisTM (IPA) suggested that curcumin may exert its anticancer effects over multiple critical biological pathways including the EIF2, eIF4/p70S6K, mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction pathways. Functional validations confirmed that curcumin downregulates cellular protein synthesis, and induces autophagy, lysosomal activation and increased ROS production, thus leading to cell death. PMID:26915414

  4. Changes in Subcellular Localization of Visfatin in Human Colorectal HCT-116 Carcinoma cell Line After Cytochalasin-B Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczna, M.; Bułdak, Ł; Matysiak, N.; Mielańczyk, Ł; Wyrobiec, G.; Kukla, M.; Michalski, M.; Żwirska-Korczala, K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the expression and subcellular localization of visfatin in HCT-116 colorectal carcinoma cells after cytokinesis failure using Cytochalasin B (CytB) and the mechanism of apoptosis of cells after CytB. We observed translocation of visfatin’s antigen in cytB treated colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells from cytosol to nucleus. Statistical and morphometric analysis revealed significantly higher area-related numerical density visfatin-bound nano-golds in the nuclei of cytB-treated HCT-116 cells compared to cytosol. Reverse relation to visfatin subcellular localization was observed in un-treated HCT-116 cells. The total amount of visfatin protein and visfatin mRNA level in HCT-116 cells was also decreased after CytB treatment. Additionally, CytB significantly decreased cell survival, increased levels of G2/M fractions, induced bi-nuclei formation as well as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in HCT-116 cells. CytB treatment showed cytotoxic effect that stem from oxidative stress and is connected with the changes in the cytoplasmic/nuclear amount of visfatin in HCT-116 cells. PMID:25308845

  5. Proliferative and Inhibitory Activity of Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) Extract on Cancer Cell Lines; A-549, XWLC-05, HCT-116, CNE and Beas-2b.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo; Yao, Qian; Dowell, Ashley; Leury, Brian; He, Xiao-Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is used primarily as an adaptogen herb and also for its immune stimulant properties in Western herbal medicine. Another closely related species used in East Asian medicine systems i.e. Kampo, TCM (Manchuria, Korea, Japan and Ainu of Hokkaido) and also called Siberian ginseng (Acanthopanax senticosus) also displays immune-stimulant and anti-cancer properties. These may affect tumour growth and also provide an anti-fatigue effect for cancer patients, in particular for those suffering from lung cancer. There is some evidence that a carbohydrate in Siberian ginseng may possess not only immune stimulatory but also anti-tumour effects and also display other various anti-cancer properties. Our study aimed to determine the inhibitory and also proliferative effects of a methanol plant extract of Siberan ginseng (E. senticosus) on various cancer and normal cell lines including: A-549 (small cell lung cancer), XWLC-05 (Yunnan lung cancer cell line), CNE (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line), HCT-116 (human colon cancer) and Beas-2b (human lung epithelial). These cell lines were treated with an extract from E. senticosus that was evaporated and re- constituted in DMSO. Treatment of A-549 (small cell lung cancer) cells with E. senticosus methanolic extract showed a concentration-dependent inhibitory trend from 12.5 - 50μg/mL, and then a plateau, whereas at 12.5 and 25 μg/mL, there is a slight growth suppression in QBC-939 cells, but then a steady suppression from 50, 100 and 200μg/mL. Further, in XWLC-05 (Yunnan lung cancer cell line), E. senticosus methanolic extract displayed an inhibitory effect which plateaued with increasing dosage. Next, in CNE (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line) there was a dose dependent proliferative response, whereas in Beas-2 (human lung epithelial cell line), an inhibitory effect. Finally in colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) we observed an initially weak inhibitory effect and then plateau

  6. Anti-cancer effects of 2-oxoquinoline derivatives on the HCT116 and LoVo human colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Feng-Qi; Guo, Hui-Shu; Zhang, Jie; Ban, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Wei; Yu, Pei-Yao

    2015-12-01

    The present study demonstrated the anti-tumor effects of the quinoline derivative [5-(3-chloro-oxo-4-phenyl-cyclobutyl)-quinoli-8-yl-oxy] acetic acid hydrazide (CQAH) against colorectal carcinoma. Substantial apoptotic effects of CQAH on HCT116 and LoVo human colon cancer cell lines were observed. Apoptosis was identified based on cell morphological characteristics, including cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation as well as Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis and detection of apoptosis-associated proteins by western blot analysis. CQAH induced caspase-3 and PARP cleavage, reduced the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins myeloid cell leukemia-1 and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl) extra large protein and elevated the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38, significantly reduced CQAH-mediated cell death as well as cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP. Co-treatment of CQAH with the commercial chemotherapeutics 5-fluorouracil and camptothecin-11 significantly improved their efficacies. Comparison of the apoptotic effects of CQAH with those of two illustrated structure-activity associations for this compound type, indicating that substitution at position-4 of the azetidine phenyl ring is pivotal for inducing apoptosis. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated CQAH and its analogues are potent candidate drugs for the treatment of colon carcinoma.

  7. Methylsulfonylmethane Induces p53 Independent Apoptosis in HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Asli; Ozkan, Tulin; Hekmatshoar, Yalda; Sunguroglu, Asuman; Aktan, Fugen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha

    2016-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organic sulfur-containing compound which has been used as a dietary supplement for osteoarthritis. MSM has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as exhibit apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects depending on the cell type or activating stimuli. However, there are still a lot of unknowns about the mechanisms of actions of MSM. In this study, MSM was tested on colon cancer cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that MSM inhibited cell viability and increased apoptotic markers in both HCT-116 p53 +/+ and HCT-116 p53 −/− colon cancer cells. Increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragmentation and caspase-3 activity by MSM also supported these findings. MSM also modulated the expression of various apoptosis-related genes and proteins. Moreover, MSM was found to increase c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation in both cell lines, dose-dependently. In conclusion, our results show for the first time that MSM induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells regardless of their p53 status. Since p53 is defective in >50% of tumors, the ability of MSM to induce apoptosis independently of p53 may offer an advantage in anti-tumor therapy. Moreover, the remarkable effect of MSM on Bim, an apoptotic protein, also suggests its potential use as a novel chemotherapeutic agent for Bim-targeted anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27428957

  8. Methylsulfonylmethane Induces p53 Independent Apoptosis in HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Asli; Ozkan, Tulin; Hekmatshoar, Yalda; Sunguroglu, Asuman; Aktan, Fugen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha

    2016-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organic sulfur-containing compound which has been used as a dietary supplement for osteoarthritis. MSM has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as exhibit apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects depending on the cell type or activating stimuli. However, there are still a lot of unknowns about the mechanisms of actions of MSM. In this study, MSM was tested on colon cancer cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that MSM inhibited cell viability and increased apoptotic markers in both HCT-116 p53 +/+ and HCT-116 p53 -/- colon cancer cells. Increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragmentation and caspase-3 activity by MSM also supported these findings. MSM also modulated the expression of various apoptosis-related genes and proteins. Moreover, MSM was found to increase c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation in both cell lines, dose-dependently. In conclusion, our results show for the first time that MSM induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells regardless of their p53 status. Since p53 is defective in >50% of tumors, the ability of MSM to induce apoptosis independently of p53 may offer an advantage in anti-tumor therapy. Moreover, the remarkable effect of MSM on Bim, an apoptotic protein, also suggests its potential use as a novel chemotherapeutic agent for Bim-targeted anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27428957

  9. Anticoagulant properties and cytotoxic effect against HCT116 human colon cell line of sulfated glycosaminoglycans isolated from the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) shell.

    PubMed

    Sayari, Nadhem; Balti, Rafik; Ben Mansour, Mohamed; Ben Amor, Ikram; Graiet, Imen; Gargouri, Jalel; Bougatef, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (SGNL) were extracted for the first time from Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) shell. The monosaccharide composition analysed by GC/MS revealed the presence of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. The analysis of SGNL with acetate cellulose electrophoresis in Zn-acetate revealed the presence of heparan sulfate (HS) and dermatan sulfate (DS). SGNL were evaluated for their anticoagulant activities using activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombine time (PT) tests. After 21h incubation, HCT116 cell proliferation was inhibited (p<0.05) between 39.7 and 54.8% at 1.5-7.5mg/mL of SGNL. SGNL don't show hemolytic activity towards bovine erythrocytes and no cytotoxicity against the normal lymphocytes. The antiproliferative efficacy of these lobster glycosaminoglycans were probably related with the higher sulfate content. SGNL demonstrated promising antiproliferative and anticoagulant potential, which may be used as a novel, effective and promising antithrombotic agent.

  10. Anticoagulant properties and cytotoxic effect against HCT116 human colon cell line of sulfated glycosaminoglycans isolated from the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) shell.

    PubMed

    Sayari, Nadhem; Balti, Rafik; Ben Mansour, Mohamed; Ben Amor, Ikram; Graiet, Imen; Gargouri, Jalel; Bougatef, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (SGNL) were extracted for the first time from Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) shell. The monosaccharide composition analysed by GC/MS revealed the presence of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. The analysis of SGNL with acetate cellulose electrophoresis in Zn-acetate revealed the presence of heparan sulfate (HS) and dermatan sulfate (DS). SGNL were evaluated for their anticoagulant activities using activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombine time (PT) tests. After 21h incubation, HCT116 cell proliferation was inhibited (p<0.05) between 39.7 and 54.8% at 1.5-7.5mg/mL of SGNL. SGNL don't show hemolytic activity towards bovine erythrocytes and no cytotoxicity against the normal lymphocytes. The antiproliferative efficacy of these lobster glycosaminoglycans were probably related with the higher sulfate content. SGNL demonstrated promising antiproliferative and anticoagulant potential, which may be used as a novel, effective and promising antithrombotic agent. PMID:27133072

  11. Isolation and characterization of alborixin from Streptomyces scabrisporus: A potent cytotoxic agent against human colon (HCT-116) cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aabid Manzoor; Wani, Abubakar; Qazi, Parvaiz H; Rehman, Shakeel-U; Mushtaq, Saleem; Ali, Shiekh Abid; Hussain, Aehtesham; Shah, Aiyatullah; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Makhdoomi, Ubaid Sharif; Hamid, Abid; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-08-25

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of an actinomycete strain, identified as Streptomyces scabrisporus isolated from soil of Kashmir Himalayas - India, exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines. The active fraction subjected to column chromatography led to the isolation of pharmacologically potent anticancer compound whose structure was established to be alborixin on the basis of spectral data analysis. The compound exhibited antiproliferative activity against panel of cell lines N2a, MCF-7, MiaPaca-2, PC-3, HCT-116, MDA-MB-231, HL-60 and A-549 cells with IC50 of 9.7, 15.4, 7.2, 8.1, 3.2, 9.7, 7.5 and 11.5 μM respectively. Alborixin displayed the maximum cytotoxic activity against HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cells and therefore further studies were carried on this cell line. Alborixin decreased the clonogenic potential of HCT-116 cells in a dose dependent manner. It induced apoptotic cell death in HCT116 cells that were confirmed by Flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V/PI staining and microscopic examination of cellular morphology through DAPI-stained cells. Biochemical evidence of apoptosis came from elevating the intracellular ROS level that was accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, decreasing the expression profile of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, whereas it augments cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP-1, activates caspase-8 and 9 with concomitant increase in expression of proapoptotic protein Bax in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that alborixin obtained from Streptomyces scabrisporus IIIM55 induces apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells HCT-116 and can be further evaluated for its potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:27378626

  12. Cell specific apoptosis by RLX is mediated by NFκB in human colon carcinoma HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to chemotherapy represents a major obstacle in correcting colorectal carcinomas (CRC). Inspite of recent advances in the treatment of metastatic disease, the prognosis of the patients remains poor. RLX, a vasicinone analogue has been reported to possess potent bronchodilator, anti-asthmatic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its anti-cancer activity is unknown. Results Here, we report for the first time that RLX has anti-cancer property against panel of human cancer cell lines and most potent activity was found against HCT-116 cells with IC50 value of 12 μM and have further investigated the involvement of NFκB and caspase-3 in RLX action in CRC apoptosis. Following RLX and BEZ-235 treatment in HCT-116, we observed significant down-regulation of NFκB (1 to 0.1 fold) and up-regulation of caspase-3 (1 to 2 fold) protein expressions. Additionally, morphological studies revealed membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and finally apoptosis in HCT-116 cells. Conclusions Overall, these findings indicate that RLX is a potent small molecule which triggers apoptosis, and promising potential candidate to be a chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:25303828

  13. Herbal Formulation C168 Attenuates Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells: Role of Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Lek Mun; Chan, Kok Meng; Hamid, Asmah; Latip, Jalifah; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal formulations has gained scientific interest, particularly in cancer treatment. In this study, the herbal formulation of interest, denoted as C168, is a mixture of eight genera of plants. This study aims to investigate the antiproliferative effect of C168 methanol extract (CME) on various cancer cells and its underlying mechanism of action on the most responsive cell line, namely, HCT 116 cells. CME exerted antiproliferative activities on HCT 116 colorectal carcinoma cells and HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells but not on CCD-841-CoN normal colon epithelial cells, Jurkat E6.1 lymphoblastic leukemic cells, and V79-4 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Further investigation on HCT 116 cells showed that CME induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Treatment of CME induced oxidative stress in HCT 116 cells by increasing the superoxide anion level and decreasing the intracellular glutathione. CME also increased tail moment value and H2AX phosphorylation in HCT 116 cells, suggesting DNA damage as an early signal of CME induced apoptosis. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in CME-treated cells also indicated the involvement of mitochondria in CME induced apoptosis. This study indicated the selectivity of CME toward colon cancer cells with the involvement of oxidative damage as its possible mechanism of action. PMID:26884792

  14. p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} deficiency induces mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ae Jeong; Jee, Hye Jin; Song, Naree; Kim, Minjee; Jeong, Seon-Young; Yun, Jeanho

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells exhibited an increase in mitochondrial mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression levels of PGC-1{alpha} and AMPK were upregulated in p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proliferation of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells in galactose medium was significantly impaired. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21 may play a role in maintaining proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function. -- Abstract: p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression. However, the role of p21 in mitochondrial function remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of p21 deficiency on mitochondrial function in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. We found that there was a significant increase in the mitochondrial mass of p21{sup -/-} HCT116 cells, as measured by 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange staining, as well as an increase in the mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, p53{sup -/-} cells had a mitochondrial mass comparable to that of wild-type HCT116 cells. In addition, the expression levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis regulators PGC-1{alpha} and TFAM and AMPK activity were also elevated in p21{sup -/-} cells, indicating that p21 deficiency induces the rate of mitochondrial biogenesis through the AMPK-PGC-1{alpha} axis. However, the increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in p21{sup -/-} cells did not accompany an increase in the cellular steady-state level of ATP. Furthermore, p21{sup -/-} cells exhibited significant proliferation impairment in galactose medium, suggesting that p21 deficiency induces a defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain in HCT116 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of p21 results in an aberrant increase in the mitochondrial mass and in mitochondrial dysfunction in HCT116 cells, indicating that p21 is required to maintain proper mitochondrial mass and respiratory function.

  15. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit D inhibits proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Zheng, Bo'an; Chai, Rui

    2014-12-12

    Dysregulation of protein synthesis is emerging as a major contributory factor in cancer development. eIF3D (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit D) is one member of the eIF3 (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3) family, which is essential for initiation of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. Acquaintance with eIF3D is little since it has been identified as a dispensable subunit of eIF3 complex. Recently, eIF3D was found to embed somatic mutations in human colorectal cancers, indicating its importance for tumour progression. To further probe into its action in colon cancer, we utilized lentivirus-mediated RNA interference to knock down eIF3D expression in one colon cancer cell line HCT116. Knockdown of eIF3D in HCT116 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that depletion of eIF3D led to cell-cycle arrest in the G2/M phase, and induced an excess accumulation of HCT116 cells in the sub-G1 phase representing apoptotic cells. Signalling pathways responsible for cell growth and apoptosis have also been found altered after eIF3D silencing, such as AMPKα (AMP-activated protein kinase alpha), Bad, PRAS40 [proline-rich Akt (PKB) substrate of 40 kDa], SAPK (stress-activated protein kinase)/JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase), GSK3β and PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase]. Taken together, these findings suggest that eIF3D might play an important role in colon cancer progression.

  16. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05) and maximal (50%, p<0.05) OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  17. Columbianadin Inhibits Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Necroptosis in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji In; Hong, Ji-Young; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-05-01

    Columbianadin (CBN), a natural coumarin from Angelica decursiva (Umbelliferae), is known to have various biological activities including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In this study, the anti-proliferative mechanism of actions mediated by CBN was investigated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. CBN effectively suppressed the growth of colon cancer cells. Low concentration (up to 25 µM) of CBN induced apoptosis, and high concentration (50 µM) of CBN induced necroptosis. The induction of apoptosis by CBN was correlated with the modulation of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, Bim and Bid, and the induction of necroptosis was related with RIP-3, and caspase-8. In addition, CBN induced the accumulation of ROS and imbalance in the intracellular antioxidant enzymes such as SOD-1, SOD-2, catalase and GPx-1. These findings demonstrate that CBN has the potential to be a candidate in the development of anti-cancer agent derived from natural products.

  18. Induction of autophagy by dimethyl cardamonin is associated with proliferative arrest in human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 and LOVO cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Young-Joo; Amor, Evangeline C; Lee, Jong Wha; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Hee Ju; Yang, Hyun Ok

    2011-09-01

    Dimethyl cardamonin (2',4'-dihydroxy-6'-methoxy-3',5'-dimethylchalcone; DMC) is a naturally occurring chalcone, and it is the major compound isolated from the leaves of Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry (Myrtaceae). Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of DMC on cell proliferation, cell-cycle distribution, and programmed cell death in cultures of human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 and LOVO cells. Results showed that DMC inhibited HCT116 and LOVO cell proliferation and induced G(2) /M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the conversion of microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-I-LC3-II, an autophagosome marker, and the incorporation of monodansylcadaverine (MDC), a marker for the acidic compartment of autolysosomes or acidic vesicular organelles. The treatment of HCT116 and LOVO cells using a combination of DMC with an autophagy inhibitor, such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA), beclin 1 siRNA, or atg5 siRNA, suppressed the effect of DMC-mediated anti-proliferation. These results imply that DMC can suppress colorectal carcinoma HCT116 and LOVO cell proliferation through a G(2) /M phase cell-cycle delay, and can induce autophagy, the hallmark of Type II programmed cell death (PCD). Taken together, our results suggest that DMC may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for HCT116 and LOVO colorectal carcinoma cells.

  19. Crocin, the main active saffron constituent, mitigates dichlorvos-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Intidhar; Boussabbeh, Manel; Kantaoui, Hiba; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-08-01

    The protective effects of Crocin (CRO), a carotenoid with wide spectrum of pharmacological effects, against the cytotoxicity and the apoptosis produced by exposure to Dichlorvos (DDVP) in HCT116 cells were investigated in this work. The cytotoxicity was monitored by cell viability, ROS generation, antioxidant enzymes activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) production and DNA fragmentation. The apoptosis was assessed through the measurement of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and caspases activation. The results indicated that pretreatment of HCT116 cells with CRO, 2h prior to DDVP exposure, significantly increased the survival of cells, inhibited the ROS generation, modulated the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced the MDA level. The reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation and caspases activation were also inhibited by CRO. These findings suggest that CRO can protect HCT116 cells from DDVP-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:27470340

  20. Columbianadin Inhibits Cell Proliferation by Inducing Apoptosis and Necroptosis in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji In; Hong, Ji-Young; Choi, Jae Sue; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Columbianadin (CBN), a natural coumarin from Angelica decursiva (Umbelliferae), is known to have various biological activities including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In this study, the anti-proliferative mechanism of actions mediated by CBN was investigated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. CBN effectively suppressed the growth of colon cancer cells. Low concentration (up to 25 μM) of CBN induced apoptosis, and high concentration (50 μM) of CBN induced necroptosis. The induction of apoptosis by CBN was correlated with the modulation of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, Bim and Bid, and the induction of necroptosis was related with RIP-3, and caspase-8. In addition, CBN induced the accumulation of ROS and imbalance in the intracellular antioxidant enzymes such as SOD-1, SOD-2, catalase and GPx-1. These findings demonstrate that CBN has the potential to be a candidate in the development of anti-cancer agent derived from natural products. PMID:27098859

  1. Antimicrobial peptide FF/CAP18 induces apoptotic cell death in HCT116 colon cancer cells via changes in the metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kengo; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Isogai, Hiroshi; Okumura, Kazuhiko; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Isogai, Emiko

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is one of the hallmarks of cancer and can be targeted by therapeutic agents. We previously reported that cathelicidin-related or modified antimicrobial peptides, such as FF/CAP18, have antiproliferative effects on the squamous cell carcinoma cell line SAS-H1, and the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116. Although antimicrobial peptides have potential use in the development of new therapeutic strategies, their effects on the metabolism of cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we investigated changes in the levels of metabolites in HCT116 cells caused by FF/CAP18, via capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). Analysis of the 177 intracellular metabolites and 113 metabolites in conditioned medium that were detected by CE-TOFMS, revealed dramatic changes in the metabolic profile of HCT116 cells after treatment with FF/CAP18. The metabolic profile showed that the levels of most metabolites in the major metabolic pathways supported the rapid proliferation of cancer cells. Purine metabolism, glycolysis, and the TCA cycle, were altered in FF/CAP18-treated cells in a dose-dependent manner. Our present study provides mechanistic insights into the anticancer effects of antimicrobial peptides that show great potential as new therapies for colon cancer.

  2. Stereospecific ligands and their complexes. Part XII. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro antiproliferative activity of platinum(IV) complexes with some O,O‧-dialkyl esters of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N‧-di-2-propanoic acid against colon cancer (HCT-116) and breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojković, Danijela Lj.; Jevtić, Verica V.; Radić, Gordana P.; Đačić, Dragana S.; Ćurčić, Milena G.; Marković, Snežana D.; Ðinović, Vesna M.; Petrović, Vladimir P.; Trifunović, Srećko R.

    2014-03-01

    Synthesis of three new platinum(IV) complexes C1-C3, with bidentate N,N‧-ligand precursors, O,O‧-dialkyl esters (alkyl = propyl, butyl and pentyl), of (S,S)-ethylenediamine-N,N‧-di-2-propanoic acid, H2-S,S-eddp were reported. The reported platinum(IV) complexes characterized by elemental analysis and their structures were discussed on the bases of their infrared, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. In vitro antiproliferative activity was determined on tumor cell lines: human colon carcinoma HCT-116 and human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231, using MTT test.

  3. Piper betle leaf extract enhances the cytotoxicity effect of 5-fluorouracil in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 colon cancer cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Pek Leng; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Then, Sue Mian; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Pin, Kar Yong; Looi, Mee Lee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The combination effect of Piper betle (PB) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in enhancing the cytotoxic potential of 5-FU in inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells was investigated. Methods: HT29 and HCT116 cells were subjected to 5-FU or PB treatment. 5-FU and PB were then combined and their effects on both cell lines were observed after 24 h of treatment. PB-5-FU interaction was elucidated by isobologram analysis. Apoptosis features of the treated cells were revealed by annexin V/PI stain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed to exclude any possible chemical interaction between the compounds. Results: In the presence of PB extract, the cytotoxicity of 5-FU was observed at a lower dose (IC50 12.5 μmol/L) and a shorter time (24 h) in both cell lines. Both cell lines treated with 5-FU or PB alone induced a greater apoptosis effect compared with the combination treatment. Isobologram analysis indicated that PB and 5-FU interacted synergistically and antagonistically in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 cells, respectively. Conclusions: In the presence of PB, a lower dosage of 5-FU is required to achieve the maximum drug effect in inhibiting the growth of HT29 cells. However, PB did not significantly reduce 5-FU dosage in HCT116 cells. Our result showed that this interaction may not solely contribute to the apoptosis pathway. PMID:25091987

  4. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide derived from marine peroxy sesquiterpenoids induces apoptosis in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Haruna; Taira, Junsei; Ueda, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the isolates of the peroxy sesquiterpenoids (1-3) from the Okinawan soft coral, Sinularia sp., indicated cytotoxicity in HCT116 colon cancer cells. The apoptotic cells with a nuclear condensation were detected in the presence of these compounds, then the caspase 3/7 activity was induced, indicating that the compounds have a potential antitumor activity by apoptosis-induction. The cells treated with these compounds were generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), indicating that the ROS is related to the induction of apoptosis. The ROS production reduced in the presence of catalase or trolox, indicating that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is generated through a certain free radical reaction derived from the compound. In fact, the accumulation of intracellular H2O2 was also confirmed in the presence of these compounds. Based on all the results, this study proposed the apoptosis-inducing mechanism due to the compounds that the H2O2 produced involving free radical reactions derived from cleavage of the end or hydro-peroxide in the molecule induced cell death. PMID:27575468

  7. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Jeong, Yongsu; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  8. RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Shenghua; He, Hongwei; Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Yi; Yu, Dongke; Chen, Jianhua; Shao, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of currently used anti-cancer genotoxins, one of the current efforts is to find agents that can sensitize cancer cells to genotoxins so that the efficacious doses of genotoxins can be lowered to reduce deleterious side-effects. In this study, we reported that a synthetic RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 could enhance the effect of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (CDDP) in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. Our results showed that GAP159 significantly increased the CDDP-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells. This synergistic effect was associated with the inhibitions of phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK and NF-κB. In mouse colon tumor CT26 animal models, GAP159 combined with CDDP significantly suppressed CT26 tumor growth, and GAP159 alone showed slight inhibitory effect. Our data suggests that co-treatment of GAP159 and chemotherapeutics will become a potential therapeutic strategy for colon cancers. PMID:26579374

  9. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  10. Gene Expression Analysis of HCT116 Colon Tumor-derived Cells Treated with the Polyamine Analog PG-11047

    PubMed Central

    IGNATENKO, NATALIA A.; YERUSHALMI, HAGIT F.; PANDEY, RITU; KACHEL, KAREN L.; STRINGER, DAVID E.; MARTON, LAURENCE J.; GERNER, EUGENE W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The conformationally restricted polyamine analog PG-11047 has significant growth inhibitory activity against prostate and lung cancer cell lines and is currently under evaluation in several clinical trials, both alone and in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of relapsed or refractory cancer. The objective of this study was to identify the molecular signature of genes responsive to PG-11047 treatment and the biochemical effects of this drug in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Materials and Methods Gene expression analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip human genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Changes in protein expression were evaluated using 2D polyacrylamide gels followed by LCMS/MS. Results Treatment of cells with PG-11047 at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 μM caused inhibition of cell growth. The activity of PG-11047 was found to correlate with its transcriptional effects on cell cycle control, focal adhesion, adherent and gap junction genes, MAPK-, Wnt- and, TGF-β signaling pathways, transport and DNA/RNA transcription factor genes. PG-11047 caused depletion of polyamine pools. Proteomics analysis showed that PG-11047 restricts the modification of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A), resulting in suppression of general protein synthesis in PG-11047-treated cells. Conclusion These data show that PG-11047 has a broad spectrum of anticancer activity in colon cancer cells. PMID:19487545

  11. Selected novel 5'-amino-2'-hydroxy-1, 3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones arrest cell cycle of HCT-116 in G0/G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Simon, Lalitha; Srinivasan, K K; Kumar, Nitesh; Reddy, Neetinkumar D; Biswas, Subhankar; Rao, C Mallikarjuna; Moorkoth, Sudheer

    2016-01-01

    A series of 5'-amino-2'-hydroxy-1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones (AC1-AC15) were synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation of 5'-acetamido-2'-hydroxy acetophenone with various substituted aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized compounds were characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry and evaluated for their selective cytotoxicity using MTT assay on two cancer cell lines namely breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) and one normal kidney epithelial cell line (Vero). Among the tested compounds, AC-10 showed maximum cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell line with IC50 value 74.7 ± 3.5 µM. On HCT-116 cells, AC-13 exhibited maximum cytotoxicity with IC50 value 42.1 ± 4.0 µM followed by AC-14 and AC-10 with IC50 values 62 ± 2.3 µM and 95.4 ± 1.7 µM respectively. All tested compounds were found to be safe on Vero cell line with IC50 value more than 200 µM. Based on their highest efficacy on HCT-116, AC-10, AC-13 and AC-14 were selected for mechanistic study on this cell line by evaluating changes nucleomorphological characteristics using acridine orange-ethidium bromide (AOEB) dual stain and by analyzing cell cycle with flow cytometry using propidium iodide stain. In AOEB staining, all three tested compounds showed significant (p < 0.05) increase in percentage apoptotic nuclei compared to control cells, with highest increase in apoptotic nuclei by AC-13 treatment (31 %). Flow cytometric studies showed cell cycle arrest by AC-10 and AC-14 treatment in G0/G1 phase and by AC-13 in G0/G1 and G2/M phase. The study reflected the potential of AC-10, AC-13 and AC-14 to be the lead molecules for further optimization. PMID:27152112

  12. Selected novel 5'-amino-2'-hydroxy-1, 3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones arrest cell cycle of HCT-116 in G0/G1 phase

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Lalitha; Srinivasan, K. K.; Kumar, Nitesh; Reddy, Neetinkumar D.; Biswas, Subhankar; Rao, C. Mallikarjuna; Moorkoth, Sudheer

    2016-01-01

    A series of 5'-amino-2'-hydroxy-1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones (AC1-AC15) were synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation of 5'-acetamido-2'-hydroxy acetophenone with various substituted aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized compounds were characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry and evaluated for their selective cytotoxicity using MTT assay on two cancer cell lines namely breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) and one normal kidney epithelial cell line (Vero). Among the tested compounds, AC-10 showed maximum cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell line with IC50 value 74.7 ± 3.5 µM. On HCT-116 cells, AC-13 exhibited maximum cytotoxicity with IC50 value 42.1 ± 4.0 µM followed by AC-14 and AC-10 with IC50 values 62 ± 2.3 µM and 95.4 ± 1.7 µM respectively. All tested compounds were found to be safe on Vero cell line with IC50 value more than 200 µM. Based on their highest efficacy on HCT-116, AC-10, AC-13 and AC-14 were selected for mechanistic study on this cell line by evaluating changes nucleomorphological characteristics using acridine orange-ethidium bromide (AOEB) dual stain and by analyzing cell cycle with flow cytometry using propidium iodide stain. In AOEB staining, all three tested compounds showed significant (p < 0.05) increase in percentage apoptotic nuclei compared to control cells, with highest increase in apoptotic nuclei by AC-13 treatment (31 %). Flow cytometric studies showed cell cycle arrest by AC-10 and AC-14 treatment in G0/G1 phase and by AC-13 in G0/G1 and G2/M phase. The study reflected the potential of AC-10, AC-13 and AC-14 to be the lead molecules for further optimization. PMID:27152112

  13. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  14. Flavokawain C Inhibits Cell Cycle and Promotes Apoptosis, Associated with Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulation of MAPKs and Akt Signaling Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colon Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Chung-Weng; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sethi, Gautam; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2016-01-01

    Flavokawain C (FKC) is a naturally occurring chalcone which can be found in Kava (Piper methysticum Forst) root. The present study evaluated the effect of FKC on the growth of various human cancer cell lines and the underlying associated mechanisms. FKC showed higher cytotoxic activity against HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in comparison to other cell lines (MCF-7, HT-29, A549 and CaSki), with minimal toxicity on normal human colon cells. The apoptosis-inducing capability of FKC on HCT 116 cells was evidenced by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and increased phosphatidylserine externalization. FKC was found to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of Smac/DIABLO, AIF and cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. Our results also revealed that FKC induced intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis via upregulation of the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bak) and death receptors (DR5), while downregulation of the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP-1, c-FlipL, Bcl-xL and survivin), resulting in the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). FKC was also found to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as suggested by the elevation of GADD153 protein after FKC treatment. After the cells were exposed to FKC (60μM) over 18hrs, there was a substantial increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was also reduced. FKC also caused cell cycle arrest in the S phase in HCT 116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and with accumulation of cells in the sub-G1 phase. This was accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2 and CDK4), consistent with the upregulation of CDK inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1), and hypophosphorylation of Rb. PMID:26859847

  15. Antiproliferative activity of O4-benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids against HCT-116 and HL-60 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Noriyuki; Fujita, Erina; Shigenobu, Saori; Shimoyama, Sayumi; Ishihara, Yuhsuke; Kurata, Yuhki; Choshi, Tominari; Nishiyama, Takashi; Okada, Chiaki; Hibino, Satoshi

    2015-07-15

    The O4-benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids exhibit potent antiproliferative activity against cancer cells, which is derived from their ability to inhibit of topoisomerase I and II. It has been reported that in the alkaloids a cationic quaternary ammonium atom, which results in resonance effects between ring A and B, is necessary for increased antiproliferative activity. These findings indicate the role of their substituents at ring A on inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. In the present study, we systematically assessed the cytotoxic activities of naturally occurring alkaloids and their derivatives containing various ring A substituents against two tumor cell lines, HCT-116 colon tumor cells and HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. Among the cationic iminium alkaloids, which displayed more potent activity than the corresponding neutral derivatives, and the 7,8-oxygenated benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids, chelerythrine and NK109, exhibited stronger antiproliferative activity than the 8,9- and 9,10-oxygenated alkaloids. The activity of cationic iminium alkaloids could be correlated with the bond lengths of their ring A substituents and the electrostatic potentials of their ammonium molecules by DFT calculation.

  16. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K. P

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer. PMID:26927179

  17. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-02-26

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer.

  18. The H1047R point mutation in p110 alpha changes the morphology of human colon HCT116 cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, G; Pehlke, C; Pepermans, R; Cannon, JL; Lidke, D; Rajput, A

    2015-01-01

    The class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) is involved in controlling changes in cell morphology, which is a highly coordinated cellular event. This event is powered by actin filament polymerization and remodeling. The gain-of-function mutations in the catalytic subunit of p110α of class IA PI3K, which occur in up to one-third of human colorectal cancers (CRCs), are capable of causing dysregulation of cell signaling and thus may result in the alteration in cell morphology and motility and in turn cause cancer metastasis. In vivo studies have demonstrated that cell lines bearing the H1047R point mutation, the most frequent cancer-specific mutation in the kinase domain of p110α, are more metastatic than cells carrying wild-type p110α. In the current study, we show that the H1047R in p110α of PI3K decreases F-actin polymerization, increases the formation of filopodia and significantly changes the cell morphology in HCT116 cancer cells. The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), which is also involved in actin polymerization and cell migration, is downregulated by the H1047R mutation in p110α. Our data suggest that the H1047R mutation in PI3K is responsible for the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, alteration in cell morphology and enhancing cell motility, and that Bcl-2 may be involved in the H1047R mutation-mediated morphological changes and increased migratory capability. PMID:27551473

  19. Preclinical study of treatment response in HCT-116 cells and xenografts with (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS.

    PubMed

    Darpolor, Moses M; Kennealey, Peter T; Le, H Carl; Zakian, Kristen L; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Rizwan, Asif; Chen, Jin-Hong; Sambol, Elliot B; Schwartz, Gary K; Singer, Samuel; Koutcher, Jason A

    2011-11-01

    The topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan, and its active metabolite SN-38 have been shown to induce G(2) /M cell cycle arrest without significant cell death in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). Subsequent treatment of these G(2) /M-arrested cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, induced these cells to undergo apoptosis. The goal of this study was to develop a noninvasive metabolic biomarker for early tumor response and target inhibition of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol treatment in a longitudinal study. A total of eleven mice bearing HCT-116 xenografts were separated into two cohorts where one cohort was administered saline and the other treated with a sequential course of irinotecan followed by flavopiridol. Each mouse xenograft was longitudinally monitored with proton ((1) H)-decoupled phosphorus ((31) P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) before and after treatment. A statistically significant decrease in phosphocholine (p = 0.0004) and inorganic phosphate (p = 0.0103) levels were observed in HCT-116 xenografts following treatment, which were evidenced within twenty-four hours of treatment completion. Also, a significant growth delay was found in treated xenografts. To discern the underlying mechanism for the treatment response of the xenografts, in vitro HCT-116 cell cultures were investigated with enzymatic assays, cell cycle analysis, and apoptotic assays. Flavopiridol had a direct effect on choline kinase as measured by a 67% reduction in the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine. Cells treated with SN-38 alone underwent 83 ± 5% G(2) /M cell cycle arrest compared to untreated cells. In cells, flavopiridol alone induced 5 ± 1% apoptosis while the sequential treatment (SN-38 then flavopiridol) resulted in 39 ± 10% apoptosis. In vivo (1) H-decoupled (31) P MRS indirectly measures choline kinase activity. The decrease in phosphocholine may be a potential indicator of early tumor response to

  20. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Trujillo, Olivia N; Moyer, Mary P; Botnen, James H

    2011-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring chemopreventive agent; the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon cancer and normal cells. In this study, we demonstrated that SFN (15 μmol/L) exposure (72 h) inhibited cell proliferation by up to 95% in colon cancer cells (HCT116) and by 52% in normal colon mucosa-derived (NCM460) cells. Our data also showed that SFN exposure (5 and 10 μmol/L) led to the reduction of G1 phase cell distribution and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116 cells, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 cells. Furthermore, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling status revealed that SFN upregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in NCM460 cells but not in HCT116 cells. In contrast, SFN enhanced the phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and decreased cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) expression in HCT116 cells but not NCM460 cells. Taken together, the activation of survival signaling in NCM460 cells and apoptotic signaling in HCT116 cells may play a critical role in SFN's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation in colon cancer cells than in normal colon cells.

  1. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases. PMID:26945724

  2. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases.

  3. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays common and different roles in cancerous colon HCT116 cell and noncancerous NCM460 colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Briske-Anderson, Mary; Wu, Min; Moyer, Mary P

    2012-01-01

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer action, and differential chemopreventive effects of methylselenol on cancerous and noncancerous cells may play an important role. In this study, the submicromolar concentrations of methylselenol were generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to methylselenol. Methylselenol exposure inhibited cell growth and led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in S-phase and an induction of apoptosis in HCT116, but to a much lesser extent in NCM460 colon cells. Similarly, the examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-Myc) signaling status revealed that methylselenol inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the expression of c-Myc in HCT116 cells, but also to a lesser extent in NCM460 cells. The other finding is that methylselenol inhibits sarcoma kinase phosphorylation in HCT116 cells. In contrast, methylselenol upregulated the phosphorylation of sarcoma and focal adhesion kinase survival signals in the noncancerous NCM460 cells. Collectively, methylselenol's stronger potential of inhibiting cell proliferation/survival signals in the cancerous HCT116 cells when compared with that in noncancerous NCM460 cells may partly explain the potential of methylselenol's anticancer action.

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 is overexpressed in colonic adenocarcinomas and promotes migration and invasion of HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Haiyun; Makizumi, Ryouji; Ravikumar, T.S.; Dong Huali; Yang Wancai; Yang, W.-L. . E-mail: wlyang@nshs.edu

    2007-03-10

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), a member of the TGF-{beta} superfamily, is involved in development, morphogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Dysregulation of BMP signaling has been suggested in tumorigenesis. In an analysis of human colon normal mucosa and tumors at different stages by immunohistochemistry, we observed that the intensity of BMP-4 staining in late-adenocarcinomas was stronger than that in normal mucosa and adenomas, while there was no difference in the staining of its receptors (BMPR-IA and BMPR-II) at all stages. The up-regulation of BMP-4 was further validated in another panel of tumor tissues by real-time RT-PCR, showing that BMP-4 mRNA levels in primary colonic carcinomas with liver metastasis were significantly higher than that in the matched normal mucosa. In order to understand the functional relevance of BMP-4 expression in colon cancer progression, BMP-4-overexpressing cell clones were generated from HCT116 cells. Overexpression of BMP-4 did not affect the HCT116 cell growth. The cells overexpressing BMP-4 became resistant to serum-starvation-induced apoptosis and exhibited enhanced migration and invasion characteristics. Overexpression of BMP-4 changed cell morphology to invasive spindle phenotype and induced the expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). These results indicate that BMP-4 confers invasive phenotype during progression of colon cancer.

  5. Phytochemical investigation of Gynura bicolor leaves and cytotoxicity evaluation of the chemical constituents against HCT 116 cells.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Wuen Yew; Tan, Hooi Poay; Ling, Sui Kiong; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Sim, Kae Shin

    2016-01-01

    Gynura bicolor (Compositae) is a popular vegetable in Asia and believed to confer a wide range of benefits including anti-cancer. Our previous findings showed that the ethyl acetate extract of G. bicolor possessed cytotoxicity and induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death in human colon carcinoma cells (HCT 116). A combination of column chromatography had been used to purify chemical constituents from the ethyl acetate and water extract of G. bicolor leaves. Eight chemical constituents 5-p-trans-coumaroylquinic acid (I), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (II), rutin (III), kampferol-3-O-rutinoside (IV), 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (V), kampferol-3-O-glucoside (VI), guanosine (VII) and chlorogenic acid (VIII) were isolated from G. bicolor grown in Malaysia. To our best knowledge, all chemical constituents were isolated for the first time from G. bicolor leaves except rutin (III). 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (V), guanosine (VII) and chlorogenic acid (VIII) demonstrated selective cytotoxicity (selective index>3) against HCT 116 cancer cells compared to CCD-18Co human normal colon cells. PMID:25738869

  6. Synergistic inhibition of the APC/C by the removal of APC15 in HCT116 cells lacking UBE2C

    PubMed Central

    Garvanska, Dimitriya H.; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in response to unattached kinetochores by generating a diffusible inhibitor termed the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). At metaphase, rapid activation of the APC/C requires removal of the MCC, a process that has been shown to depend on the APC/C E2 enzymes, UBE2C and UBE2S. Here we investigate the in vivo role of the APC/C E2 enzymes in SAC silencing using CRISPR/Cas9 genetically engineered HCT116 UBE2C or UBE2S null cell lines. Using live cell assays, we show that UBE2C and UBE2S make a minor contribution to SAC silencing in HCT116 cells. Strikingly, in cells specifically lacking UBE2C, we observe a strong synergistic inhibition of mitotic progression when we stabilize the MCC on the APC/C by depleting APC15, potentially reflecting increased competition between the MCC and the remaining initiating E2 enzyme UBE2D. In conclusion, we provide in vivo insight into the APC/C E2 module and its interplay with SAC silencing components. PMID:27591192

  7. Synthesis of tetrahydrohonokiol derivates and their evaluation for cytotoxic activity against CCRF-CEM leukemia, U251 glioblastoma and HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bernaskova, Marketa; Kretschmer, Nadine; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Huefner, Antje; Weis, Robert; Bauer, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Biphenyl neolignans such as honokiol and magnolol, which are the major active constituents of the Asian medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, are known to exert a multitude of pharmacological and biological activities. Among these, cytotoxic and tumor growth inhibitory activity against various tumour cell lines are well-documented. To further elucidate the cytotoxic effects of honokiol derivatives, derivatizations were performed using tetrahydrohonokiol as a scaffold. The derivatizations comprised the introduction of functional groups, e.g., nitro and amino groups, as well as alkylation. This way, 18 derivatives, of which 13 were previously undescribed compounds, were evaluated against CCRF-CEM leukemia cells, U251 glioblastoma and HCT-116 colon cancer cells. The results revealed no significant cytotoxic effects in any of the three tested cell lines at a test concentration of 10 µM. PMID:24448063

  8. Synthesis of tetrahydrohonokiol derivates and their evaluation for cytotoxic activity against CCRF-CEM leukemia, U251 glioblastoma and HCT-116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bernaskova, Marketa; Kretschmer, Nadine; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Huefner, Antje; Weis, Robert; Bauer, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Biphenyl neolignans such as honokiol and magnolol, which are the major active constituents of the Asian medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, are known to exert a multitude of pharmacological and biological activities. Among these, cytotoxic and tumor growth inhibitory activity against various tumour cell lines are well-documented. To further elucidate the cytotoxic effects of honokiol derivatives, derivatizations were performed using tetrahydrohonokiol as a scaffold. The derivatizations comprised the introduction of functional groups, e.g., nitro and amino groups, as well as alkylation. This way, 18 derivatives, of which 13 were previously undescribed compounds, were evaluated against CCRF-CEM leukemia cells, U251 glioblastoma and HCT-116 colon cancer cells. The results revealed no significant cytotoxic effects in any of the three tested cell lines at a test concentration of 10 µM.

  9. Orexin A induces autophagy in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells through the ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zhao, Yuyan; Guo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Orexins are a class of peptides which have a potent influence on a broad variety of cancer cells. Autophagy is closely associated with tumors; however, its function is not yet completely understood. In this study, we aimed to determine whether orexin A induces autophagy in HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. For this purpose, HCT‑116 cells were treated with orexin A, and cell viability was then measured by MTT assay, and apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. The expression levels of autophagy‑related proteins were measured by western blot analysis. Quantitative analysis of autophagy following acridine orange (AO) staining was performed using fluorescence microscopy, and cellular morphology was observed under a transmission electron microscope. In addition, the HCT‑116 cells were treated with the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, U0126, or the autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, in combination with orexin A in order to examine the activation of ERK. We found that orexin A significantly inhibited the viability of the HCT‑116 cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis were activated during the orexin A‑induced death of HCT‑116 cells. When the HCT‑116 cells were treated with orexin A for 24 h, an accumulation of punctate microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3) and an increase in LC3‑Ⅱ protein levels were also detected, indicating the activation of autophagy. Moreover, orexin A upregulated ERK phosphorylation; however, U0126 or chloroquine abrogated ERK phosphorylation and decreased autophagy, compared to treatment with orexin A alone. Therefore, our findings demonstratedm that orexin A induced autophagy through the ERK pathway in HCT‑116 human colon cancer cells. The inhibition of autophagy may thus prove to be an effective strategy for enhancing the antitumor potential of orexin A as a treatment for colon cancer.

  10. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways.

  11. Nano-Self Assembled Photosensitizer Composed of Methoxy Poly(ethylene glycol)-Conjugated Chlorin e6 for Enhanced Photosensing of HCT116 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chung-Wook; Choi, Cheol Woong; Jeong, Young-Il; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-02-01

    We synthesized methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG)-chlórin e6 (Ce6) conjugates to increase aqueous solubility of Ce6, to fabricate nanoparticles, and to improve tumor targetability of Ce6. MPEG-Ce6 conjugates (abbreviated as Pe6) associated in the aqueous solution as a nanoparticle. Pe6 nanoparticles have small diameter less than 100 nm, spherical shape, and core-shell structure in the aqueous environment. They have improved photophysical properties compared to Ce6 itself. Photosensitivity of Pe6 nanoparticles were studied using HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells. Pe6 nanoparticles practically have no dark-toxicity against HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells while they showed enhanced cellular uptake, phototoxicity, and ROS generation at in vitro cell culture experiment. Furthermore, they showed improved tumor tissue penetration and accumulation in vivo animal studies. We suggested Pe6 nanoparticles as an ideal candidate for PDT of colon cancer. PMID:27433590

  12. Effect of the orthoquinone moiety in 9,10-phenanthrenequinone on its ability to induce apoptosis in HCT-116 and HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Hatae, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Jun; Okujima, Tetsuo; Ishikura, Minoru; Abe, Takumi; Hibino, Satoshi; Choshi, Tominari; Okada, Chiaki; Yamada, Hiroko; Uno, Hidemitsu; Toyota, Eiko

    2013-08-15

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ) is one of the most abundant quinones among diesel exhaust particulates. Recent data have suggested that quinones induce apoptosis in immune, epithelial and tumor cells, leading to respirator illness; however, the mechanisms by which quinones induce apoptosis and the structure required for this remain unknown. We studied the antitumor activity of 9,10-PQ analogs against two human tumor cell lines, HCT-116 colon tumor cells and HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. The loss of the cis-orthoquinone unit in 9,10-PQ abrogated its ability to induce apoptosis in the two tumor cell lines, and the LC50 values of these analogs were indicated over 10 μM. An analog of 9,10-PQ in which the biaryl unit had been deleted displayed a reduced ability to induce tumor cell apoptosis, while the analogs 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione (9) and pyrene-4,5-dione (10), which also had modified biaryl units, exhibited increased tumor cell apoptotic activity. The cis-orthoquinone unit in 9,10-PQ was identified as essential for its ability to induce apoptosis in tumor cells, and its biaryl unit is also considered to influence orthoquinone-mediated apoptotic activity.

  13. Apoptosis induced by glycoprotein (150-kDa) isolated from Solanum nigrum L. is not related to intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2006-04-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the apoptotic effects of glycoprotein [Solanum nigrum L. (SNL) glycoprotein, 150-kDa] isolated from Solanum nigrum L., which has been used as an antipyretic and anticancer agent in folk medicine. With the purified SNL glycoprotein, we evaluated the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of SNL glycoprotein on HCT-116 cells, DNA fragmentation and nuclear staining assays, respectively. SNL glycoprotein has an apparent cytotoxic and apoptotic effect at a concentration of 40 microg/ml after 4 h. To further verify the apoptotic effect, we investigated the changes in activity of the apoptotic-related proteins [Bid, cytochrome c, caspases and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP)] triggered by SNL glycoprotein, using a western blot analysis. The results in this study indicated that SNL glycoprotein has a stimulatory effect on Bid activation, resulting in the release of cytochrome c, the stimulation of caspase-8, -9 and -3 activities, and the cleavage of PARP in HCT-116 cells. However, SNL glycoprotein did not significantly stimulate an increase in levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). From the results in this experiment, it is suggested that SNL glycoprotein induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic signal pathway in HCT-116 cells, rather than through intracellular ROS. PMID:16208518

  14. BUB1 and SURVIVIN proteins are not degraded after a prolonged mitosis and accumulate in the nuclei of HCT116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Andonegui-Elguera, Marco A; Cáceres-Gutiérrez, Rodrigo E; Luna-Maldonado, Fernando; López-Saavedra, Alejandro; Díaz-Chávez, José; Cisneros-Soberanis, Fernanda; Prada, Diddier; Mendoza-Pérez, Julia; Herrera, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Spindle poisons activate the spindle assembly checkpoint and prevent mitotic exit until cells die or override the arrest. Several studies have focused on spindle poison-mediated cell death, but less is known about consequences in cells that survive a mitotic arrest. During mitosis, proteins such as CYCLIN B, SECURIN, BUB1 and SURVIVIN are degraded in order to allow mitotic exit, and these proteins are maintained at low levels in the next interphase. In contrast, exit from a prolonged mitosis depends only on degradation of CYCLIN B; it is not known whether the levels of other proteins decrease or remain high. Here, we analyzed the levels and localization of the BUB1 and SURVIVIN proteins in cells that escaped from a paclitaxel-mediated prolonged mitosis. We compared cells with a short arrest (HCT116 cells) with cells that spent more time in mitosis (HT29 cells) after paclitaxel treatment. BUB1 and SURVIVIN were not degraded and remained localized to the nuclei of HCT116 cells after a mitotic arrest. Moreover, BUB1 nuclear foci were observed; BUB1 did not colocalize with centromere proteins. In HT29 cells, the levels of BUB1 and SURVIVIN decreased during the arrest, and these proteins were not present in cells that reached the next interphase. Using time-lapse imaging, we observed morphological heterogeneity in HCT116 cells that escaped from the arrest; this heterogeneity was due to the cytokinesis-like mechanism by which the cells exited mitosis. Thus, our results show that high levels of BUB1 and SURVIVIN can be maintained after a mitotic arrest, which may promote resistance to cell death.

  15. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus.

  16. Concise synthesis of carbazole-1,4-quinones and evaluation of their antiproliferative activity against HCT-116 and HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takashi; Hatae, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Teruki; Takaki, Sawa; Abe, Takumi; Ishikura, Minoru; Hibino, Satoshi; Choshi, Tominari

    2016-10-01

    We report a convenient synthesis of carbazole-1,4-quinone alkaloid koeniginequinones A and B using a tandem ring-closing metathesis with the dehydrogenation reaction sequence under an O2 atmosphere as an important step. Using this method, carbazole-1,4-quinones substituted at the 5-, 6-, 7-, and/or 8-positions have been synthesized. Moreover, 24 compounds, including koeniginequinones A and B, have been evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against HCT-116 and HL-60 cells, and the 6-nitro analog exhibited the most potent activity against both tumor cell types. PMID:27318980

  17. Bufalin Inhibits HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells and Its Orthotopic Xenograft Tumor in Mice Model through Genes Related to Apoptotic and PTEN/AKT Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Chao; Wang, Shiying; Zhang, Yong; Yin, Peihao; Gao, Zhongxiang; Xu, Jie; Feng, Dianxu; Zuo, Qinsong; Zhao, Ronghua; Chen, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To investigate the anticolorectal cancer (CRC) effects of Bufalin, a bioactive polyhydroxysteroid from Venenum Bufonis, using HCT116 human CRC cell and an established orthotopic xenograft model in mice, and to explore the mechanisms of action. Material and Methods. Cultured HCT116 cells or BALB/c mice with orthotopic tumor were treated by Bufalin (positive control: 5-FU). Cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cycling were determined by MTT, Annexin V/PI staining, and flow cytometry, respectively. In mice, tumor inhibition rate and animal survival were calculated. The expressions of PTEN/phosphate-PTEN, AKT/phosphate-AKT, Bad, Bcl-xl, Bax, or Caspase-3 in cells and/or tumors were determined by Western blot or immunohistochemical staining. Results. Bufalin significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis and cycle arrest in a dose/time-dependent manner. In the animal model, Bufalin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival. In the Bufalin-treated cultured cells and/or xenograft tumors, the expressions of PTEN, Bad, Bax, and Caspase-3 were significantly increased, while p-AKT and Bcl-xL significantly decreased. Conclusions. Our results indicate that Bufalin inhibit cell proliferation and orthotopic tumor growth by inducing cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is of pivotal significance in the identification of an anticancer drug that may synergize with Bufalin. PMID:26770191

  18. Evaluation of anti-HER2 scFv-conjugated PLGA-PEG nanoparticles on 3D tumor spheroids of BT474 and HCT116 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Duong Le, Thi; Pham, Thu Hong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Giang Ngo, Thi Hong; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional culture cells (spheroids) are one of the multicellular culture models that can be applied to anticancer chemotherapeutic development. Multicellular spheroids more closely mimic in vivo tumor-like patterns of physiologic environment and morphology. In previous research, we designed docetaxel-loaded pegylated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with anti-HER2 single chain antibodies (scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG) and evaluated them in 2D cell culture. In this study, we continuously evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG on a 3D tumor spheroid model of BT474 (HER2-overexpressing) and HCT116 (HER2-underexpressing) cancer cells. The results showed that the nanoparticle formulation conjugated with scFv had a significant internalization effect on the spheroids of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells as compared to the spheroids of HER2-underexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, cytotoxic effects of targeted nanoparticles decreased the size and increased necrotic score of HER2-overexpressing tumor spheroids. Thus, these scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles have potential for active targeting for HER2-overexpressing cancer therapy. In addition, BT474 and HCT116 spheroids can be used as a tumor model for evaluation of targeting therapies.

  19. The flavonoid morin from Moraceae induces apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 family members and Fas receptor in HCT 116 cells.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Hwang-Bo; Lee, Won Sup; Go, Se-Il; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Park, Cheol; Han, Min Ho; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gonsup; Kim, Gi Young; Cheong, Jaehun; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    It is evident based on literature that flavonoids from fruit can safely modulate cancer cell biology and induce apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the anticancer activity of morin, a flavonoid which is plentiful in twigs of mulberry focusing on apoptosis, and its mechanisms. Morin upregulated the Fas receptor, and activates caspase-8, -9 and -3 in HCT-116 cells. Morin also activates Bid, and induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ∆Ψm) with Bax protein activation and cytochrome c release. In addition, morin induced ROS generation which was not blocked by N-acetylcysteine. Morin also suppressed Bcl-2 and cIAP-1, anti-apoptotic proteins, which may contribute to augmentation of morin-triggered apoptosis. As an upstream signaling pathway, suppressed Akt activity by morin was associated to apoptosis. This study suggests that morin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis through extrinsic pathway by upregulating Fas receptor as well as through the intrinsic pathway by modulating Bcl-2 and IAP family members, and ROS generation, and that Akt is the critical upstream signaling that regulates the apoptotic effect of morin in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells. PMID:25892545

  20. The flavonoid morin from Moraceae induces apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 family members and Fas receptor in HCT 116 cells.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Hwang-Bo; Lee, Won Sup; Go, Se-Il; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Park, Cheol; Han, Min Ho; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gonsup; Kim, Gi Young; Cheong, Jaehun; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    It is evident based on literature that flavonoids from fruit can safely modulate cancer cell biology and induce apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the anticancer activity of morin, a flavonoid which is plentiful in twigs of mulberry focusing on apoptosis, and its mechanisms. Morin upregulated the Fas receptor, and activates caspase-8, -9 and -3 in HCT-116 cells. Morin also activates Bid, and induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ∆Ψm) with Bax protein activation and cytochrome c release. In addition, morin induced ROS generation which was not blocked by N-acetylcysteine. Morin also suppressed Bcl-2 and cIAP-1, anti-apoptotic proteins, which may contribute to augmentation of morin-triggered apoptosis. As an upstream signaling pathway, suppressed Akt activity by morin was associated to apoptosis. This study suggests that morin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis through extrinsic pathway by upregulating Fas receptor as well as through the intrinsic pathway by modulating Bcl-2 and IAP family members, and ROS generation, and that Akt is the critical upstream signaling that regulates the apoptotic effect of morin in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells.

  1. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers.

  2. 5-Methoxyflavanone induces cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, apoptosis and autophagy in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soon Young; Hyun, Jiye; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2011-08-01

    Natural flavonoids have diverse pharmacological activities, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the action of 5-methoxyflavanone (5-MF) which has a strong bioavailability and metabolic stability. Our results show that 5-MF inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of HCT116 human colon cancer cells, and that it activated DNA damage responses, as revealed by the accumulation of p53 and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-sensitive proteins, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at Ser1981, checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) at Thr68, and histone H2AX at Ser139. 5-MF-induced DNA damage was confirmed in a comet tail assay. We also found that 5-MF increased the cleavage of caspase-2 and -7, leading to the induction of apoptosis. Pretreatment with the ATM inhibitor KU55933 enhanced 5-MF-induced {gamma}-H2AX formation and caspase-7 cleavage. HCT116 cells lacking p53 (p53{sup -/-}) or p21 (p21{sup -/-}) exhibited increased sensitivity to 5-MF compared to wild-type cells. 5-MF further induced autophagy via an ERK signaling pathway. Blockage of autophagy with the MEK inhibitor U0126 potentiated 5-MF-induced {gamma}-H2AX formation and caspase-2 activation. These results suggest that a caspase-2 cascade mediates 5-MF-induced anti-tumor activity, while an ATM/Chk2/p53/p21 checkpoint pathway and ERK-mediated autophagy act as a survival program to block caspase-2-mediated apoptosis induced by 5-MF. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > 5-MF inhibits the proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells. > 5-MF inhibits cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis. > Inhibition of autophagy triggers 5-MF-induced apoptosis. > Inhibition of ERK signaling blocks 5-MF-induced autophagy but activates apoptosis. > Treatment with 5-MF in combination with an ERK inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic strategy in human colon cancer.

  3. Differential growth inhibitory effects of highly oxygenated guaianolides isolated from the Middle Eastern indigenous plant Achillea falcata in HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rita; Al Aaraj, Lamis; Ghaddar, Tarek; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Saliba, Najat A; Darwiche, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Medicinal plants play a crucial role in traditional medicine and in the maintenance of human health worldwide. Sesquiterpene lactones represent an interesting group of plant-derived compounds that are currently being tested as lead drugs in cancer clinical trials. Achillea falcata is a medicinal plant indigenous to the Middle Eastern region and belongs to the Asteraceae family, which is known to be rich in sesquiterpene lactones. We subjected Achillea falcata extracts to bioassay-guided fractionation against the growth of HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells and identified four secotanapartholides, namely 3-β-methoxy-isosecotanapartholide (1), isosecotanapartholide (2), tanaphallin (3), and 8-hydroxy-3-methoxyisosecotanapartholide (4). Three highly oxygenated guaianolides were isolated for the first time from Achillea falcata, namely rupin A (5), chrysartemin B (6), and 1β, 2β-epoxy-3β,4α,10α-trihydroxyguaian-6α,12-olide (7). These sesquiterpene lactones showed no or minor cytotoxicity while exhibiting promising anticancer effects against HCT-116 cells. Further structure-activity relationship studies related the bioactivity of the tested compounds to their skeleton, their lipophilicity, and to the type of functional groups neighboring the main alkylating center of the molecule. PMID:23860275

  4. Apoptotic effects of extract from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson by adenosine monosphosphate-activated protein kinase-independent pathway in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Guen Tae; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Sang-Yong; Kim, Young Min

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer, a common malignancy, can occur due to poor eating habits and increasing age. Consequently, careful regulation of eating habits may serve as a possible method for preventing the occurrence or progression of colon cancer. Extracts of the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson are well‑known as an effective herbal medicine for the treatment of pain in female genitalia and carbuncle. However, there have been no studies on the apoptotic effects of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson (CME). Adenosine monophosphate‑activated protein kinase (AMPK), the major regulator of energy metabolism, is activated by metabolic stress, including hypoxia and glucose deprivation. Activation of AMPK inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through the inhibition of phosphorylated (p)‑Akt and control of B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) family members. The pro‑apoptotic proteins Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl‑2‑homologous antagonist killer (Bak), are activated by their translocation to mitochondria from the cytosol. Translocation of Bax/Bak induces outer membrane permeabilization and is likely to lead to apoptosis through cytochrome C release and caspase activity. In the present study, the apoptotic effects and influence on mitochondria‑mediated apoptotic proteins of CME in HCT116 cells were assessed. We hypothesized that CME may have an effect on the inhibition of p‑Akt in an AMPK‑independent pathway. The present study demonstrated that CME induced the release of LDH and apoptosis through its inhibition of p‑Akt to control Bcl‑2 and activate Bax and Bak. Co‑treatment with CME and AMPK inhibitors showed that CME‑induced apoptosis does not occurr through a AMPK‑dependent pathway. Therefore, the present study determined, for the first time, that CME induced apoptosis as a result of causing metabolic stresses due to directly regulation of the de‑phosphorylation of Akt, whereas it did not control the AMPK-dependent pathway in HCT116

  5. Khz (fusion product of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) induces apoptosis in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species, activation of caspase 3, and increased intracellular Ca²⁺.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Ju Sung; Kim, Zoo Haye; Huang, Ren Bin; Chae, Young Lye; Wang, Ren Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Khz (a fusion mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum and Polyporus umbellatus mycelia) is isolated from ganoderic acid and P. umbellatus and it exerts antiproliferative effects against malignant cells. However, no previous study has reported the inhibitory effects of Khz on the growth of human colon cancer cells. In the present study, we found that Khz suppressed cell division and induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Khz cytotoxicity was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Khz reduced cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential levels and it also induced disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and increased calcium concentration and reactive oxygen species generation. Khz increased caspase 3, PARP, caspase 7, and caspase 9 levels, but reduced Bcl-2 protein levels. Flow cytometry showed that the percentage of HCT116 cells in the sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle increased in response to Khz treatment.

  6. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  7. Raman micro-spectroscopic investigation of the interaction of cultured HCT116 colon cancer cells with alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, S.; Ozel, A. E.; Balci, K.; Akyuz, T.; Coker, A.; Arisan, E. D.; Palavan-Unsal, N.; Ozalpan, A.

    2011-05-01

    The interaction of cultured colon cancer cells with alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, has been investigated, using Raman micro-spectroscopy, in order to investigate DFMO induced effects. Raman spectra of the cultured HCT116 colon cancer cells treated with DFMO at different concentrations (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 7.5 mM) were recorded in the range 550-2300 cm -1. It has been shown that second derivative profile of the raw Raman spectrum of the colon cancer cells (i.e., the original experimental spectrum without any computational corrections) discriminates the weak but sharp bands from the strong, broad fluorescence background, and gives information about the position of the peaks and their band widths. The relative integrated intensities of the 781 cm -1 and 788 cm -1 DNA/RNA marker bands to that of 1451 cm -1 band are found to decrease by addition of DFMO. Up to 65% reduction in the magnitude of the 1003 cm -1 band, the characteristic phenylalanine ring breathing mode, in comparison to that of 1451 band, is observed. The results indicate DFMO induced apoptosis. On the other hand the intensity ratio of the tyrosine Fermi doubled around 830 cm -1 and 850 cm -1, which is a marker of hydrogen-bonding state of phenolic OH, is changed. The addition of DFMO may alter the tyrosine environment in cells, and parts of tyrosine residues are exposed. We also observed some modifications in amide I band, pointing out the alterations of the secondary structure of cell proteins by the presence of DFMO.

  8. Activations of Both Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways in HCT 116 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Contribute to Apoptosis through p53-Mediated ATM/Fas Signaling by Emilia sonchifolia Extract, a Folklore Medicinal Plant.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Huang, Wen-Wen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chung, Jing-Gung; Wu, Tian-Shung; Jhan, Jia-Hua; Lin, Kuei-Li; Pai, Shu-Jen; Chiu, Yu-Jen; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2012-01-01

    Emilia sonchifolia (L.) DC (Compositae), an herbaceous plant found in Taiwan and India, is used as folk medicine. The clinical applications include inflammation, rheumatism, cough, cuts fever, dysentery, analgesic, and antibacteria. The activities of Emilia sonchifolia extract (ESE) on colorectal cancer cell death have not been fully investigated. The purpose of this study explored the induction of apoptosis and its molecular mechanisms in ESE-treated HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. The methanolic ESE was characterized, and γ-humulene was formed as the major constituent (63.86%). ESE induced cell growth inhibition in a concentration- and time-dependent response by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells (DNA fragmentation, an apoptotic catachrestic) were found after ESE treatment by TUNEL assay and DNA gel electrophoresis. Alternatively, ESE stimulated the activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 and their specific caspase inhibitors protected against ESE-induced cytotoxicity. ESE promoted the mitochondria-dependent and death-receptor-associated protein levels. Also, ESE increased ROS production and upregulated the levels of ATM, p53, and Fas in HCT 116 cells. Strikingly, p53 siRNA reversed ESE-reduced viability involved in p53-mediated ATM/Fas signaling in HCT 116 cells. In summary, our result is the first report suggesting that ESE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  9. Characterization of sphere-forming HCT116 clones by whole RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eunkyung; Oh, Inkyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine CD133+ cells defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) in colon cancer, we examined whether CD133+ clones in HCT116 demonstrate known features of CSCs like sphere-forming ability, chemodrug-resistance, and metastatic potential. Methods Magnetic cell isolation and cell separation demonstrated that <1% of HCT116 cells expressed CD133, with the remaining cells being CD133- clones. In colon cancer cells, radioresistance is also considered a CSC characteristic. We performed clonogenic assay using 0.4 Gy γ-irradiation. Results Interestingly, there were no differences between HCT116 parental and HCT116 CD133+ clones when the cells comprised 0.5% of the total cells, and CD133- clone demonstrated radiosensitive changes compared with parental and CD133+ clones. Comparing gene expression profiles between sphere-forming and nonforming culture conditions of HCT116 subclones by whole RNA sequencing failed to obtain specific genes expressed in CD133+ clones. Conclusion Despite no differences of gene expression profiles in monolayer attached culture conditions of each clone, sphere-forming conditions of whole HCT116 subclones, parental, CD133+, and CD133- increased 1,761 coding genes and downregulated 1,384 genes related to CSCs self-renewal and survival. Thus, spheroid cultures of HCT116 cells could be useful to expand colorectal CSCs rather than clonal expansion depending on CD133 expressions. PMID:27073788

  10. Isoledene from Mesua ferrea oleo-gum resin induces apoptosis in HCT 116 cells through ROS-mediated modulation of multiple proteins in the apoptotic pathways: A mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Asif, Muhammad; Shafaei, Armaghan; Jafari, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Mohamed, Shazmin Kithur; Ezzat, Mohammed Oday; Abdul Majid, Aman Shah; Oon, Chern Ein; Petersen, Sven H; Kono, Koji; Abdul Majid, Amin Malik Shah

    2016-08-22

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignant tumors worldwide. Arising from the transformation of epithelial cells in the colon and/or rectum into malignant cells, the foundation of CRC pathogenesis lies in the progressive accumulation of mutations in oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, such as KRAS and APC. Resistance to apoptosis is one of the key mechanisms in the development of CRC as it is for any other kind of cancer. Natural products have been shown to induce the expression of apoptosis regulators that are blocked in cancer cells. In the present study, a series of in vitro assays were employed to study the apoptosis-inducing attributes of Isoledene rich sub-fraction (IR-SF) collected from the oleo-gum resin of M. ferrea. Data obtained, showed that IR-SF inhibited cell proliferation and induced typical apoptotic changes in the overall morphology of all the CRC cell lines tested. Fluorescent staining assays revealed characteristic nuclear condensation, and marked decrease in mitochondrial outer membrane potential in the treated cells. In addition, an increment in the levels of ROS, caspase-8, -9 and -3 was observed. Proteomic analysis revealed that IR-SF up-regulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, i.e., Bid, Bim and cytochrome c. Cytochrome c in turn activated caspases cascade resulting in the induction of apoptosis. Moreover, IR-SF significantly down-regulated Bcl-2, Bcl-w, survivin, xIAP and HSPs pro-survival proteins and induced DNA fragmentation and G0/G1-phase arrest in HCT 116 cells. Chemical characterization of IR-SF by GC-MS and HPLC methods identified Isoledene as one of the major compounds. Altogether, results of the present study demonstrate that IR-SF may induce apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cells through activation of ROS-mediated apoptotic pathways. PMID:27268964

  11. Preparation of branched cyclomaltoheptaose with 3-O-α-L-fucopyranosyl-α-D-mannopyranose and changes in fucosylation of HCT116 cells treated with the fucose-modified cyclomaltoheptaose.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Madoka; Masui, Yuki; Shirai, Yuko; Honda, Chie; Moriwaki, Kenta; Imai, Taku; Takagi, Uichiro; Kiryu, Takaaki; Kiso, Taro; Murakami, Hiromi; Nakano, Hirofumi; Kitahata, Sumio; Miyoshi, Eiji; Tanimoto, Toshiko

    2013-06-01

    From a mixture of 4-nitrophenyl α-L-fucopyranoside and D-mannopyranose, 3-O-α-L-fucopyranosyl-D-mannopyranose was synthesised through the transferring action of α-fucosidase (Sumizyme PHY). 6(I),6(IV)-Di-O-(3-O-α-L-fucopyranosyl-α-D-mannopyranosyl)-cyclomaltoheptaose {8, 6(I),6(IV)-di-O-[α-L-Fuc-(1→3)-α-D-Man]-βCD} was chemically synthesised using the trichloroacetimidate method. The structures were confirmed by MS and NMR spectroscopy. A cell-based assay using the fucosyl βCD derivatives, including the newly synthesised 8, showed that derivatives with two branches of the α-L-Fuc or α-L-Fuc-(1→3)-α-D-Man residues possessed slight growth-promoting effects and lower toxicity in HCT116 cells compared to those with one branch. These compounds may be useful as drug carriers in targeted drug delivery systems.

  12. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer. PMID:27156533

  13. Integrated in silico and experimental methods revealed that Arctigenin inhibited angiogenesis and HCT116 cell migration and invasion through regulating the H1F4A and Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouyue; Li, Jie; Song, Sicheng; Li, Jing; Tong, Rongsheng; Zang, Zhihe; Jiang, Qinglin; Cai, Lulu

    2015-11-01

    Arctigenin (ARG) has been previously reported to exert diverse biological activities including anti-proliferation, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral, etc. In the current study, the anti-metastasis and anti-angiogenesis activities of ARG were investigated. To further understand how ARG played these bioactivities, proteomic approaches were used to profile the proteome changes in response to ARG treatment using 2DE-MS/MS. Using these approaches, a total of 50 differentially expressed proteins were identified and clustered. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that multiple signalling pathways were involved. Moreover, ARG induced anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenesis activities were mainly accompanied by a deactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HCT116 cells.

  14. Integrated in silico and experimental methods revealed that Arctigenin inhibited angiogenesis and HCT116 cell migration and invasion through regulating the H1F4A and Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouyue; Li, Jie; Song, Sicheng; Li, Jing; Tong, Rongsheng; Zang, Zhihe; Jiang, Qinglin; Cai, Lulu

    2015-11-01

    Arctigenin (ARG) has been previously reported to exert diverse biological activities including anti-proliferation, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral, etc. In the current study, the anti-metastasis and anti-angiogenesis activities of ARG were investigated. To further understand how ARG played these bioactivities, proteomic approaches were used to profile the proteome changes in response to ARG treatment using 2DE-MS/MS. Using these approaches, a total of 50 differentially expressed proteins were identified and clustered. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that multiple signalling pathways were involved. Moreover, ARG induced anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenesis activities were mainly accompanied by a deactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HCT116 cells. PMID:26267229

  15. Resveratrol induces AMPK-dependent MDR1 inhibition in colorectal cancer HCT116/L-OHP cells by preventing activation of NF-κB signaling and suppressing cAMP-responsive element transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyuan; Zhang, Long; Ni, Zhenhua; Sun, Jian; Gao, Hong; Cheng, Zhuoan; Xu, Jianhua; Yin, Peihao

    2015-12-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound found in foods and beverages, has attracted increasing attention in recent years because of its potent chemopreventive and anti-tumor effects. In this study, the effects of resveratrol on the expression of P-glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (P-gp/MDR1), and the underlying molecular mechanisms, were investigated in oxaliplatin (L-OHP)-resistant colorectal cancer cells (HCT116/L-OHP). Resveratrol downregulated MDR1 protein and mRNA expression levels and reduced MDR1 promoter activity. It also enhanced the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123, suggesting that resveratrol can reverse multi-drug resistance by downregulating MDR1 expression and reducing drug efflux. Resveratrol treatment also reduced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, reduced phosphorylation levels of IκBα, and reduced nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65. Moreover, downregulation of MDR1 expression and promoter activity was mediated by resveratrol-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. The inhibitory effects of resveratrol on MDR1 expression and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation were reversed by AMPKα siRNA transfection. We found that the transcriptional activity of cAMP-responsive element (CRE) was inhibited by resveratrol. These results demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of resveratrol on MDR1 expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells were closely associated with the inhibition of NF-κB signaling and CREB activation in an AMPK-dependent manner.

  16. A delay prior to mitotic entry triggers caspase 8-dependent cell death in p53-deficient Hela and HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Victoria C; Plooster, Melissa; Leung, Jessica C; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Stathmin/Oncoprotein 18, a microtubule destabilizing protein, is required for survival of p53-deficient cells. Stathmin-depleted cells are slower to enter mitosis, but whether delayed mitotic entry triggers cell death or whether stathmin has a separate pro-survival function was unknown. To test these possibilities, we abrogated the cell cycle delay by inhibiting Wee1 in synchronized, stathmin-depleted cells and found that apoptosis was reduced to control levels. Synchronized cells treated with a 4 hour pulse of inhibitors to CDK1 or both Aurora A and PLK1 delayed mitotic entry and apoptosis was triggered only in p53-deficient cells. We did not detect mitotic defects downstream of the delayed mitotic entry, indicating that cell death is activated by a mechanism distinct from those activated by prolonged mitotic arrest. Cell death is triggered by initiator caspase 8, based on its cleavage to the active form and by rescue of viability after caspase 8 depletion or treatment with a caspase 8 inhibitor. In contrast, initiator caspase 9, activated by prolonged mitotic arrest, is not activated and is not required for apoptosis under our experimental conditions. P53 upregulates expression of cFLIPL, a protein that blocks caspase 8 activation. cFLIPL levels are lower in cells lacking p53 and these levels are reduced to a greater extent after stathmin depletion. Expression of FLAG-tagged cFLIPL in p53-deficient cells rescues them from apoptosis triggered by stathmin depletion or CDK1 inhibition during G2. These data indicate that a cell cycle delay in G2 activates caspase 8 to initiate apoptosis specifically in p53-deficient cells.

  17. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Briske-Anderson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer nutrients. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical Se metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that both DCA (75-300 micromol/l) and submicromolar methylselenol inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation by up to 64% and 63%, respectively. In addition, DCA and methylselenol each increased colon cancer cell apoptosis rate by up to twofold. Cell cycle analyses revealed that DCA induced an increase in only the G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in G2 and S-phase; in contrast, methylselenol led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop only in the S-phase. Although both DCA and methylselenol significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell growth, examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation showed that DCA, but not methylselenol, induced SAPK/JNK1/2, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 activation. Thus, our data provide, for the first time, the molecular basis for opposite effects of methylselenol and DCA on colon tumorigenesis.

  18. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  19. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis. PMID:26631293

  20. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis.

  1. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773

  2. Aspirin inhibits glucose‑6‑phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin‑mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT‑29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT‑29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin‑acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH.

  3. Physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside prevents hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer HCT116 cells by modulating EMMPRIN.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z; Xu, F; Tang, J; Li, G; Jiang, P; Tang, Z; Wu, H

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered as the most important mechanism that underlies the initiation of cancer metastasis. Here we report that Physicon 8-O-β-glucopyranoside (PG), a major active ingredient from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Rumex japonicus Houtt, is capable of preventing human colorectal cancer cells from hypoxia-induced EMT. The treatment of the cells with PG reversed the EMT-related phenotype that has the morphological changes, down-regulation of E-cadherin, and hypoxia-induced cell migration and invasion. The effect was mediated at least in part by inhibiting the mRNA and protein expressions of EMMPRIN via modulation of PTEN/Akt/HIF-1α pathway. In addition, we found that PG-mediated prevention of EMT involved blockade of the hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Snail, Slug and Twist. In summary, this study showed that PG can prevent EMT induced by hypoxia, the environment that commonly exists in the center of a solid tumor. Given the low toxicity of PG to the healthy tissues, our study suggests that PG can serve as a safe therapeutic agent for suppressing cancer metastasis. PMID:26925795

  4. Combination of Albendazole and 2-Methoxyestradiol significantly improves the survival of HCT-116 tumor-bearing nude mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Albendazole (ABZ) is a microtubule-targeting anthelmintic with a remarkable activity against a variety of human cancer cells. In this study, we examined if the antitumor activity of ABZ could be enhanced by its combination with other microtubule-binding agents. Methods The interactions between ABZ and microtubule-binding agents, paclitaxel, vinblastine, colchicine, and 2-methoxyestradiol were characterized using median effect analysis method in HCT-116 colorectal cancer cells and DU145 prostate cancer cell line. The mechanism underlying the synergistic interaction related to tubulin polymerization and apoptosis was then investigated. Finally, the effect of the combination therapy on the survival of HCT-116 tumor-bearing nude mice was evaluated. Results Among the tested drugs, a synergistic anti-proliferative effect was observed with the combination of low concentrations of ABZ plus colchicine and ABZ plus 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME). Exploring the mechanism of the interaction between ABZ and 2ME revealed that the combination therapy synergistically activated the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Consistent with in vitro results, the combination of low concentration of ABZ with 2ME prolonged the survival of mice-bearing HCT-116 tumors. High concentration of ABZ in combination with 2ME, however, proved to be less effective than ABZ alone. Conclusions The combination of low doses of ABZ and 2ME has shown promising results in our pre-clinical model. Additionally, the finding that the combination of two microtubule-binding agents that share the same binding site can act synergistically may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. PMID:23432760

  5. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC class II gene

  6. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-10-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC

  7. p53 is important for the anti-proliferative effect of ibuprofen in colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Astrid; Schiffmann, Susanne; Birod, Kerstin; Maier, Thorsten J.; Wobst, Ivonne; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2008-01-25

    S-ibuprofen which inhibits the cyclooxygenase-1/-2 and R-ibuprofen which shows no COX-inhibition at therapeutic concentrations have anti-carcinogenic effects in human colon cancer cells; however, the molecular mechanisms for these effects are still unknown. Using HCT-116 colon carcinoma cell lines, expressing either the wild-type form of p53 (HCT-116 p53{sup wt}) or being p(HCT-116 p53{sup -/-}), we demonstrated that both induction of a cell cycle block and apoptosis after S- and R-ibuprofen treatment is in part dependent on p53. Also in the in vivo nude mice model HCT-116 p53{sup -/-} xenografts were less sensitive for S- and R-ibuprofen treatment than HCT-116 p53{sup wt} cells. Furthermore, results indicate that induction of apoptosis in HCT-116 p53{sup wt} cells after ibuprofen treatment is in part dependent on a signalling pathway including the neutrophin receptor p75{sup NTR}, p53 and Bax.

  8. Selective suicide gene therapy of colon cancer cell lines exploiting fibroblast growth factor 18 promoter.

    PubMed

    Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Zeinali, Sirous

    2010-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 18 (FGF18) is one of the genes downstream of Wnt, one of the most important signaling pathways activated in colon cancer. An FGF18 promoter containing a single T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor 1 (TCF/LEF1) binding site was inserted upstream of a thymidine kinase (TK) suicide gene module, while a bacterial beta-Gal (LacZ) element served as the reporter gene. Following transient transfection with pUCFGF18LacZ, beta-Gal staining showed that 5% of SW480, 10% of HCT116, 0% of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and 0% of normal colon cells (NCCs) had expressed LacZ. beta-Gal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that the ratio of pUCFGF18LacZ activity to that of positive control was 0.09 and 0.25 in SW480 and HCT116, respectively (significantly higher than mock plasmid), while there were no significant changes in the beta-Gal expression in HUVEC and NCC cells transfected with pUCFGF18LacZ or mock plasmid. Following transfection with pUCFGF18TK and pUCCMVTK (positive control), cytotoxicity analysis of transfected cells showed that treatment with ganciclovir (GCV) significantly decreased SW480 and HCT116 cell survival at GCV concentrations above 20 microg/mL. An inverse correlation between GCV concentration and cell viability was evident in both colon cancer cell lines following transfection with these suicide plasmids. pUCFGF18TK and pUCCMVTK induced apoptosis after the administration of GCV in HCT116, but not in SW480, as demonstrated by M30 cytodeath antibody. This discrepancy may stem from differences in the mechanisms of TK/GCV-induced apoptosis in p53-proficient (HCT116) and -deficient (SW480) cells. The specific activity of the FGF18 promoter in HCT116 and SW480 may reflect the advantage of this promoter over artificial promoters containing artificial TCF/LEF binding sites. PMID:20187803

  9. PKM2 Subcellular Localization Is Involved in Oxaliplatin Resistance Acquisition in HT29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ginés, Alba; Bystrup, Sara; Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Guardia, Cristina; Musulén, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is the main cause of treatment failure in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). However, molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. In a previous work we identified low levels of PKM2 as a putative oxaliplatin-resistance marker in HT29 CRC cell lines and also in patients. In order to assess how PKM2 influences oxaliplatin response in CRC cells, we silenced PKM2 using specific siRNAs in HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. MTT test demonstrated that PKM2 silencing induced resistance in HT29 and SW480 cells and sensitivity in HCT116 cells. Same experiments in isogenic HCT116 p53 null cells and double silencing of p53 and PKM2 in HT29 cells failed to show an influence of p53. By using trypan blue stain and FITC-Annexin V/PI tests we detected that PKM2 knockdown was associated with an increase in cell viability but not with a decrease in apoptosis activation in HT29 cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed PKM2 nuclear translocation in response to oxaliplatin in HCT116 and HT29 cells but not in OXA-resistant HTOXAR3 cells. Finally, by using a qPCR Array we demonstrated that oxaliplatin and PKM2 silencing altered cell death gene expression patterns including those of BMF, which was significantly increased in HT29 cells in response to oxaliplatin, in a dose and time-dependent manner, but not in siPKM2-HT29 and HTOXAR3 cells. BMF gene silencing in HT29 cells lead to a decrease in oxaliplatin-induced cell death. In conclusion, our data report new non-glycolytic roles of PKM2 in response to genotoxic damage and proposes BMF as a possible target gene of PKM2 to be involved in oxaliplatin response and resistance in CRC cells.

  10. The role of p53 in the trafficking of copper-64 to tumor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Eiblmaier, Martin; Meyer, Laura A; Anderson, Carolyn J

    2008-01-01

    Copper-64 (T(1/2) = 12.7 h; beta(+): 17.8%, beta(-): 41%) has applications in both positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and targeted radiotherapy of cancer. Copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals have shown tumor growth inhibition with a relatively low radiation dose in animal models; however, the mechanism of cytotoxicity has not been fully elucidated. Here, we report an investigation on the potential role of the tumor suppressor protein p53 in trafficking (64)Cu to tumor cell nuclei. Two EGFR expressing human colorectal cell lines (HCT 116 +/+ and HCT 116 -/-) that are positive or negative for p53 expression respectively, were used to compare internalization and nuclear localization of [(64)Cu]copper acetate and of (64)Cu-DOTA-cetuximab, a monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. [(64)Cu]copper acetate uptake into cells was similar between the two cell lines during a 24 h time course. In contrast, the uptake of [(64)Cu]copper acetate in the nuclei of HCT 116 +/+ cells was significantly higher than in HCT 116 -/- cells (p < 0.0001) at 24 h. There was no difference in receptor binding, receptor-mediated internalization, and efflux of (64)Cu-DOTA-cetuximab between the two HCT 116 cells lines. However, nuclear localization of (64)Cu-DOTA-cetuximab showed increased uptake in the nuclei of HCT 116 +/+ cells as early as 4 h. These data demonstrate that (64)Cu is delivered to tumor cell nuclei in a p53 positive cell line in significantly greater amounts than in p53 negative cells by both non-specific and receptor-mediated uptake mechanisms.

  11. In vivo and in vitro antitumor activity of oxaliplatin in combination with cetuximab in human colorectal tumor cell lines expressing different level of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Balin-Gauthier, Diane; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Rochaix, Philippe; Mallard, Valérie; Thomas, Fabienne; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bugat, Roland; Canal, Pierre; Allal, Cuider

    2006-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of cetuximab (C225, Erbitux, a chimeric anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody) in combination with oxaliplatin in vitro and in vivo on four colon cancer cell lines (HCT-8; HT-29, SW620, HCT-116) expressing different levels of EGFR. In vitro, cetuximab combined with oxaliplatin significantly decreased the IC50 values of oxaliplatin in HCT-8 (EGF-R moderate) and HT-29 (EGF-R weak) cell lines, while SW620 (EGF-R negative) and HCT-116 (EGFR strong) cell lines remained unresponsive. This combination was synergistic in HCT-8 and HT-29 cell lines while cetuximab induced no major modification of the IC50 of oxaliplatin in HCT-116 or SW620 cell lines. We then determined the effect of cetuximab on the EGF-induced EGFR phosphorylation and we highlight a correlation between the basal level of phospho-EGFR and the response to the combination. In vivo, the combination of cetuximab plus oxaliplatin significantly inhibited tumor growth of HCT-8 and HT-29 (tumor delay or Td = 21.6+/-2.9 and 18.0+/-2.9 days respectively, synergistic effect) compared to either oxaliplatin (Td=12.6+/-2.3 and 14.4+/-3.2 days respectively) or cetuximab (Td=13.4+/-2.9 and 14.5+/-2.4 days, respectively) alone in xenograft models. The combination had no effect on HCT-116 and SW-620 cell lines. The observed responses are strictly dependent on the cell type, and are not correlated with the level of EGFR expression but related to the basal level of phospho-EGFR. This study provides promising preclinical results for a possible clinical investigation of the combination of oxaliplatin plus cetuximab in chemorefractory colorectal tumors.

  12. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  13. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  14. In-vitro assessment of cytotoxicity of halloysite nanotubes against HepG2, HCT116 and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farrukh Rafiq; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Azhar, Mudassar; Um, Soong Ho; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Hashmi, Shahkamal; Dar, Ahsana

    2015-11-01

    Halloysite is a clay mineral with chemical similarity to kaolin, a pharmaceutical ingredient. It consists of mainly aluminosilicate nanotubular particles in the size range of ∼ 200-1000 nm. Many studies have tried to empirically explore this novel clay for its potential in drug delivery systems but no work has yet studied its cytotoxicity from the perspective of oral drug delivery system. In this study, the halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were subjected to size distribution analyses, which reveal more than 50% of nanotubes in the size range of 500 nm and rest mainly in the sub micrometer range. HNTs were then evaluated for in-vitro cytotoxicity against HCT116 (colorectal carcinoma) and HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) cells which represent the earliest entry point and the first accumulating organ, respectively, for nanoparticles en-route to systemic circulation after oral delivery. Moreover, HNTs were tested for their cytogenetic toxicity against human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both these results collectively indicated that HNTs are generally safe at practical concentrations of excipients for oral dosage forms.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of E-cadherin and oncoprotein E7 by valproic acid in HPV positive cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Akbari, Abolfazl; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Valproic acid (VPA) has proven to be as one of the most promising useful drug with anticancer properties. In this study, we investigate the VPA effects on E-cadherin expression in HeLa, TC1, MKN45, and HCT116 cell lines. This study assesses the effects of VPA on human papillomavirus E7 expression in HPV positive cell lines. Materials and Methods: Cell lines were treated by 2 mmol/l VPA and expression of E-cadherin and E7 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Student’s t test and ANOVA were used to determine changes in expression levels. Results: The results revealed that mean of E-cadherin expression is increased by VPA 1.8 times in HCT116 and MKN45 cell lines, also the mean of E-cadherin mRNA levels is up-regulated 2.9 times in HeLa and TC1 cell lines. So, E-cadherin augmentation induced by VPA in HeLa and TC-1, HPV positive cell lines, is higher than HPV negative cell lines MKN45 and HCT116. The mean of HPV E7 expression is decreased by VPA, 4.6 times in in HeLa and TC-1 cell lines. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that re-expression of E-cadherin by VPA in HPV positive cell lines is more than HPV negative cell lines. Whereas, HPV E7 reduces the expression of E-cadherin, reduction of HPV E7 expression by VPA is related to more augmentation of E-cadherin in HPV positive cell lines. So, this study demonstrates that VPA has more anticancer properties in HPV positive cell lines, and could potentially be a promising candidate for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:27482340

  16. Annona squamosa Linn: cytotoxic activity found in leaf extract against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Shen; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Guo, Huiqin; Ahmed, Mansoor; Ahmed, Maryam; Hassan, Syed Zeeshan; Hassan, Amir; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death in human populations. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy still remain the corner stone of treatment. However, herbal medicines are gaining popularity on account of their lesser harmful side effects on non-targeted human cells and biological environment. Annona squamosa Linn is a common delicious edible fruit and its leaf have been used for the treatment in various types of diseases. The objective of present study is to determine the anticancer potential of the organic and aqueous extracts of leaf of Annona squamosa L. MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2yl)-2, 5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay against hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BEL-7404, lung cancer line H460, human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1, prostatic cancer cell line DU145, breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, and colon cancer cell line HCT-116 Human primary embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 as control were used for the study. The crude extract (Zcd) and Ethyl acetate extract (ZE) were found significant anticancer activity only on human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1 and colon cancer cell line HCT-116. PMID:25176251

  17. Annona squamosa Linn: cytotoxic activity found in leaf extract against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Shen; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Guo, Huiqin; Ahmed, Mansoor; Ahmed, Maryam; Hassan, Syed Zeeshan; Hassan, Amir; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death in human populations. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy still remain the corner stone of treatment. However, herbal medicines are gaining popularity on account of their lesser harmful side effects on non-targeted human cells and biological environment. Annona squamosa Linn is a common delicious edible fruit and its leaf have been used for the treatment in various types of diseases. The objective of present study is to determine the anticancer potential of the organic and aqueous extracts of leaf of Annona squamosa L. MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2yl)-2, 5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay against hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BEL-7404, lung cancer line H460, human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1, prostatic cancer cell line DU145, breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, and colon cancer cell line HCT-116 Human primary embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 as control were used for the study. The crude extract (Zcd) and Ethyl acetate extract (ZE) were found significant anticancer activity only on human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1 and colon cancer cell line HCT-116.

  18. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G(1) to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  19. In vitro anti-proliferative activities of Aloe perryi flowers extract on human liver, colon, breast, lung, prostate and epithelial cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Oqail, Mai Mohammad; El-Shaibany, Amina; Al-Jassas, Ebtesam; Al-Sheddi, Ebtesam Saad; Al-Massarani, Shaza Mohamed; Farshori, Nida Nayyar

    2016-03-01

    Natural products, especially plant extracts have offered vast opportunities in the field of drug development due to its chemical diversity. The genus Aloe has for long been used for medicinal purposes in different parts of the world. The present study was designed to investigate the phytochemicals and anti-cancer potential of Aloe perryi flowers. The phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of carbohydrates, glycosides, phytosterols, phenols, flavonoids and proteins. While alkaloids and saponins were absent. The percentage inhibition of various extracts (viz. petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol and aqueous) of A. perryi flowers on seven human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HCT-116, MCF-7, A549, PC-3, HEp-2 and HeLa) has been evaluated using MTT assay. All the extracts significantly inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The petroleum ether extract was most active, where the inhibition was recorded as 92.6%, 93.9%, 92%, 90.9%, 88.9%, 82% and 85.7% for HepG2, HCT-116, MCF-7, A-549, PC-3, HEp-2 and HeLa cells, respectively. The results also revealed that HCT-116 cells were more sensitive among all the cell lines studied.

  20. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We report distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.

  1. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    DOE PAGES

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We reportmore » distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.« less

  2. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  3. Dichloroacetate affects proliferation but not survival of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Delaney, L M; Ho, N; Morrison, J; Farias, N R; Mosser, D D; Coomber, B L

    2015-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a metabolic reprogramming agent that reverses the Warburg effect, causing cancer cells to couple glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation. This has been shown to induce apoptosis and reduce the growth of various types of cancer but not normal cells. Colorectal cancer cells HCT116, HCT116 p53(-/-), and HCT116 Bax(-/-), were treated with DCA in vitro. Response to treatment was determined by measuring PDH phosphorylation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle. Molecular changes associated with these responses were determined using western immunoblotting and quantitative PCR. Treatment with 20 mM DCA did not increase apoptosis, despite decreasing levels of anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 after 6 h, in any of the cell lines observed. Mcl-1 expression was stabilized with MG-132, an inhibitor of proteasomal degradation. A decrease in Mcl-1 correlated with a decrease in proliferation, both of which showed dose-dependence in DCA treated cells. Cells showed nuclear localization of Mcl-1, however cell cycle was unaffected by DCA treatment. These data suggest that a reduction in the prosurvival Bcl-2 family member Mcl-1 due to increased proteasomal degradation is correlated with the ability of DCA to reduce proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells without causing apoptosis.

  4. MicroRNA-203 induces apoptosis by upregulating Puma expression in colon and lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Funamizu, Naotake; Lacy, Curtis R; Kamada, Minori; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between microRNA-203 (miR-203) and the p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) in colon (HCT116) and lung cancer (A549) cells. Colon and lung cancer cell lines were selected for this study since a relationship between p53/miR-203 and p53/Puma has been established in both cancers. In the present study, adriamycin and nutlin-3 were used to activate p53, which induced both miR-203 and Puma expression in HCT116 cells. In contrast, HCT 116 cells with downregulated p53 showed decreased miR-203 and Puma expression. Importantly, we found that overexpressed miR-203 in HCT116 cells resulted in significantly increased Puma expression (P<0.05). Based on these findings, we hypothesized that another limb of the p53/Puma axis depends on miR-203 expression. To further validate this relationship, we used lung cancer cells (A549) and found that activated p53 increased both miR-203 and Puma expression. In addition, we found that Puma expression remained elevated in cells with overexpressed miR-203 in the presence of p53 downregulation. Cumulatively, our data purport that p53 not only increased Puma expression directly, but that it may also do so through miR-203. Additionally, functional studies revealed that miR-203 overexpression induced apoptosis and inhibited cell invasiveness.

  5. Functional characterization of the nitrogen permease regulator-like-2 candidate tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-Yun; Liu, Ming-Na; Pei, Feng-Hua; Chen, Jing; Wang, Xin-Hong; Liu, Dan; Du, Ya-Ju; Liu, Bing-Rong

    2015-09-01

    The nitrogen permease regulator‑like‑2 (NPRL2) gene is a candidate tumor suppressor gene, which has been identified in the 3p21.3 human chromosome region. Decreased expression levels of NPRL2 have been observed in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues, however, the function of NPRL2 in CRC progression remains to be fully elucidated. The present study investigated the biological characteristics of the HCT116 and HT29 CRC cell lines overexpressing exogenous NPRL2. NPRL2 recombinant lentiviral vectors were also constructed and transfected in the present study. Cell growth was determined using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay and a colony formation assay. The cell cycle and rate of apoptosis were assessed using flow cytometric analysis. Transwell assays were used to evaluate cell invasion. The protein expression of phosphorylated (p)‑AKT and caspase 3, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein apoptosis‑associated genes, were detected using western blotting. The results revealed that NPRL2 overexpression inhibited cell growth, induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest, promoted apoptosis and inhibited invasion in the two human CRC cell lines. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of p‑AKT and Bcl2 were significantly reduced in the NPRL2‑transfected HCT116 and HT29 cells, compared with the mock‑transfected group and control group, while the protein expression of caspase‑3 was increased. Therefore, NPRL2 acted as a functional tumor suppressor in the CRC cell lines.

  6. Effect of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), an allosteric activator of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and bioenergetics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Módis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Asimakopoulou, Antonia; Szczesny, Bartosz; Chao, Celia; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R.; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Recent data show that colon cancer cells selectively overexpress cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), which produces hydrogen sulfide (H2S), to maintain cellular bioenergetics, support tumor growth and stimulate angiogenesis and vasorelaxation in the tumor microenvironment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of the allosteric CBS activator S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) on the proliferation and bioenergetics of the CBS-expressing colon cancer cell line HCT116. The non-transformed, non-tumorigenic colon epithelial cell line NCM356 was used as control. For assessment of cell proliferation, the xCELLigence system was used. Bioenergetic function was measured by Extracellular Flux Analysis. Experiments using human recombinant CBS or HCT116 homogenates complemented the cell-based studies. SAM markedly enhanced CBS-mediated H2S production in vitro, especially when a combination of cysteine and homocysteine was used as substrates. Addition of SAM (0.1 – 3 mM) to HCT116 cells induced a concentration-dependent increase H2S production. SAM exerted time-and concentration-dependent modulatory effects on cell proliferation. At 0.1–1 mM SAM increased HCT116 proliferation between 0–12 h, while the highest SAM concentration (3 mM) inhibited proliferation. Over a longer time period (12–24 h), only the lowest concentration of SAM used (0.1 mM) stimulated cell proliferation; higher SAM concentrations produced a concentration-dependent inhibition. The short-term stimulatory effects of SAM were attenuated by the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) or by stable silencing of CBS. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of SAM on cell proliferation was unaffected by CBS inhibition or CBS silencing. In contrast to HCT116 cells, the lower rate of proliferation of the low-CBS expressor NCM356 cells was unaffected by SAM. Short-term (1h) exposure of HCT116 cells to SAM induced a concentration-dependent increase in oxygen consumption and bioenergetic function at

  7. Effect of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), an allosteric activator of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and bioenergetics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Módis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Asimakopoulou, Antonia; Szczesny, Bartosz; Chao, Celia; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-09-15

    Recent data show that colon cancer cells selectively overexpress cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), which produces hydrogen sulfide (H2S), to maintain cellular bioenergetics, support tumor growth and stimulate angiogenesis and vasorelaxation in the tumor microenvironment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of the allosteric CBS activator S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) on the proliferation and bioenergetics of the CBS-expressing colon cancer cell line HCT116. The non-transformed, non-tumorigenic colon epithelial cell line NCM356 was used as control. For assessment of cell proliferation, the xCELLigence system was used. Bioenergetic function was measured by Extracellular Flux Analysis. Experiments using human recombinant CBS or HCT116 homogenates complemented the cell-based studies. SAM markedly enhanced CBS-mediated H2S production in vitro, especially when a combination of cysteine and homocysteine was used as substrates. Addition of SAM (0.1-3 mM) to HCT116 cells induced a concentration-dependent increase H2S production. SAM exerted time- and concentration-dependent modulatory effects on cell proliferation. At 0.1-1 mM SAM increased HCT116 proliferation between 0 and 12 h, while the highest SAM concentration (3 mM) inhibited proliferation. Over a longer time period (12-24 h), only the lowest concentration of SAM used (0.1 mM) stimulated cell proliferation; higher SAM concentrations produced a concentration-dependent inhibition. The short-term stimulatory effects of SAM were attenuated by the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) or by stable silencing of CBS. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of SAM on cell proliferation was unaffected by CBS inhibition or CBS silencing. In contrast to HCT116 cells, the lower rate of proliferation of the low-CBS expressor NCM356 cells was unaffected by SAM. Short-term (1 h) exposure of HCT116 cells to SAM induced a concentration-dependent increase in oxygen consumption and bioenergetic function at 0

  8. Anti-proliferative effect of Melissa officinalis on human colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Encalada, Manuel Alejandro; Hoyos, Kelly Melissa; Rehecho, Sheyla; Berasategi, Izaskun; de Ciriano, Mikel García-Íñiguez; Ansorena, Diana; Astiasarán, Iciar; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Calvo, María Isabel

    2011-11-01

    Melissa officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) is consumed as a traditional herbal tea in the Mediterranean region. The cytotoxic effect of the 50% ethanolic and aqueous extract, determined by the MTT and NR assays, was evaluated in vitro on Human Colon Cancer Cell Line (HCT-116), using Triton 10% as positive control. The 50% ethanolic extract showed significant differences after 72 h of treatment, reducing cell proliferation to values close to 40%, even the lowest dose tested (5 μg/ml). In the MTT assay, the same extract caused the lowest cell viability with 13% at a concentration of 1,000 μg/ml after 72 h of treatment, being a value lower than Triton 10%. The antioxidant activity was also confirmed evaluating the capacity of the extracts to scavenge ABTS and DPPH radicals, and IC(50) values were highly correlated with the total phenolic and flavonoid content. Bioassay guided fractionation led to the isolation of an anti-proliferative compound, rosmarinic acid. Its structural elucidation was performed by HPLC/DAD/ESI/MS analysis. High dose of rosmarinic acid (1,000 μg/ml) was clearly cytotoxic against HCT-116 cells, with a significant decrease in cell number since the earliest time point (24 h).

  9. Crude Extracts of Marine-derived and Soil Fungi of the Genus Neosartorya Exhibit Selective Anticancer Activity by Inducing Cell Death in Colon, Breast and Skin Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alice Abreu; Castro-Carvalho, Bruno; Prata-Sena, Maria; Dethoup, Tida; Buttachon, Suradet; Kijjoa, Anake; Rocha, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The crude ethyl acetate extracts of marine-derived fungi Neosartorya tsunodae KUFC 9213 (E1) and N. laciniosa KUFC 7896 (E2), and soil fungus N. fischeri KUFC 6344 (E3) were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activities on a panel of seven human cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed, after 48 h treatments with different concentrations of extracts, to determine their concentration of the extract or Dox that inhibits cell viability by 50% for each cell line. The effects of the crude extracts on DNA damage, clonogenic potential and their ability to induce cell death were also assessed. Results: E1 was found to the void of anti-proliferative effects. E2 was shown to decrease the clonogenic potential in human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT116), human malignant melanoma cell line (A375), human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7), and human caucasian colon adenocarcinoma Grade II cell line (HT29) cells, whereas E3 showed such effect only in HCT116 and MCF7 cells. Both extracts were found to increase DNA damage in some cell lines. E2 was found to induce cell death in HT29, HCT116, MCF7, and A375 cells while extract E3 increased cell death in MCF7 and HCT116 cell lines. Conclusion: The results reveal that E2 and E3 possess anticancer activities in human colon carcinoma, breast adenocarcinoma, and melanoma cells, validating the interest for an identification of molecular targets involved in the anticancer activity. SUMMARY The crude ethyl acetate extract of N. tsunodae (E1) did not decrease cell viability in any of the tested cell linesThe crude ethyl acetate extracts of N. laciniosa (E2) and N. fischeri (E3) decreased cell proliferation in some human cancer cell lines tested at both short- and long-termN. laciniosa (E2) induced a significant increase in the number of cell death, in part, due to the induction of DNA damageN. fischeri (E3) induce cell death but in

  10. Silencing the Nucleocytoplasmic O-GlcNAc Transferase Reduces Proliferation, Adhesion, and Migration of Cancer and Fetal Human Colon Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Steenackers, Agata; Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Baldini, Steffi F; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram; Lefebvre, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins by O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is regulated by a unique couple of enzymes. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) transfers the GlcNAc residue from UDP-GlcNAc, the final product of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP), whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes it. This study and others show that OGT and O-GlcNAcylation levels are increased in cancer cell lines. In that context, we studied the effect of OGT silencing in the colon cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116 and the primary colon cell line CCD841CoN. Herein, we report that OGT silencing diminished proliferation, in vitro cell survival and adhesion of primary and cancer cell lines. SiOGT dramatically decreased HT29 and CCD841CoN migration, CCD841CoN harboring high capabilities of migration in Boyden chamber system when compared to HT29 and HCT116. The expression levels of actin and tubulin were unaffected by OGT knockdown but siOGT seemed to disorganize microfilament, microtubule, and vinculin networks in CCD841CoN. While cancer cell lines harbor higher levels of OGT and O-GlcNAcylation to fulfill their proliferative and migratory properties, in agreement with their higher consumption of HBP main substrates glucose and glutamine, our data demonstrate that OGT expression is not only necessary for the biological properties of cancer cell lines but also for normal cells.

  11. Butyrate-mediated acquisition of chemoresistance by human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyang Ri; Choi, Hyeon Gyeom; Jeon, Chae Kyung; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Kim, So Hee

    2016-08-01

    Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced by the intestinal microflora and it not only induces apoptosis but also inhibits the proliferation of cancer cells. Recently, it has been reported that butyrate may cause resistance in colon cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the effects of increased resistance to butyrate in HCT116 colon cancer cells. We established HCT116 cells resistant to butyrate (HCT116/BR) by treating HCT116 parental cells (HCT116/PT) with increasing concentrations of butyrate to a maximum of 1.6 mM for 3 months. The butyrate concentrations that inhibited cell growth by 50% (IC50) were 0.508 and 5.50 mM in HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The values after treatment with paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin and trichostatin A (TSA) were 2.42, 2.36, 4.31 and 11.3-fold higher, respectively, in HCT116/BR cells compared with HCT116/PT cells. The protein expression of drug efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer-resistant protein (BCRP) and the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), did not differ between HCT116/PT and HCT116/BR cells. The expression level of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein was increased while those of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bim proteins were reduced in HCT116/BR cells. There were no significant differences in cell motility and invasion. This study suggests that exposure of colon cancer cells to butyrate results in development of resistance to butyrate, which may play a role in the acquisition of chemoresistance in colon cancer. PMID:27277338

  12. The effect of a dimeric Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:1907)2 targeting EGFR in combination with radiation in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara; Spiegelberg, Diana; Lennartsson, Johan; Nygren, Peter; Glimelius, Bengt; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer and is therefore an attractive target for treatment. (ZEGFR:1907)2 is a newly developed dimeric affibody molecule with high affinity to the extracellular part of EGFR. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of (ZEGFR:1907)2 in combination with external radiation and the possible inhibitory effects in the EGFR signalling pathways in the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT116. The effects were compared with an EGFR antibody (cetuximab) and the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib and sunitinib). These cell lines are genotypically different with respect to e.g. KRAS and BRAF mutational status, recently shown to be of clinical significance for therapeutic effects. Both cell lines express approximately 100,000-150,000 EGFRs per cell but differ in the radiation response (HCT116, SF2=0.28 and HT-29, SF2=0.70). Exposure to (ZEGFR:1907)2 produced a small, but significant, reduction in survival in HCT116 but did not affect HT-29 cells. Similar results were obtained after exposure to EGF and the EGFR antibody cetuximab. The EGFR tyrosine kinase targeting inhibitor erlotinib and the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib reduced survival in both cell lines. However, none of the drugs had any significant radiosensitizing effects in combination with radiation. Akt and Erk are central proteins in the EGFR downstream signalling and in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. The activation of Akt (Ser 473) and Erk (Thr202/Tyr204) by radiation was both dose- and time-dependent. However the activation of EGFR was not clearly affected by radiation. Neither (ZEGFR:1907)2 nor any of the other drugs were able to completely inactivate Akt or Erk. On the contrary, erlotinib stimulated Akt phosphorylation in both cell lines and in HCT116 cells Erk was activated. Overall the results illustrate the complexity in response to radiation and drugs in cells with differential

  13. In vitro metabolism study of normal and tumor cells when exposed to red LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbovskaya, Olga V.; Khairullin, Radik M.; Saenko, Yuri V.; Krasnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the results of studying the mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ROS, peculiarities of the cell cycle of cancer cells HCT-116 and the normal line of CHO cells when exposed to the red LED light with a wavelength range of 0.620-0.680 μm. A dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ROS concentration in cancer cells HCT-116 was established. In normal CHO cell line a dose-dependent reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and dose-dependent increase in intracellular ROS occur. It has been shown that the sensitivity of the studied cell lines to the red light depends on the stage of the cell cycle.

  14. iTRAQ analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines suggests Drebrin (DBN1) is overexpressed during liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qifeng; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Khoo, Avery; Lim, Kiat Hon; Chung, Maxey C M

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third in cancer incidence worldwide and the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths. Mortality in colorectal cancer is often ascribed to liver metastasis. In an effort to elucidate the proteins involved in colorectal cancer liver metastasis, we compared the proteome profiles of the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 with its metastatic derivative E1, using the iTRAQ labelling technology, coupled to 2D-LC and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. A total of 547 proteins were identified, of which 31 of them were differentially expressed in the E1 cell line. Among these proteins, the differential expressions of translationally controlled tumour protein 1, A-kinase anchor protein 12 and Drebrin (DBN1) were validated using Western blot. In particular, DBN1, a protein not previously known to be involved in colorectal cancer metastasis, was found to be overexpressed in E1 as compared to HCT-116 cells. The overexpression of DBN1 was further validated using immunohistochemistry on colorectal cancer tissue sections with matched lymph node and liver metastasis tissues. DBN1 is currently believed to be involved in actin cytoskeleton reorganisation and suppresses actin filament cross-linking and bundling. Since actin reorganisation is an important process for tumour cell migration and invasion, DBN1 may have an important role during colorectal cancer metastasis.

  15. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or

  16. Relative biological effectiveness of light ions in human tumoural cell lines: role of protein p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggio, L.; Cavinato, M.; Cherubini, R.; Conzato, M.; Cucinotta, F.; Favaretto, S.; Gerardi, S.; Lora, S.; Stoppa, P.; Williams, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles of high linear energy transfer (LET) have shown an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with respect to X/gamma rays for several cellular and molecular endpoints in different in vitro cell systems. To contribute to understanding the biochemical mechanisms involved in the increased effectiveness of high LET radiation, an extensive study has been designed. The present work reports the preliminary result of this study on two human tumoural cell lines, DLD1 and HCT116, (with different p53 status), which indicate that for these cell lines, p53 does not appear to take a part in the response to radiation induced DNA damage, suggesting an alternative p53-independent pathway and a cell biochemical mechanism dependent on the cell type.

  17. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  18. Spontaneous γH2AX Foci in Human Solid Tumor-Derived Cell Lines in Relation to p21WAF1 and WIP1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Scott, April; Wang, Ying W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Murray, David

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of H2AX on Ser139 (γH2AX) after exposure to ionizing radiation produces nuclear foci that are detectable by immunofluorescence microscopy. These so-called γH2AX foci have been adopted as quantitative markers for DNA double-strand breaks. High numbers of spontaneous γH2AX foci have also been reported for some human solid tumor-derived cell lines, but the molecular mechanism(s) for this response remains elusive. Here we show that cancer cells (e.g., HCT116; MCF7) that constitutively express detectable levels of p21WAF1 (p21) exhibit low numbers of γH2AX foci (<3/nucleus), whereas p21 knockout cells (HCT116p21−/−) and constitutively low p21-expressing cells (e.g., MDA-MB-231) exhibit high numbers of foci (e.g., >50/nucleus), and that these foci are not associated with apoptosis. The majority (>95%) of cells within HCT116p21−/− and MDA-MB-231 cultures contain high levels of phosphorylated p53, which is localized in the nucleus. We further show an inverse relationship between γH2AX foci and nuclear accumulation of WIP1, an oncogenic phosphatase. Our studies suggest that: (i) p21 deficiency might provide a selective pressure for the emergence of apoptosis-resistant progeny exhibiting genomic instability, manifested as spontaneous γH2AX foci coupled with phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation of p53; and (ii) p21 might contribute to positive regulation of WIP1, resulting in dephosphorylation of γH2AX. PMID:26006237

  19. Essential Oil Content of the Rhizome of Curcuma purpurascens Bl. (Temu Tis) and Its Antiproliferative Effect on Selected Human Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sok-Lai; Lee, Guan-Serm; Ahmed Hamdi, Omer Abdalla; Awang, Khalijah; Aznam Nugroho, Nurfina

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma purpurascens Bl., belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, is known as temu tis in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. In this study, the hydrodistilled dried ground rhizome oil was investigated for its chemical content and antiproliferative activity against selected human carcinoma cell lines (MCF7, Ca Ski, A549, HT29, and HCT116) and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC5). Results from GC-MS and GC-FID analysis of the rhizome oil of temu tis showed turmerone as the major component, followed by germacrone, ar-turmerone, germacrene-B, and curlone. The rhizome oil of temu tis exhibited strong cytotoxicity against HT29 cells (IC50 value of 4.9 ± 0.4 μg/mL), weak cytotoxicity against A549, Ca Ski, and HCT116 cells (with IC50 values of 46.3 ± 0.7, 32.5 ± 1.1, and 35.0 ± 0.3 μg/mL, resp.), and no inhibitory effect against MCF7 cells. It exhibited mild cytotoxicity against a noncancerous human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC5), with an IC50 value of 25.2 ± 2.7 μg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of this rhizome's oil and its selective antiproliferative effect on HT29. The obtained data provided a basis for further investigation of the mode of cell death. PMID:25177723

  20. Essential oil content of the rhizome of Curcuma purpurascens Bl. (Temu Tis) and its antiproliferative effect on selected human carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sok-Lai; Lee, Guan-Serm; Syed Abdul Rahman, Syarifah Nur; Ahmed Hamdi, Omer Abdalla; Awang, Khalijah; Aznam Nugroho, Nurfina; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2014-01-01

    Curcuma purpurascens Bl., belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, is known as temu tis in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. In this study, the hydrodistilled dried ground rhizome oil was investigated for its chemical content and antiproliferative activity against selected human carcinoma cell lines (MCF7, Ca Ski, A549, HT29, and HCT116) and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC5). Results from GC-MS and GC-FID analysis of the rhizome oil of temu tis showed turmerone as the major component, followed by germacrone, ar-turmerone, germacrene-B, and curlone. The rhizome oil of temu tis exhibited strong cytotoxicity against HT29 cells (IC50 value of 4.9 ± 0.4 μg/mL), weak cytotoxicity against A549, Ca Ski, and HCT116 cells (with IC50 values of 46.3 ± 0.7, 32.5 ± 1.1, and 35.0 ± 0.3 μg/mL, resp.), and no inhibitory effect against MCF7 cells. It exhibited mild cytotoxicity against a noncancerous human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC5), with an IC50 value of 25.2 ± 2.7 μg/mL. This is the first report on the chemical composition of this rhizome's oil and its selective antiproliferative effect on HT29. The obtained data provided a basis for further investigation of the mode of cell death.

  1. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53-/- HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53-/- HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  2. Upregulation of CYP2S1 by oxaliplatin is associated with p53 status in colorectal cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhou, Qian; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Sun, Jiayi; Qing, Yin; Sun, Liya; Yang, Xuhan; Hu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Jie; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin displays a wide spectrum of antitumor activities and is widely used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, tumor responses to this agent are variable, and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In the present study, oxaliplatin was found to strongly inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells harboring wild-type p53 but to only weakly inhibit SW480 cells, HT29 cells or p53−/− HCT116 cells, which all lack p53 expression. Administration of oxaliplatin significantly induced p53 accumulation and enhanced expression of CYP2S1 in HCT116 cells with wild-type p53. CYP2S1 knockdown conferred a cell survival advantage after oxaliplatin treatment to cells harboring wild-type p53 in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, enzyme immunoassays, TOPFlash/FOPFlash reporter activity assays and western blotting analysis demonstrated oxaliplatin-mediated downregulation of PGE2 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in a manner dependent on p53. Moreover, oxaliplatin treatment of mice with subcutaneous tumor xenografts drastically reduced the volume of wild-type p53 HCT116 tumors but had no effect on isogenic p53−/− HCT116 tumors. These results suggest that oxaliplatin exerts its inhibitory effects in human CRC cells via upregulation of CYP2S1 expression in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:27609465

  3. Lucidumol C, a new cytotoxic lanostanoid triterpene from Ganoderma lingzhi against human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amen, Yhiya M; Zhu, Qinchang; Tran, Hai-Bang; Afifi, Mohamed S; Halim, Ahmed F; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A new oxygenated lanostane-type triterpene, named lucidumol C, together with six known compounds, was isolated from the chloroform extract of the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lingzhi. Structures were established based on extensive spectroscopic and chemical studies. Potential cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated against human colorectal carcinoma (HCT-116, Caco-2), human liver carcinoma (HepG2), and human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell lines using WST-1 reagent. Selectivity was evaluated using normal human fibroblast cells (TIG-1 and HF19). Among the compounds, lucidumol C showed potent selective cytotoxicity against HCT-116 cells with an IC50 value of 7.86 ± 4.56 µM and selectivity index (SI) >10 with remarkable cytotoxic activities against Caco-2, HepG2 and HeLa cell lines. PMID:26899240

  4. Zinc Finger Nuclease Mediated Knockout of ADP-Dependent Glucokinase in Cancer Cell Lines: Effects on Cell Survival and Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Susan; Morrison, Shona; Connor, Tim; Su, Jiechuang; Print, Cristin G.; Ronimus, Ron S.; McGee, Sean L.; Wilson, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) are powerful tools for editing genes in cells. Here we use ZFNs to interrogate the biological function of ADPGK, which encodes an ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADPGK), in human tumour cell lines. The hypothesis we tested is that ADPGK utilises ADP to phosphorylate glucose under conditions where ATP becomes limiting, such as hypoxia. We characterised two ZFN knockout clones in each of two lines (H460 and HCT116). All four clones had frameshift mutations in all alleles at the target site in exon 1 of ADPGK, and were ADPGK-null by immunoblotting. ADPGK knockout had little or no effect on cell proliferation, but compromised the ability of H460 cells to survive siRNA silencing of hexokinase-2 under oxic conditions, with clonogenic survival falling from 21±3% for the parental line to 6.4±0.8% (p = 0.002) and 4.3±0.8% (p = 0.001) for the two knockouts. A similar increased sensitivity to clonogenic cell killing was observed under anoxia. No such changes were found when ADPGK was knocked out in HCT116 cells, for which the parental line was less sensitive than H460 to anoxia and to hexokinase-2 silencing. While knockout of ADPGK in HCT116 cells caused few changes in global gene expression, knockout of ADPGK in H460 cells caused notable up-regulation of mRNAs encoding cell adhesion proteins. Surprisingly, we could discern no consistent effect on glycolysis as measured by glucose consumption or lactate formation under anoxia, or extracellular acidification rate (Seahorse XF analyser) under oxic conditions in a variety of media. However, oxygen consumption rates were generally lower in the ADPGK knockouts, in some cases markedly so. Collectively, the results demonstrate that ADPGK can contribute to tumour cell survival under conditions of high glycolytic dependence, but the phenotype resulting from knockout of ADPGK is cell line dependent and appears to be unrelated to priming of glycolysis in these lines. PMID:23799003

  5. Combined effects of alternariols mixture on human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bensassi, Fatma; Gallerne, Cindy; Sharaf el dein, Ossama; Hajlaoui, Mohamed Rabeh; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins are naturally occurring contaminants encountered at high levels in a wide variety of agricultural products intended for human and animal consumptions. Various Alternaria mycotoxins may occur simultaneously in small grain cereals. Considering the concomitant production of alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), it is expected that humans and animals are exposed to the mixture rather than to individual compounds. Therefore, we studied the interactive effects of binary mixture of alternariols (AOH and AME) on the human intestinal cell line, HCT116 cells. Exposure of HCT116 cells to low cytotoxic alternariols doses, resulted in a moderate cytotoxicity manifested by a loss in the cell viability mediated by an activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic process, associated with the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) and the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). However, when combined, they exert a significant increase in their toxic potential. Altogether, our study showed that AOH and AME combination is obviously additive.

  6. Simultaneous inhibition of ATR and PARP sensitizes colon cancer cell lines to irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Sanad, Atlal; Wang, Yunzhe; Hasheminasab, Fatemeh; Panasci, Justin; Noë, Alycia; Rosca, Lorena; Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Sharif-Askari, Bahram; Aloyz, Raquel; Panasci, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced DNA damage repair is one mechanism involved in colon cancer drug resistance. Thus, targeting molecular components of repair pathways with specific small molecule inhibitors may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. ABT-888 and VE-821, inhibitors of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP) and the serine/threonine-kinase Ataxia telangiectasia related (ATR), respectively, were used to treat colon cancer cell lines in combination with the topoisomerase-I inhibitor irinotecan (SN38). Our findings show that each of these DNA repair inhibitors utilized alone at nontoxic single agent concentrations resulted in sensitization to SN38 producing a 1.4–3 fold reduction in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of SN38 in three colon cancer cell lines. When combined together, nontoxic concentrations of ABT-888 and VE-821 produced a 4.5–27 fold reduction in the IC50 of SN38 with the HCT-116 colon cancer cells demonstrating the highest sensitization as compared to LoVo and HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of all three agents was associated with maximal G2 −M arrest and enhanced DNA-damage (γH2AX) in all three colon cancer cell lines. The mechanism of this enhanced sensitization was associated with: (a) maximal suppression of SN38 induced PARP activity in the presence of both inhibitors and (b) ABT-888 producing partial abrogation of the VE-821 enhancement of SN38 induced DNA-PK phosphorylation, resulting in more unrepaired DNA damage; these alterations were only present in the HCT-116 cells which have reduced levels of ATM. This novel combination of DNA repair inhibitors may be useful to enhance the activity of DNA damaging chemotherapies such as irinotecan and help produce sensitization to this drug in colon cancer. PMID:26257651

  7. Thiazole-based nitrogen mustards: Design, synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculation, molecular docking, and antiproliferative activity against selected human cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Świtalska, Marta; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Plech, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Misiura, Konrad; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Czaplińska, Barbara; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Malarz, Katarzyna; Musioł, Robert; Grela, Izabela

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis, characterization and investigation of antiproliferative activity of ten thiazole-based nitrogen mustard against human cancer cells lines (MV4-11, A549, MCF-7 and HCT116) and normal mouse fibroblast (BALB/3T3) is presented. The structures of novel compounds were determined using 1H and 13C NMR, FAB(+)-MS, and elemental analyses. Among the derivatives, 5b, 5c, 5e, 5f and 5i were found to exhibit high activity against human leukaemia MV4-11 cells with IC50 values of 2.17-4.26 μg/ml. The cytotoxic activity of compound 5c and 5f against BALB/3T3 cells is up to 20 times lower than against cancer cell lines. Our results also show that compounds 5e and 5i have very strong activity against MCF-7 and HCT116 with IC50 values of 3.02-4.13 μg/ml. Moreover, spectroscopic characterization and cellular localization for selected compound were performed. In order to identify potential drug targets we perform computer simulations with DNA-binding site of hTopoI and hTopoII and quantum chemical calculation of interaction and binding energies in complexes of the five most active compounds with guanine.

  8. In vitro anticancer activity of extracts of Mentha Spp. against human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Hussain, Shabir; Gupta, Moni; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In vitro anticancer potential of methanolic and aqueous extracts of whole plants of Mentha arvensis, M. longifolia, M. spicata and M. viridis at concentration of 100 μg/ml was evaluated against eight human cancer cell lines--A-549, COLO-205, HCT-116, MCF-7, NCI-H322, PC-3, THP-1 and U-87MG from six different origins (breast, colon, glioblastoma, lung, leukemia and prostate) using sulphorhodamine blue (SRB) assay. Methanolic extracts of above-mentioned Mentha Spp. displayed anti-proliferative effect in the range of 70-97% against four human cancer cell lines, namely COLO-205, MCF-7, NCI-H322 and THP-1; however, aqueous extracts were found to be active against HCT-116 and PC-3. The results indicate that Mentha Spp. contain certain constituents with cytotoxic properties which may find use in developing anticancer agents.

  9. Integrity of p53 associated pathways determines induction of apoptosis of tumor cells resistant to Aurora-A kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shionome, Yoshimi; Yan, Li; Liu, Song; Saeki, Toshiaki; Ouchi, Toru

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that mammary tumorigenesis in MMTV-Aurora-A mice is further enhanced when p53 is inactivated, demonstrating that integrity of p53 pathway determines phenotypes induced by this oncogenic kinase. In this study, we investigated the roles of genes involved in p53 pathway (p53, Puma, p21, Bax, and Chk2) in response to Aurora-A inhibitors, VX680 and MK-8745, and explored whether chemoresistant tumor cells would further undergo apoptosis with other therapeutic agents. Isogenic HCT116 cell lines were treated with VX680 or MK-8745. Cell cycle analysis, apoptosis, and tumorigenesity were studied. Chemoresistant cells were recovered from xenograft, and further induction of apoptosis was studied. Induction of apoptosis and aneuploidy with VX680 is much stronger than MK-8745. Xenograft assay indicates that tumor growth of HCT116 and HCT116 p53(-) cells are strongly inhibited by VX680, while that of other cell types are similarly inhibited by two compounds. Among the established cell lines recovered from xenografts, MK-8745-resistant clones contain elevated phosphorylation of mTOR and Akt. When further treated with inhibitors of both mTOR and Akt, those cells undergo apoptosis. These results indicate that p53-associated pathway plays a crucial role in regulating growth inhibition of tumor cells when treated with Aurora-A inhibitors. Combined treatment with Akt/mTOR inhibitors can further induce apoptosis of Aurora-A tumors.

  10. Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon cancer stem cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Bu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hao; Wang, Qiyi; Sha, Weihong

    2016-10-01

    Metastasis and recurrence are the challenges of cancer therapy. Recently, mounting evidence has suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are critical factors in tumor metastasis and recurrence. The oncogene, Bmi-1, promotes the development of hematologic malignancies and many solid tumors. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms through which Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon CSCs (CCSCs) using the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Sphere formation medium and magnetic‑activated cell sorting were used to enrich and screen the CCSCs. CD133 and CD44 were regarded as markers of CCSCs and they were found to be co-expressed in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Colony formation assay, cell proliferation assay and viability assay using the Cell Counting Kit-8, and transplantation assay using nude mice injected with CCSCs were used to examine the CCSCs. The CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells exhibited greater cloning efficiency, an enhanced proliferative ability, increased cell viability and stronger tumorigenicity; these cells were used as the CCSCs for subsequent experiments. In addition, the invasive and migratory abilities of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells were markedly decreased when Bmi-1 was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results of RT-qPCR and western blot analysis suggested that Bmi-1 had a negative effect on E-cadherin expression. On the whole, our findings suggest that Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of CCSCs through the downregulation of E-cadherin, possibly by inducing EMT. Our findings thus indicate that Bmi-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27600678

  11. Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon cancer stem cells through the downregulation of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zefeng; Bu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hao; Wang, Qiyi; Sha, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis and recurrence are the challenges of cancer therapy. Recently, mounting evidence has suggested that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are critical factors in tumor metastasis and recurrence. The oncogene, Bmi-1, promotes the development of hematologic malignancies and many solid tumors. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms through which Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of colon CSCs (CCSCs) using the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Sphere formation medium and magnetic-activated cell sorting were used to enrich and screen the CCSCs. CD133 and CD44 were regarded as markers of CCSCs and they were found to be co-expressed in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Colony formation assay, cell proliferation assay and viability assay using the Cell Counting Kit-8, and transplantation assay using nude mice injected with CCSCs were used to examine the CCSCs. The CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells exhibited greater cloning efficiency, an enhanced proliferative ability, increased cell viability and stronger tumorigenicity; these cells were used as the CCSCs for subsequent experiments. In addition, the invasive and migratory abilities of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells were markedly decreased when Bmi-1 was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results of RT-qPCR and western blot analysis suggested that Bmi-1 had a negative effect on E-cadherin expression. On the whole, our findings suggest that Bmi-1 promotes the invasion and migration of CCSCs through the downregulation of E-cadherin, possibly by inducing EMT. Our findings thus indicate that Bmi-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27600678

  12. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-xuan; Qian, Hao-cheng; Yu, Zhang-yin; Shen, Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines. PMID:27256681

  13. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Qian, Hao-Cheng; Yu, Zhang-Yin; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines.

  14. Evaluation of the major royal jelly proteins as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in culturing human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Qian, Hao-Cheng; Yu, Zhang-Yin; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-06-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a well-known bioactive substance. It contains large amounts of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs), which express growth-factor-like activity in several animal and human cell lines. However, the question on whether MRJPs possess growth-factor-like activity on all types of cell cultures remains. In order to determine whether MRJPs can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in different types of human cell culture, the proliferation of the complex serum with different ratios of MRJPs/FBS (M/F) was evaluated on five cell lines: 293T, HFL-I, 231, HCT116, and Changliver using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The proliferation activity of the combination of the complex M/F serum with cytokines on the test cell lines was also measured. The results demonstrated that the complex serum with M/F 6/4 possessed the highest proliferation activity similar to or in excess of FBS. However, no activity of complex medium with M/F 6/4 was observed in 231 cells, indicating a selectivity of MRJPs on cell types. Compared with the complex medium with M/F 6/4, the complex medium with M/F 6/4 together with two cytokines, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), promoted proliferations of Changliver, 293T, HCT116, and HFL-I by 18.73%‒56.19% (P<0.01). Our findings demonstrate that MRJPs could partially replace FBS in culturing many human cell lines. PMID:27256681

  15. Hedgehog-glioma-associated oncogene homolog-1 signaling in colon cancer cells and its role in the celecoxib-mediated anti-cancer effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Ke, Fei; Zheng, Jie

    2014-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is activated in numerous malignant tumors, but its role in human colorectal cancer remains uncertain. Celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, has been shown to exhibit chemoprevention in colorectal cancer, however, the effects of celecoxib on Hh signaling remain unknown. The current study presents an evaluation of Hh signaling in colon cancer cell lines and the effects of celecoxib in vitro. Active Hh signaling was observed in LoVo and HT-29 cells, with particularly high levels in the LoVo cells. However, Hh signaling activity was absent in HCT-116 cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction indicated that the expression of Hh receptor patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) was absent in the LoVo cells, but that they exhibited high levels of glioma-associated oncogene homolog-1 (GLI1) expression, while high expression levels of PTCH1 and low expression levels of smoothened (SMO) and GLI1 were observed in the HCT-116 cells. The HCT-116 cells were extremely sensitive to celecoxib, whereas the LoVo cells were resistant to the anticancer effect of the drug. Celecoxib downregulated the expression of GLI1 in the HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, but did not change the expression of GLI1 in the LoVo cells. The results presented in this study indicated that the anticancer effect of celecoxib is selective in colon cancer cells; celecoxib may target cancer cells via the SMO-independent modulation of GLI1 activity, and Hh signaling may be significant in maintaining the malignant state of LoVo cells. These findings may aid in improving our understanding of the carcinogenesis of colon cancer and the development of novel approaches for the targeted therapy of this disease. PMID:25295109

  16. Role of miR-100 in the radioresistance of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Yong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Ru, Gan; Xu, Hong-Tao; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of radioresistant colorectal cancer (CRC) is generally poor. Abnormal expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in the radiosensitivity of various tumor cells as these RNAs regulate biological signaling pathways. However, radioresistance-associated miRNAs in CRC have not yet been identified. In this study, we filtered out HCT116 and CCL-244 from seven CRC cell lines that showed the highest difference in radiosensitivity in a clonogenic assay. MiRNA sequencing identified 33 differentially expressed miRNAs (13 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated) in CCL-244 and 37 in HCT116 (20 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated) cells. MiR-100 was significantly down-regulated in CCL-244 cells after X-ray irradiation but not in HCT116 cells. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the expression of miR-100 in CRC tissues was significantly lower than that in normal tissues. Thus, miR-100 seems to be involved in the radioresistance of CCL-244 cells. MiR-100 up-regulation sensitized CCL-244 cells to X-ray irradiation, which probably led to apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in these. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first study to show that miR-100 may play an important role in regulating the radiosensitivity of CRC, and it may act as a new clinical target for CRC radiotherapy. PMID:25973296

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 inhibits the proliferation and growth of human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNYUAN; CHEN, XIAN; QIAO, MIN; ZHANG, BING-QIANG; WANG, NING; ZHANG, ZHONGLIN; LIAO, ZHAN; ZENG, LIYI; DENG, YOULIN; DENG, FANG; ZHANG, JUNHUI; YIN, LIANGJUN; LIU, WEI; ZHANG, QIAN; YAN, ZHENGJIAN; YE, JIXING; WANG, ZHONGLIANG; ZHOU, LAN; LUU, HUE H.; HAYDON, REX C.; HE, TONG-CHUAN; ZHANG, HONGYU

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most deadly cancers worldwide. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of CRC, which has led to successful early diagnosis, surgical intervention and combination chemotherapy. However, limited therapeutic options are available for metastatic and/or drug-resistant CRC. While the aberrantly activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays a critical initiating role in CRC development, disruption of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway causes juvenile polyposis syndrome, suggesting that BMP signaling may play a role in CRC development. However, conflicting results have been reported concerning the possible roles of BMP signaling in sporadic colon cancer. Here, we investigated the effect of BMP2 on the proliferation, migration, invasiveness and tumor growth capability of human CRC cells. Using an adenovirus vector that overexpresses BMP2 and the piggyBac transposon-mediated stable BMP2 overexpression CRC line, we found that exogenous BMP2 effectively inhibited HCT116 cell proliferation and colony formation. BMP2 was shown to suppress colon cancer cell migration and invasiveness. Under a low serum culture condition, forced expression of BMP2 induced a significantly increased level of apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Using a xenograft tumor model, we found that forced expression of BMP2 in HCT116 cells suppressed tumor growth, accompanied by decreased cell proliferation activity. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that BMP2 plays an important inhibitory role in governing the proliferation and aggressive features of human CRC cells. PMID:24993644

  18. Cell diameter measurements obtained with a handheld cell counter could be used as a surrogate marker of G2/M arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines exposed to SN-38

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, Makiko; Inoue, Takeshi; Fujii, Hirofumi; Kotake, Kenjiro; Sugano, Kokichi

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Chemo-sensitivity to SN-38 was assayed by the automated cell counter. •Colon cancer cell line, HCT116 cells were more sensitive to SN-38 than HT29 cells. •Increase of cell size reflects G2/M arrest. •Appearance of small particles indicates cell apoptosis. -- Abstract: In vitro assessment of chemosensitivity are important for experiments evaluating cancer therapies. The Scepter 2.0 cell counter, an automated handheld device based on the Coulter principle of impedance-based particle detection, enables the accurate discrimination of cell populations according to cell size and volume. In this study, the effects of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, on the colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were evaluated using this device. The cell count data obtained with the Scepter counter were compared with those obtained with the {sup 3}H-thymidine uptake assay, which has been used to measure cell proliferation in many previous studies. In addition, we examined whether the changes in the size distributions of these cells reflected alterations in the frequency of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis induced by SN-38 treatment. In our experiments using the Scepter 2.0 cell counter, the cell counts were demonstrated to be accurate and reproducible measure and alterations of cell diameter reflected G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our data show that easy-to-use cell counting tools can be utilized to evaluate the cell-killing effects of novel treatments on cancer cells in vitro.

  19. Magneto-controllable capture and release of cancer cells by using a micropillar device decorated with graphite oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolei; He, Rongxiang; Li, Shasha; Cai, Bo; Zhao, Libo; Liao, Lei; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qian; Wang, Hao; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2013-11-25

    Aiming to highly efficient capture and analysis of circulating tumor cells, a micropillar device decorated with graphite oxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles is developed for magneto-controllable capture and release of cancer cells. Graphite oxide-coated, Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized by solution mixing and functionalized with a specific antibody, following by the immobilization of such modified MNPs on our designed micropillar device. For the proof-of-concept study, a HCT116 colorectal cancer cell line is employed to exam the capture efficiency. Under magnetic field manipulation, the high density packing of antibody-modified MNPs on the micropillars increases the local concentration of antibody, as well as the topographic interactions between cancer cells and micropillar surfaces. The flow rate and the micropillar geometry are optimized by studying their effects on capture efficiency. Then, a different number of HCT116 cells spiked in two kinds of cell suspension are investigated, yielding capture efficiency >70% in culture medium and >40% in blood sample, respectively. Moreover, the captured HCT116 cells are able to be released from the micropillars with a saturated efficiency of 92.9% upon the removal of applied magnetic field and it is found that 78% of the released cancer cells are viable, making them suitable for subsequent biological analysis.

  20. DNA microarray profiling of genes differentially regulated by the histone deacetylase inhibitors vorinostat and LBH589 in colon cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the significant progress made in colon cancer chemotherapy, advanced disease remains largely incurable and novel efficacious chemotherapies are urgently needed. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represent a novel class of agents which have demonstrated promising preclinical activity and are undergoing clinical evaluation in colon cancer. The goal of this study was to identify genes in colon cancer cells that are differentially regulated by two clinically advanced hydroxamic acid HDACi, vorinostat and LBH589 to provide rationale for novel drug combination partners and identify a core set of HDACi-regulated genes. Methods HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells were treated with LBH589 or vorinostat and growth inhibition, acetylation status and apoptosis were analyzed in response to treatment using MTS, Western blotting and flow cytometric analyses. In addition, gene expression was analyzed using the Illumina Human-6 V2 BeadChip array and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis. Results Treatment with either vorinostat or LBH589 rapidly induced histone acetylation, cell cycle arrest and inhibited the growth of both HCT116 and HT29 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of the microarray profiling revealed significant similarity in the genes altered in expression following treatment with the two HDACi tested within each cell line. However, analysis of genes that were altered in expression in the HCT116 and HT29 cells revealed cell-line-specific responses to HDACi treatment. In addition a core cassette of 11 genes modulated by both vorinostat and LBH589 were identified in both colon cancer cell lines analyzed. Conclusion This study identified HDACi-induced alterations in critical genes involved in nucleotide metabolism, angiogenesis, mitosis and cell survival which may represent potential intervention points for novel therapeutic combinations in colon cancer. This information will assist in the identification of novel pathways and targets that are modulated by HDACi

  1. Sorbitol induces apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells via p38 MAPK signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue; Li, Chun; Wang, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Kun; Gai, Xiao-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Sorbitol has been reported to have anticancer effects in several tumor models, however its effects on colorectal cancer remain elusive. In the present study, the effects of sorbitol on growth inhibition and apoptosis in the colorectal cancer HCT116 cell line were evaluated and its mechanism of action was examined. An MTT assay was utilized to determine the effect of sorbitol on HCT116 cell proliferation at different time points and variable doses. Western blot analysis was used to examine the effect of sorbitol on apoptosis-related protein expression and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results revealed that sorbitol may inhibit the growth of HCT116 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Following treatment with sorbitol for 3 h, western blotting demonstrated cleavage of the caspase-3 zymogen protein and a cleavage product of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a known substrate of caspase-3, was also evident. During sorbitol-induced apoptosis, the mitochondrial pathway was activated by a dose-dependent increase in Bax expression and cytochrome c release, while the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The investigation for the downstream signal pathway revealed that sorbitol-induced apoptosis was mediated by an increase in phosphorylated p38 MAPK expression. Overall, the observations from the present study imply that sorbitol causes increased levels of Bax in response to p38 MAPK signaling, which results in the initiation of the mitochondrial death cascade. Therefore, sorbitol is a promising candidate as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer HCT116 cells.

  2. Cytotoxicity of probiotics from Philippine commercial dairy products on cancer cells and the effect on expression of cfos and cjun early apoptotic-promoting genes and Interleukin-1 β and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α proinflammatory cytokine genes.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Peter T; Oyong, Glenn G; Cabrera, Esperanza C

    2014-01-01

    This study determined cytotoxicity of probiotic Lactobacillus spp. from Philippine dairy products on cancer cells and normal fibroblasts and their effects on expression of early apoptotic-promoting cfos, cjun and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, TNF-α genes. Cultures were from Yakult, Bear Brand Probiotic Drink, Nido3+ Powdered Milk. Filter-sterilized supernatants from cultures of Lactobacillus spp. were evaluated for cytotoxicity to colon cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT116), leukemia cells (THP-1), and normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn) using PrestoBlue. Bleomycin was the positive control. Absolute quantification of transcript levels was conducted using qRT-PCR. Cytotoxicity index profiles on HDFn, THP-1 of all probiotic supernatants and negative controls suggest nontoxicity to the cells when compared to bleomycin, whereas all probiotic supernatants were found to be cytotoxic to HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cell lines. Expression of cfos, cjun transcripts was significantly upregulated in HT-29 and HCT116 cells treated with probiotic supernatants compared to untreated baseline levels (P < 0.05). Expression of IL-1β and TNF-α by lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages was significantly downregulated in cells with probiotic supernatants compared to those exposed to MRS medium (P < 0.05). Results provide strong support for the role of Lactobacillus spp. studied in anticancer therapy and in prevention of inflammation that may act as precursor to carcinogenesis.

  3. Cytotoxicity of probiotics from Philippine commercial dairy products on cancer cells and the effect on expression of cfos and cjun early apoptotic-promoting genes and Interleukin-1 β and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α proinflammatory cytokine genes.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Peter T; Oyong, Glenn G; Cabrera, Esperanza C

    2014-01-01

    This study determined cytotoxicity of probiotic Lactobacillus spp. from Philippine dairy products on cancer cells and normal fibroblasts and their effects on expression of early apoptotic-promoting cfos, cjun and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, TNF-α genes. Cultures were from Yakult, Bear Brand Probiotic Drink, Nido3+ Powdered Milk. Filter-sterilized supernatants from cultures of Lactobacillus spp. were evaluated for cytotoxicity to colon cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT116), leukemia cells (THP-1), and normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn) using PrestoBlue. Bleomycin was the positive control. Absolute quantification of transcript levels was conducted using qRT-PCR. Cytotoxicity index profiles on HDFn, THP-1 of all probiotic supernatants and negative controls suggest nontoxicity to the cells when compared to bleomycin, whereas all probiotic supernatants were found to be cytotoxic to HT-29 and HCT-116 colon cancer cell lines. Expression of cfos, cjun transcripts was significantly upregulated in HT-29 and HCT116 cells treated with probiotic supernatants compared to untreated baseline levels (P < 0.05). Expression of IL-1β and TNF-α by lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages was significantly downregulated in cells with probiotic supernatants compared to those exposed to MRS medium (P < 0.05). Results provide strong support for the role of Lactobacillus spp. studied in anticancer therapy and in prevention of inflammation that may act as precursor to carcinogenesis. PMID:25276792

  4. Withaferin-A Inhibits Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Blocking STAT3 Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bu Young; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Withania somnifera (known as Ashwagandha) is a medicinal plant used in the ayurvedic medicines in India. Withaferin-A, a withanolide derived from the leaf extract of W. somnifera, has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity against various cancer cells, such as leukemia, breast cancer and colon cancer cells. Methods: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of withaferin-A on the proliferation and migration of human colorectal cancer (HCT116) cells. And we evaluated the effects of withaferin-A on the transcriptional activity of STAT3 and the growth of HCT116 cells in xenograft mouse tumor model. Results: In the present study, we found that withaferin-A inhibited the proliferation and migration of HCT116 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT116 cells with withaferin-A attenuated interleukin-6-induced activation of STAT3, which has been implicated in the development and progression of colon cancer. To examine the effect of withaferin-A on HCT116 cells proliferation in vivo, we generated HCT116 cells xenograft tumors in Balb/c nude mice and treated the tumor bearing mice with or without withaferin-A intraperitoneally. Treatment with withaferin-A exhibited significant decrease in the volume and weight of tumors as compared to untreated controls. Conclusions: The present study suggests that withaferin-A holds the potential to be developed as a small molecule inhibitor of STAT3 for the treatment of HCT116. PMID:26473157

  5. Targeting KRAS Oncogene in Colon Cancer Cells with 7-Carboxylate Indolo[3,2-b]quinoline Tri-Alkylamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Hugo; Martins, Ana Cláudia; Lavrado, João; Mendes, Eduarda; Francisco, Ana Paula; Santos, Sofia A.; Ohnmacht, Stephan A.; Kim, Nam-Soon; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Moreira, Rui; Neidle, Stephen; Borralho, Pedro M.; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background A guanine-rich strand within the promoter of the KRAS gene can fold into an intra-molecular G-quadruplex structure (G4), which has an important role in the regulation of KRAS transcription. We have previously identified indolo[3,2-b]quinolines with a 7-carboxylate group and three alkylamine side chains (IQ3A) as effective G4 stabilizers and promising selective anticancer leads. Herein we investigated the anticancer mechanism of action of these compounds, which we hypothesized due to stabilization of the G4 sequence in the KRAS promoter and subsequent down-regulation of gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings IQ3A compounds showed greater stabilization of G4 compared to duplex DNA structures and reduced KRAS promoter activity in a dual luciferase reporter assay. Moreover, IQ3A compounds showed high anti-proliferative activity in HCT116 and SW620 colon cancer cells (IC50 < 2.69 μM), without eliciting cell death in non-malignant HEK293T human embryonic kidney, and human colon fibroblasts CCD18co. IQ3A compounds significantly reduced KRAS mRNA and protein steady-state levels at IC50 concentrations, and increased p53 protein steady-state levels and cell death by apoptosis in HCT116 cells (mut KRAS, wt p53). Furthermore, KRAS silencing in HCT116 p53 wild-type (p53(+/+)) and null (p53(-/-)) isogenic cell lines induced a higher level of cell death, and a higher IQ3A-induced cell death in HCT116 p53(+/+) compared to HCT116 p53(-/-). Conclusions Herein we provide evidence that G4 ligands such as IQ3A compounds can target G4 motifs present in KRAS promoter, down-regulate the expression of the mutant KRAS gene through inhibition of transcription and translation, and induce cell death by apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines. Thus, targeting KRAS at the genomic level with G4 ligands may be a new anticancer therapy strategy for colon cancer. PMID:26024321

  6. Cytotoxicity of Elaoephorbia drupifera and other Cameroonian medicinal plants against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major hurdle for cancer treatment worldwide and accounts for chemotherapy failure in over 90% of patients with metastatic cancer. Evidence of the cytotoxicity of Cameroonian plants against cancer cell lines including MDR phenotypes is been intensively and progressively provided. The present work was therefore designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the methanol extracts of twenty-two Cameroonian medicinal plants against sensitive and MDR cancer cell lines. Methods The methanol maceration was used to obtain the crude plant extracts whilst the cytotoxicity of the studied extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay. Results A preliminary assay on leukemia CCRF-CEM cells at 40 μg/mL shows that six of the twenty plant extract were able to enhance less than 50% of the growth proliferation of CCRF-CEM cells. These include Crinum zeylanicum (32.22%), Entada abyssinica (34.67%), Elaoephorbia drupifera (35.05%), Dioscorea bulbifera (45.88%), Eremomastax speciosa (46.07%) and Polistigma thonningii (45.11%). Among these six plants, E. drupifera showed the best activity with IC50 values below or around 30 μg/mL against the nine tested cancer cell lines. The lowest IC50 value of 8.40 μg/mL was recorded with the extract of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line. The IC50 values below 10 μg/mL were recorded with the extracts of E. drupifera against MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, C. zeylanicum against HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116p53-/- colon cancer cells and E. abyssinica against HCT116 p53+/+ cells. Conclusion The results of the present study provide evidence of the cytotoxic potential of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and a baseline information for the potential use of Elaoephorbia drupifera in the treatment of sensitive and drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24088184

  7. Interleukin-8 as an autocrine growth factor for human colon carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brew, R; Erikson, J S; West, D C; Kinsella, A R; Slavin, J; Christmas, S E

    2000-01-01

    Cell lines derived from human colon carcinomas secrete interleukin 8 (IL-8) in vitro and this chemokine has also been detected immunohistochemically in human colon carcinoma specimens, in which it is tumour cell associated. In these experiments, IL-8 was shown to comprise an important component of the angiogenic activity of colon carcinoma cell line supernatants. The effect of modulating IL-8 activity upon the growth of the colon carcinoma cell lines HCT116A, HT29 and CaCo2 was investigated. Supplementing endogenously produced IL-8 by recombinant chemokine led to stimulation of cell growth. Neutralization of the effect of endogenously produced IL-8, either with the specific antagonist peptide AcRRWWCR or with blocking anti-IL-8 antibody, resulted in around 50% inhibition of cell growth (P<0.05). All of the colon carcinoma cell lines tested expressed mRNA for both IL-8RA and RB when grown at confluence. At the protein level, all cell lines expressed IL-8RA. Expression of IL-8RB was weak, although increased expression was seen in HCT116A cells as they approached confluence. Antibodies to IL-8RA and RB did not affect proliferation at low cell density but were strongly inhibitory when cells were cultured at a higher density. These data suggest that IL-8 acts as an autocrine growth factor for colon carcinoma cell lines and would support the concept that a similar autocrine loop operates in vivo.

  8. Molecular portrait of cisplatin induced response in human testis cancer cell lines based on gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Duale, Nur; Lindeman, Birgitte; Komada, Mitsuko; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Andreassen, Ashild; Soderlund, Erik J; Brunborg, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Background Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) respond well to cisplatin-based chemotherapy and show a low incidence of acquired resistance compared to most somatic tumors. The reasons for these specific characteristics are not known in detail but seem to be multifactorial. We have studied gene expression profiles of testicular and colon cancer derived cell lines treated with cisplatin. The main goal of this study was to identify novel gene expression profiles with their functional categories and the biochemical pathways that are associated with TGCT cells' response to cisplatin. Results Genes that were differentially expressed between the TGCT cell lines vs the (somatic) HCT116 cell line, after cisplatin treatment, were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) method. The response of TGCT cells was strikingly different from that of HCT116, and we identified 1794 genes that were differentially expressed. Functional classification of these genes showed that they participate in a variety of different and widely distributed functional categories and biochemical pathways. Database mining showed significant association of genes (n = 41) induced by cisplatin in our study, and genes previously reported to by expressed in differentiated TGCT cells. We identified 37 p53-responsive genes that were altered after cisplatin exposure. We also identified 40 target genes for two microRNAs, hsa-mir-372 and 373 that may interfere with p53 signaling in TGCTs. The tumor suppressor genes NEO1 and LATS2, and the estrogen receptor gene ESR1, all have binding sites for p53 and hsa-mir-372/373. NEO1 and LATS2 were down-regulated in TGCT cells following cisplatin exposure, while ESR1 was up-regulated in TGCT cells. Cisplatin-induced genes associated with terminal growth arrest through senescence were identified, indicating associations which were not previously described for TGCT cells. Conclusion By linking our gene expression data to publicly available databases and

  9. Induction of apoptosis against cancer cell lines by four ascomycetes (endophytes) from Malaysian rainforest.

    PubMed

    Hazalin, Nurul Aqmar Mohamad Nor; Ramasamy, Kalavathy; Lim, Siong Meng; Cole, Anthony L J; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2012-05-15

    Endophytic fungi have been shown to be a promising source of biologically active natural products. In the present study, extracts of four endophytic fungi isolated from plants of the National Park, Pahang were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity and the nature of their active compounds determined. Those extracts exhibiting activity with IC(50) values less than 17 μg/ml against HCT116, MCF-7 and K562 cell lines were shown to induce apoptosis in these cell lines. Molecular analysis, based on sequences of the rDNA internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS4, revealed all four endophytic fungi to be ascomycetes: three sordariomycetes and a dothideomycete. Six known compounds, cytochalasin J, dechlorogriseofulvin, demethylharzianic-acid, griseofulvin, harzianic acid and 2-hexylidene-3-methyl-succinic acid were identified from a rapid dereplication technique for fungal metabolites using an in-house UV library. The results from the present study suggest the potential of endophytic fungi as cytotoxic agents, and there is an indication that the isolates contain bioactive compounds that mainly kill cancer cells by apoptosis.

  10. Inhibitor or promoter? The performance of polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum on human tumor cells with different p53 statuses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jue; Chen, Jun-ming; Wang, Xiao-xia; Xia, Yong-mei; Cui, Steve W; Li, Jian; Ding, Zhong-yang

    2016-04-01

    Polysaccharides from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPs) have been taken as effective supplements by both healthy people and cancer patients for many years. However, this short survey indicates that instead of inhibiting cancer cell growth, both submerge-cultured intracellular GLP and fruiting body GLP can stimulate the growth of human carcinoma cell lines lacking functional p53, such as HCT-116 p53(-/-), Saos-2, H1299, HL-60, MDA-MB-157. Conversely, the two GLPs inhibit all other assayed cells with functional p53. These results could be an alert since mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is the most frequent genetic alteration found in human tumors. PMID:26999513

  11. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) induce direct electric field effects and biological effects on human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2005-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are ultrashort pulses with high electric field intensity (kV/cm) and high power (megawatts), but low energy density (mJ/cc). To determine roles for p53 in response to nsPEFs, HCT116 cells (p53+/+ and p53-/-) were exposed to nsPEF and analyzed for membrane integrity, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activation, and cell survival. Decreasing plasma membrane effects were observed in both HCT116p53+/+ and p53-/- cells with decreasing pulse durations and/or decreasing electric fields. However, addition of ethidium homodimer-1 and Annexin-V-FITC post-pulse demonstrated greater fluorescence in p53-/- versus p53+/+ cells, suggesting a postpulse p53-dependent biological effect at the plasma membrane. Caspase activity was significantly higher than nonpulsed cells only in the p53-/- cells. HCT116 cells exhibited greater survival in response to nsPEFs than HL-60 and Jurkat cells, but survival was more evident for HCT116p53+/+ cells than for HCT116p53-/- cells. These results indicate that nsPEF effects on HCT116 cells include (1) apparent direct electric field effects, (2) biological effects that are p53-dependent and p53-independent, (3) actions on mechanisms that originate at the plasma membranes and at intracellular structures, and (4) an apparent p53 protective effect. NsPEF applications provide a means to explore intracellular structures and functions that can reveal mechanisms in health and disease.

  12. Human fetal colon cells and colon cancer cells respond differently to butyrate and PUFAs.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Jirina; Vaculová, Alena; Koubková, Zuzana; Hýzd'alová, Martina; Kozubík, Alois

    2009-05-01

    We verified the hypothesis suggesting modulation of the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBt) by omega-3 or omega-6 PUFAs. Comparing the response of human colon epithelial cell lines of fetal (FHC) and adenocarcinoma (HT-29, HCT-116) origin, we detected significant differences in proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic response to the treatment of NaBt, arachidonic or docosahexaenoic acids and their combination. While in FHC and HT-29 cells NaBt induced G0/G1 arrest, differentiation and low level of apoptosis, in HCT-116 cells G2/M arrest, no differentiation and high degree of apoptosis were detected. Moreover, in FHC cells significant potentiation of apoptosis accompanied by increased arrest in the cell cycle, cell detachment and decrease in differentiation were detected after combined treatment with NaBt and both PUFAs. Changes in cytokinetics induced by fatty acids were accompanied by membrane lipid unpacking, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Detection of caspase-3 activation and dynamic modulation of Mcl-1 protein expression imply their possible role in both cell differentiation and apoptotic response. Our results support the concept of modulation of NaBt effects by PUFAs, especially of omega-3 type, in colonic cells in vitro with diverse impact in cell lines derived from normal or neoplastic epithelium.

  13. Inhibitory effects of docosyl p-coumarate on DNA topoisomerase activity and human cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Katsumi; Takenaka, Yukiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi; Sugawara, Fumio; Yoshida, Hiromi; Tanahashi, Takao

    2010-10-01

    We previously found six compounds of alkyl p-coumarates from a composite plant Artemisia annua L., and chemically synthesized these compounds (cis-isomer of C20, C22 and C24, and trans-isomer of C20, C22 and C24 of p-coumarates are compounds 1-6, respectively). This report describes the inhibitory activities of these alkyl p-coumarates against DNA polymerase (pol), DNA topoisomerase (topo), and human cancer cell growth. Among the compounds tested, compounds 1 and 4 weakly inhibited repair-related pol beta activity, but no compound influenced the activity of replicative pol alpha. Compounds 4-6 and compounds 2 and 5 were potent inhibitors of human topos I and II, respectively. Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 6 also suppressed the growth of human colon carcinoma cell line, HCT116, with or without p53, suggesting that cell growth inhibition had the same tendency as the inhibition of topos rather than pols. Compound 5 (docosyl p-coumarate), which was the strongest inhibitor of topo II and cancer cell growth in the compounds tested, halted HCT116 p53(+/+) cells in G2/M phases, and induced apoptosis, although this compound did not affect the cell cycle of HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. These results suggest that the effect of p53-dependent cell cycle arrest may be effective for topo inhibition by com-pound 5. From these findings, the action mode of alkyl p-coumarates as an anti-cancer agent is discussed. PMID:20811721

  14. Immunocapture of CD133-positive cells from human cancer cell lines by using monodisperse magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres containing amino groups.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Wei-Chih; Horák, Daniel; Plichta, Zdeněk; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-based macroporous microspheres with an average particle size of 4.2μm were prepared using a modified multi-step swelling polymerization method and by introducing amino functionality on their surfaces. Antibody molecules were oxidized on their carbohydrate moieties and bound to the amino-containing magnetic microspheres via a site-directed procedure. CD133-positive cells could be effectively captured from human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HCT116, MCF7, and IMR-32) by using magnetic microspheres conjugated to an anti-human CD133 antibody. After further culture, the immunocaptured CD133-expressing cells from IMR-32 proliferated and gradually detached from the magnetic microspheres. Flow-cytometric analysis confirmed the enrichment of CD133-expressing cells by using the antibody-bound magnetic microspheres. Such microspheres suitable for immunocapture are very promising for cancer diagnosis because the CD133-expressing cells in cancer cell lines have been suggested to be cancer stem cells.

  15. Variable responses of different human cancer cells to the lichen compounds parietin, atranorin, usnic acid and gyrophoric acid.

    PubMed

    Bačkorová, M; Bačkor, M; Mikeš, J; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2011-02-01

    One of the ways for searching for potentially new anti-cancer drugs is the testing of various naturally synthesized compounds. Lichens are a source of unique chemical agents of which some have already been proved to be effective against various cancer in vitro models. Our study reports on the sensitivity of up to nine human cancer cell lines (A2780, HeLa, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, HT-29, HCT-116 p53(+/+), HCT-116 p53(-/-), HL-60 and Jurkat) to the anti-proliferative/cytotoxic effects of four typical secondary metabolites of lichens (parietin, atranorin, usnic acid and gyrophoric acid). Variations in the dynamics of tumour cell line populations were evaluated by the MTT, clonogenic and viability assays, cell proliferation and detachment, cell cycle transition and apoptotic nuclear morphology, thereby confirming their concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. However, in comparison with parietin and gyrophoric acid, the suppression of viability and cell proliferation by usnic acid or atranorin was found to be more efficient at equitoxic doses and correlated more strongly with an increased number of floating cells or a higher apoptotic index. Moreover, the analysis of cell cycle distribution also revealed an accumulation of cells in S-phase. This study has confirmed a differential sensitivity of cancer cell lines to lichen secondary metabolites. PMID:20837130

  16. IND2, a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline derivative, circumvents multi-drug resistance and causes apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Lee, Crystal; Moore, Joshua; Mittal, Roopali; Suswam, Esther A.; Abbott, Kodye L; Pondugula, Satyanarayana R.; Manne, Upender; Narayanan, Narayanan K.; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring condensed quinolines have anticancer properties. In efforts to find active analogues, we designed and synthesized eight polycyclic heterocycles with a pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline framework (IND series). The compounds were evaluated for activity against colon (HCT-116 and S1-MI-80), prostate (PC3 and DU-145), breast (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231), ovarian (ov2008 and A2780), and hepatocellular (HepG2) cancer cells and against non-cancerous Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK), mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3), and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). IND-2, a 4-chloro-2-methyl pyrimido[1”,2”:1,5]pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoline, exhibited more than tenfold selectivity and potent cytotoxic activity against colon cancer cells relative to the other cancer and non-cancer cells. With five additional colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, HCT-15, LS-180, LS-174, and LoVo), IND-2 had similar cytotoxicity and selectivity, and submicromolar concentrations caused changes in the morphology of HCT-116 and HCT-15 cells. IND-2 did not activate the transactivating function of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), indicating that it does not induce PXR-regulated ABCB1 or ABCG2 transporters. Indeed, IND-2 was not a substrate of ABCB1 or ABCG2, and it induced cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells overexpressing ABCB1 or ABCG2 to the same extent as in normal HEK293 cells. IND-2 was cytotoxic to resistant colon carcinoma S1-MI-80 cells, approximately three- and fivefold more than SN-38 and topotecan, respectively. In HCT-116 colon cancer cells, IND-2 produced concentration-dependent changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, leading to apoptosis, and sub-micromolar concentrations caused chromosomal DNA fragmentation. These findings suggest that, by increasing apoptosis, IND-2 has potential therapeutic efficacy for colorectal cancer. PMID:25537531

  17. Anti-proliferative activity of 2,6-dichloro-9- or 7-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-9H- or 7H-purines against several human solid tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fátima; Ramírez, Alberto; Conejo-García, Ana; Morata, Cynthia; Marchal, Juan A; Campos, Joaquín M

    2014-04-01

    As leads we took several benzo-fused seven- and six-membered scaffolds linked to the pyrimidine or purine moieties with notable anti-proliferative activity against human breast, colon and melanoma cancerous cell lines. We then decided to maintain the double-ringed nitrogenous bases and change the other components to the ethyl acetate moiety. This way six purine and two 5-fluorouracil derivatives were obtained and evaluated against the MCF-7, HCT-116, A-375 and G-361 cancer cell lines. Two QSARs are obtained between the anti-proliferative IC₅₀ values for compounds 26-33 and the clog P against the melanoma cell lines A-375 and G-361. Our results show that two of the analogues [ethyl 2-(2,6-dichloro-9H- or 7H-purine-9- or 7-yl)acetates (30 and 33, respectively)] are potent cytotoxic agents against all the tumour cell lines assayed, showing single-digit micromolar IC₅₀ values. This exemplifies the potential of our previously reported purine compounds to qualify as lead structures for medicinal chemistry campaigns, affording simplified analogues easy to synthesize and with a noteworthy bioactivity. The selective activity of 30 and 33 against the melanoma cell line A-375, via apoptosis, supposes a great advantage for a future therapeutic use.

  18. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  19. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system. PMID:26428235

  20. KRAS G13D Mutation and Sensitivity to Cetuximab or Panitumumab in a Colorectal Cancer Cell Line Model

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shalini Sree; Price, Timothy J.; Mohyieldin, Omar; Borg, Matthew; Townsend, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) includes drugs targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Mutation in codon 12 or 13 in the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) gene, downstream of the EGFR, evokes constitutive activation of the RAS/RAF/MAPK signaling pathway and correlates with resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies. However, a retrospective study reported that a proportion of patients with the KRAS G13D mutation may respond to cetuximab. A similar analysis for panitumumab was not as conclusive. We sought to determine the sensitivity of CRC cell lines to cetuximab or panitumumab treatment and to investigate the correlation of the KRAS mutational status of the CRC cell lines to the responsiveness to cetuximab or panitumumab. METHODS: To determine the responsiveness of CRC cell lines to cetuximab or panitumumab, cell lines were treated with an optimized concentration of each mAb, and proliferation assays were conducted. RESULTS: After treatment with cetuximab or panitumumab, at the optimum concentration of 8 μg/well, the KRAS G13D mutant cell lines HCT-116, LoVo, and T84 showed intermediate sensitivity to both treatments, between the resistant KRAS G12V mutant cell line SW480 and the sensitive KRAS wild-type cell line LIM1215. One of the G13D cell lines was significantly more sensitive to panitumumab than to cetuximab (P = .02). CONCLUSION: The specific KRAS mutation determines the responsiveness to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody treatment, corresponding to reported clinical observations. PMID:24558511

  1. Measurement of Cancer Cell Growth Heterogeneity through Lentiviral Barcoding Identifies Clonal Dominance as a Characteristic of In Vivo Tumor Engraftment.

    PubMed

    Nolan-Stevaux, Olivier; Tedesco, Donato; Ragan, Seamus; Makhanov, Mikhail; Chenchik, Alex; Ruefli-Brasse, Astrid; Quon, Kim; Kassner, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the fields of cancer initiating cells and high-throughput in vivo shRNA screens have highlighted a need to observe the growth of tumor cells in cancer models at the clonal level. While in vivo cancer cell growth heterogeneity in xenografts has been described, it has yet to be measured. Here, we tested an approach to quantify the clonal growth heterogeneity of cancer cells in subcutaneous xenograft mouse models. Using a high-throughput sequencing method, we followed the fate in vitro and in vivo of ten thousand HCT-116 cells individually tagged with a unique barcode delivered by lentiviral transduction. While growth in vitro was less homogeneous than anticipated, we still find that 95% of the final cells derived from 80% of the original cells. In xenografts, however, 95% of the retrieved barcoded cells originated from only 6% of the initially injected cells, an effect we term "clonal dominance". We observed this clonal dominance in two additional xenograft models (MDA-MB-468 and A2780(cis)) and in two different host strains (NSG and Nude). By precisely and reproducibly quantifying clonal cancer cell growth in vivo, we find that a small subset of clones accounts for the vast majority of the descendant cells, even with HCT-116, a cell line reported to lack a tumor-initiating compartment. The stochastic in vivo selection process we describe has important implications for the fields of in vivo shRNA screening and tumor initiating cells.

  2. Novel self-micellizing anticancer lipid nanoparticles induce cell death of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kyu Yoo, Bong; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel drug-like self-micellizing anticancer lipid (SMAL), and investigated its anticancer activity and effects on cell death pathways in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, namely, SMAL102 (lauramide derivative), SMAL104 (palmitamide derivative), and SMAL108 (stearamide derivative) by a thin-film hydration technique, and were characterized for physicochemical and biological parameters. SMAL102 were nanosized (160.23 ± 8.11 nm) with uniform spherical shape, while SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not form spherical shape but formed large size nanoparticles and irregular in shape. Importantly, SMAL102 showed a cytotoxic effect towards CRC cell lines (HCT116 and HT-29), and less toxicity to a normal colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co). Conversely, SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not have an anti-proliferative effect on CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles were actively taken up by CRC cell lines, localized in the cell membrane, and exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The normal colon cell line showed significantly less cellular uptake and non-cytotoxicity as compared with the CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells, indicating the induction of apoptosis; whereas LC3B was activated in HCT116 cells, indicating autophagy-induced cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SMAL102 induced cell death via activation of apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cell lines. The present study could be a pioneer for further preclinical and clinical development of such compounds. PMID:26342325

  3. Influence of Repressive Histone and DNA Methylation upon D4Z4 Transcription in Non-Myogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Sunny; Chadwick, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    We looked at a disease-associated macrosatellite array D4Z4 and focused on epigenetic factors influencing its chromatin state outside of the disease-context. We used the HCT116 cell line that contains the non-canonical polyadenylation (poly-A) signal required to stabilize somatic transcripts of the human double homeobox gene DUX4, encoded from D4Z4. In HCT116, D4Z4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin, characterized by DNA methylation and histone H3 tri-methylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me3), resulting in low basal levels of D4Z4-derived transcripts. However, a double knockout (DKO) of DNA methyltransferase genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, but not either alone, results in significant loss of DNA and H3K9 methylation. This is coupled with upregulation of transcript levels from the array, including DUX4 isoforms (DUX4-fl) that are abnormally expressed in somatic muscle in the disease Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) along with DUX4 protein, as indicated indirectly by upregulation of bondafide targets of DUX4 in DKO but not HCT116 cells. Results from treatment with a chemical inhibitor of histone methylation in HCT116 suggest that in the absence of DNA hypomethylation, H3K9me3 loss alone is sufficient to facilitate DUX4-fl transcription. Additionally, characterization of a cell line from a patient with Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability and Facial anomalies syndrome 1 (ICF1) possessing a non-canonical poly-A signal and DNA hypomethylation at D4Z4 showed DUX4 target gene upregulation in the patient when compared to controls in spite of retention of H3K9me3. Taken together, these data suggest that both DNA methylation and H3K9me3 are determinants of D4Z4 silencing. Moreover, we show that in addition to testis, there is appreciable expression of spliced and polyadenylated D4Z4 derived transcripts that contain the complete DUX4 open reading frame (ORF) along with DUX4 target gene expression in the thymus, suggesting that DUX4 may provide normal function in

  4. Influence of Repressive Histone and DNA Methylation upon D4Z4 Transcription in Non-Myogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sunny; Chadwick, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    We looked at a disease-associated macrosatellite array D4Z4 and focused on epigenetic factors influencing its chromatin state outside of the disease-context. We used the HCT116 cell line that contains the non-canonical polyadenylation (poly-A) signal required to stabilize somatic transcripts of the human double homeobox gene DUX4, encoded from D4Z4. In HCT116, D4Z4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin, characterized by DNA methylation and histone H3 tri-methylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me3), resulting in low basal levels of D4Z4-derived transcripts. However, a double knockout (DKO) of DNA methyltransferase genes, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, but not either alone, results in significant loss of DNA and H3K9 methylation. This is coupled with upregulation of transcript levels from the array, including DUX4 isoforms (DUX4-fl) that are abnormally expressed in somatic muscle in the disease Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) along with DUX4 protein, as indicated indirectly by upregulation of bondafide targets of DUX4 in DKO but not HCT116 cells. Results from treatment with a chemical inhibitor of histone methylation in HCT116 suggest that in the absence of DNA hypomethylation, H3K9me3 loss alone is sufficient to facilitate DUX4-fl transcription. Additionally, characterization of a cell line from a patient with Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability and Facial anomalies syndrome 1 (ICF1) possessing a non-canonical poly-A signal and DNA hypomethylation at D4Z4 showed DUX4 target gene upregulation in the patient when compared to controls in spite of retention of H3K9me3. Taken together, these data suggest that both DNA methylation and H3K9me3 are determinants of D4Z4 silencing. Moreover, we show that in addition to testis, there is appreciable expression of spliced and polyadenylated D4Z4 derived transcripts that contain the complete DUX4 open reading frame (ORF) along with DUX4 target gene expression in the thymus, suggesting that DUX4 may provide normal function in

  5. A novel class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, I-7ab, induces apoptosis and arrests cell cycle progression in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyan; Liang, Qiannan; Shen, Ke; Ma, Li; An, Na; Deng, Weiping; Fei, Zhewei; Liu, Jianwen

    2015-04-01

    Epigenetic mutations are closely associated with human diseases, especially cancers. Among them, dysregulations of histone deacetylases (HDACs) are commonly observed in human cancers. Recent years, HDAC inhibitors have been identified as promising anticancer agents; several HDAC inhibitors have been applied in clinical practice. In this study, we synthesized a novel N-hydroxyacrylamide-derived HDAC inhibitor, I-7ab, and examined its antitumor activity. Our investigations demonstrated that I-7ab exerted cytotoxicity toward and inhibited the growth of human cancer cell lines at micromolar concentrations. Among tested cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive one to the treatment of I-7ab. However, I-7ab displayed far less cytotoxicity in human normal cells. In HCT116 cells, I-7ab inhibited the expression of class I HDACs, especially that of HDAC3, and suppressed EGFR signaling pathway. With respect to the cytotoxic effect of I-7ab, it induced apoptosis via increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and suppressing the translocation of NF-κB. Other than inducing apoptosis, I-7ab inhibited the expression of cyclin B1 and thereby arrests cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Further analyses revealed potential role of p53 and p21 in I-7ab-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. According to our findings, I-7ab may serve as a lead compound for potential antitumor drugs.

  6. Evaluation of copper-64-labeled somatostatin agonists and antagonist in sstr2-transfected cell lines that are positive and negative for p53: implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim; Parry, Jesse J.; Rogers, Buck E.; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs have become important agents for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Here we determine the effect of the tumor suppressor protein, p53, on trafficking 64Cu to tumor cell nuclei from DOTA vs.CB-TE2A-conjugated agonist Y3-TATE and the antagonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT in cell lines that are positive or negative for p53. Methods Receptor binding, internalization, cAMP and nuclear localization studies were performed with the SSTr2 agonists, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE and 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE vs. antagonist, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT, in SSTr2-transfected p53 +/+ and −/− HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. Results The antagonist, 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT, bound 8-9-fold more SSTr2 binding sites than did the 64Cu-labeled agonists. 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE was more efficiently internalized than 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE, while 64Cu-CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT showed lower, yet significant levels of internalization. CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE acted as a full agonist, inhibiting cAMP production, whereas CB-TE2A-sst2-ANT showed no inhibition of cAMP production.The 64Cu from agonists 64Cu-DOTA-Y3-TATE and 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE showed greater nuclear localization at 24 h in p53 +/+ vs. −/− cells; however, there was no difference in the levels of 64Cu from the antagonist based on p53 status. Surprisingly, the DOTA and CB-TE2A-conjugated agonists showed similar nuclear localization in the p53 +/+ and −/− cells, suggesting no difference in 64Cu release from these chelators in the HCT116 cell lines. Conclusion Based on thesein vitro data, the agonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-Y3-TATE demonstrated the most promise as an agent for targeted radiotherapy in p53 positive, SSTr2-positive tumors. PMID:22056254

  7. p53 is involved in clearance of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci in a human colon cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Orre, Lukas M. . E-mail: Lukas.Orre@ki.se; Stenerloew, Bo; Dhar, Sumeer; Larsson, Rolf; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lehtioe, Janne

    2006-04-21

    We have investigated p53-related differences in cellular response to DNA damaging agents, focusing on p53s effects on RAD51 protein level and sub-cellular localization post exposure to ionizing radiation. In a human colon cancer cell line, HCT116 and its isogenic p53-/- subcell line we show here p53-independent RAD51 foci formation but interestingly the resolution of RAD51 foci showed clear p53 dependence. In p53 wt cells, but not in p53-/- cells, RAD51 protein level decreased 48 h post irradiation and fluorescence immunostaining showed resolution of RAD51 foci and relocalization of RAD51 to nucleoli at time points corresponding to the decrease in RAD51 protein level. Both cell lines rejoined DNA double strand breaks efficiently with similar kinetics and p53 status did not influence sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We suggest that p53 has a role in RAD51 clearance post DSB repair and that nucleoli might be sites of RAD51 protein degradation.

  8. Folic Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Regulate the Antitumor Effect of 5-Fluoro-2′-Deoxyuridine in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Tsukihara, Hiroshi; Tsunekuni, Kenta; Takechi, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In colorectal cancer chemotherapy, the current standard of care includes combination therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV). However, the factors that determine the LV-mediated enhancement of 5-FU antitumor activity are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the roles of thymidine synthase (TYMS), folate receptor 1 (FOLR1), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase (GART), methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD1), and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) in LV-mediated enhancement of 5-fluoro-2′-deoxyuridine (FdUrd) cytotoxicity in vitro as a model of 5-FU antitumor activity. These genes were downregulated in DLD-1 and HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells by using small-interfering RNA. Reduced expression of TYMS mRNA significantly increased FdUrd cytotoxicity by 100- and 8.3-fold in DLD-1 and HCT116 cells, respectively. In contrast, reducing the expression of FOLR1, DHFR, GART, MTHFD1, and MTHFR decreased FdUrd cytotoxicity by 2.13- to 12.91-fold in DLD-1 cells and by 3.52- to 10.36-fold in HCT116 cells. These results demonstrate that folate metabolism is important for the efficacy of FdUrd. Overall, the results indicate that it is important to clarify the relationship between folate metabolism-related molecules and 5-FU treatment in order to improve predictions of the effectiveness of 5-FU and LV combination therapy. PMID:27685866

  9. MAD2γ, a novel MAD2 isoform, reduces mitotic arrest and is associated with resistance in testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    López-Saavedra, Alejandro; Ramírez-Otero, Miguel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Cáceres-Gutiérrez, Rodrigo; Justo-Garrido, Monserrat; Andonegui, Marco A.; Mendoza, Julia; Downie-Ruíz, Ángela; Cortés-González, Carlo; Reynoso, Nancy; Castro-Hernández, Clementina; Domínguez-Gómez, Guadalupe; Santibáñez, Miguel; Fabián-Morales, Eunice; Pruefer, Franz; Luna-Maldonado, Fernando; González-Barrios, Rodrigo; Herrera, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Prolonged mitotic arrest in response to anti-cancer chemotherapeutics, such as DNA-damaging agents, induces apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Disruptions in mitotic checkpoints contribute resistance to DNA-damaging agents in cancer. MAD2 has been associated with checkpoint failure and chemotherapy response. In this study, a novel splice variant of MAD2, designated MAD2γ, was identified, and its association with the DNA damage response was investigated. Methods: Endogenous expression of MAD2γ and full-length MAD2 (MAD2α) was measured using RT-PCR in cancer cell lines, normal foreskin fibroblasts, and tumor samples collected from patients with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). A plasmid expressing MAD2γ was transfected into HCT116 cells, and its intracellular localization and checkpoint function were evaluated according to immunofluorescence and mitotic index. Results: MAD2γ was expressed in several cancer cell lines and non-cancerous fibroblasts. Ectopically expressed MAD2γ localized to the nucleus and reduced the mitotic index, suggesting checkpoint impairment. In patients with TGCTs, the overexpression of endogenous MAD2γ, but not MAD2α, was associated with resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Likewise, cisplatin induced the overexpression of endogenous MAD2γ, but not MAD2α, in HCT116 cells. Conclusions: Overexpression of MAD2γ may play a role in checkpoint disruption and is associated with resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in TGCTs. PMID:27315568

  10. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  11. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:27424123

  12. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells.

  13. AZD-4547 exerts potent cytostatic and cytotoxic activities against fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-expressing colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ting-Jing; Zhu, Jin-Hai; Peng, De-Feng; Cui, Zhen; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Pei-hua

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) causes significant mortalities worldwide. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor (FGFR) signaling is frequently dysregulated and/or constitutively activated in CRCs, contributing to cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Here, we studied the activity of AZD-4547, a novel and potent FGFR kinase inhibitor, on CRC cells. AZD-4547 inhibited CRC cell growth in vitro, and its activity correlated with the FGFR-1/2 expression level. AZD-4547 was cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic in FGFR-1/2-expressed CRC cell lines (NCI-H716 and HCT-116), but not in FGFR-1/2 null HT-29 cells. Further, AZD-4547 inhibited cell cycle progression and attenuated the activation of FGFR1-FGFR substrate 2 (FRS-2), ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (AKT/mTOR) signalings in NCI-H716 and HCT-116 cells. In vivo, AZD-4547 oral administration at effective doses inhibited NCI-H716 (high FGFR-1/2 expression) xenograft growth in nude mice. Phosphorylation of FGFR-1, AKT, and ERK1/2 in xenograft specimens was also inhibited by AZD-4547 administration. Thus, our preclinical studies strongly support possible clinical investigations of AZD-4547 for the treatment of CRCs harboring deregulated FGFR signalings. PMID:25691251

  14. Synthesis of 4-piperidone Based Curcuminoids with Anti-inflammatory and Anti-Proliferation Potential in Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Amit; Singh, Kundan; Rawat, M S M; Tyagi, Amit K; Haque, Ashanul; Ali, Imran; Rawat, Diwan S

    2016-01-01

    A series of 4-piperidone based curcuminoids were synthesized and anticancer potential of these compounds was evaluated against human myeloid leukemia (KBM5) and colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines. Their anti-inflammatory potential was determined through the down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB. All compounds, except one, were found to exhibit better cytotoxicity than curcumin at 5 μM. Furthermore, many compounds have shown good potential to inhibit the TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation. Docking study of the compounds with NF-κB revealed that the binding affinity of the compounds ranged from ‒9.0 to ‒6.5 kcal/mol with 0-8 H-bonds. It was also observed that amido-ether based mono-carbonyl compounds bound around the same region of NF-κB where polynucleotides are known to bind to exhibit their activity. PMID:26567619

  15. Synthesis of 4-piperidone Based Curcuminoids with Anti-inflammatory and Anti-Proliferation Potential in Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Amit; Singh, Kundan; Rawat, M S M; Tyagi, Amit K; Haque, Ashanul; Ali, Imran; Rawat, Diwan S

    2016-01-01

    A series of 4-piperidone based curcuminoids were synthesized and anticancer potential of these compounds was evaluated against human myeloid leukemia (KBM5) and colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines. Their anti-inflammatory potential was determined through the down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB. All compounds, except one, were found to exhibit better cytotoxicity than curcumin at 5 μM. Furthermore, many compounds have shown good potential to inhibit the TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation. Docking study of the compounds with NF-κB revealed that the binding affinity of the compounds ranged from ‒9.0 to ‒6.5 kcal/mol with 0-8 H-bonds. It was also observed that amido-ether based mono-carbonyl compounds bound around the same region of NF-κB where polynucleotides are known to bind to exhibit their activity.

  16. Growth inhibitory activities of crude extracts obtained from herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands on several human colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Tatsuya; Suzui, Masumi; Takamatsu, Reika; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Fujino, Tetsuya; Yoshimi, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of herbs for the treatment of human diseases including cancer. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether crude extracts obtained from 44 herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands might contain components capable of inhibiting the growth of a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines. Leaves, roots and other parts of the plants were extracted with chloroform, and the crude extracts were dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide and used for the experiments. Extracts of Hemerocallis fulva, Ipomoea batatas, Curcuma longa, and Nasturium officinale caused marked dose-dependent growth inhibition, with IC(50) values in the range of 10-80 mug/ml. With the HCT116 cell line, the extracts of Hemerocallis fulva and Ipomoea batatas induced G1 cell cycle arrest after 48 h of treatment. In addition, we found that extracts of Curcuma longa, and Nasturium officinale induced apoptosis in these cells after 48 h of treatment. The present studies are the first systematic examination of the growth inhibitory effects of crude extracts obtained from herbal plants in the Ryukyu Islands. The findings provide evidence that several plants in the Ryukyu Islands contain components that may have anticancer activity. PMID:16235999

  17. Sanguisorba officinalis L synergistically enhanced 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity in colorectal cancer cells by promoting a reactive oxygen species-mediated, mitochondria-caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-ping; Liao, Min; Dai, Cong; Chen, Jie-feng; Yang, Chun-juan; Liu, Ming; Chen, Zuan-guang; Yao, Mei-cun

    2016-01-01

    Sanguisorba officinalis L. radix is a widely used herb called DiYu (DY) in China and has an extensive range of bioactivities, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative activities. However, there is little evidence to support its anti-cancer effects against colorectal cancer (CRC). The first-line chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is used to treat CRC, but its efficiency is hampered by acquired drug resistance. This study found that a water extract of DY exerted anti-proliferative effects against two CRC cell lines (HCT-116 and RKO), and it sensitized CRC cells to 5-FU therapy by activating a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated, mitochondria-caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Co-treatment of DY and 5-FU significantly elevated ROS levels, up-regulated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by a release of cytochrome c and up-regulation of proteins such as cleaved-caspase-9/3 and cleaved-PARP. Additionally, the induction of autophagy may be involved in mediating synergism of DY in HCT-116 cells. Gallic acid (GA), catechinic acid (CA) and ellagic acid (EA) were identified as the potential chief constituents responsible for the synergistic effects of DY. In conclusion, co-treatment of DY, specifically GA, CA and EA, with 5-FU may be a potential alternative therapeutic strategy for CRC by enhancing an intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27671231

  18. Capsaicin-mediated tNOX (ENOX2) up-regulation enhances cell proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nei-Chi; Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Zeng, Zih-Ming; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2012-03-14

    Cancer chemoprevention is employed to block or reverse the progression of malignancies. To date, several thousands of agents have been found to possess chemopreventative activity, one of which is capsaicin, a component of chili peppers that exhibits antigrowth activity against various cancer cell lines. However, the role of capsaicin in tumorigenesis remains controversial because both cancer prevention and promotion have been proposed. Here, we made the unexpected discovery that treatment with low concentrations of capsaicin up-regulates tNOX (tumor-associated NADH oxidase) expression in HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells in association with enhanced cell proliferation and migration, as evidenced by down-regulation of epithelial markers and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Importantly, tNOX-knockdown in HCT116 cells by RNA interference reversed capsaicin-induced cell proliferation and migration in vitro and decreased tumor growth in vivo. Collectively, these findings provide a basis for explaining the tumor-promoting effect of capsaicin and might imply that caution should be taken when using capsaicin as a chemopreventive agent. PMID:22353011

  19. Expression of domains for protein-protein interaction of nucleotide excision repair proteins modifies cancer cell sensitivity to platinum derivatives and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Matera, Eva-Laure; Bouledrak, Karima; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by platinum derivatives and has been shown to decrease the cytotoxic activity of these drugs. Because protein-protein interactions are essential for NER activity, we transfected human cancer cell lines (A549 and HCT116) with plasmids coding the amino acid sequences corresponding to the interacting domains between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), as well as ERCC1 and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group F (XPF), all NER proteins. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin V staining, we showed that transfected A549 cells were sensitized 1.2-2.2-fold to carboplatin and that transfected HCT116 cells were sensitized 1.4-5.4-fold to oxaliplatin in vitro. In addition, transfected cells exhibited modified in vivo sensitivity to the same drugs. Finally, in particular cell models of the interaction between ERCC1 and XPF, DNA repair was decreased, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone 2AX after exposure to mitomycin C, and genomic instability was increased, as determined by comparative genomic hybridization studies. The results indicate that the interacting peptides act as dominant negatives and decrease NER activity through inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  20. Pp IX silica nanoparticles demonstrate differential interactions with in vitro tumor cell lines and in vivo mouse models of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Simon, Virginie; Devaux, Corinne; Darmon, Audrey; Donnet, Thibault; Thiénot, Edouard; Germain, Matthieu; Honnorat, Jérôme; Duval, Alex; Pottier, Agnès; Borghi, Elsa; Levy, Laurent; Marill, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Protoporphyrin IX (Pp IX) silica nanoparticles, developed for effective use in photodynamic therapy (PDT), were explored in in vitro and in vivo models with the ambition to improve knowledge on the role of biological factors in the photodamage. Pp IX silica nanoparticles are found efficient at temperature with extreme metabolic downregulation, which suggest a high proportion of passive internalization. For the first time, clearance of silica nanoparticles on tumor cells is established. Cell viability assessment in six tumor cell lines is reported. In all tumor types, Pp IX silica nanoparticles are more efficient than free Pp IX. A strong fluorescence signal of reactive oxygen species generation colocalized with Pp IX silica nanoparticles, correlates with 100% of cell death. In vivo studies performed in HCT 116, A549 and glioblastoma multiforme tumors-bearing mice show tumor uptake of Pp IX silica nanoparticles with better tumor accumulation than the control alone, highlighting a high selectivity for tumor tissues. As observed in in vitro tests, tumor cell type is likely a major determinant but tumor microenvironment could more influence this differential time accumulation dynamic. The present results strongly suggest that Pp IX silica nanoparticles may be involved in new alternative local applications of PDT. PMID:19769577

  1. Expression of p53 protein as a predictor of the response to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy in human gastrointestinal cancer cell lines evaluated with apoptosis by use of thin layer collagen gel.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Saio, Masanao; Matsuo, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Yasuyuki; Saji, Shigetoyo

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis of the target cells is an important index in the assessment of the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. We previously established a new experimental technique in which cancer cells are distributed in thin collagen gel as one or two cell layers, and cultured with anti-cancer drugs. The cells are stained with fluorescent Hoechst 33258 (Ho) and photographed, then with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and again photographed. The results show that most cell death patterns can be determined by combining observations of Ho and H&E-stained cells without the necessity for judging the apoptosis by electron microscopy. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP) are important anti-cancer drugs in the treatment of a variety of cancers. 5-FU or CDDP alone have shown significant effects in the treatment of gastric and colon cancers, and in addition, it has been shown that the combination of 5-FU plus CDDP (FP) therapy produces synergism greater than 5-FU or CDDP alone in gastrointestinal cancer. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of FP therapy in the gastric cancer cell lines MKN45, MKN28, and KATOIII and the colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and COLO320, and examined the relationship between the response to FP therapy and apoptosis. Additionally, we performed transfection of normal p53 gene into p53 mutant MKN28 cells and analyzed the impact of the p53 gene on a sensitivity test. Wild-type p53 in MKN45, HCT116, and COLO320 cells underwent significantly (p<0.01) more apoptosis than MKN28 and KATOIII cells possessing p53 mutant- and deficient-type, respectively, in FP therapy. Transfection of p53 to MKN28 cells resulted in a significantly (p<0.01) higher apoptotic index. From these results, we conclude that the p53 pathway allows induction of apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancers in FP therapy treatment, and that identification of the p53 type of a patient's cancer can be used to predict the success of FP therapy. PMID:15010816

  2. RSPO2 enriches LGR5+ spheroid colon cancer stem cells and promotes its metastasis by epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi; Han, Xiaoyan; Wei, Bo; Fang, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) account for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer and promote its progression and metastasis. RSPO2, the agonist of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and serves as the growth factor of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), is considered playing an important role in CCSCs. However, the specific function of RSPO2 in CCSCs remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that RSPO2 was highly expressed in CCSCs-enriched HCT116 spheroid cells. Elevates the concentration of RSPO2 in medium in favor of enriching the LGR5+ cells and increasing the LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells, meanwhile silencing of RSPO2 by small interfering RNA inhibits LGR5 expression in HCT116 spheroid cells. In addition, RSPO2 promotes spheres formation but has little effect on the proliferation of HCT116 spheroid cells in vitro. Moreover, RSPO2 also promotes the invasion of HCT116 spheroid cells through enhancing Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These findings suggests that RSPO2 is a potential growth factor for CCSCs, helps enriching the CCSCs by serum-free DMEM/F12 medium (SFM) culture and plays a vital role in the metastasis of colon cancer. PMID:27158331

  3. Piceatannol promotes apoptosis via up-regulation of microRNA-129 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haogang; Jia, Ruichun; Wang, Chunjing; Hu, Tianming; Wang, Fujing

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Piceatannol induces apoptosis in cultured CRC cells. • Piceatannol promotes expression of miR-129. • miR-129 mediates proapoptotic effects of piceatannol. - Abstract: Piceatannol, a naturally occurring analog of resveratrol, has been confirmed as an antitumor agent by inhibiting proliferation, migration, and metastasis in diverse cancer. However, the effect and mechanisms of piceatannol on colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been well understood. This study aimed to test whether piceatannol could inhibit growth of CRC cells and reveal its underlying molecular mechanism. MTT assay was used to detect the cell viability in HCT116 and HT29 cells. Flow cytometry analysis was employed to measure apoptosis of CRC cells. Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 levels were analyzed by Western blot and miR-129 levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Our study showed that piceatannol inhibited HCT116 and HT29 cells growth in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Piceatannol induced apoptosis by promoting expression of miR-129, and then inhibiting expression of Bcl-2, an known target for miR-129. Moreover, knock down of miR-129 could reverse the reduction of cell viability induced by piceatannol in HCT116 and HT29 cells. Taken together, our study unraveled the ability of piceatannol to suppress colorectal cancer growth and elucidated the participation of miR-129 in the anti-cancer action of piceatannol. Our findings suggest that piceatannol can be considered to be a promising anticancer agent for CRC.

  4. The ethanolic extract of bark from Salix aegyptiaca L. inhibits the metastatic potential and epithelial to mesenchymal transition of colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Enayat, Shabnam; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2014-01-01

    Willow bark extracts have been used for centuries as a natural pain killer. Recently their potential as anticancer agents has been reported. We have shown the high antioxidant activity, phenolic and flavonoid content in the ethanolic extract of bark (EEB) from Salix aegyptiaca, a species endogenous to the Middle East. We have also reported that incubation with EEB resulted in a reduction in cell proliferation through the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest via the inhibition of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/Protein kinase B and mitogen activated protein kinases signaling pathways as strongly as commercial inhibitors. The current study demonstrates the robust inhibition of anchorage-independent growth, motility, migration, and adhesion of colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 and HT-29 by EEB. These in vitro functional changes were accompanied by a restoration of E-cadherin expression, a reduction in EGFR, SNAI1, SNAI2, and Twist1 and the matrix metalloproteases MMP9 and MMP2. Many of these proteins are involved in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which is considered as a critical step in the progression of noninvasive tumor cells into malignant, metastatic carcinomas. We therefore propose that EEB from Salix aegyptiaca is a potent nutraceutical causing cancer chemoprevention by inhibiting epithelial to mesenchymal transition and can be consumed for its health promoting effects.

  5. Antitumor Activity of Americanin A Isolated from the Seeds of Phytolacca americana by Regulating the ATM/ATR Signaling Pathway and the Skp2-p27 Axis in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cholomi; Hong, Ji-Young; Bae, Song Yi; Kang, Sam Sik; Park, Hyen Joo; Lee, Sang Kook

    2015-12-24

    The antiproliferative and antitumor activities of americanin A (1), a neolignan isolated from the seeds of Phytolacca americana, were investigated in human colon cancer cells. Compound 1 inhibited the proliferation of HCT116 human colon cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. The induction of G2/M cell-cycle arrest by 1 was concomitant with regulation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated/ATM and Rad3-related (ATM/ATR) signaling pathway. Treatment with 1 activated ATM and ATR, initiating the subsequent signal transduction cascades that include checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), and tumor suppressor p53. Another line of evidence underlined the significance of 1 in regulation of the S phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2)-p27 axis. Compound 1 targeted selectively Skp2 for degradation and thereby stabilized p27. Therefore, compound 1 suppressed the activity of cyclin B1 and its partner cell division cycle 2 (cdc2) to prevent entry into mitosis. Furthermore, prolonged treatment with 1 induced apoptosis by producing excessive reactive oxygen species. The intraperitoneal administration of 1 inhibited the growth of HCT116 tumor xenografts in nude mice without any overt toxicity. Modulation of the ATM/ATR signaling pathway and the Skp2-p27 axis might be plausible mechanisms of action for the antiproliferative and antitumor activities of 1 in human colon cancer cells.

  6. Transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affects cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Akhtar Ali, Muhammad; Younis, Shady; Wallerman, Ola; Gupta, Rajesh; Andersson, Leif; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-06-23

    The transcription factor ZBED6 (zinc finger, BED-type containing 6) is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation, and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate in RKO cells but reduced growth in HCT116 cells. This striking difference was reflected in the transcriptome analyses, which revealed enrichment of cell-cycle-related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines, but the direction of change often differed between the cell lines. ChIP sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes up-regulated in ZBED6-knockout clones, consistent with the view that ZBED6 modulates gene expression primarily by repressing transcription. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets, and their down-regulation by ZBED6 was validated experimentally. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-β, EGF receptor, or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. The results of this study show that the effect of ZBED6 on tumor development depends on the genetic background and the transcriptional state of its target genes.

  7. Highly skewed distribution of miRNAs and proteins between colorectal cancer cells and their exosomes following Cetuximab treatment: biomolecular, genetic and translational implications

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, Cristina; Passanisi, Roberta; Alhamdani, Mohamed S.; Destri, Giovanni Li; Cappellani, Alessandro; Barbagallo, Davide; Scalia, Marina; Valadi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Exchange of molecules via exosomes is a means of eukaryotic intercellular communication, especially within tumour microenvironments. However, no data are available on alterations of exosomal molecular cargo by environmental cues (eg, pharmacological treatments). To approach this issue, we compared the abundance of 754 miRNAs and 741 cancer-related proteins in exosomes secreted by Caco-2 (Cetuximab-responsive) and HCT- 116 (Cetuximab-resistant) CRC cells, before and after Cetuximab treatment, with that in their source cells. Cetuximab significantly altered the cargo of Caco-2 exosomes: it increased abundance of miRNAs and proteins activating proliferation and inflammation and reduced miRNAs and proteins related to immune suppression. These alterations did not precisely mirror those in source cells, suggesting a Cetuximab-linked effect. Analogous alterations were detected in HCT-116. Transfection of exosomes from Cetuximab-treated Caco-2 into HCT-116 significantly increased HCT-116 viability; conversely, no viability alteration was detected in Caco-2 transfected with exosomes from Cetuximab-treated HCT-116. Analysis of networks, comprising targets of differentially expressed (DE) exosomal miRNAs and DE exosomal proteins, demonstrates a significant involvement of processes related to proliferation, inflammation, immune response, apoptosis. Our data extend existing knowledge on molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic intercellular communication, especially in oncological processes. Their translation to clinical settings may add new weapons to existing therapeutic repertoires against cancer. PMID:25594007

  8. Autophagy inhibition by chloroquine sensitizes HT-29 colorectal cancer cells to concurrent chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Schonewolf, Caitlin A; Mehta, Monal; Schiff, Devora; Wu, Hao; Haffty, Bruce G; Karantza, Vassiliki; Jabbour, Salma K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine (CQ) sensitizes rectal tumors to radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (chemoRT). METHODS: In vitro, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines were treated as following: (1) PBS; (2) CQ; (3) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); (4) RT; (5) CQ and RT; (6) 5-FU and RT; (7) CQ and 5-FU; and (8) 5-FU and CQ and RT. Each group was then exposed to various doses of radiation (0-8 Gy) depending on the experiment. Cell viability and proliferative capacity were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and clonogenic assays. Clonogenic survival curves were constructed and compared across treatment groups. Autophagy status was determined by assessing the LC3-II to LC3-I ratio on western blot analysis, autophagosome formation on electron microscopy and identification of a perinuclear punctate pattern with GFP-labeled LC3 on fluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle arrest and cell death were evaluated by FACS and Annexin V analysis. All experiments were performed in triplicate and statistical analysis was performed by the student’s t test to compare means between treatment groups. RESULTS: RT (2-8 Gy) induced autophagy in HCT-116 and HT-29 CRC cell lines at 4 and 6 h post-radiation, respectively, as measured by increasing LC3-II to LC3-I ratio on western blot. Additionally, electron microscopy demonstrated autophagy induction in HT-29 cells 24 h following irradiation at a dose of 8 Gy. Drug treatment with 5-FU (25 μmol/L) induced autophagy and the combination of 5-FU and RT demonstrated synergism in autophagy induction. CQ (10 μmol/L) alone and in combination with RT effectively inhibited autophagy and sensitized both HCT-116 and HT-29 cells to treatment with radiation (8 Gy; P < 0.001 and 0.00001, respectively). Significant decrease in clonogenic survival was seen only in the HT-29 cell line, when CQ was combined with RT at doses of 2 and 8 Gy (P < 0.5 and

  9. Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 is decreased in intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to the anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Song, Yang; He, Chong; Liu, Changqin; Wu, Ruijin; Fang, Leilei; Cong, Yingzi; Miao, Yinglei; Liu, Zhanju

    2015-11-17

    Divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) has been found to play an important role in the iron metabolism and hemogenesis. However, little is known about the potential role of DMT1 in the pathogenesis of anemia from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we investigated expression of DMT1 in the intestinal mucosa by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, and found that DMT1 was significantly decreased in the inflamed mucosa of active IBD patients compared with that in those patients at remission stage and healthy controls. To further study the mechanism, we cultured HCT 116 cell line in vitro. Expression of DMT1 in HCT116 was demonstrated to be markedly decreased under stimulation with TNF for 24 and 48 h, while JNK inhibitor (JNK-IN-7) could significantly reverse the decrease. Interestingly, anti-TNF therapy successfully improved anemia in clinical responsive Crohn's disease patients, and DMT1 was found to be markedly up-regulated in intestinal mucosa. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that decreased expression of DMT1 in intestinal mucosa leads to compromised absorption and transportation of iron and that blockade of TNF could rescue anemia and promote DMT1 expression in gut mucosa. This work provides a therapeutic approach in the management of anemia in IBD.

  10. Reducing Compounds Equivocally Influence Oxidation during Digestion of a High-Fat Beef Product, which Promotes Cytotoxicity in Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Van Hecke, Thomas; Wouters, An; Rombouts, Caroline; Izzati, Tazkiyah; Berardo, Alberto; Vossen, Els; Claeys, Erik; Van Camp, John; Raes, Katleen; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Peeters, Marc; De Vos, Winnok H; De Smet, Stefaan

    2016-02-24

    We studied the formation of malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-nonenal, and hexanal (lipid oxidation products, LOP) during in vitro digestion of a cooked low-fat and high-fat beef product in response to the addition of reducing compounds. We also investigated whether higher LOP in the digests resulted in a higher cyto- and genotoxicity in Caco-2, HT-29 and HCT-116 cell lines. High-fat compared to low-fat beef digests contained approximately 10-fold higher LOP concentrations (all P < 0.001), and induced higher cytotoxicity (P < 0.001). During digestion of the high-fat product, phenolic acids (gallic, ferulic, chlorogenic, and caffeic acid) displayed either pro-oxidant or antioxidant behavior at lower and higher doses respectively, whereas ascorbic acid was pro-oxidant at all doses, and the lipophilic reducing compounds (α-tocopherol, quercetin, and silibinin) all exerted a clear antioxidant effect. During digestion of the low-fat product, the hydrophilic compounds and quercetin were antioxidant. Decreases or increases in LOP concentrations amounted to 100% change versus controls.

  11. Differential expression of nanog1 and nanogp8 in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Sato, Ai; Ohata, Hirokazu; Sakai, Hiroaki; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is expressed in a majority of colon cancer cell lines examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both nanog1 and nanogp8 are expressed in colon cancer cells with varying ratios. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog mediates cell proliferation of colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog predominantly localizes in cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Nanog, a homeodomain transcription factor, is an essential regulator for promotion of self-renewal of embryonic stem cells and inhibition of their differentiation. It has been demonstrated that nanog1 as well as nanogp8, a retrogene of nanog1, is preferentially expressed in advanced stages of several types of cancer, suggesting their involvement during cancer progression. Here, we investigated the expression of Nanog in well-characterized colon cancer cell lines. Expression of Nanog was detectable in 5 (HCT116, HT29, RKO, SW48, SW620) out of seven cell lines examined. RNA expression analyses of nanog1 and nanogp8 indicated that, while nanog1 was a major form in SW620 as well as in teratoma cells Tera-2, nanogp8 was preferentially expressed in HT29 and HCT116. In accordance with this, shRNA-mediated knockdown of nanog1 caused the reduction of Nanog in SW620 but not in HT29. Inhibition of Nanog in SW620 cells negatively affected cell proliferation and tumor formation in mouse xenograft. Biochemical subcellular fractionation and immunostaining analyses revealed predominant localization of Nanog in cytoplasm in SW620 and HT29, while it was mainly localized in nucleus in Tera-2. Our data indicate that nanog1 and nanogp8 are differentially expressed in colon cancer cells, and suggest that their expression contributes to proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  12. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  13. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J.; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  14. LPA Induces Colon Cancer Cell Proliferation through a Cooperation between the ROCK and STAT-3 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Leve, Fernanda; Peres-Moreira, Rubem J; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana; Morgado-Díaz, José A

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) plays a critical role in the proliferation and migration of colon cancer cells; however, the downstream signaling events underlying these processes remain poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling pathways triggered by LPA to regulate the mechanisms involved in the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have used three cell line models of CRC, and initially analyzed the expression profile of LPA receptors (LPAR). Then, we treated the cells with LPA and events related to their tumorigenic potential, such as migration, invasion, anchorage-independent growth, proliferation as well as apoptosis and cell cycle were evaluated. We used the Chip array technique to analyze the global gene expression profiling that occurs after LPA treatment, and we identified cell signaling pathways related to the cell cycle. The inhibition of these pathways verified the conclusions of the transcriptomic analysis. We found that the cell lines expressed LPAR1, -2 and -3 in a differential manner and that 10 μM LPA did not affect cell migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth, but it did induce proliferation and cell cycle progression in HCT-116 cells. Although LPA in this concentration did not induce transcriptional activity of β-catenin, it promoted the activation of Rho and STAT-3. Moreover, ROCK and STAT-3 inhibitors prevented LPA-induced proliferation, but ROCK inhibition did not prevent STAT-3 activation. Finally, we observed that LPA regulates the expression of genes related to the cell cycle and that the combined inhibition of ROCK and STAT-3 prevented cell cycle progression and increased the LPA-induced expression of cyclins E1, A2 and B1 to a greater degree than either inhibitor alone. Overall, these results demonstrate that LPA increases the proliferative potential of colon adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells through a mechanism involving cooperation between the Rho-ROCK and STAT3 pathways involved in cell

  15. Development of an Optimized Protocol for NMR Metabolomics Studies of Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines and First Insight from Testing of the Protocol Using DNA G-Quadruplex Ligands as Novel Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lauri, Ilaria; Savorani, Francesco; Iaccarino, Nunzia; Zizza, Pasquale; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Novellino, Ettore; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Randazzo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The study of cell lines by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy metabolomics represents a powerful tool to understand how the local metabolism and biochemical pathways are influenced by external or internal stimuli. In particular, the use of adherent mammalian cells is emerging in the metabolomics field in order to understand the molecular mechanism of disease progression or, for example, the cellular response to drug treatments. Hereto metabolomics investigations for this kind of cells have generally been limited to mass spectrometry studies. This study proposes an optimized protocol for the analysis of the endo-metabolome of human colon cancer cells (HCT116) by NMR. The protocol includes experimental conditions such as washing, quenching and extraction. In order to test the proposed protocol, it was applied to an exploratory study of cancer cells with and without treatment by anti-cancer drugs, such as DNA G-quadruplex binders and Adriamycin (a traditional anti-cancer drug). The exploratory NMR metabolomics analysis resulted in NMR assignment of all endo-metabolites that could be detected and provided preliminary insights about the biological behavior of the drugs tested. PMID:26784246

  16. HMGB1-mediated autophagy modulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to oxaliplatin via MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijun; Zhang, Zhenyong; Zhang, Yongxue; Chen, Xinju; Guo, Shikui; Lei, Yi; Xu, Yu; Ji, Chao; Bi, Zhigang; Wang, Kunhua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced drug resistance in human colorectal cancer cell lines HT29 and HCT116. Our results demonstrate a significant autophagy expression in CRC cells after an oxaliplatin treatment. Administration of oxaliplatin to human CRC cells significantly enhanced the expression of HMGB1, which regulated the autophagy response and negatively regulate the cell apoptosis. Moreover, a decreased oxaliplatin -induced autophagy response and an increased apoptosis level were detected in stable CRC cells harboring HMGB1 shRNA. Then we noted that HMGB1 significantly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/Extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these data suggest that HMGB1-mediated autophagy modulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to oxaliplatin via MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

  17. The Association of CXC Receptor 4 Mediated Signaling Pathway with Oxaliplatin-Resistant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Yi; Kuo, Yi-Hung; Tung, Shui-Yi; Shen, Chien-Heng; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Teng, Chih-Chuan; Lee, Kam-Fai; Chen, Te-Chuan; Lee, Ko-Chao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. In addition, metastatic CRC remains one of the most difficult human malignancies to treat because of its chemoresistant behavior. However, the mechanism by which correlation occurs between CXCR4 and the clinical response of CRC to chemotherapy remains unknown. We generated chemoresistant cells with increasing doses of oxaliplatin (OXA) and 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) to develop resistance at a clinical dose. We found that the putative markers did not change in the parental cells, but HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR were more aggressive and had higher tumor growth (demonstrated by wound healing, chemotaxis assay, and a nude mice xenograft model) with the use of oxaliplatin. Apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin treatment was significantly decreased in HCT-116/OxR compared to the parental cells. Moreover, HCT-116/OxR cells displayed increased levels of p-gp, p-Akt p-ERK, p-IKBβ, CXCR4, and Bcl-2, but they also significantly inhibited the apoptotic pathways when compared to the parental strain. We evaluated the molecular mechanism governing the signaling pathway associated with anti-apoptosis activity and the aggressive status of chemoresistant cells. Experiments involving specific inhibitors demonstrated that the activation of the pathways associated with CXCR4, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt is critical to the functioning of the HCT-116/OxR and HCT-116/5-FUR characteristics of chemosensitivity. These findings elucidate the mechanism of CXCR4/PI3K/Akt downstream signaling and provide strategies to inhibit CXCR4 mediated signaling pathway in order to overcome CRC’s resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27668882

  18. Differential ganciclovir-mediated cell killing by glutamine 125 mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Drake, R R; Wilbert, T N; Hinds, T A; Gilbert, K M

    1999-12-24

    The therapeutic combination of the herpesvirus simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) gene and the prodrug, ganciclovir (GCV), has found great utility for the treatment of many types of cancer. After initial phosphorylation of GCV by HSV-1 TK, cellular kinases generate the toxic GCV-triphosphate metabolite that is incorporated into DNA and eventually leads to tumor cell death. The cellular and pharmacological mechanisms by which metabolites of GCV lead to cell death are still poorly defined. To begin to address these mechanisms, different mutated forms of HSV-1 TK at residue Gln-125 that have distinct substrate properties were expressed in mammalian cell lines. It was found that expression of the Asn-125 HSV-1 TK mutant in two cell lines, NIH3T3 and HCT-116, was equally effective as wild-type HSV-1 TK for metabolism and sensitivity to GCV, bystander effect killing and induction of apoptosis. The major difference between the two enzymes was the lack of deoxypyrimidine metabolism in the Asn-125 TK-expressing cells. In HCT-116 cells expressing the Glu-125 TK mutant, GCV metabolism was greatly attenuated, yet at higher GCV concentrations, cell sensitivity to the drug and bystander effect killing were diminished but still effective. Cell cycle analysis, 4', 6'-diamidine-2'-phenylindoledihydrochloride staining, and caspase 3 activation assays indicated different cell death responses in the Glu-125 TK-expressing cells as compared with the wild-type HSV-1 TK or Asn-125 TK-expressing cells. A mechanistic hypothesis to explain these results based on the differences in GCV-triphosphate metabolite levels is presented.

  19. Cytotoxic Compounds from Juglans sinensis Dode Display Anti-Proliferative Activity by Inducing Apoptosis in Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Cui, Jun; Lee, Jun; Han, Ah-Reum; Lee, Eun Byul; Jang, Ho Hee; Seo, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the bark of Juglans sinensis Dode (Juglandaceae) led to the isolation of two active compounds, 8-hydroxy-2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (1) and 5-hydroxy-2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2), together with 15 known compounds 3-17. All compounds were isolated from this plant for the first time. The structures of 1 and 2 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Compounds 1-17 were tested for their cytotoxicity against the A549 human lung cancer cell line; compounds 1 and 2 exhibited significant cytotoxicity and additionally had potent cytotoxicity against six human cancer cell lines, MCF7 (breast cancer), SNU423 (liver cancer), SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma), HeLa (cervical cancer), HCT116 (colorectal cancer), and A549 (lung cancer). In particular, breast, colon, and lung cancer cells were more sensitive to the treatment using compound 1. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 showed strong cytotoxic activity towards human breast cancer cells MCF7, HS578T, and T47D, but not towards MCF10A normal-like breast cells. They also inhibited the colony formation of MCF7, A549, and HCT116 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the percentage of apoptotic cells significantly increased in MCF7 cells upon the treatment with compounds 1 and 2. The mechanism of cell death caused by compounds 1 and 2 may be attributed to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl2. These findings suggest that compounds 1 and 2 may be regarded as potential therapeutic agents against cancer.

  20. Effect of a nutrient mixture on matrix metalloproteinase-9 dimers in various human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Roomi, M W; Kalinovsky, T; Rath, M; Niedzwiecki, A

    2014-03-01

    Strong clinical and experimental evidence demonstrates association of elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9 with cancer progression, metastasis and shortened patient survival, as it plays a key role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis by digesting the basement membrane and ECM components. MMP-9 is secreted in both the monomeric and dimeric form. Although there is little research on MMP-9 dimers, some studies have shown the dimer to be associated with more aggressive tumor progression. Our objective was to study the relative secretion patterns of MMP-9 monomer and dimer in a variety of cancer cell lines and the effect of a nutrient mixture (NM) containing lysine, proline, ascorbic acid and green tea extract on MMP-9 secretion. The cancer cell lines were grown in their respective media, supplemented with 10% FBS, penicillin (100 U/ml) and streptomycin (100 µg/ml) in 24-well tissue culture plates. At near confluence, the cells were treated with NM at 0,10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000 µg/ml. Parallel sets of cultures were treated with PMA (100 ng/ml) for induction of MMP-9. Cell MMP-9 secretion was assayed by gelatinase zymography. MMP-9 dimer secretion patterns of cancer cells fell into different categories. We observed no MMP-9 dimer in prostate DU-145 and PC-3, pancreatic MIA-Pa-Ca2, colon HCT-116, bladder T-24, head and neck FaDu, glioblastoma A-172, T-98 and LN-18 and leukemia HL-60, Jurkat, and Raji cell lines. MMP-dimer secretion only with PMA induction was seen in breast MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, uterine SK-UT-1, lung A-549, tongue SC-25, melanoma A2058, osteosarcoma U-2OS, rhabdomyosarcoma, fibrosarcoma HT-1080, chondrosarcoma SW-1350 and liposarcoma SW-872. Cervical HeLa and DoTc 2 4510, renal 786-0 and HCC SK-Hep-1 cells exhibited MMP-9 dimer without PMA treatment and increased secretion with PMA treatment. Sarcomas had the highest levels of MMP-9 monomer and dimer with and without PMA among these cancer cell lines. Cervical, uterine and male

  1. Intestinal trefoil factor controls the expression of the adenomatous polyposis coli-catenin and the E-cadherin-catenin complexes in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, J A; Noda, M; Rowan, A; Dixon, C; Chinery, R; Jawhari, A; Hattori, T; Wright, N A; Bodmer, W F; Pignatelli, M

    1998-03-17

    Intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is a member of the trefoil family of peptides, small molecules constitutively expressed in epithelial tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. TFF3 has been shown to promote migration of intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and to enhance mucosal healing and epithelial restitution in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effect of recombinant TFF3 (rTFF3) stimulation on the expression and cellular localization of the epithelial (E)-cadherin-catenin complex, a prime mediator of Ca2+ dependent cell-cell adhesion, and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-catenin complex in HT29, HCT116, and SW480 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Stimulation by rTFF3 (10(-9) M and 10(-8) M) for 20-24 hr led to cell detachment and to a reduction in intercellular adhesion in HT29 and HCT116 cells. In both cell lines, E-cadherin expression was down-regulated. The expression of APC, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin also was decreased in HT29 cells, with a translocation of APC into the nucleus. No change in either cell adhesion or in the expression of E-cadherin, the catenins, and APC was detected in SW480 cells. In addition, TFF3 induced DNA fragmentation and morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in HT29. Tyrphostin, a competitive inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, inhibited the effects of TFF3. Our results indicate that by perturbing the complexes between E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and associated proteins, TFF3 may modulate epithelial cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

  2. PES1 regulates sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to anticancer drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wei; Qu, Like; Meng, Lin; Liu, Caiyun; Wu, Jian; Shou, Chengchao

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► PES1 was overexpressed in diverse cancer cell lines. ► PES1-ablation enhances DNA damage response by decreasing DNA repair. ► PES1-ablation increases the sensitivity of HCT116 cells to chemotherapeutic agents. ► PES1-ablation is associated with diminished nuclear entry of RAD51. -- Abstract: PES1 (also known as Pescadillo), a nucleolar protein, was involved in biogenesis of ribosomal RNA. Up-regulation of PES1 has been documented in some human cancers, indicating that PES1 may play some crucial roles in tumorigenesis. In our previous study, it was found that silencing of PES1 resulted in decreased proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. We also noticed that depletion of PES1 altered expression profiles of diverse genes. In the present study, we validated the expression changes of a subset of genotoxic stress-related genes in PES1-silenced HCT116 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. The steady and etoposide-induced phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were higher in PES1-silenced cells than in control cells. Besides, etoposide-induced γ-H2AX persisted longer in PES1-silenced cells after removing the etoposide. Next, results of comet assay revealed decreased DNA repair after PES1-ablation. PES1-ablated cells were more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents, which could be reversed by reconstitution with exogenous PES1. Furthermore, deletion of PES1 diminished steady and DNA damage-induced levels of nuclear RAD51. Our results uncover a potential role of PES1 in chemoresistance by regulating DNA damage response in colorectal cancer cells.

  3. DAPK loss in colon cancer tumor buds: implications for migration capacity of disseminating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Agaimy, Abbas; Garreis, Fabian; Söder, Stephan; Laqua, William; Lugli, Alessandro; Hartmann, Arndt; Rau, Tilman T.; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Defining new therapeutic strategies to overcome therapy resistance due to tumor heterogeneity in colon cancer is challenging. One option is to explore the molecular profile of aggressive disseminating tumor cells. The cytoskeleton-associated Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is involved in the cross talk between tumor and immune cells at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. Here dedifferentiated tumor cells histologically defined as tumor budding are associated with a high risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Analyzing samples from 144 colorectal cancer patients we investigated immunhistochemical DAPK expression in different tumor regions such as center, invasion front, and buds. Functional consequences for tumor aggressiveness were studied in a panel of colon tumor cell lines using different migration, wound healing, and invasion assays. DAPK levels were experimentally modified by siRNA transfection and overexpression as well as inhibitor treatments. We found that DAPK expression was reduced towards the invasion front and was nearly absent in tumor buds. Applying the ECIS system with HCT116 and HCT116 stable lentiviral DAPK knock down cells (HCTshDAPK) we identified an important role for DAPK in decreasing the migratory capacity whereas proliferation was not affected. Furthermore, the migration pattern differed with HCTshDAPK cells showing a cluster-like migration of tumor cell groups. DAPK inhibitor treatment revealed that the migration rate was independent of DAPK's catalytic activity. Modulation of DAPK expression level in SW480 and DLD1 colorectal cancer cells significantly influenced wound closure rate. DAPK seems to be a major player that influences the migratory capability of disseminating tumor cells and possibly affects the dynamic interface between pro- and anti-survival factors at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. This interesting and new finding requires further evaluation. PMID:26405175

  4. A novel synthetic C-1 analogue of 7-deoxypancratistatin induces apoptosis in p53 positive and negative human colorectal cancer cells by targeting the mitochondria: enhancement of activity by tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dennis; Tremblay, Phillip; Mahngar, Kevinjeet; Akbari-Asl, Pardis; Collins, Jonathan; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2012-06-01

    The natural compound pancratistatin (PST), isolated from the Hymenocallis littoralis plant, specifically induces apoptosis in many cancer cell lines. Unlike many other chemotherapeutics, PST is not genotoxic and has minimal adverse effects on non-cancerous cells. However, its availability for preclinical and clinical work is limited due to its low availability in its natural source and difficulties in its chemical synthesis. Several synthetic analogues of 7-deoxypancratistatin with different modifications at C-1 were synthesized and screened for apoptosis inducing activity in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We found that a C-1 acetoxymethyl derivative of 7-deoxypancratistatin, JC-TH-acetate-4 (JCTH-4), was effective in inducing apoptosis in both p53 positive (HCT 116) and p53 negative (HT-29) human CRC cell lines, demonstrating similar efficacy to that of natural PST. JCTH-4 was able to decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increase levels of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria, cause release of the apoptogenic factor cytochrome c (Cyto c) from isolated mitochondria, and induce autophagy in HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. Interestingly, when JCTH-4 was administered with tamoxifen (TAM), there was an enhanced effect in apoptosis induction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and Cyto c release by isolated mitochondria, and autophagic induction by CRC cells. Minimal toxicity was exhibited by a normal human fetal fibroblast (NFF) and a normal colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cell line. Hence, JCTH-4 is a novel compound capable of selectively inducing apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cells alone and in combination with TAM and may serve as a safer and more effective alternative to current cancer therapies. PMID:21494837

  5. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Sabita N; Kala, Rishabh; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells.

  6. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chiao-May; Sun, H. Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h) dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27078027

  7. Protein kinase CK2 is involved in G2 arrest and apoptosis following spindle damage in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sayed, M; Pelech, S; Wong, C; Marotta, A; Salh, B

    2001-10-25

    p53 undergoes phosphorylation on several residues in response to cellular stresses that include UV and ionizing radiation, however the influence of spindle damage on this parameter is relatively unclear. Consequently, the effect of nocodazole on serine 392 phosphorylation was examined in two epithelial cell lines. We show that this process is dependent upon the stepwise activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and protein kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2). Furthermore, this activation correlated with the biochemical regulation of the maturation-promoting factor (MPF, cdc2/cyclin B), as both DRB and antisense depletion of CK2, as well as SB203580 were associated with an inhibition of its activation in response to nocodazole. Strikingly, when the cell cycle characteristics of nocodazole treated cells were examined, we observed that depletion or inhibition of the catalytic subunit of CK2, in the presence of microtubule inhibitors, resulted in a compromise of the G2 arrest (spindle checkpoint). Furthermore, CK2-depleted, nocodazole treated cells demonstrated a dramatic reduction in the apoptotic cell fraction, confirming that these cells had been endowed with oncogenic properties. These changes were observed in both HeLa cells and HCT116 cells. We also show that this effect is dependent on the presence of functional wild-type p53, as this phenomenon is not apparent in HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. Collectively, our results indicate two novel roles for CK2 in the spindle checkpoint arrest, in concert with p53. Firstly, to maintain increased cyclinB/cdc2 kinase activity, as a component of G2 arrest, and secondly, a role in p53-mediated apoptosis. These findings may have implications for an improved understanding of abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint in human cancers, which is a prerequisite for defining future therapies. PMID:11704824

  8. New constituents from Crinum latifolium with inhibitory effects against tube-like formation of human umbilical venous endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Nguyen-Hai; Kim, Yong; You, Young-Jae; Hong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Ahn, Byung-Zun

    2004-12-01

    Six compounds (1-6) were isolated from the methanol extract of Crinum latifolium by bioassay-guided separation. Among the six isolates, compounds 2 and 6 were new metabolites. Their structures were established as 4-senecioyloxymethyl-3,4-dimethoxycoumarin (2) and 5,6,3'-trihydroxy-7,8,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6) based on spectroscopic analyses. Compound 2 was found to be strongly inhibitory against the in vitro tube-like formation of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) while manifesting no cytotoxicity in tumor cell lines (B16F10, HCT116). Significant inhibitory activity (inhibition percentage, 53.5%) was still observed at concentrations as low as 1 microg/mL. Compound 6 showed a modest inhibitory effect on the tube-like formation of HUVECs. Other compounds, including cycloartenol (1), 4',7-dihydroxy-3'-methoxyflavan (3), 4',7-dihydroxyflavan (4), and 2',4',7-trihydroxydihydrochalcone (5) were found to be nearly inactive.

  9. Storage elevates phenolic content and antioxidant activity but suppresses antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic properties of colored-flesh potatoes against human colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Madiwale, Gaurav P; Reddivari, Lavanya; Holm, David G; Vanamala, Jairam

    2011-08-10

    Colored-flesh potatoes are an excellent source of health-benefiting dietary polyphenols, but are stored for up to 3-6 months before consumption. This study investigated the effect of simulated commercial storage conditions on antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS), phenolic content (FCR) and composition (UPLC-MS), and anticancer properties (early, HCT-116 and advanced stage, HT-29 human colon cancer cell lines) of potato bioactive compounds. Extracts from seven potato clones of differing flesh colors (white, yellow, and purple) before and after 90 days of storage were used in this study. The antioxidant activity of all clones increased with storage; however, an increase in total phenolic content was observed only in purple-fleshed clones. Advanced purple-fleshed selection CO97227-2P/PW had greater levels of total phenolics, monomeric anthocyanins, antioxidant activity and a diverse anthocyanin composition as compared with Purple Majesty. Purple-fleshed potatoes were more potent in suppressing proliferation and elevating apoptosis of colon cancer cells compared with white- and yellow-fleshed potatoes. The extracts from both fresh and stored potatoes (10-30 μg/mL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation and elevated apoptosis compared with the solvent control, but these anticancer effects were more pronounced with the fresh potatoes. Storage duration had a strong positive correlation with antioxidant activity and percentage of viable cancer cells and a negative correlation with apoptosis induction. These results suggest that although the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of potatoes were increased with storage, the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activities were suppressed. Thus, in the assessment of the effects of farm to fork operations on the health-benefiting properties of plant foods, it is critical to use quantitative analytical techniques in conjunction with in vitro and/or in vivo biological assays.

  10. Methylselenol, a selenium metabolite, plays a critical role in inhibiting colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylselenol is hypothesized to be a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity. In this study, submicromolar methylselenol was generated by incubating methionase with seleno-L methionine, and both colon-cancer-derived HCT-116 cells and noncancerous colon NCM460 cells were exposed to...

  11. Expression of DNA damage checkpoint 53BP1 is correlated with prognosis, cell proliferation and apoptosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Jianping; Huang, Ai; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Hong

    2015-01-01

    53BP1, an important mediator of DNA damage checkpoint, plays an essential role in maintaining the cell genome stability, and the aberrant expression of 53BP1 was found to contribute to tumor occurrence and development. In this study, we explored the clinical significance of 53BP1 expression in colorectal cancer and investigated the effects of 53BP1 expression on tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and its possible mechanisms. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to detect the expression of 53BP1 in 95 cases of tumor tissues. After establishment of shRNA-mediated knockdown stable HCT-116 cell lines, cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were detected by MTT and flow cytometry, and expression of up-and down-steam related proteins as γ-H2AX, CHK2 and P53 were tested by Western blot. 53BP1 intensity was found to be associated with tumor location (P < 0.05), and the low expression of 53BP1 revealed decreased survival time compared with high expression in subgroups as male, tumor size > 5 cm, tumor located at right side, T stage as T3-T4, N0, clinical stage as I-II (P < 0.05). In vitro, shRNA-mediated loss of 53BP1 obviously inhibited HCT-116 tumor cell apoptosis, promoted cell proliferation and increased accumulation of cells in S phase. Meanwhile, the expression of γ-H2AX, CHK2 and P53 was significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest 53BP1 may serve as a candidate biomarker for predicting prognosis and disease development in colorectal cancer. PMID:26261485

  12. Defective Autophagosome Formation in p53-Null Colorectal Cancer Reinforces Crocin-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amr; Bajbouj, Khuloud; Koch, Adrian; Gandesiri, Muktheshwar; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron, inhibited proliferation of both HCT116 wild-type and HCT116 p53−/− cell lines at a concentration of 10 mM. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle distribution revealed that there was an accumulation of HCT116 wild-type cells in G1 (55.9%, 56.1%) compared to the control (30.4%) after 24 and 48 h of crocin treatment, respectively. However, crocin induced only mild G2 arrest in HCT116 p53−/− after 24 h. Crocin induced inefficient autophagy in HCT116 p53−/− cells, where crocin induced the formation of LC3-II, which was combined with a decrease in the protein levels of Beclin 1 and Atg7 and no clear p62 degradation. Autophagosome formation was not detected in HCT116 p53−/− after crocin treatment predicting a nonfunctional autophagosome formation. There was a significant increase of p62 after treating the cells with Bafilomycin A1 (Baf) and crocin compared to crocin exposure alone. Annexin V staining showed that Baf-pretreatment enhanced the induction of apoptosis in HCT116 wild-type cells. Baf-exposed HCT116 p53−/− cells did not, however, show any enhancement of apoptosis induction despite an increase in the DNA damage-sensor accumulation, γH2AX indicating that crocin induced an autophagy-independent classical programmed cell death. PMID:25584615

  13. Depletion of Securin Induces Senescence After Irradiation and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Cancer Cells Regardless of Functional p53 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Yu Yichu; Lee Yijang; Chen, J.-H.; Hsu, H.-Y.; Chiu, S.-J.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is one of the best choices for cancer treatment. However, various tumor cells exhibit resistance to irradiation-induced apoptosis. The development of new strategies to trigger cancer cell death besides apoptosis is necessary. This study investigated the role of securin in radiation-induced apoptosis and senescence in human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. Western blot analysis was used to analyze levels of securin, caspase-3, PARP, p53, p21, Rb, gamma-H2AX, and phospho-Chk2. Senescent cells were analyzed using a beta-galactosidase staining assay. A securin-expressed vector (pcDNA-securin) was stably transfected into securin-null HCT116 cells. Securin gene knockdown was performed by small interfering RNA and small hairpin RNA in HCT116 and MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively. Results: Radiation was found to induce apoptosis in securin wild type HCT116 cells but induced senescence in securin-null cells. Restoration of securin reduced senescence and increased cell survival in securin-null HCT116 cells after irradiation. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX and Chk2 phosphorylation were induced transiently in securin-wild-type cells but exhibited sustained activation in securin-null cells. Securin gene knockdown switches irradiation-induced apoptosis to senescence in both HCT116 p53-null and MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the level of securin expression plays a determining role in the radiosensitivity and fate of cells. Depletion of securin impairs DNA repair after irradiation, increasing DNA damage and promoting senescence in the residual surviving cells regardless of functional p53 expression. The knockdown of securin may contribute to a novel radiotherapy protocol for the treatment of human cancer cells that are resistant to irradiation.

  14. CYP2S1 depletion enhances colorectal cell proliferation is associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Li, Changyuan; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Hu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xuhan; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2015-02-15

    Colorectal epithelial cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and its 5-year survival rate is still relatively low. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in epithelial cells lining the alimentary tract play an important role in the oxidative metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics, including (pro-)carcinogens and endogenous compounds. Although CYP2S1, a member of CYP family, strongly expressed in many extrahepatic tissues, the role of CYP2S1 in cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether CYP2S1 involves in colorectal carcinogenesis, cell proliferation was analyzed in HCT116 cells depleted of CYP2S1 using small hairpin interfering RNA. Our data show that CYP2S1 knockdown promotes cell proliferation through increasing the level of endogenous prostaglandin E2(PGE2). PGE2, in turn, reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and activates β-catenin signaling, which contributes to the cell proliferation. Furthermore, CYP2S1 knockdown increase tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. In brief, these results demonstrate that CYP2S1 regulates colorectal cancer growth through associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. - Highlights: • Knockdown of CYP2S1 expression improve HCT116 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Elevate PGE2 production in CYP2S1 knockdown cell is associated with its proliferation. • Elevate PGE2 level in CYP2S1 knockdown cells enhance β-catenin accumulation. • β-catenin activate TCF/LEF and target gene expression thus promote cell proliferation.

  15. Inhibition of microRNA-31-5p protects human colonic epithelial cells against ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Bum; Zhang, Lu; Barron, Summer; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous non-coding small RNAs, are sensitive to environmental changes, and their differential expression is important for adaptation to the environment. However, application of miRNAs as a clinical prognostic or diagnostic tool remains unproven. In this study we demonstrate a chronic/persistent change of miRNAs from the plasma of a colorectal cancer susceptible mouse model (CPC;Apc) about 250 days after exposure to a simulated solar particle event (SPE). Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified compared to unirradiated control mice, including miR-31-5p, which we investigated further. To address the cellular function of miR-31-5p, we transfected a miR-31-5p mimic (sense) or inhibitor (antisense) into immortalized human colonic epithelial cells followed by gamma-irradiation. A miR-31-5p mimic sensitized but a miR-31-5p inhibitor protected colonic epithelial cells against radiation induced killing. We found that the miR-31-5p mimic inhibited the induction of hMLH1 expression after irradiation, whereas the miR-31-5p inhibitor increased the basal level of hMLH1 expression. The miR-31-5p inhibitor failed to modulate radiosensitivity in an hMLH1-deficient HCT116 colon cancer cell line but protected HCT116 3-6 and DLD-1 (both hMLH1-positive) colon cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that miR-31-5p has an important role in radiation responses through regulation of hMLH1 expression. Targeting this pathway could be a promising therapeutic strategy for future personalized anti-cancer radiotherapy.

  16. LRH-1 drives colon cancer cell growth by repressing the expression of the CDKN1A gene in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Holly B; Lai, Chun-Fui; Patel, Hetal; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lin, Meng-Lay; Feller, Stephan M; Fuller-Pace, Frances V; Meek, David W; Ali, Simak; Buluwela, Laki

    2016-01-29

    Liver receptor homologue 1 (LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has been implicated in the progression of breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancer (CRC). To determine mechanisms underlying growth promotion by LRH-1 in CRC, we undertook global expression profiling following siRNA-mediated LRH-1 knockdown in HCT116 cells, which require LRH-1 for growth and in HT29 cells, in which LRH-1 does not regulate growth. Interestingly, expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (CDKN1A) was regulated by LRH-1 in HCT116 cells. p21 regulation was not observed in HT29 cells, where p53 is mutated. p53 dependence for the regulation of p21 by LRH-1 was confirmed by p53 knockdown with siRNA, while LRH-1-regulation of p21 was not evident in HCT116 cells where p53 had been deleted. We demonstrate that LRH-1-mediated p21 regulation in HCT116 cells does not involve altered p53 protein or phosphorylation, and we show that LRH-1 inhibits p53 recruitment to the p21 promoter, likely through a mechanism involving chromatin remodelling. Our study suggests an important role for LRH-1 in the growth of CRC cells that retain wild-type p53.

  17. LRH-1 drives colon cancer cell growth by repressing the expression of the CDKN1A gene in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Holly B; Lai, Chun-Fui; Patel, Hetal; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lin, Meng-Lay; Feller, Stephan M; Fuller-Pace, Frances V; Meek, David W; Ali, Simak; Buluwela, Laki

    2016-01-29

    Liver receptor homologue 1 (LRH-1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has been implicated in the progression of breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancer (CRC). To determine mechanisms underlying growth promotion by LRH-1 in CRC, we undertook global expression profiling following siRNA-mediated LRH-1 knockdown in HCT116 cells, which require LRH-1 for growth and in HT29 cells, in which LRH-1 does not regulate growth. Interestingly, expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (CDKN1A) was regulated by LRH-1 in HCT116 cells. p21 regulation was not observed in HT29 cells, where p53 is mutated. p53 dependence for the regulation of p21 by LRH-1 was confirmed by p53 knockdown with siRNA, while LRH-1-regulation of p21 was not evident in HCT116 cells where p53 had been deleted. We demonstrate that LRH-1-mediated p21 regulation in HCT116 cells does not involve altered p53 protein or phosphorylation, and we show that LRH-1 inhibits p53 recruitment to the p21 promoter, likely through a mechanism involving chromatin remodelling. Our study suggests an important role for LRH-1 in the growth of CRC cells that retain wild-type p53. PMID:26400164

  18. Construction of interference vector targeting Ep-CAM gene and its effects on colorectal cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanmei; Zhou, Fengqiang; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Lei; Xu, Hong; Guo, Huiguang

    2015-01-01

    Background Prior study indicates that abnormal protein expression and functional changes in the development and progression of colorectal cancer is related to gene expression. The aim of this study was to construct an interference plasmid targeting the Ep-CAM gene and to investigate its effects on the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. Methods In this study, HT-29 and HCT-116 colorectal cancer cell lines were selected as cell models. The double-stranded micro (mi)RNA oligo was inserted into the pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFPmiR vector, which is an expression of miRNA. Lipofectamine™ 2000 was used to transfer plasmid into the empty plasmid group (transfected pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFPmiR-neg) and the interference group (transfected pcDNATM6.2-GW/EmGFPmiR-Ep-CAM-1), respectively. Meanwhile, the nontransferred HT-29 and HCT-116 acts as the blank control group. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the transfection efficiency. Western blot was used to detect Ep-CAM protein expression. The cell proliferation in each group was detected by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results The results indicated that the Ep-CAM messenger (m)RNA expression in the interference group was lower significantly compared with that of the empty plasmid group and control group (P<0.01). Western blot analysis results showed that Ep-CAM protein expression was significantly lower in interference group compared with that of the empty plasmid group and the control group (P<0.01). MTT assay results demonstrated that the proliferation ability of cells in the interference group was significantly inhibited compared with the two other groups (P<0.05). Conclusion Silencing of Ep-CAM can significantly inhibit the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26028961

  19. High mobility group box-1 is phosphorylated by protein kinase C zeta and secreted in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hanna; Park, Minhee; Shin, Nara; Kim, Gamin; Kim, Yun Gi; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Hoguen

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific enzyme for HMGB1 phosphorylation and its secretion is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of PKC-{zeta} leads to significant reduction of the secreted HMGB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of specific site of HMGB1 redirects its secretion in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of PKC-{zeta} in cancers explains the enhanced HMGB1 secretion. -- Abstract: High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, is overexpressed and secreted in cancer cells. Phosphorylation on two different nuclear localization signal regions are known to be important for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic transport and secretion of HMGB1. However, little is known about the biochemical mechanism of HMGB1 modifications and its subsequent secretion from cancer cells. To identify the specific enzyme and important sites for HMGB1 phosphorylation, we screened the protein kinase C (PKC) family in a colon cancer cell line (HCT116) for HMGB1 binding by pull-down experiments using a 3XFLAG-HMGB1 construct. Strong interactions between atypical PKCs (PKC-{zeta}, {lambda}, and {iota}) and cytoplasmic HMGB1 were observed in HCT116 cells. We further identified the most critical PKC isotype that regulates HMGB1 secretion is PKC-{zeta} by using PKC inhibitors and siRNA experiments. The serine residues at S39, S53 and S181 of HMGB1 were related to enhancing HMGB1 secretion. We also demonstrated overexpression and activation of PKC-{zeta} in colon cancer tissues. Our findings suggest that PKC-{zeta} is involved in the phosphorylation of HMGB1, and the phosphorylation of specific serine residues in the nuclear localization signal regions is related to enhanced HMGB1 secretion in colon cancer cells.

  20. Effects on the transcriptome upon deletion of a distal element cannot be predicted by the size of the H3K27Ac peak in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Yu Gyoung; Hung, Yuli; Yao, Lijing; Grimmer, Matthew R.; Do, Albert; Bhakta, Mital S.; O'Geen, Henriette; Segal, David J.; Farnham, Peggy J.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). A molecular understanding of the functional consequences of this genetic variation is complicated because most GWAS SNPs are located in non-coding regions. We used epigenomic information to identify H3K27Ac peaks in HCT116 colon cancer cells that harbor SNPs associated with an increased risk for CRC. Employing CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases, we deleted a CRC risk-associated H3K27Ac peak from HCT116 cells and observed large-scale changes in gene expression, resulting in decreased expression of many nearby genes. As a comparison, we showed that deletion of a robust H3K27Ac peak not associated with CRC had minimal effects on the transcriptome. Interestingly, although there is no H3K27Ac peak in HEK293 cells in the E7 region, deletion of this region in HEK293 cells decreased expression of several of the same genes that were downregulated in HCT116 cells, including the MYC oncogene. Accordingly, deletion of E7 causes changes in cell culture assays in HCT116 and HEK293 cells. In summary, we show that effects on the transcriptome upon deletion of a distal regulatory element cannot be predicted by the size or presence of an H3K27Ac peak. PMID:26743005

  1. Combined treatment with vitamin C and sulindac synergistically induces p53- and ROS-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Shin, Yu Jin; Hwang, Ih-Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee; Hur, Dae Young; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Woo; Lee, Won Keun; Lee, Wang-Jae

    2016-09-01

    Sulindac has anti-neoplastic properties against colorectal cancers; however, its use as a chemopreventive agent has been limited due to toxicity and efficacy concerns. Combinatorial treatment of colorectal cancers has been attempted to maximize anti-cancer efficacy with minimal side effects by administrating NSAIDs in combination with other inhibitory compounds or drugs such as l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which is known to exhibit cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells at high concentrations. In this study, we evaluated a combinatorial strategy utilizing sulindac and vitamin C. The death of HCT116 cells upon combination therapy occurred via a p53-mediated mechanism. The combination therapeutic resistance developed in isogenic p53 null HCT116 cells and siRNA-mediated p53 knockdown HCT116 cells, but the exogenous expression of p53 in p53 null isogenic cells resulted in the induction of cell death. In addition, we investigated an increased level of intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species), which was preceded by p53 activation. The expression level of PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), but not Bim, was significantly increased in HCT116 cells in response to the combination treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that combination therapy with sulindac and vitamin C could be a novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy for p53 wild type colon cancers.

  2. Combined treatment with vitamin C and sulindac synergistically induces p53- and ROS-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Shin, Yu Jin; Hwang, Ih-Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seung-Mi; Moon, Jai-Hee; Shin, Jae-Sik; Lee, Dae-Hee; Hur, Dae Young; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Woo; Lee, Won Keun; Lee, Wang-Jae

    2016-09-01

    Sulindac has anti-neoplastic properties against colorectal cancers; however, its use as a chemopreventive agent has been limited due to toxicity and efficacy concerns. Combinatorial treatment of colorectal cancers has been attempted to maximize anti-cancer efficacy with minimal side effects by administrating NSAIDs in combination with other inhibitory compounds or drugs such as l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C), which is known to exhibit cytotoxicity towards various cancer cells at high concentrations. In this study, we evaluated a combinatorial strategy utilizing sulindac and vitamin C. The death of HCT116 cells upon combination therapy occurred via a p53-mediated mechanism. The combination therapeutic resistance developed in isogenic p53 null HCT116 cells and siRNA-mediated p53 knockdown HCT116 cells, but the exogenous expression of p53 in p53 null isogenic cells resulted in the induction of cell death. In addition, we investigated an increased level of intracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species), which was preceded by p53 activation. The expression level of PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), but not Bim, was significantly increased in HCT116 cells in response to the combination treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that combination therapy with sulindac and vitamin C could be a novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy for p53 wild type colon cancers. PMID:27339904

  3. Synthetic Development of New 3-(4-Arylmethylamino)butyl-5-arylidene-rhodanines under Microwave Irradiation and Their Effects on Tumor Cell Lines and against Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Dago, Camille Déliko; Ambeu, Christelle N'ta; Coulibaly, Wacothon-Karime; Békro, Yves-Alain; Mamyrbékova, Janat; Defontaine, Audrey; Baratte, Blandine; Bach, Stéphane; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Guével, Rémy Le; Ravache, Myriam; Corlu, Anne; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    A new route to 3-(4-arylmethylamino)butyl-5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidine-4-one 9 was developed in six steps from commercial 1,4-diaminobutane 1 as starting material. The key step of this multi-step synthesis involved a solution phase "one-pot two-steps" approach assisted by microwave dielectric from N-(arylmethyl)butane-1,4-diamine hydrochloride 6a-f (as source of the first point diversity) and commercial bis-(carboxymethyl)-trithiocarbonate reagent 7 for construction of the rhodanine platform. This platform was immediately functionalized by Knoevenagel condensation under microwave irradiation with a series of aromatic aldehydes 3 as second point of diversity. These new compounds were prepared in moderate to good yields and the fourteen synthetic products 9a-n have been obtained with a Z-geometry about their exocyclic double bond. These new 5-arylidene rhodanines derivatives 9a-n were tested for their kinase inhibitory potencies against four protein kinases: Human cyclin-dependent kinase 5-p25, HsCDK5-p25; porcine Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3, GSK-3α/β; porcine Casein Kinase 1, SsCK1 and human HsHaspin. They have also been evaluated for their in vitro inhibition of cell proliferation (HuH7 D12, Caco 2, MDA-MB 231, HCT 116, PC3, NCI-H727, HaCat and fibroblasts). Among of all these compounds, 9j presented selective micromolar inhibition activity on SsCK1 and 9i exhibited antitumor activities in the HuH7 D12, MDA-MBD231 cell lines.

  4. Synthetic Development of New 3-(4-Arylmethylamino)butyl-5-arylidene-rhodanines under Microwave Irradiation and Their Effects on Tumor Cell Lines and against Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Dago, Camille Déliko; Ambeu, Christelle N'ta; Coulibaly, Wacothon-Karime; Békro, Yves-Alain; Mamyrbékova, Janat; Defontaine, Audrey; Baratte, Blandine; Bach, Stéphane; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Guével, Rémy Le; Ravache, Myriam; Corlu, Anne; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    A new route to 3-(4-arylmethylamino)butyl-5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidine-4-one 9 was developed in six steps from commercial 1,4-diaminobutane 1 as starting material. The key step of this multi-step synthesis involved a solution phase "one-pot two-steps" approach assisted by microwave dielectric from N-(arylmethyl)butane-1,4-diamine hydrochloride 6a-f (as source of the first point diversity) and commercial bis-(carboxymethyl)-trithiocarbonate reagent 7 for construction of the rhodanine platform. This platform was immediately functionalized by Knoevenagel condensation under microwave irradiation with a series of aromatic aldehydes 3 as second point of diversity. These new compounds were prepared in moderate to good yields and the fourteen synthetic products 9a-n have been obtained with a Z-geometry about their exocyclic double bond. These new 5-arylidene rhodanines derivatives 9a-n were tested for their kinase inhibitory potencies against four protein kinases: Human cyclin-dependent kinase 5-p25, HsCDK5-p25; porcine Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3, GSK-3α/β; porcine Casein Kinase 1, SsCK1 and human HsHaspin. They have also been evaluated for their in vitro inhibition of cell proliferation (HuH7 D12, Caco 2, MDA-MB 231, HCT 116, PC3, NCI-H727, HaCat and fibroblasts). Among of all these compounds, 9j presented selective micromolar inhibition activity on SsCK1 and 9i exhibited antitumor activities in the HuH7 D12, MDA-MBD231 cell lines. PMID:26184130

  5. Silencing Egr1 Attenuates Radiation-induced Apoptosis in Normal Tissues while Killing Cancer Cells and Delaying Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Diana Yi; Jacobs, Keith M; Hallahan, Dennis E; Thotala, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity reduces the therapeutic index of radiotherapy and decreases the quality of life for cancer survivors. Apoptosis is a key element of the radiation response in normal tissues like the hippocampus and small intestine, resulting in neurocognitive disorders and intestinal malabsorption. The Early Growth Response 1 (Egr1) transcription factor mediates radiation-induced apoptosis by activating the transcription of pro-apoptosis genes in response to ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we hypothesized that the genetic abrogation of Egr1 and the pharmacological inhibition of its transcriptional activity could attenuate radiation-induced apoptosis in normal tissues. We demonstrated that Egr1 null mice had less apoptosis in the hippocampus and intestine following irradiation as compared to their wild-type littermates. A similar result was achieved using Mithramycin A (MMA) to prevent binding of Egr1 to target promoters in the mouse intestine. Egr1 expression using shRNA dampened apoptosis and enhanced the clonogenic survival of irradiated HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells and IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells. Mechanistically, these events involved an abrogation of p53 induction by IR and an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax expression. In contrast, targeted silencing of Egr1 in two cancer cell lines (GL261 glioma cells, HCT116 colorectal cancer cells) was not radioprotective, since it reduced their growth while also sensitizing them to radiation-induced death. Further, Egr1 depletion delayed the growth of heterotopically implanted GL261 and HCT116 tumors. These results support the potential of silencing Egr1 in order to minimize the normal tissue complications associated with radiotherapy while enhancing tumor control. PMID:26206332

  6. Identification of potential pathways involved in induction of apoptosis by butyrate and 4-benzoylbutyrate in HT29 colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Kim Y C; Ooi, Cheng Cheng; Lewanowitsch, Tanya; Tan, Sandra; Tan, Hwee Tong; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Williams, Desmond B; Lockett, Trevor J; Cosgrove, Leah J; Chung, Maxey C M; Head, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Butyrate and its analogues have long been investigated as potential chemotherapeutic agents. Our previous structure-activity relationship studies of butyrate analogues revealed that 4-benzoylbutyrate had comparable in vitro effects to butyrate when used to treat HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to identify potential mechanisms associated with the antitumorigenic effects of 4-benzoylbutyrate. In this study, butyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrate and 4-benzoylbutyrate were also investigated for their effects on histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and histone H4 acetylation in HT29 and HCT116 cells. The biological effects of these analogues on HT29 cells were further investigated using quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in their apoptotic and antiproliferative effects. Because 3-hydroxybutyrate had minimal to no effect on apoptosis, proliferation or HDAC activity, this analogue was used to identify differentially expressed proteins that were potentially specific to the apoptotic effects of butyrate and/or 4-benzoylbutyrate. Butyrate treatment inhibited HDAC activity and induced H4 acetylation. 4-Benzoylbutyrate inhibited HDAC activity but failed to enhance H4 acetylation. Proteomic analysis revealed 20 proteins whose levels were similarly altered by both butyrate and 4-benzoylbutyrate. Proteins that showed common patterns of differential regulation in the presence of either butyrate or 4-benzoylbutyrate included c-Myc transcriptional targets, proteins involved in ER homeostasis, signal transduction pathways and cell energy metabolism. Although an additional 23 proteins were altered by 4-benzoylbutyrate uniquely, further work is required to understand the mechanisms involved in its apoptotic effects.

  7. miR-139-5p sensitizes colorectal cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil by targeting NOTCH-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heyong; Yin, Yuan; Hu, Yaling; Feng, Yuyang; Bian, Zehua; Yao, Surui; Li, Min; You, Qingjun; Huang, Zhaohui

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), a phenomenon that often occurs with drug treatment and is characterized by relapse or attenuation of drug efficacy, is almost unavoidable in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Our previous study has identified miR-139-5p as a potential tumor suppressor in CRC, but its role in chemoresistance of CRC has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that miR-139-5p was down-regulated either in CRC tumors receiving chemotherapy or in 5-FU-resistant CRC cell lines (HCT-8/5-FU and HCT-116/5-FU). Ectopic expression of miR-139-5p sensitized CRC cells to 5-FU by increasing 5-FU-induced apoptosis. In addition, miR-139-5p inhibited the expression of the miR-139-5p target gene NOTCH-1 and its downstream molecules MRP-1 and BCL-2, two key MDR-associated genes. Furthermore, silencing NOTCH-1 expression promoted the chemotherapeutic effects of 5-FU, and up-regulation of NOTCH-1 abrogated miR-139-5p-mediated sensitization to 5-FU in LoVo and HCT-116 cells. Taken together, our data indicate a new role of miR-139-5p/NOTCH-1 pathway in the drug resistance of CRC cells to 5-FU, which may be a promising therapeutic target for the anti-MDR treatment of CRC. PMID:27173050

  8. New potent and selective inhibitor of Pim-1/3 protein kinases sensitizes human colon carcinoma cells to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Pascale; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Anizon, Fabrice; Nauton, Lionel; Thery, Vincent; Liang, Shuguang; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Shtil, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The Pim protein kinases (provirus insertion site of Moloney murine leukemia virus) have been identified as important actors involved in tumor cell survival, proliferation, migration and invasion. Therefore, inhibition of Pim activity by low molecular weight compounds is under investigation as a part of anticancer therapeutic strategies. We have synthesized a series of pyrrolo[2,3-a]carbazole derivatives that significantly inhibited Pim protein kinases at submicromolar concentrations. Particularly, benzodiazocine derivative 1 potently inhibited Pim-1 and -3 isoforms in in vitro kinase assays (IC50 8 nM and 13 nM, respectively), whereas Pim-2 activity was less affected (IC50 350 nM). We show here that no inhibitory effect of 1 was detectable at 1 µM against other 22 serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. In addition, 1, possessing a planar pyrrolocarbazole scaffold, demonstrated no significant binding to DNA, nor was it a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, suggesting that 1 is likely to be highly selective for Pim-1 and -3. Importantly, whereas 1 exerted a negligible cytotoxicity for human colon carcinoma HCT116 cell line at concentrations >10 µM within 72 h of cell exposure, it synergized at nontoxic concentrations with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (Dox) in killing HCT116 cells: IC50 of Dox alone and Dox+1 were ~200 nM and ~25 nM, respectively. These data strongly suggest that 1 emerges as a prospective antitumor drug candidate due to its selectivity to individual Pim protein kinases and the ability to potentiate the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:25175798

  9. Celecoxib Induced Tumor Cell Radiosensitization by Inhibiting Radiation Induced Nuclear EGFR Transport and DNA-Repair: A COX-2 Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, Klaus H. Mayer, Claus; Ohneseit, Petra A.; Raju, Uma; Andratschke, Nickolaus H.; Milas, Luka; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms mediating radiosensitization of human tumor cells by the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed using bronchial carcinoma cells A549, transformed fibroblasts HH4dd, the FaDu head-and-neck tumor cells, the colon carcinoma cells HCT116, and normal fibroblasts HSF7. Effects of celecoxib treatment were assessed by clonogenic cell survival, Western analysis, and quantification of residual DNA damage by {gamma}H{sub 2}AX foci assay. Results: Celecoxib treatment resulted in a pronounced radiosensitization of A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells, whereas FaDu and HH4dd cells were not radiosensitized. The observed radiosensitization could neither be correlated with basal COX-2 expression pattern nor with basal production of prostaglandin E2, but was depended on the ability of celecoxib to inhibit basal and radiation-induced nuclear transport of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The nuclear EGFR transport was strongly inhibited in A549-, HSF7-, and COX-2-deficient HCT116 cells, which were radiosensitized, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells, which resisted celecoxib-induced radiosensitization. Celecoxib inhibited radiation-induced DNA-PK activation in A549, HSF7, and HCT116 cells, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells. Consequentially, celecoxib increased residual {gamma}H2AX foci after irradiation, demonstrating that inhibition of DNA repair has occurred in responsive A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells only. Conclusions: Celecoxib enhanced radiosensitivity by inhibition of EGFR-mediated mechanisms of radioresistance, a signaling that was independent of COX-2 activity. This novel observation may have therapeutic implications such that COX-2 inhibitors may improve therapeutic efficacy of radiation even in patients whose tumor radioresistance is not dependent on COX-2.

  10. Differential Effects of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Isoforms on Tumor Growth and T-Cell Factor 4/AP-1 Interactions in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Linh M.; Chellappa, Karthikeyani; Dhahbi, Joseph M.; Deans, Jonathan R.; Fang, Bin; Bolotin, Eugene; Titova, Nina V.; Hoverter, Nate P.; Spindler, Stephen R.; Waterman, Marian L.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is tumor suppressive in the liver but amplified in colon cancer, suggesting that it also might be oncogenic. To investigate whether this discrepancy is due to different HNF4α isoforms derived from its two promoters (P1 and P2), we generated Tet-On-inducible human colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines that express either the P1-driven (HNF4α2) or P2-driven (HNF4α8) isoform and analyzed them for tumor growth and global changes in gene expression (transcriptome sequencing [RNA-seq] and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing [ChIP-seq]). The results show that while HNF4α2 acts as a tumor suppressor in the HCT116 tumor xenograft model, HNF4α8 does not. Each isoform regulates the expression of distinct sets of genes and recruits, colocalizes, and competes in a distinct fashion with the Wnt/β-catenin mediator T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) at CTTTG motifs as well as at AP-1 motifs (TGAXTCA). Protein binding microarrays (PBMs) show that HNF4α and TCF4 share some but not all binding motifs and that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sites bound by both HNF4α and TCF4 can alter binding affinity in vitro, suggesting that they could play a role in cancer susceptibility in vivo. Thus, the HNF4α isoforms play distinct roles in colon cancer, which could be due to differential interactions with the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF4 and AP-1 pathways. PMID:26240283

  11. Selenium compounds activate ATM-dependent DNA damage responses via the mismatch repair protein hMLH1 in colorectal cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that selenium supplementation suppresses risk of colorectal and other cancers. The majority of colorectal cancers are characterized by a defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR) process. Here, we have employed the MMR-deficient HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells ...

  12. Insulin, CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Proteins and Lactate Regulate the Human 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Gene Expression in Colon Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani-Koupaei, Rasoul; Ignatova, Irena D.; Guettinger, Andreas; Frey, Felix J.; Frey, Brigitte M.

    2014-01-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11beta-HSD) modulate mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation by glucocorticoids and regulate access to the glucocorticoid receptor. The isozyme 11beta-HSD2 is selectively expressed in mineralocorticoid target tissues and its activity is reduced in various disease states with abnormal sodium retention and hypertension, including the apparent mineralocorticoid excess. As 50% of patients with essential hypertension are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic, we hypothesized that insulin downregulates the 11beta-HSD2 activity. In the present study we show that insulin reduced the 11beta-HSD2 activity in cancer colon cell lines (HCT116, SW620 and HT-29) at the transcriptional level, in a time and dose dependent manner. The downregulation was reversible and required new protein synthesis. Pathway analysis using mRNA profiling revealed that insulin treatment modified the expression of the transcription factor family C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins) but also of glycolysis related enzymes. Western blot and real time PCR confirmed an upregulation of C/EBP beta isoforms (LAP and LIP) with a more pronounced increase in the inhibitory isoform LIP. EMSA and reporter gene assays demonstrated the role of C/EBP beta isoforms in HSD11B2 gene expression regulation. In addition, secretion of lactate, a byproduct of glycolysis, was shown to mediate insulin-dependent HSD11B2 downregulation. In summary, we demonstrate that insulin downregulates HSD11B2 through increased LIP expression and augmented lactate secretion. Such mechanisms are of interest and potential significance for sodium reabsorption in the colon. PMID:25133511

  13. CLO: The cell line ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lines have been widely used in biomedical research. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is a member of the OBO Foundry library that covers the domain of cell lines. Since its publication two years ago, significant updates have been made, including new groups joining the CLO consortium, new cell line cells, upper level alignment with the Cell Ontology (CL) and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation, and logical extensions. Construction and content Collaboration among the CLO, CL, and OBI has established consensus definitions of cell line-specific terms such as ‘cell line’, ‘cell line cell’, ‘cell line culturing’, and ‘mortal’ vs. ‘immortal cell line cell’. A cell line is a genetically stable cultured cell population that contains individual cell line cells. The hierarchical structure of the CLO is built based on the hierarchy of the in vivo cell types defined in CL and tissue types (from which cell line cells are derived) defined in the UBERON cross-species anatomy ontology. The new hierarchical structure makes it easier to browse, query, and perform automated classification. We have recently added classes representing more than 2,000 cell line cells from the RIKEN BRC Cell Bank to CLO. Overall, the CLO now contains ~38,000 classes of specific cell line cells derived from over 200 in vivo cell types from various organisms. Utility and discussion The CLO has been applied to different biomedical research studies. Example case studies include annotation and analysis of EBI ArrayExpress data, bioassays, and host-vaccine/pathogen interaction. CLO’s utility goes beyond a catalogue of cell line types. The alignment of the CLO with related ontologies combined with the use of ontological reasoners will support sophisticated inferencing to advance translational informatics development. PMID:25852852

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Enhancement of Chemoradiation Using the Oral PARP Inhibitor ABT-888 in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, Joseph W.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Landry, Jerome; Gao, Huiying; Xu, Yanbo; Wang, Lanfang; El-Rayes, Bassel; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase plays a critical role in the recognition and repair of DNA single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs). ABT-888 is an orally available inhibitor of this enzyme. This study seeks to evaluate the use of ABT-888 combined with chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) in colorectal carcinoma models. Methods and Materials: RT clonogenic assays were performed on HCT116 and HT29 cells treated with 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, or oxaliplatin with or without ABT. The surviving fraction at 2 Gy and dose-modifying factor at 10% survival were analyzed. Synergism was assessed by isobologram analysis for combination therapies. γH2AX and neutral comet assays were performed to assess the effect of therapy on DSB formation/repair. In vivo assessments were made by use of HCT116 cells in a xenograft mouse model. Tumor growth delay was measured at a volume of 500 mm{sup 3}. Results: Both lines were radiosensitized by ABT alone, and ABT further increased chemotherapy dose-modifying factors to the 1.6 to 1.8 range. All combinations were synergistic (combination indices <0.9). ABT treatment significantly increased DSB after RT (γH2AX, 69% vs 43%; P=.017) and delayed repair. We found tumor growth delays of 7.22 days for RT; 11.90 days for RT and ABT; 13.5 days for oxaliplatin, RT, and ABT; 14.17 days for 5-fluorouracil, RT, and ABT; and 23.81 days for irinotecan, RT, and ABT. Conclusion: ABT-888 radiosensitizes at similar or higher levels compared with classic chemotherapies and acts synergistically with these chemotherapies to enhance RT effects. In vivo confirmation of these results indicates a potential role for combining its use with existing chemoradiation regimens.

  15. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Niamh M.; Joyce, Myles R.; Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy; Kerin, Michael J.; Dwyer, Roisin M.

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  16. Interaction of celecoxib with different anti-cancer drugs is antagonistic in breast but not in other cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    El-Awady, Raafat A.; Saleh, Ekram M.; Ezz, Marwa; Elsayed, Abeer M.

    2011-09-15

    Celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, is being investigated for enhancement of chemotherapy efficacy in cancer clinical trials. This study investigates the ability of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to sensitize cells from different origins to several chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of the drug's mechanism of action and sequence of administration are also investigated. The sensitivity, cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA damage of five different cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT116, HepG2, MCF7 and U251) to 5-FU, cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide {+-} celecoxib following different incubation schedules were analyzed. We found antagonism between celecoxib and the four drugs in the breast cancer cells MCF7 following all incubation schedules and between celecoxib and doxorubicin in all cell lines except for two combinations in HCT116 cells. Celecoxib with the other three drugs in the remaining four cell lines resulted in variable interactions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that celecoxib exerts different molecular effects in different cells. In some lines, it abrogates the drug-induced G2/M arrest enhancing pre-mature entry into mitosis with damaged DNA thus increasing apoptosis and resulting in synergism. In other cells, it enhances drug-induced G2/M arrest allowing time to repair drug-induced DNA damage before entry into mitosis and decreasing cell death resulting in antagonism. In some synergistic combinations, celecoxib-induced abrogation of G2/M arrest was not associated with apoptosis but permanent arrest in G1 phase. These results, if confirmed in-vivo, indicate that celecoxib is not a suitable chemosensitizer for breast cancer or with doxorubicin for other cancers. Moreover, combination of celecoxib with other drugs should be tailored to the tumor type, drug and administration schedule. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Celecoxib may enhance effects of anticancer drugs. > Its combination with four drugs was tested in five cancer cell

  17. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K.; Szabo, Sandor; Tarnawski, Andrzej S.

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is

  18. Radiosensitization by PARP Inhibition in DNA Repair Proficient and Deficient Tumor Cells: Proliferative Recovery in Senescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Moureq; Sharma, Khushboo; Saleh, Tareq; Povirk, Lawrence F; Hendrickson, Eric A; Gewirtz, David A

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy continues to be a primary modality in the treatment of cancer. In addition to promoting apoptosis, radiation-induced DNA damage can promote autophagy and senescence, both of which can theoretically function to prolong tumor survival. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that autophagy and/or senescence could be permissive for DNA repair, thereby facilitating tumor cell recovery from radiation-induced growth arrest and/or cell death. In addition, studies were designed to elucidate the involvement of autophagy and senescence in radiosensitization by PARP inhibitors and the re-emergence of a proliferating tumor cell population. In the context of this work, the relationship between radiation-induced autophagy and senescence was also determined. Studies were performed using DNA repair-proficient HCT116 colon carcinoma cells and a repair-deficient ligase IV(-/-) isogenic cell line. Exposure to radiation promoted a parallel induction of autophagy and senescence that was strongly correlated with the extent of persistent H2AX phosphorylation in both cell lines, however, inhibition of autophagy failed to suppress senescence, indicating that the two responses were dissociable. Exposure to radiation resulted in a transient arrest in the HCT116 cells while arrest was prolonged in the ligase IV(-/-) cells, however, both cell lines ultimately recovered proliferative function, which may reflect maintenance of DNA repair capacity. The PARP inhibitors, olaparib and niraparib, increased the extent of persistent DNA damage induced by radiation exposure as well as the extent of both autophagy and senescence. Neither cell line underwent significant apoptosis by radiation exposure alone or in the presence of the PARP inhibitors. Inhibition of autophagy failed to attenuate radiosensitization, indicating that autophagy was not involved in the action of the PARP inhibitors. As with radiation alone, despite sensitization by PARP inhibition, proliferative recovery was evident

  19. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death.

  20. Spatial Heterogeneity Analysis in Evaluation of Cell Viability and Apoptosis for Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kucharavy, Herman; Hubbard, Karen; Uyar, Muharrem Ümit

    2016-01-01

    In evaluation of cell viability and apoptosis, spatial heterogeneity is quantified for cancerous cells cultured in 3-D in vitro cell-based assays under the impact of anti-cancer agents. In 48-h experiments using human colorectal cancer cell lines of HCT-116, SW-620, and SW-480, incubated cells are divided into control and drug administered groups, to be grown in matrigel and FOLFOX solution, respectively. Our 3-D cell tracking and data acquisition system guiding an inverted microscope with a digital camera is utilized to capture bright field and fluorescent images of colorectal cancer cells at multiple time points. Identifying the locations of live and dead cells in captured images, spatial point process and Voronoi tessellation methods are applied to extract morphological features of in vitro cell-based assays. For the former method, spatial heterogeneity is quantified with the second-order functions of Poisson point process, whereas the deviation in the area of Voronoi polygons is computed for the latter. With both techniques, the results indicate that the spatial heterogeneity of live cell locations increases as the viability of in in vitro cell cultures decreases. On the other hand, a decrease is observed for the heterogeneity of dead cell locations with the decrease in cell viability. This relationship between morphological features of in vitro cell-based assays and cell viability can be used for drug efficacy measurements and utilized as a biomarker for 3-D in vitro microenvironment assays. PMID:27574578

  1. Spatial Heterogeneity Analysis in Evaluation of Cell Viability and Apoptosis for Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Saribudak, Aydin; Kucharavy, Herman; Hubbard, Karen; Uyar, Muharrem Umit

    2016-01-01

    In evaluation of cell viability and apoptosis, spatial heterogeneity is quantified for cancerous cells cultured in 3-D in vitro cell-based assays under the impact of anti-cancer agents. In 48-h experiments using human colorectal cancer cell lines of HCT-116, SW-620, and SW-480, incubated cells are divided into control and drug administered groups, to be grown in matrigel and FOLFOX solution, respectively. Our 3-D cell tracking and data acquisition system guiding an inverted microscope with a digital camera is utilized to capture bright field and fluorescent images of colorectal cancer cells at multiple time points. Identifying the locations of live and dead cells in captured images, spatial point process and Voronoi tessellation methods are applied to extract morphological features of in vitro cell-based assays. For the former method, spatial heterogeneity is quantified with the second-order functions of Poisson point process, whereas the deviation in the area of Voronoi polygons is computed for the latter. With both techniques, the results indicate that the spatial heterogeneity of live cell locations increases as the viability of in in vitro cell cultures decreases. On the other hand, a decrease is observed for the heterogeneity of dead cell locations with the decrease in cell viability. This relationship between morphological features of in vitro cell-based assays and cell viability can be used for drug efficacy measurements and utilized as a biomarker for 3-D in vitro microenvironment assays. PMID:27574578

  2. Biology of SNU Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ja-Lok

    2005-01-01

    SNU (Seoul National University) cell lines have been established from Korean cancer patients since 1982. Of these 109 cell lines have been characterized and reported, i.e., 17 colorectal carcinoma, 12 hepatocellular carcinoma, 11 gastric carcinoma, 12 uterine cervical carcinoma, 17 B-lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from cancer patients, 5 ovarian carcinoma, 3 malignant mixed Mllerian tumor, 6 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, 7 renal cell carcinoma, 9 brain tumor, 6 biliary tract, and 4 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. These SNU cell lines have been distributed to biomedical researchers domestic and worldwide through the KCLB (Korean Cell Line Bank), and have proven to be of value in various scientific research fields. The characteristics of these cell lines have been reported in over 180 international journals by our laboratory and by many other researchers from 1987. In this paper, the cellular and molecular characteristics of SNU human cancer cell lines are summarized according to their genetic and epigenetic alterations and functional analysis. PMID:19956504

  3. Design, Synthesis and In Vitro Cell-based Evaluation of the Anti-cancer Activities of Hispolon Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, Leticia P.; White, Jason; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Lee, Crystal; Gana, Theophilus J.; Egiebor, Nosa O.; Subbaraju, Gottumukkala V.; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemicals play an important role in cancer therapy. Hispolon and 26 of its analogs (9 known and 17 new) were synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activities in a panel of six independent human cancer cell lines using the in vitro cell-based MTT assay. Among the hispolon analogs tested, Compound VA-2, the most potent overall, produced its most significant effect in the colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 (IC50 1.4±1.3 μM) and S1 (IC50 1.8±0.9 μM) compared to its activity in the normal HEK293/pcDNA3.1 cell line (IC50 15.8±3.7 μM; p<0.01 for each comparison). Based on our results, VA-2 was about 9- to 11-times more potent in colon cancer cells and 2- to 3-times more potent in prostate cancer cells compared to HEK293/pcDNA3.1 cells. Morphological analysis of VA-2 showed significant reduction of cell number, while the cells’ sizes were also markedly increased and were obvious at 68 h of treatment with 1 μM in HCT-116 (colon) and PC-3 (prostate) cancer cells. A known analog, Compound VA-4, prepared by simple modifications on the aromatic functional groups of hispolon, inhibited prostate and colon cancer cell lines with IC50 values < 10 μM. In addition, hispolon isoxazole and pyrazole analogs, VA-7 and VA-15 (known), respectively, have shown significant activity with the mean IC50 values in the range 3.3 to 10.7 μM in all the cancer cell lines tested. Activity varied among the analogs in which aromatic functional groups and β-diketone functional groups are modified. But the activity of analogs VA-16 to VA-27 was completely lost when the side chain double-bond was hydrogenated indicating the crucial role of this functionality for anticancer activity. Furthermore, many of the compounds synthesized were not substrates for the ABCB1-transporter, the most common cause of multidrug resistance in anti-cancer drugs, suggesting they may be more effective anticancer agents. PMID:25842364

  4. Differential sensitivity of normal and malignant breast epithelial cells to genistein is partly mediated by p21(WAF1).

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, S; Neburi, M; Chinni, S R; Alhasan, S; Miller, F; Sarkar, F H

    2001-06-01

    Genistein, a soy metabolite, is a potential chemopreventive agent against various types of cancer. There are several studies documenting molecular alterations leading to cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells; however, no studies, to date, have shown the effect of genistein in isogenic normal and malignant breast epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated whether genistein shows any differential sensitivity to normal (MCF10A and MCF12A) and malignant (MCF10CA1a and MDA-MB-231) breast epithelial cells. We found that genistein causes a greater degree of G(2)-M arrest and induces apoptosis in malignant cell lines compared with normal breast epithelial cells. After genistein treatment, flow cytometric analysis revealed a hyperdiploid population in malignant cells that was not observed in normal cells. Cell cycle regulator p21(WAF1), which is known to be up-regulated by genistein treatment, was greatly induced at RNA and protein levels in normal cells, whereas its level was only slightly induced in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells and not detectable in malignant MCF10CA1a cells. Therefore, we investigated the causal role of p21(WAF1) in the differential sensitivity of genistein among these cell lines. We examined the effects of genistein on p21(WAF1) -/- and p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells, which were used as controls prior to studies on breast cancer cells. We found that there was a greater degree of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p21(WAF1) -/- cells compared with p21(WAF1) +/+ HCT116 cells after genistein treatment. Flow cytometric analysis after genistein treatment showed a significant number of p21(WAF1) -/- cells in the hyperdiploid population, which are probably programmed to die through apoptotic processes. To further confirm the causal role of p21(WAF1) in genistein-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, we down-regulated p21(WAF1) by antisense p21(WAF1) cDNA transfection experiments. We found that both normal and malignant p

  5. Synthesis, Structural Characterization of a Novel Ferrocene Derivative and Preliminarily Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jianping; Wu, Xiaoyuan; Liao, Jianzhen; Lu, Canzhong; Liu, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    A novel structure of ferrocene derivative 1 was synthesized with cyanuric chloride and ferrocenemethanol as starting materials. The synthesized compound was fully characterized using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and XRD. Subsequently, the in vitro anticancer effect against A549, HCT116 and MCF-7 cell lines was preliminarily evaluated by the MTT method. The result showed that this compound exhibits good cytotoxic effect on A549, HCT116 and MCF-7 cell lines.

  6. Comprehensive measurement of chromosomal instability in cancer cells: combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Camps, Jordi; Ponsa, Immaculada; Ribas, Maria; Prat, Esther; Egozcue, Josep; Peinado, Miguel A; Miró, Rosa

    2005-05-01

    Most tumors show abnormal karyotypes involving either chromosome rearrangements and/or aneuploidies. The aim of our study is to measure the rate of both structural and numerical chromosome instability in two colorectal cancer cell lines: HCT116, and SW480 and its single subclones. To determine structural instability, we measured the nonclonal chromosome alterations of the last cell division by means of multicolor-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). To quantify numerical instability, we used centromere-specific DNA probes to simultaneously detect chromosome loss and nondisjunctional events in binucleated cells obtained by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). After clonal episodes, the structural chromosome instability rate increased significantly, confirming the large contribution of structural rearrangements to the heterogeneity of cancer cells. On the other hand, the aneuploidy rate was high and conserved in both the parental SW480 cell line and its subclones. The ability to differentiate chromosome loss and nondisjunction by the CBMN assay allowed us to conclude that no significant differences were detected among these events. Analysis of nucleoplasmic bridges, micronuclei, and nuclear blebs also demonstrated the differences among the structural instability rates of the parental cell line and its subclones. Overall, our results demonstrate the prevalence of structural over numerical chromosome instability in the subclones when comparing them with their parental cell line, confirming the contribution of ongoing chromosomal reorganizations in the generation of tumor cell heterogeneity.

  7. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  8. The CDX1–microRNA-215 axis regulates colorectal cancer stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew F.; Hara, Toshifumi; Francis, Princy; Li, Xiao Ling; Bilke, Sven; Zhu, Yuelin; Pineda, Marbin; Subramanian, Murugan; Bodmer, Walter F.; Lal, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor caudal-type homeobox 1 (CDX1) is a key regulator of differentiation in the normal colon and in colorectal cancer (CRC). CDX1 activates the expression of enterocyte genes, but it is not clear how the concomitant silencing of stem cell genes is achieved. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important mediators of gene repression and have been implicated in tumor suppression and carcinogenesis, but the roles of miRNAs in differentiation, particularly in CRC, remain poorly understood. Here, we identified microRNA-215 (miR-215) as a direct transcriptional target of CDX1 by using high-throughput small RNA sequencing to profile miRNA expression in two pairs of CRC cell lines: CDX1-low HCT116 and HCT116 with stable CDX1 overexpression, and CDX1-high LS174T and LS174T with stable CDX1 knockdown. Validation of candidate miRNAs identified by RNA-seq in a larger cell-line panel revealed miR-215 to be most significantly correlated with CDX1 expression. Quantitative ChIP–PCR and promoter luciferase assays confirmed that CDX1 directly activates miR-215 transcription. miR-215 expression is depleted in FACS-enriched cancer stem cells compared with unsorted samples. Overexpression of miR-215 in poorly differentiated cell lines causes a decrease in clonogenicity, whereas miR-215 knockdown increases clonogenicity and impairs differentiation in CDX1-high cell lines. We identified the genome-wide targets of miR-215 and found that miR-215 mediates the repression of cell cycle and stemness genes downstream of CDX1. In particular, the miR-215 target gene BMI1 has been shown to promote stemness and self-renewal and to vary inversely with CDX1. Our work situates miR-215 as a link between CDX1 expression and BMI1 repression that governs differentiation in CRC. PMID:25775580

  9. Demethylation of a LINE-1 antisense promoter in the cMet locus impairs Met signalling through induction of illegitimate transcription.

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Kimhi, S; Howard, G; Eden, A; Lyko, F

    2010-10-28

    The cytosine analogues 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine are currently the most advanced drugs for epigenetic cancer therapy. Both drugs function as DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors and lead to the reactivation of epigenetically silenced tumour suppressor genes. However, not much is known about their target sequence specificity and their possible side effects on normally methylated sequences such as long interspersed nuclear element (LINE)-1 retroelements. It has been shown that demethylation and activation of the LINE-1 antisense promoter can drive the transcription of neighbouring sequences. In this study, we show that demethylation of the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, either by treatment with DNMT inhibitors or by genetic disruption of the major DNMTs, induces the expression of an illegitimate fusion transcript between an intronic LINE-1 element and the proto-oncogene cMet (L1-cMet). Similar findings were also obtained with myeloid leukaemia cells, an established cellular model for the approved indication of azacytidine and decitabine. Interestingly, upregulation of L1-cMet transcription resulted in reduced cMet expression, which in turn led to decreased cMet receptor signalling. Our results thus provide an important paradigm for demethylation-dependent modulation of gene expression, even if the promoter of the corresponding gene is unmethylated.

  10. Controlling the intracellular localization of fluorescent polyamide analogues in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Kathleen S; Phillion, Dennis P; Woodard, Scott S; Schweitzer, Barbara A; Singh, Megh; Shabany, Hossein; Burnette, Barry; Hippenmeyer, Paul; Heitmeier, Monique; Bashkin, James K

    2003-05-01

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescent-labeled polyamides was examined in live cells. We showed that BODIPY-labeled polyamides accumulate in acidic vesicles, mainly lysosomes, in the cytoplasm of HCT116 colon cancer cells and human rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF). Verapamil blocked vesicular accumulation and led to nuclear accumulation of the BODIPY-labeled polyamide in RSFs. We infer that the basic amine group commonly found at the end of synthetic polyamide chains is responsible for their accumulation in cytoplasmic vesicles in mammalian cells. Modifying the charge on a polyamide by replacing the BODIPY moiety with a fluorescein moiety on the amine tail allowed the polyamide to localize in the nucleus of the cell and bypass the cytoplasmic vesicles in HCT116 cells.

  11. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas silymarin showed significant inhibition only at the highest concentrations assessed. We found synergistic effects when colon cancer cells were treated with curcumin and silymarin together. The combination treatment led to inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to single compound treated cells. Combination treated cells exhibited marked cell rounding and membrane blebbing of apoptotic cells. Curcumin treated cells showed 3-fold more caspase3/7 activity whereas combination treated cells showed 5-fold more activity compared to control and silymarin treated cells. When DLD-1 cells were pre-exposed to curcumin, followed by treatment with silymarin, the cells underwent a high amount of cell death. The pre-exposure studies indicated curcumin sensitization of silymarin effect. Our results indicate that combinatorial treatments using phytochemicals are effective against colorectal cancer. PMID:27390600

  12. Curcumin Sensitizes Silymarin to Exert Synergistic Anticancer Activity in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Amanda; Adeyeni, Temitope; San, KayKay; Heuertz, Rita M.; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R.

    2016-01-01

    We studied combinatorial interactions of two phytochemicals, curcumin and silymarin, in their action against cancer cell proliferation. Curcumin is the major component of the spice turmeric. Silymarin is a bioactive component of milk thistle used as a protective supplement against liver disease. We studied antiproliferative effects of curcumin alone, silymarin alone and combinations of curcumin and silymarin using colon cancer cell lines (DLD-1, HCT116, LoVo). Curcumin inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas silymarin showed significant inhibition only at the highest concentrations assessed. We found synergistic effects when colon cancer cells were treated with curcumin and silymarin together. The combination treatment led to inhibition of colon cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared to single compound treated cells. Combination treated cells exhibited marked cell rounding and membrane blebbing of apoptotic cells. Curcumin treated cells showed 3-fold more caspase3/7 activity whereas combination treated cells showed 5-fold more activity compared to control and silymarin treated cells. When DLD-1 cells were pre-exposed to curcumin, followed by treatment with silymarin, the cells underwent a high amount of cell death. The pre-exposure studies indicated curcumin sensitization of silymarin effect. Our results indicate that combinatorial treatments using phytochemicals are effective against colorectal cancer. PMID:27390600

  13. Blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry, and strawberry extracts inhibit growth and stimulate apoptosis of human cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Navindra P; Adams, Lynn S; Zhang, Yanjun; Lee, Rupo; Sand, Daniel; Scheuller, Henry S; Heber, David

    2006-12-13

    Berry fruits are widely consumed in our diet and have attracted much attention due to their potential human health benefits. Berries contain a diverse range of phytochemicals with biological properties such as antioxidant, anticancer, anti-neurodegerative, and anti-inflammatory activities. In the current study, extracts of six popularly consumed berries--blackberry, black raspberry, blueberry, cranberry, red raspberry and strawberry--were evaluated for their phenolic constituents using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) detection. The major classes of berry phenolics were anthocyanins, flavonols, flavanols, ellagitannins, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins, and phenolic acids. The berry extracts were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of human oral (KB, CAL-27), breast (MCF-7), colon (HT-29, HCT116), and prostate (LNCaP) tumor cell lines at concentrations ranging from 25 to 200 micro g/mL. With increasing concentration of berry extract, increasing inhibition of cell proliferation in all of the cell lines were observed, with different degrees of potency between cell lines. The berry extracts were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate apoptosis of the COX-2 expressing colon cancer cell line, HT-29. Black raspberry and strawberry extracts showed the most significant pro-apoptotic effects against this cell line. The data provided by the current study and from other laboratories warrants further investigation into the chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of berries using in vivo models.

  14. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function.

  15. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function. PMID:27052166

  16. N-Myristoyltransferase Inhibition Induces ER-Stress, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT) covalently attaches a C14 fatty acid to the N-terminal glycine of proteins and has been proposed as a therapeutic target in cancer. We have recently shown that selective NMT inhibition leads to dose-responsive loss of N-myristoylation on more than 100 protein targets in cells, and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. N-myristoylation lies upstream of multiple pro-proliferative and oncogenic pathways, but to date the complex substrate specificity of NMT has limited determination of which diseases are most likely to respond to a selective NMT inhibitor. We describe here the phenotype of NMT inhibition in HeLa cells and show that cells die through apoptosis following or concurrent with accumulation in the G1 phase. We used quantitative proteomics to map protein expression changes for more than 2700 proteins in response to treatment with an NMT inhibitor in HeLa cells and observed down-regulation of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and up-regulation of proteins involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response, with similar results in breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) and colon (HCT116) cancer cell lines. This study describes the cellular response to NMT inhibition at the proteome level and provides a starting point for selective targeting of specific diseases with NMT inhibitors, potentially in combination with other targeted agents. PMID:27267252

  17. N-Myristoyltransferase Inhibition Induces ER-Stress, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Thinon, Emmanuelle; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Mann, David J; Tate, Edward W

    2016-08-19

    N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT) covalently attaches a C14 fatty acid to the N-terminal glycine of proteins and has been proposed as a therapeutic target in cancer. We have recently shown that selective NMT inhibition leads to dose-responsive loss of N-myristoylation on more than 100 protein targets in cells, and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. N-myristoylation lies upstream of multiple pro-proliferative and oncogenic pathways, but to date the complex substrate specificity of NMT has limited determination of which diseases are most likely to respond to a selective NMT inhibitor. We describe here the phenotype of NMT inhibition in HeLa cells and show that cells die through apoptosis following or concurrent with accumulation in the G1 phase. We used quantitative proteomics to map protein expression changes for more than 2700 proteins in response to treatment with an NMT inhibitor in HeLa cells and observed down-regulation of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation and up-regulation of proteins involved in the endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response, with similar results in breast (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) and colon (HCT116) cancer cell lines. This study describes the cellular response to NMT inhibition at the proteome level and provides a starting point for selective targeting of specific diseases with NMT inhibitors, potentially in combination with other targeted agents. PMID:27267252

  18. Targeting Colorectal Cancer Stem-Like Cells with Anti-CD133 Antibody-Conjugated SN-38 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ning, Sin-Tzu; Lee, Shin-Yu; Wei, Ming-Feng; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Lin, Susan Yun-Fan; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Chi; Shih, Ying-Hsia; Lin, Chun-Yen; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2016-07-20

    Cancer stem-like cells play a key role in tumor development, and these cells are relevant to the failure of conventional chemotherapy. To achieve favorable therapy for colorectal cancer, PEG-PCL-based nanoparticles, which possess good biological compatibility, were fabricated as nanocarriers for the topoisomerase inhibitor, SN-38. For cancer stem cell therapy, CD133 (prominin-1) is a theoretical cancer stem-like cell (CSLC) marker for colorectal cancer and is a proposed therapeutic target. Cells with CD133 overexpression have demonstrated enhanced tumor-initiating ability and tumor relapse probability. To resolve the problem of chemotherapy failure, SN-38-loaded nanoparticles were conjugated with anti-CD133 antibody to target CD133-positive (CD133(+)) cells. In this study, anti-CD133 antibody-conjugated SN-38-loaded nanoparticles (CD133Ab-NPs-SN-38) efficiently bound to HCT116 cells, which overexpress CD133 glycoprotein. The cytotoxic effect of CD133Ab-NPs-SN-38 was greater than that of nontargeted nanoparticles (NPs-SN-38) in HCT116 cells. Furthermore, CD133Ab-NPs-SN-38 could target CD133(+) cells and inhibit colony formation compared with NPs-SN-38. In vivo studies in an HCT116 xenograft model revealed that CD133Ab-NPs-SN-38 suppressed tumor growth and retarded recurrence. A reduction in CD133 expression in HCT116 cells treated with CD133Ab-NPs-SN-38 was also observed in immunohistochemistry results. Therefore, this CD133-targeting nanoparticle delivery system could eliminate CD133-positive cells and is a potential cancer stem cell targeted therapy. PMID:27348241

  19. Sasa quelpaertensis Leaf Extract Inhibits Colon Cancer by Regulating Cancer Cell Stemness in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Min, Soo Jin; Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Haeng Ran; Kim, Se-Jae; Kim, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), may be responsible for tumor relapse and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The development of a non-toxic, natural treatment for the elimination of CSCs is considered a strategy for cancer treatment with minimal side effects. In the present study, the potential for Sasa quelpaertensis leaf extract (SQE) and its two bioactive compounds, tricin and p-coumaric acid, to exert anti-CSC effects by suppressing cancer stemness characteristics were evaluated in colon cancer cells. CD133+CD44+ cells were isolated from HT29 and HCT116 cell lines using flow-activated cell sorting (FACs). SQE treatment was found to significantly suppress the self-renewal capacity of both cell lines. SQE treatment was also associated with the down-regulation of β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK3β, while significantly enhancing cell differentiation by up-regulating CK20 expression and blocking the expression of several stem cell markers, including DLK1, Notch1, and Sox-2. In vivo, SQE supplementation suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model by down-regulating stem cell markers and β-catenin as well as HIF-1α signaling. Compared with two bioactive compounds of SQE, SQE exhibited the most effective anti-CSC properties. Taken together, these results provide evidence that SQE inhibits colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of CSCs. PMID:25941936

  20. A Ribonuclease Isolated from Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Suppressed Autophagy and Triggered Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xiuli; Liu, Wenlong; Wong, Jack H; Ng, Tzi B

    2016-01-01

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been consumed in China as a medicine for promoting health and longevity for thousands of years. Due to its paramount and multiple pharmaceutical effects, G. lucidum has received considerable attention from researchers and its chemical constituents as well as their respective functions were gradually unveiled by using modern research methods. Herein, we reported the isolation of a protein (Ganoderma lucidum ribonuclease, GLR) with anti-colorectal cancer activities from G. lucidum. This protein is a 17.4-kDa RNA degrading enzyme (ribonuclease) and was purified by using liquid chromatography procedures. GLR manifested potent anti-proliferative and anti-colony formation activities on HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase through the regulation of cyclin D1 and P53 expression. GLR was demonstrated to induce cell apoptosis in HCT116 cells by activating unfolded protein response and caspase-9 regulated pathways. Besides, the ability to undergo autophagy which is a stress adaption mechanism to cope with metabolic crisis was significantly suppressed by GLR treatment in HCT116 cells. The activation of apoptosis in GLR-treated HT29 cells was, however, independent of caspase-9 and the suppression of autophagy was also relatively minor. Thus the apoptosis of HT29 cells triggered by GLR was much milder than that in HCT116 cells. Our findings show that the RNase from G. lucidum may be one of the bioactive components that contribute to the anti-colorectal cancer activity of G. lucidum. PMID:27504094

  1. A Ribonuclease Isolated from Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Suppressed Autophagy and Triggered Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Xiuli; Liu, Wenlong; Wong, Jack H.; Ng, Tzi B.

    2016-01-01

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been consumed in China as a medicine for promoting health and longevity for thousands of years. Due to its paramount and multiple pharmaceutical effects, G. lucidum has received considerable attention from researchers and its chemical constituents as well as their respective functions were gradually unveiled by using modern research methods. Herein, we reported the isolation of a protein (Ganoderma lucidum ribonuclease, GLR) with anti-colorectal cancer activities from G. lucidum. This protein is a 17.4-kDa RNA degrading enzyme (ribonuclease) and was purified by using liquid chromatography procedures. GLR manifested potent anti-proliferative and anti-colony formation activities on HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase through the regulation of cyclin D1 and P53 expression. GLR was demonstrated to induce cell apoptosis in HCT116 cells by activating unfolded protein response and caspase-9 regulated pathways. Besides, the ability to undergo autophagy which is a stress adaption mechanism to cope with metabolic crisis was significantly suppressed by GLR treatment in HCT116 cells. The activation of apoptosis in GLR-treated HT29 cells was, however, independent of caspase-9 and the suppression of autophagy was also relatively minor. Thus the apoptosis of HT29 cells triggered by GLR was much milder than that in HCT116 cells. Our findings show that the RNase from G. lucidum may be one of the bioactive components that contribute to the anti-colorectal cancer activity of G. lucidum. PMID:27504094

  2. A Ribonuclease Isolated from Wild Ganoderma Lucidum Suppressed Autophagy and Triggered Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xiuli; Liu, Wenlong; Wong, Jack H; Ng, Tzi B

    2016-01-01

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been consumed in China as a medicine for promoting health and longevity for thousands of years. Due to its paramount and multiple pharmaceutical effects, G. lucidum has received considerable attention from researchers and its chemical constituents as well as their respective functions were gradually unveiled by using modern research methods. Herein, we reported the isolation of a protein (Ganoderma lucidum ribonuclease, GLR) with anti-colorectal cancer activities from G. lucidum. This protein is a 17.4-kDa RNA degrading enzyme (ribonuclease) and was purified by using liquid chromatography procedures. GLR manifested potent anti-proliferative and anti-colony formation activities on HT29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest in G1 phase through the regulation of cyclin D1 and P53 expression. GLR was demonstrated to induce cell apoptosis in HCT116 cells by activating unfolded protein response and caspase-9 regulated pathways. Besides, the ability to undergo autophagy which is a stress adaption mechanism to cope with metabolic crisis was significantly suppressed by GLR treatment in HCT116 cells. The activation of apoptosis in GLR-treated HT29 cells was, however, independent of caspase-9 and the suppression of autophagy was also relatively minor. Thus the apoptosis of HT29 cells triggered by GLR was much milder than that in HCT116 cells. Our findings show that the RNase from G. lucidum may be one of the bioactive components that contribute to the anti-colorectal cancer activity of G. lucidum.

  3. Dual Targeting of Bromodomain and Extraterminal Domain Proteins, and WNT or MAPK Signaling, Inhibits c-MYC Expression and Proliferation of Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tögel, Lars; Nightingale, Rebecca; Chueh, Anderly C; Jayachandran, Aparna; Tran, Hoanh; Phesse, Toby; Wu, Rui; Sieber, Oliver M; Arango, Diego; Dhillon, Amardeep S; Dawson, Mark A; Diez-Dacal, Beatriz; Gahman, Timothy C; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Shiau, Andrew K; Mariadason, John M

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitors of the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family attenuate the proliferation of several tumor cell lines. These effects are mediated, at least in part, through repression of c-MYC. In colorectal cancer, overexpression of c-MYC due to hyperactive WNT/β-catenin/TCF signaling is a key driver of tumor progression; however, effective strategies to target this oncogene remain elusive. Here, we investigated the effect of BET inhibitors (BETi) on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and c-MYC expression. Treatment of 20 colorectal cancer cell lines with the BETi JQ1 identified a subset of highly sensitive lines. JQ1 sensitivity was higher in cell lines with microsatellite instability but was not associated with the CpG island methylator phenotype, c-MYC expression or amplification status, BET protein expression, or mutation status of TP53, KRAS/BRAF, or PIK3CA/PTEN Conversely, JQ1 sensitivity correlated significantly with the magnitude of c-MYC mRNA and protein repression. JQ1-mediated c-MYC repression was not due to generalized attenuation of β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, as JQ1 had minimal effects on other β-catenin/TCF target genes or β-catenin/TCF reporter activity. BETi preferentially target super-enhancer-regulated genes, and a super-enhancer in c-MYC was recently identified in HCT116 cells to which BRD4 and effector transcription factors of the WNT/β-catenin/TCF and MEK/ERK pathways are recruited. Combined targeting of c-MYC with JQ1 and inhibitors of these pathways additively repressed c-MYC and proliferation of HCT116 cells. These findings demonstrate that BETi downregulate c-MYC expression and inhibit colorectal cancer cell proliferation and identify strategies for enhancing the effects of BETi on c-MYC repression by combinatorial targeting the c-MYC super-enhancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1217-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26983878

  4. Synthesis and cytotoxic evaluation of a series of 2-amino-naphthoquinones against human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Thiago A P; Filha, Maria J S; Camara, Celso A; Silva, Tania M S; Soares, Bruno M; Bomfim, Igor S; Pessoa, Claudia; Ximenes, George C; Silva Junior, Valdemiro A

    2014-08-26

    The cytotoxicity of a series of aminonaphthoquinones resulting from the reaction of suitable aminoacids with 1,4-naphthoquinone was assayed against SF-295 (glioblastoma), MDAMB-435 (breast), HCT-8 (colon), HCT-116 (colon), HL-60 (leukemia), OVCAR-8 (ovarian), NCI-H358M (bronchoalveolar lung carcinoma) and PC3-M (prostate) cancer cells and also against PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells). The results demonstrated that all the synthetic aminonaphthoquinones had relevant cytotoxic activity against all human cancer lines used in this experiment. Five of the compounds showed high cytotoxicity and selectivity against all cancer cell lines tested (IC50 = 0.49 to 3.89 µg·mL-1). The title compounds were less toxic to PBMC, since IC50 was 1.5 to eighteen times higher (IC50 = 5.51 to 17.61 µg·mL-1) than values shown by tumour cell lines. The mechanism of cell growth inhibition and structure-activity relationships remains as a target for future investigations.

  5. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  6. Antitumor activity of 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde for human colon cancer cells through suppression of β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Ai; Park, Hyen Joo; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Kim, Won Kyung; Lee, Sang Kook

    2013-07-26

    The antiproliferative and antitumor activities of 2-hydroxycinnamaldehyde (1), a phenylpropanoid isolated from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia, were investigated using human colorectal cancer cells. Compound 1 exhibited antiproliferative effects in HCT116 colon cancer cells, accompanied by modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin cell signaling pathway. This substance was found also to inhibit β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Further mechanistic investigations in human colon cancer cells with aberrantly activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling showed that 1 significantly suppressed the binding of β-catenin/TCF complexes to their specific genomic targets in the nucleus and led to the down-regulation of Wnt target genes such as c-myc and cyclin D1. In an in vivo xenograft model, the intraperitoneal administration of 1 (10 or 20 mg/kg body weight, three times/week) for four weeks suppressed tumor growth in athymic nude mice implanted with HCT116 colon cancer cells significantly, without any apparent toxicity. In an ex vivo biochemical analysis of the tumors, compound 1 was also found to suppress Wnt target genes associated with tumor growth including β-catenin, c-myc, cyclin D1, and survivin. The suppression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a plausible mechanism of action underlying the antiproliferative and antitumor activity of 1 in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:23855266

  7. Resveratrol-induced transcriptional up-regulation of ASMase (SMPD1) of human leukemia and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Naoki; Omori, Yukari; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Sobue, Sayaka; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murate, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant-derived phytoalexin present in plants, whose pleiotropic effects for health benefits have been previously reported. Its anti-cancer activity is among the current topics for novel cancer treatment. Here, effects of RSV on cell proliferation and the sphingolipid metabolism of K562, a human leukemia cell line, were analyzed. Some experiments were also performed in HCT116, a human colon cancer cell line. RSV inhibited cell proliferation of both cell lines. Increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P by RSV were observed in RSV-treated K562 cells. Further analysis revealed that acid sphingomyelinase mRNA and enzyme activity levels were increased by RSV. Desipramine, a functional ASMase inhibitor, prevented RSV-induced ceramide increase. RSV increased ATF3, EGR1, EGR3 proteins and phosphorylated c-Jun and FOXO3. However, co-transfection using these transcription factor expression vectors and ASMase promoter reporter vector revealed positive effects of EGR1 and EGR3 but not others. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated the direct binding of EGR1/3 transcription factors with ASMase 5'-promoter. These results indicate that increased EGR1/3 and ASMase expression play an important role in cellular ceramide increase by RSV treatment. PMID:26809095

  8. Hydrogen sulfide lowers proliferation and induces protective autophagy in colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya C; Wang, Xiao J; Yu, Le; Chan, Francis K L; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y; Wu, William K K; Cho, Chi H

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gaseous bacterial metabolite that reaches high levels in the large intestine. In the present study, the effect of H(2)S on the proliferation of normal and cancerous colon epithelial cells was investigated. An immortalized colon epithelial cell line (YAMC) and a panel of colon cancer cell lines (HT-29, SW1116, HCT116) were exposed to H(2)S at concentrations similar to those found in the human colon. H(2)S inhibited normal and cancerous colon epithelial cell proliferation as measured by MTT assay. The anti-mitogenic effect of H(2)S was accompanied by G(1)-phase cell cycle arrest and the induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip). Moreover, exposure to H(2)S led to features characteristic of autophagy, including increased formation of LC3B(+) autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles as determined by immunofluorescence and acridine orange staining, respectively. Abolition of autophagy by RNA interference targeting Vps34 or Atg7 enhanced the anti-proliferative effect of H(2)S. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that H(2)S stimulated the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6 kinase. Inhibition of AMPK significantly reversed H(2)S-induced autophagy and inhibition of cell proliferation. Collectively, we demonstrate that H(2)S inhibits colon epithelial cell proliferation and induces protective autophagy via the AMPK pathway. PMID:22679478

  9. hcrcn81 promotes cell proliferation through Wnt signaling pathway in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Jiang, Tingting; Shi, Lihong; He, Kunyan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the role of hcrcn81 gene in Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway related to human colorectal cancer. A total of 30 pairs of human colorectal cancer tissues with control normal tissues were analyzed by qRT-PCR. The proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, cell colony and metastasis of LS174T(-hcrcn81), HCT116(-hcrcn81), LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) cells were tested, of which hcrcn81 was knockdown in LS174T, HCT116 cells and hcrcn81 was overexpressed in LoVo, SMMC-7721 cells. Besides, the mRNA and protein levels of hcrcn81, β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclinD1, GSK-3β and survivin in colon cancer cell lines were evaluated by qRT-PCR and western blot. The mRNA levels of β-catenin and Survivin were up-regulated in 76.7 % (23/30) and 63.3 % (19/30) of the tumor samples, respectively. hcrcn81 and GSK-3β mRNA expression levels were down-regulated in 20/30 (66.7 %) and 21/30 (70.0 %) of the tumor samples as compared to the adjacent normal tissues, respectively. Furthermore, in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) cells, the mRNA and protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclinD1 and Survivin were up-regulated, whereas those of GSK-3 were down-regulated. In LS174T(-hcrcn81) and HCT116(-hcrcn81) cells, the mRNA levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, cyclinD1 and Survivin were down-regulated, whereas GSK-3βmRNA was up-regulated. Cell proliferation in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) groups was significantly enhanced (P < 0.05). Proliferation index in both LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) groups was significantly higher than that in the control groups (P < 0.05). The number of colony in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) cells were significantly higher than that in the control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells in LoVo(+hcrcn81) and SMMC-7721(+hcrcn81) groups were significantly lower than that in the control groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Finally, the number of migrating cells was

  10. Cytotoxicity of Salvia miltiorrhiza Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Bohnert, Stefan; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Lamiaceae) is a well-known Chinese herb that possesses numerous therapeutic activities, including anticancer effects. In this study, the cytotoxicity and the biological mechanisms of S. miltiorrhiza (SM) root extract on diverse resistant and sensitive cancer cell lines were investigated. CEM/ADR5000 cells were 1.68-fold resistant to CCRF-CEM cells, while HCT116 (p53[Formula: see text] and U87.MG[Formula: see text]EGFR cells were hypersensitive (collateral sensitive) compared to their parental cells. SM root extract stimulated ROS generation, cell cycle S phase arrest and apoptosis. The induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway was validated by increased cleavage of caspase 3, 7, 9 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). MAP kinases including JNK, ERK1/2 and p38 were obviously phosphorylated and nuclear P65 was downregulated upon SM treatment. Transcriptome-wide COMPARE analysis revealed that the expression of encoding genes with diverse functions were associated with the cellular response to cryptotanshinone, one of the main constituents of SM root extract. In conclusion, SM root extract exerted profound cytotoxicity towards various sensitive and resistant cancer cells and induced the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27222067

  11. mTOR inhibition sensitizes ONC201-induced anti-colorectal cancer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe-Zhu; Wang, Wei; Fang, Di-Long; Jin, Yong-Jun

    2016-09-30

    We here tested the anti-colorectal cancer (CRC) activity by a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer ONC201. The potential effect of mTOR on ONC201's actions was also examined. ONC201 induced moderate cytotoxicity against CRC cell lines (HT-29, HCT-116 and DLD-1) and primary human CRC cells. Significantly, AZD-8055, a mTOR kinase inhibitor, sensitized ONC201-induced cytotoxicity in CRC cells. Meanwhile, ONC201-induced TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR-5) expression, caspase-8 activation and CRC cell apoptosis were also potentiated with AZD-8055 co-treatment. Reversely, TRAIL sequestering antibody RIK-2 or the caspase-8 specific inhibitor z-IETD-fmk attenuated AZD-8055 plus ONC201-induced CRC cell death. Further, mTOR kinase-dead mutation (Asp-2338-Ala) or shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized ONC201's activity in CRC cells, leading to profound cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, expression of a constitutively-active S6K1 (T389E) attenuated ONC201-induced CRC cell apoptosis. For the mechanism study, we showed that ONC201 blocked Akt, but only slightly inhibited mTOR in CRC cells. Co-treatment with AZD-8055 also concurrently blocked mTOR activation. These results suggest that mTOR could be a primary resistance factor of ONC201 in CRC cells. PMID:27565731

  12. Metabolism of [6]-Shogaol in Mice and in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huadong; Lv, Lishuang; Soroka, Dominique; Warin, Renaud F.; Parks, Tiffany A.; Hu, Yuhui; Zhu, Yingdong; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2012-01-01

    Ginger has received extensive attention because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor activities. However, the metabolic fate of its major components is still unclear. In the present study, the metabolism of [6]-shogaol, one of the major active components in ginger, was examined for the first time in mice and in cancer cells. Thirteen metabolites were detected and identified, seven of which were purified from fecal samples collected from [6]-shogaol-treated mice. Their structures were elucidated as 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-4-decen-3-ol (M6), 5-methoxy-1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M7), 3′,4′-dihydroxyphenyl-decan-3-one (M8), 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-ol (M9), 5-methylthio-1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M10), 1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-one (M11), and 5-methylthio-1-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxyphenyl)-decan-3-ol (M12) on the basis of detailed analysis of their 1H, 13C, and two-dimensional NMR data. The rest of the metabolites were identified as 5-cysteinyl-M6 (M1), 5-cysteinyl-[6]-shogaol (M2), 5-cysteinylglycinyl-M6 (M3), 5-N-acetylcysteinyl-M6 (M4), 5-N-acetylcysteinyl-[6]-shogaol (M5), and 5-glutathiol-[6]-shogaol (M13) by analysis of the MSn (n = 1–3) spectra and comparison to authentic standards. Among the metabolites, M1 through M5, M10, M12, and M13 were identified as the thiol conjugates of [6]-shogaol and its metabolite M6. M9 and M11 were identified as the major metabolites in four different cancer cell lines (HCT-116, HT-29, H-1299, and CL-13), and M13 was detected as a major metabolite in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells. We further showed that M9 and M11 are bioactive compounds that can inhibit cancer cell growth and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells. Our results suggest that 1) [6]-shogaol is extensively metabolized in these two models, 2) its metabolites are bioactive compounds, and 3) the mercapturic acid pathway is one of the major

  13. Stool-fermented Plantago ovata husk induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells independently of molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vanessa R; Giros, Anna; Xicola, Rosa M; Fluvià, Lourdes; Grzybowski, Mike; Anguera, Anna; Llor, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have suggested that the partially fermentable fibre Plantago ovata husk (PO) may have a protective effect on colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the potentially pro-apoptotic effect of PO and the implicated mechanisms in CRC cells with different molecular phenotypes (Caco-2, HCT116, LoVo, HT-29, SW480) after PO anaerobic fermentation with colonic bacteria as it occurs in the human colon. The fermentation products of PO induced apoptosis in all primary tumour and metastatic cell lines, independent of p53, adenomatous polyposis coli, β-catenin or cyclo-oxygenase-2 status. Apoptosis was caspase-dependent and both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were implicated. The intrinsic pathway was activated through a shift in the balance towards a pro-apoptotic environment with an up-regulation of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 homologous antagonist killer (BAK) and a down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) seen in HCT116 and LoVo cells. This resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, increased expression of caspase activators second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac)/Diablo, death effector apoptosis-inducing factor, apoptosome member apoptotic protease activating factor 1 and down-regulation of inhibitors of apoptosis Survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in most cells. The extrinsic pathway was activated presumably through the up-regulation of death receptor (DR5). Some important differences were seen between primary tumour and metastatic CRC cells. Thus, metastatic PO-treated LoVo cells had a remarkable up-regulation of TNF-α ligand along with death-inducing signalling complex components receptor interacting protein and TNF-α receptor 1-associated death domain protein. The extrinsic pathway modulator FCICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), an inhibitor of both spontaneous death ligand-independent and death receptor-mediated apoptosis, was significantly down-regulated after PO treatment in all primary tumour cells, but not

  14. Molecular mechanisms for inhibition of colon cancer cells by combined epigenetic-modulating epigallocatechin gallate and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Kala, Rishabh; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2014-05-15

    Bioactive compounds are considered safe and have been shown to alter genetic and epigenetic profiles of tumor cells. However, many of these changes have been reported at molecular concentrations higher than physiologically achievable levels. We investigated the role of the combinatorial effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a predominant polyphenol in green tea, and sodium butyrate (NaB), a dietary microbial fermentation product of fiber, in the regulation of survivin, which is an overexpressed anti-apoptotic protein in colon cancer cells. For the first time, our study showed that the combination treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in RKO, HCT-116 and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. This was found to be regulated by the decrease in HDAC1, DNMT1, survivin and HDAC activity in all three cell lines. A G2/M arrest was observed for RKO and HCT-116 cells, and G1 arrest for HT-29 colorectal cancer cells for combinatorial treatment. Further experimentation of the molecular mechanisms in RKO colorectal cancer (CRC) cells revealed a p53-dependent induction of p21 and an increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-p65. An increase in double strand breaks as determined by gamma-H2A histone family member X (γ-H2AX) protein levels and induction of histone H3 hyperacetylation was also observed with the combination treatment. Further, we observed a decrease in global CpG methylation. Taken together, these findings suggest that at low and physiologically achievable concentrations, combinatorial EGCG and NaB are effective in promoting apoptosis, inducing cell cycle arrest and DNA-damage in CRC cells. - Highlights: • EGCG and NaB as a combination inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation. • The combination treatment induces DNA damage, G2/M and G1 arrest and apoptosis. • Survivin is effectively down-regulated by the combination treatment. • p21 and p53 expressions are induced by the combination treatment. • Epigenetic proteins DNMT1 and HDAC1 are

  15. Multi-color fluorescence imaging of sub-cellular dynamics of cancer cells in live mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2006-02-01

    We have genetically engineered dual-color fluorescent cells with one color in the nucleus and the other in the cytoplasm that enables real-time nuclear-cytoplasmic dynamics to be visualized in living cells in the cytoplasm in vivo as well as in vitro. To obtain the dual-color cells, red fluorescent protein (RFP) was expressed of the cancer cells, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to histone H2B was expressed in the nucleus. Mitotic cells were visualized by whole-body imaging after injection in the mouse ear. Common carotid artery or heart injection of dual-color cells and a reversible skin flap enabled the external visualization of the dual-color cells in microvessels in the mouse where extreme elongation of the cell body as well as the nucleus occurred. The migration velocities of the dual-color cancer cells in the capillaries were measured by capturing individual images of the dual-color fluorescent cells over time. Human HCT-116-GFP-RFP colon cancer and mouse mammary tumor (MMT)-GFP-RFP cells were injected in the portal vein of nude mice. Extensive clasmocytosis (destruction of the cytoplasm) of the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells occurred within 6 hours. The data suggest rapid death of HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells in the portal vein. In contrast, MMT-GFP-RFP cells injected into the portal vein mostly survived and formed colonies in the liver. However, when the host mice were pretreated with cyclophosphamide, the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells also survived and formed colonies in the liver after portal vein injection. These results suggest that a cyclophosphamide-sensitive host cellular system attacked the HCT-116-GFP-RFP cells but could not effectively kill the MMT-GFP-RFP cells. With the ability to continuously image cancer cells at the subcellular level in the live animal, our understanding of the complex steps of metastasis will significantly increase. In addition, new drugs can be developed to target these newly visible steps of metastasis.

  16. Maple polyphenols, ginnalins A-C, induce S- and G2/M-cell cycle arrest in colon and breast cancer cells mediated by decreasing cyclins A and D1 levels.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Ma, Hang; Edmonds, Maxwell E; Seeram, Navindra P

    2013-01-15

    Polyphenols are bioactive compounds found in plant foods. Ginnalins A-C are polyphenols present in the sap and other parts of the sugar and red maple species which are used to produce maple syrup. Here we evaluated the antiproliferative effects of ginnalins A-C on colon (HCT-116) and breast (MCF-7) tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic colon (CCD-18Co) cells and investigated whether these effects were mediated through cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Ginnalins A-C were twofold more effective against the tumourigenic than non-tumourigenic cells. Among the polyphenols, ginnalin A (84%, HCT-116; 49%, MCF-7) was more effective than ginnalins B and C (50%, HCT-116; 30%, MCF-7) at 50 μM concentrations. Ginnalin A did not induce apoptosis of the cancer cells but arrested cell cycle (in the S- and G(2)/M-phases) and decreased cyclins A and D1 protein levels. These results suggest that maple polyphenols may have potential cancer chemopreventive effects mediated through cell cycle arrest. PMID:23122108

  17. Downregulation of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is essential for the Induction of Autophagy and Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yizhou; Hu, Hao; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shang, Zengfu; Yang, Xiaodong; Sun, Kang; Zhan, Shenghua; Yu, Zhengyuan; Li, Peiyao; Pan, Guofeng; Sun, Liang; Zhu, Xinguo; He, Songbing

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that elevated expression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 gene (EZH2) in many human malignant tumors acts a significant role in the oncogenic process. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclarified. It is evident that apoptosis and autophagy of tumor cells is crucial for the tumorigenesis and progression of cancer, however, the exact role of EZH2 plays in apoptosis and autophagy has not been fully elucidated in colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous study found that the expression level of EZH2 was higher in CRC tumor tissues than in the paired normal tissues using immunohistochemical analysis. We also recently found that the autophagy-related gene-related protein Ambra1 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway in CRC cells. In this study, mRNA and protein expression of EZH2 in four CRC cell lines were tested at first and RKO and HCT116 cells showed the highest levels among them. Here we transfected with EZH2-shRNA, or added DZNep (an EZH2 inhibitor) to RKO and HCT116 cells in order to detect the effect of EZH2 on autophagy via determining the change of the protein expression of LC3 and Ambra1. The outcome indicated an obvious decrease of autophagy level in cells transfected with EZH2-shRNA or DZNep. We also found the apoptotic rate of cells was elevated significantly after downregulation of EZH2. In addition, compared to control group, CRC cells transfected with EZH2-shRNA or added DZNep revealed a significantly increased G1 cell cycle rate and an obvious decrease in the G2 cell cycle rate. Further analysis showed that knockdown of EZH2 induced cell-cycle arrest in CRC cells. Meanwhile, downregulation of EZH2 in CRC cells induces autophagy and apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that EZH2 plays a critical role in autophagy and apoptosis in the progression of CRC, which potentially facilitates the development of an ideal strategy for combating colorectal cancer. PMID:27706111

  18. Computerized video time lapse study of cell cycle delay and arrest, mitotic catastrophe, apoptosis and clonogenic survival in irradiated 14-3-3sigma and CDKN1A (p21) knockout cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kenneth; Teele, Noella; Dewey, Michael W; Albright, Norman; Dewey, William C

    2004-09-01

    Computerized video time lapse (CVTL) microscopy was used to observe cellular events induced by ionizing radiation (10-12 Gy) in nonclonogenic cells of the wild-type HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell line and its three isogenic derivative lines in which p21 (CDKN1A), 14-3-3sigma or both checkpoint genes (double-knockout) had been knocked out. Cells that fused after mitosis or failed to complete mitosis were classified together as cells that underwent mitotic catastrophe. Seventeen percent of the wild-type cells and 34-47% of the knockout cells underwent mitotic catastrophe to enter generation 1 with a 4N content of DNA, i.e., the same DNA content as irradiated cells arrested in G(2) at the end of generation 0. Radiation caused a transient division delay in generation 0 before the cells divided or underwent mitotic catastrophe. Compared with the division delay for wild-type cells that express CDKN1A and 14-3-3sigma, knocking out CDKN1A reduced the delay the most for cells irradiated in G(1) (from approximately 15 h to approximately 3- 5 h), while knocking out 14-3-3sigma reduced the delay the most for cells irradiated in late S and G(2) (from approximately 18 h to approximately 3-4 h). However, 27% of wild-type cells and 17% of 14-3-3sigma(-/-) cells were arrested at 96 h in generation 0 compared with less than 1% for CDKN1A(-/-) and double-knockout cells. Thus expression of CDKN1A is necessary for the prolonged delay or arrest in generation 0. Furthermore, CDKN1A plays a crucial role in generation 1, greatly inhibiting progression into subsequent generations of both diploid cells and polyploid cells produced by mitotic catastrophe. Thus, in CDKN1A-deficient cell lines, a series of mitotic catastrophe events occurred to produce highly polyploid progeny during generations 3 and 4. Most importantly, the polyploid progeny produced by mitotic catastrophe events did not die sooner than the progeny of dividing cells. Death was identified as loss of cell movement, i

  19. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamhane, Tripti; Wolters, Brit K.; Illukkumbura, Rukshala; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M.; Haugen, Mads H.; Brix, Klaudia

    2015-01-01

    The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015) [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP) in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed. PMID:26594658

  20. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Tripti; Wolters, Brit K; Illukkumbura, Rukshala; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M; Haugen, Mads H; Brix, Klaudia

    2015-12-01

    The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015) [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP) in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed.

  1. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the 5' flanking region of the sialomucin complex/rat Muc4 gene: promoter activity in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Price-Schiavi, S A; Perez, A; Barco, R; Carraway, K L

    2000-01-01

    Sialomucin complex (SMC/Muc4) is a heterodimeric glycoprotein complex consisting of a mucin subunit ascites sialoglycoprotein-1 (ASGP-1) and a transmembrane subunit (ASGP-2), which is aberrantly expressed on the surfaces of a variety of tumour cells. SMC is transcribed from a single gene, translated into a large polypeptide precursor, and further processed to yield the mature ASGP-1/ASGP-2 complex. SMC has complex spatial and temporal expression patterns in the normal rat, suggesting that it has complex regulatory mechanisms. A crude exon/intron map of the 5' regions of the SMC/Muc4 gene generated from clones isolated from a normal rat liver genomic DNA library reveals that this gene has a small first exon comprising the 5' untranslated region and signal peptide, followed by a large intron. The second exon appears to be large, comprising the 5' unique region and a large part (probably all) of the tandem repeat domain. This structure is strikingly similar to that reported for the human MUC4 gene. Using PCR-based DNA walking, 2.4 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the SMC/Muc4 gene was cloned and characterized. Promoter-pattern searches yielded multiple motifs commonly found in tissue-specific promoters. Reporter constructs generated from this 2.4 kb fragment demonstrate promoter activity in primary rat mammary epithelial cells (MEC), the human colon tumour cell line HCT-116, and the human lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H292, but not in COS-7 cells, suggesting epithelial cell specificity. Deletion constructs of this sequence transfected into rat MEC or HCT-116 cells demonstrate greatly varying levels of activity, suggesting that there are positive and negative, as well as tissue-specific, regulatory elements in this sequence. Taken together, these data suggest that the rat SMC/Muc4 promoter has been identified, that it is tissue- (epithelial cell-) specific, and that there are both positive and negative, as well as tissue-specific, regulatory elements in the sequence

  3. Pinoresinol inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation on human HL60 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Sepporta, Maria Vittoria; Mazza, Teresa; Morozzi, Guido; Fabiani, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Pinoresinol (PIN), one of the simplest lignans, is the precursor of other dietary lignans that are present in whole-grain cereals, legumes, fruits, and other vegetables. Several experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that lignans may prevent human cancer in different organs. In this study we investigated the chemopreventive properties of PIN on cell lines derived from different sites either expressing or not the functional tumor suppressor protein p53. It was found that PIN inhibited the proliferation of p53 wild type colon and prostate tumor cells (HCT116 and LNCaP) while in breast cells the inhibition of growth was observed only in p53 mutant cells (MDA-MB-231). A potent antiproliferative activity of PIN was also observed on p53 null cells HL60 (IC50% 8 μM), their multidrug resistant variant HL60R (IC50% 32 μM) and K562. On HL60 cells, PIN caused a block of cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, induced a weak proapoptotic effect but it was a good trigger of differentiation (NBT reduction and CD11b expression). PIN caused an upregulation of the CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/Cip1) both at mRNA and protein levels so suggesting that this could be a mechanism by which PIN reduced proliferation and induced differentiation on HL60 cells.

  4. Oridonin upregulates PTEN through activating p38 MAPK and inhibits proliferation in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiu-Xiang; Yuan, Shuang-Xue; Ren, Chun-Mei; Yu, Yu; Sun, Wen-Juan; He, Bai-Cheng; Wu, Ke

    2016-06-01

    Oridonin (ORI) has been reported as an antiproliferation and apoptosis-inducing natural product in various cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated the antiproliferation effect of ORI in HCT116 cells, and analyzed the possible molecular mechanism which mediates this effect. We found that ORI inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT116 cells, thus also tumor growth. Mechanically, we found that ORI has no substantial effect on mRNA expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), but increases the total protein level of PTEN and markedly reduces the phosphorylation of PTEN; Exogenous expression of PTEN potentiates the anticancer effect of ORI, while knockdown of PTEN attenuates it. ORI also increases the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and p38 MAPK-specific inhibitor reduces the antiproliferation effect ORI in HCT116 cells. Moreover, inhibition of p38 MAPK increases the phosphorylation of PTEN, and reverses ORI-induced decrease of PTEN phosphorylation. Our findings suggested that ORI may be a potential anticancer drug for colon cancer, this effect may be mediated by enhancing the function of PTEN through reducing its phosphorylation, which may be resulted from the ORI-induced activation of p38 MAPK.

  5. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-07

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions. - Highlights: • AR-42 is anti-proliferative against primary/established colon cancer cells. • AR-42 induces significant apoptotic death in primary/established colon cancer cells. • Ceramide production mediates AR-42-induced cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells. • AR-42 oral administration potently inhibits SW-620 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  6. Pantoprazole, an FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitor, suppresses colorectal cancer growth by targeting T-cell-originated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huimin; Xiao, Juanjuan; Lu, Tao; Huang, Guangqian; Chen, Pianpian; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Hua; Duan, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is highly expressed in several cancer cells and promotes tumorigenesis and progression, and therefore, it is an important target for drug treatment of tumor. Pantoprazole (PPZ) was identified to be a TOPK inhibitor from FDA-approved drug database by structure based virtual ligand screening. Herein, the data indicated that pantoprazole inhibited TOPK activities by directly binding with TOPK in vitro and in vivo. Ex vivo studies showed that pantoprazole inhibited TOPK activities in JB6 Cl41 cells and HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of TOPK in HCT 116 cells decreased their sensitivities to pantoprazole. Results of an in vivo study demonstrated that i.p. injection of pantoprazole in HCT 116 colon tumor-bearing mice effectively suppressed cancer growth. The TOPK downstream signaling molecule phospho-histone H3 in tumor tissues was also decreased after pantoprazole treatment. In short, pantoprazole can suppress growth of colorectal cancer cells as a TOPK inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26967058

  7. Pterostilbine, an active component of blueberries, sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line of therapy for this debilitating disease, treatment effectiveness is often hampered by the development of drug resistance and toxicity at high doses. ER-β can play an important role in CRC development and possibly in its response to therapy. Pterostilbene (PT) possesses antioxidant and anticancer effects that are mediated by ER-β. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that PT sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-FU and we examine the underlying mechanism(s) by which PT exerts its cytotoxic effects in CRC cells. Our data indicate that PT exhibited a more potent cytotoxic effect in Caco-2 compared to HCT-116 cells. PT/5-FU co-treatment was more effective in Caco-2 cells. Our data indicate that ER-β is expressed at higher levels in Caco-2 cells and its levels are further boosted with PT treatment. PT significantly suppressed Akt and ERK phosphorylations, and enhanced FOXO-1 and p27(kip1) levels in Caco-2 cells. PT also induced a significant increase in Caco-2 cells at pre-G phase coupled with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and PARP cleavage. These results provide a rationale for novel combination treatment strategies, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing ER-β protein. PMID:26472352

  8. Pterostilbine, an active component of blueberries, sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2015-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line of therapy for this debilitating disease, treatment effectiveness is often hampered by the development of drug resistance and toxicity at high doses. ER-β can play an important role in CRC development and possibly in its response to therapy. Pterostilbene (PT) possesses antioxidant and anticancer effects that are mediated by ER-β. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that PT sensitizes colon cancer cells to 5-FU and we examine the underlying mechanism(s) by which PT exerts its cytotoxic effects in CRC cells. Our data indicate that PT exhibited a more potent cytotoxic effect in Caco-2 compared to HCT-116 cells. PT/5-FU co-treatment was more effective in Caco-2 cells. Our data indicate that ER-β is expressed at higher levels in Caco-2 cells and its levels are further boosted with PT treatment. PT significantly suppressed Akt and ERK phosphorylations, and enhanced FOXO-1 and p27(kip1) levels in Caco-2 cells. PT also induced a significant increase in Caco-2 cells at pre-G phase coupled with increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and PARP cleavage. These results provide a rationale for novel combination treatment strategies, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing ER-β protein.

  9. Toxins vapC and pasB from prokaryotic TA modules remain active in mammalian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wieteska, Łukasz; Skulimowski, Aleksander; Cybula, Magdalena; Szemraj, Janusz

    2014-10-01

    Among the great number of addictive modules which have been discovered, only a few have been characterized. However, research concerning the adoption of toxins from these systems shows their great potential as a tool for molecular biology and medicine. In our study, we tested two different toxins derived from class II addictive modules, pasAB from plasmid pTF-FC2 (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) and vapBC 2829Rv (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), in terms of their usefulness as growth inhibitors of human cancer cell lines, namely KYSE 30, MCF-7 and HCT 116. Transfection of the pasB and vapC genes into the cells was conducted with the use of two different expression systems. Cellular effects, such as apoptosis, necrosis and changes in the cell cycle, were tested by applying flow cytometry with immunofluorescence staining. Our findings demonstrated that toxins VapC and PasB demonstrate proapoptotic activity in the human cancer cells, regardless of the expression system used. As for the toxin PasB, observed changes were more subtle than for the VapC. The level of expression for both the genes was monitored by QPCR and did not reveal statistically significant differences within the same cell line.

  10. Synthesis of Tolmetin Hydrazide-Hydrazones and Discovery of a Potent Apoptosis Inducer in Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz; Koç, Derya; Çıkla-Süzgün, Pelin; Özsavcı, Derya; Bingöl-Özakpınar, Özlem; Mega-Tiber, Pınar; Orun, Oya; Erzincan, Pınar; Sağ-Erdem, Safiye; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-10-01

    Tolmetin hydrazide and a novel series of tolmetin hydrazide-hydrazones 4a-l were synthesized in this study. The structures of the new compounds were determined by spectral (FT-IR, (1)H NMR) methods. N'-[(2,6-Dichlorophenyl)methylidene]-2-[1-methyl-5-(4-methylbenzoyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]acetohydrazide (4g) was evaluated in vitro using the MTT colorimetric method against the colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 (ATCC, CCL-247) and HT-29 (ATCC, HTB-38) to determine growth inhibition and cell viability at different doses. Compound 4g exhibited anti-cancer activity with an IC50 value of 76 μM against colon cancer line HT-29 (ATCC, HTB-38) and did not display cytotoxicity toward control NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells compared to tolmetin. In addition, this compound was evaluated for caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and annexin-V activation in the apoptotic pathway, which plays a key role in the treatment of cancer. We demonstrated that the anti-cancer activity of this compound was due to the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9 involved in the apoptotic pathway. In addition, in this study, we investigated the catalytical effect of COX on the HT-29 cancer line, the apoptotic mechanism, and the moleculer binding of tolmetin and compound 4g on the COX enzyme active site.

  11. A correction to the research article titled: "Amplification of the driving oncogene, KRAS or BRAF, underpins acquired resistance to MEK1/2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer cells" by A. S. Little, K. Balmanno, M. J. Sale, S. Newman, J. R. Dry, M. Hampson, P. A. W. Edwards, P. D. Smith, S. J. Cook.

    PubMed

    Little, Annette S; Balmanno, Kathryn; Sale, Matthew J; Newman, Scott; Dry, Jonathan R; Hampson, Mark; Edwards, Paul A W; Smith, Paul D; Cook, Simon J

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition of resistance to protein kinase inhibitors is a growing problem in cancer treatment. We modeled acquired resistance to the MEK1/2 (mitogen-activated or extracellular signal–regulated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2) inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244) in colorectal cancer cell lines harboring mutations in BRAF (COLO205 and HT29 lines) or KRAS (HCT116 and LoVo lines). AZD6244-resistant derivatives were refractory to AZD6244-induced cell cycle arrest and death and exhibited a marked increase in ERK1/2 (extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1 and 2) pathway signaling and cyclin D1 abundance when assessed in the absence of inhibitor. Genomic sequencing revealed no acquired mutations in MEK1 or MEK2, the primary target of AZD6244. Rather, resistant lines showed a marked up-regulation of their respective driving oncogenes, BRAF600E or KRAS13D, due to intrachromosomal amplification. Inhibition of BRAF reversed resistance to AZD6244 in COLO205 cells, which suggested that combined inhibition of MEK1/2 and BRAF may reduce the likelihood of acquired resistance in tumors with BRAF600E. Knockdown of KRAS reversed AZD6244 resistance in HCT116 cells as well as reduced the activation of ERK1/2 and protein kinase B; however, the combined inhibition of ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling had little effect on AZD6244 resistance, suggesting that additional KRAS effector pathways contribute to this process. Microarray analysis identified increased expression of an 18-gene signature previously identified as reflecting MEK1/2 pathway output in resistant cells. Thus, amplification of the driving oncogene (BRAF600E or KRAS13D) can drive acquired resistance to MEK1/2 inhibitors by increasing signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway. However, up-regulation of KRAS13D leads to activation of multiple KRAS effector pathways, underlining the therapeutic challenge posed by KRAS mutations. These results may have implications for the use of combination therapies.

  12. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  13. JNK confers 5-fluorouracil resistance in p53-deficient and mutant p53-expressing colon cancer cells by inducing survival autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xinbing; Kong, Na; Wang, Xian; Fang, Yong; Hu, Xiaotong; Xu, Yinghua; Chen, Wei; Wang, Kaifeng; Li, Da; Jin, Wei; Lou, Fang; Zheng, Yu; Hu, Hong; Gong, Liu; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency or mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene commonly occurs in human cancer and can contribute to disease progression and chemotherapy resistance. Currently, although the pro-survival or pro-death effect of autophagy remains a controversial issue, increasing data seem to support the idea that autophagy facilitates cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy treatment. Here we report that 5-FU treatment causes aberrant autophagosome accumulation in HCT116 p53−/− and HT-29 cancer cells. Specific inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA, CQ or small interfering RNA treatment targeting Atg5 or Beclin 1 can potentiate the re-sensitization of these resistant cancer cells to 5-FU. In further analysis, we show that JNK activation and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 are key determinants in 5-FU-induced autophagy. Inhibition of JNK by the compound SP600125 or JNK siRNA suppressed autophagy and phosphorylation of c-Jun and Bcl-2 but increased 5-FU-induced apoptosis in both HCT116 p53−/− and HT29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that JNK activation confers 5-FU resistance in HCT116 p53−/− and HT29 cells by promoting autophagy as a pro-survival effect, likely via inducing Bcl-2 phosphorylation. These results provide a promising strategy to improve the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer patients harboring a p53 gene mutation. PMID:24733045

  14. Anticarcinogenic effects of the ethanolic extract of Salix aegyptiaca in colon cancer cells: involvement of Akt/PKB and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Enayat, Shabnam; Ceyhan, Müşerref Şeyma; Başaran, Arif Ahmet; Gürsel, Mayda; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2013-01-01

    The bark from Salix species of plants has been traditionally consumed for its antiinflammatory properties. Because inflammation frequently accompanies the progress of colorectal cancer (CRC), we have evaluated the anticancer properties of the ethanolic extract from the bark (EEB) of S. aegyptiaca, a Salix species endogenous to the Middle East, using HCT-116 and HT29 CRC cell lines. Fresh bark from S. aegyptiaca was extracted with ethanol, fractionated by solvent-solvent partitioning and the fractions were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Catechin, catechol, and salicin were the most abundant constituents of the extract. Interestingly, EEB showed the highest anticancer effect in the colon cancer cells followed by its fractions in ethyl acetate and water, with catechin, catechol, and salicin showing the least efficacy. EEB could strongly reduce the proliferation of the cancer cells, but not of CCD-18Co, normal colon fibroblast cell line. Accompanying this was cell cycle arrest at G1/S independent of DNA damage in the cancer cells, induction of apoptosis through a p53 dependent pathway and an inhibition of PI3K/Akt and MAP Kinase pathways at levels comparable to known commercial inhibitors. We propose that the combination of the polyphenols and flavonoids in EEB contributes toward its potent anticarcinogenic effects. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Nutrition and Cancer for the following free supplemental resource(s): Supplementary Figure 1 and Supplementary Figure 2.]. PMID:24168160

  15. Anticarcinogenic effects of the ethanolic extract of Salix aegyptiaca in colon cancer cells: involvement of Akt/PKB and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Enayat, Shabnam; Ceyhan, Müşerref Şeyma; Başaran, Arif Ahmet; Gürsel, Mayda; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2013-01-01

    The bark from Salix species of plants has been traditionally consumed for its antiinflammatory properties. Because inflammation frequently accompanies the progress of colorectal cancer (CRC), we have evaluated the anticancer properties of the ethanolic extract from the bark (EEB) of S. aegyptiaca, a Salix species endogenous to the Middle East, using HCT-116 and HT29 CRC cell lines. Fresh bark from S. aegyptiaca was extracted with ethanol, fractionated by solvent-solvent partitioning and the fractions were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Catechin, catechol, and salicin were the most abundant constituents of the extract. Interestingly, EEB showed the highest anticancer effect in the colon cancer cells followed by its fractions in ethyl acetate and water, with catechin, catechol, and salicin showing the least efficacy. EEB could strongly reduce the proliferation of the cancer cells, but not of CCD-18Co, normal colon fibroblast cell line. Accompanying this was cell cycle arrest at G1/S independent of DNA damage in the cancer cells, induction of apoptosis through a p53 dependent pathway and an inhibition of PI3K/Akt and MAP Kinase pathways at levels comparable to known commercial inhibitors. We propose that the combination of the polyphenols and flavonoids in EEB contributes toward its potent anticarcinogenic effects. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Nutrition and Cancer for the following free supplemental resource(s): Supplementary Figure 1 and Supplementary Figure 2.].

  16. Isolation and antiproliferative activity of Lotus corniculatus lectin towards human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shaista; Majeed, Rabiya; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Ganai, Bashir Ahmad; Wani, Ishfak; Rakhshanda, Syed; Qurishi, Yasrib; Sharma, P R; Hamid, Abid; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Rabia

    2013-12-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the anti cancer activity of a lectin isolated from Lotus corniculatus seeds. A tetrameric 70kDa galactose specific lectin was purified using two step simple purification protocol which involved affinity chromatography on AF-BlueHC650M and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The lectin was adsorbed on AF-BlueHC650M and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 yielded a major peak absorbance that gave two bands of 15kDa and 20kDa in SDS PAGE. Hemagglutination activity was completely preserved, when the temperature was in the range of 20-60°C. However, drastic reduction in activity occurred at temperatures above 60°C. Full hemagglutination activity was retained at ambient pH 4-12. Thereafter no activity was observed above pH 13. Hemaglutination of the lectin was inhibited by d-galactose. The lectin showed a strong antiproliferative activity towards human leukemic (THP-1) cancer cells followed by lung cancer (HOP62) cells and HCT116 with an IC50 of 39μg/ml and 50μg/ml and 60μg/ml respectively. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0G1 phase confirming that Lotus corniculatus lectin induced apoptosis. Morphological observations showed that Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) treated THP-1 cells displayed apparent apoptosis characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of membrane enclosed apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) effectively inhibits the cell migration in a dose dependent manner as indicated by the wound healing assay. PMID:24055517

  17. Isolation and antiproliferative activity of Lotus corniculatus lectin towards human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shaista; Majeed, Rabiya; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Ganai, Bashir Ahmad; Wani, Ishfak; Rakhshanda, Syed; Qurishi, Yasrib; Sharma, P R; Hamid, Abid; Masood, Akbar; Hamid, Rabia

    2013-12-15

    The objective of the study was to investigate the anti cancer activity of a lectin isolated from Lotus corniculatus seeds. A tetrameric 70kDa galactose specific lectin was purified using two step simple purification protocol which involved affinity chromatography on AF-BlueHC650M and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The lectin was adsorbed on AF-BlueHC650M and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 yielded a major peak absorbance that gave two bands of 15kDa and 20kDa in SDS PAGE. Hemagglutination activity was completely preserved, when the temperature was in the range of 20-60°C. However, drastic reduction in activity occurred at temperatures above 60°C. Full hemagglutination activity was retained at ambient pH 4-12. Thereafter no activity was observed above pH 13. Hemaglutination of the lectin was inhibited by d-galactose. The lectin showed a strong antiproliferative activity towards human leukemic (THP-1) cancer cells followed by lung cancer (HOP62) cells and HCT116 with an IC50 of 39μg/ml and 50μg/ml and 60μg/ml respectively. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0G1 phase confirming that Lotus corniculatus lectin induced apoptosis. Morphological observations showed that Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) treated THP-1 cells displayed apparent apoptosis characteristics such as nuclear fragmentation, appearance of membrane enclosed apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. Lotus corniculatus lectin (LCL) effectively inhibits the cell migration in a dose dependent manner as indicated by the wound healing assay.

  18. Tussilagone suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation by promoting the degradation of β-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hua; Lee, Hwa Jin; Ahn, Yeon Hwa; Kwon, Hye Jin; Jang, Chang-Young; Kim, Woo-Young; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Tussilagone (TSL) was purified from plant as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. •TSL suppressed the β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity. •The proteasomal degradation of β-catenin was induced by TSL. •TSL suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin target genes, cyclin D1 and c-myc. •TSL inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway frequently induces colon cancer progression. In the present study, we identified tussilagone (TSL), a compound isolated from the flower buds of Tussilago farfara, as an inhibitor on β-catenin dependent Wnt pathway. TSL suppressed β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity and down-regulated β-catenin level both in cytoplasm and nuclei of HEK293 reporter cells when they were stimulated by Wnt3a or activated by an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Since the mRNA level was not changed by TSL, proteasomal degradation might be responsible for the decreased level of β-catenin. In SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines, TSL suppressed the β-catenin activity and also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, representative target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and consequently inhibited the proliferation of colon cancer cells. Taken together, TSL might be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of human colon cancer.

  19. Short-chain ceramides depress integrin cell surface expression and function in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Bridges, Lance C; Almeida Larrea, Alex D; Mayen, Anthony L; MacDougall, Matthew R; Davis, Traci S; Kester, Mark; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly metastatic, significantly so to liver, a characteristic that embodies one of the most challenging aspects of treatment. The integrin family of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion receptors plays a central role in migration and invasion, functions that underlie metastatic potential. In the present work we sought to determine the impact of ceramide, which plays a key modulatory role in cancer suppression, on integrin cell surface expression and function in CRC cells in order to reveal possible ceramide-centric effects on tumor cell motility. Human CRC cells LoVo, HT-29, and HCT-116 were employed, which represent lines established from primary and metastatic sites. A cell-permeable, short-chain analog, C6-ceramide, was used as ceramide mimic. Exposure of cells to C6-ceramide (24 h) promoted a dose-dependent (2.5-10 µM) decrease in the expression of cell surface β1 and β4 integrin subunits in all cell lines; at 10 µM C6-ceramide, the decreases ranged from 30 to 50% of the control. Expression of cell surface αVβ6 integrin, which is associated with advanced invasion in CRC, was also suppressed by C6-ceramide. Decreases in integrin expression translated to diminished cellular adhesion, 50% of the control at 5 µM C6-ceramide, and markedly reduced cellular migration, approximately 30-40% of the control in all cell lines. Physicochemical examination revealed potent efficacy of nano-formulated C6-ceramide, but inferior activity of dihydro-C6-ceramide and L-C6-ceramide, compared to the unsaturated counterpart and the natural d-enantiomer, respectively. These studies demonstrate novel actions of ceramides that may have application in suppression of tumor metastasis, in addition to their known tumor suppressor effects. PMID:27045476

  20. Acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53−/− cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  1. HDAC1 controls CIP2A transcription in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Balliu, Manjola; Cellai, Cristina; Lulli, Matteo; Laurenzana, Anna; Torre, Eugenio; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Paoletti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the effectiveness of HDAC-inhibitor (S)-2 towards colorectal cancer (CRC) HCT116 cells in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and in vivo by contrasting tumour growth in mice xenografts. Among the multifaceted drug-induced events described herein, an interesting link has emerged between the oncoprotein histone deacetylase HDAC1 and the oncogenic Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) which is overexpressed in several cancers including CRCs. HDAC1 inhibition by (S)-2 or specific siRNAs downregulates CIP2A transcription in three different CRC cell lines, thus restoring the oncosuppressor phosphatase PP2A activity that is reduced in most cancers. Once re-activated, PP2A dephosphorylates pGSK-3β(ser9) which phosphorylates β-catenin that remains within the cytosol where it undergoes degradation. The decreased amount/activity of β-catenin transcription factor prompts cell growth arrest by diminishing c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression and abrogating the prosurvival Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These results are the first evidence that the inhibition of HDAC1 by (S)-2 downregulates CIP2A transcription and unleashes PP2A activity, thus inducing growth arrest and apoptosis in CRC cells. PMID:27029072

  2. Cytotoxic hydrogen bridged ruthenium quinaldamide complexes showing induced cancer cell death by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lord, Rianne M; Allison, Simon J; Rafferty, Karen; Ghandhi, Laura; Pask, Christopher M; McGowan, Patrick C

    2016-08-16

    This report presents the first known p-cymene ruthenium quinaldamide complexes which are stabilised by a hydrogen-bridging atom, [{(p-cym)Ru(II)X(N,N)}{H(+)}{(N,N)XRu(II)(p-cym)}][PF6] (N,N = functionalised quinaldamide and X = Cl or Br). These complexes are formed by a reaction of [p-cymRu(μ-X)2]2 with a functionalised quinaldamide ligand. When filtered over NH4PF6, and under aerobic conditions the equilibrium of NH4PF6 ⇔ NH3 + HPF6 enables incorporation of HPF6 and the stabilisation of two monomeric ruthenium complexes by a bridging H(+), which are counter-balanced by a PF6 counterion. X-ray crystallographic analysis is presented for six new structures with OO distances of 2.420(4)-2.448(15) Å, which is significant for strong hydrogen bonds. Chemosensitivity studies against HCT116, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis human cancer cells showed the ruthenium complexes with a bromide ancillary ligand to be more potent than those with a chloride ligand. The 4'-fluoro compounds show a reduction in potency for both chloride and bromide complexes against all cell lines, but an increase in selectivity towards cancer cells compared to non-cancer ARPE-19 cells, with a selectivity index >1. Mechanistic studies showed a clear correlation between IC50 values and induction of cell death by apoptosis. PMID:27417660

  3. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  4. Anti-proliferative effect of horehound leaf and wild cherry bark extracts on human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Liggett, Jason L; Kim, Nam-Cheol; Baek, Seung Joon

    2006-01-01

    Marubium vulgare (horehound) and Prunus serotina (wild cherry) have been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory-related symptoms such as cold, fever, and sore throat. In this report, we show that extracts of anti-inflammatory horehound leaves and wild cherry bark exhibit anti-proliferative activity in human colorectal cancer cells. Both horehound and wild cherry extracts cause suppression of cell growth as well as induction of apoptosis. We found that horehound extract up-regulates pro-apoptotic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-activated gene (NAG-1) through transactivation of the NAG-1 promoter. In contrast, wild cherry extract decreased cyclin D1 expression and increased NAG-1 expression in HCT-116 and SW480 cell lines. Treatment with wild cherry extract resulted in the suppression of beta-catenin/T cell factor transcription, as assessed by TOP/FOP reporter constructs, suggesting that suppressed beta-catenin signaling by wild cherry extract leads to the reduction of cyclin D1 expression. Our data suggest the mechanisms by which these extracts suppress cell growth and induce apoptosis involve enhanced NAG-1 expression and/or down-regulation of beta-catenin signaling, followed by reduced cyclin D1 expression in human colorectal cancer cells. These findings may provide mechanisms for traditional anti-inflammatory products as cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:16328068

  5. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  6. The novel HDAC inhibitor AR-42-induced anti-colon cancer cell activity is associated with ceramide production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Shen, Jie

    2015-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated the potential activity of AR-42, a novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, against colon cancer cells. Our in vitro results showed that AR-42 induced ceramide production, exerted potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities in established (SW-620 and HCT-116 lines) and primary human colon cancer cells. Exogenously-added sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) suppressed AR-42-induced activity, yet a cell-permeable ceramide (C4) facilitated AR-42-induced cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In addition, AR-42-induced ceramide production and anti-colon cancer cell activity were inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1, but were exacerbated by PDMP, which is a ceramide glucosylation inhibitor. In vivo, oral administration of a single dose of AR-42 dramatically inhibited SW-620 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without inducing overt toxicities. Together, these results show that AR-42 dramatically inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ceramide production might be the key mechanism responsible for its actions.

  7. NPRL-Z-1, as a New Topoisomerase II Poison, Induces Cell Apoptosis and ROS Generation in Human Renal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Yan; Hsu, Jui-Ling; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Teng, Che-Ming

    2014-01-01

    NPRL-Z-1 is a 4β-[(4″-benzamido)-amino]-4′-O-demethyl-epipodophyllotoxin derivative. Previous reports have shown that NPRL-Z-1 possesses anticancer activity. Here NPRL-Z-1 displayed cytotoxic effects against four human cancer cell lines (HCT 116, A549, ACHN, and A498) and exhibited potent activity in A498 human renal carcinoma cells, with an IC50 value of 2.38 µM via the MTT assay. We also found that NPRL-Z-1 induced cell cycle arrest in G1-phase and detected DNA double-strand breaks in A498 cells. NPRL-Z-1 induced ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase phosphorylation at serine 1981, leading to the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways, including Chk2, histone H2AX, and p53/p21. By ICE assay, the data suggested that NPRL-Z-1 acted on and stabilized the topoisomerase II (TOP2)–DNA complex, leading to TOP2cc formation. NPRL-Z-1-induced DNA damage signaling and apoptotic death was also reversed by TOP2α or TOP2β knockdown. In addition, NPRL-Z-1 inhibited the Akt signaling pathway and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These results demonstrated that NPRL-Z-1 appeared to be a novel TOP2 poison and ROS generator. Thus, NPRL-Z-1 may present a significant potential anticancer candidate against renal carcinoma. PMID:25372714

  8. Relative inhibition of lipid peroxidation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, and human tumor cell proliferation by natural food colors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Muntha K; Alexander-Lindo, Ruby L; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2005-11-16

    The most abundant water soluble natural food colors are betacyanins and anthocyanins. Similarly, lycopene, bixin, beta-carotene, and chlorophyll are water insoluble colors. Pure betanin, bixin, lycopene, chlorophyll, beta-carotene, and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside were isolated from Beta vulgaris, Bixa orellana,Lycopersicum esculentum, Spinacia oleracea, Daucus carrota, and Prunus cerasus, respectively. These natural pigments, alone and in combination, were evaluated for their relative potencies against cyclooxygenase enzymes and tumor cell growth inhibition by using MCF-7 (breast), HCT-116 (colon), AGS (stomach), CNS (central nervous system), and NCI-H460 (lung) tumor cell lines. Among the colors tested, betanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, lycopene, and beta-carotene inhibited lipid peroxidation. However, all pigments tested gave COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition and showed a dose-dependent growth inhibition against breast, colon, stomach, central nervous system, and lung tumor cells, respectively. The mixtures of these pigments were also evaluated for their synergistic effects and chemical interactions at various concentrations. The mixture of anthocyanin and betanin negated their efficacy in the cell growth inhibitory assay and did not enhance the COX enzyme inhibitory activity. This is the first report of a comparative evaluation and the impact on biological activities of these pigments alone and in combination. PMID:16277432

  9. Relative inhibition of lipid peroxidation, cyclooxygenase enzymes, and human tumor cell proliferation by natural food colors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Muntha K; Alexander-Lindo, Ruby L; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2005-11-16

    The most abundant water soluble natural food colors are betacyanins and anthocyanins. Similarly, lycopene, bixin, beta-carotene, and chlorophyll are water insoluble colors. Pure betanin, bixin, lycopene, chlorophyll, beta-carotene, and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside were isolated from Beta vulgaris, Bixa orellana,Lycopersicum esculentum, Spinacia oleracea, Daucus carrota, and Prunus cerasus, respectively. These natural pigments, alone and in combination, were evaluated for their relative potencies against cyclooxygenase enzymes and tumor cell growth inhibition by using MCF-7 (breast), HCT-116 (colon), AGS (stomach), CNS (central nervous system), and NCI-H460 (lung) tumor cell lines. Among the colors tested, betanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, lycopene, and beta-carotene inhibited lipid peroxidation. However, all pigments tested gave COX-1 and COX-2 inhibition and showed a dose-dependent growth inhibition against breast, colon, stomach, central nervous system, and lung tumor cells, respectively. The mixtures of these pigments were also evaluated for their synergistic effects and chemical interactions at various concentrations. The mixture of anthocyanin and betanin negated their efficacy in the cell growth inhibitory assay and did not enhance the COX enzyme inhibitory activity. This is the first report of a comparative evaluation and the impact on biological activities of these pigments alone and in combination.

  10. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  11. Cytotoxicity of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Neoambrosin and Damsin from Ambrosia maritima Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohamed; Jacob, Stefan; Sandjo, Louis P.; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Khalid, Hassan E.; Opatz, Till; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a prevailing phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in cancer patients. In the current study two known cytotoxic pseudoguaianolide sesquiterpene lactones; neoambrosin (1) and damsin (2) that circumvent MDR were identified. The two cytotoxic compounds were isolated using column chromatography, characterized using 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and compared with literature values. The isolated compounds were investigated for their cytotoxic potential using resazurin assays and thereafter confirmed with immunoblotting and in silico studies. MDR cells overexpressing ABC transporters (P-glycoprotein, BCRP, ABCB5) did not confer cross-resistance toward (1) and (2), indicating that these compounds are not appropriate substrates for any of the three ABC transporters analyzed. Resistance mechanisms investigated also included; the loss of the functions of the TP53 and the mutated EGFR. The HCT116 p53-/- cells were sensitive to 1 but resistant to 2. It was interesting to note that resistant cells transfected with oncogenic ΔEGFR exhibited hypersensitivity CS toward (1) and (2) (degrees of resistances were 0.18 and 0.15 for (1) and (2), respectively). Immunoblotting and in silico analyses revealed that 1 and 2 silenced c-Src kinase activity. It was hypothesized that inhibition of c-Src kinase activity may explain CS in EGFR-transfected cells. In conclusion, the significant cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against different drug-resistant tumor cell lines indicate that they may be promising candidates to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26617519

  12. Stevia rebaudiana ethanolic extract exerts better antioxidant properties and antiproliferative effects in tumour cells than its diterpene glycoside stevioside.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Pérez, Sergio; Vinuesa, Arturo; Zorzetto, Christian; Abian, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Steviol glycosides are currently being used as natural sweeteners by the food industry and Stevia rebaudiana has long been used as a sweet plant in South America for patients suffering from diabetes. In this study, a Stevia rebaudiana ethanolic extract (SREE) was prepared, analysed and tested for antioxidant activity in terms of free radical scavenging properties and antiproliferative effects in cervix (HeLa), pancreatic (MiaPaCa-2) and colonic (HCT116) cancer cells. The antiproliferative mechanism was confirmed by testing the effects on cyclin D1-CDK4. Bioassays were also performed for the diterpene glycoside stevioside. Our results demonstrate that the extract acts as an antioxidant being able to scavenge free radicals, but this activity was not due to stevioside. The extract also induced cell death in the three cell lines, being more active against cervix cancer cells (HeLa); however, the concentration of stevioside needed to produce antiproliferative effects was higher than the amount of steviol glycosides found in a lower dose of extract inducing cell death. In addition, the extract clearly inhibited CDK4 whereas stevioside did not, concluding that the antiproliferative activity of stevia may be due to inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases performed by other compounds of the extract.

  13. Stevia rebaudiana ethanolic extract exerts better antioxidant properties and antiproliferative effects in tumour cells than its diterpene glycoside stevioside.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Pérez, Sergio; Vinuesa, Arturo; Zorzetto, Christian; Abian, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Steviol glycosides are currently being used as natural sweeteners by the food industry and Stevia rebaudiana has long been used as a sweet plant in South America for patients suffering from diabetes. In this study, a Stevia rebaudiana ethanolic extract (SREE) was prepared, analysed and tested for antioxidant activity in terms of free radical scavenging properties and antiproliferative effects in cervix (HeLa), pancreatic (MiaPaCa-2) and colonic (HCT116) cancer cells. The antiproliferative mechanism was confirmed by testing the effects on cyclin D1-CDK4. Bioassays were also performed for the diterpene glycoside stevioside. Our results demonstrate that the extract acts as an antioxidant being able to scavenge free radicals, but this activity was not due to stevioside. The extract also induced cell death in the three cell lines, being more active against cervix cancer cells (HeLa); however, the concentration of stevioside needed to produce antiproliferative effects was higher than the amount of steviol glycosides found in a lower dose of extract inducing cell death. In addition, the extract clearly inhibited CDK4 whereas stevioside did not, concluding that the antiproliferative activity of stevia may be due to inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases performed by other compounds of the extract. PMID:27071804

  14. Cytotoxicity of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Neoambrosin and Damsin from Ambrosia maritima Against Multidrug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohamed; Jacob, Stefan; Sandjo, Louis P; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Khalid, Hassan E; Opatz, Till; Thines, Eckhard; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a prevailing phenomenon leading to chemotherapy treatment failure in cancer patients. In the current study two known cytotoxic pseudoguaianolide sesquiterpene lactones; neoambrosin (1) and damsin (2) that circumvent MDR were identified. The two cytotoxic compounds were isolated using column chromatography, characterized using 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and compared with literature values. The isolated compounds were investigated for their cytotoxic potential using resazurin assays and thereafter confirmed with immunoblotting and in silico studies. MDR cells overexpressing ABC transporters (P-glycoprotein, BCRP, ABCB5) did not confer cross-resistance toward (1) and (2), indicating that these compounds are not appropriate substrates for any of the three ABC transporters analyzed. Resistance mechanisms investigated also included; the loss of the functions of the TP53 and the mutated EGFR. The HCT116 p53(-/-) cells were sensitive to 1 but resistant to 2. It was interesting to note that resistant cells transfected with oncogenic ΔEGFR exhibited hypersensitivity CS toward (1) and (2) (degrees of resistances were 0.18 and 0.15 for (1) and (2), respectively). Immunoblotting and in silico analyses revealed that 1 and 2 silenced c-Src kinase activity. It was hypothesized that inhibition of c-Src kinase activity may explain CS in EGFR-transfected cells. In conclusion, the significant cytotoxicity of 1 and 2 against different drug-resistant tumor cell lines indicate that they may be promising candidates to treat refractory tumors. PMID:26617519

  15. Cell line: 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    2014-11-20

    2014 marks Cell's 40th anniversary, and over the year we have looked back at how discoveries of the last four decades have molded our understanding of biology. The final decade of the Cell Line features a selection of the exceptional scientific work-both landmark papers and essential reviews. Select entries can be read as an "Annotated Classic," which includes the original paper and accompanying reflections of a leading scientist, considering the work from our current vantage point. Our last installment includes a harbinger of the interplay between microbiota and mammalian hosts in 2004, revolutionary papers in 2006 and 2007 unlocking cellular reprogramming, the discovery of beige adipocytes in 2012, and the first example of CRISPR-based genome editing in a nonhuman primate in 2014. In addition to landmark publications, there were innovative developments at the journal in this decade, with the complete redesign of the print journal and the creation of Leading Edge in late 2005 and the restructuring of the online display of the article in 2010. Keeping pace with the changing nature of biological research, over the decade Cell added new article types, introduced guidelines for the organization of supplementary material, and expanded the journal's web-based content to bring editors' and authors' excitement and perspective on individual papers to the readership. An interactive version of the timeline, with links to the papers, full author lists, and Annotated Classics, is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.004. PMID:25416957

  16. Expression of stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) defines spontaneous loss of epithelial phenotype in human solid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramaniyan, Kavitha; Harichandan, Abhishek; Schilbach, Karin; Mack, Andreas F; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Kanz, Lothar; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Bühring, Hans-Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 (SSEA-4) is a glycosphingolipid, which is overexpressed in some cancers and has been linked to disease progression. However, little is known about the functions of SSEA-4 and the characteristics of SSEA-4 expressing tumor cells. Our studies identified SSEA-4 expression on a subpopulation of cells in many solid tumor cell lines but not in leukemic cell lines. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-sorted SSEA-4(+) prostate cancer cells formed fibroblast-like colonies with limited cell-cell contacts, whereas SSEA-4(-) cells formed cobblestone-like epithelial colonies. Only colonies derived from SSEA-4(+) cells were enriched for pluripotent embryonic stem cell markers. Moreover, major epithelial cell-associated markers Claudin-7, E-cadherin, ESRP1 and GRHL2 were down-regulated in the SSEA-4(+) fraction of DU145 and HCT-116 cells. Similar to cell lines, SSEA-4(+) primary prostate tumor cells also showed down-regulation of epithelial cell-associated markers. In addition, they showed up-regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, SSEA-4(+) cells escape from adhesive colonies spontaneously and form invadopodia-like migratory structures, in which SSEA-4, cortactin as well as active pPI3K, pAkt and pSrc are enriched and colocalized. Finally, SSEA-4(+) cells displayed strong tumorigenic ability and stable knockdown of SSEA-4 synthesis resulted in decreased cellular adhesion to different extracellular matrices. In conclusion, we introduce SSEA-4 as a novel marker to identify heterogeneous, invasive subpopulations of tumor cells. Moreover, increased cell-surface SSEA-4 expression is associated with the loss of cell-cell interactions and the gain of a migratory phenotype, suggesting an important role of SSEA-4 in cancer invasion by influencing cellular adhesion to the extracellular matrix.

  17. Asymmetric triplex metallohelices with high and selective activity against cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Alan D.; Kaner, Rebecca A.; Abdallah, Qasem M. A.; Clarkson, Guy; Fox, David J.; Gurnani, Pratik; Howson, Suzanne E.; Phillips, Roger M.; Roper, David I.; Simpson, Daniel H.; Scott, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Small cationic amphiphilic α-helical peptides are emerging as agents for the treatment of cancer and infection, but they are costly and display unfavourable pharmacokinetics. Helical coordination complexes may offer a three-dimensional scaffold for the synthesis of mimetic architectures. However, the high symmetry and modest functionality of current systems offer little scope to tailor the structure to interact with specific biomolecular targets, or to create libraries for phenotypic screens. Here, we report the highly stereoselective asymmetric self-assembly of very stable, functionalized metallohelices. Their anti-parallel head-to-head-to-tail ‘triplex’ strand arrangement creates an amphipathic functional topology akin to that of the active sub-units of, for example, host-defence peptides and p53. The metallohelices display high, structure-dependent toxicity to the human colon carcinoma cell-line HCT116 p53++, causing dramatic changes in the cell cycle without DNA damage. They have lower toxicity to human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MDA-MB-468) and, most remarkably, they show no significant toxicity to the bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

  18. Half-sandwich ruthenium(II) biotin conjugates as biological vectors to cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Babak, Maria V; Plażuk, Damian; Meier, Samuel M; Arabshahi, Homayon John; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Rychlik, Błażej; Błauż, Andrzej; Szulc, Katarzyna; Hanif, Muhammad; Strobl, Sebastian; Roller, Alexander; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-03-23

    Ruthenium(II)-arene complexes with biotin-containing ligands were prepared so that a novel drug delivery system based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis could be developed. The complexes were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their in vitro anticancer activity in cancer cell lines with various levels of major biotin receptor (COLO205, HCT116 and SW620 cells) was tested in comparison with the ligands. In all cases, coordination of ruthenium resulted in significantly enhanced cytotoxicity. The affinity of Ru(II) -biotin complexes to avidin was investigated and was lower than that of unmodified biotin. Hill coefficients in the range 2.012-2.851 suggest strong positive cooperation between the complexes and avidin. To estimate the likelihood of binding to the biotin receptor/transporter, docking studies with avidin and streptavidin were conducted. These explain, to some extent, the in vitro anticancer activity results and support the conclusion that these novel half-sandwich ruthenium(II)-biotin conjugates may act as biological vectors to cancer cells, although no clear relationship between the cellular Ru content, the cytotoxicity, and the presence of the biotin moiety was observed. PMID:25676245

  19. Identification and functional analysis of epigenetically silenced microRNAs in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongli; Choi, Ae-Jin; Lee, Byron H; Ting, Angela H

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal microRNA (miRNA) expression has been linked to the development and progression of several human cancers, and such dysregulation can result from aberrant DNA methylation. While a small number of miRNAs is known to be regulated by DNA methylation, we postulated that such epigenetic regulation is more prevalent. By combining MBD-isolated Genome Sequencing (MiGS) to evaluate genome-wide DNA methylation patterns and microarray analysis to determine miRNA expression levels, we systematically searched for candidate miRNAs regulated by DNA methylation in colorectal cancer cell lines. We found 64 miRNAs to be robustly methylated in HCT116 cells; eighteen of them were located in imprinting regions or already reported to be regulated by DNA methylation. For the remaining 46 miRNAs, expression levels of 18 were consistent with their DNA methylation status. Finally, 8 miRNAs were up-regulated by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment and identified to be novel miRNAs regulated by DNA methylation. Moreover, we demonstrated the functional relevance of these epigenetically silenced miRNAs by ectopically expressing select candidates, which resulted in inhibition of growth and migration of cancer cells. In addition to reporting these findings, our study also provides a reliable, systematic strategy to identify DNA methylation-regulated miRNAs by combining DNA methylation profiles and expression data.

  20. Rapid purification of cell encapsulated hydrogel beads from oil phase to aqueous phase in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuliang; Zhang, Nangang; Zhao, Libo; Yu, Xiaolei; Ji, Xinghu; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Liu, Kan; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of microfluidic chip that can realize continuous-flow purification of hydrogel beads from a carrier oil into aqueous solution by using a laminar-like oil/water interface. The microfluidic chip is composed by two functional components: (1) a flow-focusing bead generation module that can control size and shape of beads, (2) a bead extraction module capable of purifying hydrogel beads from oil into aqueous solution. This module is featured with large branch channels on one side and small ones on the opposite side. Water is continuously infused into the bead extraction module through the large branch channels, resulting in a laminar-like oil/water interface between the branch junctions. Simulation and experimental data show that the efficiency of oil depletion is determined by the relative flow rates between infused water and carrier oil. By using such a microfluidic device, viable cells (HCT116, colon cancer cell line) can be encapsulated in the hydrogel beads and purified into a cell culture media. Significantly improved cell viability was achieved compared to that observed by conventional bead purification approaches. This facile microfluidic chip could be a promising candidate for sample treatment in lab-on-a-chip applications.

  1. Molecular size fractions of bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) exhibit differentiated regulation of colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Abeywardena, Mahinda; Burnard, Sharon; Forsyth, Santina; Head, Richard; King, Kerryn; Patten, Glen; Watkins, Peter; Williams, Roderick; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Lockett, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Numerous in vitro studies using solvent or aqueous extracts of raw dietary plant material have demonstrated modulation of colon cancer cell growth and apoptosis and effects on immune and nonimmune pathways of inflammation. We have developed a generic, 3-staged food-compatible process involving heating for conversion of dietary plants into food ingredients and report results on potential colon cancer-regulating properties of processed forms of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis). In vitro studies demonstrated inhibition of cancer cell growth by processed Bay leaf products in HT-29, HCT-116, Caco-2, and SW-480 human cancer cell lines, which were accompanied by variable levels of elevated apoptosis. Bay leaf also exerted moderate inhibition of cycloxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase enzymatic activity. In addition, these extracts significantly downregulated interferon-γ production in T helper Type 1-stimulated whole blood from healthy donors. Furthermore, size fractionation of the extracts revealed that antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities were associated with low mass (primarily polyphenolics and essential oils) and high mass (primarily proteins including polyphenol oxidase) chemical classes, respectively. Bay leaf exerted in vitro bioactivity that might be relevant to protecting against early events in sporadic colorectal cancer, with potential for further optimization of bioactivity by size-based fractionation. PMID:23859043

  2. Molecular size fractions of bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) exhibit differentiated regulation of colorectal cancer cell growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Louise; Abeywardena, Mahinda; Burnard, Sharon; Forsyth, Santina; Head, Richard; King, Kerryn; Patten, Glen; Watkins, Peter; Williams, Roderick; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Lockett, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Numerous in vitro studies using solvent or aqueous extracts of raw dietary plant material have demonstrated modulation of colon cancer cell growth and apoptosis and effects on immune and nonimmune pathways of inflammation. We have developed a generic, 3-staged food-compatible process involving heating for conversion of dietary plants into food ingredients and report results on potential colon cancer-regulating properties of processed forms of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis). In vitro studies demonstrated inhibition of cancer cell growth by processed Bay leaf products in HT-29, HCT-116, Caco-2, and SW-480 human cancer cell lines, which were accompanied by variable levels of elevated apoptosis. Bay leaf also exerted moderate inhibition of cycloxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase enzymatic activity. In addition, these extracts significantly downregulated interferon-γ production in T helper Type 1-stimulated whole blood from healthy donors. Furthermore, size fractionation of the extracts revealed that antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities were associated with low mass (primarily polyphenolics and essential oils) and high mass (primarily proteins including polyphenol oxidase) chemical classes, respectively. Bay leaf exerted in vitro bioactivity that might be relevant to protecting against early events in sporadic colorectal cancer, with potential for further optimization of bioactivity by size-based fractionation.

  3. Assessing the anti-tumour properties of Iraqi propolis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Ghassan M; Ad'hiah, Ali H; Al-Sammarrae, Khulood W; Bagnati, Renzo; Frapolli, Roberta; Bello, Ezia; Uboldi, Sarah; Romano, Michela; Panini, Nicolò; Scanziani, Eugenio; Pezzolato, Marzia; Erba, Eugenio; D'Incalci, Maurizio

    2012-05-01

    The study was designed to evaluate anti-tumour properties of Iraqi propolis collected from Mosul region (M) on HL-60 and HCT-116 cell lines and on HCT-116 in vivo. M induced an inhibitory effect against the proliferation of HL-60 and colony potential of HCT-116 cells. The apoptosis in HL-60 cells was associated with down-regulation of Bcl-2 and activation of Bax, while in HCT-116 cells, necrotic features were observed; size of cells was dramatically increased by swelling of cytoplasm and loss of membrane integrity, cell rupture and release of cellular contents. Analysis of BrdU/DNA cell cycle in both cell lines showed that M induced cell cycle perturbations in both BrdU positive and BrdU negative cells. The exposure of HL-60 to M caused γ-H2AX in a dose dependent manner and was associated with induction of apoptosis. The experiments in HCT-116 tumor-bearing mice showed that oral administration of propolis at doses that caused no detectable toxicity was associated with a decrease in mitotic cells and an increase in endoreduplications, increased p53 and decreased Ki-67 expression of cells in tumor sections. This study provides the rationale to investigate the potential beneficial effect of propolis in the diet of patients receiving anti-cancer therapies. PMID:22306915

  4. Colon cancer cell apoptosis is induced by combined exposure to the n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid and butyrate through promoter methylation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youngmi; Turner, Nancy D; Davidson, Laurie A; Chapkin, Robert S; Carroll, Raymond J; Lupton, Joanne R

    2014-03-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation contribute to the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in apoptosis. We have demonstrated that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3) and butyrate enhance colonocyte apoptosis. To determine if DHA and/or butyrate elevate apoptosis through epigenetic mechanisms thereby restoring the transcription of apoptosis-related genes, we examined global methylation; gene-specific promoter methylation of 24 apoptosis-related genes; transcription levels of Cideb, Dapk1, and Tnfrsf25; and global histone acetylation in the HCT-116 colon cancer cell line. Cells were treated with combinations of (50 µM) DHA or linoleic acid (18:2 n-6), (5 mM) butyrate or an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferases, and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC, 2 µM). Among highly methylated genes, the combination of DHA and butyrate significantly reduced methylation of the proapoptotic Bcl2l11, Cideb, Dapk1, Ltbr, and Tnfrsf25 genes compared to untreated control cells. DHA treatment reduced the methylation of Cideb, Dapk1, and Tnfrsf25. These data suggest that the induction of apoptosis by DHA and butyrate is mediated, in part, through changes in the methylation state of apoptosis-related genes.

  5. Synthesis of a DNA-targeting nickel (II) complex with testosterone thiosemicarbazone which exhibits selective cytotoxicity towards human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP).

    PubMed

    Heng, Mok Piew; Sinniah, Saravana Kumar; Teoh, Wuen Yew; Sim, Kae Shin; Ng, Seik Weng; Cheah, Yoke Kqueen; Tan, Kong Wai

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone thiosemicarbazone, L and its nickel (II) complex 1 were synthesized and characterized by using FTIR, CHN, (1)H NMR, and X-ray crystallography. X-ray diffraction study confirmed the formation of L from condensation of testosterone and thiosemicarbazide. Mononuclear complex 1 is coordinated to two Schiff base ligands via two imine nitrogens and two tautomeric thiol sulfurs. The cytotoxicity of both compounds was investigated via MTT assay with cisplatin as positive reference standard. L is more potent towards androgen-dependent LNCaP (prostate) and HCT 116 (colon). On the other hand, complex 1, which is in a distorted square planar environment with L acting as a bidentate NS-donor ligand, is capable of inhibiting the growth of all the cancer cell lines tested, including PC-3 (prostate). It is noteworthy that both compounds are less toxic towards human colon cell CCD-18Co. The intrinsic DNA binding constant (Kb) of both compounds were evaluated via UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Both compounds showed Kb values which are comparable to the reported Kb value of typical classical intercalator such as ethidium bromide. The binding constant of the complex is almost double compared with ligand L. Both compounds were unable to inhibit the action topoisomerase I, which is the common target in cancer treatment (especially colon cancer). This suggest a topoisomerase I independent-cell death mechanism. PMID:26057090

  6. Mitochondrial p53 mediates a transcription-independent regulation of cell respiration and interacts with the mitochondrial F₁F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergeaud, Marie; Mathieu, Lise; Guillaume, Arnaud; Moll, Ute M; Mignotte, Bernard; Le Floch, Nathalie; Vayssière, Jean-Luc; Rincheval, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    We and others previously reported that endogenous p53 can be located at mitochondria in the absence of stress, suggesting that p53 has a role in the normal physiology of this organelle. The aim of this study was to characterize in unstressed cells the intramitochondrial localization of p53 and identify new partners and functions of p53 in mitochondria. We find that the intramitochondrial pool of p53 is located in the intermembrane space and the matrix. Of note, unstressed HCT116 p53(+/+) cells simultaneously show increased O₂ consumption and decreased mitochondrial superoxide production compared with their p53-null counterpart. This data was confirmed by stable H1299 cell lines expressing low levels of p53 specifically targeted to the matrix. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP), a subunit of the F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex, as a new partner of endogenous p53, specifically interacting with p53 localized in the matrix. Interestingly, this interaction seems implicated in mitochondrial p53 localization. Moreover, p53 localized in the matrix promotes the assembly of F₁F₀-ATP synthase. Taking into account that deregulations of mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species production are tightly linked to cancer development, we suggest that mitochondrial p53 may be an important regulator of normal mitochondrial and cellular physiology, potentially exerting tumor suppression activity inside mitochondria.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of AICAR and DOX Conjugated Multifunctional Nanoparticles as a Platform for Synergistic Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Daglioglu, Cenk; Okutucu, Burcu

    2016-04-20

    The success of cancer treatment depends on the response to chemotherapeutic agents. However, malignancies often acquire resistance to drugs if they are used frequently. Combination therapy involving both a chemotherapeutic agent and molecularly targeted therapy may have the ability to retain and enhance therapeutic efficacy. Here, we addressed this issue by examining the efficacy of a novel therapeutic strategy that combines AICAR and DOX within a multifunctional platform. In this context, we reported the bottom-up synthesis of Fe3O4@SiO2(FITC)-FA/AICAR/DOX multifunctional nanoparticles aiming to neutralize survivin (BIRC5) to potentiate the efficacy of DOX against chemoresistance. The structure of nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta-potential measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and electron microscopy (SEM and STEM with EDX) techniques. Cellular uptake and cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated preferentially targeted delivery of nanoparticles and an efficient reduction of cancer cell viability in five different tumor-derived cell lines (A549, HCT-116, HeLa, Jurkat, and MIA PaCa-2). These results indicate that the multifunctional nanoparticle system possesses high inhibitory drug association and sustained cytotoxic effect with good biocompatibility. This novel approach which combines AICAR and DOX within a single platform might be promising as an antitumor treatment for cancer. PMID:26996194

  8. HLA expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wadee, A A; Paterson, A; Coplan, K A; Reddy, S G

    1994-08-01

    The present study undertook to investigate the biological significance of human leucocyte antigen expression in hepatocellular carcinoma and to elucidate the role of potential modulating agents on human leucocyte antigen expression. These studies used several hepatic tumour-derived cell lines as in vitro model systems. The cell lines included PLC/PRF/5 (Alexander cell line), Hep3B, HepG2, TONG PHC, HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and Mahlavu. The cell lines K562 and Raji were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. K562, a B lymphoid-derived cell line, was shown to express negligible amounts of human leucocyte antigens, while Raji, an erythromyeloid-derived cell line, expressed both class I and class II human leucocyte antigens as well as their respective invariant chains, beta 2-microglobulin and Ii. Using an ELISA, experiments performed on these cell lines confirmed the natural expression of class I and class II antigens by the HA22T/VGH and HA59T/VGH cell lines, whereas PLC/PRF/5 displayed class II surface antigens only. The effects of modulating agents such as interferon-gamma sodium butyrate and clofazimine on human leucocyte antigen expression were investigated using the HA22T/VGH, HA59T/VGH and TONG PHC cell lines. These agents increased class II and class II human leucocyte antigen expression on HA22T/VGH and TONG PHC cells, but had no effect on the HA59T/VGH cell line. The results suggest a potential use for these agents as modulators of human leucocyte antigen expression by human heptocellular cell lines.

  9. Schlafen-3 decreases cancer stem cell marker expression and autocrine/juxtacrine signaling in FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Patel, Vaishali B; Sanders, Matthew A; Kanwar, Shailender S; Yu, Yingjie; Nautiyal, Jyoti; Patel, Bhaumik B; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2011-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that expression of the novel gene schlafen-3 (Slfn-3) correlates with intestinal epithelial cell differentiation (Patel VB, Yu Y, Das JK, Patel BB, Majumdar AP. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 388: 752-756, 2009). The present investigation was undertaken to examine whether Slfn-3 plays a role in regulating differentiation of FOLFOX-resistant (5-fluorouracil + oxaliplatin) colon cancer cells that are highly enriched in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Transfection of Slfn-3 in FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer HCT-116 cells resulted in increase of alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of intestinal differentiation. Additionally, Slfn-3 transfection resulted in reduction of mRNA and protein levels of the CSC markers CD44, CD133, CD166, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in both FOLFOX-resistant HCT-116 and HT-29 cells. This was accompanied by decreased formation of tumorosphere/colonosphere (an in vitro model of tumor growth) in stem cell medium and inhibition of expression of the chemotherapeutic drug transporter protein ABCG2. Additionally, Slfn-3 transfection of FOLFOX-resistant HCT-116 and HT-29 cells reduced Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion. Finally, Slfn-3 transfection inhibited the expression of transforming growth factor-α in both FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells, but stimulated apoptosis in response to additional FOLFOX treatment. In summary, our data demonstrate that Slfn-3 expression inhibits multiple characteristics of CSC-enriched, FOLFOX-resistant colon cancer cells, including induction of differentiation and reduction in tumorosphere/colonosphere formation, drug transporter activity, and autocrine stimulation of proliferation. Thus Slfn-3 expression may render colon CSCs more susceptible to cancer chemotherapeutics.

  10. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  11. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14APD) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14APD cells. hCDC14APD cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14APD cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  12. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation. PMID:12062184

  13. Mutated epithelial cadherin is associated with increased tumorigenicity and loss of adhesion and of responsiveness to the motogenic trefoil factor 2 in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, J A; Liu, D; Wheeler, J M; Kim, H C; Beck, N E; Ilyas, M; Karayiannakis, A J; Mortensen, N J; Kmiot, W; Playford, R J; Pignatelli, M; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin and its associated cytoplasmic proteins (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins) are important mediators of epithelial cell-cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Much evidence exists suggesting a tumor/invasion suppressor role for E-cadherin, and loss of expression, as well as mutations, has been described in a number of epithelial cancers. To investigate whether E-cadherin gene (CDH1) mutations occur in colorectal cancer, we screened 49 human colon carcinoma cell lines from 43 patients by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing. In addition to silent changes, polymorphisms, and intronic variants in a number of the cell lines, we detected frameshift single-base deletions in repeat regions of exon 3 (codons 120 and 126) causing premature truncations at codon 216 in four replication-error-positive (RER+) cell lines (LS174T, HCT116, GP2d, and GP5d) derived from 3 patients. In LS174T such a mutation inevitably contributes to its lack of E-cadherin protein expression and function. Transfection of full-length E-cadherin cDNA into LS174T cells enhanced intercellular adhesion, induced differentiation, retarded proliferation, inhibited tumorigenicity, and restored responsiveness to the migratory effects induced by the motogenic trefoil factor 2 (human spasmolytic polypeptide). These results indicate that, although inactivating E-cadherin mutations occur relatively infrequently in colorectal cancer cell lines overall (3/43 = 7%), they are more common in cells with an RER+ phenotype (3/10 = 30%) and may contribute to the dysfunction of the E-cadherin-catenin-mediated adhesion/signaling system commonly seen in these tumors. These results also indicate that normal E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion can restore the ability of colonic tumor cells to respond to trefoil factor 2.

  14. Resveratrol inhibits invasion and metastasis of colorectal cancer cells via MALAT1 mediated Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qing; Liu, Xuan; Fu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Long; Sui, Hua; Zhou, Lihong; Sun, Jian; Cai, Jianfeng; Qin, Jianmin; Ren, Jianlin; Li, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol, extracted from Chinese herbal medicine Polygonum cuspidatum, is known to inhibit invasion and metastasis of human colorectal cancer (CRC), in which long non-coding Metastasis Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (RNA-MALAT1) also plays an important role. Using MALAT1 lentiviral shRNA and over-expression constructs in CRC derived cell lines, LoVo and HCT116, we demonstrated that the anti-tumor effects of resveratrol on CRC are through inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thus the expression of its target genes such as c-Myc, MMP-7, as well as the expression of MALAT1. In detail, resveratrol down-regulates MALAT1, resulting in decreased nuclear localization of β-catenin thus attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which leads to the inhibition of CRC invasion and metastasis. This finding of ours surely provides important pre-clinical evidence supporting future use of resveratrol in prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:24244343

  15. Structure elucidation and chemical profile of sphingolipids in wheat bran and their cytotoxic effects against human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Soroka, Dominique N; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-01-30

    Sphingolipids are known to have diverse properties and physiological functions. These distinctive lipids have been identified in wheat bran, a food well-known for its chemopreventive activity. However, the complete profile of sphingolipids in wheat bran and their contributions to the cancer preventive effect of wheat bran have not been fully explored until this study. Twelve sphingolipids (1-12) were purified from wheat bran extract and characterized by analyzing their 1D and 2D NMR spectra, and seven sphingolipids (13-19) were characterized based on their tandem mass spectra (MS(n): n = 2-4). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of sphingolipids 1, 6-9, 11-14, and 16-19 in wheat bran. In particular, 2-N-(2'-hydroxy-15'-tricosenoyl)-4-hydroxysphinganine (peak 17) is a novel compound. Additionally, compounds 2-4 were reported with complete NMR data for the first time. Sphingolipids (1-12) showed little growth inhibition against human colon cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) in vitro. PMID:23286461

  16. Activated Ki-Ras suppresses 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, K; Shirasawa, S; Nishioka, M; Sasazuki, T

    1999-05-15

    Although the frequency of activated Ki-ras genes is high in human colorectal tumors, much less is known of activated Ki-ras-mediated signaling pathways. Using gene targeting, we examined HCT116 cells that contain the Gly-13-->Asp mutation of Ki-ras and activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones derived from HCT116. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced immediate early genes, such as c-Jun, c-Fos, and Egr-1 in activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones, whereas c-Jun induction was rare in HCT116. TPA induced both phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (SEK1) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in the activated Ki-ras-disrupted clones but not in HCT116. On the other hand, TPA-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was equally induced between HCT116 and the Ki-ras-disrupted clones. Furthermore, TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation was observed in a DLD-1-derived activated Ki-ras-disrupted clone but not in DLD-1. The TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation in these disrupted clones was completely inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, GF109203X (1 microM), but not by another PKC inhibitor, H7 (50 microM), whereas TPA-induced MEK1/2-ERK activation was partially and completely inhibited by GF109203X (1 microM) and H7 (50 microM), respectively. A phosphoinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, did not inhibit the TPA-induced SEK1-JNK activation. Taken together, these results suggest that activated Ki-Ras-mediated signals are involved in the SEK1-JNK pathway through a PKC isotype that is distinct from that involved in MEK1/2-ERK activation in human colon cancer cells and independent of phosphoinositol 3-kinase activation, and the imbalance between ERK and JNK activity caused by activated Ki-Ras may play critical roles in human colorectal tumorigenesis.

  17. 5-Hydroxy-7-Methoxyflavone Triggers Mitochondrial-Associated Cell Death via Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Souren; Jakhar, Rekha; Han, Jaehong; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived compounds are an important source of clinically useful anti-cancer agents. Chrysin, a biologically active flavone found in many plants, has limited usage for cancer chemotherapeutics due to its poor oral bioavailability. 5-Hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (HMF), an active natural chrysin derivative found in various plant sources, is known to modulate several biological activities. However, the mechanism underlying HMF-induced apoptotic cell death in human colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro is still unknown. Herein, HMF was shown to be capable of inducing cytotoxicity in HCT-116 cells and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of HCT-116 cells with HMF caused DNA damage and triggered mitochondrial membrane perturbation accompanied by Cyt c release, down-regulation of Bcl-2, activation of BID and Bax, and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. These results show that ROS generation by HMF was the crucial mediator behind ER stress induction, resulting in intracellular Ca2+ release, JNK phosphorylation, and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, time course study also reveals that HMF treatment leads to increase in mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS generation and decrease in antioxidant enzymes expression. Temporal upregulation of IRE1-α expression and JNK phosphorylation was noticed after HMF treatment. These results were further confirmed by pre-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), which completely reversed the effects of HMF treatment by preventing lipid peroxidation, followed by abolishment of JNK phosphorylation and attenuation of apoptogenic marker proteins. These results emphasize that ROS generation by HMF treatment regulates the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway in HCT-116 cells, demonstrating HMF as a promising pro-oxidant therapeutic candidate for targeting colorectal cancer. PMID:27116119

  18. A new phenanthrene derivative and two diarylheptanoids from the roots of Brassica rapa ssp. campestris inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines and LDL-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Yoo, Ki-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Park, Ji-Hae; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Chung, In-Sik; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Chung, Hae-Gon; Bang, Myun-Ho; Baek, Nam-In

    2013-04-01

    Brassica rapa ssp. campestris (Brassicaceae) is a conical, deep purple, edible root vegetable commonly known as a turnip. We initiated phytochemical and pharmacological studies to search for biological active compounds from the roots of B. rapa ssp. campestris. We isolated a novel phenanthrene derivative, 6-methoxy-1-[10-methoxy-7-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)phenanthren-3-yl]undecane-2,4-dione, named brassicaphenanthrene A (3) along with two known diarylheptanoid compounds, 6-paradol (1) and trans-6-shogaol (2), through the repeated silica gel (SiO2), octadecyl silica gel, and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The chemical structures of the compounds were determined by spectroscopic data analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and infra-red spectroscopy. All compounds exhibited high inhibitory activity against the growth of human cancer lines, HCT-116, MCF-7, and HeLa, with IC50 values ranging from 15.0 to 35.0 μM and against LDL-oxidation with IC50 values ranging from 2.9 to 7.1 μM.

  19. Metabolites of ginger component [6]-shogaol remain bioactive in cancer cells and have low toxicity in normal cells: chemical synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Warin, Renaud F; Soroka, Dominique N; Chen, Huadong; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study found that [6]-shogaol, a major bioactive component in ginger, is extensively metabolized in cancer cells and in mice. It is unclear whether these metabolites retain bioactivity. The aim of the current study is to synthesize the major metabolites of [6]-shogaol and evaluate their inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells. Twelve metabolites of [6]-shogaol (M1, M2, and M4-M13) were successfully synthesized using simple and easily accessible chemical methods. Growth inhibition assays showed that most metabolites of [6]-shogaol had measurable activities against human cancer cells HCT-116 and H-1299. In particular, metabolite M2 greatly retained the biological activities of [6]-shogaol, with an IC(50) of 24.43 µM in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells and an IC(50) of 25.82 µM in H-1299 human lung cancer cells. Also exhibiting a relatively high potency was thiol-conjugate M13, with IC(50) values of 45.47 and 47.77 µM toward HCT-116 and H-1299 cells, respectively. The toxicity evaluation of the synthetic metabolites (M1, M2, and M4-M13) against human normal fibroblast colon cells CCD-18Co and human normal lung cells IMR-90 demonstrated a detoxifying metabolic biotransformation of [6]-shogaol. The most active metabolite M2 had almost no toxicity to CCD-18Co and IMR-90 normal cells with IC(50)s of 99.18 and 98.30 µM, respectively. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay indicated that apoptosis was triggered by metabolites M2, M13, and its two diastereomers M13-1 and M13-2. There was no significant difference between the apoptotic effect of [6]-shogaol and the effect of M2 and M13 after 6 hour treatment. PMID:23382939

  20. Metabolites of Ginger Component [6]-Shogaol Remain Bioactive in Cancer Cells and Have Low Toxicity in Normal Cells: Chemical Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingdong; Chen, Huadong; Sang, Shengmin

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study found that [6]-shogaol, a major bioactive component in ginger, is extensively metabolized in cancer cells and in mice. It is unclear whether these metabolites retain bioactivity. The aim of the current study is to synthesize the major metabolites of [6]-shogaol and evaluate their inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells. Twelve metabolites of [6]-shogaol (M1, M2, and M4–M13) were successfully synthesized using simple and easily accessible chemical methods. Growth inhibition assays showed that most metabolites of [6]-shogaol had measurable activities against human cancer cells HCT-116 and H-1299. In particular, metabolite M2 greatly retained the biological activities of [6]-shogaol, with an IC50 of 24.43 µM in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells and an IC50 of 25.82 µM in H-1299 human lung cancer cells. Also exhibiting a relatively high potency was thiol-conjugate M13, with IC50 values of 45.47 and 47.77 µM toward HCT-116 and H-1299 cells, respectively. The toxicity evaluation of the synthetic metabolites (M1, M2, and M4–M13) against human normal fibroblast colon cells CCD-18Co and human normal lung cells IMR-90 demonstrated a detoxifying metabolic biotransformation of [6]-shogaol. The most active metabolite M2 had almost no toxicity to CCD-18Co and IMR-90 normal cells with IC50s of 99.18 and 98.30 µM, respectively. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay indicated that apoptosis was triggered by metabolites M2, M13, and its two diastereomers M13-1 and M13-2. There was no significant difference between the apoptotic effect of [6]-shogaol and the effect of M2 and M13 after 6 hour treatment. PMID:23382939

  1. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H.

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  2. The effect of p53-RNAi and p53 knockout on human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOgg1) activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aditi; Mambo, Elizabeth; Osada, Motonobu; Upadhyay, Sunil; Sidransky, David

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that in vitro p53 augments base excision repair (BER) activities in mammalian cells. To understand the role of p53 in BER, we analyzed the repair activity of hOgg1 in isogenic cell lines HCT116p53+/+ and HCT116p53-/-. We found that hOgg1 activity was significantly decreased in HCT116p53-/- cells as compared with HCT116p53+/+ cells, indicating a functional role for p53 in the regulation of hOGG1. Using gel-shift assays, we showed that p53 binds to its putative cis-elements within the hOGG1 promoter. In addition we demonstrated that supplementing p53 in HCT116p53-/- cells enhanced the transcription of hOGG1. To further strengthen our findings, we used p53-RNAi to study the effects of decreased p53 levels on hOgg1 activity. We observed that p53-RNAi resulted in decreased hOGG1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. This decrease in hOGG1 expression was associated with reduced cell viability upon oxidative damage and reduced hOgg1 activity as evidenced by the 8-oxoG incision assay. Taken together, our results indicate that loss of p53 function can lead to decreased hOgg1 repair activity.

  3. PPARδ deficiency disrupts hypoxia-mediated tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunshil; Koo, Jung Eun; Yeon, Sang Hyeon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Young

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ is highly expressed in colon epithelial cells and closely linked to colon carcinogenesis. However, the role of PPARδ in colon cancer cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We found that expression of the tumor-promoting cytokines, IL-8 and VEGF, induced by hypoxia (<1% O2) and deferoxamine (a hypoxia mimetic) was significantly attenuated in PPARδ-deficient HCT116 colon cancer cells. Consequently, PPARδ-knockout colon cancer cells exposed to hypoxia and deferoxamine failed to stimulate endothelial cell vascularization and macrophage migration/proliferation, whereas wild-type cells were able to induce angiogenesis and macrophage activation in response to hypoxic stress. Hypoxic stress induced transcriptional activation of PPARδ, but not its protein expression, in HCT116 cells. Exogenous expression of p300 potentiated deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation, while siRNA knockdown of p300 abolished hypoxia- and deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation. PPARδ associated with p300 upon hypoxic stress as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies. PI3K inhibitors or siRNA knockdown of Akt suppressed the PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxia and deferoxamine in HCT116 cells, leading to decreased expression of IL-8 and VEGF. Collectively, these results reveal that PPARδ is required for hypoxic stress-mediated cytokine expression in colon cancer cells, resulting in promotion of angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and macrophage proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. p300 and the PI3K/Akt pathway play a role in the regulation of PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxic stress. Our results demonstrate the positive crosstalk between PPARδ in tumor cells and the hypoxic tumor microenvironment and provide potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer.

  4. Dual drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and methotrexate (MTX) through random copolymeric nanomicelles of PLGA and polyethylenimine demonstrating enhanced cell uptake and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ashwanikumar, N; Kumar, Nisha Asok; Nair, S Asha; Kumar, G S Vinod

    2014-10-01

    We now report the synthesis of a random copolymer of poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) grafted branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) and the use of it as a multi drug delivery system (DDS). The methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to BPEI through DCC/NHS chemistry. The copolymer-drug conjugate (PBP-MTX) was characterised by FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The PBP-MTX was converted into nanomicelles with entrapped 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) through nanoprecipitation technique. The size, shape, morphology and surface charge of the nanomicelles were confirmed using different techniques. The thermal behaviour and distribution of both conjugated and entrapped drug through the polymeric matrix were assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction analysis (PXRD). In vitro drug release pattern of the nanomicelles was examined to ascertain the release pattern of two drugs namely 5-FU and MTX. The cellular uptake studies demonstrated higher uptake of the nanomicelles in colon cancer cell line HCT 116. Further the cytotoxicity evaluation of nanomicelles illustrated promising action which confirms the use of the system as a potential DDS to colon cancer. PMID:25108479

  5. Synergistic anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of combined therapy with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) drugs in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Tina; Morelli, Maria Pia; Morgillo, Floriana; Kim, Woo-Young; Rodolico, Gabriella; Pepe, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo; Berrino, Liberato; Lee, Ho-Young; Heymach, John V; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2008-09-01

    The proteasome plays a pivotal role in the turnover of regulatory transduction proteins induced by activated cell membrane growth factor receptors. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway is crucial in the development and progression of human epithelial cancers. Proteasome inhibition may sensitize human cancer cell lines to EGFR inhibitors. We investigated the growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in combination with anti-EGFR drugs, such as gefitinib, vandetanib, and cetuximab in EGFR-expressing human cancer cell lines. Bortezomib determined dose-dependent growth inhibition in a nine cancer cell line panel (IC(50) values, range 6-42 nM). A significant synergistic growth inhibitory effect was observed with the combination of bortezomib and each EGFR inhibitor in all cell lines (combination index, CI, range 0.10-0.55), which was accompanied by a significant induction in apoptosis by the combined treatment with bortezomib, cetuximab and vandetanib. In HCT-116 colon cancer and A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, bortezomib plus EGFR inhibitor treatment induced a more effective inhibition of EGFR-activated down-stream signals, including a marked suppression in activated, phosphorylated Akt (P-Akt). In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active P-Akt protected A549 cells by cell growth inhibition and apoptosis following treatment with bortezomib and EGFR inhibitors. The combined treatment with bortezomib and EGFR inhibitors has a synergistic growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic activity in different human cancer cells which possess a functional EGFR-dependent autocrine growth pathway through to a more efficient and sustained inhibition of Akt.

  6. Tumor suppression by resistant maltodextrin, Fibersol-2.

    PubMed

    So, Eui Young; Ouchi, Mutsuko; Cuesta-Sancho, Sara; Olson, Susan Losee; Reif, Dirk; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Ouchi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Resistant maltodextrin Fibersol-2 is a soluble and fermentable dietary fiber that is Generally Recognized As Safe (GRAS) in the United States. We tested whether Fibersol-2 contains anti-tumor activity. Human colorectal cancer cell line, HCT116, and its isogenic cells were treated with FIbersol-2. Tumor growth and tumorigenesis were studied in vitro and in vivo. Apoptotic pathway and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were investigated. We discovered that Fibersol-2 significantly inhibits tumor growth of HCT116 cells by inducing apoptosis. Fibersol-2 strongly induces mitochondrial ROS and Bax-dependent cleavage of caspase 3 and 9, which is shown by isogenic HCT116 variants. Fibersol-2 induces phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR in parental HCT116 cells, but not in HCT116 deficient for Bax or p53. It prevents growth of tumor xenograft without any apparent signs of toxicity in vivo. These results identify Fibersol-2 as a mechanism-based dietary supplement agent that could prevent colorectal cancer development.

  7. Curcumin targets FOLFOX-surviving colon cancer cells via inhibition of EGFRs and IGF-1R.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhaumik B; Gupta, Deepshika; Elliott, Althea A; Sengupta, Vivek; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip P N

    2010-02-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), which has no discernible toxicity, inhibits initiation, promotion and progression of carcinogenesis. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or 5-FU plus oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) remains the backbone of colorectal cancer chemotherapeutics, but produces an incomplete response resulting in survival of cells (chemo-surviving cells) that may lead to cancer recurrence. The present investigation was, therefore, undertaken to examine whether addition of curcumin to FOLFOX is a superior therapeutic strategy for chemo-surviving cells. Forty-eight-hour treatment of colon cancer HCT-116 and HT-29 cells with FOLFOX resulted in 60-70% survival, accompanied by a marked activation of insulin like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and minor to moderate increase in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), v-erb-b2 erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER-2) as well as v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cyclin-D1. However, inclusion of curcumin to continued FOLFOX treatment for another 48 h greatly reduced the survival of these cells, accompanied by a concomitant reduction in activation of EGFR, HER-2, IGF-1R and AKT, as well as expression of COX-2 and cyclin-D1. More importantly, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib or attenuation of IGF-1R expression by the corresponding si-RNA caused a 30-60% growth inhibition of chemo-surviving HCT-116 cells. However, curcumin alone was found to be more effective than both gefitinib and IGF-1R si-RNA mediated growth inhibition of chemo-surviving HCT-116 cells and addition of FOLFOX to curcumin did not increase the growth inhibitory effect of curcumin. Our data suggest that inclusion of curcumin in conventional chemotherapeutic regimens could be an effective strategy to prevent the emergence of chemoresistant colon cancer cells.

  8. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  9. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  10. Streptomyces malaysiense sp. nov.: A novel Malaysian mangrove soil actinobacterium with antioxidative activity and cytotoxic potential against human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacteria from the unique intertidal ecosystem of the mangroves are known to produce novel, bioactive secondary metabolites. A novel strain known as MUSC 136T (=DSM 100712T = MCCC 1K01246T) which was isolated from Malaysian mangrove forest soil has proven to be no exception. Assessed by a polyphasic approach, its taxonomy showed a range of phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties consistent with the genus of Streptomyces. Phylogenetically, highest similarity was to Streptomyces misionensis NBRC 13063T (99.6%) along with two other strains (>98.9% sequence similarities). The DNA–DNA relatedness between MUSC 136T and these type strains ranged from 22.7 ± 0.5% to 46.5 ± 0.2%. Overall, polyphasic approach studies indicated this strain represents a novel species, for which the name Streptomyces malaysiense sp. nov. is proposed. The potential bioactivities of this strain were explored by means of antioxidant and cytotoxic assays. Intriguingly, MUSC 136T exhibited strong antioxidative activities as evaluated by a panel of antioxidant assays. It was also found to possess high cytotoxic effect against HCT-116 cells, which probably mediated through altering p53 protein and intracellular glutathione levels. Chemical analysis of the extract using GC-MS further affirms that the strain produces chemopreventive related metabolites. PMID:27072394

  11. Streptomyces malaysiense sp. nov.: A novel Malaysian mangrove soil actinobacterium with antioxidative activity and cytotoxic potential against human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacteria from the unique intertidal ecosystem of the mangroves are known to produce novel, bioactive secondary metabolites. A novel strain known as MUSC 136(T) (=DSM 100712(T) = MCCC 1K01246(T)) which was isolated from Malaysian mangrove forest soil has proven to be no exception. Assessed by a polyphasic approach, its taxonomy showed a range of phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties consistent with the genus of Streptomyces. Phylogenetically, highest similarity was to Streptomyces misionensis NBRC 13063(T) (99.6%) along with two other strains (>98.9% sequence similarities). The DNA-DNA relatedness between MUSC 136(T) and these type strains ranged from 22.7 ± 0.5% to 46.5 ± 0.2%. Overall, polyphasic approach studies indicated this strain represents a novel species, for which the name Streptomyces malaysiense sp. nov. is proposed. The potential bioactivities of this strain were explored by means of antioxidant and cytotoxic assays. Intriguingly, MUSC 136(T) exhibited strong antioxidative activities as evaluated by a panel of antioxidant assays. It was also found to possess high cytotoxic effect against HCT-116 cells, which probably mediated through altering p53 protein and intracellular glutathione levels. Chemical analysis of the extract using GC-MS further affirms that the strain produces chemopreventive related metabolites. PMID:27072394

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cell motility in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ssu-Ming; Lin, Chingju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Chiu, Chien-Ming; Fang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Dar-Ren; Yeh, Wei-Lan

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has been shown to affect cancer cell metastasis and migration. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BDNF-induced cell migration in colon cancer cells. The migratory activities of two colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480, were found to be increased in the presence of human BDNF. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 is known to be involved in the development and progression of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie HO-1 in the regulation of colon cancer cell migration remain unclear. Expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA increased in response to BDNF stimulation. The BDNF-induced increase in cell migration was antagonized by a HO-1 inhibitor and HO-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also increased in response to BDNF stimulation, as did VEGF mRNA expression and transcriptional activity. The increase in BDNF-induced cancer cell migration was antagonized by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, transfection with HO-1 siRNA effectively reduced the increased VEGF expression induced by BDNF. The BDNF-induced cell migration was regulated by the ERK, p38, and Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, BDNF-increased HO-1 and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity were inhibited by ERK, p38, and AKT pharmacological inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants in colon cancer cells. These results indicate that BDNF increases the migration of colon cancer cells by regulating VEGF/HO-1 activation through the ERK, p38, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The results of this study may provide a relevant contribution to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF promotes colon cancer cell motility.

  13. Isolation and characterization of calcium sensing receptor null cells: a highly malignant and drug resistant phenotype of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Liu, Guangming; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2013-05-01

    The expression of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in the human colonic crypt epithelium is linked to cellular differentiation while its lack of expression is associated with undifferentiated and invasive colon carcinoma. Human colon carcinoma cell lines contain small subpopulations (10-20%) that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null cells). Here, we report on the isolation, propagation, maintenance and characterization of CaSR null cells from the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines. CaSR null cells grew as three-dimensional non-adherent spherical clusters with increased propensity for anchorage independent growth, cellular proliferation and invasion of matrigels. CaSR null cells were highly resistant to fluorouracil and expressed abundant amount of thymidylate synthase and survivin. Molecular profiling by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blots showed a high level of expression of the previously reported cancer stem cell markers CD133, CD44 and Nanog in CaSR null cells. A significant increase in the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transitional molecules and transcription factors was also observed. These include N-cadherin, β-catenin, vimentin, fibronectin, Snail1, Snail2, Twist and FOXC2. The expression of the tumor suppressive E-cadherin and miR145, on the other hand, was greatly reduced while expression of the oncogenic microRNAs: miR21, miR135a and miR135b was significantly up-regulated. CaSR null cells possess a myriad of cellular and molecular features that drive and sustain the malignant phenotype. We conclude that CaSR null constitutes a highly malignant and drug resistant phenotype of colon cancer.

  14. p53-Dependent activation of a molecular beacon in tumor cells following exposure to doxorubicin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rishita; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2004-09-01

    In an effort to begin developing a non-invasive strategy for in-vivo detection of the cellular DNA damage response, we engineered a molecular beacon to detect expression of p21(WAF1/CIP1), a gene whose transcription is directly activated by the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Introduction of a phosphorothioate-modified p21-beacon by transfection in human tumor cells led to a slight background signal that increased in a dose dependent manner between 50 and 400 nM beacon. Strong nuclear signal was observed following treatment of wild-type p53-expressing human H460 lung cancer cells for 8 hours with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (adriamycin). Similar induction was observed in wild-type p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Interestingly, following doxorubicin exposure, there was activation of the p21-beacon in p21-null HCT116 cells, which was not observed in p53-null HCT116, or mutant p53-expressing DLD1 cells that are either wild-type or p21-null. Increased signal from the phosphorothioate-modified p21-beacon in doxorubicin-treated cells likely resulted from sequence-specific hybridization as well as sequence-independent cleavage that may occur due to p53-dependent activation of endonucleases during apoptosis. We conclude that activation of p53 by chemotherapy leads to a strong signal from a p21-beacon that may be useful in further testing both in vitro and in vivo. Strategies need to be developed to optimize the gene or damage specificity as well as the sensitivity to therapeutic response of this non-invasive imaging approach.

  15. Potential anticancer agents. I. Synthesis of isoxazole moiety containing quinazoline derivatives and preliminarily in vitro anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jian-Ping; Lu, Can-Zhong; Wu, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    14 new structures of isoxazole-moiety-containing quinazoline derivatives(3a~3n) were synthesized for the first time and characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, ESI-MS. Subsequently, their in vitro anticancer activity against A549, HCT116 and MCF-7 cell lines was preliminarily evaluated using the MTT method. Among them, most compounds showed good to excellent anticancer activity, especially 3d, 3i, 3k and 3m exhibited the more potent anticancer activity against A549, HCT116 and MCF-7 cell lines, which can be regarded as the promising drug candidates for development of anticancer drugs.

  16. Automation of 3D cell culture using chemically defined hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Angres, Brigitte; Patocchi-Tenzer, Isabel; Braum, Susanne; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    Drug development relies on high-throughput screening involving cell-based assays. Most of the assays are still based on cells grown in monolayer rather than in three-dimensional (3D) formats, although cells behave more in vivo-like in 3D. To exemplify the adoption of 3D techniques in drug development, this project investigated the automation of a hydrogel-based 3D cell culture system using a liquid-handling robot. The hydrogel technology used offers high flexibility of gel design due to a modular composition of a polymer network and bioactive components. The cell inert degradation of the gel at the end of the culture period guaranteed the harmless isolation of live cells for further downstream processing. Human colon carcinoma cells HCT-116 were encapsulated and grown in these dextran-based hydrogels, thereby forming 3D multicellular spheroids. Viability and DNA content of the cells were shown to be similar in automated and manually produced hydrogels. Furthermore, cell treatment with toxic Taxol concentrations (100 nM) had the same effect on HCT-116 cell viability in manually and automated hydrogel preparations. Finally, a fully automated dose-response curve with the reference compound Taxol showed the potential of this hydrogel-based 3D cell culture system in advanced drug development.

  17. Neuroblastoma cell lines showing smooth muscle cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, T; Mine, H; Horii, Y; Takahashi, K; Nagai, R; Morishita, R; Komada, M; Asada, Y; Sawada, T

    2000-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is a tumor that is derived from the neural crest. Recent studies demonstrated that several human neuroblastoma cell lines exhibit at least three morphologic types: neuroblastic (N)-type, substrate-adhesive (S)-type and intermediate (I)-type cells. However, the origin of the S-type cells has not been clearly identified. In this study, the expressions of smooth muscle-specific proteins (desmin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, basic calponin and the smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms of SM1 and SM2) in three parent and four cloned neuroblastoma cell lines, composed of S-type cells, were examined by indirect immunofluorescence, Western blot and/or by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Desmin was found in two of the seven cell lines, and alpha-smooth muscle actin and basic calponin were detected in all of seven of the cell lines. In three parent cell lines and one cloned cell line composed of N-type cells, none of three smooth muscle-specific proteins were detected. In smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms, SM1 was detected in two parent cell lines composed of S-type cells (MP-N-MS and KP-N-YS) by immunofluorescence, Western blot and/or by RT-PCR, whereas the SM2 isoform was detected in one parent cell line (MP-N-MS) by RT-PCR. These findings indicate that S-type cells have either the immature or mature smooth muscle cell phenotype, and neural crest cells very likely have the ability of to differentiate into smooth muscle cells in the human system.

  18. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  19. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks’ genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area.

  20. Virus Discovery Using Tick Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Attoui, Houssam

    2016-01-01

    While ticks have been known to harbor and transmit pathogenic arboviruses for over 80 years, the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that ticks also appear to harbor a diverse range of endogenous tick-only viruses belonging to many different families. Almost nothing is known about these viruses; indeed, it is unclear in most cases whether the identified viral sequences are derived from actual replication-competent viruses or from endogenous virus elements incorporated into the ticks' genomes. Tick cell lines play an important role in virus discovery and isolation through the identification of novel viruses chronically infecting such cell lines and by acting as host cells to aid in determining whether or not an entire replication-competent, infective virus is present in a sample. Here, we review recent progress in tick-borne virus discovery and comment on the actual and potential applications for tick cell lines in this emerging research area. PMID:27679414

  1. Killer cell lines against Shope carcinoma cells in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Yamade, I; Seto, A

    1991-09-01

    Killer cell activity against Shope carcinoma cells was not detected in PBL nor in spleen cells from tumor-bearing B/J rabbits, but was induced by in vitro culture of these cells in the presence of IL-2 and X-irradiated carcinoma cells. HTLV-I-transformed killer cell lines were successfully obtained by the culturing of PBL from an HTLV-I-infected and tumor-bearing Chbb:HM rabbit. These killer cells included large cells with azurophilic granules in the cytoplasm and with a reniform nucleus, thus resembling large granular lymphocytes. The killer activity was similar against the Vx2K cell line from a random-bred rabbit and SCB cell lines from an B/J rabbit, suggesting the absence of MHC restriction. PMID:1655241

  2. Gene expression profiles modulated by the human carcinogen aristolochic acid I in human cancer cells and their dependence on TP53

    SciTech Connect

    Simoes, Maria L.; Hockley, Sarah L.; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2008-10-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is the causative agent of urothelial tumours associated with aristolochic acid nephropathy. These tumours contain TP53 mutations and over-express TP53. We compared transcriptional and translational responses of two isogenic HCT116 cell lines, one expressing TP53 (p53-WT) and the other with this gene knocked out (p53-null), to treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) (50-100 {mu}M) for 6-48 h. Modulation of 118 genes was observed in p53-WT cells and 123 genes in p53-null cells. Some genes, including INSIG1, EGR1, CAV1, LCN2 and CCNG1, were differentially expressed in the two cell lines. CDKN1A was selectively up-regulated in p53-WT cells, leading to accumulation of TP53 and CDKN1A. Apoptotic signalling, measured by caspase-3 and -7 activity, was TP53-dependent. Both cell types accumulated in S phase, suggesting that AAI-DNA adducts interfere with DNA replication, independently of TP53 status. The oncogene MYC, frequently over-expressed in urothelial tumours, was up-regulated by AAI, whereas FOS was down-regulated. Observed modulation of genes involved in endocytosis, e.g. RAB5A, may be relevant to the known inhibition of receptor-mediated endocytosis, an early sign of AA-mediated proximal tubule injury. AAI-DNA adduct formation was significantly greater in p53-WT cells than in p53-null cells. Collectively, phenotypic anchoring of the AAI-induced expression profiles to DNA adduct formation, cell-cycle parameters, TP53 expression and apoptosis identified several genes linked to these biological outcomes, some of which are TP53-dependent. These results strengthen the importance of TP53 in AA-induced cancer, and indicate that other alterations, e.g. to MYC oncogenic pathways, may also contribute.

  3. Triptolide Abrogates Growth of Colon Cancer and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest by Inhibiting Transcriptional Activation of E2F

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Rohit; Skube, Steven J; Majumder, Kaustav; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sangwan, Veena; Li, Lihua; Dawra, Rajinder; Subramanian, Subbaya; Saluja, Ashok; Dudeja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite significant progress in diagnostics and therapeutics, over fifty thousand patients die from colorectal cancer annually. Hence there is urgent need for new lines of treatment. Triptolide, a natural compound isolated from the Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii, is effective against multiple cancers. We have synthesized a water soluble analog of triptolide, named Minnelide, which is currently in phase I trial against pancreatic cancer. The aims of the current study were to evaluate whether triptolide/Minnelide is effective against colorectal cancer and to elucidate the mechanism by which triptolide induces cell death in colorectal cancer. Methods Efficacy of Minnelide was evaluated in subcutaneous xenograft and liver metastasis model of colorectal cancer. For mechanistic studies colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were treated with triptolide and the effect on viability, caspase activation, annexin positivity, lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) release and cell cycle progression was evaluated. Effect of triptolide on E2F transcriptional activity, mRNA levels of E2F dependent genes, E2F1-Rb binding and proteins levels of regulator of G1-S transition was also measured. DNA binding of E2F1 was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Results Triptolide decreased colon cancer cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Minnelide markedly inhibited the growth of colon cancer in the xenograft and liver metastasis model of colon cancer and more than doubles the median survival of animals with liver metastases from colon cancer. Mechanistically we demonstrate that at low concentrations, triptolide induces apoptotic cell death but at higher concentrations it induces cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that triptolide is able to induce G1 cell cycle arrest by inhibiting transcriptional activation of E2F1. Our data also show that triptolide downregulates E2F activity by potentially modulating events downstream of DNA binding. Conclusion

  4. Refractory lining for electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Cook, Glenn M.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contcat with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  5. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V-FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate.

  6. Umbelliprenin Induces Apoptosis in CLL Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ziai, Seyed Ali; Gholami, Omid; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Zamani, Amir Hassan; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease that requires innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. Many Ferula species, including F. asa-foetida, synthesize terpenyloxy coumarins. One of these coumarins is umbelliprenin, which has been implicated with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines. In this study induction of apoptosis by umbelliprenin on Jurkat T-CLL and Raji B-CLL cell lines was studied. In this regard, cells were incubated with various concentrations of umbelliprenin in-vitro for different times and assayed for apoptosis with annexin V–FITC/PI double staining flowcytometry method. Results showed that umbelliprenin induced apoptosis in leukemic cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that CLL cells were more susceptible to umbelliprenin induced cell death than normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs). Moreover, we study the induction of apoptosis in Jurkat cells by umbelliprenin in the presence of interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an agent that causes resistance to apoptosis in CLL cells, was also student. We showed that IL-4 can not reduce apoptotic effect of umbelliprenin. The preferential toxicity of umbelliprenin for CLL cells, supports the hypothesis that oral administration of umbelliprenin in the form of foods or folk medicines containing this coumarin, might enhance protection against the development of CLL in man with little side effects. In conclusion, umbelliprenin may be an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of CLL, and thus clinical studies with umbelliprenin may be appropriate. PMID:24250490

  7. Synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth with nanoemulsion-loaded paclitaxel and PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitor BEZ235 through apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hong; Li, Li; Garcia Carcedo, Ines; Xu, Zhi Ping; Monteiro, Michael; Gu, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, with drug resistance and metastasis being the major challenges to effective treatments. To overcome this, combination therapy with different chemotherapeutics is a common practice. In this study, we demonstrated that paclitaxel (PTX) together with BEZ235 exhibited a synergetic inhibition effect on colon cancer cell growth. Furthermore, nanoemulsion (NE)-loaded PTX and BEZ235 were more effective than the free drug, and a combination treatment of both NE drugs increased the efficiency of the treatments. BEZ235 pretreatment before adding PTX sensitized the cancer cells further, suggesting a synergistic inhibition effect through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The 50% inhibitory concentrations for BEZ235 were 127.1 nM and 145.0 nM and for PTX 9.7 nM and 9.5 nM for HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, respectively. When loaded with NE the 50% inhibitory concentrations for BEZ235 decreased to 52.6 nM and 55.6 nM and for PTX to 1.9 nM and 2.3 nM for HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, respectively. Combination treatment with 10 nM NE-BEZ235 and 0.6 nM and 1.78 nM NE-PTX could kill 50% of HCT-116 and HT-29, respectively. The cell death caused by the treatment was through apoptotic cell death, which coincided with decreased expression of anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2. Our data indicate that the combination therapy of PTX with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin dual inhibitor BEZ235 using NE delivery may hold promise for a more effective approach for colon cancer treatment. PMID:27226714

  8. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  9. Up-regulation of the interferon-related genes in BRCA2 knockout epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Xian, Jian; Vire, Emmanuelle; McKinney, Steven; Wong, Jason; Wei, Vivien; Tong, Rebecca; Kouzarides, Tony; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 mutations are significantly associated with early onset breast cancer, and the tumour suppressing function of BRCA2 has been attributed to its involvement in homologous recombination [1]-mediated DNA repair. In order to identify additional functions of BRCA2, we generated BRCA2-knockout HCT116 human colorectal carcinoma cells. Using genome-wide microarray analyses, we have discovered a link between the loss of BRCA2 and the up-regulation of a subset of interferon (IFN)-related genes, including APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G. The over-expression of IFN-related genes was confirmed in different human BRCA2−/− and mouse Brca2−/− tumour cell lines, and was independent of either senescence or apoptosis. In isogenic wild type BRCA2 cells, we observed over-expression of IFN-related genes after treatment with DNA-damaging agents, and following ionizing radiation. Cells with endogenous DNA damage because of defective BRCA1 or RAD51 also exhibited over-expression of IFN-related genes. Transcriptional activity of the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) was increased in BRCA2 knockout cells, and the expression of BRCA2 greatly decreased IFN-α stimulated ISRE reporter activity, suggesting that BRCA2 directly represses the expression of IFN-related genes through the ISRE. Finally, the colony forming capacity of BRCA2 knockout cells was significantly reduced in the presence of either IFN-β or IFN-γ, suggesting that IFNs may have potential as therapeutic agents in cancer cells with BRCA2 mutations. PMID:25043256

  10. [Characterization of a liver metastatic cell line derived from a human gastric cancer cell line].

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, J

    1990-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether there is any difference of biological characteristics between a gastric cancer cell line (KATOIII) and another cell line derived from liver metastasis of the same cell line (KATOIII-H2). The liver metastasis was produced by intrasplenic injection of the fluid containing of KATOIII in nude mouse and new cell line was established using the cells of metastatic site. The results are as follows. 1) Inoculation of KATOIII-H2 into the spleen produced liver metastases in all of the experimental animals, whereas the same procedure with KATOIII produced metastasis only in 30% of the animals. 2) KATOIII-H2 exhibited more prominent platelet-aggregating activity than KATOIII. 3) There is no difference between two cell lines on doubling time, histological findings of the xenografts and chromosomal number. 4) DNA index of KATOIII-H2 is lower than KATOIII and the trisomy in NO. 20 chromosome of KATOIII-H2 was noted. The results indicate that metastatic potential is different between two cell lines and this fact is probably in a part because of the different platelet-aggregating activity of each cell line. PMID:2233668

  11. CCL21 Facilitates Chemoresistance and Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties of Colorectal Cancer Cells through AKT/GSK-3β/Snail Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Lin; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Ge; Liu, Zong-Cai; Wu, Nong; Wang, Hao; Qi, Yi-Fei; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Cai, Shao Hui; Du, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Some evidence indicated that chemoresistance associates with the acquisition of cancer stem-like properties. Recent studies suggested that chemokines can promote the chemoresistance and stem cell properties in various cancer cells, while the underling mechanism is still not completely illustrated. In our study, we found that CCL21 can upregulate the expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and stem cell property markers such as Bmi-1, Nanog, and OCT-4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) HCT116 cells and then improve the cell survival rate and mammosphere formation. Our results suggested that Snail was crucial for CCL21-mediated chemoresistance and cancer stem cell property in CRC cells. Further, we observed that CCL21 treatment increased the protein but not mRNA levels of Snail, which suggested that CCL21 upregulates Snail via posttranscriptional ways. The downstream signals AKT/GSK-3β mediated CCL21 induced the upregulation of Snail due to the fact that CCL21 treatment can obviously phosphorylate both AKT and GSK-3β. The inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, LY294002 significantly abolished CCL21 induced chemoresistance and mammosphere formation of HCT116 cells. Collectively, our results in the present study revealed that CCL21 can facilitate chemoresistance and stem cell property of CRC cells via the upregulation of P-gp, Bmi-1, Nanog, and OCT-4 through AKT/GSK-3β/Snail signals, which suggested a potential therapeutic approach to CRC patients. PMID:27057280

  12. Thymoquinone chemosensitizes colon cancer cells through inhibition of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lida; Bai, Yangqiu; Yang, Yuxiu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effects and molecular mechanisms of thymoquinone (TQ) on colon cancer cells were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and the results revealed that treatment with TQ significantly decreased cell viability in COLO205 and HCT116 cells in a dose-dependent manner. TQ treatment additionally sensitized COLO205 and HCT116 cells to cisplatin therapy in a concentration-dependent manner. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TQ action, western blot analysis was used to determine the levels of phosphorylated p65 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-regulated gene products vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), c-Myc and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The results indicated that TQ treatment significantly decreased the level of phosphorylated p65 in the nucleus, which indicated the inhibition of NF-κB activation by TQ treatment. Treatment with TQ also decreased the expression levels of VEGF, c-Myc and Bcl-2. In addition, the inhibition of NF-κB activation with a specific inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, potentiated the induction of cell death and caused a chemosensitization effect of TQ in colon cancer cells. Overall, the results of the present study suggested that TQ induced cell death and chemosensitized colon cancer cells by inhibiting NF-κB signaling. PMID:27698868

  13. Thymoquinone chemosensitizes colon cancer cells through inhibition of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lida; Bai, Yangqiu; Yang, Yuxiu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effects and molecular mechanisms of thymoquinone (TQ) on colon cancer cells were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and the results revealed that treatment with TQ significantly decreased cell viability in COLO205 and HCT116 cells in a dose-dependent manner. TQ treatment additionally sensitized COLO205 and HCT116 cells to cisplatin therapy in a concentration-dependent manner. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TQ action, western blot analysis was used to determine the levels of phosphorylated p65 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-regulated gene products vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), c-Myc and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The results indicated that TQ treatment significantly decreased the level of phosphorylated p65 in the nucleus, which indicated the inhibition of NF-κB activation by TQ treatment. Treatment with TQ also decreased the expression levels of VEGF, c-Myc and Bcl-2. In addition, the inhibition of NF-κB activation with a specific inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, potentiated the induction of cell death and caused a chemosensitization effect of TQ in colon cancer cells. Overall, the results of the present study suggested that TQ induced cell death and chemosensitized colon cancer cells by inhibiting NF-κB signaling.

  14. Apoptotic-like death occurs through a caspase-independent route in colon carcinoma cells undergoing mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Llovera, Laia; Mansilla, Sylvia; Portugal, José

    2012-12-29

    We have examined the relationship between chemotherapy-induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death by apoptosis in both wild-type and p53(-/-) HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells treated with nanomolar concentrations of paclitaxel (PTX), a drug that acts on tubulin altering the normal development of mitosis. After treatment, HCT116 cells entered mitosis regardless of the presence of functional p53, which resulted in changes in the distribution of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle, and in cell death. In the presence of PTX, the percentage of polyploid cells observed was higher in p53-deficient cells, indicating that mitotic slippage was favored compared to wild-type cells, with the presence of large multinucleate cells. PTX caused mitotic catastrophe and about 50-60% cells that were entering an aberrant mitosis died through an apoptotic-like pathway characterized by the presence of phosphatidylserine in the outer cell membrane, which occurred in the absence of significant activation of caspases. Lack of p53 facilitated endoreduplication and polyploidy in PTX-treated cells, but cells were still killed with similar efficacy through the same apoptotic-like mechanism in the absence of caspase activity. PMID:22885806

  15. Cancer stem cell-like cells from a single cell of oral squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Felthaus, O.; Ettl, T.; Gosau, M.; Driemel, O.; Brockhoff, G.; Reck, A.; Zeitler, K.; Hautmann, M.; Reichert, T.E.; Schmalz, G.; Morsczeck, C.

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Four oral squamous cancer cell lines (OSCCL) were analyzed for cancer stem cells (CSCs). {yields} Single cell derived colonies of OSCCL express CSC-marker CD133 differentially. {yields} Monoclonal cell lines showed reduced sensitivity for Paclitaxel. {yields} In situ CD133{sup +} cells are slow cycling (Ki67-) indicating a reduced drug sensitivity. {yields} CD133{sup +} and CSC-like cells can be obtained from single colony forming cells of OSCCL. -- Abstract: Resistance of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) to conventional chemotherapy or radiation therapy might be due to cancer stem cells (CSCs). The development of novel anticancer drugs requires a simple method for the enrichment of CSCs. CSCs can be enriched from OSCC cell lines, for example, after cultivation in serum-free cell culture medium (SFM). In our study, we analyzed four OSCC cell lines for the presence of CSCs. CSC-like cells could not be enriched with SFM. However, cell lines obtained from holoclone colonies showed CSC-like properties such as a reduced rate of cell proliferation and a reduced sensitivity to Paclitaxel in comparison to cells from the parental lineage. Moreover, these cell lines differentially expressed the CSC-marker CD133, which is also upregulated in OSCC tissues. Interestingly, CD133{sup +} cells in OSCC tissues expressed little to no Ki67, the cell proliferation marker that also indicates reduced drug sensitivity. Our study shows a method for the isolation of CSC-like cell lines from OSCC cell lines. These CSC-like cell lines could be new targets for the development of anticancer drugs under in vitro conditions.

  16. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Limian; Lin, Yuyang; Zheng, Wenwen; Hong, Sen; Tang, Xiuqi; Zhao, Pingwei; Li, Ming; Ni, Jingsong; Li, Chenguang; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are important for immune defense against infectious pathogens and regulate the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases. However, their roles in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) are still unclear. This study examined the phenotype, distribution, clinical relevance and potential function of MAIT cells in CRC patients. We found that the percentages of circulating memory CD8+ MAIT cells were significantly reduced while tumor infiltrating MAIT cells were increased, especially in patients with advanced CRC. The serum CEA levels were positively correlated with the percentages of tumor infiltrating MAIT cells in CRC patients, but negatively correlated with the percentages of circulating MAIT in advanced CRC patients. Activated circulating MAIT cells from CRC patients produced lower IFN-γ, but higher IL-17. Furthermore, higher levels of Vα7.2-Jα33, IFN-γ and IL-17A were expressed in the CRC tissues. Co-culture of activated MAIT cells with HCT116 cells enhanced IL-17 expression and induced HCT116 cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in a contact- and dose-dependent manner, which was abrogated by treatment with anti-MR1. Therefore, MAIT cells preferably infiltrate into the solid tumor in CRC patients and may participate in the immune surveillance of CRC. PMID:26837580

  17. Ferrocene and (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes of the natural anticancer naphthoquinone plumbagin with enhanced efficacy against resistant cancer cells and a genuine mode of action.

    PubMed

    Spoerlein-Guettler, Cornelia; Mahal, Katharina; Schobert, Rainer; Biersack, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    A series of ferrocene and (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes attached to the naturally occurring anticancer naphthoquinones plumbagin and juglone was tested for efficacy against various cancer cell lines and for alterations in the mode of action. The plumbagin ferrocene and (p-cymene)Ru(II) conjugates 1c and 2a overcame the multi-drug drug resistance of KB-V1/Vbl cervix carcinoma cells and showed IC50 (72 h) values around 1 μM in growth inhibition assays using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). They were further investigated for their influence on the cell cycle of KB-V1/Vbl and HCT-116 colon carcinoma cells, on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the latter cell line, for their substrate character for the P-glycoprotein drug eflux pump via the calcein-AM efflux assays, and for DNA affinity by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The derivatives 1c and 2a increased the number of dead cancer cells (sub-G0/G1 fraction) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ROS levels were significantly increased upon treatment with 1c and 2a. These compounds also showed a greater affinity to linear DNA than plumbagin. While plumbagin did not affect calcein-AM transport by P-glycoprotein the derivatives 1c and 2a exhibited a 50% or 80% inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-mediated calcein-AM efflux relative to the clinically established sensitizer verapamil.

  18. Induction of calcium sensing receptor in human colon cancer cells by calcium, vitamin D and aquamin: Promotion of a more differentiated, less malignant and indolent phenotype.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Aslam, Muhammad N; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2015-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a robust promoter of differentiation in colonic epithelial cells and functions as a tumor suppressor. Cancer cells that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null) are highly malignant while acquisition of CaSR expression in these cells circumvents the malignant phenotype. We hypothesize that chemopreventive agents mediate their action through the induction of CaSR. Here, we compare the effectiveness of Ca(2+), vitamin D, and Aquamin (a marine algae product containing Ca(2+), magnesium and detectable levels of 72 additional minerals) on the induction of CaSR in the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines and the corresponding CaSR null cells isolated from these lines. All three agonists induced CaSR mRNA and protein expression and inhibited cellular proliferation in the parental and CaSR null cells. Aquamin was found to be most potent in this regard. Induction of CaSR expression by these agonists resulted in demethylation of the CaSR gene promoter with a concurrent increase in CaSR promoter reporter activity. However, demethylation per se did not induce CaSR transcription. Induction of CaSR expression resulted in a down-regulated expression of tumor inducers and up-regulated expression of tumor suppressors. Again, Aquamin was found to be most potent in these biologic effects. This study provides a rationale for the use of a multi-mineral approach in the chemoprevention of colon cancer and suggests that induction of CaSR may be a measure of the effectiveness of chemopreventive agents.

  19. miR-6734 Up-Regulates p21 Gene Expression and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moo Rim; Park, Ki Hwan; Yang, Jeong-Ook; Lee, Chang Woo; Oh, Soo Jin; Yun, Jieun; Lee, Myeong Youl; Han, Sang-Bae; Kang, Jong Soon

    2016-01-01

    Recently, microRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression in terms of both gene silencing and gene activation. Here, we investigated the effects of miR-6734, which has a sequence homology with a specific region of p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21) promoter, on cancer cell growth and the mechanisms involved in this effect. miR-6734 up-regulated p21 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis using biotin-labeled miR-6734 confirmed the association of miR-6734 with p21 promoter. Moreover, miR-6734 inhibited cancer cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells, which was abolished by knockdown of p21. The phosphorylation of Rb and the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP were suppressed by miR-6734 transfection in HCT-116 cells and these effects were also reversed by p21 knockdown. In addition, miR-6734 transfection caused prolonged induction of p21 gene and modification of histones in p21 promoter, which are typical aspects of a phenomenon referred to as RNA activation (RNAa). Collectively, our results demonstrated that miR-6734 inhibits the growth of colon cancer cells by up-regulating p21 gene expression and subsequent induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting its role as an important endogenous regulator of cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:27509128

  20. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR).

    PubMed

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-05-29

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757-866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin.

  1. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR)*

    PubMed Central

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A.; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757–866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin. PMID:25882847

  2. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  3. Spontaneous Cell Competition in Immortalized Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo I.; Chen, Yi-Ju; Li, Jinyang; Witze, Eric S.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cell competition is a form of cell-cell interaction by which cells compare relative levels of fitness, resulting in the active elimination of less-fit cells, “losers,” by more-fit cells, “winners.” Here, we show that in three routinely-used mammalian cell lines – U2OS, 3T3, and MDCK cells – sub-clones arise stochastically that exhibit context-dependent competitive behavior. Specifically, cell death is elicited when winner and loser sub-clones are cultured together but not alone. Cell competition and elimination in these cell lines is caspase-dependent and requires cell-cell contact but does not require de novo RNA synthesis. Moreover, we show that the phenomenon involves differences in cellular metabolism. Hence, our study demonstrates that cell competition is a common feature of immortalized mammalian cells in vitro and implicates cellular metabolism as a mechanism by which cells sense relative levels of “fitness.” PMID:26200654

  4. Effect of dapagliflozin on colon cancer cell [Rapid Communication].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsugumichi; Okada, Shuichi; Yamada, Eijiro; Shimoda, Yoko; Osaki, Aya; Tagaya, Yuko; Shibusawa, Ryo; Okada, Junichi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Dapagliflozin is a SGLT2 (Sodium/Glucose cotransporter 2) inhibitor that reduces circulating glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients by blocking the SGLT2-dependent reabsorption of glucose in the kidney. Dapagliflozin is metabolized by UGT1A9 (UDP Glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, Polypeptidase A9), suppressing its SGLT2 inhibitor activity. However little information is available on whether dapagliflozin acts in the absence of dapagliflozin metabolism. Treatment with 0.5μM dapagliflozin significantly reduced the number of HCT116 cells, which express SGLT2 but not UGT1A9. This was independent of SGLT2 inhibition, as the SGLT2 inhibitor phlorizin had no effect. Dapagliflozin also enhanced Erk phosphorylation but without changing levels of uncleaved and cleaved PPAR and uncleaved caspase-3, suggesting that the cause of the decrease in HCT116 cell number was apoptosis independent cell death. Taken together, these data indicate a new potential role for dapagliflozin as an anticancer reagent in tumor cell populations that do not express UGT1A9. PMID:26522271

  5. Experience with the Vero cell line.

    PubMed

    Montagnon, B J; Vincent-Falquet, J C

    1998-01-01

    The Vero cell line has been managed with the Cell Bank system to produce at the 142nd passage IPV, OPV and rabies vaccines since 1982 by Pasteur Mérieux Serums & Vaccins (PMsv). The safety of the cell line was regularly validated at the Working Cell Bank (WCB) level according to the WHO and European Pharmacopoeia requirements for absence of bacteria, fungi, mycoplasma and viruses. A special emphasis was devoted to research on the absence of simian viruses (SV40, SIV, Retro-D virus and simian CMV). All these specific researches were negative. At a low level of passage, the Vero cells are not tumorigenic. Vaccines have been prepared in low passage level Vero cells and together with the excellent downstream purification have resulted in excellent safety as attested by pharmacovigilance of more than 100 million doses of IPV during 12 years, more than 20 million doses of rabies vaccine during 10 years and more than 1 billion of OPV during eight years.

  6. Mechanism of Alternariol monomethyl ether-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bensassi, Fatma; Gallerne, Cindy; el Dein, Ossama Sharaf; Hajlaoui, Mohamed Rabeh; Bacha, Hassen; Lemaire, Christophe

    2011-12-18

    Alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) is a major mycotoxin produced by fungi of the genus Alternaria and a common contaminant of food products such as fruits and cereals worldwide. AME can cause serious health problems for animals as well as for humans. In this study, human colon carcinoma cells (HCT116) were used to explore the mechanisms of cell death induced by AME. Exposure of HCT116 cells to AME resulted in significant cytotoxicity manifested by a loss in cell viability mainly mediated by activation of apoptotic process. AME activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway evidenced by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) downstream generation of O(2)(-), cytochrome c release and caspase 9 and 3 activation. Experiments conducted on isolated organelles indicated that AME does not directly target mitochondria to induce PTP-dependent permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes. Moreover, no difference was observed in Bax-KO cells in comparison to parental cells, suggesting that the pro-apoptotic protein Bax is not involved in AME-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that AME induces cell death in human colon carcinoma cells by activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  7. Cells Cultured on Core-Shell Photonic Crystal Barcodes for Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fanfan; Shang, Luoran; Zheng, Fuyin; Chen, Zhuoyue; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jie; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective drug screening platforms is an important task for biomedical engineering. Here, a novel methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel-encapsulated core-shell photonic crystal (PhC) barcode particle was developed for three-dimensional cell aggregation culture and drug screening. The GelMA shells of the barcode particles enable creation of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment for cell adhesion and growth, while the PhC cores of the barcode particles provide stable diffraction peaks that can encode different cell spheroids during culture and distinguish their biological response during drug testing. The applicability of this cell spheroids-on-barcodes platform was investigated by testing the cytotoxic effect of tegafur (TF), a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), on barcode particle-loaded liver HepG2 and HCT-116 colonic tumor cell spheroids. The cytotoxicity of TF against the HCT-116 tumor cell spheroids was enhanced in systems using cocultures of HepG2 and NIH-3T3 cells, indicating the effectiveness of this multiple cell spheroids-on-barcodes platform for drug screening.

  8. Cells Cultured on Core-Shell Photonic Crystal Barcodes for Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fanfan; Shang, Luoran; Zheng, Fuyin; Chen, Zhuoyue; Wang, Huan; Wang, Jie; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective drug screening platforms is an important task for biomedical engineering. Here, a novel methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel-encapsulated core-shell photonic crystal (PhC) barcode particle was developed for three-dimensional cell aggregation culture and drug screening. The GelMA shells of the barcode particles enable creation of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment for cell adhesion and growth, while the PhC cores of the barcode particles provide stable diffraction peaks that can encode different cell spheroids during culture and distinguish their biological response during drug testing. The applicability of this cell spheroids-on-barcodes platform was investigated by testing the cytotoxic effect of tegafur (TF), a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), on barcode particle-loaded liver HepG2 and HCT-116 colonic tumor cell spheroids. The cytotoxicity of TF against the HCT-116 tumor cell spheroids was enhanced in systems using cocultures of HepG2 and NIH-3T3 cells, indicating the effectiveness of this multiple cell spheroids-on-barcodes platform for drug screening. PMID:27214156

  9. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  10. Profilin potentiates chemotherapeutic agents mediated cell death via suppression of NF-κB and upregulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Raviprakash, Nune; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Gupta, Pankaj; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism by which Profilin acts as a tumor suppressor is still unclear. Several chemotherapeutic agents, used till date either have unfavorable side effects or acquired resistance in tumor cells. Our findings show that Profilin enhances cell death mediated by several chemotherapeutic-agents. The activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes, mediated by paclitaxel and vinblastine, was completely inhibited in Profilin overexpressing cells. This inhibition was due to the Profilin mediated attenuation of IκBα degradation, thereby preventing p65 nuclear translocation and low NF-κB DNA binding activity.Moreover, Profilin increases level of p53 in the presence of known inducers, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and benzofuran. This increased p53 level leads to enhanced cell death as indicated by activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, which results in cleavage of PARP.Furthermore, knocking down of p53 in Profilin overexpressing cells leads to decreased cell death. Ectopic expression of Profilin in HCT116 p53 knock out cells showed lesser cell death as compared to the HCT116 p53 wild type cells. For the first time, we provide evidences, which suggest that Profilin synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs to induce tumor cell death by regulating NF-κB and p53. Thus, modulation of Profilin may be a useful strategy for effective combination therapy. PMID:26842845

  11. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells through the mitochondria-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Sun, Luhaoran; Zhou, Jin; Yang, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity in various cancer cells, including colorectal cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying its antitumor activity in colorectal cancer remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated DHA-induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro. The results showed that DHA treatment significantly reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA induced G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptotic cell death, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that DHA decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential; activated the caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9; and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria were observed. Strikingly, the free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine or the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO significantly prevented DHA-induced apoptotic cell death. Taken together, we concluded that DHA-triggered apoptosis in HCT-116 cells occurs through the ROS-mediated mitochondria-dependent pathway. Our data suggest that DHA has great potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:24519064

  12. Perfluorocarbon-Encapsulated PLGA-PEG Emulsions as Enhancement Agents for Highly Efficient Reoxygenation to Cell and Organism.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yanjie; Zhang, Minmin; Liu, Tian; Zhou, Juan; Gao, Yuan; Wen, Zhengfeng; Guan, Jun; Zhu, Jun; Lin, Zhaofen; He, Dannong

    2015-08-26

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC), a kind of oxygen carrier, is encapsulated in PLGA-PEG to prepare a PLGA-PEG/PFC emulsion for highly efficient reoxygenation to cell and organism. HCT 116 cells are used as a model cell, whose viability has a significant enhancement after reoxygenation with PLGA-PEG/PFC emulsion because of the sufficient and timely oxygen supply. Meanwhile, hypoxia-reoxygenation injury will happen along with cell hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment, which is reflected by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. However, the integration of intracellular ROS and cell viability implies that the degree of hypoxia-reoxygenation injury is sublethal to HCT116 cells when the concentration of PLGA-PEG/PFC emulsion is lower than 0.2 mg/mL. Furthermore, the change of the expression level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is similar to that of cell viability during reoxygenation, which suggests that HIF-1α or its downstream proteins may make a significant contribution to cell viability. In vivo oxygen supply is assessed in rats through pulmonary delivery, which shows that PLGA-PEG/PFC emulsion can supply oxygen to rats and improve rats' lung ventilation. PMID:26222132

  13. Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 7 regulates p21-dependent growth arrest in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Saki; Kuwano, Yuki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Rokutan, Kazuhito; Nishida, Kensei

    2016-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factors (SRSFs) play wide-ranging roles in gene expression through post-transcriptional regulation as well as pre-mRNA splicing. SRSF7 was highly expressed in colon cancer tissues, and its knockdown inhibited cell growth in colon cancer cells (HCT116) in association with altered expression of 4,499 genes. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that cell cycle-related canonical pathways were ranked as the highly enriched category in the affected genes. Western blotting confirmed that p21, a master regulator in cell cycle, was increased without any induction of p53 in SRSF7 knockdown cells. Furthermore, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and retinoblastoma protein were remained in the hypophosphorylated state. In addition, the SRSF7 knockdown-induced cell growth inhibition was observed in p53-null HCT116 cells, suggesting that p53-independent pathways were involved in the SRSF7 knockdown-induced cell growth inhibition. The reduction of SRSF7 stabilized cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) mRNA without any activation of the CDKN1A promoter. Interestingly, SRSF7 knockdown also blocked p21 degradation. These results suggest that the reduction of SRSF7 post-transcriptionally regulates p21 induction at the multistep processes. Thus, the present findings disclose a novel, important role of SRSF7 in cell proliferation through regulating p21 levels. J. Med. Invest. 63: 219-226, August, 2016. PMID:27644562

  14. Novel microtubule-targeted agent 6-chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin induces G2-M arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi-ming; Zhou, Yu-bo; Xie, Chuan-ming; Chen, Dong-mei; Li, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To identify a novel coumarin analogue with the highest anticancer activity and to further investigate its anticancer mechanisms. Methods: The viability of cancer cells was investigated using the MTT assay. The cell cycle progression was evaluated using both flow cytometric and Western blotting analysis. Microtubule depolymerization was observed with immunocytochemistry in vivo and a tubulin depolymerization assay in vitro. Apoptosis was demonstrated using Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) double-staining and sub-G1 analysis. Results: Among 36 analogues of coumarin, 6-chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin showed the best anticancer activity (IC50 value about 200 nmol/L) in HCT116 cells. The compound had a broad spectrum of anticancer activity against 9 cancer cell lines derived from colon cancer, breast cancer, liver cancer, cervical cancer, leukemia, epidermoid cancer with IC50 value of 75 nmol/L–1.57 μmol/L but with low cytotocitity against WI-38 human lung fibroblasts (IC50 value of 12.128 μmol/L). The compound (0.04–10 μmol/L) induced G2-M phase arrest in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was reversible after the compound was removed. The compound (10–300 μmol/L) induced the depolymerization of purified porcine tubulin in vitro. Finally, the compound (0.04–2.5 μmol/L) induced apoptosis of HeLa cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Conclusion: 6-Chloro-4-(methoxyphenyl) coumarin is a novel microtubule-targeting agent that induces G2–M arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMID:22266726

  15. Hinokitiol inhibits cell growth through induction of S-phase arrest and apoptosis in human colon cancer cells and suppresses tumor growth in a mouse xenograft experiment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn-Sun; Choi, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Wonkyun; Jeon, Young-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Hong, Jin-Tae; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Yoo, Hwan-Soo

    2013-12-27

    Hinokitiol (1), a tropolone-related natural compound, induces apoptosis and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antitumor activities. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 1 were investigated on human colon cancer cell growth and tumor formation of xenograft mice. HCT-116 and SW-620 cells derived from human colon cancers were found to be similarly susceptible to 1, with IC50 values of 4.5 and 4.4 μM, respectively. Compound 1 induced S-phase arrest in the cell cycle progression and decreased the expression levels of cyclin A, cyclin E, and Cdk2. Conversely, 1 increased the expression of p21, a Cdk inhibitor. Compound 1 decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased the expression of Bax, and cleaved caspase-9 and -3. The effect of 1 on tumor formation when administered orally was evaluated in male BALB/c-nude mice implanted intradermally separately with HCT-116 and SW-620 cells. Tumor volumes and tumor weights in the mice treated with 1 (100 mg/kg) were decreased in both cases. These results suggest that the suppression of tumor formation by compound 1 in human colon cancer may occur through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

  16. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133⁺CD44⁺ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133⁺CD44⁺ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs. PMID:27455311

  17. Walnut Phenolic Extract and Its Bioactive Compounds Suppress Colon Cancer Cell Growth by Regulating Colon Cancer Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jisoo; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, JaeHwan; Heo, Seung Chul; Lee, Kook Lae; Choi, Sang-Woon; Kim, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Walnut has been known for its health benefits, including anti-cardiovascular disease and anti-oxidative properties. However, there is limited evidence elucidating its effects on cancer stem cells (CSCs) which represent a small subset of cancer cells that provide resistance against chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-CSCs potential of walnut phenolic extract (WPE) and its bioactive compounds, including (+)-catechin, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, and gallic acid. In the present study, CD133+CD44+ cells were isolated from HCT116 cells using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and then treated with WPE. As a result, survival of the CD133+CD44+ HCT116 cells was inhibited and cell differentiation was induced by WPE. In addition, WPE down-regulated the CSC markers, CD133, CD44, DLK1, and Notch1, as well as the β-catenin/p-GSK3β signaling pathway. WPE suppressed the self-renewal capacity of CSCs. Furthermore, the WPE exhibited stronger anti-CSC effects than its individual bioactive compounds. Finally, the WPE inhibited specific CSC markers in primary colon cancer cells isolated from primary colon tumor. These results suggest that WPE can suppress colon cancer by regulating the characteristics of colon CSCs. PMID:27455311

  18. Cytosine methylation profiling of cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Mathias; Turner, Julia; Gibbs, Peter; Lipton, Lara; Giovanneti, Mara; Cantor, Charles; van den Boom, Dirk

    2008-01-01

    DNA-methylation changes in human cancer are complex and vary between the different types of cancer. Capturing this epigenetic variability in an atlas of DNA-methylation changes will be beneficial for basic research as well as translational medicine. Hypothesis-free approaches that interrogate methylation patterns genome-wide have already generated promising results. However, these methods are still limited by their quantitative accuracy and the number of CpG sites that can be assessed individually. Here, we use a unique approach to measure quantitative methylation patterns in a set of >400 candidate genes. In this high-resolution study, we employed a cell-line model consisting of 59 cancer cell lines provided by the National Cancer Institute and six healthy control tissues for discovery of methylation differences in cancer-related genes. To assess the effect of cell culturing, we validated the results from colon cancer cell lines by using clinical colon cancer specimens. Our results show that a large proportion of genes (78 of 400 genes) are epigenetically altered in cancer. Although most genes show methylation changes in only one tumor type (35 genes), we also found a set of genes that changed in many different forms of cancer (seven genes). This dataset can easily be expanded to develop a more comprehensive and ultimately complete map of quantitative methylation changes. Our methylation data also provide an ideal starting point for further translational research where the results can be combined with existing large-scale datasets to develop an approach that integrates epigenetic, transcriptional, and mutational findings. PMID:18353987

  19. Expression of DIAPH1 is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and its down-regulation strongly reduces the metastatic capacity of colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Na; Izbicki, Jakob R; König, Alexandra; Habermann, Jens K; Blechner, Christine; Lange, Tobias; Schumacher, Udo; Windhorst, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    In most cases, metastatic colorectal cancer is not curable, thus new approaches are necessary to identify novel targets for colorectal cancer therapy. Actin-binding-proteins (ABPs) directly regulate motility of metastasising tumor cells, and for cortactin an association with colon cancer metastasis has been already shown. However, as its depletion only incompletely inhibits metastasis, additional, more suitable cellular targets have to be identified. Here we analyzed expression of the ABPs, DIAPH1, VASP, N-WASP, and fascin in comparison with cortactin and found that, besides cortactin, DIAPH1 was expressed with the highest frequency (63%) in colorectal cancer. As well as cortactin, DIAPH1 was not detectable in normal colon tissue and expression of both proteins was positively correlated with metastasis of colorectal cancer. To analyse the mechanistic role of DIAPH1 for metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in comparison with cortactin, expression of the proteins was stably down-regulated in the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29, HROC-24 and HCT-116. Analysis of metastasis of colon carcinoma cells in SCID mice revealed that depletion of DIAPH1 reduced metastasis 60-fold and depletion of cortactin 16-fold as compared with control cells. Most likely the stronger effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon cancer metastasis is due to the fact that in vitro knock down of DIAPH1 impaired all steps of metastasis; adhesion, invasion and migration while down-regulation of cortactin only reduced adhesion and invasion. This very strong reducing effect of DIAPH1 depletion on colon carcinoma cell metastasis makes the protein a promising therapeutic target for individualized colorectal cancer therapy.

  20. Cinnamaldehyde affects the biological behavior of human colorectal cancer cells and induces apoptosis via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiepin; Teng, Yuhao; Liu, Shenlin; Wang, Zifan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yingying; Xi, Songyang; Xu, Song; Wang, Ruiping; Zou, Xi

    2016-03-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is a bioactive compound isolated from the stem bark of Cinnamomum cassia, that has been identified as an antiproliferative substance with pro-apoptotic effects on various cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, the effects of CA on human colon cancer cells were investigated at both the molecular and cellular levels. Three types of colorectal cancer cells at various stages of differentiation and invasive ability (SW480, HCT116 and LoVo) were treated with CA at final concentrations of 20, 40 and 80 µg/ml for 24 h. Compared with the control group, the proliferation inhibition rate of the human colorectal cancer cells following treatment with CA increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The invasion and adhesion abilities of the cells were significantly inhibited as indicated by Transwell and cell-matrix adhesion assays. Meanwhile, CA also upregulated the expression of E-cadherin and downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. CA also elevated the apoptotic rate. The levels of pro-apoptotic genes were upregulated while the levels of apoptosis inhibitory genes were decreased which further confirmed the pro-apoptotic effect of CA. In order to explore the mechanism of CA-induced apoptosis, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) were used to regulate the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The transcription activity of PI3K/AKT was markedly inhibited by CA, as well as IGF-1 which functions as an anti-apoptotic factor. In conclusion, CA has the potential to be developed as a new antitumor drug. The mechanisms of action involve the regulation of expression of genes involved in apoptosis, invasion and adhesion via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:26677144

  1. Cinnamaldehyde affects the biological behavior of human colorectal cancer cells and induces apoptosis via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiepin; Teng, Yuhao; Liu, Shenlin; Wang, Zifan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yingying; Xi, Songyang; Xu, Song; Wang, Ruiping; Zou, Xi

    2016-03-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is a bioactive compound isolated from the stem bark of Cinnamomum cassia, that has been identified as an antiproliferative substance with pro-apoptotic effects on various cancer cell lines in vitro. In the present study, the effects of CA on human colon cancer cells were investigated at both the molecular and cellular levels. Three types of colorectal cancer cells at various stages of differentiation and invasive ability (SW480, HCT116 and LoVo) were treated with CA at final concentrations of 20, 40 and 80 µg/ml for 24 h. Compared with the control group, the proliferation inhibition rate of the human colorectal cancer cells following treatment with CA increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The invasion and adhesion abilities of the cells were significantly inhibited as indicated by Transwell and cell-matrix adhesion assays. Meanwhile, CA also upregulated the expression of E-cadherin and downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. CA also elevated the apoptotic rate. The levels of pro-apoptotic genes were upregulated while the levels of apoptosis inhibitory genes were decreased which further confirmed the pro-apoptotic effect of CA. In order to explore the mechanism of CA-induced apoptosis, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) were used to regulate the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The transcription activity of PI3K/AKT was markedly inhibited by CA, as well as IGF-1 which functions as an anti-apoptotic factor. In conclusion, CA has the potential to be developed as a new antitumor drug. The mechanisms of action involve the regulation of expression of genes involved in apoptosis, invasion and adhesion via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  2. The trefoil factor 1 participates in gastrointestinal cell differentiation by delaying G1-S phase transition and reducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Kannan, Rama; Ribieras, Stéphane; Wendling, Corinne; Stoll, Isabelle; Thim, Lars; Tomasetto, Catherine; Rio, Marie-Christine

    2002-01-01

    Trefoil factor (TFF)1 is synthesized and secreted by the normal stomach mucosa and by the gastrointestinal cells of injured tissues. The link between mouse TFF1 inactivation and the fully penetrant antropyloric tumor phenotype prompted the classification of TFF1 as a gastric tumor suppressor gene. Accordingly, altered expression, deletion, and/or mutations of the TFF1 gene are frequently observed in human gastric carcinomas. The present study was undertaken to address the nature of the cellular and molecular mechanisms targeted by TFF1 signalling. TFF1 effects were investigated in IEC18, HCT116, and AGS gastrointestinal cells treated with recombinant human TFF1, and in stably transfected HCT116 cells synthesizing constitutive or doxycycline-induced human TFF1. We observed that TFF1 triggers two types of cellular responses. On one hand, TFF1 lowers cell proliferation by delaying G1-S cell phase transition. This results from a TFF1-mediated increase in the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors of both the INK4 and CIP subfamilies, leading to lower E2F transcriptional activity. On the other hand, TFF1 protects cells from chemical-, anchorage-free–, or Bad-induced apoptosis. In this process, TFF1 signalling targets the active form of caspase-9. Together, these results provide the first evidence of a dual antiproliferative and antiapoptotic role for TFF1. Similar paradoxical functions have been reported for tumor suppressor genes involved in cell differentiation, a function consistent with TFF1. PMID:12034770

  3. Activation of p53 with ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, marine sponge metabolites, induces apoptosis and autophagy in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Chung, Kyu Jin; Hwang, In Hyun; Gwak, Jungsuk; Park, Seoyoung; Ju, Bong Gun; Yun, Eunju; Kim, Dong-Eun; Chung, Young-Hwa; Na, MinKyun; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, p53, plays an essential role in the cellular response to stress through regulating the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy. Here, we used a cell-based reporter system for the detection of p53 response transcription to identify the marine sponge metabolites, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, as activators of the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone efficiently stabilize the p53 protein through promotion of p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 in both HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Moreover, both compounds upregulate the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1, a p53-dependent gene, and suppress proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase-3 cleavage and the population of cells that positively stained with Annexin V-FITC, both of which are typical biochemical markers of apoptosis. Furthermore, autophagy was elicited by both compounds, as indicated by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta formations and LC3-II turnover in HCT116 cells. Our findings suggest that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone exert their anti-cancer activity by activation of the p53 pathway and may have significant potential as chemo-preventive and therapeutic agents for human colon cancer. PMID:25603347

  4. Effect of Heat-Inactivated Clostridium sporogenes and Its Conditioned Media on 3-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Madhura Satish; Hassanbhai, Ammar Mansoor; Anand, Padmaja; Luo, Kathy Qian; Teoh, Swee Hin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy continue to have limited efficacy due to tumor hypoxia. While bacterial cancer therapy has the potential to overcome this problem, it comes with the risk of toxicity and infection. To circumvent these issues, this paper investigates the anti-tumor effects of non-viable bacterial derivatives of Clostridium sporogenes. These non-viable derivatives are heat-inactivated C. sporogenes bacteria (IB) and the secreted bacterial proteins in culture media, known as conditioned media (CM). In this project, the effects of IB and CM on CT26 and HCT116 colorectal cancer cells were examined on a 2-Dimensional (2D) and 3-Dimensional (3D) platform. IB significantly inhibited cell proliferation of CT26 to 6.3% of the control in 72 hours for the 2D monolayer culture. In the 3D spheroid culture, cell proliferation of HCT116 spheroids notably dropped to 26.2%. Similarly the CM also remarkably reduced the cell-proliferation of the CT26 cells to 2.4% and 20% in the 2D and 3D models, respectively. Interestingly the effect of boiled conditioned media (BCM) on the cells in the 3D model was less inhibitory than that of CM. Thus, the inhibitive effect of inactivated C. sporogenes and its conditioned media on colorectal cancer cells is established. PMID:26507312

  5. CellLineNavigator: a workbench for cancer cell line analysis.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Markus; Itzel, Timo; Maass, Thorsten; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Galle, Peter R; Teufel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The CellLineNavigator database, freely available at http://www.medicalgenomics.org/celllinenavigator, is a web-based workbench for large scale comparisons of a large collection of diverse cell lines. It aims to support experimental design in the fields of genomics, systems biology and translational biomedical research. Currently, this compendium holds genome wide expression profiles of 317 different cancer cell lines, categorized into 57 different pathological states and 28 individual tissues. To enlarge the scope of CellLineNavigator, the database was furthermore closely linked to commonly used bioinformatics databases and knowledge repositories. To ensure easy data access and search ability, a simple data and an intuitive querying interface were implemented. It allows the user to explore and filter gene expression, focusing on pathological or physiological conditions. For a more complex search, the advanced query interface may be used to query for (i) differentially expressed genes; (ii) pathological or physiological conditions; or (iii) gene names or functional attributes, such as Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes pathway maps. These queries may also be combined. Finally, CellLineNavigator allows additional advanced analysis of differentially regulated genes by a direct link to the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) Bioinformatics Resources.

  6. Covalent coupling of gum arabic onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI cell labeling: physicochemical and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Palma, Susana I C J; Carvalho, Alexandra; Silva, Joana; Martins, Pedro; Marciello, Marzia; Fernandes, Alexandra R; del Puerto Morales, Maria; Roque, Ana C A

    2015-01-01

    Gum arabic (GA) is a hydrophilic composite polysaccharide derived from exudates of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal trees. It is biocompatible, possesses emulsifying and stabilizing properties and has been explored as coating agent of nanomaterials for biomedical applications, namely magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Previous studies focused on the adsorption of GA onto MNPs produced by co-precipitation methods. In this work, MNPs produced by a thermal decomposition method, known to produce uniform particles with better crystalline properties, were used for the covalent coupling of GA through its free amine groups, which increases the stability of the coating layer. The MNPs were produced by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 in organic solvent and, after ligand-exchange with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), GA coating was achieved by the establishment of a covalent bond between DMSA and GA moieties. Clusters of several magnetic cores entrapped in a shell of GA were obtained, with good colloidal stability and promising magnetic relaxation properties (r2 /r1 ratio of 350). HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell line was used for in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation and cell-labeling efficiency studies. We show that, upon administration at the respective IC50 , GA coating enhances MNP cellular uptake by 19 times compared to particles bearing only DMSA moieties. Accordingly, in vitro MR images of cells incubated with increasing concentrations of GA-coated MNP present dose-dependent contrast enhancement. The obtained results suggest that the GA magnetic nanosystem could be used as a MRI contrast agent for cell-labeling applications. PMID:25766788

  7. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues. PMID:26314861

  8. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues.

  9. TAT-RasGAP317-326-mediated tumor cell death sensitization can occur independently of Bax and Bak.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Alessandro; Heulot, Mathieu; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Widmann, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The increase of cancer specificity and efficacy of anti-tumoral agents are prime strategies to overcome the deleterious side effects associated with anti-cancer treatments. We described earlier a cell-permeable protease-resistant peptide derived from the p120 RasGAP protein, called TAT-RasGAP317-326, as being an efficient tumor-specific sensitizer to apoptosis induced by genotoxins in vitro and in vivo. Bcl-2 family members regulate the intrinsic apoptotic response and as such could be targeted by TAT-RasGAP317-326. Our results indicate that the RasGAP-derived peptide increases cisplatin-induced Bax activation. We found no evidence, using in particular knock-out cells, of an involvement of other Bcl-2 family proteins in the tumor-specific sensitization activity of TAT-RasGAP317-326. The absence of Bax and Bak in mouse embryonic fibroblasts rendered them resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and consequently to the sensitizing action of the RasGAP-derived peptide. Surprisingly, in the HCT116 colon carcinoma cell line, the absence of Bax and Bak did not prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis and the ability of TAT-RasGAP317-326 to augment this response. Our study also revealed that p53, while required for an efficient genotoxin-induced apoptotic response, is dispensable for the ability of the RasGAP-derived peptide to improve the capacity of genotoxins to decrease long-term survival of cancer cells. Hence, even though genotoxin-induced Bax activity can be increased by TAT-RasGAP317-326, the sensitizing activity of the RasGAP-derived peptide can operate in the absence of a functional mitochondrial intrinsic death pathway.

  10. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  11. All Trans-Retinoic Acid Mediates MED28/HMG Box-Containing Protein 1 (HBP1)/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Huang, Chun-Yin; Li, Chun-I

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin A is required for normal body function, including vision, epithelial integrity, growth, and differentiation. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a family member of vitamin A, has been explored in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of cancer. Dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and disrupted cadherin-catenin complex often contribute to colorectal malignancy. MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, is found highly expressed in breast and colorectal cancers. Our laboratory has also reported that MED28 regulates cell growth, migration, and invasion in human breast cancer cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of ATRA on MED28 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer. HCT116, HT29, SW480, and SW620, four human colorectal cancer